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Bobby Mote 2nd in bareback

There’s a lot at stake – for both teams – in today’s game • SPORTS, D1

WEATHER TODAY

SATURDAY

Patchy freezing fog early, a few snow flurries High 34, Low 24 Page C8

• December 4, 2010 50¢

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Pitch-perfect pedigree

John Beland, Chris’ newfound father

Local singer-songwriter Chris Beland

Read their story on Page B1

Woman, 23, of Bend, faces charges in car crash that killed 2

PREPPING FOR BEND’S CHRISTMAS PARADE

By Betsy Cliff The Bulletin

Frustrated by some of the decisions of hospital management, about 600 employees at St. Charles Bend are seeking to join a union. The group filed a petition at the end of November with the National Labor Relations Board and will likely vote next month on whether to become part of a chapter of the Service Employees International Union that represents about 7,000 hospital employees in Oregon and southwest Washington. “We decided we needed to organize because we were losing a lot of our voice in company decisions,” said Joanne Kennedy, a pharmacy technician at the hospital. “We have departments that are short-staffed, and we were concerned about staffing issues.” Hospital management is against the move, and the effort has caused tension between staff and management. “We respect the right of all (employees) to decide whether they want to be represented by a union,” said Katy Vitcovich, senior vice president of human resource for St. Charles Health System, parent company of the hospital. “But management does not feel we need a third party to speak with us about (employees).” “If there are issues with morale or work conditions, we should hear about them,” directly, Vitcovich said, rather than through a union. Kennedy said efforts to organize began last summer because employees were worried about losing their jobs after the hospital laid off its housekeepers and contracted for the service instead. See St. Charles / A7

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

The full length of the parade route will be closed to traffic starting at around 11 a.m. Streets will be reopened as the parade passes, and all streets should be open to traffic by around 2 p.m. The parade should cross the Newport Avenue bridge at noon. t.

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Bend Christmas Parade through downtown. The parade begins at noon, and the theme is

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The 23-year-old Bend woman who was behind the wheel in a crash that killed two young people in August is now facing charges of manslaughter, assault and drunken driving. Prosecutors say Stacia Roberts had at least three controlled substances in her blood when she swerved off U.S. Highway 20 near Black Butte, crossed the oncoming lane of traffic and smashed into a large tree. At about 7:30 a.m. on Aug. 17, Roberts was driving east on Highway 20 with three friends in the car: 19-year-old Joshua Herrin, of Bend; 18-year-old Nina Blackmore, of Sisters; and 20year-old Casey Hoyle, of Bend. According to a search warrant affidavit filed by a Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputy, Roberts said later that the four young people had spent the hours before the crash at Cougar Hot Springs, where they drank beer and smoked marijuana. When it was time to head home, the four decided that Roberts was in the best shape to drive. But as she headed east on Highway 20 in a Ford Escort, Roberts reportedly had trouble handling the car. According to the affidavit, a witness who had been in a car behind Roberts for several miles told investigators that the Escort was moving at erratic speeds and was weaving within the lane. See Crash / A7

“Christmas Carols on Parade.” See map at left for areas closed to traffic.

Inside • Christmas kayakers on Mirror Pond, Page C1

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

TOP NEWS INSIDE ECONOMY: Blow to recovery hopes as jobless rate rises, Page C3

INDEX Abby

B2

Business

Local

Silicon Valley shows signs of a new dot-com deal frenzy By Jenna Wortham and Evelyn M. Rusli

C1-8

C3-5

Movies

B3

Classified

F1-6

Obituaries

C7

Comics

B4-5

Sudoku

B5

Community B1-6

Sports

D1-6

Crossword B5, F2

Stocks

C4-5

Editorial

C6

TV listings

B2

Horoscope

B5

Weather

C8

St. Charles, workers at odds in union bid

New York Times News Service

In a memorable scene in the movie “The Social Network,” Sean Parker, the investor played by Justin Timberlake, leans over the table and tells the founders of Facebook in a conspiratorial tone: “A million dollars isn’t cool. You know what’s cool? A billion dollars.” These days in Silicon Valley, a bil-

lion dollars seems downright quaint. The enthusiasm for social networking and mobile apps has venture capitalists clamoring to give money to young companies. The exuberance has given rise to an elite club of start-ups — all younger than seven years and all worth billions. Successive investments in Twitter have reportedly cranked its value 33 percent, to $4 billion, while Zyn-

ga, creator of the popular Facebook game FarmVille, is worth more than $5 billion. Google was willing to pay $6 billon for Groupon, an online coupon company that was valued at $1.35 billion only eight months ago. And Groupon was willing to reject it Friday evening, presumably because it could sell for even more money later. See Startups / A6

Teacher ratings get new look, pushed by a very rich watcher By Sam Dillon New York Times News Service

PRINCETON, N.J. — In most American schools, teachers are evaluated by principals or other administrators who drop in for occasional classroom visits and fill out forms to rate their performance. The result? Nine out of 10 teachers get top marks, according to a prominent study last year by the New Teacher Project, a nonprofit group focusing on improving teacher quality. Now Bill Gates, who in recent years has turned his attention and considerable fortune to improving American education, is investing $335 million through his foundation to overhaul the personnel departments of several big school systems. A big chunk of that money is financing research by dozens of social scientists and thousands of teachers to develop a better system for evaluating classroom instruction. See Teachers / A6

Travis Dove / New York Times News Service

A digital video recording device is set up in a classroom in November as part of a teacherevaluation program at a school in Charlotte, N.C.

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

MON-SAT

Vol. 107, No. 338, 66 pages, 6 sections

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Produce good, processed bad: Weight Watchers upends points system By Elissa Gootman New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Their world had been rocked, and the questions came fast and furious: A 31-year-old teacher who had barely touched a banana in six years

wanted to know if she could really consume them with impunity. A small-business owner wondered whether she was being nudged to part with that second (or third) glass of wine. And a woman with silky brown hair, on her way out the door

after a Weight Watchers meeting in the basement of an office building, had a particularly urgent need. “I just have one question,” the woman said. “How much is a potato latke? I need to know for tonight.”

They and others had been searching for answers and grappling with their implications since Sunday, when Weight Watchers began unveiling its first major overhaul to its cultlike points system. See Watchers / A7


A2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Buffett helps U.N. on nuclear fuel bank By Mary Beth Sheridan The Washington Post

After years of debate and a fund-raising campaign launched by investor Warren Buffett, the U.N. atomic agency decided Friday to set up a $150 million uranium fuel “bank” aimed at slowing the spread of dangerous nuclear material around the globe. The idea of such a bank has been floated for decades, but the concept took on new urgency with the development of Iran’s nuclear program and the recent growth of

interest in nuclear energy. The bank would guarantee the sale of fuel for countries’ nuclear power plants, theoretically eliminating their need to develop it themselves. The same centrifuges used to prepare uranium for power plants can also be used to enrich it to higher, weaponsgrade levels. President Barack Obama has touted the fuel bank, which will get $50 million from the U.S. “This is a breakthrough in global cooperation to enable peaceful

uses of nuclear energy while reducing the risks of proliferation and catastrophic terrorism,” said former Sen. Sam Nunn, co-chairman of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a private group that played a key role in getting the bank off the ground. Although more guarded, academic experts said the bank was a positive step at a time of rising fears of nuclear proliferation. “The bank is not a guarantee against the risk some countries might choose to proliferate,” said

Lawrence Scheinman of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. “But the fewer the countries that have capacity to enrich uranium in the first place, the lower the prospect is they will be able to weaponize.” The fuel bank, in essence, will ensure the sale of uranium for power plants to countries that are in good standing with the U.N. energy watchdog. The new institution is meant to be a backup in case countries face a cutoff from commercial suppliers.

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama waves Friday as he is introduced to the troops at a rally during an unannounced visit at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan. Obama told cheering U.S. troops in Afghanistan they’re succeeding in their vital mission fighting terrorism. But after he flew in secrecy for 13 hours to get here, foul weather kept him from nearby Kabul and a meeting to address frayed relations with Afghan President Hamid Karzai

Obama’s surprise visit to the war zone, his second as president, came 10 days before he is to address the nation about a new review of U.S. strategy to defeat the Taliban and strengthen the Afghan government so American troops can begin leaving next year. The trip also came at a particularly awkward moment in already strained U.S. relations with Afghanistan because of new and embarrassing leaked cables alleging widespread fraud and underscoring deep American concerns about Karzai.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

6 11 12 18 56 12 x3 Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $74 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

WikiLeaks Yemen helps fight al-Qaida, struggles but on leader’s own terms to keep a step ahead of hackers By Scott Shane

New York Times News Service

By Ashlee Vance New York Times News Service

The operators of the WikiLeaks website are in the midst of a game of virtual dodge ball, as they battle a diverse group of hackers and try to keep their stash of once confidential documents online. The WikiLeaks site has been under attack since Sunday when it began releasing some 250,000 leaked State Department documents relating to American foreign policy. On Wednesday, Amazon. com kicked WikiLeaks off its systems after inquiries from an aide to Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., Amazon said WikiLeaks had violated its terms of service. Then on Thursday, WikiLeaks ran into another roadblock. It was abandoned by EveryDNS.net, which is one of many companies that manage the underlying domain name system of the Internet, and act as a directory to help people find websites. EveryDNS.net said the mass influx of traffic coming from hackers put its operations at risk. The result was that people who tried to visit the WikiLeaks site found an error message. So on Friday, WikiLeaks began a mad dash to direct users to alternative routes to its site through Web addresses based in Europe.

WASHINGTON — One Obama administration security official after another was visiting to talk about terrorism, and Yemen’s redoubtable president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, seemed to be savoring his newfound leverage. The Americans are “hot-blooded and hasty when you need us,” Saleh chided one visitor, Daniel Benjamin, the State Department’s counterterrorism chief, but “coldblooded and British when we need you.” It was Jan. 31, just a few weeks after a young Nigerian trained and equipped in Yemen had tried to blow up an airliner as it approached Detroit. The wave of attention to al-Qaida’s Yemen branch and its American-born propagandist, Anwar al-Awlaki, might not do much for tourism, but paradoxically it did give the Yemeni leader more influence. Diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks and made available to several news organizations offer the most intimate view to date of the wily, irreverent and sometimes erratic Yemeni autocrat, who over the past year has become steadily more aggressive against al-Qaida. But he appears determined to join the fight on his own terms, sometimes accommodating and other times rebuffing American requests on counterterrrorism. Yemen, long an arid, impoverished afterthought for the United States, now draws high-level American attention far out of proportion to its size. In October, militants in Yemen sent off printer cartridges packed with explosives to Chicago addresses. The bombs were intercepted, but the plot set off a furor and prompted the latest in a series of phone calls between President Barack Obama and his

Yemeni counterpart about counterterrorism and aid. The cables portray Yemen, a land of 23 million people that is nearly the size of Texas, as a beleaguered, often baffling place, bristling with arms and riven by tribal conflict, where shoulderlaunched missiles go missing and the jihad-curious arrive from all over the world. The Americans are seen coaxing the Yemenis to go after al-Qaida, working out the rules for American missile strikes, seeking a safe way to send Yemeni prisoners home from the Guantanamo Bay prison and sizing up Americans caught in Yemeni security sweeps. Always at the center of the diplomatic traffic is Saleh, who first appears seeking a half-million tons of wheat in a 1990 meeting with James Baker III, then the secretary of state. These days, his most pressing requests are for heavy weapons and military training. But he also has become more cooperative with the American campaign against al-Qaida. In a 2009 meeting with John Brennan, Obama’s top counterterrorism adviser, Saleh offered an unusual bargain. He “insisted that Yemen’s national territory is available for unilateral CT operations by the U.S.” — but with a catch. If there were to be an attack on a Western target, Saleh said, it would not be his fault. “I have given you an open door on terrorism,” he said, “so I am not responsible.” In fact, despite such rhetoric, Saleh has imposed strict limits over American operations in his country, even as he has helped disguise them as his own. When the first two American missile strikes against al-Qaida camps in Yemen took place in December 2009, Saleh publicly claimed that they were Yemeni

strikes to avert any antiAmerican backlash. Gen. David H. Petraeus flew to Yemen to thank the president, who promised to keep up the ruse. “We’ll continue saying the bombs are ours, not yours,” Saleh said, according to a cable. A deputy prime minister, Rashad al-Alimi, had already assured the Americans that “U.S. munitions found at the sites” of strikes “could be explained away as equipment purchased from the U.S.”

Deficit vote falls short, but rivals join in support By Lori Montgomery The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — An unexpected groundswell of support was building Friday around an aggressive blueprint for cutting long-term spending, raising taxes and stabilizing the growing national debt, as lawmakers in both parties called on President Barack Obama to embrace the proposal and launch a serious effort to rebalance the federal budget. Eleven of the 18 members on Obama’s fiscal commission voted to endorse the package, short of the 14 needed to force quick action in Congress. But three Republican and three Democratic lawmakers were among those voting “yes,” a show of bipartisan support that assistant Senate Majority Leader Richard Durbin, D-Ill., a commission member, hailed as a “breakthrough.” The reality of deficit reduction remains more complicated, though, particularly against a backdrop of stubbornly high unemployment and strident calls for short-term spending to boost the economy. The Bureau of Labor Statistics released a surprisingly weak jobs report Friday showing that the unemployment rate jumped to 9.8 percent in November. Emergency jobless benefits expired this week, and the price for keeping them through next year, as Democrats favor, is $56 billion. Meanwhile, tax cuts enacted 10 years ago during record surpluses are set to expire New Year’s Eve, and the two political parties are waging a bitter battle to extend some or all of them — adding trillions of dollars to future deficits. Even as they applaud the commission’s work, lawmakers have so far demonstrated little appetite for raising people’s taxes and cutting their federal perks. Many economists, including Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, argue that this would be the wrong time to pursue austerity measures, anyway. Fresh spending and tax cuts may worsen deficits in the short term, but they could serve to shrink them in the long run by boosting economic growth, increasing business profits and swelling personal paychecks. “If the unemployment rate were at its pre-recession level of 4.5 percent, we would have, at most, a modest deficit,” said Dean Baker, co-director of the left-leaning Center for Economic and Policy Research, who has called forcefully for Congress to abandon its obsession with deficit reduction in favor of more spending on job creation. The commission’s plan to slash deficits by $4 trillion by the end of the decade seeks to account for those concerns by delaying austerity measures until 2013 and urging adoption of a payroll tax holiday that would leave as much as $100 billion in the pockets of consumers next year.

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Clinton attempts to defuse Kyrgyz base tensions New York Times News Service BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan — Hoping to defuse the latest round of tensions over a strategically important American air base, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Thursday that the United States would steer part of a lucrative Pentagon jet fuel contract to a newly created Kyrgyz stateowned corporation. The Pentagon had previously awarded the $315 million contract to a pair of secretive companies controlled by an American investor and said to be linked to the son of a former Kyrgyz leader, Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who was ousted in April amid accusations of corruption. Clinton made the announcement after meeting Kyrgyzstan’s president, Roza Otunbayeva, who assumed the leadership after Bakiyev’s ouster and who had pushed for the United States to add a locally owned supplier to the fuel contract. The Manas air base has become the key transit center for U.S. and allied troops deployed to Afghanistan. Bakiyev used his country’s role as the base’s host as a bargaining chip to win concessions and payments from both the United States and Russia, which jealously guards its influence in Central Asia. Pressures over the base may build up again under the current coalition government here, which includes parties angry that Kyrgyzstan had been cut out of the jet fuel contract. “We have had some serious issues regarding the air base that we have worked to answer and resolve,” Clinton said in a meeting with students. While the details of the deal were not yet clear, the new stateowned corporation would, over time, take a significant chunk of the fuel-supply business, an American official said. The two companies that now hold the contract, Mina Corp. and Red Star Enterprises, are registered in Gibraltar. Some critics of Bakiyev’s have linked the companies to Maksim Bakiyev, his son; they deny any connection.

Democrats turn tax debate to rich By David M. Herszenhorn New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats on Friday denounced Republicans for insisting on continued tax breaks for “millionaires and billionaires,” even as they braced for the White House to make concessions that would allow an extension of the Bush-era tax cuts at all income levels. In a last-ditch effort to control

MANAMA, Bahrain — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton firmly shut the door on another bid for elected office Friday, saying her current job is “my last public position.” Clinton, the wife of former President Bill Clinton and a strong challenger to Barack Obama for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination, regularly says she is not interested in a second run for president. But her remarks also appeared designed to dampen ongoing speculation that she could replace Joe Biden as vice president. Another complicated, and apparently imagined, scenario had her replacing Defense Secretary Robert Gates next year and then being tapped for the second spot on Obama’s 2012 ticket. Speaking at a televised town hall meeting here, Clinton, 63, said she has had a “fascinating and rewarding public career,” starting off as an advocate for children. She noted that she had served eight years as first lady and eight years as senator; 2011 will be her third year as the chief U.S. diplomat. “I think I will serve as secretary of state as my last public position and the probably go back to advocacy, and probably on behalf of women and children,” she said. Clinton is in Bahrain as part of a six-day tour of Central Asia and the Middle East. On Thursday, she managed to touch down in four different countries — Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Bahrain — thanks to cooperative time zones and a willingness to work 22 hours straight. She is expected to return to Washington today. — The Washington Post

the political messaging in the tax fight, Democrats accused the Republicans of favoring the rich over the middle class, of cruelly holding up an extension of jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed, and of pursuing bad economic policies that contributed to the recent recession. “They can pretend giving the rich tax breaks creates jobs, but we know it doesn’t,” the majori-

ty leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, said in a floor speech. Republicans, however, remained firm in their position that taxes should not be allowed to rise for anyone, given the continued weakness in the economy. And they accused Democrats of political showboating rather than focusing on advancing a tax package that has any chance of becoming law. “We have heard a lot from our

friends on the other side of the aisle this week about the middle class,” the Senate Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, said. “That’s because their policies have been so ineffective in helping the middle class. They try to distract the American people from their record.” After making big gains in the midterm elections, Republicans are feeling confident that they have the upper hand in the

debate. To illustrate their desire to end the tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans, the Democrats have scheduled votes today. One is on the bill approved by the House on Thursday to extend the Bushera tax rates only on income up to $250,000 for couples and $200,000 for individuals while allowing the lowered rates to expire on income above those amounts.

Top generals buck White House on ‘don’t ask’ military policy By Anne Gearan The Associated Press

The Associated Press ile photo

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill floats in June on the surface of the water in Bay Jimmy in Plaquemines Parish, La. BP’s lawyers are arguing that the U.S. government overstated the spill by 20 to 50 percent. Under the Clean Water Act, BP faces fines of up to $1,100 for each barrel of oil spilled. If BP were found to have committed gross negligence or willful misconduct, the fine could be up to $4,300 per barrel.

New BP challenge to size of spill could affect fine By Dina Cappiello The Associated Press

Clinton aims to quell VP bid talk

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 A3

WASHINGTON — BP is mounting a new challenge to the U.S. government’s estimates of how much oil flowed from the runaway well deep below the Gulf of Mexico, an argument that could reduce by billions of dollars the federal pollution fines it faces for the largest offshore oil spill in history. BP’s lawyers are arguing that the government overstated the spill by 20 to 50 percent, staffers working for the presidential oil spill commission said Friday. In a 10-page document obtained by The Associated Press, BP says the government’s spill estimate of 206 million gallons is “overstated by a significant amount” and the company said any con-

sensus around that number is premature and inaccurate. The company submitted the document to the commission, the Justice Department and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “They rely on incomplete or inaccurate information, rest in large part on assumptions that have not been validated, and are subject to far greater uncertainties than have been acknowledged,” BP wrote. “BP fully intends to present its own estimate as soon as the information is available to get the science right.” In a statement Friday, the company said the government’s estimates failed to account for equipment that could obstruct the flow of oil and gas, such as the blowout preventer, making

its numbers “highly unreliable.” BP’s request could save it as much as $10.5 billion or as little as $1.1 billion, depending on factors such as whether the government concludes that BP acted negligently. For context, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s entire federal budget for 2010 was $10.3 billion. President Barack Obama has said he wants Congress to set aside some of the money BP pays for fines for the Gulf’s coastal restoration. Louisiana lawmakers are pushing legislation that would require at least 80 percent of the civil and criminal penalties charged to BP, and possibly other companies, to be returned to the Gulf Coast. William K. Reilly, co-chairman of the presidential commis-

sion, expressed amazement at BP’s case Friday. Reilly headed the Environmental Protection Agency under President George H.W. Bush. “They are going to argue that it is 50 percent less” than the government’s total? Reilly asked. “Wow.” Under the Clean Water Act, the oil giant — which owned and operated the well — faces fines of up to $1,100 for each barrel of oil spilled. If BP were found to have committed gross negligence or willful misconduct, the fine could be up to $4,300 per barrel. That means that based on the government’s estimate of 206 million gallons, BP could face civil fines alone of between $5.4 billion and $21.1 billion.

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World is running out of places to catch wild fish, study finds By Juliet Eilperin The Washington Post

Global fisheries have expanded so rapidly over the past half-century that the world is running out of places to catch wild fish, according to a new study conducted by researchers in Canada, the United States and Australia. The findings, published Thursday evening in the online journal PLoS ONE, are the first to examine how marine fisheries have expanded geographically over time. Looking at fleets’ movements between 1950 and 2005, the five researchers charted how fishing has been expanding southward into less exploited seas at roughly one degree latitude each year in order to compensate for the fact that humans have depleted fish stocks closer to their shores in the Northern Hemisphere. During that same period, the world’s fish catch increased fivefold from 19 million metric tons in 1950 to a peak of 90

million in the late 1980s, before declining to 87 million tons in 2005. It was 79.5 million tons in 2008, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the most recent year for which figures are available. Daniel Pauly, a co-author who serves as principal investigator of the Sea Around Us Project at the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre, said the global seafood catch is now dropping “because there’s essentially nowhere to go.” The fact that fish catches rose for so many decades “looks like sustainability but it is actually expansion driven. That is frightening, because the accounting is coming now.” The authors — including lead author and UBC doctoral student Wilf Swartz and National Geographic Society ocean fellow Enric Sala — write that this relentless pursuit for seafood has left “only unproductive waters of high seas, and relatively inaccessible waters

in the Arctic and Antarctic as the last remaining ‘frontiers.’” “The focus should move from looking for something new to looking at what we have and making the most sustainable use out of it,” Swartz said in an interview. Although the new analysis largely confirms what researchers, activists and policymakers know, the way it quantifies this global trend could provide new ammunition to those who are seeking to curb fishing of some of the world’s most imperiled species. Last week, for example, negotiators at the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas — which oversees dozens of fish stocks in the Atlantic Ocean — imposed new restrictions on vulnerable species such as oceanic whitetip and hammerhead sharks but stopped short of making deep cuts in the annual catch of imperiled bluefin tuna in either the eastern or western Atlantic.

Bucking the Pentagon’s top leaders, the chiefs of the Army and Marines urged Congress on Friday not to allow openly gay people to serve in the military, at least not while troops are at war in Afghanistan. The generals publicly rebutted their own bosses and the White House, arguing that it is too risky to change the policy now. That gave political ammunition to congressional Republicans trying to retain the ban known as “don’t ask, don’t tell.” “It’s important that we’re clear about the military risks,” said Gen. George Casey, the Army’s top officer. “Repeal of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ would be a major cultural and policy change in the middle of a war.” President Barack Obama has promised to jettison a policy he says is discriminatory, and asked Congress to repeal the 17-year-old law this year. Chances of that were slim to begin with, and they sank lower after Friday’s blunt assessment that lifting the ban would tear the close bonds of the foxhole. Democrats have promised a vote this month. Both Casey and Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos undercut Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ claim that the change is not too dangerous. The generals acknowledged that openly gay service was probably inevitable and they played down suggestions that recruiting would drop off or large numbers of soldiers would resign when it happens. But they warned of social upheaval among the tight units that live and fight side by side for months at a time on the front lines.

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A4 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R  I B Special guest Kevin Butcher will share the message “Learning to Accept God’s Love” at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the 11:15 Redux service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “Find the Joy of Christmas In: Generosity” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “Bah Humbug! What is the Big Deal About Christmas?” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Elder Shawn Sahlberg will share the message “Receive the Gift of Hope” at 11 a.m. Sunday following the 10:45 a.m. song service at Community of Christ, 23080 Cooley Road, Bend. • Senior Leader Debbie Borovec will share the message “Overcome” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Celebration Church, 1245 S. Third St., Suite C-10, Bend. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Are You Expecting?,” based on Luke 3:2-6, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Preparing,” based on Luke 1:26-33, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • The message “Jesus Christ: The Good Shepherd,” based on John 10, is this week’s part of the series “I AM” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share the message at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “Hell: It’s Not a Bedtime Story” as part of the series “Storytime” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Pastor Syd Brestel will share the advent message “There’s Something About His Name,” based on Isaiah 9:6, at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Greg Bolt will speak on the topic “Simply Christmas: Less Talking, More Listening” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service this second advent Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “PEACE … strength to hold on!,” based on Matthew 3:1-12, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Joel LiaBraaten will share the messages “What’s the Point?” and “Getting Along” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. •

Pastor Dan Dillard will share the message “Advent, Israel, and the Nations” at 10:30 a.m. and “Messiah the Prince” at 6 p.m. Sunday at Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church, 62162 Hamby Road, Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will begin a new series “Contagious Love” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.W. Sixth St., Bend. • Pastor Randy Myers will begin a new series “Great Joy” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Pastor George Bender will share the message “Jesus Says …!” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Radiant Life Fellowship, 60670 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Author and spiritual teacher Terri Daniel will share how origins of modern Christmas rituals are based in ancient Winter Solstice observances as part of a “Winter Solstice Ceremony” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor Robert Luinstra will share the message “Are You Connected?” at the 8 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Special Guest Margaret Feinberg will share the message “Sacred Echo” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. • Pastor Steve Mickel will share the message “Witness: Mary, the Surrendered Life” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Myron Wells will share the message “Glad Dad’s and Marvelous Mom’s!,” based on Proverbs 4:1-19, at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Pastor Rob Anderson will share the message “Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven,” based on Revelation 21:1-5, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “The Why of Immanuel” as part of the series “Christmas Presence — God with Us” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “The God of History is the God of Salvation through the Gospel of Christ and Him Crucified for the Sins of All Men,” based on Romans 15:4, at 11 a.m. service and “Christ’s Active Obedience: Christ Enters God’s Holy Mountain and House to Worship God Purely in Behalf of All Men in Order to Give to All Men the Saving Righteousness and Worship of God through the Gospel,” based on Psalm 24:45 at the 1 p.m. Advent Vespers service Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

American Hindu group stirs a debate over yoga’s soul By Paul Vitello New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Yoga is practiced by about 15 million people in the United States, for reasons almost as numerous — from the physical benefits mapped in brain scans to the less tangible rewards that New Age journals call spiritual centering. Religion, for the most part, has nothing to do with it. But a group of Indian-Americans has ignited a surprisingly fierce debate in the gentle world of yoga by mounting a campaign to acquaint Westerners with the faith that it says underlies every single yoga style followed in gyms, ashrams and spas: Hinduism. The campaign, labeled “Take Back Yoga,” does not ask yoga devotees to become Hindu, or instructors to teach more about Hinduism. The small but increasingly influential group behind it, the Hindu American Foundation, suggests only that people become more aware of yoga’s debt to the faith’s ancient traditions. That suggestion, modest though it may seem, has drawn a flurry of strong reactions from figures far apart on the religious spectrum. Deepak Chopra, the New Age writer, has dismissed the campaign as a jumble of faulty history and Hindu nationalism. R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, has said he agrees that yoga is Hindu — and cited that as evidence that the practice imperiled the souls of Christians who engage in it. The question at the core of the debate — who owns yoga? — has become an enduring topic of chatter in yoga Web forums, Hindu American newspapers and journals catering to the many consumers of what is now a multibillion-dollar yoga industry. In June, it even prompted the Indian government to begin making digital copies of ancient drawings showing the provenance of more than 4,000 yoga poses, to discourage further claims by entrepreneurs like Bikram Choudhury, an Indian-born, Los Angeles-based yoga instructor to the stars. Choudhury nettled Indian officials in 2007 when he copyrighted his personal style of 26 yoga poses as “Bikram Yoga.”

‘Hinduism has lost control of the brand’ Organizers of the Take Back Yoga effort point out that the philosophy of yoga was first described in Hinduism’s seminal texts and remains at the core of Hindu teaching. Yet, because the religion has been stereotyped in the West as a polytheistic faith of “castes, cows and curry,” they say, most Americans prefer to see yoga as the legacy of a more timeless, spiritual “Indian wisdom.” “In a way,” said Dr. Aseem Shukla, the foundation’s cofounder, “our issue is that yoga has thrived, but Hinduism has lost control of the brand.” For many practitioners, including Debbie Desmond, 27, a yoga instructor in Brooklyn, the talk of branding and ownership is bewildering.

Hiroko Masuike / New York Times News Service

Many practitioners of yoga, such as Debbie Desmond, 27, a yoga instructor in Brooklyn, are puzzled by a campaign to “Take Back Yoga” by making people more aware of yoga’s debt to the traditions of Hinduism.

“Nobody owns yoga. Yoga is not a religion. It is a way of life, a method of becoming. We were taught that the roots of yoga go back further than Hinduism itself.” — Debbie Desmond, Namaste Yoga, Brooklyn

“Nobody owns yoga,” she said, sitting cross-legged in her studio, Namaste Yoga, and tilting her head as if the notion sketched an impossible yoga position she had never seen. “Yoga is not a religion. It is a way of life, a method of becoming. We were taught that the roots of yoga go back further than Hinduism itself.” Like Chopra and some religious historians, Desmond believes that yoga originated in the Vedic culture of Indo-Europeans who settled in India in the third millennium B.C., long before the tradition now called Hinduism emerged. Other historians trace the first written description of yoga to the Bhagavad Gita, the sacred Hindu scripture believed to have been written between the fifth and second centuries B.C. The effort to “take back” yoga began quietly enough, with a scholarly essay posted in January on the website of the Hindu American Foundation, a Minneapolis-based group that promotes human rights for Hindu minorities worldwide. The essay lamented a perceived snub in modern yoga culture, saying that yoga magazines and studios had assiduously decoupled the practice “from the Hinduism that gave forth this immense contribution to humanity.” Shukla put a sharper point on his case a few months later in a column on the “On Faith” blog of The Washington Post. Hinduism, he wrote, had become a victim of “overt intellectual property theft,” made possible by generations of Hindu yoga teachers who had “offered up a religion’s spiritual wealth at the altar of crass commercialism.” That drew the attention of

Chopra, an Indian-American who has done much to popularize Indian traditions like alternative medicine and yoga. He posted a reply saying that Hinduism was too “tribal” and “self-enclosed” to claim ownership of yoga. The fight went viral — or as viral as things can get in a narrow Web corridor frequented by yoga enthusiasts, Hindu Americans and religion scholars.

Spreading ideas Loriliai Biernacki, a professor of Indian religions at the University of Colorado, said the debate had raised important issues about a spectrum of Hindu concepts permeating American culture, including meditation, belief in karma and reincarnation, and even cremation. “All these ideas are Hindu in origin, and they are spreading,” she said. “But they are doing it in a way that leaves behind the proper name, the box that classifies them as ‘Hinduism.’” Shukla said reaction to the yoga campaign had far exceeded his expectations. “We started this, really, for our kids,” said Shukla, a urologist and a second-generation IndianAmerican. “When our kids go to school and say they are Hindu, nobody says, ‘Oh, yeah — Hindus gave the world yoga.’ They say, ‘What caste are you?’ Or ‘Do you pray to a monkey god?’ Because that’s all Americans know about Hinduism.” With its tiny budget, the foundation has pressed its campaign largely by generating buzz through letters and Web postings to academic journals and yoga magazines. The September issue of Yoga Journal, which

has the largest circulation in the field, alluded to the campaign, if fleetingly, in an article calling yoga’s “true history a mystery.” The effort has been received most favorably by Indian-American community leaders like Dr. Uma Mysorekar, the president of the Hindu Temple Society of North America, in Flushing, Queens, which helps groups around the country to build temples. A naturalized immigrant, she said Take Back Yoga represented a coming-of-age for Indians in the United States. “My generation was too busy establishing itself in business and the professions,” she said. “Now, the second and third generation is looking around and finding its voice, saying, ‘Our civilization has made contributions to the world, and these should be acknowledged.’” In the basement of the society’s Ganesha Temple, an hourlong yoga class ended one recent Sunday morning with a long exhalation of the sacred syllable “om.” Via the lung power of 60 students, it sounded as deeply as a blast from the organ at St. Patrick’s Cathedral. After the session, which began and concluded with Hindu prayers, many students said they were practicing Hindus and in complete sympathy with the yoga campaign. Not all were, though. Shweta Parmar, 35, a community organizer and project director for a health and meditation group, said she had grown up in a Hindu household. “Yoga is part of the tradition I come from,” she said. But is yoga specifically Hindu? She paused to ponder. “My parents are Hindu,” she said. But in matters of yoga, “I don’t use that term.”

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters License #78462

Dallas Christian TV network founder sued over affair The Dallas Morning News DALLAS — The adultery and extortion saga at a Dallas-area Christian television network has taken a turn with the filing of a civil lawsuit against network founder Marcus Lamb. Former employee Jeanette Hawkins filed a fraud claim Wednesday against Daystar Television Network and Lamb, claiming she was hired to work in a Christian environment and later learned he was having an affair with a high-ranking female employee there. The lawsuit claims that e-mails seen by Hawkins showed the affair lasted about seven years, that in one e-mail Lamb told the

woman he wanted to make her “the next Mrs. Marcus Lamb,” and that Daystar funds were used “to facilitate trysts.” On Tuesday, Marcus Lamb and his wife, Joni, appeared on Daystar’s morning show and acknowledged he had been unfaithful in past years and that three people were pressuring the network to pay them $7.5 million to keep the story out of the media. Dallas attorney James Fisher said Thursday that he’s representing Hawkins and two other women and that he met Nov. 18 with Daystar’s lawyers to ask for a settlement. Fisher wouldn’t discuss how much he asked for. But he did

say, “I did not threaten to go to the news media with the story of the affair.” John Lynch IV, the Grapevine lawyer who represents Daystar,

said, “I would strongly refute his position that he didn’t indicate he was going to the media. He made it clear that there was a sevenand-a-half-million number.”

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It’s no secret that millions of Christian women all around the world believe in a Divine Feminine—but, until now, they have lacked biblical evidence to prove She exists. That has changed! Recently identified data in the Bible that has been peer reviewed by credible scholars at a leading evangelical seminary, has been declared “a new discovery,” and “biblically viable.” This stunning breakthrough confirms what many Christian women have always intuitively known—that there is a heavenly Mother as well as a heavenly Father and a Divine Son. A “Let Her Dance!” presentation of this stunning development will be presented Wed., Dec. 8th, 7-9 pm at the Old Stone Church, on Franklin just west of the underpass, by Don Zygutis, a key participant in the academic research. Bible believing women and men have a choice-to continue supporting an archaic patriarchy, or join the global reformation that claims it’s now biblically acceptable for Christians to openly embrace the Divine Feminine. Check out our web site: christiansforthedivinefeminine.com, and make plans now to attend the seminar!


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike Johnson will share his message in the morning worship service beginning at 10:30 AM. On Wednesday “Fuel” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service At the First Baptist Church, Pastor Syd Brestel will deliver an Advent message, from Isa. 9:6 entitled “Theres something about His name.” For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together.

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen. CROSSROADS CHURCH Come join us as one family of Believers, young and old,to worship our great God. You can expect a time of Christ-centered meaningful worship and verse by verse practical biblical teaching. We believe the gospel of Jesus Christ is the central theme of Scripture and speaks to every area of the Christian life. Sunday mornings at 9:30. Acts Series: Christ on the Crossroads. 1st Sunday of each month is HomeFront Sunday; we focus on scriptural truths in our roles and relationships in life. Extended fellowship time follows. www.crossroadschurchbend.com 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy (On the corner of Old Bend-Redmond Hwy and Highway 20 on the NW side of Bend)

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00 AM Sunday Mass — 10:00 AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00 PM HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30 AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30 PM Sunday Mass — 8:00 AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15 AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00 –12:15 PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15 PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Fr. Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Liturgy of the Hours will be recited at 6:40 AM, before Mass each day. NEW Reconciliation Schedule* New Church at Catholic Center Wed: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 6:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday 3:00 - 5:00 PM Historic Downtown Church Tues: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 5:00 - 5:45 PM Saturday 8:00 - 9:00 AM Latin Mass on Sunday, December 19. at 1:30 PM at the historic downtown St. Francis Church. *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M.

Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m.

Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth

Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

Sunday, December 5 Sermon Title: Glad Dad’s and Marvelous Mom’s Message from Proverbs 4:1-19 Speaker: Pastor Myron Wells

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you!

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Children will be dismissed from service at 9:15 AM for the Junior Church for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service Pastor David C . Nagler preaching the sermon. Both the 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM services to be posted with the Junior Church at 9:15 AM.

Rev. Dr. Steven H Koski Senior Pastor

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

Christian Schools CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Peggy Miller www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org

Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH “Sacred Echo” Westside Church welcomes Popular Speaker and Author, Margaret Feinberg WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th Grade: Sat. 6:30pm and Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 5th Grade: Wednesday at 6:45pm Sat. 6:30pm and Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades: Wednesday at 6:45pm Sat. at 6:30pm and Sun. at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades: Tues. at 6:45pm and Sun. at 10:45am

Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Fall schedule Contemporary Worship at 8:00 AM Traditional Worship at 11:00 AM Sunday School & Bible Study at 9:30 AM Nursery provided on Sundays www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am

SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net

Midweek Advent Soup Supper 6:15 pm & Worship Service 7:00 pm Wednesday, December 1, 8 & 15

Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am

TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eckankar ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God 541-728-6476 www.eckankar-oregon.org www.eckankar.org You are warmly invited to a Worship Service, a time to share in God’s love for Soul. The topic will be “The Blessings of Gratitude”. The service begins with a short reading from the ECK works that reflects the topic. This is followed by a brief HU Song, a sacred name for God, which includes a time for quiet contemplation. We will then explore more of “The Blessings of Gratitude”. There will be an opportunity to share your gifts of insights, stories and inspirations on the topic in a group with others who attend. Saturday December 11, at 2:00pm. Held at the Redmond Library, 827 Deschutes Ave. Redmond Oregon. For more local information: 541-728-6476 (msg) or go to www.eckankar.org

Episcopal ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education 10:00 am Morning Prayer Presider The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown Tuesday - 3 pm Bible Study Wednesday - 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome!

1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Eric Burtness www.zionrdm.com

Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com

Nazarene

Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack Religious Education, Hebrew program & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Sat. Dec. 4, 6 pm - Home Havdallah and Chanukah Call for more info Sat. Dec. 4, 6:30 pm COJY (Central Oregon Jewish Youth) Chanukah event at Shalom Bayit Friday, Dec. 17, 7 pm - Shabbat service Sat., Jan 8 - 10 am - Sat. morning service and Torah study TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. Our monthly activities include social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Glenn Ettman Saturday, December 4 at 9:00 am - Torah Study Saturday, December 4 at 10:30 am - Torah Service Saturday, December 4 at 6:00 pm Chanukah Party & Havdallah for members & guests All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street

BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org

For more information and complete schedule of services go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826

SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

\Lutheran

Open Bible Standard

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service

CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241

Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000

Schedule for Advent, and Christmas December 5 1:00 PM: Vespers Service December 12 1:00 PM: Vespers Service December 24 7:00 PM: Christmas Eve Divine Service December 25 10:00 AM: Christmas Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Advent Service Wednesday 6:15 p.m. Women’s Bible Study Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org

Youth Groups Senior Highs Mondays Middle School Wednesdays Details: gbolt@bendfp.org Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always!

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

SOUTH CAMPUS iWitness Mary – The Surrendered Life Steve Mickel - LIVE

Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am

2nd Sunday of Advent “Simply Christmas: Less Talking, More Listening” Rev. Greg Bolt 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are

Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care provided for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, December 5, 11:00am Rev. Heather Starr: “Light One Candle” In the midst of these days and nights of Hanukkah, we will share in songs and stories from the Jewish tradition as we also ponder the value, for all of us, of intentionally slowing down in one another’s company to savor the blessings of our lives. Religious Education and Childcare is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569 United Church of God

United Church of Christ ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. United by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with us at 10 a.m. Sunday, December 5th at the Summer Creek Clubhouse 3660 SW 29th St. in Redmond. The next meeting will be Sunday, December 19th. For details, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call the church at: 541-388-2230 or, email: prisbill@earthlink.net

Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson Sermon title “**PEACE ... strength to hold on!*” Scripture: Matthew 3:1-12 8:30am Praise & Worship 9:30am Sunday School 11:00am Traditional Service *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH & SYNAGOGUE DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

Presbyterian

$126

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367

The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday

Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Synagogues


A6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mexican drug gang made me behead 4, 14-year-old says By Oswald Alonso and Katherine Corcoran The Associated Press

CUERNAVACA, Mexico — In cargo pants and a T-shirt, the skinny, American-born 14-yearold looked like he should be in middle school. Instead he was surrounded by three armed Mexican soldiers in ski masks and camouflage as he told reporters that he helped a Mexican drug gang behead four people. Mexican officials say they arrested the youth known as “El Ponchis” late Thursday at an airport south of Mexico City with a 19-year-old sister who is accused of helping him dump the bodies. Authorities said he was caught with two cell phones that held photographs of tortured victims. Many youths have been used by drug cartels in their bloody battles against the government and each other, but the story of El Ponchis may be the most shocking. A YouTube video that emerged a month ago sparked talk of a child hit man — said by some to be as young as 12. “I participated in four executions, but I did it drugged and under threat that if I didn’t, they would kill me,” the boy said calmly when he was handed over to the federal prosecutor Friday morning, showing no remorse. Authorities identified the curly-haired suspect by his first name only — Edgar. He told reporters early Friday he was kidnapped at the age of 11 and forced to work for the Cartel of the South Pacific, a branch of the splintered Beltran Leyva gang, and that he had participated in at least four decapitations. Authorities said the siblings

were detained at an airport near Cuernavaca in Morelos state with paid tickets to flee the country. Morelos Gov. Marco Adame Castillo said the boy was born in San Diego, California, and Mexican officials were researching whether he has dual nationality. A U.S. Embassy official who spoke on condition of anonymity due to embassy policy said American officials had not yet confirmed his citizenship. The boy’s sister said they were headed for Tijuana, where they planned to cross the border and seek refuge with their stepmother in San Diego. Their mother sent them money for the tickets, she said, but it was not clear where their parents are. The army did not say whether the children had passed security when they were detained. Neither has been formally charged. The two allegedly worked for Julio “El Negro” Padilla, who has been fighting for control of the drug trade in Morelos, formerly part of the territory under the Beltran Leyva gang, which broke up with the killing of leader Arturo Beltran Leyva by Mexican marines a year ago. The battle among remnants of the gang has caused an unprecedented spike in violence in Morelos and in neighboring Guerrero state, where the resort city of Acapulco is located. El Ponchis’ sister said she was the girlfriend of Padilla and part of a group of girls called Las Chabelas, who helped dump bodies on streets and freeways in and around Cuernavaca, a city about 56 miles south of Mexico City. She said her brother introduced them.

Antonio Sierra / The Associated Press

Mexican army soldiers escort a 14-year-old suspected of working as a killer for a drug cartel Friday in the city of Cuernavaca, Mexico. The much-rumored alleged young assassin, nicknamed “El Ponchis,’’ was captured late Thursday at the airport in Cuernavaca with his sister as they were trying to catch a flight to Tijuana and flee the country to San Diego.

Startups Continued from A1 Less than a decade after the dot-com bust taught Wall Street and Silicon Valley investors that what goes up does not keep going up forever, a growing number of entrepreneurs and a few venture capitalists are beginning to wonder if investments in tech start-ups are headed toward another big bust. The chief evidence, according to industry experts and analysts, is the way venture capitalists and established companies are clamoring to give money to young companies, including those with only a shred of an idea. They are piling into me-too start-ups that imitate popular Web companies that already received financing. Companies that involve social shopping, mobile photo sharing and new social networking are finding it easy to attract investors because no one wants to miss the next big thing. Yammer, a system for sending Twitter-like messages inside businesses, recently raised $25 million, while investors reportedly signed a check for close to $30 million for a niche blogging site called Tumblr. GroupMe, a new group messaging app for cell phones, raised $9 million. Path, an iPhone app for sharing only photos on a social network limited to just 50 people, received $2.5 million. Its competitor, Picplz, scored $5 million. And those are just within the last few weeks. It has some venture capitalists scratching their heads. “I’m not saying Quora, Foursquare, Square aren’t eventually worth a lot of money, but

the price to pay to get into those games is kind of amazing — $50 to $80 million?” said Dave McClure, founding partner of 500 Startups, a technology incubator in Silicon Valley. “These companies are in big markets with proven founders, so maybe not absolutely crazy but certainly eyebrow-raising.” Fred Wilson, a prominent venture capitalist, said he had watched the trend accelerate over the last six to nine months. “I am seeing many more unnatural acts from investors happening,” he said in a recent blog post. He attributes it to competition among investors eager to participate in popular young start-ups. And he notes, “I have never seen phases like this end nicely.”

Troubling signs No one really knows if there is a bubble until after one pops. Nevertheless, there are many signs of froth. For example, enthusiasm for closely held Facebook shares has run so high that private investors are trading derivatives of it. “I always get a little nervous about bubbles when five different angel investors ask me to join their brand new angel funds” in one week, said Alex Gould, Leadership Scholar of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. And although the rapid fire pace of investment in popular Web companies feels reminiscent of the investing craze that led to the dot-com bust a decade ago, there are a few significant differences. For starters, this is not a stock market bubble. None of the companies is publicly traded.

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Teachers Continued from A1 The effort will have enormous consequences for the movement to hold schools and educators more accountable for student achievement. Twenty states are overhauling their teacher-evaluation systems, partly to fulfill plans set in motion by a $4 billion federal grant competition, and they are eagerly awaiting the research results. For teachers, the findings could mean more scrutiny. But they may also provide more specific guidance about what is expected of the teachers in the classroom if new experiments with other measures are adopted — including tests that gauge teachers’ mastery of their subjects, surveys that ask students about the learning environments in their classes and digital videos of teachers’ lessons, scored by experts. “It’s huge,” said Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the University of Michigan School of Education. “They’re trying to do something nobody’s done before, and do it very quickly.”

Many measurements The Gates research is by no means the first effort of its kind. Economists have already developed a statistical method called value-added modeling that calculates how much teachers help their students learn, based on changes in test scores from year to year. The method allows districts to rank teachers from best to worst. Value-added modeling is used in hundreds of districts. But teachers complain that boiling down all they do into a single statistic offers an incomplete picture; they want more measures of their performance taken into account. The Gates research uses value added as a starting point, but aims to develop other measures that can not only rate teachers but also help educators understand why one is more successful than another. Researchers and educators involved in the project described it as maddeningly complex in its effort to separate the attributes of good teaching from the idiosyncrasies of individual teachers. Gates is tracking the research closely. The use of digital video in particular has caught his attention. In an interview, he cited its potential for evaluating teachers and for helping them learn from talented colleagues. “Some teachers are extremely good,” Gates said. “And one of the goals is to say, you know, ‘Let’s go look at those teachers.’ What’s unbelievable is how little the exemplars have been studied. And then saying, ‘OK, How do you take a math teacher who’s in the third quartile and teach them how to get kids interested — get the kid who’s smart to pay attention, a kid who’s be-

Gould said that while “bubble behavior doesn’t change,” the culture of high-flying start-ups like Flooz.com, Pets.com and theGlobe.com making initial public offerings is largely nonexistent. Those did not fare well, though companies like Amazon have continued to prosper. Instead, entrepreneurs are increasingly looking to large technology companies like Microsoft, Apple or Google with mountains of cash, not the stock market. Those three companies have about $90 billion in cash on their books. McKinsey & Company calculates that the largest software and hardware companies have enough excess cash on hand to buy nearly all of the tech industry’s medium-sized companies. Although the volume of deals is expected to swell, financiers are much more conservative in the amounts they are investing in each company. “Back in the ‘90s, companies got funded for five times the amount that Tumblr raised and didn’t have anything close to a business model,” said Roger Ehrenberg, founder and manager partner of IA Ventures. “People were getting $50 to $200 million a pop and it brought down an entire industry.” The frenzy is as much the result of simple laws of supply and demand as the herd mentality. Thanks to the constantly falling cost of computing power, a start-up needs less money to get off the ground. Meanwhile, more wealthy people are viewing investing in tech as a hobby, which has increased the competition. “Investing in technology has become fashionable,” Ehrenberg said. “It used to be that angel investing was the province of

Travis Dove / New York Times News Service

A fifth-grade student raises her hand during a class that is being recorded as part of a classroom instruction evaluation at Croft Community School in Charlotte, N.C. Bill Gates has cited the potential of digital video in evaluating teachers and for helping them learn from talented colleagues. hind to pay attention?’ Teaching a teacher to do that — you have to follow the exemplars.” The meticulous scoring of videotaped lessons for this project is unfolding on a scale never undertaken in educational research, said Catherine McClellan, a director for the Educational Testing Service who is overseeing the process. By next June, researchers will have about 24,000 videotaped lessons. Because some must be scored using more than one protocol, the research will eventually involve reviewing some 64,000 hours of classroom video. Early next year, McClellan expects to recruit hundreds of educators and train them to score lessons. The goal is to help researchers look for possible correlations between certain teaching practices and high student achievement, measured by value-added scores. Thomas Kane, a Harvard economist who is leading the research, is scheduled to announce some preliminary results in Washington next Friday. More definitive conclusions are expected in about a year.

‘Video lasts’ The effort has also become a large-scale field trial of using classroom video, to help teachers improve and to evaluate them remotely. “Video lasts,” McClellan said, creating possibilities for dialogue among teachers about improving classroom techniques. “Colleagues can watch your video and say, ‘Right here — where you did that — try this next time.’ So the teacher learns a new skill.” There are advantages for teacher evaluations, too, Kane said. With videos, for instance, several professionals, rather than just one principal, could rate the same classroom performance, making ratings less subjective,

wealthy men. Now its become the province of everyone.” Some venture capitalists, hungry for growth and troubled by weak returns, have moved toward smaller investments, hoping to catch the next Facebook in its infancy. “I think at the high end, it’s not that frothy, but there’s a lot of exuberance in the early-stage stuff,” said Chris Sacca, an angel investor who has decided to temporarily hold off on new investments until valuations drift lower. “A lot of the valuations there don’t make a lot of sense.”

Optimistic investors Most Silicon Valley inves-

he said. “It potentially creates a cottage industry for retired principals, or even expert teachers, to moonlight on weekends scoring classroom observations,” he said. An Internet-based approach to teacher evaluation could also alleviate some pressures on school districts. New laws in many states, after all, are requiring more frequent observations of teachers. A new evaluation system in Washington, D.C., for example, requires five observations each year, compared with the previous systems that required one or two at most, and in many cases none at all. Starting next fall, a Tennessee law will require at least four observations a year, rather than one every five years. In some districts, the increased pace is straining the workload of administrators. Memphis officials realized that under the new rules, their district would need to conduct more than 28,000 classroom observations annually, a task that could overwhelm the city’s school principals. “This technology can help us face the logistical challenge of being so many places at the same time,” said John Barker, who leads the district’s research and evaluation office. The district still intends to have principals visit classrooms, but in January will start a pilot program to use videotaped observations, he said. Kane said the foundation hoped more school districts would start using classroom videos, for training and for evaluations, and has worked to keep costs down.

Cost, opposition Teachscape, a contractor providing cameras, software, and other services for the research, estimated first-year startup costs of about $1.5

tors still see no signs of gloom and doom. Ron Conway, a San Francisco financier who has invested in more than 500 companies, including Facebook, Zappos, Google and Twitter, says he does not think there is any bubble. “All the start-ups today have business models and business cases that make them viable,” he said in an e-mail. “In 1999 when the bubble happened many companies did not have business models and advertising on the Web was very immature.” Jeff Clavier, managing partner at SoftTech VC and a well-known Silicon Valley angel investor who has financed companies like Mint and Ustream, said that

million for a district with 140 schools and 7,000 teachers to buy one camera per school and lease the software to carry out classroom observations using digital video. After that, annual costs would drop to about $800,000, said Mark Atkinson, the chief executive of Teachscape, which is based in San Francisco. In addition to the cost — which many struggling districts may consider too high — another barrier could be teacher opposition. The Memphis teachers union, an affiliate of the National Education Association, has partnered with the foundation for the project. But Keith Harris, its president, said the use of videotaped observations in evaluations raised troubling questions. “Whose eyes would see these videos?” Harris asked. “Who would own them? This seems like an ‘I gotcha’ kind of thing. We think these observations deserve a human being.” Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, which has several affiliates participating in the research, also expressed reservations. “Videotaped observations have their role but shouldn’t be used to substitute for in-person observations to evaluate teachers,” Weingarten said. “It would be hard to justify ratings by outsiders watching videotapes at a remote location who never visited the classroom and couldn’t see for themselves a teacher’s interaction and relationship with students.” Kane said doubts may disappear with time. “We’re not naive,” he said. “We realize that most principals and teachers imagine an in-person visit from a human being when they think of classroom observations. But that could rapidly change. It’s not out of the realm of possibility that millions of classrooms could be using this technology within four or five years.”

over the next 12 to 18 months the real challenge for start-ups flush with venture cash would be proving they were worth the investment or risk having to fold their companies. “There may not be a big implosion, but down the road there will be a bunch of blood and tears,” he said. “The music is going to stop and people will realize there aren’t enough chairs for companies to get the next round of financing.”

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

541-388-4418


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Under fire, coal company CEO to quit New York Times News Service Don Blankenship, the embattled chief executive of Massey Energy, resigned Friday in a move that might enable the company to improve relations with federal regulators but might also hasten a takeover. Blankenship, 60, and Massey, one of the country’s largest coal producers, have been under fire since an explosion in April at a mine in West Virginia in which 29 workers were killed. The explosion, at the Upper Big Branch mine, was the nation’s worst coal mining accident in 40 years. Since then, the company has been hit by civil and criminal investigations and damage suits, and regulators have stepped up investigations of several company mines for possible infractions. “After almost three decades at Massey, it is time for me to move on,” Blankenship said in a statement. His resignation will be effective Dec. 31. He will be succeeded by Baxter Phillips Jr., president of Massey, as chief executive and by retired Adm. Bobby Inman, a former senior Central Intelligence Agency official and the lead independent director on the Massey board, as nonexecutive chairman. Reports of possible takeover bids have been swirling for more than a month. The leading contender for such a takeover has been Alpha Natural Resources, which has made a bid.

St. Charles Continued from A1 “That caused a concern that we were next,” said Kennedy. Other employees said they felt the hospital was losing the atmosphere they had enjoyed in the past. “We are sticking together because we want to return our hospital to being the fun, caring and upbeat environment it used to be when Sister Catherine (Hellmann) was here,” wrote Kathy Korne, a phlebotomist, on a website explaining the effort, www. wearestcharles.org, and referencing the revered Catholic nun who led the hospital for nearly 20 years. According to the petition filed with the labor board, the employees represented would come from a number of different positions at the hospital, including food service employees, housekeepers, nursing assistants, mail clerks and lab technicians. Currently, the hospital and employees are at odds about who should be represented, with hospital management contending that some of the jobs currently in the petition should not fall under the union contract. Under federal law, only employees who do similar types of work, in this case service and maintenance workers, can be represented in the same bargaining unit. At issue is whether the job descriptions in the petition filed can fit in that unit. Though this can often become an issue when workers are organizing, “in over 90 percent of cases we get agreement without a hearing,” said Richard Ahearn, regional director of the SEIU. Vitcovich said she does not expect to come to an agreement before the hearing, scheduled for Tuesday. After the hearing, a decision will be made by the labor board as to who can be represented by the union. The next step is a vote by all eligible employees as to whether they want to join. That will likely take place in January by secret ballot. If more than 50 percent of employees vote to organize, they will join the SEIU. Organizers say they have more than enough support to bring the union to St. Charles. “It looks like we’re over 60 percent supporting the union,” said Kennedy. But Vitcovich said there were many employees who had contacted her office with concerns. “I have had numerous calls from other (employees) who are not interested in being represented by the union, so they have been calling to ask how do I make sure I get a vote,” she said. Betsy Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or at bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 A7

Watchers Continued from A1 The move has prompted the 750,000 members who attend weekly meetings across the United States — and some 1 million online adherents — to rethink how they shop, cook and eat. The new plan, company officials say, is based on scientific findings about how the body processes different foods. The biggest change: All fruits and most vegetables are point-free (or free of PointsPlus, as the new program is called). Processed foods, meanwhile, generally have higher point values, which roughly translates to: should be eaten less. “If I lived in the Caribbean, maybe I’d be able to make goal,” said Susan Slotkis, 64, an interior designer at the meeting Wednesday. “The pineapple is great; all the fruits are fresh; you’re never tempted to drink juice.” In the new system, oranges are free, but eight ounces of orange juice cost three points.

Part of the culture When Weight Watchers introduced its points plan to Americans in 1997, it captivated a generation of women, propelling the company into a $1.4 billion empire. Weight Watchers points became a cultural touchstone: Restaurants like Applebee’s distributed special Weight Watchers menus; food companies like Healthy Choice listed points on their soup cans; and members bought Weight Watchers cookbooks, scales and points calculators. Members pay $12 to $15 a week to attend one of 20,000 weigh-ins and pep talks across the nation, or $65 to use the company’s Internet-monitoring program for three months. Under the old points plan, all participants were given daily and weekly allowances of points, based on their particular bodies, and each food, from apples to pepperoni pizzas, was given a point value, based primarily on the number of calories it contained, with slight ad-

Crash Continued from A1 Roberts later told a deputy that she was very tired and falling asleep as she drove toward Bend, and asked the others in the car to help keep her awake. Before the crash, she said, she opened her eyes and saw the tree. She tried to steer away and press on the brake, but it was too late. The car crashed into the tree and caught on fire. Roberts told the deputy that she tried to get the others in the car to wake up, but got no response. She crawled out the passenger window and called for help. When deputies and medics arrived on the scene, Herrin was already dead. Blackmore, who had been critically injured, was flown by Air Link to St. Charles Bend, where she died

Lisa Shaub explains a new food-management system during a Weight Watchers meeting Thursday in New York. The diet company’s new PointsPlus plan puts less emphasis on calories and more on each item’s mix of protein, fiber, carbohydrates and fat. Fred R. Conrad New York Times News Service

“It’s a complete overhaul; it doesn’t get any bigger than this. Fifteen years ago we said a calorie is a calorie is a calorie. If you ate 100 calories of butter or 100 calories of chicken, it was all the same. Now, we know that is not the case.” — Karen Miller-Kovach, chief scientific officer for Weight Watchers International

the Weight Watchers point system by the idea that it seemed almost like an anti-diet: You could eat whatever you wanted, as long as you gauged the portion, counted the points and, if necessary, scrimped elsewhere. And while many members are lauding what one blogger described as a “Weight Watchers meets Michael Pollan,” and celebrating the advent of the guilt-free fruit cup, others are pushing back.

justments for fat (bad) and fiber (good). “You could be holding an apple in one hand, which was two points, and you could be holding a 100-calorie snack pack of Oreos in the other hand, which was also two points,” David Kirchhoff, president and chief executive of Weight Watchers International, said in a telephone interview. Now, all of that has been upended. The new system allots points based on a complex formula that considers each item’s mix of protein, fiber, carbohydrates and fat. Making it more confusing, most people are now given more total allowed points — a kind of new math that requires recalculation of what had been ingrained. Under the old system, for example, the average new member of Weight Watchers was allotted 22 daily points and an extra 35 weekly points. Now, the average

new member is allotted 31 daily points and 49 weekly points. So while two potato latkes are now seven points instead of five, their portion of the total is about the same (too high). But a Burger King bacon double cheeseburger remains 12 points, making it slightly less objectionable under the new regime. “It’s a complete overhaul; it doesn’t get any bigger than this,” said Karen Miller-Kovach, the chief scientific officer for Weight Watchers International. “Fifteen years ago we said a calorie is a calorie is a calorie. If you ate 100 calories of butter or 100 calories of chicken, it was all the same. Now, we know that is not the case, in terms of how hard the body has to work to make that energy available. And even more important is that where that energy comes from affects feelings of hunger and fullness.” Some people were drawn to

“I don’t want to be forced to choose veggies. I do NOT like veggies or fruit,” one member wrote in an online discussion on the Weight Watchers website. “I feel like I am being forced to ‘diet,’ and that is what I DO NOT WANT.” Kate Mack, 28, a high school English teacher in Allentown, Pa., questioned the timing of the shift, between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, long a challenging time for the weight-conscious (a half-cup of reduced-calorie egg nog, for the record, used to be three points and now is four, but remember, the allowed total has changed, too). “If you’re going to a party, for instance, and don’t know what’s going to be served there,” Mack posited, “I don’t know what I

the following day. Roberts and Hoyle were both taken to the hospital by ambulance and were later released. Inside the car, a deputy smelled alcohol and spotted an open 30pack of Bush beer, the affidavit said. The deputy noted that some of the containers of beer were open. When officials asked Roberts if she’d submit to blood and urine tests, she said no. A couple of days earlier, she told a deputy, she’d taken some Ecstasy. Later that day, she changed her mind about the tests. “I want to,” Roberts told a deputy. “I don’t have anything to hide.” According to information provided in a court hearing on Friday, prosecutors say the tests turned up traces of three substances: Ecstasy, marijuana and some kind of opiate.

In late November, a Deschutes County grand jury convened to consider the case, indicted Roberts on two counts of first-degree manslaughter, two counts of second-degree manslaughter and one count of third-degree assault, all felonies, along with one count of fourth-degree assault and drunken driving, which are both misdemeanors. Roberts was arraigned this week and on Friday, she was back in court as a judge considered if she should be allowed to stay at home or be sent to jail. In a hearing attended by Roberts’ family members — and family of some of the crash victims — her attorney, Noal Smith, told Judge Stephen Tiktin that the blood alcohol test administered after the crash did not turn up evidence that Roberts had been drinking. But Deputy District Attorney

Van McIver said the blood was drawn for the test at 11 a.m. — more than three hours after the crash and about seven hours after Roberts said she had her last beer — too late to turn up alcohol that may have been in her blood at the time of the crash. Either way, Tiktin said that he was concerned by Roberts’ reported substance use. He was hesitant to grant Roberts’ request to live with her parents while her case is pending because he wanted to ensure that she would not use drugs or drive. “This is a significant and serious case with very significant potential consequences,” he said. Herrin’s mother, who was in the courtroom, offered to take Roberts under her care. Roberts shook her head and her attorney told the judge she wasn’t pleased with that option. Hoyle’s family also offered to

‘Diet’ criticism

can or can’t enjoy as a treat because I’m not entirely clear, without taking a second to go into the ladies’ room and go look up the point value on Weight Watchers mobile.” Weight Watchers officials say the new plan has been in the works for three years and was tested in pilot programs throughout the country over the past year. Miller-Kovach said that pilot programs showed that, while members ate different foods, their caloric intake was roughly the same and they lost at least as much if not more. Weight Watchers members in Continental Europe have been using a version of PointsPlus for the past year, and those in Britain and Australia made the switch a few weeks ago. Lauren Cohen, a svelte 64year-old Weight Watchers group leader with dangly earrings, tall boots and the enthusiasm of a circus announcer, said that one points devotee was particularly agitated upon studying the new system this week. “I lost 64 pounds, I’m at goal, I love points. If it’s not broke, why fix it?” she recalled the man saying. Her response: “The latest scientific research shows that this will be an even better way to maintain that.” At the meeting on Wednesday afternoon, Cohen warned her clients that, points or no points, even fruits and vegetables had their limits. One Weight Watchers credo, she said — to eat until satisfied, not stuffed — remained firmly in place. “We’re not talking about running home with a wheelbarrow full of grapes from a vineyard,” she cautioned. Then she noted perhaps the most compelling piece of information, the one that made even the most banana-fearing members perk up. “You see Jennifer Hudson on the cover of your weekly reader?” she said, gesturing to a picture of the slimmed-down starlet gracing the cover of the Weight Watchers weekly booklet. “Guess what plan she lost that weight on?”

help with Roberts’ supervision, but Tiktin agreed to let Roberts stay with her parents — provided that she had a tracking device, alcohol monitoring and submitted to random drug testing. That living situation, however, may only be temporary. Roberts is scheduled to have an additional release hearing on Monday. Tiktin said he was surprised to hear that Roberts didn’t sign up for drug counseling or treatment after the accident. Smith said Roberts had attended one Alcoholics Anonymous meeting after the crash, on Thursday. “One AA meeting the day before she goes to her release hearing?” Tiktin said. “Nothing to me could be more self-serving than that.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

1865 NE Highway 20, Bend M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6

541-389-1177 Expires December 31, 2010.


WOR L D

A8 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

W  B Weather extremes cause havoc in Europe LONDON — Northern Europe remained in the grip of arctic weather Friday after a week of blinding snow, biting winds and plummeting temperatures. Airports have closed, trains have halted midtrip, cars have been abandoned on highways, and several dozen people from Poland to Britain have died of exposure so far, the authorities say. In the southeast, heavy rainfall in the Balkan countries of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro caused the worst flooding along the Drina River in more than 100 years, deluging villages and causing more than 1,000 people to be evacuated from their homes. But in the north, all the misery involved the cold and the snow. In Britain, flights at Gatwick Airport were resuming Friday, after two days in which the airport was closed entirely, with more than 1,200 flights canceled, as frantic efforts failed to clear the snow as it fell.

South Korea defense nominee Ivory Coast vows airstrikes if North attacks declaration By Mark McDonald New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — The four-star general chosen as South Korea’s new defense minister said Friday that the South would use airstrikes against North Korea if it carried out further attacks. “If the enemy attacks our people and territory again, I will use force to punish the enemy to make sure it doesn’t even

dare think about it again,” the minister-designate, Kim Kwanjin, said in confirmation hearings Friday. His comments provided the first details of a muscular new military posture announced by President Lee Myung-bak last week. Lee’s government has come under fierce criticism for what is widely seen here as a feeble response to the North Korean shelling of a South Ko-

rean island last month. Last week Lee accepted the resignation of his defense minister, announced plans to reinforce the island’s defenses and revised the rules of engagement to make it easier for South Korea to respond to a North Korean attack with greater force. Kim’s comments on Friday were the first to suggest that such a response could include bombing the North from the air.

When North Korea shelled Yeonpyeong Island on Nov. 23, killing two marines and two civilians, the South responded with a volley of artillery and put its fighter jets on alert, but they did not take off. Kim, 61, a former infantry commander who led the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the new rules of engagement would also give more authority to commanders in the field.

BLAZE RAGES AS A WEARY ISRAEL RECEIVES AID

‘Canned’ S. African lion hunts to resume JOHANNESBURG — A South African court has ruled that the hunting of captive-bred lions shortly after their release into the wild should be allowed to resume, the International Fund for Animal Welfare said. The Supreme Court of Appeal struck down a law hindering the practice, known as “canned hunting,” after an appeal by the South African Predator Breeders Association, IFAW said in an e-mail from its Cape Town office. “This ruling puts canned hunting right back on the agenda and further entrenches South Africa’s image of a country that puts animal welfare last while profiteering from an abhorrent form of hunting practice,” IFAW said. The predators association has warned that the law would shut an industry that employs 5,000 people because farmers can’t afford to keep lions on their estates for long periods of time due to the value of the antelopes they eat. — From wire reports

Tsafrir Abayov / The Associated Press

Firefighters rest on the road at sunrise Friday after participating overnight in the efforts to gain control over a massive wildfire, still raging, in Tirat Hacarmel, northern Israel. The inferno, which broke out Thursday and has killed at least 41, has stunned Israelis at their firefighters’ helplessness in quelling the blaze, the worst forest fire in the nation’s history. On Friday, aircraft from Turkey, Greece, Cyprus and Britain

dumped sea water and flame retardant on the blaze as burials began for the dead, most of them prison guards who perished Thursday when the blaze engulfed a bus that was transporting them to evacuate a prison. The human tragedy was compounded by the loss of precious woodland in a country where only 7 percent of the land is forested.

sets up presidential standoff By Adam Nossiter New York Times News Service

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Defying international observers and the country’s own electoral commission, officials tied to President Laurent Gbagbo on Friday declared him the winner of a landmark election in this troubled West African nation, potentially setting the stage for the kind of violence and division that the long-awaited voting was supposed to prevent. The announcement, made by the Constitutional Council, came only a day after the country’s top election official said Gbagbo’s challenger had won the election by a solid margin, 54.1 to 45.9 percent — a result the United Nations secretary-general, Ban Kimoon, also endorsed on Friday. The United Nations has a role in certifying the elections, and both Ban and his longtime special representative here made it clear there was only one winner of last Sunday’s vote: the opposition candidate, Alassane Ouattara. The conflicting declarations left the country in a strange limbo, with two men declared president, and on Friday Gbagbo’s government found itself under increasing isolation, some of it self-imposed. It has ordered the country’s borders sealed, blocked all foreign television and radio broadcasts — much of the population gets its news from French broadcasters — and imposed a strict dusk-to-dawn curfew. President Barack Obama issued a statement congratulating Ouattara. He urged “all parties, including incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo, to acknowledge and respect this result, and to allow Côte d’Ivoire to move forward toward a peaceful, democratic future, leaving long years of conflict and missed opportunities in the past.”


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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT

COMMUNITY LIFE

Inside

‘Hasselhoffs’ on A&E Reality show stars ‘The Hoff’ and his daughters, Page B3

JULIE JOHNSON

Bend singer-songwriter CHRIS BELAND just discovered his biological father is veteran guitarist JOHN BELAND. On Monday, they’ll meet for the first time. It’s no wonder Chris has

Music genes

Winter wear creates chaos for parents

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in his

Submitted photo

John Beland performs with the Burrito Brothers in 1982 at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tenn. Beland will fly to Central Oregon on Monday to meet his son, Chris.

By Ben Salmon • The Bulletin hanks to John Beland’s long and high-profile career in the music business, the veteran guitarist, songwriter and

producer receives his share of unusual e-mails from fans and other folks.

Some know his solo work or one of his songs that another singer turned into a hit. Others may recognize him as the leader of legendary countryrock band the Flying Burrito Brothers in the 1980s and ’90s. And some may remember his years as an in-demand guitarist to big stars like Dolly Parton, Ricky Nelson and Linda Ronstadt. Barbara Chabot, a 53-year-old social worker who lives outside Denver, wrote Beland a few months ago. She didn’t fall into any of those categories, though she did see Beland perform with Nelson at a county fair in California in 1978. But it was the highly personal nature of Chabot’s message that drew Beland’s attention. “I sent him an e-mail and it said, ‘I really need to have contact with you.’ And he wrote me back and said, ‘Um, do I know you?’ ” Chabot said in an interview earlier this week. “And I said, ‘I think better than you remember.’ “ ‘This is a embarrassing, but a couple days ago I was shocked by the results of my son’s paternity test,’ ” Chabot continued, recalling her note to Beland. “ ‘And the person I thought was his biological father is not his biological father.’ ” From his home in Brenham, John Beland Texas, Beland, 61, said he didn’t think too much of Chabot’s correspondence until she included a link to a video of her son, Chris, performing at a church. He clicked on the video and suddenly, everything changed. “My first impression was he looked exactly like my father and he looked a lot like my son, Tyler, who’s 21,” Beland said, speaking with a distinct Midwestern accent that surfaces when he gets excited. “The similarity was just jaw-dropping. “His vocal and his guitar playing were very similar to mine, and his mannerisms were similar to mine. The way that he looked and his actions were pretty amazing,” Beland said of Chris. “I told my girlfriend about it and she just said, ‘I don’t think you even need a DNA test, it’s so obvious. But go ahead, and let’s see where it goes.’ ”

Growing up in California On Friday, a local singer-songwriter named Chris Beland will celebrate the release of his new album, “The Weather Man,” with a concert at The Kilns Bookstore in Bend (see “If you go”). He’ll sing his lush, acoustic folk-pop songs, and he’ll be backed by a band of close friends who for years have known him by a different name, Chris Chabot. Chris, 31, grew up in Santa Maria, Calif., a midsize town on the state’s central coast, where he lived with his mom, Barbara, an older brother and sister, and a man who left the family around the time Chris was born. Both Barbara and Chris believed that man was Chris’ father for the past 31 years. (The man’s last name was not Chabot. That name came from Barbara’s second husband, who adopted Chris when he was 4.) See Beland / B6

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2010

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Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Chris Beland of Bend holds an album by his father, veteran musician and producer John Beland. Chris recently discovered John is his biological father, and the two will meet for the first time Monday.

If you go

If you go

What: Chris Beland’s CD release show, with openers Justin Lavik and Erin Cole-Baker When: 7:30 p.m. Friday, doors open 6:30 p.m. Where: The Kilns Bookstore, 550 N.W. Industrial Way, Suite 180, Bend Cost: $10, includes CD Contact: www.myspace.com/ christopherchabot or 541-389-9166

What: John Beland When: 9 p.m. Thursday Where: Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $7 Contact: 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com

“He’s like, ‘If you’re my son, I’d be the most blessed person in the world. And if you’re not, then you’ve gained a friend for life.’ ” — Chris Beland, describing an e-mail from his father, John

ever the most pleasant of times, mornings in my house have become even more harried and, well, loud since the onset of winter weather. I blame outerwear. The morning rush to get the kids ready for school, myself ready for work, and everyone out the door on time has always been rushed and punctuated by intermittent yelling (“You don’t have your SHOES ON YET?!”). But when you add gloves, hats, coats, scarves and boots to the equation, it’s chaos. Central Oregon winters require a certain amount of protection in the form of clothing. We all know this. It’s why there are approximately 152 stores selling such accoutrements in Bend — you can’t throw a snowball without hitting a purveyor of snowboarding pants, wool hats or puffy jackets. As parents, we are morally and (probably) legally required to provide cold-weather clothing for our children. Happily do we do this, secure in the knowledge that in 20 years, we will look fondly at photos depicting wintertime fun — snowball fights, cute little misshapen snowmen, family outings including tiny skis. But those photos will fail to depict all the time and energy (and money, for that matter) invested in getting the kids dressed. Long johns. Snow pants. Warm coat. Hat. Gloves. Scarf. It’s a 20-minute ordeal of reminding, yelling and sometimes wrestling to get my kids into all their snow-day gear. Just tracking all that stuff for two kids is a part-time job. Years ago I abandoned the heap-in-the-closet approach to winter-wear management in favor of a shoe holder that hangs over the back of a closet door. The little pouches in the shoe holder are perfect for stowing a pair of gloves or mittens, a winter hat or even a rolled scarf. Coats can hang from the closet bar. Of course, that system only works when the kids put their things away, which is never, seeing as how they prefer to dump all their winter gear in a giant, icy pile just inside the front door. But the real problem with winter clothing management is the fact that my children lose about 60 percent of their possessions each year. We have gone through so many mittens, gloves, hats, coats and scarves in the past few years, we are probably single-handedly responsible for Columbia Sportswear’s profitable children’s line. My older son alone has gone through four coats in the past six months alone. He lost his good winter coat at the end of the school year, and no amount of searching the lost and found would turn it up. We had to replace that coat with another so he could attend a summer camp in the mountains. He returned home without his new coat (but with a pair of jeans with the name Noah Lutzman sewn inside. Sorry, Noah. I hope you ended up with the coat). A hand-me-down coat with a broken zipper was good enough to start the school year with, but that coat was lost within a month or two. So we raided our son’s meager savings to purchase his newest coat, on the theory that if he had to pay for it himself, he’d take better care of it. So far so good, which is great news for the kid, his dad having threatened to let him go coatless if he loses yet another jacket. But the thing I hate the most about the wrangling of winter gear is how it has turned me into a winter-wear drill sergeant. This is me every day when the kids are home from school: “WHERE ARE YOUR MITTENS?” “In my backpack.” “COATS?” “On the floor.” “WHY AREN’T THEY HUNG UP?” “Uh, we forgot?” Those photos better be good 20 years from now. Julie Johnson can be reached at 541383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.


T EL EV I

B2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Daughter doesn’t want alcoholic dad in her life Dear Abby: I’m 15, and my parents have fought constantly for years. Dad is an alcoholic. I guess you could say I have kind of given up on him. I’m involved in many sports, but rarely does he show up to support me, unlike my mom, who is there at every game. Dad has now left us. He still calls Mom just about every day, and he stops by the house to “check up” on things about three times a week. Mom forced me to send him a “Happy Birthday” text. She wants me to start talking to him again and to build a relationship with him, but I think he has missed out on too much of my life already. (He even missed my first prom!) I don’t feel I need him in my life, or that he deserves me in his. What should I do? — Let Down by Dad in Kansas Dear Let Down: Because you are close to your mother, you need to have her explain to you why she feels it is important for you to include your father in your life. If he is trying to quit drinking, she may have good reasons for wanting you to. While I understand and sympathize with the fact that your father has disappointed you and that you are angry about it, carrying that kind of anger can be more destructive to you than it is to him. That’s why it could be helpful to you to check out a support group called Alateen. It was started especially to help young people whose lives have been affected by the compulsive drinking of a family member or a friend. It offers a booklet titled “Al-Anon Faces Alcoholism 2011,” which can be read on the Al-Anon website at www.AlAnonFamilyGroups.org. If you would like to order a postage-paid free copy, direct your request to www.al-anon familyfroups.org, or mail a request to Al-Anon Family Groups, 1600 Corporate Landing Parkway, Virginia Beach, VA 23454-5617.

DEAR ABBY Dear Abby: I have been dating “Harper” for two months. He now involves me in his family dinners and events on a weekly basis. I feel weird going to family functions that include his mom, dad, brother, sister, and their spouses and kids. Sometimes even extended family members and friends attend. Harper loves including me, but it’s overwhelming because it feels too soon to spend so much time with them. My anxiety has me in a panic during nearly every visit. I’m having a hard time saying no because it’s all so normal for Harper. I dread going to his family’s for dinner for fear that it will turn into “card night.” Harper’s ex-girlfriend was fine with being included in everything. I feel like I’m stepping into her shoes, and I don’t like how it feels. Harper never forces me to go, but I have to find a way to tell him it’s not necessary for me to accompany him every week. I don’t want to offend him or his family. Help! — Too Much, Too Soon Dear Too Much, Too Soon: You need to recognize that Harper is extremely close to his family and that his idea of a good time is seeing and interacting with them. If you continue to date him, you will have to accept that his family — including extended family, friends and card nights — will be a large part of the package. Many women might welcome being wrapped in the embrace of a large, warm family, but because you feel otherwise, it’s time to level with him and tell him that you’re finding this overwhelming. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

S ION

Fallon a breath of fresh fun By Robert Lloyd Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Now that Conan O’Brien has come to rest, presumably for more than seven months, as the host of a TBS talk show, it seems like a good time to take another look at the person who replaced him, and I don’t mean Jay Leno. One year and nine months ago Jimmy Fallon — who, like O’Brien, was touched by the hand of Lorne, and I do mean Michaels — followed O’Brien into the “Late Night” chair previously vacated by David Letterman. There is a moment early in the career of every major-network late-night talk show host when the people ask, “Why him?” (There are no “hers” in major-network late-night, and no one ever asks why a particular person might be hosting a basic-cable or a daytime talk show; those things just happen.) And yet with a little time, most new hosts begin to take on a patina of inevitability. Conan may have lasted only seven months captaining “The Tonight Show,” but he commanded “Late Night” for 17 years, and even a short run in late-night produces a lot of television. More than 350 hours of “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” have aired on NBC since March 2009, with Fallon in or near the center of the frame nearly all the time. Along with Craig Ferguson’s very different “Late Late Show,” Fallon’s show seems to me to have moved to the head of its class, although I admit that talk shows are largely a matter of taste: Different hosts for different folks. It was an uneven beginning: Fallon booked one of the world’s worst interview subjects, Robert DeNiro, as his first guest, and the acknowledged irony — DeNiro was asked questions he could answer in a single word — did not make the interview any better, or funny. But whatever tentativeness

Associated Press ile photo

Jimmy Fallon attends The Gentleman’s Ball hosted by GQ Magazine in New York on Oct. 27. Fallon showed has long dissipated, and what he lacks in penetrating insight — if such a thing were even required here — he makes up in enthusiasm. He loves comedy, movies, music and video games (technology gets the attention here that other talk shows deny it) and loves them like a fan, which means that his questions are sometimes weightless — asking Keith Richards to name his favorite Rolling Stones album cover, for example. That does not mean they don’t get interesting results. Fallon will address his guests as “buddy” or “my friend” or “my man” (as in “My man Dick Cavett is joining us!”). He can sing, and dance more than a little, which not all late-night TV hosts can do, and is an impressive mimic and a good storyteller. He feels “psyched” about things that are “crazy good” or “awesome”; really crazy good awesome things might “blow your pants off.” He is young enough to get away with a phrase like “That’s what I’m talking about” without sounding ironic or like your

Uncle Harry coming on all hep. At 36, conveniently positioned between the incoming freshmen of show business and its graying eminences, he’s a little bit hiphop and a little bit rock ’n’ roll. His dead-on impersonations of Neil Young, in which he marries the lyrics of current pop fluff — “Whip My Hair,” “Pants on the Ground” — to Young’s early acoustic music perfectly embodies this averaging of the generations. Because of the hinterland hours, the smaller audience and the proportionally reckoned budget, it’s common for latenight hosts, especially late-late nights, to adopt a position of comical self-deprecation (this show stinks) combined with a derogatory attitude to the network that feeds it. “Late Night” doesn’t; it gleams with happy satisfaction. Most impressive is a number of elaborate serials parodying other television shows, all set within the fictional universe of “Late Night”: “7th Floor West” echoes “The Hills”; “Late” is “Lost,” with Fallon and company stranded on a deserted floor at Rockefeller Center after an elevator crash; “6-bee,” for 6B, the compact studio where the show tapes, was a splendid takeoff on “Glee” that featured Fallon and his staff battling the cast of “Parks and Recreation” to the tune of Twisted Sister’s “We’re Not Going to Take It.” (It worked as a musical number even while it parodied musical numbers; I mean it was kind of exciting.) “The Real Housewives of Late Night” — well, you can work that out. “Suckers” is a vampire drama, as comedy. These are very funny, but they also have high production values and nar-

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rative elegance and are played straight; the writers seem less concerned with cramming in jokes than with establishing a plausible askew world. That balance applies to the whole show, really. What above all gives the show its special character and makes it such a good place to hang out on an early morning is a spirit of inclusiveness that extends from the host to his band to his writers to the audience. It’s hierarchical to the extent that Fallon is the host and gets to wear a suit — he wears them well — but he’s also in a way along for the ride. There are games to play with the crowd — Wheel of Carpet Samples, Competitive Spit-Takes, the Battle of the Instant Bands. Guests are drafted for skits or made to play Fallon in beer pong or miniature golf. One of the best bits on “Late Night” is a low-key piece in which Fallon catches up on writing his thank-you notes. (It plays to his natural softness.) “Thank you, shampoo,” he says to himself as he writes, “or as I like to call you when I run out of soap, ‘soap.’ ” “Thank you, plastic cutlery, for reminding us all how strong bread can be.” Along with the Shout-Outs, in which homage is paid to such things as Scotch tape, the Jheri curl and podiums, it betokens a delight in small, weird things. Wonder and celebration and gratitude are the order of the day here; the knives are not out. It smells like love.

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College Football Big 12 Championship -- Nebraska vs. Oklahoma From Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (Live) Paid Program Comedy.TV ’ ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å News Nightly News Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Chase The Comeback Kid ‘14’ Å Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ The Unit Exposure ’ ‘PG’ Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News Old Christine Old Christine ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell. Premiere. ’ Å College Football Big 12 Championship -- Nebraska vs. Oklahoma From Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (Live) College Football Entourage ‘MA’ Curb Enthusiasm NUMB3RS Noisy Edge ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Finger in the Nest ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Legacy ’ ‘14’ Å Cops (N) ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Å America’s Most Wanted Old Christine Old Christine PDXposed ‘G’ Green Econ. The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Da Vinci’s Inquest ‘14’ Å NUMB3RS Noisy Edge ’ ‘14’ Å Tommy Emmanuel -- Center Stage Easy Yoga for Arthritis Johnny Mathis: Wonderful, Wonderful! ’ ‘PG’ Å Riverdance: Live From Beijing ’ ‘G’ Å News News Nightly News Straight Talk Dental Implants Grants Getaways Chase The Comeback Kid ‘14’ Å Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show House Ugly ’ ‘14’ Å House You Don’t Want to Know ‘14’ ›› “Arthur’s Quest” (1999) Catherine Oxenberg, Arye Gross. Å Wolf: Travels Food Trip-Todd Katie Brown Smart Travels Holiday Table Katie Brown Holiday Table Katie Brown Burt Wolf: Taste Holiday Table Tommy Emmanuel -- Center Stage Easy Yoga for Arthritis Johnny Mathis: Wonderful, Wonderful! ’ ‘PG’ Å Riverdance: Live From Beijing ’ ‘G’ Å

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune KATU News at 11 Comedy.TV ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News Sat. Night Live 48 Hours Mystery (N) ’ Å News (11:35) Cold Case The Closer Brenda must testify. ‘14’ College Football Ugly Betty ‘PG’ News Channel 21 Two/Half Men Fringe The Abducted ‘14’ Å NUMB3RS Longshot ’ ‘PG’ Å South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Magic Moments: The Best of 50s Pop ’ ‘G’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News Sat. Night Live House of Payne House of Payne Stargate Universe Air ‘14’ Å Katie Brown Wolf: Travels Wolf: Travels Food Trip-Todd Magic Moments: The Best of 50s Pop ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 A teenager is murdered. Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å (4:30) ››› “Predator” (1987, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Carl Weath- ››› “Independence Day” (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ››› “Independence Day” (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Gold102 40 39 ers. A team is stalked by an intergalactic trophy hunter. Å ships. blum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. Killer Aliens ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Bad Dog! Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) ’ ‘PG’ Bad Dog! Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Killer Squid ’ ‘PG’ Å Top Chef History Never Repeats ‘14’ House Ugly ’ ‘14’ Å House You Don’t Want to Know ‘14’ House An over-the-hill rock star. ‘14’ House Paralysis. ’ ‘14’ Å House Frozen ’ ‘14’ Å House Don’t Ever Change ‘14’ Å 137 44 ›› “Mr. Mom” (1983, Comedy) Michael Keaton, Teri Garr, Ann Jillian. ’ ›› “The Stepford Wives” (2004) Nicole Kidman, Matthew Broderick. ’ (10:15) ›› “Mr. Mom” (1983, Comedy) Michael Keaton, Teri Garr. ’ 190 32 42 53 “A Smoky Mountain Christmas” ‘G’ The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part American Greed The Suze Orman Show Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Paid Program Kardashians 51 36 40 52 American Greed Funny Money Larry King Live ‘PG’ John Lennon Newsroom Losing Lennon: Countdown Larry King Live ‘PG’ Newsroom Losing Lennon: Countdown 52 38 35 48 Losing Lennon: Countdown (6:40) ›› “Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” (2008, Comedy) Kal Penn. Å ›› “The Girl Next Door” (2004) Emile Hirsch, Elisha Cuthbert. Premiere. Å Nick Swardson 135 53 135 47 (4:36) ›› “The Slammin’ Salmon” (2009) Å High Desert Paid Program Get Outdoors Visions of NW Joy of Fishing Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Bend on the Run Ride Guide ‘14’ City Edition 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 98 11 American Perspectives Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Sonny-Chance Suite/Deck Hannah Forever Phineas and Ferb Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place The Kennedy Detail ’ ‘PG’ Å FBI’s 10 Most Wanted (N) ’ ‘PG’ I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ Get Out Alive Hijack on Flight 73 ‘14’ FBI’s 10 Most Wanted ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Secrets of the Secret Service ‘PG’ (7:45) SportsCenter (Live) Å College Football Final (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:45) College Football ACC Championship -- Florida State vs. Virginia Tech (Live) College Football Scoreboard Å SportsNation (N) Å NBA Tonight Rodeo Wrangler National Finals, Third Round Å 22 24 21 24 College Football Connecticut at South Florida (Live) Rodeo Wrangler National Finals, Third Round From Las Vegas. (Live) Å Best of-Poker 2005 World Series of Poker Å 2005 World Series of Poker Å 2005 World Series of Poker Å 23 25 123 25 College Football: 1981 Okla. at USC ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” (2005) Daniel Radcliffe. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. “T. Burton’s Nightmare” 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004) Daniel Radcliffe. Å Campaign ’08: Fight to the Finish Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Red Eye Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Campaign 2010: Fight to the Finish 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Holiday Windows Bobby Flay Food Feuds (N) Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Matchmaking Party Cupcake Wars Survival of the Fittest Iron Chef America 177 62 46 44 Iron Chef America Runnin’ With PAC College Football USC at UCLA (Live) College Basketball 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) High School Football Washington Class 4A Final: Teams TBA (Live) (4:30) ›› “XXX: State of the Union” (2005) Ice Cube. ›› “Eagle Eye” (2008, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan, Rosario Dawson. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The League ‘MA’ The League ‘MA’ 131 Color Splash: Mi Designed to Sell Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Celebrity Holiday Homes (N) ‘G’ Dear Genevieve Curb/Block House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve Top Gear Blind Drift ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Most Extreme Airports ‘PG’ Å “The Christmas Shoes” (2002) Rob Lowe, Kimberly Williams. ‘PG’ Å “Unanswered Prayers” (2010) Eric Close, Samantha Mathis. ‘PG’ Å The Fairy Jobmother ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 ›› “Holiday in Your Heart” (1997, Drama) LeAnn Rimes. ‘PG’ Å Lockup: Raw The Three R’s Lockup: Raw It’s Complicated (N) Lockup Lockup Lockup: Raw It’s Complicated Lockup 56 59 128 51 Lockup That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ›› “Adam Sandler’s Eight Crazy Nights” (2002), Jackie Titone ’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 (4:40) 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å SpongeBob Victorious Freak the Freak Out ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush (N) ’ ‘G’ Å A Very School Gyrls Holla-Day ‘G’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter (Season Finale) Grove vs. Maia; Bonnar vs. Pokrajac. From Las Vegas. ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006, Adventure) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Å ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” (2007, Adventure) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Å 133 35 133 45 (3:30) ››› “Serenity” (2005) Å In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades Thru History Travel the Road “Our First Christmas” (2008) John Ratzenberger. ‘PG’ Neville Cmas Virtual Memory Michael English 205 60 130 Love-Raymond Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “The House Bunny” (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. Å ››› “Mean Girls” (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. (10:45) ›› “Legally Blonde” (2001), Luke Wilson Å 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “The Snake Pit” (1948, Drama) Olivia de Havilland, Mark Stevens, Leo Genn. A ››› “Confessions of a Nazi Spy” (1939) Edward G. Robinson, Francis Lederer. FBI ›› “The Long Night” (1947, Crime Drama) Henry Fonda, Barbara Bel Geddes. A con- ››› “Act of Love” (1953, Drama) Kirk 101 44 101 29 man commits his wife to a mental hospital. Å agent nabs Nazi spy, weak link in U.S. chain. Å niving magician drives a wedge between two lovers. Douglas, Dany Robin. Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å Crazy Christmas Lights ’ ‘G’ Å Invasion of the Christmas Lights ‘G’ Invasion of the Christmas Lights 2 More Crazy Christmas Lights ’ ‘G’ Invasion of the Christmas Lights ‘G’ 178 34 32 34 Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å ››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford. Terrorists hijack the president’s plane. Å ››› “Troy” (2004) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana. Premiere. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. Å ››› “The Fugitive” (1993) Å 17 26 15 27 The Fugitive Å Olive, the Other Reindeer ‘G’ Å Grandma Got Run Over/Reindeer Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale ‘G’ ›› “Shark Tale” (2004, Comedy) Voices of Will Smith, Robert De Niro. King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ 84 Extreme Waterparks ‘G’ Å Deep Fried Paradise ‘G’ Å Man-Carnivore Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å Deep Fried Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Terror Rides ‘G’ Å Andy Griffith (6:13) The Andy Griffith Show ‘G’ Andy Griffith Andy Griffith (7:56) M*A*S*H (8:28) M*A*S*H Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith ›› “The Wedding Planner” (2001) Jennifer Lopez, Matthew McConaughey. Premiere. Å ››› “Sex and the City” (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker. Time brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals. “I Now Pronounce You” 15 30 23 30 Chuck and Larry Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Nicki Minaj: My Time Now ’ Entourage ‘MA’ (8:35) Entourage (9:10) Entourage (9:45) Entourage (10:15) Entourage (10:45) Entourage (11:15) Entourage (11:45) Entourage 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:45) ››› “The Mask” 1994 Jim Carrey. ’ ‘PG-13’ › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ››› “The Fifth Element” 1997 Bruce Willis. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Moving Violation” 1976, Drama Stephen McHattie. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper. ‘R’ Å ›› “Moving Violation” 1976 ‘PG’ ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper. ‘R’ Å Firsthand ‘PG’ Firsthand ‘PG’ ASP Men’s World Tour: 2010 Billa Snowscrapers Cubed Å Firsthand ‘PG’ Firsthand ‘PG’ ASP Men’s World Tour: 2010 Billa Snowscrapers Cubed Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ LPGA Tour Golf LPGA Tour Championship, Third Round Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf Top 10 12 Nights Golf Central PGA Tour Golf 2010 PGA Tour Q-School, Fourth Round From Winter Garden, Fla. (4:00) “Eloise at Christmastime” ‘G’ “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008) Henry Winkler. ‘PG’ Å “Farewell Mr. Kringle” (2010) Christine Taylor. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å “Farewell Mr. Kringle” (2010) Christine Taylor, Chris Wiehl. ‘PG’ Å (4:00) ›› “Mission: Impossible” 1996 Tom ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action Vin Diesel. Fugitive Dom Torretto and Brian ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009, Action Robert Downey Jr. Premiere. The detective and (10:15) Boardwalk Empire Nucky shakes (11:15) ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009 RobHBO 425 501 425 10 Cruise. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å O’Conner resume a feud in Los Angeles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å his astute partner face a strange enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å up the status quo. ’ ‘MA’ ert Downey Jr. ’ ‘PG-13’ The Culture ››› “Mad Max” 1979 Mel Gibson. ‘R’ The Culture (7:35) ››› “American Psycho” 2000, Horror Christian Bale. ‘R’ ›› “Anamorph” 2007, Suspense Willem Dafoe. ‘R’ (11:15) ››› “Mad Max” 1979 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) › “Miss ›› “He’s Just Not That Into You” 2009, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck. Men and (7:45) ››› “Spider-Man 2” 2004, Action Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco. Peter Parker fights a ›› “The Wolfman” 2010 Benicio Del Toro. A nobleman becomes (11:45) Lingerie ’ MAX 400 508 7 March” 2009 ‘R’ women navigate through complex relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å man who has mechanical tentacles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the embodiment of a terrible curse. ‘R’ ‘MA’ Å Frontier Force ‘14’ Wild Justice Thrill Killer ‘14’ Wild Justice ‘14’ Frontier Force ‘14’ Wild Justice Thrill Killer ‘14’ Wild Justice ‘14’ Explorer Narco State ‘14’ NGC 157 157 OddParents OddParents SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob OddParents OddParents Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Glenn Martin Iron Man Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. NTOON 89 115 189 Tracks, Africa The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Lethal Wild and Raw Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Best of West OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. iTV. Col. Claus Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Knowing” 2009, Science Fiction Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne. iTV Premiere. A note Strikeforce: Henderson vs. Sobral II (iTV) Dan Henderson vs. Renato “Babalu” SoSHO 500 500 von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å found in a time capsule predicts disastrous events. ‘PG-13’ bral; Robbie Lawler vs. Matt Lindland. From St. Louis. Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam SPEED 35 303 125 › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Brooklyn’s Finest” 2009, Crime Drama Richard Gere. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:20) District 9 ›› “Dear John” 2010, Romance Channing Tatum. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) “Nobel Son” 2007, Suspense Alan (5:50) “Below the Beltway” 2010 Tate Donovan. An operative ›› “Mercy” 2009 Scott Caan. Premiere. A writer pursues a › “Glass Trap” 2005 C. Thomas Howell. Giant ants corner (10:35) › “The Collector” 2009 Josh Stewart. A thief picks a bad TMC 525 525 Rickman, Shawn Hatosy. ’ ‘R’ romance with a critic who drubbed him. ‘R’ weekend workers in an office building. ‘PG-13’ night to break into a mansion. ’ ‘R’ Å tries to expose a senatorial sex scandal. ‘NR’ (4:00) College Football Washington at Washington State (Live) The T.Ocho Show Skiing Skiing Boxing ‘PG’ VS. 27 58 30 Downsized ‘PG’ Å Downsized (N) ‘G’ Å The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ Downsized ‘G’ Å The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ ››› “Baby Boom” 1987, Comedy Diane Keaton. ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY VFW BREAKFAST: Community champagne breakfast with fruit, coffee and more; $7.50; 8-10 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. CROOKED RIVER RANCH OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Includes visits with Santa, a parade, an illumination of the ranch Christmas tree and more; free; 10 a.m., 2 p.m. parade, 4:15 p.m. tree lighting; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-548-8939. I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association; $5 in advance, $6 at the door; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-330-3907. TEMPLE GRANDIN: The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Convention presents worldrenowned cattle care advocate Temple Grandin; $10; 10:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-3111. FESTIVAL OF TREES: The 27th annual event showcases decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and more; with music, refreshments and visits with Santa; proceeds benefit Redmond-Sisters Hospice; free daytime family festivities, $40 evening event; 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. family festivities, 5 p.m. evening gala, 7:30 p.m. tree auction; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-7483. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Take a photo of Santa Claus with your pet; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with donation to the Humane Society; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-923-8558. CIVIL WAR FOOTBALL GAME FUNDRAISER: Crook County Foundation hosts the civil war clash between the Ducks and the Beavers on Pine Theater’s big screen; games and tailgate party food included; $25; 11:30 a.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK FOR ARTHRITIS : Runners and walkers don festive holiday costumes for this yearly 5K run and walk; proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation; $20, $10 children 12 and younger; 9:30 a.m. registration, 11:30-11:45 a.m. races begin; downtown Bend; 503245-5695, klowry@arthritis.org or http://bendjinglebellrun.kintera.org. BEND CHRISTMAS PARADE: Parade theme is “Christmas Carols on Parade”; free; noon; downtown Bend; 541-388-3879. CIVIL WAR FUNDRAISER: Watch the Ducks and the Beavers clash on a big screen; proceeds benefit Ephesians Vision Ministries; $20; noon; Ephesians Vision Ministries, 711 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-323-2882. CIVIL WAR FUNDRAISER: Watch the civil war game with food, drinks and an auction; proceeds benefit New Generations Childhood Development Center; $40, $20 ages 17 and younger; noon; Mavericks at Sunriver, 18135 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-6135. HAT AND SCARF SEW-A-THON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541-383-1999. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org.

“STORYBOOK CHRISTMAS”: Bend Theatre for Young People presents Santa’s elves rewriting classic fairy tales with contemporary twists; $8, $3 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395, bendtheatre4youngpeople@gmail. com or www.bendtheatre.org. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. “THE NUTCRACKER”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 3 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. ART FOR INDIA: Fourth annual event features canvas art, an auction, slide show, live music and more; benefits underprivileged children in India; $10 with buffet, $5 concert only, free ages 9 and younger; 5 p.m., 8 p.m. concert; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@riseupinternational. com or www.riseupinternational.com. ST. FRANCIS CHRISTMAS FAIRE: A spaghetti dinner, with a silent auction, raffle and food sale; proceeds benefit St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church; free admission, $4-$22 for dinner; 5 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. LA PINE HOLIDAY LIGHTS PARADE: Conveyances of all types are decorated with lights; free; 6 p.m.; downtown La Pine; 541-536-9771 or director@lapine.org. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER”: Redmond School of Dance presents a Central Oregon version of the classic ballet; $5; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957. “THE NUTCRACKER”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. CONCRETE COWBOYS: Portlandbased country band performs; $3; 8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112. GRANT SABIN: The Colorado-based blues and indie folk act performs, with The Dela Project; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY PHOTOS WITH FRONTIER SANTA: Take pictures with a Victorian-era Father Christmas and listen to live music by the Thorn Hollow String Band; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $10 plus museum admission, $5 for museum members; 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER”: Redmond School of Dance presents the classic holiday ballet, in a style inspired by Central Oregon people and culture; $5; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or http:// redmondschoolofdance. com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837510. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs music by Leroy Anderson, Malcolm Arnold, and Percy Grainger under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-5931635 or www.cascadewinds.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Heyoka Merrifield talks about his works, with live music and screening of “Sundancing with the Muse”; $7; 2:305:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-323-1885. “THE NUTCRACKER”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at the door; $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at the door; 3 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com.

MONDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Year-end book party; bring a favorite book or two to share with the group; free; noon-1 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. HUMANE GOOSE MANAGEMENT: Screening of a film and discussion of nonlethal goose management practices; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-280-0802.

TUESDAY TOTALLY AWESOME ’80S HOLIDAY PARTY: Dress up in ’80s fashions, with music, dancing, food, a costume contest and more; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Serendipity West Foundation; $30; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-350-8201. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Blue Gold:

World Water Wars,” an awardwinning film about the world water crisis and the privatization of water; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY HANUKKAH ACTIVITY TIME: Books, songs and crafts to celebrate Hanukkah; for ages 3-6; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-633-7991. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Food Fight,” with a dessert potluck; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-504-4040 or slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. BELA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES: The bluegrass-jazz fusion act performs a holiday concert, with Alash; proceeds benefit KPOV; $33$47, with fees in advance; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. SURGERY AND RECOVERY PRESENTATION: Hear about Adam Craig’s ACL surgery and rehabilitation, with Q&A with elite cycling racers; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $5 or three cans of food; 7 p.m.; Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 S.W. Century Drive , Bend; 541-585-2540. YAMN: The trance-fusion band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:20, 9:45 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:35, 6:25, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:45, 6:35, 9:35 RED (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:55 SECRETARIAT (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45 DUE DATE (R) 2:05, 5:10, 8, 10:25 FASTER (R) 1:55, 5:05, 7:55, 10:20 HARRY POTTER AND THE

DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:15, 3:20, 6:30, 9:40 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (DP — PG-13) 12:40, 1:10, 3:50, 4:20, 7, 7:30, 10:10, 10:35 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:45, 10:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:55 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 1, 3:35, 6:20, 9:15 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 1:20, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG13) 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 10 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:30, 3:30, 6:35, 9:25 TANGLED (PG) 12:25, 4:05, 7:10, 9:35 TANGLED 3-D (PG) 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:05 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 1:40, 5, 7:50, 10:15 THE WARRIOR’S WAY (R) 1:30, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected

shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

FRIDAY BICYCLE ART WALK: An art walk featuring businesses displaying bike-themed art; 5-9 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.visitbend.com. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or http://bendpac.org.

MEGAMIND (PG) 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 TANGLED (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1, 4, 6:15, 8:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE TOWN (R) 6 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 9:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: The University of Oregon vs. Oregon State University football game will screen at 12:30 p.m. Saturday (doors open at 11:30 p.m.)

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 2:15, 5:30, 9

A&E’s ‘Hasselhoffs’: Another family where fame comes first By Hank Stuever The Washington Post

RUBBISH RENEWED ECO FASHION SHOW: Sustainable fashion show fusing environmental responsibility and funky fashion; proceeds benefit REALMS Charter School’s arts program; $10; 5 p.m. doors, 6 p.m. all ages, 8 p.m. ages 21 and older; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.realmschool.org. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. SPOKE-N-WORD: Storytelling forum as part of the Cross Culture arts festival celebrating bikes and art in Bend; free; 8:30 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541647-2233.

M T For Saturday, Dec. 4

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 3:45, 7 MORNING GLORY (PG13) 3, 5:30, 7:45 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) 3 TANGLED (PG) 3, 5:15, 7:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 5:30, 7:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: The Pine Theater is hosting a Civil War Football Game Fundraiser 12:30 p.m. Saturday . Doors open at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 and includes a barbecue lunch.

The disturbing ads for “The Hasselhoffs,” which premieres Sunday night on A&E, featured a toddler in red swim trunks running down the beach (in slo-mo “Baywatch”-style) and sporting a mat of fake chest hair. That’s a fairly obvious metaphor for what to expect from this dull and transparently desperate reality series: Some men really are just big babies. David Hasselhoff (“The Hoff,” danke very much) is not a fussy baby; he’s more of a gurgling, cooing, pleasant sort of baby who is nevertheless in a constant state of manly need. Thanks to his roles in “Knight Rider” and “Baywatch,” the actor-singer’s place in the ’80s/’90s wing of the Museum of Cheese is secure, and yet, over decades of lucrative B-listdom, the Hoff projects an odd sense of dopey vulnerability. He gabs a lot about his remarkable skills of perseverance and positive thinking, but it’s as if he only half-believes what he’s saying. A central preoccupation at the outset of “The Hasselhoffs” is the notorious home video that Hasselhoff’s daughter, Taylor-Ann, shot of the performer nearly four years ago, in which he is seen drunk out of his mind, sprawled on the floor of a Las Vegas hotel room, attempting to get a cheeseburger into his mouth. You’ve almost forgotten about it, but the Hoff hasn’t. The video, widely viewed online and mocked hither and yon, served as the wakeup call Taylor-Ann hoped it would, putting her father on a path to sobriety. Once you have been shamed like that, then the shame of starring in a reality TV show cannot sting, even if your show seems to be a parody of the genre, a la the still totally brilliant satire “The Comeback,” in which Lisa Kudrow played a washed-up TV star submitting to the reality-show process. “I’m starting over at 57,” Hasselhoff says in the first episode of his own “Comeback.” “Most of the money I made is gone.” In direct contrast to that statement, Hoff Manor itself seems jim-dandy — all the lights in the house are on; there are drivers, hotels, flights to catch. There is even regular work (judging “America’s Got Talent,” for example) and people pressing Hasselhoff for autographs wherever he goes. He reportedly made millions in “Baywatch” rerun syndication fees, a show in which he invested as well as starred. And, in one of the

‘The Hasselhoffs’ When: Two 30-minute episodes premiere at 10 p.m. Sunday Where: A&E

great examples of mediocrity getting lost in translation, he has enjoyed pop superstardom in Germany, selling millions of records. Soon enough, the real reason we’ve been beckoned to watch “The Hasselhoffs” becomes clear: His daughters wish to become celebrities now, and Daddy would love nothing more than to provide. If only “The Hasselhoffs” would just come right out and say so. What this family really wants is to have some of what the Kardashians (and innumerable others) are having, and no amount of pretend documentary scenes can wash away this cynical bid to get some. Taylor-Ann, now 20, is on the verge of dropping out of the University of Arizona and returning to Los Angeles, to start a rock band with her kid sister, Hayley. Meanwhile, Hayley, 18, is anxiously waiting to see if she’s going to get a part in a new TV show. The Hoff makes a half-hearted attempt to fly to Tucson and persuade Taylor-Ann to stick with her education. “The Hoff is a character, but I’m a dad,” he says. He warns his daughter about all the rejection that awaits her in show business. But then he gets to, uhhhh, thinking: “What if I’d played it safe?” the Hoff posits, during the show’s constant, insipid voice-over narration. “One thing’s for sure, I never would have become the German Elvis!” And so we see the Hoff and the young princesses (badly) act their way through a family struggle over “dreams.” If Hayley gets the TV show, then how will she have time to become part of a famous rock duo with her sister? Dreams cause tears: “This is my dreeeam,” one or both of the daughters repeatedly whine. “I want you to go for your dream, but what about my dream?”; “She has to follow her dreams,” and so on. “Do you know how much (expletive) I’ve been through in my life?” Taylor-Ann asks her father. “It can be a real hassle to be a Hoff,” he sighs. Just when psychiatrists have decided to strike narcissistic personality disorder from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (as reported last week in science journals), the Hasselhoffs make a clear case for reinstating it.

Associated Press ile photo

David Hasselhoff performs on “Dancing with the Stars.”


B4 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010: This year, your birthday falls on a New Moon, making new resolutions and beginnings unusually fortunate. This lunar gift adds to your personal charisma and energy, making 2011 a year not easily forgotten. If you could wish upon a star, what would you like to happen? Then you will understand which direction to head. If you are single, you easily could be enticed to change that status. Someone very interesting probably will be entering your life. If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy more quality time together. A fellow SAGITTARIUS is very different but has similar problems. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Nothing is forever. Scheduling one-on-one time might be a necessity, especially if traveling or visiting with others. A partner or friend feels left out and perhaps confused by the whirlwind around you. Be clear about your intentions. Tonight: Opt for a different experience. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Determining your plans could take some time, as you speak to different friends and family members. Opt to make very special time for a dear friend. On a one-on-one level, you relate with depth and clarity. Enjoy a leisurely meal around a favorite activity. Tonight: Be a duo.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Head to the gym, or get a few errands done this morning. Once you go out or clear out work, you will want to leave all that behind. Catch up with friends, and make time to visit with a special person. Tonight: Where the action is. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH What might have seemed like a perfect lazy day has you jumping through hoops by the afternoon. You might not believe how much you need to accomplish. Of course, you can always give yourself permission to say “no” and continue as you would like. Tonight: Just don’t push. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH How you start your day might be very different from what occurs. Your plans could transform. Never fear -- the going gets better and increasingly more fun. Allow the kid in you to reveal him- or herself one more time. Tonight: Be a wild thing. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Reach out for a neighbor or sibling this morning. Staying close to home could be more satisfying than running around. Invite a friend or two over. Many of you will get into a project you have been putting off. Tonight: At home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Know the balance in your checkbook as well as your financial landscape. Spontaneity takes over. You don’t want to leave anything up to mystery and have a problem later. Join a friend at a favorite spot or go off to a movie or a game. Tonight: Let it unfurl naturally.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Use the morning hours, when you have the most energy and vim and vigor. Later, you will want to relax or perhaps even be a tad lazy. Make it OK to not plan anything and just hang out wherever you want. Tonight: Your treat. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Though you are slow to start, you hit the finish line. This morning, you might want to veg, but by the afternoon, you are your sunny self. A decision or a new resolution you make will stick with the New Moon in your sign. Tonight: You are all smiles. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Use the morning to visit with a friend or do something important. Unexpected news tosses you into a new frame of mind. Vanish this afternoon. Remember, you don’t need to share everything. Tonight: Mum’s the word. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Check in with an older relative or friend you care about. Making plans with this person could prove to be quite fun. Don’t minimize the importance of another friend. You might want to mix it up. Tonight: Where the party is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Take off this morning; if you are planning a mini-trip, take off ASAP. If you hang at home too long or where people know to find you, you could be doing someone a favor or filling in at work. Tonight: A force to behold. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

ABC News taps former ‘GMA’ producer Sherwood as president said Anne Sweeney, co-chair of Disney Media Networks and NEW YORK — ABC News president of Disney/ABC Telehas tapped a former executive vision Group, in a statement. producer of “Good Morning “While at ABC News, he delivered GMA’s two most successAmerica” as its new president. ful seasons in history, Ben Sherwood, who and guided prize-winspent many years toilning coverage of some ing at ABC News of the biggest stories of before becoming an the day.” author and Internet Sherwood left “Good entrepreneur, will Morning America” in succeed David Wes2006 to write books. He tin, who announced is the author of two novin September that he would step down at Ben Sherwood els, 2000’s “The Man Who Ate the 747” and the end of the year. 2004’s “The Death and “Ben combines an intimate knowledge and success Life of Charlie St. Cloud,” as well in the news business with a cre- as the 2009 book, “The Survivors ative flair and entrepreneurial Club: The Secrets and Science spirit that are second to none,” that Could Save Your Life.”

By Melissa Maerz Los Angeles Times

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Chris Beland, center, leads his band through a rehearsal Tuesday for his CD-release show Friday at The Kilns Bookstore in Bend.

Beland

On the Web To listen to songs from Chris Beland’s new album, visit www. bendbulletin.com/frequency

Continued from B1 Chris never had much of a relationship with the man he thought was his biological father. He said earlier this week he has met the fully, as evidenced by their many man a few times, and “shied away friendly Facebook comments. from getting to know him.” But the key component of this Chris took an early interest in happy story is that a son knows music; he remembers enjoying his father, and a father knows his the sound of a record player’s son. And both finally feel more needle against a vinyl LP while complete than they did before. wearing “footie pajamas.” He “It’s life-changing,” Chris said. learned to play guitar at age 11, “I feel like I’ve gotten my other wrote songs at 13, and started a leg. I feel like I’ve been crippled punk band at 14. By 15, he was my whole life, and I finally feel a father himself. He married his whole.” son’s mother and moved out of That feeling couldn’t have the house. come at a better time, he said. Over the next several years, “I can be on the rock bottom Chris grew up fast. He eventually and still be smiling because I’m divorced his first wife, met and just so happy,” Chris said. “This married his current wife, Annie, has changed my perspective. No and had three more children. Fed matter how hard life gets, I’ve up with their lifestyle in Califorcome to this turn in my life where nia, the family moved to Bend six things are making sense. years ago after Chris got a job “It’s been a rough year,” he over the phone as a kidney disaid, “but it’s been the best year alysis tech at a medical clinic in at the same time.” town. Submitted photo For John, the past couple of Throughout his life, Chris has John Beland, left, performs with Ricky Nelson in the late 1970s, months have been an unexpecthad a “deep-rooted need to know right around the time Beland met Barbara Chabot. ed highlight of a lifetime packed where he’s from,” said his mothwith triumphs. er. So last spring, when he asked “Just when you think you’ve her for contact information for preparing to go to Australia to pro- from you. If anything, I just want experienced about all you could the man he thought was his dad, duce a record, watched video of to have a friendship with you and in the world, something like this she handed it over. Chris and saw the face of his own get to know you.’ ” comes along and everything else Chris said he reached out not to father. He tracked down Chris’ He describes Beland’s reply as pales,” he said. “I’ve achieved build a relationship, but to learn Facebook profile, “friended” him “the sweetest” e-mail: “He’s like, a lot in the music business over about that side of his family, its on Sept. 21, and began reading ‘If you’re my son, I’d be the most the years, and I’m thankful for health history and genetic make- his updates, his interaction with blessed person in the world. And that, but those were all fleeting up, and anything else he Annie, and com- if you’re not, then you’ve gained moments. might need to know for ments from his a friend for life.’ ” “People have a hard time underhis kids’ sake. The prospect of gaining Chris standing that all that stuff — Dol“I’m so happy. friends and family. The two men decided to also visited as a son made John Beland ecstat- ly Parton and Ricky Nelson, doing I’m at peace. Beland put to rest long-standing Chris’ MySpace ic. He agreed to a paternity test, TV, traveling around the world in uncertainty as to whether I feel like God page and read his which came back positive a week jets, staying at big hotels, doing they were truly father and answered my bio, picking up on later, setting off a celebration in an Carnegie Hall — all that stuff son. A paternity test came several phrases Australian recording studio and a was all wonderful, but they were back negative. And Chris prayers.” that sounded just wave of relief for a young man in really just fleeting moments. But returned to his mother, like something he Bend, Oregon, not to mention his a situation like this is something — Barbara Chabot would say. looking for answers. mom in Colorado. that will stay with me for the rest “I thought I was going Soon, he began “I’m so happy. I’m at peace. of my life. So just when you think to go to my grave not knowing commenting on Chris’ Face- I feel like God answered my life couldn’t offer much more than who my dad is,” Chris said ear- book page, complimenting his prayers,” Barbara said. what you’ve experilier this week. music and offering guidance on “Chris has not just a enced, along comes manufacturing CDs and staging father figure, but a “I feel like I’ve this gigantic thing release show, but never hinting friend, and someone been crippled that makes everyEncouraging from afar athat the advice might be from fa- he can respect and thing else just look so From the moment he was born, ther to son. talk to. In 100 different my whole life, unimportant.” Chris was the “calmest, sweet“He had already gone through ways, I feel this weight and I finally est” kid, Barbara said. so many years of disappoint- off my shoulders. It has Meeting for “God gave me this perfect ments and wondering where been an albatross my feel whole.” the first time child,” she said. “We called him he came from, if it had gone the whole life, and it’s hard — Chris Beland ‘Casual Chris.’ That was on his other way, it would’ve been a tre- to float when you’re Chris is in the pro(birthday cakes when he was 2 mendous letdown for him,” Be- got this weight pulling cess of legally changand 3 years old) … because he land said. “So I just approached you down. I feel like somebody ing his last name from Chabot to was so cool about everything.” him as a friend.” just cut that off and I don’t have to Beland to formally recognize his In the wake of the negative On Sept. 22, Beland wrote on carry it anymore.” new relationship with John. And paternity test, however, Chris Chris’ Facebook profile: “Really on Monday, father and son will was not so cool. He was agitated, nice stuff … good picking and meet for the first time after John’s unsure if he would ever know his very heartfelt writing. Good luck ‘I finally feel whole’ plane lands at Redmond Municireal father. And Barbara didn’t with your music, John Beland.” “(When I got the results,) my pal Airport. When Chris schedknow what to tell him, until her Chris replied: “Thanks for the jaw dropped,” John Beland said. uled his CD-release show, John sister reminded her of a night in encouragement!” “It was obviously very emotional, “couldn’t stay away,” he said. 1978, when she got a baby sitter but also very exciting, (and) I felt Both men are excited and nerand set off into the night to be a real need to make up for all of vous about the meeting. young and have fun during what A connection is made those years that he spent not “I think it’s going to be one of she now calls a “very traumatic “Some random guy, he’s in knowing, and all the years that those times when you have to time” of her life. Australia, and he writes me these he spent (without) a real father. I kind of hop on the surfboard and That night, she watched Ricky comments about how he likes my felt bad that we both missed those push your way into the waves,” Nelson perform, and after the music and he bought my album, years, but I picked up the phone John said. “However it goes, it’s show, she got to hang out back- and I’m like, ‘Oh cool, thanks for and called him, and it was a bit of going to be a very loving and stage with Nelson’s guitar play- listening,’ ” Chris said. “Before I a hard call to make because, you wonderful time. er, John Beland, where the two even knew any of this know, where do you “This is going to be one amazdrank beers and played guitar. was going on, he knew. start?” ing Christmas for me, and I hope She doesn’t remember what hap- He and my mom were “This is going Chris soon found it is for Chris, too,” he said. pened after that. talking. So when she to be one out that his father Instead of letting the intense Her fuzzy memory newly called me and told me knew just how to start. emotions of the coming moment stoked, Barbara hit the Internet that John Beland might amazing He and John talked get to him, Chris is choosing to to search for Beland, worried be my dad, I was like, Christmas for hours. “He’s really put his wry sense of humor on that he had died in the plane ‘The guy on Facebook?’ funny,” Chris said. “He display. crash that killed Nelson in 1985 “I went online and I for me, and I has the gift of gab.” “I am going to see my Dad and that Chris would never get looked up pictures of hope it is for Chris learned he has for the first time face to face in the answers he wanted. But him, and I was seeing other siblings all over 4 days,” read his Facebook stashe found him alive and well in myself in all these pic- Chris, too.” the country, including tus on Thursday night. “I might Texas. She sent him an e-mail, tures,” Chris said. “It — John Beland a sister in New York he stand at the airport with a cardassuring him she didn’t want was the weirdest thing now talks to regularly, board sign that says ‘DAD.’ ” anything from him, but simply to ever. So I wrote him and a younger brother let him know that he might have and I said, ‘Dude, I know about with whom he has “really connectBen Salmon can be a son in Oregon. you now, and I just want you to ed,” he said. Plus there is a gang of reached at 541-383-0377 or That’s when Beland, who was know that I don’t want anything Belands who have embraced him bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

Sunriver music fest to host wine tasting

Christian women set holiday luncheon

The Sunriver Music Festival will host a wine tasting of five Sunriver Music Festival-labeled wines from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday. Whybra Vineyards owner Steve Whybra will be on hand at the event, which will feature wines from Whybra, Eola Hills and Duck Pond. Admission is $5 and includes five wines to sample, a $5 gift certificate good for purchase that evening of any festival item, such as wine, wineglasses, baseball caps and more. The wine tasting will be held at the Sunriver Music Festival office, located in Building 25 of the Village at Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-1084, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org.

The Bend Christian Women’s Connection will hold a Christmas Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Awbrey Glen Restaurant, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend. The event will feature speaker Jan Mathers, who will talk about calming Christmas crazies. Admission is $15, and reservations must be made by Monday. Contact: Patty at 541-388-7435 or Kay at 541-382-7573.

SPOTLIGHT

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Monday, December 20, 2010 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationallyrecognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

Advertising space reservation deadline is Monday, December 6, 2010 CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ____________________________________________ Contact Person ____________________________________________________ Phone________________________E-mail ______________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________


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Inside

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OREGON Governor considers clemency applications, see Page C2. BUSINESS Bank of the Cascades taps 7 federal loans, see Page C3. OBITUARIES New York restaurateur dies at 81, see Page C7.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2010

Cannabis Chamber to market entire county as destination centers raise legal questions JEFFERSON COUNTY

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

When Holli Van Wert, executive director of the Madras-Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, first heard the idea, she laughed a little. But then she couldn’t stop thinking about the possibility: Instead of developing new destination resorts, why not market the entire county as one? “Jefferson County needs to be the destination,” Van Wert said during a Jefferson County Commission meeting. “We have everything.” In 2009, Gov. Ted Kulongoski signed a bill banning large-scale development in the Metolius River Basin. The bill killed two proposed destination resorts in the area that county officials were hoping would be developed.

“One study I saw (described) tourism as the gateway drug. You got to an area, you like it and you have a taste of it and need more. And you want to make your life happen in that area.” — Jon Skidmore, Jefferson County Planning Department Now, the county is starting over and creating new maps to show destination resort-eligible land. While the county is continuing to pursue its mapping of the east side for future potential resorts, it is also considering what currently exists in Jefferson County that could bring tourists to the area. “The idea here, and obviously it’s in it’s infancy: Would it be worth the county’s while to better inventory what type of recreational assets we

do have here?” said Jon Skidmore with the Jefferson County Planning Department. Skidmore said if the county determined all the recreational opportunities in Jefferson County — from Lake Billy Chinook to Camp Sherman to all the festivals, like the Crawdad and Woodpecker festivals — it would be easier to market the county’s resources. Plus, the county would then know what else it could create or

develop to attract more people to the area. Skidmore said a large percentage of people who relocate to smaller communities recreated in the area first. “One study I saw (described) tourism as the gateway drug,” Skidmore said. “You got to an area, you like it and you have a taste of it and need more. And you want to make your life happen in that area.” Skidmore proposed creating an “amenities coalition” to take a look at the county’s offerings and identify projects that would help support the strategy. He pointed out several projects that have already been tossed around, including creating a trail for cyclists from Camp Sherman all the way to Lake Billy Chinook. See Jefferson / C7

Success of Portland clubs inspires some locals, but neighbors voice worries By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Lights on the water

Bend’s first-ever cannabis club opening on North East Division Street next week has some of its neighbors concerned about their businesses and confused about how such a thing can exist after voters rejected Measure 74, which would have allowed for medical marijuana dispensaries. The Central Oregon Alternative Therapy Club LLC, plans to charge medical marijuana cardholders a monthly membership fee so they can have access to the facility. Once inside, those individuals can ex- “I think that once change marijuana the smoke clears with each other or get it from the club for a that the truth will donation. come out and that A delivery service will also be available it won’t have an for prequalified mem- affect on tenants. bers of the club who live in Bend, La Pine My goal is to be and Redmond. able to do this But while the manand provide a ager of COAT, Chris Smith, says the club liaison opportunity is legally sound and for patient filling a much-needed gap for Central Or- interactions and to egonians who use keep a low profile.” marijuana as medicine, his soon-to-be — Chris Smith, neighbors are wor- manager, Central Oregon ried it will cast a Alternative Therapy Club negative light on their businesses. “I am very concerned about the perception of having medical marijuana next door,” said Kathleen Chabot, a co-owner of ARCPoint, which does drug and DNA testing for employment screening. “Now, by proximity, we’re associated with this.” She said she thinks her clientele, which includes people in aviation and government, might not want to use her services anymore because the club is so close.

Drug-free workplace

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Two decorated boaters paddle underneath a footbridge lined with parade watchers in Drake Park on Friday night during the annual Christmas kayakers float on Mirror Pond.

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

ODOT dispute may raise path’s price tag By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

“Some of the design standards pointed more toward recreation than transportation, and that’s part of the reason we raised these issues.” — Sheila Lyon, manager, ODOT pedestrian and bicycle program

Transportation route

Existing river trail Revere Ave.

Proposed bridge location

Proposed parking Linster Rd.

Proposed trail

De sc hu tes St eid lR d.

Source: Bend Metro Park and Recreation District

Bend Riverside Motel

er Riv

To function as a transportation route and qualify for the ODOT grant, Lyons said the trail extension should meet minimum design standards to accommodate

people with disabilities. Given the district’s extensive use of paver bricks on other pathways, and the city’s costly Americans with Disabilities Act settlement, Lyons sought clarification on the district’s design plans. “The money is geared toward transportation facilities, and is this a recreational facility or a transportation facility?” she said. “And certainly, some of the design standards pointed more toward recreation than transportation, and that’s part of the reason we raised these issues.” See Trail / C7

Harriman St.

Two months later, Sheila Lyons, manager of ODOT’s pedestrian and bicycle program, put the brakes on the application. Citing concerns about wheelchair accessibility, Lyons questioned the width of the proposed trail and bridge, and the possible use of paver bricks to build the trail.

Trail extension Differences of opinion between ODOT and the Bend Park & Recreation District have delayed planning of an extension of the Deschutes River Trail that would link Pioneer Park with First Street Rapids. The locations shown below are approximate.

t.

A months-long disagreement between the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Bend Park & Recreation District over the latter’s application for a $79,000 grant has been resolved, but the difference of opinion could leave district taxpayers footing a bigger slice of the bill to expand the Deschutes River Trail. In April, ODOT approved the park district’s grant application, which was to be used to conduct design work for a new section of the river trail. The proposed segment would run north from Pioneer Park on the east side of the river, cross the river on a bridge near the First Street Rapids, and connect with the existing trail on the west side.

First S

Two Bend residents who allegedly sold securities without a license, stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from people who wanted to open franchises and made false statements about their wellness center company have been charged with more than 40 counts of financial crimes. Todd Andrew Surgeon Sr., 40, and Laurie Jeanne Rose, 42, the owners of Surgeons Inc., were arrested this week following a nine-month investigation. According to Lt. Ben Gregory of the Bend Police Department, the case began with a complaint from a person who reportedly wanted to open a wellness cen-

ter — and lost $49,000 when Surgeon and Rose allegedly failed to deliver on their promises. Investigators turned up evidence of other financial crimes involving at least 10 victims. Late last month, a Deschutes County grand jury indicted Surgeon on 45 counts, including aggravated theft, issuing a false financial statement, securities fraud and identity theft. Rose was indicted on 20 counts of financial crimes, including aggravated theft. On Friday, Surgeon and Rose, who live together as a couple but are not married, both appeared in court through a video link from the Deschutes County jail. See Surgeons Inc. / C7

DESCHUTES RIVER TRAIL

St Da eid m l

Wellness promoters charged with array of financial crimes

The branch manager of FlexForce Staffing next door, Claudia Hamilton, has some of the same concerns about her clients, especially since she assures her business is a drug-free workplace. “You’re in association with those that are in your area,” she said. “How would you feel when that moves in next door to you?” While both Chabot and Hamilton said they wouldn’t mind if the club were located elsewhere, even across the street, they feel like it sounds a lot like what voters turned down in November. Measure 74 would have created state-regulated dispensaries where cardholders could simply walk in and buy marijuana, something that is currently illegal under Oregon’s medical cannabis law. See Marijuana / C7

Existing trail Pioneer Park

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


C2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Kulongoski weighs clemency requests Unstable neon landmark By Anna Canzano The Associated Press

PORTLAND — As Gov. Ted Kulongoski finishes his time in office, he holds in his hands the fate of more than 60 convicted criminals. They’ve applied for clemency in the hope the governor will forgive their crimes. One of those who had hoped for a pardon was Wendy Maldonado. She confessed to a 9-1-1 dispatcher in 2005 that she killed her husband, Aaron, by hitting him over the head with a hammer. She also told the dispatcher that her husband hurt her “every (deleted) day of my life.� Kulongoski, however, denied her request for clemency Thursday afternoon. Her supporters said they will try again. Maldonado’s violent act and conviction, along with her then16-year-old son, Randy — who was also denied clemency Thursday — were detailed in a documentary shown on HBO. The piece included comments from an Oregon judge who was bound by Measure 11 sentencing guidelines but was clearly aware of her claim she was a battered wife. “I can’t imagine a wife would kill her husband or a son would kill his father in cold blood unless this background existed,� the judge said. “He (the judge) feels she has a

case to take to the Oregon Legislature to expand the definition of justifiable homicide,� said Terrie Quinteros with the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. Quinteros was among those advocating for Wendy and Randy’s release. “It would be a gift of mercy from the governor if he allowed this family to be reunited so that they can focus together as a family unit to heal,� she said. Similar appeals are being made on behalf of other offenders, some of whom have made big news.

Panty thief seeks commuted sentence Panty thief Sung Koo Kim is hoping to get his 11-year sentence reduced. He believes he was punished unfairly for his underwear thefts due to the mistaken connection investigators made between him and the disappearance of college student Brooke Wilberger. Kim was eventually cleared in her case, with Joel Courtney pleading guilty to her murder last year. Kim has already served six years behind bars. Also on the list of clemency applications is Edward Morris. He shot and stabbed his pregnant wife and their three children and then dumped their bodies in the Tillamook Forest.

“I calculate that it’s going to cost taxpayers more than 40 million dollars if I live out my life in prison,� he said after his November 2004 sentencing. And then there is Bradley Price, one of the two notorious Seaside thrill killers of the 1990s. He and his best friend, Jesse McAllister, were convicted of murdering a couple watching the sunrise on the beach. The governor hasn’t pardoned or commuted any killers. In fact, he hasn’t granted clemency to many offenders at all. Of the 735 people who have sought his help, 66 have received clemency and nearly 600 have been denied. Of the 66 applications granted, 44 have had their sentences commuted by the governor under House Bill 3508. It means they were in the United States illegally when they committed nonviolent crimes and agreed to be deported and not return. According to the governor’s office, Kulongoski only grants clemencies in what he considers extraordinary circumstances, like for someone who needs it to continue serving in the military, for someone who is going to lose a job or for someone who can’t get a job because of an old conviction. Kulongoski says he takes the responsibility very seriously and meets with the applicant because it is the only power he has that is not reviewed by the court.

N  R POLICE LOG

of Southwest Cascade Vista Drive.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:21 a.m. Dec. 2, in the area of Southeast Fifth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:45 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of State Highway 126 West. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:24 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of Southeast Fifth Street.

Prineville Police Department

Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:23 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 1200 block of Northwest Upas Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:34 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of Southwest 17th Street and Southwest Quartz Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:42 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 2900 block of Southwest Salmon Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:21 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 2100 block of Southwest Salmon Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:55 a.m. Dec. 2, in the 500 block of Southwest Fifth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:42 a.m. Dec. 2, in the 3200 block

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:12 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 147 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:32 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of Cline Falls Road near milepost 9 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:59 p.m. Dec. 2, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 164 in La Pine. DUII — Josiah D. Smith, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:50 a.m. Dec. 2, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Highland Avenue in Redmond.

Oregon State Police

DUII — Bonni L. Saunders, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:20 p.m. Dec. 1, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Brosterhous Road in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 19 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pit Bull and Australian Cattle Dog mix — Adult male, black and white; found near West Adams Avenue in Sisters.

FDR orders dismantling of WPA in 1942 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Dec. 4, the 338th day of 2010. There are 27 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 4, 1783, Gen. George Washington bade farewell to his Continental Army officers at Fraunces Tavern in New York, telling them, “With a heart full of love and gratitude I now take leave of you.� ON THIS DATE In 1619, settlers from Bristol, England, arrived at Berkeley Hundred in present-day Charles City County, Va. In 1816, James Monroe of Virginia was elected the fifth president of the United States. In 1875, William Marcy Tweed, the “Boss� of New York City’s Tammany Hall political organization, escaped from jail and fled the country. In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson left Washington on a trip to France to attend the Versailles Peace Conference. In 1942, U.S. bombers struck the Italian mainland for the first time in World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the dismantling of the Works Progress Administration, which had been created to provide jobs during the Depression. In 1965, the United States launched Gemini 7 with Air Force Lt. Col. Frank Borman and Navy Cmdr. James Lovell aboard. In 1978, San Francisco got its first female mayor as City Supervisor Dianne Feinstein was named to replace the assassinated George Moscone. In 1980, the bodies of four American churchwomen slain in El Salvador two days earlier were unearthed. (Five Salvadoran national guardsmen were later convicted of murdering nuns Ita

T O D AY I N HISTORY Ford, Maura Clarke and Dorothy Kazel, and lay worker Jean Donovan.) In 1984, a five-day hijack drama began as four armed men seized a Kuwaiti airliner en route to Pakistan and forced it to land in Tehran, where the hijackers killed American passenger Charles Hegna. In 1996, the Mars Pathfinder lifted off from Cape Canaveral and began speeding toward Mars on a 310 million-mile odyssey. (It arrived on Mars in July 1997.) TEN YEARS AGO In a pair of legal setbacks for Al Gore, a Florida state judge refused to overturn George W. Bush’s certified victory in Florida and the U.S. Supreme Court set aside a ruling that had allowed manual recounts. PepsiCo agreed to pay $13.4 billion to acquire Quaker Oats. European Union farm ministers approved a six-month ban on animal products in fodder, part of an extraordinary plan to stem growing panic over mad cow disease. FIVE YEARS AGO Members of the former September 11th commission said the U.S. was at great risk for more terrorist attacks because Congress and the White House had failed to enact several strong security measures. Show business legends Robert Redford, Tina Turner, Tony Bennett, Julie Harris and ballerina Suzanne Farrell headlined the annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C. Croatia won its first Davis Cup title. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama began putting the finishing touches

on a fresh job creation proposal, telling a community college crowd in Allentown, Pa., “I still consider one job lost one job too many.� Gunmen and a suicide bomber attacked a mosque in a military installation in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, killing 35. Paula Hawkins, a Republican who in 1980 became the first woman elected to a full U.S. Senate term without a family political connection, died in Orlando, Fla. at age 82. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress-singer Deanna Durbin is 89. Game show host Wink Martindale is 77. Pop singer Freddy Cannon is 74. Actor-producer Max Baer Jr. is 73. Actress Gemma Jones is 68. Rock musician Bob Mosley (Moby Grape) is 68. Singer-musician Chris Hillman is 66. Musician Terry Woods (The Pogues) is 63. Rock singer Southside Johnny Lyon is 62. Actor Jeff Bridges is 61. Rock musician Gary Rossington (Lynyrd Skynyrd; the Rossington Collins Band) is 59. Actress Patricia Wettig is 59. Actor Tony Todd is 56. Jazz singer Cassandra Wilson is 55. Country musician Brian Prout (Diamond Rio) is 55. Rock musician Bob Griffin (The BoDeans) is 51. Rock singer Vinnie Dombroski (Sponge) is 48. Actress Marisa Tomei is 46. Actress Chelsea Noble is 46. Actor-comedian Fred Armisen is 44. Rapper Jay-Z is 41. Actor Kevin Sussman is 40. Actressmodel Tyra Banks is 37. Country singer Lila McCann is 29. Actress Lindsay Felton is 26. Actor Orlando Brown is 23. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “There’s much to be said for challenging fate instead of ducking behind it.� — Diana Trilling, American author and literary critic (1905-1996)

awaits decision on return By Jessica Musicar The Associated Press

NORTH BEND — It seems everything is up in the air when it comes to the North Bend welcome sign — except for the sign itself. Just before Thanksgiving, a crew removed the deteriorating sign from the entrance to North Bend, where it had straddled U.S. Highway 101 for more than 70 years. The neon sign was taken to the North Bend Fire Department’s station at Southwest Oregon Regional Airport, where it will remain until decisions are made about its future, said Fire Chief Scott Graham. North Bend City Council hasn’t decided whether to refurbish or replace it, but Gra-

ham guaranteed North Benders won’t lose their landmark. Mayor Rick Wetherell said many other decisions about the sign haven’t been made, including whether it will return to the same spot or be moved closer to the McCullough Bridge, if its towers will be replaced, and what the city must do to bring it up to modern standards. “The first thing was to get it down,� Wetherell said. If the sign’s pylon footings prove solid, North Benders could find it back in its historical home. Determinations likely will be made in coming weeks, but Graham estimated it could take at least two months for the sign to be reinstalled. He heads the “Welcome to

North Bend� sign project group that includes with North Bend Parks Supervisor Bryan Owen, fire department staff, and area businesses. According to an e-mail from City Administrator Jan Willis to city councilors, Graham has consulted several engineers and a sign shop, and is researching the sign’s history through old photographs. City officials first became aware of issues with the stability of the sign while considering replacing its burned-out neon lettering with LEDs. They noticed that the sign itself and its supporting pylons needed repairs. After consulting engineers said the sign could threaten public safety, the city decided to take the sign down.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Bend teen arrested in school burglary A 17-year-old Bend boy was arrested early Friday morning after police were called to a burglary in progress at a northeast Bend apartment being leased by Bend-La Pine Schools as a transitional school. About 3:30 a.m., a neighbor called to report suspicious activity in the building on Northeast Forum Drive, according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. Police officers who responded to the call saw a person standing in the parking lot — and then take off running once he spotted the officers. Police caught up with the person, who was identified as Adrin Michael Cruz. Officers found evidence, including shoe prints in the snow, linking Cruz to the burglary. Several items were taken from the apartment, including computer equipment and kitchen supplies, the release said. Cruz was taken to the Deschutes County Juvenile Department, where he was being held on suspicion of second-degree burglary.

Driver arrested after car chase A 19-year-old Bend man who tried to speed away from police before crashing his car was arrested Friday morning near the intersection of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive and Northeast 27th Street. The chase began about 2 a.m., after a Bend police officer spotted a tan Volvo passenger car without its lights on heading south on Southeast Fifth Street near Southeast Wilson Avenue. The officer believed the driver may have been impaired and tried to stop the Volvo, according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. The driver of the Volvo did not pull over, and instead sped

away, heading east on Southeast Wilson Avenue. The driver lost control in the roundabout at Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Bear Creek Road and then kept heading east, running three stoplights before crashing. The driver, Acea Lee Anderson, was arrested and taken to the Deschutes County jail on suspicion of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, attempting to elude, reckless driving, reckless endangering and failure to perform the duties of a driver. Anderson also had a warrant out for his arrest and had violated his parole. A passenger in the car was not cited or charged with any crime.

Sisters Council to vote on water rate bump The Sisters City Council is scheduled to vote Thursday on a proposed increase to water rates. The city has been considering a rate bump for several months, debating approaches to make up for projected shortfalls in the water fund. In the current proposal, the base usage amount would be reduced from 1,337 cubic feet of water to 1,000 cubic feet — or, 7,480 gallons. The average home in Sisters uses about 500 cubic feet during the winter months, according to a city news release. If the council approves the proposal, Sisters will charge more of customers whose water usage is over the base amount. Currently, if a customer uses more than the base amount, Sisters charges $1.32 for every 1,000 gallons of water. Under the proposed changes, the overage rate will be $1.64 per 1,000 gallons, according to the news release. Some water rates, though, will decrease under the plan. Depending on the size of a customer’s water pipe, the monthly charge will range from Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

$18.59 to $56.96 for base usage. Mostly, those rates represent a decrease. For instance, the city will charge $18.59, down from the current $19.80, for a 3â „4-inch pipe. Only the rate on a 2-inch pipe will increase, going from $24.60 a month to $24.93, the release said. With the rate changes, Sisters projects it will have an 8 percent increase in water revenues, enough to keep the water fund in the black.

Juniper Ridge wraps up zoning hearing A 256-acre business zone in Bend’s 1,800-acre Juniper Ridge development on the northeast side of the city is one step closer to being subdivided. On Thursday, no appeals were lodged during a hearing that was held to zone that portion of land for light industrial use. A hearings officer will now review the record and make a determination on whether the zoning will be approved within the next 21 days. After that, the city will be able to begin the process of subdividing the land into parcels that can then be sold. Since fiscal year 2005-2006, the city of Bend has spent nearly $20 million on Juniper Ridge, which is intended to be a mixedused community that includes residential neighborhoods and diverse employment opportunities. The city has earned about $9.5 million in land sales. The three businesses that have bought land in Juniper Ridge are Les Schwab, Suterra LLC and PacifiCorp.


C3

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,591.46 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +12.11 +.47%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Bend scores another monthly tourism gain Bend in October collected 10.2 percent more room-tax revenue than in October 2009, while collections in unincorporated Deschutes County declined 19.2 percent, according to data released Friday by Visit Bend, the city’s tourism-promotion agency. It was the 11th consecutive month of gains for the city and the county’s first decline since May. Since the start of the fiscal year on July 1, city room-tax collections are running 13.7 percent ahead of the same four months last year and the county is up 2.9 percent. Room-tax collections are considered the best indicator of activity in the tourism industry.

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11,382.09 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +19.68 +.17%

s

1,224.71 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +3.18 +.26%

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.01 treasury CHANGE +.33%

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$1405.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$16.90

Jobless rate rises to 9.8% in blow to recovery hopes Layoffs picked back up after having briefly subsided By Motoko Rich New York Times News Service

After several months of improvement, hiring by businesses slowed to a crawl in November, a development that is sure to intensify the debate over what can and should be done to reignite the economy. The United States added a total of just 39,000 jobs last month, down from an upwardly revised gain of 172,000 in October,

the Labor Department reported Friday. With local governments shedding jobs, the additions in the private sector were too small to reduce the ranks of the unemployed or even to keep pace with people entering the work force. The unemployment rate, which is based on a separate survey of households, rose to 9.8 percent in November. It was the highest jobless rate since April and up from 9.6

percent in October. The outlook remains bleak. More than 15 million people are out of work, among them 6.3 million who have been jobless for six months or longer. Many are about to exhaust their unemployment benefits, which have been extended repeatedly by the government because of the severity of the downturn. The latest snapshot of the labor market cast a pall over what had been a brightening picture of a steadying economy. See Jobs / C5

IRS mileage rates set The Internal Revenue Service on Friday announced increases in optional standard mileage rates for business-, medical- and moving-related driving for 2011. Starting Jan. 1, the rates will be: 51 cents a mile for driving pertaining to business, 19 cents a mile for driving for medical or moving purposes, and 14 cents a mile for driving in service of charitable organizations. That compares with rates of 50, 16.5 and 14 cents, respectively, in 2010. In setting the rates, the IRS considers the costs of insurance, depreciation and gasoline, among other factors. More information on the new rates is available at http://www. irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/rp-10-51.pdf.

New York Times News Service ile photo

Groupon rejects Google buyout offer

A member of the Pixar Studios balloon team takes a photo with an iPhone at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York last month. While smart phone sales in the United States continue to skyrocket, unit sales of point-and-shoot cameras fell nearly 16 percent from 2008.

The deal didn’t tip after all. Chicago-based Groupon Inc. has eschewed an acquisition offer from Google Inc. and is staying independent, according to two sources with direct knowledge of the situation. The two companies had been engaged in talks, with speculation about the corporate marriage reaching a fever pitch over the last week. Google had reportedly offered between $5 billion and $6 billion for the group-buying startup.

Phones getting all the exposure

Pfizer plans $75M fund to address ethics

While point-and-shoot cameras get left behind

Pfizer has agreed to set up a $75 million fund and to create a new compliance committee to settle shareholders’ lawsuits accusing the board and top officials of failing to stop illegal marketing of its drugs, according to a settlement agreement filed in U.S. District Court on Friday. The company denied any wrongdoing as part of the preliminary settlement, which is subject to judicial review. A Pfizer spokesman said the fund and committee would advance the regulatory and ethics work it had already started in recent years. — From staff and wire reports

By Sam Grobart New York Times News Service

Ariel Dunitz-Johnson, a 30-year-old illustrator in San Francisco, bought a point-and-shoot camera in May. In July, she bought a smart phone, with a camera built in. Soon, whenever she wanted to take a picture, she found herself reaching for the smart phone, a Droid Incredible. She barely uses her point-and-shoot, a Panasonic DMC-LX3. “It’s much easier to share those pictures with my friends,” she explained, through social networks or e-mail. “With my point-and-shoot, I have to plug it into my computer and upload the photos. It’s just a few more steps than I want to take.”

“When a camera of this type is always in your pocket, every moment seems like a potential photo op.” — Mark Romanek, film director and avid iPhone photographer The point-and-shoot camera, which has been a part of American households since 1900, when George Eastman introduced the Kodak Brownie, is endangered. Like other single-use devices — the answering machine, the desktop calculator, the Rolodex — it is being shoved aside by

a multipurpose device: the smart phone and its camera, which takes better snapshots with each new model. Cameras, mostly point-and-shoots, are still found in 82 percent of American households, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. But for many consumers, the point-and-shoot they have now may be the last they ever own as they favor the camera in their smart phone. It’s close at hand whenever a photo opportunity arises, and can be used to instantly e-mail and share pictures. And it has an expanding menu of photo apps, well beyond the landscape and panoramic settings on a point-and-shoot, that can be used to easily manipulate the images. See Cameras / C5

Home sales rise

Bank of America steps up efforts to help distressed borrowers modify mortgages

Pending U.S. home sales index Seasonally adjusted annual rate

120 110 100

89.3

By E. Scott Reckard Los Angeles Times

90 80 70 ON D J FMA MJ J A S O 2009 2010 Source: National Association of Realtors AP

LOS ANGELES — Bank of America Corp. told 2,500 mortgage origination staffers this week that they would be reassigned to loan modification duty, two weeks after the bank promised Congress to provide better service to distressed borrowers who sought help in avoiding foreclosure. The effort attempts to address a persistent complaint of borrowers caught in the 3-year-old foreclosure crisis: being

bounced from bank employee to employee as they tried to work out a way to stay in their homes, often being told different things about their case in each conversation along the way. Bank of America, the giant Charlotte, N.C., lender, became the largest servicer of home loans in 2008, when it acquired Calabasas, Calif.-based Countrywide Financial Corp., the aggressive No. 1 mortgage lender. Bank of America came under fire last month at a Senate Banking Committee

hearing into mortgage servicing, which is the business of billing, collecting payments and handling delinquencies and foreclosures on home loans. The bank’s mortgage chief, Barbara Desoer, said at the hearing that she was instituting a new “case officer” system so customers need no longer explain their situation to a different employee on every call. “We know this goes to the heart of many customer complaints that you have heard,” Desoer said.

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$29.241 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.699

Bank of the Cascades tapped Fed program for 7 loans By Tim Doran The Bulletin

As the nation’s financial system veered toward collapse in 2007 and 2008, the Federal Reserve created several emergency programs to stabilize financial markets, including providing short-term loans to banks. The Fed made more than 4,200 loans through the Term Auction Facility program to U.S. and foreign banks and institutions, including Bend-based Bank of the Cascades and two other Oregon banks, Eugene-based Pacific Continental and Medfordbased PremierWest, according to data released Wednesday by the agency. For community banks like Bank of the Cascades, however, borrowing short term via the Term Auction Facility program had no connection to the financial crisis, said Greg Newton, chief financial officer for Bank of the Cascades and its parent company, Cascade Bancorp. The program became another outlet for short-term loans that banks take out routinely while managing their liquidity, he said, ensuring they have access to enough money to meet requirements and demand. While information about Term Auction Facility and other programs has long been available, the names of individual bank and institutional borrowers became public on Wednesday, when the Fed released the data as required under the DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. See Loans / C5

U.S. reaches highly coveted trade deal with S. Korea By Julie Pace and Ken Thomas The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. and South Korea have reached an agreement on America’s largest trade pact in more than a decade, a highly coveted deal the Obama administration hopes will boost U.S. exports and create tens of thousands of jobs at home. After a week of marathon negotiations, representatives from both countries broke through a stalemate Friday morning on outstanding issues related to the automobile industry, which have been a sticking point in the talks. The agreement would be the largest U.S. trade deal since the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Canada and Mexico, and would bolster U.S. ties with the fastgrowing South Korea economy. South Korea is agreeing to allow the U.S. to lift a 2.5 percent tariff on Korean cars in five years, instead of cutting the tariff immediately. The agreement also allows each U.S. automaker to export 25,000 cars to South Korea as long as they meet U.S. federal safety standards and allows the U.S. to continue a 25 percent tariff on trucks for eight years and then phase it out by the 10th year. South Korea would be required to eliminate its 10 percent tariff on U.S. trucks immediately. President Barack Obama hailed the agreement as a “landmark trade deal” that would support at least 70,000 U.S. jobs. See Trade / C5


B

C4 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

USI N ESS

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 20.49 ABM 22.32 ACE Ltd 59.43 AES Corp 11.40 AFLAC 54.42 AGCO u46.16 AK Steel 14.10 AMB Pr u30.76 AMR 8.35 AT&T Inc 28.49 AU Optron 10.05 AbtLab 47.37 AberFitc u56.15 Accenture 44.22 AccretvH n 14.32 Actuant u25.72 AdvAuto 68.23 AMD 7.65 AdvSemi u5.29 AecomTch 27.26 AegeanMP d8.90 Aegon 6.03 Aeropostl s 23.09 Aetna 30.62 Agilent u37.48 Agnico g u85.03 Agrium g 84.31 AirProd u87.61 Airgas 66.26 AirTran 7.46 Albemarle u55.23 AlbertoC n 37.28 AlcatelLuc 2.95 Alcoa 14.23 Alcon 162.36 Alere 33.20 AlexREE 69.12 AllgEngy 23.24 AllegTch 54.36 Allergan 68.80 AlliData 68.18 AlliBInco 8.01 AlliantEgy 37.07 AldIrish .98 AllisChE u5.97 Allstate 30.31 AlphaNRs 54.24 AlpTotDiv 5.84 AlpAlerMLP 15.86 Altria 23.81 Amdocs 26.90 Ameren 29.23 Amerigrp 44.85 AMovilL 57.26 AmAxle 11.47 AmCampus 31.28 AEagleOut 15.78 AEP 35.99 AEqInvLf u11.99 AmExp 44.88 AmIntlGrp 43.76 AmTower 51.58 AmWtrWks u24.92 Ameriprise 54.14 AmeriBrgn 32.14 Ametek u60.55 Amphenol u52.93 Anadarko 69.08 AnalogDev u37.63 AnglogldA 49.87 ABInBev 58.02 AnnTaylr u26.64 Annaly 18.20 Anworth 7.10 Aon Corp 42.78 Apache u115.11 AptInv 25.18 ApldIndlT 30.78 AquaAm 21.58 ArcelorMit 34.90 ArchCoal u32.26 ArchDan 30.39 ArrowEl u33.69 ArvMerit u19.28 Ashland 52.67 AspenIns 29.12 AsdEstat 15.06 Assurant 36.68 AssuredG 18.82 AstoriaF 12.76 AstraZen 48.23 ATMOS u31.72 AtwoodOcn 37.50 AutoNatn u26.89 Autoliv u79.86 AvalonBay 114.44 AveryD 39.85 AvisBudg 14.54 Avnet 33.12 Avon 29.33 AXIS Cap u36.73 BB&T Cp 24.71 BCE g u35.05 BHP BillLt 88.67 BHPBil plc 76.61 BP PLC 41.49 BPZ Res 4.51 BRE 43.68 BRFBrasil s 16.09 BakrHu u55.06 Baldor u63.26 BallCp u68.85 BallyTech 42.01 BcBilVArg 10.80 BcoBrades 20.40 BcoSantand 11.23 BcoSBrasil 13.32 BcpSouth 13.78 BkofAm d11.86 BkAm wtB 2.48 BkIrelnd 1.84 BkNYMel 28.00 BankAtl A .80 Barclay 17.07 Bar iPVix rs d41.30 BarVixMdT 68.63 Bard 86.33 BarnesNob 13.28 BarrickG u54.00 Baxter 49.84 BeazerHm 4.53 BectDck u81.53 Belo 6.16 Bemis 32.75 Berkley 26.74 BerkH B s 80.90 BestBuy 42.83 BigLots 29.50 BioMedR 17.80 Bitauto n 11.90 BlkHillsCp 30.09 BlackRock 172.35 Blackstone 13.85 BlockHR 13.16 Boeing 66.54 Boise Inc 7.72 Borders 1.08 BorgWarn u66.43

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Name

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Chg Wkly

BostProp 86.19 BostonSci 6.83 BoydGm 9.77 Brandyw 11.15 BrasilTele 21.73 Brinker u21.65 BrMySq 25.91 BroadrdgF 22.16 BrkfldAs g 30.96 BrkfldPrp 17.04 BrwnBrn u23.44 Brunswick 17.33 Buckle 37.66 Buenavent 53.17 BungeLt 63.94 CB REllis 19.92 CBL Asc 17.49 CBS B 17.53 CF Inds 126.83 CIGNA 37.98 CIT Grp n 41.89 CMS Eng 18.62 CNO Fincl 6.25 CSX 64.41 CVR Engy u12.58 CVS Care 32.42 CablvsnNY u32.60 CabotO&G 37.69 CalDive 5.62 Calix n 15.23 CallonP h 5.96 Calpine 12.66 CamdnP 52.26 Cameco g 37.51 CameltInf n u23.31 Cameron u51.36 CampSp 34.06 CdnNRy g 66.86 CdnNRs gs u41.82 CapOne 38.76 CapitlSrce u6.74 CardnlHlth u37.24 CareFusion 23.00 CarMax u34.55 Carnival 43.29 Carters 32.58 Caterpillar u89.38 Celanese u39.48 Celestic g 9.26 Cemex 9.72 Cemig pf 17.83 CenovusE n u31.60 CenterPnt 15.90 CntryLink u43.43 Cenveo 5.75 ChRvLab 33.67 Chemtura n 14.73 ChesEng 22.16 Chevron 84.89 ChicB&I u30.60 Chicos 12.48 Chimera 4.10 ChinaEd d3.45 ChinaMble 50.40 ChinaSecur 5.19 ChinaUni 13.74 Chipotle u235.95 Chiquita d12.04 Chubb 58.63 Cimarex u86.83 CinciBell 2.52 Cinemark 18.60 Citigp pfN 26.49 Citigrp 4.45 CliffsNRs 73.58 Clorox 62.49 Coach u56.61 CobaltIEn n 12.45 CocaCE u25.49 CocaCl u64.50 Coeur 25.90 ColgPal 77.95 CollctvBrd 20.37 Comerica 39.58 CmclMtls 16.65 ComScop 31.69 CmtyHlt 32.16 CBD-Pao s u41.77 Compellent u27.51 CompPrdS u31.46 CompSci 47.10 ConAgra 22.08 ConchoRes u85.91 ConocPhil u63.92 ConsolEngy 45.42 ConEd 49.02 ConstellA u21.80 ConstellEn 28.80 CooperCo u53.55 Cooper Ind u56.11 CooperTire 22.51 CoreLogic 18.86 CornPdts u45.59 Corning 18.74 CorpOffP 34.57 CorrectnCp 25.56 Cosan Ltd 13.64 Cott Cp 8.40 CousPrp 7.71 CovantaH 16.02 CoventryH 26.50 Covidien 42.94 CredSuiss 39.79 CrwnCstle 42.28 CrownHold 32.31 Cummins u102.84 CurEuro 133.58 Cytec 51.15

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D-E-F DCT Indl DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds Deere DelMnte DeltaAir DenburyR DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt Dillards DrxTcBll s

5.10 +.08 +.16 25.62 -.03 -.04 11.11 +.19 +1.12 45.58 +.05 +.48 u16.16 +.25 +.97 44.58 +.08 +.61 u50.32 +.30 +.83 12.54 +.03 +.56 u74.09 -.02 +1.66 43.76 +.08 +.06 d7.31 +.02 -.06 78.31 +.01 +2.31 u18.74 -.03 -.09 13.63 +.12 -.60 19.52 +.12 +1.48 d52.20 +.85 +1.65 42.55 +1.70 +3.16 8.08 -.34 -.66 13.42 +.19 +.43 73.91 +.48 +2.97 d6.70 +1.91 +1.20 72.67 +.59 -.93 66.23 -.52 +.99 10.97 +.14 +.55 13.15 -.26 +.45 u35.95 +.07 +1.22 54.36 +.57 +2.52 u34.76 +.24 +2.81 43.00 +.40 +2.35

Name

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Chg Wkly

DrxEMBll s 39.04 DrSCBear rsd17.63 DrxEBear rsd25.66 DirEMBr rs 21.65 DirFnBear 10.90 DrxFBull s 24.44 Dir30TrBear 43.42 DrxREBll s 53.33 DirxSCBull 64.89 DirxLCBear d9.58 DirxLCBull 65.74 DirxEnBull u51.81 Discover 18.84 Disney 37.59 DollarGen 33.43 DomRescs 42.42 Dominos 14.85 DoralFncl 1.39 DEmmett 16.79 Dover u57.79 DowChm u33.36 DrPepSnap 37.64 DresserR u42.20 DuPont u49.24 DuPFabros 23.06 DukeEngy 17.79 DukeRlty 11.41 Dynegy rs 5.27 E-House 14.20 EMC Cp 22.13 EMCOR 28.13 ENI 42.33 EOG Res 93.74 EQT Corp 42.79 EastChm 82.06 EKodak 4.73 Eaton u99.64

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Name

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Fortress 4.92 -.02 +.23 FortuneBr u61.50 +.03 +2.71 FranceTel 21.35 +.25 -.17 FrankRes 120.02 +.05 +5.99 FMCG u108.95 +1.31+11.03 FrontierCm u9.46 +.07 +.36 FrontierOil u16.55 +.22 +1.07 Frontline 26.05 +.17 ...

G-H-I GMX Rs 5.05 Gafisa s 14.60 GameStop 21.33 GamGld g 7.79 Gannett 14.65 Gap 21.44 GencoShip 15.27 GnCable u35.13 GenDynam 67.58 GenElec 16.78 GenGrPr n u15.94 GenMarit 3.79 GenMills s 35.61 GenMot n d34.55 GM cvpfB 51.31 Genpact 14.81 GenuPrt u50.06 Genworth 12.55 Gerdau d12.77 Gildan 28.87 GlaxoSKln 39.19 GlobalCash d2.53 GlobPay 42.76 GlbXSilvM u26.09 GolLinhas 16.99 GoldFLtd u18.12 Goldcrp g 47.07

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Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios Navistar NY CmtyB NY Times Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nordstrm NorflkSo NoestUt NorthropG Novartis Nucor OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer

Last

Chg Wkly

13.92 29.05 23.59 u30.91 d1.83 u65.29 44.35 63.00 27.19 14.77 35.42 5.44 u58.65 17.30 9.16 5.91 17.69 u70.13 62.36 6.11 22.05 51.10 16.96 44.86 u87.53 33.59 85.62 10.00 41.82 62.88 31.64 63.21 54.75 39.91 u27.60 u91.74 u72.87

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Last

Chg Wkly

Name

PitnyBw 22.67 PlainsEx 30.57 PlumCrk 37.61 Polo RL u112.12 PolyOne 12.99 PortGE u21.89 PostPrp u34.44 Potash 144.16 PwshDB 26.36 PS Agri 30.36 PS USDBull 22.88 PShEMSov 27.30 Praxair u94.20 PrecCastpt 142.76 PrecDrill 9.09 PrideIntl 32.23 PrinFncl 29.68 PrisaA n ud7.30 ProShtQQQ d35.16 ProShtS&P d45.17 PrUShS&P d25.20 ProUltDow 52.52 PrUlShDow d21.55 ProUltQQQ 79.38 PrUShQQQ d11.95 ProUltSP 45.38 ProUShL20 37.03 PrUSCh25 rs 28.85 ProUSEM rs 33.07 ProUSRE rs 19.07 ProUSBM rsd21.07 ProUltRE rs 48.44 ProUShtFn 17.35 ProUFin rs 60.34 ProUltO&G u42.42 ProUBasM u46.40 ProUSR2K d13.59

Name

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ResMed s RetailHT ReynAm s RioTinto s RiteAid RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RubyTues RdxSPEW Ryland

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541.848.4444 www.highdesertbank.com *Free at all on-premises Instant Cash ATMs. Loans subject to credit approval. EatnVan 31.19 +.47 +1.17 EVTxMGlo 10.80 +.06 +.03 Ecolab 47.59 -.37 -1.19 EdisonInt 38.07 +.28 +1.01 ElPasoCp u13.86 -.07 +.24 ElPasoPpl 33.28 +.01 +.44 Elan 5.17 -.01 -.29 EldorGld g 18.78 +.46 +2.10 EBrasAero 29.76 +.07 +.51 EmersonEl 56.84 -.02 +1.24 Emulex 11.50 -.15 -.23 EnCana g s 28.55 +.18 +.55 EnergySol 5.47 ... +.29 Enerpls g u30.27 -.06 +2.56 ENSCO 50.08 +.87 +2.85 Entergy 72.39 +.04 +.07 EntPrPt 41.12 -.13 -1.55 Equifax 35.50 -.29 +.57 EqtyRsd 52.00 +.34 +1.99 EsteeLdr u77.33 -.71 +1.54 ExcelM 5.85 +.16 +.25 ExcoRes 18.47 -.07 +.02 Exelon 40.05 +.50 +.52 Express n 16.06 -.10 +1.17 ExtraSpce 16.57 -.02 +.28 ExxonMbl 71.19 -.29 +1.96 FMC Corp u80.22 +.06 +1.13 FMC Tech u88.86 +.12 +5.36 FNBCp PA 9.31 +.07 +.47 FXCM n ud15.00 +.15 ... FairchldS u15.02 +.10 +1.15 FamilyDlr 51.07 +.46 +.40 FedExCp 95.00 -.21 +7.50 FedInvst 24.74 -.10 +.77 FelCor 6.52 +.09 +.32 Ferro 14.80 +.12 +.24 FibriaCelu 16.90 +.55 +1.05 FidlNFin 13.88 +.10 +.21 FidNatInfo 28.48 +.33 +1.19 FstBcpPR d.26 -.00 +.00 FstHorizon 10.28 +.09 +.68 FstInRT 8.01 +.05 +.47 FirstEngy 35.63 -.03 +.40 FlagstB rs 1.33 +.08 +.09 Flotek h u4.71 +.43 +.71 Fluor u61.77 +1.03 +4.31 FootLockr u19.64 +.35 +.99 FordM 16.80 +.02 +.70 FordM wt 8.14 -.01 +.61 ForestCA 15.92 +.17 +.66 ForestLab 32.31 +.07 +.46 ForestOil u36.43 +.82 +1.93

GoldmanS 162.31 -.19 +4.44 Goodrich u86.46 -.18 +.56 GoodrPet 15.50 +.46 +2.07 Goodyear 9.93 +.08 -.10 GrafTech u20.61 -.14 +1.93 Graingr u131.59 +.43 +5.84 GrtAtlPac 3.21 -.05 -.01 GtPlainEn 19.32 +.30 +.37 GpTelevisa u24.39 +.01 +1.21 Guess 49.20 +.81 -1.75 HCP Inc 33.58 -.13 +.84 HSBC 52.58 +.56 +1.79 Hallibrtn u41.15 +.54 +4.68 Hanesbrds 27.37 -.25 -.29 HarleyD 33.25 +.20 +1.92 Harman 47.61 +.91 +3.42 HarmonyG 12.41 +.89 +1.04 HarrisCorp 45.57 +.62 -.53 Harsco 25.73 +.39 +1.46 HartfdFn 23.94 -.08 +1.22 Hasbro u49.39 +.35 +1.67 HltCrREIT 45.80 -.27 -.32 HltMgmt 9.02 -.11 +.39 HealthNet 27.24 -.36 +.69 HlthSouth 18.40 -.21 +.08 Heckmann 4.20 +.03 +.28 HeclaM u10.50 +.75 +1.70 Heinz 48.81 +.05 +.33 HelixEn 13.85 +.04 -.03 HelmPayne 48.29 -.04 +2.90 Herbalife u70.79 -.12 +1.92 Hersha 6.34 -.03 +.11 Hershey 46.75 -.56 -.47 Hertz 13.21 +.25 +.98 Hess u74.30 +.01 +4.52 HewlettP 43.03 -.08 -.17 Hexcel 17.68 -.06 +.60 HighwdPrp 30.94 -.04 -.30 Hill-Rom u43.62 +2.62 +3.69 HomeDp 33.48 +.12 +2.72 HonwllIntl u51.45 +.26 +1.32 Hospira 56.86 +.32 +.21 HospPT 22.62 -.08 +.29 HostHotls 16.89 ... +.53 HovnanE 4.06 +.04 +.37 Humana 57.04 -.43 +.25 Huntsmn u15.77 +.13 +1.33 Hypercom u8.60 +.68 +1.25 IAMGld g 16.75 +.37 +.34 ICICI Bk 53.31 +.11 +3.08 ING 10.03 +.10 +.50 ION Geoph u7.65 +.09 +1.05

iShGold s 13.82 +.29 +.53 iShGSCI 33.07 +.52 +1.93 iSAstla 25.05 +.31 +1.40 iShBraz 78.15 +.72 +3.34 iSCan u30.50 +.06 +1.12 iSFrnce 24.22 +.41 +.63 iShGer 24.24 +.37 +.79 iSh HK 19.39 -.13 +.75 iShItaly 16.43 +.25 +.48 iShJapn 10.64 +.06 +.37 iSh Kor 57.31 +.75 +3.80 iSMalas 13.96 -.05 +.26 iShMex 60.68 +.01 +1.92 iShSing 13.73 -.15 +.41 iSPacxJpn 46.79 +.29 +2.28 iSSpain 38.50 +.63 +2.29 iSTaiwn u14.78 +.06 +.83 iSh UK 17.08 +.19 +.49 iShTurkey 70.66 +.31 +2.57 iShSilver u28.60 +.67 +2.47 iShS&P100 55.13 +.14 +1.57 iShDJDv 49.07 +.05 +.89 iShBTips 108.54 -.01 -.78 iShChina25 44.42 -.64 +1.22 iSSP500 u123.28 +.33 +3.98 iShBAgB 106.26 +.21 -.55 iShEMkts 47.14 +.17 +2.34 iShiBxB 108.90 -.31 -.85 iShSPLatA 53.17 +.35 +1.84 iSSPVal 57.55 +.14 +2.05 iShB20 T 94.89 -.75 -1.84 iShB7-10T 95.90 +.01 -1.13 iShB1-3T 84.17 +.11 +.04 iS Eafe 57.41 +.55 +2.04 iSRusMCV u43.88 +.20 +1.47 iSSPMid u88.69 +.54 +2.72 iShiBxHYB 89.42 +.15 +1.45 iShC&SRl 64.77 +.05 +1.26 iSR1KV 62.80 +.20 +1.99 iSR1KG u56.42 +.17 +1.47 iSRus1K u68.23 +.19 +2.18 iSR2KV 68.60 +.41 +2.01 iSR2KG u84.71 +.59 +2.61 iShR2K u75.67 +.54 +2.45 iShUSPfd 39.09 +.05 +.02 iShREst 55.32 +.08 +.99 iShFnSc 55.04 +.17 +2.36 iShSPSm u66.41 +.48 +1.97 iShBasM u74.35 +.78 +4.01 iStar 6.12 +.28 +.62 ITT Corp 48.88 +.75 +2.80 ITT Ed 59.74 +1.04 -.25

CapFedF 23.58 +.08 +.29 CpstnTrb h .76 -.01 -.02 CardioNet d4.17 +.09 -.08 Cardtronic 16.89 -.14 -.08 CareerEd 18.76 +.45 +.04 Carrizo u31.46 +.68 +3.50 Caseys 40.74 +.34 +1.24 CathayGen 14.72 +.13 +.98 CaviumNet u39.30 +.02 +2.59 CeleraGrp 5.91 +.11 +.19 Celgene 60.59 +.13 -.62 CelldexTh 4.12 +.01 -.18 CentEuro 27.04 -.40 +3.02 CEurMed d19.98 -.05 +.68 CentAl 15.06 +.10 +.83 Cephln 65.92 +.41 +.83 Cepheid 21.30 -.03 +1.13 Cerner u91.22 -.81 +3.19 CerusCp 2.40 ... -.11 Changyou 30.32 -.28 +.07 ChrmSh 3.58 +.04 -.26 ChartInds u33.18 -1.07 +4.73 ChkPoint u45.18 +.69 +1.69 Cheesecake u32.62 -.08 +.66 ChildPlace 51.87 +.15 +.62 ChinAgri s 11.58 +.30 -.29 ChinaArc h d.49 ... -.16 ChinaBAK 1.71 +.01 -.42 ChinaCEd 7.71 -.04 -.13 ChinaLdg n 22.41 -.44 -1.59 ChinaMda 14.80 -1.07 -2.77 ChinaMed 11.19 -.37 -1.86 ChinaNGas 5.29 -.02 +.01 ChiValve 9.35 -.26 -.21 CienaCorp 15.93 +.21 +.64 CinnFin u30.69 -.35 +.73 Cintas 28.49 +.11 +1.30 Cirrus 16.15 +.63 +.61 Cisco d19.07 -.15 -.42 CitrixSys 70.26 +.64 +1.52 CleanEngy 13.77 -.09 +.10 Clearwire 6.03 +.13 -.85 CognizTech u69.31 -.01 +3.06 Coinstar 64.22 -.05 -2.50 ColdwtrCrk 3.26 -.18 -.19 ColumLabs u1.51 +.13 +.28 Comcast 20.71 -.01 +.49 Comc spcl 19.59 -.05 +.46 CmcBMO 38.04 +.36 +2.48 CommVlt 29.49 -.24 -.42 Compuwre u11.08 +.36 +.68 Comtech 30.97 +.27 +1.04 Comverge 6.99 +.13 +.28 ConcurTch 53.87 +1.24 +1.36 Conexant 1.46 +.03 +.08 Conns 4.65 +.19 +1.26 ConstantC u27.12 +.33 +2.35 CopanoEn 30.24 +.42 +.03 Copart 33.40 +.28 -2.49 CorinthC 4.43 +.19 +.15 CostPlus u9.18 +.85 +1.35 Costco u68.39 -.62 +1.17 CrackerB 53.70 +.01 -.19 Cray Inc 7.25 ... +.26 Cree Inc 67.88 +.01 +4.75 CrimsnEx n 3.55 -.10 +.08 Crocs u17.83 +.08 +.35 CrosstexE 9.52 ... +.17 Ctrip.com s 44.26 +.25 -2.82 CubistPh 21.54 +.34 -1.80 Cyberonics 28.44 +.02 -.44

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Finisar u24.01 FinLine u18.81 FFnclOH 17.99 FMidBc d10.10 FstNiagara 12.98 FstSolar 131.04 FTNDXTc u25.78 FstMerit 18.67 Fiserv u58.21 Flextrn 7.48 FlowInt 3.40 FocusMda 23.93 FormFac 9.80 Fortinet 33.26 Fossil Inc u72.26 FosterWhl 31.11 FresKabi rt .04 FreshMkt n u38.19 FuelCell 1.22 FultonFncl 9.08 Fuqi Intl lf 6.39 FushiCopp 9.54

ITW Inergy IngerRd IngrmM IntegrysE IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl IBM Intl Coal IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif Interpublic Invesco InvMtgCap IronMtn ItauUnibH IvanhM g

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50.41 +1.80 +3.28 38.16 -.09 -1.34 42.91 +.22 +2.08 18.40 +.07 +.45 47.81 -.18 -1.26 116.76 -3.58 +3.69 19.25 +.30 +1.01 145.38 +.20 +1.48 u8.00 -.11 +.55 16.33 +.77 +.87 26.24 +.33 +1.12 u29.49 +.28 +.96 u10.82 -.20 +.22 22.99 +.12 +1.28 23.14 +.33 +.56 23.37 -.09 +.77 23.78 -.40 +.42 26.97 +.65 +2.32

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Kraft 30.32 -.11 +.02 KrispKrm u7.30 -.14 +1.69 Kroger u21.11 -.52 -1.96 L-3 Com 73.25 -.39 +1.87 LDK Solar 10.69 +.29 -.31 LG Display 17.81 -.17 +.22 LSI Corp 5.97 +.05 +.17 LabCp u83.73 -.18 +2.86 LVSands 49.24 +.07 -.82 LaSalleH 24.66 +.19 +1.20 LeapFrog 5.96 +.28 +.41 LearCorp u94.03 +1.27 +4.08 LeggMason 35.05 -.19 +1.74 LeggPlat 21.81 +.30 +1.28 LenderPS 31.12 -.01 +.03 LennarA 17.26 +.38 +2.21 Lennox 46.22 -.07 +3.07 LeucNatl 27.17 -.24 +.71 LexRltyTr 8.25 +.16 +.35 Lexmark 37.84 -.52 +.87 LibtProp 31.14 -.46 -.37 LillyEli 34.14 -.11 +.07 Limited u31.83 -.07 +1.08 LincNat 25.21 +.09 +1.57 LiveNatn 11.42 +.15 +.52 LizClaib 7.61 -.11 +.44 LloydBkg 4.20 +.06 +.34 LockhdM d69.18 -.62 +1.13 Loews 38.13 -.09 +.59 Lorillard 81.75 +.01 -.64 LaPac 9.22 +.23 +.85 Lowes 24.86 -.06 +2.62 LyonBas A u30.52 +.03 +1.14

M-N-O M&T Bk MBIA MDC MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MGIC MGM Rsts MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagnaI gs Manitowoc ManpwI

80.86 10.36 d26.94 20.72 11.89 8.10 u8.20 9.31 13.50 2.41 36.60 48.24 31.49 25.06 u51.50 11.93 59.56

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Manulife g 14.95 MarathonO 35.11 MktVGold 62.71 MktVRus 36.71 MktVJrGld 42.96 MktV Agri 51.68 MarIntA u40.99 MarshM 26.09 MarshIls 5.60 Masco 11.99 MasseyEn 50.42 Mastec 14.61 MasterCrd 249.08 McClatchy 3.35 McCorm u46.26 McDrmInt s u19.33 McDnlds 79.76 McGrwH 35.69 McKesson 67.01 McMoRn 15.34 McAfee 46.91 MeadJohn u62.04 MeadWvco 26.86 Mechel 27.10 Mechel pf 8.13 MedcoHlth 63.42 MedProp 10.51 Medicis 27.20 Medtrnic 34.21 MensW u28.69 Merck 35.30 Meredith 34.18 MetLife 40.14 MetroPCS u12.36 MindrayM 26.58 Mirant 10.39 MitsuUFJ 4.87 MizuhoFn 3.29 MobileTel s 21.29 MolsCoorB 49.36 Molycorp n 27.80 Monsanto 62.82 MonstrWw 23.20 Montpelr 20.10 Moodys 27.04 MorgStan 25.64 Mosaic 69.10 Motorola 8.24 MuellerWat 3.72 MurphO u70.91 NCR Corp 14.46 NRG Egy d19.15

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OcwenFn 9.14 +.23 +.32 OfficeDpt 4.89 +.21 +.40 OfficeMax 18.59 +.02 +.90 OilSvHT u137.59 +1.41 +9.74 OldNBcp 11.05 +.21 +.90 OldRepub 12.86 -.10 +.44 Olin 19.08 -.06 +.67 OmegaHlt 21.37 -.56 -.05 Omncre 23.16 -.06 +.26 Omnicom u47.31 +.37 +2.04 OrientEH 11.90 +.39 +.31 OshkoshCp 31.90 +1.40 +2.67 OwensCorn 27.39 -.47 +.98 OwensIll 28.91 +.89 +1.75

P-Q-R PG&E Cp 48.13 +.30 +1.18 PMI Grp 3.40 ... +.29 PNC 57.26 +.69 +3.14 PNM Res 12.15 +.06 +.02 PPG u80.80 +.61 +3.17 PPL Corp 25.91 +.15 +.61 PackAmer u26.76 -.14 +.67 PallCorp u47.60 +.42 +1.58 ParkDrl 4.08 -.08 +.03 ParkerHan u84.22 +.23 +2.76 PatriotCoal 17.50 -.04 +1.22 PeabdyE u63.28 +.56 +4.94 Pengrth g u13.08 -.11 +.43 PennVa 17.34 +.11 +1.28 PennWst g 22.07 -.32 +.24 Penney u33.78 -.69 +1.23 PenRE 14.00 +.34 +.52 Penske 16.18 +.32 +1.00 Pentair 34.04 +.06 +.93 PepcoHold 18.60 -.04 +.33 PepsiCo 65.17 -.03 +1.75 PerkElm 24.77 +.40 +1.15 Petrohawk 19.61 +.63 +1.81 PetrbrsA 31.14 +.56 +1.94 Petrobras 34.39 +.61 +2.15 Pfizer 16.72 +.03 +.23 PhmHTr 64.14 +.01 +.74 PhilipMor 58.12 +.19 -.66 PhilipsEl 30.25 +.75 +1.05 PhlVH u70.00 -1.23 +2.46 PhnxCos 2.27 ... -.04 PiedNG u29.08 +.05 -.57 PiedmOfc n 19.75 -.15 +.05 Pier 1 u10.30 +.30 +.50 PinWst 41.00 -.12 +.47 PioNtrl u84.05 +.13 +5.76

ProUltR2K 39.65 +.54 +2.48 ProUSSP500d21.20 -.16 -2.28 ProUltSP500188.23 +1.45+16.49 ProUltCrude 12.00 +.35 +1.40 ProUSSlv rsd11.24 -.55 -2.32 ProUShCruded10.66 -.33 -1.56 ProSUltSilv 144.57 +6.60+23.57 ProUltShYen 16.27 -.50 -.55 ProUShEuro 20.21 -.59 -.58 ProctGam 62.33 -.03 +.20 ProgrssEn 43.97 +.16 +.07 ProgsvCp 20.85 -.05 +.20 ProLogis 13.74 +.05 +.51 ProtLife 25.16 +.15 +1.34 ProvET g 7.74 -.04 +.42 Prudentl 53.64 -.28 +2.10 PSEG 31.74 +.25 +1.11 PubStrg 99.18 -.11 +1.17 PulteGrp d6.71 -.04 +.51 QEP Res n u37.01 +.10 +2.10 QuantaSvc 18.73 +.41 +.90 QntmDSS u3.91 ... +.11 QstDiag 50.10 -.47 +.52 Questar s u17.82 +.36 +.92 QksilvRes 14.94 +.22 +.48 Quiksilvr 4.63 +.19 +.63 QwestCm u7.12 +.04 +.25 RAIT Fin 1.82 +.01 +.12 RBS pfG 14.30 +.17 +.04 RPC u30.71 -.69 +2.67 RPM 21.08 +.61 +.18 RRI Engy 3.62 +.09 +.07 Rackspace u30.20 +.59 +1.71 RadianGrp 7.51 -.12 +.38 RadioShk 19.56 +.55 +.85 Ralcorp 62.34 -.76 -.76 RangeRs 45.64 +1.65 +3.12 RJamesFn 30.90 +.04 +1.84 Rayonier 52.94 +.59 +1.25 Raytheon 47.43 -.90 +.95 RltyInco 34.02 -.08 -.23 RedHat u47.45 +.52 +4.13 RedwdTr 14.31 -.10 +.36 RegalBel 61.66 -.18 +2.85 RegalEnt 15.04 +.59 +1.59 RgcyCtrs 41.55 -.20 +.13 RegionsFn 6.08 +.02 +.83 Regis Cp 18.66 +.62 +.42 RelStlAl 49.52 +1.31 +5.37 ReneSola 9.05 +.41 -.30 Repsol 26.63 +.66 +1.75 RepubSvc 28.79 -.54 +.52

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33.54 +.10 +1.36 105.08 -.24 +2.49 32.35 +.45 +.69 70.08 +1.14 +4.57 .94 -.02 ... 29.76 -.08 +1.91 u68.39 -.06 +1.30 58.14 -.20 +1.73 u39.77 +.63 +1.81 32.20 +.17 +1.88 53.17 -2.40 -.93 42.64 +.43 +1.26 63.55 +.26 +1.94 63.87 +.60 +1.64 u13.28 -.40 +.15 u46.08 +.18 +1.54 d15.94 +.13 +1.57

S-T-U SAIC 15.88 -.13 +.38 SAP AG 49.01 +1.05 +.64 SCANA 41.18 -.04 +.14 SFN Grp u9.23 -.14 +.49 SK Tlcm 18.66 -.14 +.50 SLGreen 65.89 -.54 +1.00 SLM Cp 12.12 -.05 +.74 SpdrDJIA 113.94 +.20 +3.30 SpdrGold 138.07 +2.87 +4.96 SP Mid u161.24 +.96 +5.28 S&P500ETFu122.89 +.33 +4.09 Spdr Div 51.41 -.07 +.48 SpdrHome 16.80 +.15 +1.21 SpdrKbwBk 23.89 +.24 +1.74 SpdrLehHY 40.04 +.20 +.62 SpdrKbw RB 23.97 +.22 +1.37 SpdrRetl u48.08 +.23 +.71 SpdrOGEx u50.67 +.22 +2.42 SpdrMetM u65.59 +1.14 +5.20 STMicro 10.02 +.75 +.87 Safeway 21.80 -.49 -.82 StJoe 18.63 -.01 +1.38 StJude 40.47 +.38 +1.36 Saks 11.58 +.11 ... Salesforce 142.81 -.21 -3.02 SallyBty n u13.79 +.10 +.05 SandRdge 5.63 +.20 +.33 Sanofi 32.12 +.44 -.02 SaraLee 15.24 +.08 +.10 Schlmbrg u82.74 +2.00 +6.97 Schwab 16.13 -.03 +1.08 SchMau 56.96 -7.66 -8.82 ScrippsNet 52.14 +.42 -.35 SeadrillLtd u34.05 +1.21 +2.89 SealAir u24.28 +.30 +1.15 SemiHTr u32.65 +.21 +1.18 SempraEn 50.99 -.02 +.74 SenHous 22.26 -.19 -.50 Sensata n 28.09 +.43 -.18 ServiceCp 8.12 -.04 -.08 ShawGrp 33.65 +.13 +3.63 Sherwin 77.03 +.82 +2.29 SiderNac s 16.37 +.12 +.29 Siemens u120.50 +.98 +7.05 SignetJwlrs u41.39 +.87 +1.37 SilvWhtn g u39.31 +1.02 +4.16 SilvrcpM g u13.59 +.42 +1.85 SimonProp 102.08 +.15 +3.24 Skechers 22.38 -.41 -.30 SmithfF 18.10 +.14 +.28 Smucker u64.95 -.20 +1.92 SmurfStn n u25.04 +.27 +.49 SolarWinds 18.68 +.21 +.72 Solutia u23.00 +.43 +1.19 SonocoP 33.16 -.34 +.26 SonyCp 36.32 -.24 +1.74 Sothebys 42.41 +.52 -.23 SouthnCo 38.12 +.04 +.29 SthnCopper 44.46 +.68 +1.79 SoUnCo 24.15 -.04 +.01 SwstAirl 13.20 -.08 -.33 SwstnEngy 37.91 +.19 +1.60 Spansion n u20.21 -.30 +.96 SpectraEn u24.70 -.06 +.86 SpectraEP 32.39 -.13 -1.49 SpiritAero 20.35 +.29 +.87 SprintNex 3.92 +.06 -.01 SprottSilv u12.31 +.23 +.78 SprottGld n 12.47 +.28 +.48 SP Matls u37.01 +.31 +2.14 SP HlthC 31.09 ... +.51 SP CnSt 28.81 +.01 +.31 SP Consum u37.42 +.02 +1.11 SP Engy u65.82 +.29 +3.31 SPDR Fncl 15.18 +.05 +.76 SP Inds u34.04 +.07 +1.34 SP Tech 24.81 +.06 +.56 SP Util 31.28 +.07 +.42 StdPac 3.94 +.02 +.40 StanBlkDk 62.37 -.04 +2.26 StarwdHtl 58.84 +.09 +1.07 StateStr 45.71 +.09 +1.87 Statoil ASA 21.64 +.56 +1.29 Steelcse u9.85 +.13 +.43 Sterlite 14.99 -.01 +.76 StillwtrM u21.80 +.40 +1.79 StoneEngy u21.83 +.13 +1.11 StratHotels 4.87 -.02 +.16 Stryker 52.11 +.71 +.65 Suncor gs 36.09 +.58 +2.65 Sunoco u39.58 -1.62 -.62 SunriseSen 4.16 -.01 +.47 SunstnHtl 10.20 +.13 +.47 Suntech d8.28 +.38 +.96 SunTrst 25.74 +.36 +2.16 SupEnrgy u34.44 -.14 +3.05 Supvalu d8.40 -.26 -.27 SwRCmATR 10.03 +.26 +.68 SwERCmTR 8.79 +.11 +.48 SwftEng u40.15 +.50 +3.42 Symetra n 12.23 +.01 +.25 Syniverse 30.74 +.01 +.10 Synovus 2.26 +.02 +.30 Sysco 29.30 -.01 +.34 TAM SA 25.85 +.52 +.56 TCF Fncl 14.34 +.07 +.96 TECO 17.02 +.08 +.14 TJX 45.29 +.76 -1.06 TRWAuto 51.25 +1.19 +2.25 TaiwSemi u11.97 +.43 +.97 Talbots 11.68 +.25 +.46 TalismE g 20.00 -.05 +.71 Target u59.12 -.53 +2.27 TataMotors 31.65 +.35 -3.62 Taubmn 49.71 -.06 +1.08 TeckRes g u54.73 +.94 +6.78 TeekOffsh 27.80 -1.31 -1.92 TeekayTnk 12.11 +.09 +.11 TelNorL 14.79 +.16 +.39 Teleflex 50.53 -.20 -1.38 TelefEsp 69.45 +.88 +2.29 TelMexL 16.63 -.42 +.82 TempleInld 22.33 +.13 +.85 TempurP u36.86 +.26 +.43 Tenaris 46.06 +.55 +2.36 TenetHlth 4.29 +.04 +.08 Tenneco u39.90 +1.37 +3.00 Teradata u41.55 +.28 +.55 Teradyn 12.73 +.30 +.15 Terex 27.21 +.69 +2.14

Name

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Tesoro u17.39 +.11 +.99 TetraTech 11.20 -.11 +.41 TexInst u32.82 -.03 +.62 Textron 23.70 +.30 +1.64 ThermoFis 52.85 +.35 +1.38 ThmBet u49.70 +1.06 +4.89 ThomCrk g 13.12 +.14 +.82 ThomsonR 37.12 -.48 +.15 Thor Inds 30.95 +.63 -3.60 3M Co 86.94 +.43 +2.54 Tidwtr 50.22 +.09 +2.68 Tiffany u63.30 +.10 +2.70 TW Cable u66.08 +1.29 +4.79 TimeWarn 30.64 +.20 +.33 Timken u46.63 +.23 +2.30 TitanMet 18.53 +.16 +1.27 TollBros 18.86 -.01 +1.01 Trchmrk u60.75 +.47 +2.60 TorDBk g 72.06 -.88 -1.29 Total SA 51.34 +.96 +1.19 TotalSys 15.56 +.13 +.13 Toyota 79.05 +.03 +.69 Transocn 70.51 -.42 +4.00 Travelers 54.86 -.25 +.49 TrinaSol s 23.71 +1.01 -.62 Trinity 24.25 +.02 +.74 Turkcell 17.05 -.16 -.59 TycoElec 33.05 +.11 +1.84 TycoIntl u41.18 +.48 +3.29 Tyson 16.90 +.05 +.76 U-Store-It 8.66 +.01 +.25 UBS AG 16.13 +.23 +.77 UDR 22.79 -.02 +.47 UGI Corp u31.98 +.22 +1.69 URS 42.30 +.40 +2.53 US Airwy 11.04 -.07 -.66 US Gold u7.16 +.34 +1.50 USEC 5.96 -.04 +.08 USG 14.08 -.17 +.98 UltraPt g 48.84 +.54 +1.60 UndrArmr u59.03 +.94 +2.53 UnilevNV 30.00 +.36 +.58 Unilever 29.36 +.38 +.53 UnionPac u94.55 +.89 +4.45 Unisys 24.56 +.29 +1.91 UtdContl 27.73 -.48 -1.13 UtdMicro 3.28 +.04 +.31 UPS B u71.80 -.06 +2.70 UtdRentals u21.41 +.61 +.86 US Bancrp 24.76 ... +.79 US NGsFd 5.94 ... -.12 US OilFd 38.31 +.54 +2.34 USSteel 51.05 +.54 +3.71 UtdTech u78.74 +.04 +3.46 UtdhlthGp u37.82 -.10 +2.07 UnvHlth s 41.73 -.33 +.83 UnumGrp 22.50 -.18 +.81

W-X-Y-Z VF Cp 84.96 Valassis 33.66 Vale SA 34.32 Vale SA pf u30.36 ValeantPh 28.32 ValeroE 21.08 Validus 29.40 VlyNBcp 13.39 Valspar 33.92 VanceInfo u38.95 VangSTBd 81.22 VangTotBd 81.25 VangTSM u63.34 VangREIT 54.67 VangDivAp u51.91 VangAllW 47.60 VangEmg 47.81 VangEur 50.41 VangEurPc 36.21 VarianMed u69.23 VectorGp 16.74 Vectren 25.11 Ventas 50.51 VeriFone u39.87 VerizonCm 32.90 ViacomB u39.80 VimpelC n 15.06 Visa 77.35 VishayInt u15.39 VitaminSh 29.68 VivoPart 29.60 VMware 85.76 Vonage 2.35 Vornado 82.85 VulcanM 42.00 W&T Off u18.68 WGL Hold 35.98 Wabash u11.08 WABCO u53.25 Wabtec u51.17 WaddellR 32.92 WalMart 54.62 Walgrn 36.86 WalterEn u110.52 Warnaco 55.58 WsteMInc 34.80 Waters u79.40 WatsnPh 49.55 WeathfIntl u21.72 WeinRlt 24.17 WellPoint 57.02 WellsFargo 29.05 WendyArby 4.86 WestarEn 25.31 WDigital 34.67 WstnRefin u9.82 WstnUnion 18.25 Weyerh 17.70 Whrlpl 80.06 WhitingPetu113.49 Willbros 7.98 WmsCos 23.72 WmsSon 35.02 WillisGp 32.77 WilmTr d4.08 WimmBD u31.73 WiscEn u60.30 WT India 26.04 Worthgtn 17.27 WuXi 17.22 Wyndham u30.75 XL Grp 20.55 XcelEngy 23.87 Xerox 11.83 Yamana g 12.53 YingliGrn 10.71 YumBrnds 50.57 Zimmer 50.02

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Nasdaq National Market Name

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A-B-C A-Power d4.82 ADC Tel 12.74 AMAG Ph 16.23 APACC 6.09 ASML Hld 35.58 ATP O&G 15.90 AVI Bio 1.81 AXT Inc u9.21 AcaciaTc u28.47 Accuray 5.98 AcmePkt u53.94 AcordaTh 26.40 ActivePwr u2.40 ActivsBliz 12.30 Actuate 5.61 Acxiom 18.40 AdobeSy 29.14 Adtran 33.46 AdvEnId 12.23 AEterna g 1.54 Affymax 6.22 Affymetrix 4.36 AgFeed 2.43 AirTrnsp u7.95 AirMedia 7.50 Aixtron 34.20 AkamaiT 52.96 Akorn 5.29 AlaskCom u10.79 Alexion u76.00 Alexza d.90 AlignTech 17.62 Alkerm 10.61 AllosThera 3.93 AllscriptH 17.98 AlnylamP d9.24 Alphatec 2.27 AlteraCp lf u37.71 AlterraCap 21.43 Amazon u175.68 Amedisys 27.53 ACapAgy 29.47 AmCapLtd 7.67 AmerMed 18.84 AmSupr 33.36 Amgen 53.73 AmkorT lf 7.45 Amtech u23.18 Amylin 13.12 Anadigc u7.08 AnadysPh d1.11 Ancestry u29.70 Andrsons 35.50 Angiotc gh .21 Ansys u51.36 A123 Sys 8.54 ApolloGrp d36.38 ApolloInv 11.25 Apple Inc 317.44 ApldMatl 13.06 AMCC 10.13 Approach u20.28 ArchCap 91.06 ArenaPhm 1.42 AresCap 16.85 AriadP 4.10 Ariba Inc u21.66 ArkBest 28.46

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D-E-F DDi Corp 10.73 DG FastCh 27.19 DeerConsu 11.37 Dell Inc 13.69 DeltaPtr h .73 Dndreon 38.93 Dentsply 32.45 Depomed 5.47 DexCom 11.80 DigRiver 36.68 Diodes u26.07 DirecTV A 40.62 DiscCm A 42.92 DiscCm C 37.42 DishNetwk 18.58 DollrFn u27.47 DonlleyRR 16.73 DrmWksA 31.24 DressBarn 25.71 drugstre 1.76 DryShips 5.88 DurectCp u2.91 DyaxCp 2.19 ETrade rs 15.59 eBay u29.61 EDAP TMS 3.83 eHealth 15.26 eResrch 5.95 EagleBulk 5.16 EaglRkEn u8.19 ErthLink 9.14 EstWstBcp 18.38 EchoStar 20.50 EducMgmt 13.83 ElectArts 15.18 Emcore 1.34 EmmisCm d.46 EndoPhrm 36.50 Ener1 4.23 EnerNOC 25.54 EngyConv 4.58 Entegris u7.00 EntropCom 10.02 EnzonPhar 11.27 EpicorSft 9.98 Equinix 82.59 EricsnTel 10.96 Eurand 11.83 EvrgrSlr h .79 Exelixis 5.90 ExideTc 8.55 Expedia 27.05 ExpdIntl u55.60 ExtrmNet 2.82 EZchip u27.83 Ezcorp u26.61 F5 Netwks u139.28 FEI Co 24.97 FLIR Sys 28.39 FSI Intl 4.06 FalconStor 2.74 Fastenal u57.78 FifthThird 13.27 FinEngin n 16.82

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BUSI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 C5

Cameras

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Peter Bunce, CPA, has joined Callan Accounting Services, CPA LLC in Bend. Bunce has nearly 10 years of business experience in accounting with a specialty focus in manufacturing, construction, land development, and research and development. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Oregon State University. Mary Ann Cook has joined McGregor-Caverhill CPA in Bend as a full-time staff accountant and bookkeeper. Her focus is on small-business bookkeeping with several areas of expertise, including construction, real estate, restaurant and retail bookkeeping, as well as QuickBooks training. Cook has more than 20 years of experience in bookkeeping, accounting and tax preparation. Wells Fargo has promoted Ron Johnson of Bend to community banking district manager in Central Oregon. Johnson manages the service, sales and community support efforts of 101 employees at nine branches in Bend, La Grande, Madras, Pendleton, Prineville and Redmond. He started with Wells Fargo in California in 2000, working as a credit manager, assistant manager and finance store manager. He then worked as a sales development consultant for the Los Angeles metropolitan region. For the last two years, he has worked as

Peter Bunce

Mary Ann Cook

a bank branch manager in Long Beach, Calif. Johnson graduated from University of La Verne in La Verne, Calif. Robert J. Fincham Jr., a member of New York Life Insurance Co.’s Agents Advisory Council, was elected to the council’s executive committee, which provides leadership and guidance to council membership. Fincham will serve as president of the executive committee for three years. Lisa Whitney, Angela Tweedie and John Taylor have recently joined The Garner Group Realtors and Development LLC in Bend. Whitney attended the University of California, Los Angeles, and between 1989 and 1996 was affiliated with Whitney and Associates, a direct marketing firm. She has been engaged in real estate sales for five years. Tweedie lived in Alaska for many years and obtained her Alaska real estate license in 2005. She relocated to Bend this year

Trade

Loans

Continued from C3 “We are strengthening our ability to create and defend manufacturing jobs in the United States, increasing exports of agricultural products for American farmers and ranchers and opening Korea’s services market to American companies,” Obama said in a statement. The White House had hoped to strike a deal last month during Obama’s trip to Seoul for the G-20 economic summit, but both countries were unable to broker a compromise on issues pertaining to trade of autos and beef. U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and his counterpart, Korean Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon, resumed negotiations outside Washington this week. The agreement did not address issues with the beef trade. The U.S. had sought greater access to the beef market in South Korea, which restricts imports of older U.S. meat. A senior administration official said discussions on beef are ongoing. The official insisted on anonymity to discuss private negotiations. The wider agreement would eliminate tariffs on more than 95 percent of industrial and consumer goods within five years, a move that the U.S. International Trade Commission estimated would increase exports of U.S. goods by at least $10 billion. The deal would also open up South Korea’s vast $560 billion services markets to U.S. companies. The agreement must still be ratified by lawmakers in both countries. Administration officials offered no timeline for ratification on Capitol Hill. The South Korea deal has been widely supported by those in the private sector and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which has criticized other administration policies as antibusiness. “This agreement will create thousands of new jobs, advance our national goal of doubling exports in five years, and demonstrate that America is once again ready to lead on trade,” Chamber president Tom Donohue said Friday. Ford CEO Alan Mulally said the deal was “a transformational agreement” that would open one of the most closed auto markets in the world to U.S. manufacturers.

Continued from C3 The Federal Reserve began creating the various programs in mid-2007 to calm financial markets, which had started to quiver as the fallout from the subprime mortgage collapse began to spread. The agency issued assurances that it would increase liquidity through its usual method of overnight lending directly to banks. But some banks feared that borrowing through what’s known as the discount window would be seen as a sign of financial weakness, according to the Fed’s website, so it created the Term Auction Facility program in December 2007. It was separate from the Troubled Asset Relief Program, in which the federal government injected nearly $250 billion to keep the nation’s largest banks and financial institutions afloat. To participate in the Term Auction Facility program, banks had to meet the same financial requirements as they would to borrow through the discount window. In all, data released Wednesday show more than 4,200 Term Auction Facility transactions, including some individual loans for $3 billion and $5 billion.

Jobs Continued from C3 In recent weeks, the average number of people applying for unemployment benefits has generally declined. Pending home sales topped forecasts in October, while last month retail sales posted one of the biggest increases in years. The anemic job figures could lend support to the Obama administration’s call to extend unemployment benefits as well as to recent efforts by Ben Bernanke, the Federal Reserve chairman, to continue to stimulate the economy. Plodding economic growth, however, seems insufficient to persuade businesses to hire. “Obviously this is a disappointing report, to say the least,” James O’Sullivan, chief economist at MF Global, said of the monthly jobs data. But given

Ron Johnson

Robert Fincham Jr.

Lisa Whitney

Angela Tweedie

John Taylor

Bruce Lilleston

Lisa Hart

Noah von Borstel

and obtained her Oregon broker’s license before joining The Garner Group. Taylor, a Portland native, moved to Bend in 2001 and has been licensed in Oregon since 2006. He is a former owner of Sheridan Forest Products. Ten real estate brokers also affiliated with The Garner Group have earned the National Association of Realtors’ green designation. The certification by the association’s Green Resource Council is earned through a course focusing on green building practices, consumer awareness and

More than half were 28-day loans, and essentially all were paid back, according to the data. The last loans were made in March. “This program was aimed at calming the huge, big players” in the financial markets, Newton said, adding that it was the Fed’s way of saying, “I’m here to meet your liquidity needs.” Of the Oregon banks, Pacific Continental took out 32 loans totaling $538 million, according to the data. PremierWest had one loan for $25 million. Bank of the Cascades borrowed from the Term Auction Facility program seven times between Jan. 17 and Dec. 23, 2008. All were 28-day loans, and four were secured between Oct. 23 and Dec. 23, according to the data. Individual transactions varied, from $25 million to $75 million. The seven loans combined totaled $322 million, according to Fed data. All were repaid, and the data showed no loans to Bank of the Cascades after Dec. 23, 2008, although other banks continued to borrow through the program until March. Newton said banks routinely borrow for short periods to ensure they have adequate liquidity, obtaining loans from larger banks or other sources. Before the Fed created the

other promising signs, he said, he did not believe the recovery had been derailed. “Certainly the weight of evidence is that the economy is improving.” Austan Goolsbee, chairman of the president’s Council of Economic Advisers, said, “This highlights that the recovery is fragile.” In addition to pressing for an extension of unemployment benefits, he called for a continuation of what are known as the Bush tax cuts for the middle class as well as a collection of proposals that the White House is now referring to as the Obama tax cuts. “To have taxes go up on 98 percent of Americans,” Goolsbee said, “would pose a risk to the aggregate economic performance.” The weak November job numbers will also feed the politically charged debate over whether the government should seek to aggressively reduce the deficit or be willing to spend more until

marketing homes built to green standards. This is the only green training program recognized by the association, and permits brokers to use green as a signature designation. Those who earned the designation are: Rob Davis, Carol Donohoe, Alison GarnerMata, Matt Garner, Shelley Griffin, Melody Lessar, Michael Mahar, Jody Tuttle, Lisa Whitney and principal broker Sara LaFaver. John L. Scott Redmond has recognized Lisa Hart and Noah von Borstel as the top two sales agents for November and Bruce Lilleston as the top listing agent.

Term Auction Facility program, it discouraged borrowing through the discount window, he said. But with the auction program, Newton said, the Fed cut the interest rates and actively encouraged banks to participate, or as the federal agency described on its website, it provided access to credit, “without the stigma … associated with use of the discount window.” With the mortgage crisis, the Fed knew it “had a difficult real estate cycle,” Newton said. “The last thing they wanted to do was compound it by not having enough liquidity.” The real estate crisis would eventually hit Central Oregon and Bank of the Cascades, which reported losses of nearly $250 million total for 2008 and 2009. In August 2009, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. issued a consent order, in which Bank of the Cascades agreed to, among other things, improve its capital ratios within 150 days. Last month, the bank announced it had secured agreements to raise $177 million through a private offering of its common stock. It will hold a special shareholders meeting Dec. 23 to consider the deal. Tim Doran can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 6 0 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

the economy returns to better health. The stock markets shrugged off the report, which was well shy of the forecast for a gain of 150,000 jobs, as all the major indexes rose slightly on Friday. Part of the surprise in the November report was that layoffs, which had subsided earlier this year, picked up again. The number of people who were unemployed because they had been laid off or had concluded a temporary assignment increased by 390,000. Private companies, which have been hiring since the beginning of the year, added 50,000 jobs in November. Most of those increases came in the temporary help and health care sectors. Manufacturers, which had demonstrated some strength earlier in the year, eliminated 13,000 jobs, and despite recent sales increases, the retail sector shed more than 28,000 jobs.

Continued from C3 Point-and-shoots do have certain advantages over smart phone cameras, including features like image stabilization and larger lenses and sensors. That does not matter to consumers like Emily Peterson, a 28-year-old graphic designer who lives in Brooklyn and who bought an iPhone 4 in July. “One day I just thought, ‘Wow, I never have my camera with me, when I used to carry it around all the time,’ ” she said. “It’s just one less thing for me to remember, one less thing to carry.” Geoffe Haney, a 44-yearold collections manager at a museum in Bay City, Mich., who also owns an iPhone 4, said the device was “my camera first, my phone second.” He added, “I have 40 photo apps on my iPhone — it’s like having 40 different cameras with you all the time.”

Proof in numbers The sales figures tell the story. While smart phone sales in the United States continue to skyrocket, unit sales of point-and-shoot cameras fell nearly 16 percent from 2008, according to the market research firm NPD Group. That corresponds to a decline of 24 percent in dollars, to $1.9 billion, from $2.4 billion. Even when the recession eased over the last year, sales of point-and-shoots fell. At the same time, sales of more powerful cameras like SLRs, with advanced features like interchangeable lenses and manual settings, have increased, by nearly 29 percent in dollars since 2009, according to NPD. Analysts say this suggests a split in the market, as casual shooters remain happy with the convenience of their smart phones, and dedicated enthusiasts seek out the more advanced cameras. They predict that the point-and-shoot market will drop further overall. “The compact camera market is pretty stagnant,” said Christopher Chute, an analyst at the market researcher IDC. “The ubiquity of a 5- or 10-megapixel camera phone in your pocket is hard to overcome.” David Lee, the senior vice president at Nikon, acknowledged, “The market’s peaked a little.” Still, he said he was not worried. “It’s going to go up and down, but it will stay solid,” he said. Echoing other camera makers, he said the smart phone camera would encourage more picture-taking generally, leading to more demand for traditional cameras.

The smart phone has proved irresistibly easy to use, especially for people who exchange vast numbers of photos online. Facebook says that since the site was founded in 2004, its users have uploaded more than 50 billion photos, making that feature one of its most popular. Flickr, the photo-sharing site, says users add more than 3 million photos to its inventory every day. Yet Flickr’s data show that the most popular camera among its 55 million users is a smart phone, Apple’s iPhone 3G. Not a single point-and-shoot makes it into its top five. The remaining spots are occupied by SLRs from Canon and Nikon.

Maturing technology Cameras began showing up in phones almost a decade ago. For much of that time, image quality was akin to grainy shots of UFO’s or Sasquatch. In the last few years, though, more powerful processors and better sensors have improved image quality to levels many consumers find acceptable. According to a February report from the camera industry group PMA, film cameras were not quite extinct until 2004, when most digital models took pictures with resolutions greater than 4 megapixels — allowing users to print high-quality images in conventional sizes. The report predicted that camera-phone use would “increase significantly” once those devices achieved a similar resolution. The iPhone, various Android models and phones on Microsoft’s new Windows Phone 7 operating system have crossed that threshold. Even some professionals are advocates of picture-taking with smart phones. And while dedicated cameras have long had settings and modes to adjust the quality of the picture taken, smart phones have apps like Hipstamatic, Camera Bag and OldCamera that allow users to apply filters — black and white, sepia, vintage — to images, often just by poking a finger. Mark Romanek, the director of the upcoming film “Never Let Me Go” and an avid photographer, has also abandoned his point-and-shoot. His website, markromanek.posterous.com, features his photography, all of which was taken with an iPhone and using camera apps like OldCamera. He likes the “lo-fi” quality of the images, but also likes always having his camera at hand. “When a camera of this type is always in your pocket,” he wrote via e-mail, “every moment seems like a potential photo op.”

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The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.90 AbdAustEq 12.77 AbdGlbInc 12.60 AbdnIndo 14.17 AdcareHlt 3.85 AdeonaPh .74 AdvPhot u1.35 Advntrx rs 2.37 AlexcoR g u8.44 AlldNevG 28.50 AlmadnM g u4.43 AlphaPro 1.60 AmApparel 1.60 AmDGEn 2.87 AmLorain 2.59 AmO&G u10.19 Anooraq g 1.35 AntaresP 1.46 AoxingP rs 2.50 ArcadiaRs d.31 Argan 8.77 ArmourRsd 7.52 Augusta g 3.88 Aurizon g 7.56 BMB Munai .95 BakerM 33.13 Baldw 1.28 Ballanty 6.83 Banks.com .19 Banro g 3.04

+.02 +.01 +.33 +.62 ... +.05 +.05 +.27 +.01 -.07 ... +.02 +.02 +.09 +.38 +.37 +.29 +1.50 +.29 +2.37 -.13 +.60 -.01 -.05 +.15 +.07 -.02 -.12 -.04 -.12 +.03 +.63 -.02 +.10 +.02 +.07 -.03 -.39 +.00 +.03 +.34 +.23 -.02 -.02 -.02 +.30 +.49 +.27 +.04 +.04 +.33 +.28 -.02 ... +.13 ... +.03 +.01 +.04 +.15

BarcUBS36 46.64 +.76 +2.42 BarcGSOil 25.17 +.38 +1.59 BrcIndiaTR 75.45 -.27 +3.82 BioTime u7.63 -.47 -.21 BlkMuIT2 13.52 -.03 -.29 BlkMunvst 9.57 -.01 -.07 BovieMed 3.34 +.20 +.55 Brigus grs 1.82 +.10 +.21 BritATob 74.69 +.72 -.18 CPI Aero u14.15 +.40 +.15 CAMAC En 3.07 +.12 +.79 CanoPet .32 +.03 +.02 CapGold n 4.81 +.18 +.39 CaracoP 4.54 +.03 +.10 Cardero g 1.51 -.03 +.03 CardiumTh .43 -.02 -.06 CelSci .78 +.03 +.10 CFCda g u20.02 +.45 +1.09 CentGold g 53.80 +1.15 +2.31 CheniereEn 5.51 -.47 -.69 CheniereE 19.11 -.39 -.87 ChiArmM 2.95 +.02 -.06 ChiGengM 1.57 +.19 +.21 ChIntLtg n 2.84 -.01 +.04 ChiMarFd 5.21 +.18 +.08 ChinNEPet 6.28 +.10 -.25 ChinaPhH 2.79 -.10 -.19 ChinaShen 3.08 +.63 +.39 ChShengP .59 ... -.13 ClaudeR g 1.60 +.04 +.09 CloughGA 15.60 +.02 +.44 CloughGEq 15.04 +.02 +.45

ClghGlbOp CmtyBkTr Contango CornstProg CornerstStr CrSuisInco CrSuiHiY Crossh glf Crystallx g CubicEngy Cytomed DejourE g DenisnM g DocuSec Dreams DryfMu EV CAMu EV LtdDur EVMuniBd EVMuni2 eMagin EmersnR h EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EngyInco EnovaSys EntGaming EntreeGold EvolPetrol ExeterR gs Express-1 FieldPnt

13.44 d.74 58.16 7.25 9.25 3.68 2.99 .34 .32 .77 .46 .32 u3.33 4.80 u2.65 9.13 11.55 16.31 12.23 12.70 4.93 2.03 10.52 6.87 26.78 1.26 .39 2.94 6.07 6.11 2.29 u4.43

+.05 +.01 +.55 +.04 -.01 +.01 +.02 -.01 +.00 +.03 -.01 -.01 -.03 -.04 -.02 +.03 -.04 +.13 -.11 +.02 +.05 +.01 +.14 +.41 +.16 -.04 +.01 +.10 -.03 +.17 +.13 ...

+.47 -.06 +.60 +.14 ... -.01 +.02 -.12 ... +.15 -.01 +.00 +.16 -.17 +.25 -.11 -.38 +.07 -.47 +.13 -.05 -.12 +.44 +.83 +.56 +.24 +.01 +.28 -.02 +.52 -.08 +.34

FiveStar u6.57 FortuneI .48 FrkStPrp 13.10 FrTmpLtd 13.36 FriedmInd u8.50 Fronteer g u10.70 FullHseR 3.54 GabGldNR 18.40 GascoEngy .33 Gastar grs 5.29 GenMoly 5.64 GeoGloblR .72 Geokinetics 9.13 GeoPetro .51 GoldRsv g u1.71 GoldResrc u26.35 GoldenMin u28.06 GoldStr g 4.55 GormanR u31.87 GranTrra g 7.85 GrtBasG g 2.89 GreenHntr 1.10 GugFront 24.16 HQ SustM 4.29 HSBC CTI 8.18 HearUSA .96 Hemisphrx .50 HooperH .68 HstnAEn 18.32 Hyperdyn 3.02 ImpOil gs 37.09 IndiaGC d.58

-.03 +.33 -.03 -.03 +.06 +.44 -.09 -.04 +.72 +.98 +.33 +1.51 +.07 +.43 +.25 +.38 -.01 -.03 +.15 +.55 +.19 +.10 -.04 -.07 -.08 -.06 -.01 -.03 +.02 +.11 +.20 +1.83 +.25 +.75 +.18 +.38 +.08 +1.22 +.13 +.33 +.06 +.19 -.06 -.20 +.25 +.24 -.10 -.29 +.13 +.41 -.01 -.04 -.01 +.00 +.01 +.02 -.20 +1.73 -.06 +.04 -.18 +.22 +.03 -.10

IndiaGC wt .00 Innovaro d.77 InovioPhm 1.11 IntTower g u9.60 Inuvo u.44 InvVKAdv2 11.82 InvVKSelS 11.85 IsoRay 1.33 Iteris 1.49 KeeganR g u9.04 KimberR g 1.53 KodiakO g u5.19 LaBarg u14.60 LadThalFn 1.22 Lannett 6.40 Libbey 14.73 LongweiPI 2.84 LucasEngy 2.70 MAG Slv g u11.77 MGT Cap .21 MadCatz g u.88 MagHRes u6.01 MagHR pfC 25.00 Metalico 4.86 Metalline .96 MetroHlth 4.35 MdwGold g .87 MincoG g u2.14 Minefnd g 10.28 MinesMgt 2.88 NIVS IntT 2.37 NTN Buzz .37

+.00 +.00 -.04 -.08 -.01 -.08 +.16 +1.20 ... +.04 +.21 -.23 -.13 -.04 ... -.05 +.02 -.02 +.08 +.20 +.08 +.40 +.04 +.45 +.07 +.21 -.02 -.06 +.14 +.93 -.10 -.04 +.05 +.05 +.17 +.73 +.23 +1.42 ... -.03 -.03 +.11 -.09 -.08 ... ... +.26 +.74 ... +.18 +.03 +.09 +.10 +.23 +.03 +.35 +.50 +.48 +.05 -.33 +.05 +.09 -.00 +.02

NeoStem 1.51 NeuB HYld 13.58 NBIntMu 14.11 NBRESec 3.96 Neuralstem 2.01 Nevsun g 6.49 NDragon .03 NewEnSys 7.73 NwGold g u10.11 NA Pall g u6.34 NDynMn g 10.03 NthnO&G u24.44 NthgtM g 3.08 NovaGld g 14.92 NuvCADv2 13.23 NCADv3 12.30 NCAPI 12.43 NvDCmdty 25.03 NuvDiv2 13.76 NuvDiv3 14.01 NICADv 13.66 NvInsDv 14.07 NuvInsTF 13.73 NMuHiOp 12.00 NuvREst 10.34 Oilsands g .41 Oilsnd wtA d.02 OpkoHlth 3.11 OrienPap n 6.65 OrionEngy 3.32 OrsusXel .18 Palatin rs d1.05

Biggest mutual funds +.19 +.16 -.01 -.01 +.09 -.19 +.01 +.08 +.04 -.18 +.29 +.83 -.00 -.01 +.07 -.15 +.42 +1.29 +.12 +.75 +.13 +.95 +.72 +1.74 +.01 +.15 +.44 +.67 +.06 -.49 +.11 -.52 ... -.41 +.13 +.03 -.09 -.63 -.01 -.48 +.08 -.39 -.01 -.08 -.02 -.45 +.03 -.24 -.04 -.40 -.01 -.03 -.00 -.01 +.01 -.06 -.21 -.45 -.11 +.15 +.01 -.00 -.18 -.25

ParaG&S 1.80 +.03 +.17 PhrmAth 3.71 +.04 +.04 PionDrill 7.34 +.14 +.32 PlatGpMet 2.24 ... +.18 PolyMet g 2.10 +.01 +.09 ProceraNt .52 -.03 +.05 ProlorBio 7.19 -.15 +.22 Protalix 8.78 +.11 +.41 PudaCoal u15.41 -1.06 +2.69 Quaterra g 1.73 +.01 +.10 RadientPh .39 -.03 -.06 RaeSyst 1.61 ... -.02 RareEle g 9.82 -.08 -.71 ReavesUtl 22.12 -.05 +.17 RegeneRx .27 -.01 +.03 RELM d1.87 +.07 +.21 Rentech 1.25 -.01 +.06 RexahnPh 1.08 -.05 +.02 Richmnt g 5.27 +.02 +.21 Rubicon g u5.83 +.10 +1.40 SamsO&G 1.17 -.01 +.02 ScolrPh .37 +.00 -.09 SeabGld g 29.05 +.45 +1.22 SearchMed 3.00 +.05 +.34 Senesco .30 -.00 +.03 SinoHub 2.79 -.01 -.06 SondeR grs 3.00 -.05 -.07 SparkNet 2.96 +.01 -.04 SprottRL g 1.78 -.05 +.01 StreamG wt d.08 +.01 +.04 SulphCo .19 +.01 -.01 TanzRy g 6.72 +.09 +.23

Taseko 4.64 Tengsco .53 TianyinPh 2.89 TimberlnR 1.17 TrnsatlPt n 3.18 TravelCtrs 4.05 TriValley d.44 TriangPet 6.11 Tucows g .69 TwoHrbInv 9.99 UQM Tech d1.99 US Geoth 1.12 Uluru .09 Univ Insur 4.86 Ur-Energy u2.23 Uranerz 3.42 UraniumEn u6.70 VangMega 41.94 VangTotW 47.50 VantageDrl 1.71 VirnetX 13.16 VistaGold 3.05 WalterInv 17.51 WFAdvInco 9.97 WFAdMSec 15.77 WhiteRiv u21.52 WidePoint 1.26 WT DrfChn 25.35 WT Drf Bz 29.24 WizzardSft .26 YM Bio g 2.00 ZBB Engy .57

+.03 +.16 +.02 +.05 -.05 -.20 +.03 +.02 -.01 -.05 +.39 +.81 -.06 -.09 -.01 +.12 -.01 +.01 +.02 +.18 -.03 +.04 -.02 -.03 -.01 +.01 -.05 -.13 -.07 +.24 -.16 -.43 -.47 +.31 +.11 +1.17 +.23 +1.57 -.04 +.07 -.67 -1.27 +.07 +.22 -.02 +.32 +.01 -.03 -.11 -.25 +.02 +2.82 -.02 -.08 +.03 +.20 +.26 +.77 -.01 -.02 ... +.03 -.01 +.01

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapInBldA p American Funds A: CapWGrA p American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl n American Funds A: WshMutA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA px American Funds A: NewPerA p

IB LG XC LG BL GL BL SP LC SP IL LV IL IL LC IB XC SP BL GL

147,053 64,096 61,363 58,903 58,470 54,945 51,266 50,822 47,546 46,539 41,949 41,481 39,464 37,609 37,596 35,429 35,237 33,155 32,801 32,555

-2.5 +0.2 +1.1 +1.3 -2.9 -3.2 -1.5 +0.5 -0.5 +0.5 -2.3 +0.2 -2.6 -3.3 -0.1 -2.6 +1.1 +0.5 -1.3 -0.8

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

NAV

+8.4/B +11.6/E +16.4/C +19.1/B +6.6/E +5.4/E +10.8/C +13.6/A +9.4/E +13.5/A +12.0/B +12.0/B +6.6/C +7.0/C +11.2/D +8.1/B +16.5/B +13.6/A +12.5/B +10.4/C

+49.3/A +11.1/C +11.0/C +25.5/A +23.0/B +27.3/B +21.9/B +7.8/A +10.3/B +7.2/A +29.3/B -2.6/D +33.7/A +25.0/B +7.0/C +47.5/A +11.5/C +7.7/A +30.9/A +33.1/A

1,000,000 250 3,000 2,500 250 250 250 5,000,000 250 3,000 2,500 2,500 250 3,000 250 1,000,000 100,000 100,000 1,000 250

NL 5.75 NL NL 5.75 5.75 5.75 NL 5.75 NL NL NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL NL NL 4.25 5.75

11.44 30.01 30.83 67.64 49.77 35.39 16.52 112.43 27.63 113.14 35.71 104.54 41.37 15.62 26.72 11.44 30.84 113.17 2.13 28.31

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Extend benefits for unemployed

W

e suspect that sometime before Christmas, both houses of Congress will approve legislation extending longterm unemployment benefits that expire this month.

After all, to fail to do so would mark that body for months as the biggest Scrooge of the holiday season. While there are reasonable arguments for letting long-term benefits lapse, there are equally good ones for keeping the program going for another few months. Yes, it is expensive. In fact, about half of what Uncle Sam spends on unemployment benefits in 2010, some $68 billion, is targeted to the long-term unemployed. Still, in an era where money doesn’t really add up until it hits the trillions of dollars, $68 billion isn’t much more than a drop in the budget bucket. Banks, for example, received more than $200 billion in bailout funds from Congress. It’s also true that if Congress were to let long-term benefits die, the federal government would pay more through other programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the former food stamp program known

now as SNAP. There also likely would be an uptick in TANF welfare payments to needy families with children. There’s also a simple humanitarian argument to be made for extending the unemployment benefits program. It’s winter. It is cold, and simply living costs more than it does in the summertime. Budget deficits notwithstanding, most Americans are unwilling to see their neighbors suffer during the holiday season. We cannot believe most members of Congress feel differently. For now, Republicans who wish to see Bush-era tax cuts extended across the board are squared off against Democrats who want to see jobless benefits extended. Each side has something to gain by compromise, but time is growing short. They must get on with it.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s Note: The following editorials, which appeared on Nov. 15, 1971, and Jan. 26, 1979, respectively, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

late to pollution control? If it had to be a bird, why not Trashy Vulture? Now there’s a bird that fights pollution.

Who gives a hoot?

It’s a good idea, Bend residents know, to steer clear of Century Drive in the late afternoon this time of year. The road often is bumper to bumper with traffic returning from the Mt. Bachelor Ski Area. Many of the returning skiers drive as though they were still on the slopes, careening down the icy road at unsafe speeds. A few have had a pitcher or three of beer with lunch. Students at the new Cascade Junior High School, however, can’t get home by any way but Century Drive. School gets out at about the same time the ski lifts begin to lose their customers. It’s all too easy to imagine a junior high school kid being struck down by a skier who imagines himself a stock car race driver. There are no sidewalks or bike paths along Century Drive near the school. Junior high school kids aren’t as careful as their parents wish they would be, and they can be seen fooling around on the roadway on their way home every weekday. Continuing development of the area near Mt. Bachelor Village will make the pedestrian safety problem even worse. The Oregon State Police and Deschutes County Sheriff ought to give Century Drive ... a reputation as a speed trap. The 20-mile-per-hour speed limit that is in effect while school children are present ought to be enforced. As soon as possible the road should be made safe for pedestrian traffic. There’s a tragedy waiting to happen on Century Drive — let’s prevent it before it’s too late.

There’s a new character at the Forest Service. He’s a wide-eyed sort with only a couple of toes on each foot, but that’s no handicap for Woodsy Owl. Hoo? That’s right, Woodsy Owl. He’s Smokey Bear’s new companion who will soon be peering from trees in the Deschutes National Forest, reminding hunters and campers to “Give a Hoot! Don’t Pollute.” The national campaign, which is being handled by Foote, Cone & Belding, a prestigious Park Avenue advertising agency that manages the Smokey Bear account, will cause its own kind of environmental pollution. Soon a flood of cardboard and paper posters, self-adhesive decals and bumper stickers and school handouts will deluge the nation. Woodsy Owl is one of the poorest images developed by the government. It’s too childish. Although they may care about the environment, most adults probably won’t give a hoot about Woodsy. The Bureau of Land Management’s Johnny Horizon is on the right track. Perhaps he should be the national figure for environmental concern, not just for the BLM. Then Smokey Bear could be the national figure for forest fire protection. And why an owl, anyway? How does an owl, except for being wise, re-

Dangerous road

My Nickel’s Worth RiverRim NIMBYs Who are these people in RiverRim snob division that are of the “not in my backyard” mentality? I am disgusted by them for making so many false claims, such as: Their children are in danger of being run over, their home values will plummet, and their quality of life will be ruined if the DMV moves into Brookswood Meadow Plaza. For most people, the DMV won’t even open until after they are already at work, and by the time they get home the DMV will have closed. And on Saturday and Sunday, it won’t even be open. I can hardly think of a better neighbor. I am happy to see that the DMV and Travis Lovejoy, vice president of Brookswood Meadow LLC, the plaza’s owner, are holding steady even though the City Council is starting to buckle. I hope councilors will come to their senses and take into consideration that since many have been promoting the boycotting of the grocery store, Lovejoy probably no longer needs all of those parking spaces. Maybe they can also be used by DMV if need be. I do not know Lovejoy, but Brookswood Meadow Plaza is a very nice addition to the community, and I believe the DMV will cause much less impact for the RiverRim residents than other businesses that may be allowed there. Jordan Hamilton Bend

Tax hikes It’s time that taxpayers take notice that we are being excessively taxed for

everything we do, especially owning property. Our property values have plummeted, and our property taxes continue to increase every year by 3 percent. Ten years of this ridiculous increase with any bond measures passing and we’ll probably be paying 50 percent more in property taxes. With so many families losing their jobs and many losing their homes, this continual increase is out of control. It seems that everything we do is taxed in some way. We have to buy sno-park, trail and day-use permits in our national forests. We have to have a boater safety license, invasive species permit, tag applications doubled, a new shellfish license, fishing and hunting license fees took a huge hike, ATV safety permits, permits to float the river. If you own a dog, you’re supposed to get a dog license, and we are expected to get expensive permits to do anything around our homes. If you should ever need gas in Sisters, you will pay a triple tax on the gas. (Federal, state and city.) There are many more licenses and special permits needed for many things we do in our lives, and it seems our lawmakers are constantly trying to tax us on something new to get more revenue. It’s time to start the initiative process and repeal this bad tax increase. I hope that other taxpayers will join in and work at getting Measure 50 repealed. Jeff Fields Bend

Geese exterminations Everywhere in Bend I meet people who sincerely believe that the only way to resolve the goose poop problem is through periodic exterminations. Then I explain that nonlethal methods are more effective and are currently being used in dozens of locations in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. At that point the conversational tone starts to shift. Nancy Schnell of St. Louis GeesePeace recently wrote, “We knew that an alternative would have to be offered to provide people with a choice. Usually, we have found that most people will make a kind choice when given the option. Unfortunately, often people are convinced that there are no humane options that are successful, so they opt for killing.” The “resident” Canada geese of Bend now face another impending extermination (Bulletin, Oct. 6, “Park officials discuss killing more geese”). This time overhead cannon nets will be used. Bend Park & Recreation District should provide a public forum for a full discussion of the current direction of the goose management program and the alternatives that exist. In that spirit, we have requested agenda time at the Dec. 7 regularly scheduled meeting of the parks board. It will be held at 7 p.m. at the headquarters on 799 S.W. Columbia Street. Everyone who has an opinion on this issue (and everyone does!) should plan to attend. Foster Fell Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Minor party supporters handed John Kitzhaber a victory By Dennis Tooley Bulletin guest columnist

I

t is said that politics is the art of the possible. Harold Shrader recently wrote an opinion piece defending his vote for a minor-party candidate for governor. He claimed that no change is possible when most of us vote for either of the two major parties. However, Shrader doesn’t know his U.S. political history as well as he thinks, and he may not adequately understand our political system. While it is true that Republican presidents have presided over large budget deficits, Shrader overlooks some other great budget busters, such as … Franklin Roosevelt, Democrat, laid the foundations for federal deficit spending with his New Deal programs, introducing peacetime deficit spending to end the Great Depression. It didn’t work. Lyndon Johnson, Democrat, created Medicare and Medicaid, the War on Poverty, federal support of public education and many other programs costing billions to so little effect. Jimmy Carter, Democrat, created the Departments of Education and Energy,

two more useless money pits. When it came to federal regulations, Nixon wasn’t the conservative we hoped he was. Nixon signed into law the Environmental Protection Agency and OSHA. Of course, Nixon struggled with Democrat congresses, a hostile press, resolving Johnson’s war in Vietnam and finally Watergate. Reagan kept his promise to lower taxes and tried to rein in federal spending, except for desperately needed support for a military Carter had neglected badly. Reagan delivered an economy that boomed for years. It was Congress, especially Democrats, who refused to reduce spending. Finally, George W. Bush tried to bring accountability (No Child Left Behind) and reality (tighter control of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) to government. He wanted to save a Social Security system heading for collapse. He failed, but who believes a President Gore or a President Kerry would have spent less? Yes, Republicans had a majority in the state Legislature in 2002, when Oregon’s economy tanked. However, it wasn’t a veto-proof majority, and then-Gov. John

IN MY VIEW Kitzhaber would have squashed any attempts to address Oregon’s taxes, regulations and land use laws that have crippled Oregon’s business climate. Our Founding Fathers deliberately designed our political system to prevent rapid or radical change. Government functions are divided between the executive and legislative branches, with the judicial branch refereeing between the two. The founders wanted everyone to accept compromise and stay involved (rather than resort to revolution). They wanted change to come slowly and thoughtfully to avoid the violence and social turmoil of European history. It is easy to blame this or that president or governor, as Shrader does, but electing a president or governor without also winning the Legislature won’t bring the kind of change Shrader wants. The founders didn’t want any political parties (they called them “factions”), but political parties formed shortly after the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Wash-

ington, Hamilton and the Federalists insisted the Constitution created a strong central government; Jefferson, Madison and other Democrat-Republicans (ancestors of today’s Democrats) insisted the Constitution limited the authority of the federal government and protected both the states and individuals. This debate over how much authority and power the federal government should have continues to today, and more or less has defined our two political parties. Shrader can continue to cast his vote in some vain hope that someday the Constitution or Libertarian party will replace one of the existing major parties. That is not likely to happen in our lifetimes. First, the American people express their dissatisfaction with one party by voting for the other party. They did it to the earmark-happy Republicans in 2006 and 2008. They did it to the Democrats in 2010 after the Democrats went off the left end of the political spectrum. Second, both political parties have become adept at addressing the concerns of an outspoken minority and drawing that minority into the party. One can see

this happening today as the Republicans respond to the tea party movement and win big at the ballot box. Unfortunately for Shrader, the numbers don’t lie. Had most of those who voted for the Constitution or Libertarian candidates voted instead for Chris Dudley, Dudley would be governor-elect. Certainly, Shrader concedes Dudley would make a better, not perfect, governor than Kitzhaber. The minority party voters opted to make a statement rather than elect a governor, and now Oregon will suffer four more years of failed ideas and clueless leadership. Republicans, Constitutionalists and Libertarians must accept that they cannot elect their center-right candidates to statewide office until they convince a majority of Oregon voters that Democrat policies of the last 20 years aren’t working. To have any hope in 2014, Republicans, Constitutionalists and Libertarians must start their persuasion campaign today. Dennis Tooley lives in Redmond.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 C7

O Noted political consultant Cerrell dies in California

D

N  

By Howard Blume Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Joe Cerrell, a prominent political consultant who over several decades helped steer successful campaigns for both the presidency and top statewide offices, died Friday. He was 75. Cerrell, who had pneumonia, died at St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital in Camarillo, Calif., his family said. Cerrell’s list of clients and friendships read like a “Who’s Who” of politics from the 1950s forward — John F. Kennedy, Hubert Humphrey, Al Gore, Feinstein, Willie Brown, Jesse Unruh, and both Pat Brown and his

Karin Lynne Skelton, of Bend Mar. 19, 1960 - Nov. 17, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend, 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, December 4, 2010, 1:00 p.m., Old Stone Church, Franklin Avenue.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Elaine Kaufman at her restaurant “Elaine’s” in New York in July 2005. Kaufman, who became something of a symbol of New York as the salty den mother of Elaine’s, one of the city’s bestknown restaurants, died Friday in Manhattan. She was 81.

New York restaurateur Elaine Kaufman dies By Enid Nemy New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Elaine Kaufman, who became something of a symbol of New York as the salty den mother of Elaine’s, one of the city’s best-known restaurants and a second home for almost half a century to writers, actors, athletes and other celebrities, died Friday in Manhattan. She was 81. Her death, at Lenox Hill Hospital, was caused by complications of emphysema, said Diane Becker, the restaurant’s manager. To the patrons she knew at her Upper East Side establishment, Kaufman was the quirky,

opinionated, tender-hearted and imposingly heavyset proprietor who came in almost every night to check on things and schmooze, moving from table to table and occasionally perching herself on a stool at the end of her 25-foot mahogany bar. With those she did not know, her demeanor varied; some accused her of being rude, though she indignantly denied that she ever was. As she put it, she had little time to explain to dissatisfied customers why they were being directed to tables in the back, known as Siberia, or led to the bar or even turned away, when they could clearly see empty tables along “the line.” The line was the row of ta-

bles along the right wall of the main room, extending from the front to the back and visible from the entrance. Those tables were almost always saved for the most valued regulars, with or without reservations. One regular was Woody Allen, who filmed a scene for “Manhattan” at Elaine’s. Elaine’s flourished, despite its less-than-stellar reputation for food. For 14 years, it was the site of the New York Oscar-night parties hosted by Entertainment Weekly. “I live a party life,” Kaufman said in an interview in 1983 in The New York Times. “Elsa Maxwell used to have to send out invitations. I just open the door.”

Surgeons Inc. Continued from C1 Deschutes County Deputy District Attorney Brandi Shroyer told Judge Stephen Tiktin that the couple stole money from people by selling wellness center franchises and then not providing equipment. Most of the victims, she said, gave Surgeon and Rose between $35,000 and $50,000. One alleged victim, she said, reportedly lost about $150,000. According to police, the pair have also operated businesses under the names “Reverse Aging Naturally of Bend” and “Surgeons Naturally Offering Wellness,” among others. When asked to describe the business, Rose told Tiktin: “We help every single person get well that come in our doors by applying natural modalities.” When pressed for a more specific answer, Rose added that customers were charged a maximum of $150 to have their “condition improved” within 40 days.

Surprised by indictment

Jefferson Continued from C1 In a letter to the commissioners, Skidmore wrote, “A number of communities across the country are realizing that a significant element of their economic strategy needs to include a recreation and lifestyle component. The theory is that some companies are more likely to choose to locate in places that best enable them to attract the talent they require to succeed. ... Jefferson County has many of the attributes that at-

Marijuana Continued from C1 “That might be coming in the future, but we’re not ready for something like that right now,” Hamilton said. “It’s established as an illegal drug in my mind right now.” Under state law, patients registered with the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program can exchange medicine but they cannot accept money for that interaction. A patient who has a certified grower, however, is allowed to reimburse that person for expenses for things like electricity or fertilizer used in the cultivation process, but not for labor. Cannabis clubs or collectives are supposed to abide by these same rules, and there a number in Oregon that have operated successfully under those laws. For instance, the Cannabis Cafe in Portland, which was established by Oregon NORML in 2009, gives cardholders a place where they can medicate for a day use fee. Patrons can either bring their own marijuana or can use donated cannabis from the cafe free of charge. Brothers Cannabis Club LLC, also in Portland, works a little differently. While it also has a membership fee that provides verified cardholders with access to the club and a supply of medical marijuana, it has a suggested donation for the medication, though staff there say it’s not a requirement. Bend’s new club will work much the same way as the Brothers Cannabis Club. And the executive director of an-

son, Gov.-elect Jerry Brown. At 24, Cerrell was chosen to lead the California Democratic Party, then the youngest person to hold the post, said family and friends. In 1967, he started Cerrell Associates, a public-relations firm. Calling Cerrell “one of the pioneering political consultants,” Gore said, “He was also a great champion of progressive political causes” who advised presidents as well as local, state and national level candidates. He was born Joseph Cerrella June 19, 1935, in New York City, the son of Sal, a Catholic, ItalianAmerican fireman and Marion, a Jewish switchboard operator.

tract recreational enthusiasts; the challenge will be blending this into an economic development strategy.” Skidmore proposed working in conjunction with representatives from Sen. Ron Wyden’s office.

Economic viability “I like where we’re going,” said Jefferson County Commissioner Wayne Fording. “The economic viability of destination resorts as they are now, Deschutes County can’t get overnight lodging, a lot are sitting there hanging. ...”

The county would use funding it received from the state for economic development purposes after its plans for its two destination resorts could no longer happen. It received about $398,000 from the state. It’s not clear how much would be needed for this project. The county will also likely continue to pursue mapping land that would be eligible under state law for destination resorts.

Resort opponent Bill Atherton, a Jefferson County resident and former

“From my point of view the whole system that we’re in now is really the dark ages. It’s challenging and confusing for patients and law enforcement because of all the things we’re talking about. How can you tell who’s doing this right and who isn’t?” — John Sajo, executive director, Voter Power other medical marijuana collective that’s expected to open on North East Division Street in Bend, The Herb Center, said his attorneys have not finalized plans for how his operation will work yet. John Sajo, the executive director of Voter Power and co-author of Measure 74, said one of the reasons he pushed the ballot initiative was to help eliminate some of the ambiguity in Oregon’s medical marijuana law as it relates to how patients can gain access to their medicine.

Dispensary laws Dispensaries, he said, would relieve law enforcement officers of the necessity of distinguishing donations from sales. And by narrowly defining dispensary, the measure would have given both providers and patients legal protection. Without that distinction, he said, there is only what is written in the Oregon Revised Statutes as being a prohibited act. “When you put all that together, there’s lots of room for people to structure their activities in ways that are legal, and people look at the same thing and interpret it differently,”

Sago said. “Frankly, the only interpretation that matters is that of the local DA, the local cops and the 12 people on the jury that will be the deciders in the case, because it is clearly legal for a cardholder to donate marijuana to another cardholder, but if that donation is coupled with money, then the DA might say, ‘Well, that looks like a sale.’ ”

2012 ballot measure Sajo, who was also involved in the original campaign to pass the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act in 1998, intends to draft another ballot initiative like Measure 74 for the 2012 election. The purpose of the initiative will be the same, he said — to help clearly delineate state-approved facilities where patients can get high-quality medicine. “From my point of view, the whole system that we’re in now is really the dark ages,” Sajo said. “It’s challenging and confusing for patients and law enforcement because of all the things we’re talking about. How can you tell who’s doing this right and who isn’t?” Smith said he’s structured COAT in a manner that he believes satisfies all the state laws

candidate for County Commission, has long advocated for the county to avoid destination resorts and instead focus on what already exists in the county. He’s thrown out ideas of creating a railroad operation, and he’s pointed to hunting and fishing opportunities that could be enhanced. Another one of his ideas is to play up the county’s agricultural base and let people stay for weekends on ranches and farms. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

regarding medical marijuana. He also said he’s taking the surrounding community, including his neighbors, into consideration with some of the rules he’s implementing at the facility.

No smoking, loitering In addition to keeping the club exclusive to card-carrying members, there will be no smoking or loitering allowed on the premises. He also said he will keep it open only during daylight hours, from noon to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturday. “I think that once the smoke clears that the truth will come out and that it won’t have an effect on tenants,” Smith said in response to neighbors’ concerns. “My goal is to be able to do this and provide a liaison opportunity for patient interactions and to keep a low profile.” At least one of his neighbors is hoping that’s the case. Misti Walker, who owns Focal Point Salon in the same complex, said she and her husband are giving Smith and COAT the benefit of the doubt before they say it’s a good thing or a bad thing. All they’re hoping for, she said, is a good neighbor. “We’re on the fence,” Walker said. “We’re just trying to stay neutral.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin. com.

Rose’s court-appointed attorney, Brendan Alexander, said his client was surprised by the news that she’d been indicted and doesn’t believe she’s done anything wrong. He added that Rose is an active member of the community who volunteers with several nonprofit organizations and is a mother of three children. He said the charges of financial crimes were “very complicated” and that they primarily involved

Trail Continued from C1 Bruce Ronning, the district’s director of planning and development, said the district hadn’t committed to any type of trail surface by the time Lyons raised the pavers issue, and that ODOT’s concerns were premature as the trail had not yet been planned. “We never intended on this particular section of trail to use pavers,” Ronning said. “It was always conceived of as asphalt, concrete, or potentially the bridge itself might be decked with wood.” The district sent a revised application to ODOT, addressing concerns about the width of the bridge and the trail, and ODOT reversed course, telling the district it was again eligible for the grant in November. But the delay means the park district will be unable to apply for a separate grant from the Oregon State Parks Recreational Trails Program, which could have funded a portion of the trail’s construction, said Steve Jorgenson, the district’s planning manager. Because of the particulars of ODOT’s bidding processes, bids the park district solicited to design the trail when it appeared it would not qualify for the grant were thrown out last month. Ronning said the district will likely solicit new bids that meet ODOT’s requirements, but the district is now too far behind in the process to meet the Jan. 14 deadline to apply for the Oregon State Parks grant. Jorgenson said it’s not certain the park district would have been awarded a grant from Oregon State Parks, and that the best-case scenario might have

the activities of Surgeon. Rose does not appear to have a criminal record in Oregon. Shroyer said her office is looking into reports of potential past convictions but has not yet confirmed any. Shroyer, meanwhile, said the scheme was part of a larger pattern.

‘The same tricks’ Surgeon served eight years in prison in Nevada after he was convicted of racketeering, embezzlement and securities fraud. Those convictions stemmed from an investigation with victims in Oregon, California and Nevada, Shroyer said. She added that Surgeon is still on parole and is wanted on a warrant out of California, where he owes about $600,000 in restitution. “Essentially, he’s up to the same tricks,” she said. Tiktin set Rose’s bail at $50,000. He said he didn’t buy the argument that the allegations were some kind of misunderstanding. “I can understand the nuances of securities law might be difficult to divine,” he said. “But I’m not sure that taking money in exchange for not providing equipment is very hard to understand.” Surgeon is being held on $500,000 bail. Both Surgeon and Rose are scheduled to enter pleas on the charges later this month. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

been a $100,000 grant of the approximately $800,000 that will be distributed statewide. Pat Fisher, ODOT program manager, said the delay in approving the park district’s revised application can be chalked up to ODOT employees struggling with a too-large workload. There’s no clear distinction between a trail for transportation and a trail for recreation, she said, and ODOT has to make that determination before allocating funds to any given project. “A lot of projects serve both purposes, obviously, and it’s going to be an interpretation of the funding program,” Fisher said. “In the ones I’ve worked with, if we can demonstrate a transportation purpose, then it can compete for transportation funding.” Jorgenson said transportation doesn’t need to mean a route people use to go from home to work or shopping, and that nearly any path or trail in town can enhance transportation options. “Typically funding over the years has been really segregated into transportation versus recreation, and a lot of times, it is a gray area,” Jorgenson said. “We’ve had an opinion that just about any trail can serve a transportation purpose. Unless you’re going to be out there saying it takes X amount of users to be a transportation facility, we just can’t make that determination.” Ronning said the trail extension and bridge are still scheduled to be built during the 2011-2012 fiscal year, and that preliminary estimates place the total cost of the project at around $500,000. The district has not yet identified funding for the project, he said. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.


WE

C8 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A T H E R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 4

HIGH Ben Burkel

34

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

30/26

26/23

36/30

29/17

35/31

30/21



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras

32/26

32/29

Camp Sherman 30/21 Redmond Prineville 34/24 Cascadia 34/25 33/25 Sisters 32/23 Bend Post 34/24

Oakridge Elk Lake 31/23

22/12

Partly to mostly cloudy with showers and snow above 2,500 feet today. Central

36/30

33/21

31/20

Burns 34/22

34/20

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

33/19

29/21

Fort Rock

Chemult 30/18

HIGH

24

Vancouver 38/27

22/3

Seattle 42/32

City



Missoula

40/31

Helena Bend



52/40

21/4

Boise

34/24

46/37

Redding



23/12

Eugene Grants Pass

36/25

39/30

Idaho Falls



Elko

35/23

40/24

Mostly cloudy skies with snow north and rain and snow south.



33/26

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:23 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:25 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:28 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:33 p.m.

Reno

48/34

Salt Lake City

58/48

39/27



LOW

New

Dec. 5

First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Full

Last

Dec. 13 Dec. 21 Dec. 27

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

43 30

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

WEDNESDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers developing LOW late.

HIGH

41 27

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

35/23

Crater Lake

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

LOW

37 24

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Mostly cloudy skies with snow north and rain and snow south. Eastern

Mostly cloudy.

NORTHWEST

33/22

25/14

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 53° Brookings • 6° Burns

TUESDAY

Mainly cloudy with a few snow showers.

Tonight: Mainly cloudy with a few snow showers.

40/32

Brothers

MONDAY

Low pressure to the southwest will send wet weather into the southern half of the region.

26/21

30/22

Sunriver

Today: Cloudy, patchy freezing fog early, a few snow showers, chilly.

Paulina

La Pine

SUNDAY

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 47/34/0.25 . . . . . 46/33/pc. . . . . . 48/36/sh Baker City . . . . . . . 34/9/0.03 . . . . . 35/22/sn. . . . . . 34/24/sn Brookings . . . . . . 53/34/0.00 . . . . . . 56/44/c. . . . . . . 50/38/c Burns. . . . . . . . . . . 32/6/0.07 . . . . . 36/26/sn. . . . . . 33/25/sn Eugene . . . . . . . .41/32/trace . . . . . . 40/31/c. . . . . . 43/34/sh Klamath Falls . . . 32/26/0.06 . . . . . .38/28/rs. . . . . . 36/26/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 37/25/0.11 . . . . . .36/25/rs. . . . . . 34/22/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 29/12/0.00 . . . . . . 34/20/c. . . . . . 35/22/sn Medford . . . . . . . 48/37/0.04 . . . . . 46/36/sh. . . . . . 46/36/sh Newport . . . . . . .46/36/trace . . . . . . 48/38/c. . . . . . 49/39/sh North Bend . . . . . 50/34/0.00 . . . . . . 50/40/c. . . . . . 50/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 36/20/0.33 . . . . . .36/28/rs. . . . . . 35/30/rs Pendleton . . . . . . 35/25/0.02 . . . . . . 30/23/c. . . . . . 29/27/rs Portland . . . . . . .47/39/trace . . . . . 40/32/pc. . . . . . . 40/32/r Prineville . . . . . . . 35/24/0.00 . . . . . . 34/25/c. . . . . . 35/27/rs Redmond. . . . . . .37/21/trace . . . . . 35/23/sn. . . . . . 36/25/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 46/38/0.00 . . . . . . 47/38/c. . . . . . 50/36/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 49/35/0.00 . . . . . . 41/31/c. . . . . . 44/33/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 35/19/0.00 . . . . . . 32/23/r. . . . . . 37/21/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 40/32/0.00 . . . . . . 36/30/c. . . . . . . 35/25/c

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

LOW

43 29

PRECIPITATION

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

HIGH

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32/19 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 in 1939 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 in 1985 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.15” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.82” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 10.10” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.13 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.81 in 1980 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .9:11 a.m. . . . . . .5:42 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:51 a.m. . . . . . .2:33 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:40 a.m. . . . . . .5:20 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:58 p.m. . . . . .12:38 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:19 a.m. . . . . . .1:54 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:01 p.m. . . . . .12:53 a.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly cloudy with widespread showers.

HIGH

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 32-40 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . 32-48 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-0 . . . . . . 52-56 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 58 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-44 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 75 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-45

V.HIGH

6

8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 1 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Squaw Valley, California . . . . .6-8 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 25-23 . . . . . . 50-96 . . . . . . . . 56 . . . . . . . . 79 . . . . . . 20-36 . . . . . . 12-15 . . . . . . 20-25

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 38/27

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

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S

Calgary 22/3

S

Saskatoon 12/-2

Seattle 42/32

S Winnipeg 10/-3

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S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 39/33

Thunder Bay 25/8

Halifax 47/40 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland Bismarck (in the 48 42/27 22/7 34/25 40/32 St. Paul Green Bay 15/-6 contiguous states): Boston 25/4 31/19 Boise 41/31 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 39/30 34/24 New York 24/12 • 84° 33/23 42/28 Cheyenne Des Moines Childress, Texas 35/22 Philadelphia Columbus 29/14 Chicago 32/21 42/28 32/19 • -17° Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 29/12 San Francisco Baudette, Minn. City 42/29 Las 58/50 Denver Louisville 39/27 Kansas City Vegas • 1.64” 42/29 36/26 37/21 St. Louis 61/45 Charlotte Philip, S.D. 42/25 Nashville 48/31 Oklahoma City 49/31 Los Angeles 49/25 64/53 Albuquerque Little Rock Birmingham 57/32 59/33 Atlanta 61/31 Honolulu Dallas Phoenix 58/33 61/34 83/67 Tijuana 73/48 66/50 Houston 79/50 New Orleans Orlando 73/46 68/51 Chihuahua 82/44 Miami 74/56 Monterrey La Paz 81/52 86/58 Mazatlan Anchorage 85/61 27/21 Juneau 33/32

FRONTS

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .79/37/0.00 . . .65/25/s . . . 50/23/s Akron . . . . . . . . .32/23/0.00 . .33/22/sn . . 30/22/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .37/25/c . . 36/26/sn Albuquerque. . . .57/33/0.00 . 57/32/pc . . 60/36/pc Anchorage . . . . . .16/5/0.00 . .27/21/sn . . 28/22/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .58/33/c . . 45/25/pc Atlantic City . . . .42/32/0.01 . 44/31/pc . . . 39/31/c Austin . . . . . . . . .77/37/0.00 . 77/35/pc . . 57/29/pc Baltimore . . . . . .42/32/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . . 40/28/c Billings. . . . . . . . .35/31/0.14 . . . .22/7/c . . 23/12/pc Birmingham . . . .61/33/0.00 . .61/31/sh . . 47/24/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .21/17/0.49 . . 15/-6/pc . . . .16/-5/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .32/30/0.10 . .39/30/sn . . . 37/31/c Boston. . . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . . .41/31/c . . . 39/32/c Bridgeport, CT. . .40/32/0.00 . 43/30/pc . . . 41/28/c Buffalo . . . . . . . .35/26/0.00 . .34/24/sn . . 31/25/sn Burlington, VT. . .37/31/0.00 . .35/27/sn . . 35/26/sn Caribou, ME . . . .41/34/0.29 . . .40/36/r . . .40/29/rs Charleston, SC . .58/30/0.00 . 59/44/pc . . 53/30/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .51/24/0.00 . . .48/31/c . . 45/24/pc Chattanooga. . . .56/28/0.00 . .53/32/sh . . 40/25/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .51/31/0.00 . . .35/22/c . . . 38/24/c Chicago. . . . . . . .31/18/0.00 . .32/19/sn . . 25/11/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . .33/22/sn . . . 33/21/c Cleveland . . . . . .30/27/0.04 . .33/24/sn . . 32/24/sn Colorado Springs 70/31/0.00 . . .37/23/c . . . 43/22/c Columbia, MO . .43/24/0.00 . 38/21/pc . . 33/17/pc Columbia, SC . . .59/27/0.00 . . .55/37/c . . 51/29/pc Columbus, GA. . .64/31/0.00 . 63/37/pc . . . 51/28/s Columbus, OH. . .40/28/0.00 . .32/21/sn . . 31/21/pc Concord, NH . . . .40/20/0.00 . . .39/22/c . . 37/23/sn Corpus Christi. . .80/46/0.00 . 82/53/pc . . 64/46/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .75/42/0.00 . 61/34/pc . . . 53/30/s Dayton . . . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . .32/21/sn . . . 32/20/c Denver. . . . . . . . .70/33/0.00 . . .42/29/c . . . 46/27/c Des Moines. . . . 35/21/trace . . .29/14/c . . . 24/11/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .36/27/0.01 . .33/23/sn . . .30/23/sf Duluth . . . . . . . . .18/-7/trace . . .24/2/sn . . . 14/1/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .69/27/0.00 . . .71/36/s . . . 67/37/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 3/-16/0.00 . . 6/-12/sn . . . .0/-10/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 18/-4/0.08 . . 13/-7/pc . . . .9/-7/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .55/26/0.00 . 57/26/pc . . 57/25/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . 33/27/trace . .32/22/sn . . 32/20/sn Green Bay. . . . . .24/18/0.00 . .31/19/sn . . 27/16/pc Greensboro. . . . .49/33/0.00 . . .45/30/c . . 43/24/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .38/31/0.00 . 40/27/pc . . 39/27/pc Hartford, CT . . . .42/25/0.00 . 41/27/pc . . . 39/25/c Helena. . . . . . . . .35/25/0.00 . . . .21/4/c . . 31/10/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .82/70/0.01 . . .83/67/s . . . 83/66/s Houston . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . 79/50/pc . . 60/38/pc Huntsville . . . . . .58/33/0.00 . .59/31/sh . . 43/23/pc Indianapolis . . . .37/27/0.00 . .33/22/sn . . 31/18/sn Jackson, MS . . . .67/36/0.00 . 69/35/pc . . 49/29/pc Madison, WI . . . .23/11/0.00 . .31/12/sn . . . 22/5/pc Jacksonville. . . . .65/29/0.00 . . .66/48/s . . 62/30/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .23/11/0.00 . .33/32/sn . . 37/25/sn Kansas City. . . . .47/26/0.00 . 37/21/pc . . 32/19/pc Lansing . . . . . . . 31/23/trace . .32/20/sn . . . 31/20/c Las Vegas . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . 61/45/pc . . 62/47/pc Lexington . . . . . .38/26/0.01 . . 34/24/rs . . .34/18/sf Lincoln. . . . . . . . .47/18/0.00 . 32/13/pc . . 29/13/pc Little Rock. . . . . .61/34/0.00 . 59/33/pc . . 44/26/pc Los Angeles. . . . .69/49/0.00 . . .64/53/c . . . .62/54/r Louisville . . . . . . .42/28/0.00 . . 36/26/rs . . .34/20/sf Memphis. . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .57/30/c . . 42/26/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .74/56/s . . 77/52/pc Milwaukee . . . . .28/17/0.00 . .35/22/sn . . 28/18/pc Minneapolis . . . .19/10/0.17 . . .25/4/sn . . . 15/4/pc Nashville . . . . . . .53/28/0.00 . .49/31/sh . . 38/23/pc New Orleans. . . .71/42/0.00 . 73/46/pc . . 56/38/pc New York . . . . . .40/33/0.00 . 42/28/pc . . . 37/30/c Newark, NJ . . . . .44/33/0.00 . 43/28/pc . . . 38/30/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .45/38/0.00 . . .44/32/c . . 46/30/pc Oklahoma City . .70/32/0.00 . 49/25/pc . . 44/21/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . 29/12/pc . . 28/11/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . .68/51/s . . . 68/41/s Palm Springs. . . .72/44/0.00 . 74/48/pc . . 73/52/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .30/21/0.04 . .34/19/sn . . 25/10/pc Philadelphia . . . .42/33/0.00 . 42/28/pc . . . 39/27/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . 72/51/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . .31/22/sn . . 31/21/sn Portland, ME. . . .42/25/0.00 . . .42/27/r . . .39/26/rs Providence . . . . .40/33/0.00 . . .41/29/c . . . 40/29/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .49/33/0.00 . . .47/31/c . . 45/25/pc

Even with 1 arm, man can hunt high and low By Alex Paul

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . . .24/12/c . . 25/11/pc Savannah . . . . . .63/29/0.00 . 61/43/pc . . 56/29/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . .48/34/sh . . 48/34/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . 48/38/trace . 42/32/pc . . . .43/35/f Richmond . . . . . .45/33/0.00 . . .44/29/c . . 45/26/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .31/15/0.01 . . . .20/2/c . . . 17/2/pc Rochester, NY . . .34/25/0.00 . .36/25/sn . . 33/25/sn Spokane . . . . . . .29/23/0.00 . . .24/17/f . . . 24/21/c Sacramento. . . . .52/47/0.24 . .54/44/sh . . . .54/43/r Springfield, MO. .55/26/0.00 . 42/20/pc . . 36/19/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .37/26/0.00 . . .42/25/c . . . 33/20/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .67/41/0.00 . . .70/59/s . . . 70/45/s Salt Lake City . . .37/31/0.00 . . 39/27/rs . . . 40/31/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 . 79/44/pc . . 81/47/pc San Antonio . . . .76/44/0.00 . 77/40/pc . . 60/35/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .67/29/0.00 . 47/25/pc . . 40/23/pc San Diego . . . . . .66/49/0.00 . 64/51/pc . . . 63/55/c Washington, DC .43/34/0.00 . 42/29/pc . . 41/28/pc San Francisco . . .54/51/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . . .59/47/r Wichita . . . . . . . .62/29/0.00 . 42/24/pc . . 37/21/pc San Jose . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .61/46/sh . . . .62/44/r Yakima . . . . . . . 30/24/trace . . .30/19/c . . . 29/23/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .59/25/0.00 . 53/22/pc . . 56/24/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . 74/48/pc . . 75/51/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .30/16/0.00 . . 32/26/sf . . 38/34/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .71/65/0.00 . .70/61/sh . . . 63/48/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . 69/55/pc . . . 69/56/s Baghdad . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 81/48/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 90/77/pc . . 91/78/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .43/19/0.00 . . .57/35/s . . . 51/27/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . . 80/63/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .21/5/0.00 . 22/15/pc . . .35/26/rs Bogota . . . . . . . .84/54/0.66 . .64/51/sh . . 66/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .36/27/0.36 . 35/24/pc . . 35/26/pc Buenos Aires. . . .81/54/0.00 . 86/61/pc . . 85/63/pc Cabo San Lucas .82/57/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . . 86/62/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . . 78/56/s Calgary . . . . . . . .18/10/0.00 . . . .22/3/s . . . 25/10/s Cancun . . . . . . . 77/NA/0.00 . . .80/64/s . . . 76/62/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .36/19/0.00 . . 38/31/rs . . 35/23/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .36/34/0.00 . . 36/29/rs . . .35/30/rs Geneva . . . . . . . .27/19/0.01 . 34/22/pc . . . 38/31/c Harare . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.90 . . .85/65/t . . . .83/64/t Hong Kong . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .78/67/s . . . 81/70/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . 68/57/pc . . 57/39/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . .81/50/s . . . 78/52/s Johannesburg . . .73/61/0.47 . 81/62/pc . . . .83/61/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . .67/59/sh . . 69/60/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . 59/49/pc . . . .62/54/r London . . . . . . . .37/23/0.00 . .41/34/sh . . .38/26/rs Madrid . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .46/34/s . . 52/44/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .84/79/0.06 . . .87/77/t . . . .89/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .94/69/s . . . 91/68/s Mexico City. . . . .72/37/0.00 . . .77/43/s . . . 77/42/s Montreal. . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . . 38/33/rs . . 33/26/sn Moscow . . . . . . . .16/5/0.00 . . 32/16/rs . . . 19/8/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 80/60/pc . . 81/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . . .76/66/s . . 77/67/pc New Delhi. . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . . 73/51/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .64/50/1.22 . . .59/42/s . . . 65/47/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .10/0/0.00 . 24/13/pc . . 27/19/sn Ottawa . . . . . . . .36/28/0.01 . . 37/29/rs . . 34/27/sn Paris. . . . . . . . . . .30/25/0.00 . .39/35/sh . . 38/34/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .93/79/0.00 . . .87/76/t . . . .85/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/45/0.62 . .51/38/sh . . . 57/43/s Santiago . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . .76/45/s . . . 80/48/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .84/68/t . . . .83/68/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .54/50/0.07 . .43/33/sh . . 47/35/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . . .47/31/s . . . 54/35/s Shanghai. . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . 71/55/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/75/4.00 . . .90/75/t . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . . 23/7/sf . . . 26/14/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .71/65/sh . . 72/64/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .75/65/s . . . 80/69/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . . 79/56/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .57/46/s . . . 61/48/s Toronto . . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . 34/25/pc . . .32/26/sf Vancouver. . . . . .43/37/0.14 . . .38/27/s . . 40/33/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .28/25/0.24 . 27/19/pc . . 38/26/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .21/5/0.01 . . .21/8/pc . . 26/16/pc

Timber counties face financial collapse

A lbany D emocrat-Herald

ALBANY — Thousands of Oregon hunters will bag a deer this fall. But former Linn County resident Leland Ford is probably the only one to do so one-handed — with a bow and arrow. It’s an amazing feat by anyone’s standards, but it’s just a way of life for Ford, 58, who now lives in Salem. It’s certainly not a lifestyle Ford dreamed about as a young man. Ford was a captain in the Air Force ROTC program at Oregon State University with only one term left before graduation. He had completed flight school and was set on a career flying jets. But on Dec. 8, 1974, fate intervened and his life changed forever. “We were hunting on the Santiam River north of Lebanon when my dad’s cousin’s shotgun discharged and pellets struck the right side of my brain,” Ford said. Months of rehabilitation and healing followed. He has enough mobility in his left leg to walk slowly with the use of a brace, but he never regained use of his left arm. That hasn’t stopped him from leading a full life. “I have always loved being outdoors,” Ford said. “I want to see what God has created and appreciate its beauty.” Ten years ago, Ford starting yearning to get back into the outdoors he loved to explore as a child with his best friend, Dan Powell. He missed hunting and fishing. “We’ve been friends since 1958,” Ford said with a smile. Ford has learned to adapt, creating a method of holding the bow string with his mouth while extending the 70-pound pull bow in front of his body. The process makes his dentist cringe. Ford’s wife, Susan, makes nylon patches that are attached to the bow string. Ford bites the patch, and quickly thrusts the bow forward, holding it rocksteady with his powerful right arm. “When I want to release the string, I make a puff of air with my mouth,” Ford said. “I have tried saying certain words, but eventually found that just puffing works the best in terms of accuracy.” And like any good bow hunt-

The Associated Press PORTLAND — The loss of federal timber payments is pushing some Oregon counties already suffering from recession toward possible financial collapse. To make things worse, the Legislature is trying to pare down a projected $3.5 billion state budget shortfall that likely will result in cuts to services that counties provide under shared funding or contracts with state and federal agencies.

Federal timber payments are set to expire in 2012, carving big holes in the budgets of 18 Oregon counties. The Oregonian reports that if the federal payments expire, some counties simply won’t be viable. Mike McArthur is executive director of the Association of Oregon Counties. He says there’s no provision for municipal bankruptcy under Oregon law — so counties will simply have to cut back services.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Mark Ylen / Albany Democrat-Herald

Leland Ford practices archery at a friend’s home near Turner. Ford uses his mouth to clench an arrow and then pushes the bow forward with his right arm. He has not had use of his left arm since being shot in the head during a 1974 hunting accident.

“I will shoot up to 1 0 0 arrows per night. At 2 0 yards, I will hit the bull’s eye. At 3 0 yards, I hit an area the size of a paper plate. At 4 0 yards, I can place them in an 1 8 -inch pattern. I’ve gotten a deer each of the last three years.” — Leland Ford, Linn County hunter er, Ford faithfully practices his craft. “I will shoot up to 100 arrows per night. At 20 yards, I will hit the bull’s eye. At 30 yards, I hit an area the size of a paper plate. At 40 yards, I can place them in an 18-inch pattern,” Ford said. “I’ve gotten a deer each of the last three years.” Ford said one key to his success is that “I’m a patient man. I will sit for hours waiting for a deer to get into range. I waited for this year’s deer for days off and on.” Ford said life can be hard, but “nothing’s impossible.” “I figure you just have to be smarter than the problem,” Ford said. “I also like to go fishing. I use my thumb to reel up the line.” He also figured out a way to tie

his own fish hooks by attaching a cork to a necklace to hold the hook, while he loops the line into a knot. The rigors of elk hunting, which is usually in rugged terrain, at first posed a problem, but as always, Ford’s friend Powell came through for him. “We went to a hardware store and tried out wheelbarrows,” Ford said. “Dan hauls me up and down the trail in the wheelbarrow.” Because he has limited vision, Ford’s wife, Susan, will often act as his spotter. “She’s excellent,” Ford said. “Other guys have asked if she could help them out.” Ford’s first wife was a schoolteacher and worked in Burns, where the family lived for 13 years. He says his disability was a factor in their divorce.

They reared five children of their own — Rachael Cantrell of Albany, John Ford of Jefferson, Joe Ford of Creswell, Elizabeth Taylor of Burns and adopted daughter Sharon Gardner, who lives in Utah. They also took in 31 foster children. “She didn’t want me to work, so I was a stay-at-home dad and raised the kids,” Ford said. “At one time, we had 13 kids under one roof. I loved it.” After they divorced, Ford was single for several years until he met Susan at church. She had been widowed and had no intentions of remarrying. “When he asked me what kind of food I like to eat, I ran out of the room to my car,” she said. But as in all things, Ford was persistent and four years ago, they wed. “He has so much enthusiasm I forget he has only one arm,” Susan said. “He does things so easily, people forget.” Ford’s only concession to his disability is being extra careful when he walks. “I have to watch so that I don’t get myself into dangerous situations,” Ford said. “I’m pretty conservative about that.”

Cold Weather Is Here! We have the Amish Heat Surge Fireplace and Eden Pure heaters!

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store 2660 NE Hwy 20, Bend • (541) 330-0420 By Costco, across from Safeway, in the Forum Center.

HOURS: Mon - Sat 10 - 6 • Sun 12 - 5


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Golf Inside Tiger Woods still atop leaderboard, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2010

L O C A L LY THE CIVIL WAR Bend’s Eaton wins Jim Thorpe All-Around Award Ashton Eaton, a five-time NCAA track and field champion from Bend, has been named winner of the 2010 Jim Thorpe All-Around Award. The honor, awarded annuAshton Eaton ally since 1985 by the United States Sports Academy, is presented to an individual who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in multiple sports and/or multiple events of the same sport. As a University of Oregon senior, Eaton set a new world record for points (6,499) when he won his second consecutive national heptathlon title in March at the 2010 NCAA Division I Indoor Track and Field Championships. The Mountain View High School graduate capped his career at Oregon in June by becoming the first athlete to win three consecutive NCAA championships in the decathlon. Eaton set meet, Pac-10 Conference and UO records with his winning total of 8,457 points. Past winners of the Thorpe All-Around Award include Olympic gold medalist Dan O’Brien (decathlon), Deion Sanders (football/baseball), Herschel Walker (football/ Olympic bobsledder), Willie Gault (Olympic sprinter and bobsledder/football), Danny Ainge (basketball/baseball), Bo Jackson (baseball/football) and Julius Peppers (football/basketball). —Bulletin staff report

It’s here: No. 1 Oregon’s last hurdle Ducks playing for a national title shot; Beavers hoping to make a bowl game By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

CORVALLIS — Oregon cornerback Cliff Harris put himself in Oregon State’s shoes when contemplating today’s Civil War. If he were a Beaver, Harris says that right about now he’d be thinking: “We’ve got to give it our best shot. They’re No. 1 in the nation and we want to knock them off their high horse.” Yep, that about covers it. With the BCS title game nearly within grasp, there’s one thing that top-ranked Oregon can be sure of: The Beavers are going to bring it. Oregon State (5-6, 4-4 Pac-10) needs one more win to become bowl eligible and avoid a losing season for the first time since 2005. See Civil War / D5

Next up Oregon State running back Jacquizz Rodgers

• Oregon at Oregon State • W h en:Today, 12:30 p.m. • T V :ABC • Radio: KICE-AM 940, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690

Oregon running back LaMichael James

PREP WRESTLING

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

White Buffs knock off Cowgirls Bulletin staff report

IN SID E NBA Wizards........83 Blazers .........79

Rockets ...... 127 Grizzlies ..... 111

Raptors ...... 111 Thunder .......99

Spurs ......... 107 T’wolves ....101

Bobcats .......91 Nets .............84

Nuggets .....109 Clippers .....104

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Hawks ..........93 76ers ...........88

Suns ..........105 Pacers..........97

Redmond’s David Peebles, top, and Madras’ Miguel Vasquez fight for position during the 135-pound match on Friday at the Redmond Duals. The Panthers went 3-0 in dual matches on the night.

Magic.........104 Pistons.........91

Lakers ........ 113 Kings ...........80

Celtics .......104 Bulls.............92

Mavericks ....93 Jazz..............81

Panthers win duals

Knicks ........100 Hornets ........92

Redmond defeats Mountain View, Madras and North Medford at home to kick off its season Bulletin staff report

Washington Wizards point guard Gilbert Arenas (9) guards Portland Trail Blazers guard Brandon Roy.

Blazers lose again on East Coast Portland falls to Washington, road woes continue, see Page D4

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Sports in Brief ...........................D3 Prep Sports ...............................D3 Basketball ................................. D4 Golf ........................................... D4 Football .....................................D5 NHL ...........................................D5

REDMOND — Prepping for his team’s first meet of the season, Redmond wrestling coach Nathan Stanley was not sure what to expect from his Panthers. “Coaches always feel like they’re not ready and that the kids need some more time before we compete,” Stanley said Friday night. The Panthers performed just fine in their season-opening competition as they went 3-0 at their own Redmond Duals on Friday. Redmond defeated Mountain View (60-15),

North Medford (56-24) and Madras (62-15) and was the only team to post a 3-0 record at the five-team meet. “In my six years here we’re as far along at this time as we’ve ever been,” Stanley said. The Panthers lighter weights set the tone for the day. Brandon Short (103 pounds), Ty George (112) and Ryan Haney (119) combined to go 9-0 during the duals. Chance Lindquist (130), Colby Fultz (140), Boomer Fleming (145) and Gunnar Sigado (189) also each won three matches for host Redmond. Mountain View also wrestled well, accord-

ing to Cougars coach Les Combs. Mountain View went 2-1, topping Bend (48-27) and Madras (48-30) in what was the Cougars’ first competition of the season as well. “It was a great day,” Combs said. “We hadn’t beaten either Bend or Madras in three years.” Keelin Crew led the way for Mountain View at 125 pounds, going 3-0. In other dual matches, Madras defeated Bend 36-24 and North Medford topped the Lava Bears 50-20. All of Central Oregon’s teams are back on the mat next weekend. Redmond heads to the coast for a tournament in North Bend, Bend High is at La Grande, Mountain View is in Hillsboro and Madras competes at Culver.

MADRAS — Playing its first girls basketball game of the season, Madras hung tough after trailing for the entire contest before knocking off visiting Crook County 53-51 with some last-minute heroics. Trailing 51-50 with 3.5 seconds left on the game clock, Cheyenne Wahnetah grabbed Lucy Suppah’s inbounds pass, scored on a layup and was fouled. Wahnetah drained her free throw to push the White Buffaloes past a stunned Cowgirls team. “It was a fun game to be a part of,” Madras coach Rory Oster said. The Cowgirls (1-1 overall) held what at times was a commanding lead and entered the fourth quarter ahead 44-35. Madras came alive in the fourth, thanks in large part to consistent rebounding and defensive pressure, according to Oster. On offense, the White Buffs took advantage of strong post play, but it was not until the final seconds that they took the lead. “It took us awhile to figure some things out,” said Oster. Wahnetah’s game-winning score accounted for three of the senior’s nine points on the night. Abby Scott led the home team with 15 points. Crook County’s Danni Severance posted a game-high 21 points and two three-pointers in the loss. Madras is at Mazama of Klamath Falls on Friday, while the Cowgirls are off until Saturday, Dec. 11, when they travel to meet Mazama as well.

N AT I O N A L F I N A L S R O D E O

Culver’s Mote takes second again in bareback day. Mote moved from fifth in the world Inside LAS VEGAS — Culver bareback rider standings to third, with $117,065.17 for Bobby Mote earned another paycheck at • NFR results, the year. Gray, of Cheney, Wash., still the National Finals Rodeo, giving more leads with $159,024.33, while Steven Page D2 momentum to his bid for a fourth world Dent, of Mullen, Neb., is in third place at title. $144,643.22. The money leader after the The three-time champ took second place in the NFR is declared the world champion. second go-round of the 10-round NFR on Friday Redmond bareback rider Steven Peebles finnight at the Thomas & Mack Center. It was his ished just out of the money Friday, finishing in second straight second-place finish. He rode the seventh with 81 points. Prineville’s Jason Havens horse Night Bells to a score of 86 points, trailing finished 14th in the same event with a score of only Kaycee Feild, who scored an 88. 77. Mote earned a check of $13,840.14 and made The Central Oregon team of Charly Crawford up even more ground on current world leader and Russell Cardoza did not earn a check in team Ryan Gray, who had a non-qualifying ride on Fri- roping. Crawford, of Prineville, and Cardoza, of

Bulletin staff report

Terrebonne, roped their calf in 11.8 seconds. Terrebonne’s Brenda Mays knocked over a barrel in barrel racing, and finished out of the money with a time of 18.77 seconds. Trevor Brazile won his record eighth allaround gold buckle Friday night, breaking a tie for the mark with Ty Murray. Brazile, the Decatur, Texas, cowboy who has 12 world titles — in steer roping, team roping, tie-down roping and all-around — finished second in team roping and sixth in tie-down roping Friday night to wrap up the all-around title earlier than he has ever before. With season earnings of $323,526, Brazile has a $186,065 lead over second-place Curtis Cassidy of Donalda, Alberta.

Culver’s Bobby Mote finished in second place in the second go-round of the NFR on Friday night.


D2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Qualifying Tournament, fourth round, Golf Channel Noon — PGA Tour, Chevron World Challenge, third round, NBC. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA Tour Championship, third round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 6:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Everton, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Rutgers at West Virginia, ABC 9 a.m. — College, Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Conference USA Championship Game, SMU vs. Central Florida, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — College, Troy at Florida Atlantic, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Oregon at Oregon State, ABC. 1 p.m. — College, SEC Championship Game, South Carolina vs. Auburn, CBS. 4 p.m. — High school, Washington Class 4A final, Skyline vs. Ferris, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Washington at Washington State, VS. network. 4:45 p.m. — College, ACC Championship Game, Florida State vs. Virginia Tech, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, Big 12 Championship Game, Nebraska vs. Oklahoma, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Connecticut vs. South Florida, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — College, USC at UCLA, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Women’s college, Cal at Texas A&M, FSNW. 9:30 a.m. — Men’s college, Kentucky at North Carolina, CBS. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Cal at Iowa State, FSNW. 12:15 p.m. — Men’s college, Butler at Duke, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Alabama at Purdue, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas Tech at Washington, FSNW. 2:15 p.m. — Men’s college, Illinois at Gonzaga, ESPN. 2:30 p.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina State at Syracuse, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Colorado, ESPNU.

SKIING 2 p.m. — Aspen Winternational, women’s slalom, Vs. network (taped).

RODEO 6 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 3, ESPN Classic. 10:30 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 3, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Qualifying Tournament, fifth round, Golf Channel Noon — PGA Tour, Chevron World Challenge, final round, NBC. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA Tour Championship, final round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 9 a.m. — Women’s NCAA Cup, final, Notre Dame vs. Stanford, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Denver Broncos at Kansas City Chiefs, CBS. 10 a.m. — NFL, San Francisco 49ers at Green Bay Packers, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Carolina Panthers at Seattle Seahawks, Fox. 5 p.m. — NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens, NBC.

SKIING 11 a.m. — Birds of Prey, men’s alpine, NBC (taped).

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. — Women’s college, Purdue at Notre Dame, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Oklahoma at Arizona, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Virginia at Virginia Tech, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Portland State at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, Maryland vs. Temple, FSNW. 6 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Clippers at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RODEO 6 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 4, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 12:30 p.m. — College, Oregon at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Colorado, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 1 p.m. — NFL, Carolina Panthers at Seattle Seahawks, KBNW-FM 96.5.

BASKETBALL 3 p.m. — Men’s College, Portland State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 6 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Clippers at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Girls basketball: Eagle Point at Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine tournament, 3 p.m.; Summit at Aloha Invitational, 11:30 a.m.; North Medford at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Grants Pass at Bend, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Sherman Invitational, 2 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain View at Eagle Point, 12:45 p.m.; Dallas at La Pine, 5 p.m.; Summit at Aloha Invitational, 1:15 p.m.; Redmond at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Bend at Grants Pass, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Sherman Invitational, 3:30 p.m. Wrestling: Summit at Springfield, 10 a.m.; La Pine at Grant Union, 10 a.m. Swimming: Mountain View, Sisters at Madras Relays, noon

EAST Colgate 57, Loyola of Chicago 55 Harvard 85, Hartford 61 Loyola, Md. 57, Navy 54 Manhattan 68, New Hampshire 51 Providence 55, Brown 30 TOURNAMENT ASU Classic First Round Arizona St. 69, Cal Poly 58 New Mexico 64, Lamar 58 Evansville Winter Classic First Round Cent. Michigan 96, Coastal Carolina 42 Evansville 69, Valparaiso 67 Gene Hackerman Invitational First Round Louisiana-Monroe 55, Rice 46 Prairie View 62, Long Beach St. 52

I N THE BLEACHERS

RODEO NFR NATIONAL FINALS RODEO Friday At Thomas & Mack Center Las Vegas Second go-round Bareback riding 1. Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah, 88 points on Stace Smith Pro Rodeo’s RD Mercer, $17,512. 2. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., 86, $13,840. 3. (tie) Kelly Timberman, Mills, Wyo., and Justin McDaniel, Porum, Okla., 85, $8,897 each. 5. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., 84, $4,519. 6. Dusty LaValley, Bezanson, Alberta, 82, $2,825. 7. (tie) Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas, and Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore., 81. 9. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, 80.5. 10. (tie) Matt Bright, Azle, Texas, and D.V. Fennell, Neosho, Mo., 80. 12. (tie) Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas, and Joe Gunderson, Agar, S.D., 77.5. 14. Jason Havens, Prineville, Ore., 77. 15. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash., NS. Steer wrestling 1. (tie) Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., and Ethen Thouvenell, Napa, Calif., 3.9 seconds, $15,676 each. 3. (tie) Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore., and Cody Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, 4.0, $8,897 each. 5. (tie) Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb., and Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., 4.5, $3,672. 7. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis., 4.9. 8. Dane Hanna, Berthold, N.D., 5.0. 9. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo., 5.4. 10. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, 5.5. 11. Kyle Hughes, Olney Springs, Colo., 7.0. 12. Todd Suhn, Hermosa, S.D., 14.0. 13. (tie) Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas. Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan., and Wade Sumpter, Fowler, Colo., NT. Team roping 1. Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas/Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, 3.9 seconds, $17,512 each. 2. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas/Patrick Smith, Midland, Texas, 4.3, $13,840. 3. (tie) Turtle Powell, Stephenville, Texas/ Broc Cresta, Santa Rosa, Calif., and Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo./Cody Hintz, Spring Creek, Nev., 4.5, $8,897 each. 5. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont./Travis Graves, Jay, Okla., 4.7, $4,519. 6. Chad Masters, Clarksville, Tenn./ Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev., 8.4, $2,825. 7. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas/Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz., 8.8. 8. (tie) Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont./Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., and Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz./Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz., 9.3. 10. Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn./Caleb Twisselman, Santa Margarita, Calif., 10.4. 11. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore./Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., 11.8. 12. Nick Sartain, Yukon, Okla./Kollin VonAhn, Durant, Okla., 19.1. 13. (tie) Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont./ Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas. Britt Williams, Hammond, Mont./Bobby Harris, Gillette, Wyo., and Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas/Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, NT. Saddle bronc riding 1. Cody Wright, Milford, Utah, 87 points on Burch Rodeo’s Friendly Fire, $17,512. 2. (tie) J.J. Elshere, Quinn, S.D., and Jesse Wright, Millford, Utah, 85.5, $12,145 each. 4. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb., 84.5, $7,344. 5. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., 83, $4,519. 6. Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont., 82.5, $2,825. 7. Shaun Stroh, Dickinson, N.D., 82. 8. (tie) Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa, and Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La., 81.5. 10. Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La., 80.5. 11. Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas, 78.5. 12. Dustin Flundra, Pincher Creek, Alberta, 78. 13. Scott Miller, Boise, Idaho, 77.5. 14. Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas, 74.5. 15. Jeff Willert, Belvidere, S.D., 68.5. Tie-down roping 1. (tie) Fred Whitfield, Hockley, Texas, and Jerrad Hofstetter, Portales, N.M., 7.6 seconds, $15,676 each. 3. Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, 7.7, $10,451. 4. Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, Okla., 7.8, $7,344. 5. Ryan Jarrett, Summerville, Ga., 8.0, $4,519. 6. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, 8.1, $2,825. 7. Tyson Durfey, Colbert, Wash., 8.3. 8. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 8.9. 9. Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz., 9.1. 10. Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla., 9.2. 11. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La., 9.4. 12. Clint Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 11.4. 13. Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas, 17.9. 14. (tie) Stran Smith, Childress, Texas, and Clif Cooper, Decatur, Texas, NT. Barrel racing 1. Kelli Tolbert, Hooper, Utah, 13.68 seconds, $17,512. 2. Jill Moody, Letcher, S.D., 13.71, $13,840. 3. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D., 13.74, $10,451. 4. Tana Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla., 13.79, $7,344. 5. Lindsay Sears, Nanton, Alberta, 13.81, $4,519. 6. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz., 13.93, $2,825. 7. Christina Richman, Glendora, Calif., 13.95. 8. Nellie Williams, Cottonwood, Calif., 14.00. 9. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 14.06. 10. Sherrylynn Johnson, Henryetta, Okla., 14.09. 11. Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M., 14.14. 12. Brittany Pozzi, Victoria, Texas, 14.17. 13. Benette Barrington, Lubbock, Texas, 18.75. 14. Brenda Mays, Terrebonne, Ore., 18.77. 15. Angie Meadors, Blanchard, Okla., 18.81. Bull riding 1. J.W. Harris, Mullin, Texas, 89.5 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Red Onion, $17,512. 2. Cody Whitney, Asher, Okla., 88.0, $13,840. 3. Shawn Hogg, Odessa, Texas, 85.5, $10,451. 4. Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah, 84.0, $7,344. 5. Chad Denton, Berry Creek, Calif., 75.0, $4,519. 6. (tie) Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah. Tyler Smith, Fruita, Colo.. Kanin Asay, Powell, Wyo.. Ardie Maier, Timber Lake, S.D.. Seth Glause, Rock Springs, Wyo.. Clayton Williams, Carthage, Texas. Dustin Elliott, North Platte, Neb.. Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo.. D.J. Domangue, Houma, La., and Corey Navarre, Weatherford, Okla., NS.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 9 2 0 .818 334 N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 Miami 6 5 0 .545 205 Buffalo 2 9 0 .182 229 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 5 0 .545 282 Jacksonville 6 5 0 .545 240 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 257 Houston 5 7 0 .417 288 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 8 3 0 .727 250 Pittsburgh 8 3 0 .727 254 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 216 Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 285 San Diego 6 5 0 .545 310 Oakland 5 6 0 .455 255 Denver 3 8 0 .273 250 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 8 4 0 .667 344 N.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 277 Washington 5 6 0 .455 215 Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 9 2 0 .818 276 New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 Tampa Bay 7 4 0 .636 219 Carolina 1 10 0 .091 140 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 8 3 0 .727 222 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 269 Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 189 Detroit 2 9 0 .182 258 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 6 0 .455 209 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 213 San Francisco 4 7 0 .364 187 Arizona 3 8 0 .273 194 ——— Thursday’s Game Philadelphia 34, Houston 24 Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Denver at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 10 a.m. Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Oakland at San Diego, 1:05 p.m.

PA 266 187 225 295 PA 252 294 218 321 PA 188 181 229 288 PA 231 225 256 323 PA 281 240 262 301 PA 209 197 223 276 PA 172 166 239 282 PA 275 231 225 319

HOCKEY NHL

Carolina at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets at New England, 5:30 p.m.

College Schedule All Times PST (Subject to change) ——— Friday’s Games MIDWEST MAC Championship Miami (Ohio) 26, N. Illinois 21 FAR WEST Fresno St. 25, Illinois 23 ——— Today’s Games EAST Rutgers at West Virginia, 9 a.m. SOUTH CUSA Championship, SMU at UCF, 9 a.m. Troy at Florida Atlantic, 11 a.m. Nevada at Louisiana Tech, noon SEC Championship, Auburn vs. South Carolina, at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Middle Tennessee at Fla. International, 3 p.m. ACC Championship, Virginia Tech vs. Florida St., at Charlotte, N.C., 4:45 p.m. Connecticut at South Florida, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 9 a.m. SOUTHWEST Big 12 Championship, Nebraska vs. Oklahoma, at Arlington, Texas, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Utah St. at Boise St., noon Oregon at Oregon St., 12:30 p.m. San Jose St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Washington at Washington St., 4 p.m. UNLV at Hawaii, 7:30 p.m. Southern Cal at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (36) 11-0 1,475 1 2. Auburn (23) 12-0 1,456 2 3. TCU (1) 12-0 1,383 4 4. Wisconsin 11-1 1,289 5 5. Stanford 11-1 1,283 7 6. Ohio St. 11-1 1,184 8 7. Michigan St. 11-1 1,098 11 8. Arkansas 10-2 1,094 12 9. Boise St. 10-1 908 3 10. Oklahoma 10-2 886 14 11. LSU 10-2 856 6 12. Virginia Tech 10-2 761 13 13. Nebraska 10-2 740 16 14. Nevada 11-1 736 19 15. Missouri 10-2 691 15 16. Oklahoma St. 10-2 599 10 17. Alabama 9-3 597 9 18. South Carolina 9-3 591 18 19. Texas A&M 9-3 582 17 20. Florida St. 9-3 356 22 21. Utah 10-2 249 23 22. Mississippi St. 8-4 224 25 23. West Virginia 8-3 147 — 24. N. Illinois 10-2 130 — 25. Hawaii 9-3 43 — Others receiving votes: Arizona 34, Maryland 29, Tulsa 28, Connecticut 16, Navy 14, UCF 12, San Diego St. 5, Air Force 2, N.C. State 2. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PST Conf. W L Oregon 8 0 Stanford 8 1 Oregon State 4 4 USC 4 4 Washington 4 4 Arizona 4 5 Arizona State 4 5 California 3 5 UCLA 2 6 Washington State 1 7 Thursday’s Game Arizona St. 30, Arizona 29, 2OT Today’s Games Oregon at Oregon State, 12:30 p.m. Washington at Washington State, 4 p.m. USC at UCLA, 7:30 p.m.

Ov’ll W L 11 0 11 1 5 6 7 5 5 6 7 5 6 6 5 6 4 7 2 9

2010-11 BOWL SCHEDULE Subject to Change All Times PST Dec. 18 New Mexico Bowl at Albuquerque, MWC vs. WAC, 11 a.m. (ESPN) Dec. 18 Humanitarian Bowl at Boise, Idaho, WAC vs. MWC, 2:30 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 18 New Orleans Bowl, Sun Belt champion vs. CUSA, 6 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 21 Beef ‘O’Brady’s Bowl, St. Petersburg, Fla., Big East vs. CUSA, 5 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 22 MAACO Bowl, Las Vegas, MWC vs. Pac-10, 5 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl at San Diego, MWC vs. Navy, 5 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl at Honolulu, WAC vs. CUSA, 5 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl at Detroit, Big Ten vs. MAC, 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Dec. 27 Independence Bowl at Shreveport, La., ACC vs. MWC, 2 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl at Orlando, Fla., ACC vs. Big East, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 28 Insight Bowl at Tempe, Ariz., Big 12 vs. Big 10, 7 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 29 Military Bowl at Washington, CUSA vs. ACC, 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Dec. 29 Texas Bowl at Houston, Big 12 vs. Big Ten, 3 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 29 Alamo Bowl at San Antonio, Pac-10 vs. Big 12, 6 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl at Fort Worth, Texas, CUSA vs. MWC, 9 a.m. (ESPN) Dec. 30 Pinstripe Bowl at Bronx, N.Y., Big East vs. Big 12, 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 30 Music City Bowl at Nashville, Tenn., SEC vs. ACC, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 30 Holiday Bowl at San Diego, Big 12 vs. Pac-10, 7 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl at Charlotte, N.C., ACC vs. Big East, 9 a.m. (ESPN) Dec. 31 Sun Bowl at El Paso, Texas, Pac-10 vs. ACC, 11 a.m. (CBS) Dec. 31 Liberty Bowl at Memphis, Tenn., SEC vs. CUSA, 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Dec. 31 Chick-fil-A Bowl at Atlanta, SEC vs. ACC, 4:30

p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl at Dallas, Big 12 vs. Big 10, 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Jan. 1 Capital One Bowl at Orlando, Fla., Big 10 vs. SEC, 10 a.m. (ESPN) Jan. 1 Outback Bowl at Tampa, Fla., SEC vs. Big 10, 10 a.m. (ABC) Jan. 1 Gator Bowl at Jacksonville, Fla., Big 10 vs. SEC, 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Jan. 1 Rose Bowl at Pasadena, Calif., BCS (Pac-10 champion) vs. BCS (Big Ten champion), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 1 Fiesta Bowl at Glendale, Ariz., BCS vs. BCS (Big 12 champion), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 3 Orange Bowl at Miami, BCS (At-large) vs. BCS (ACC Champion), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl at New Orleans, BCS (At-large) vs. BCS (SEC Champion), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl at Mobile, Ala., Sun Belt vs. MAC, 5 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl at Arlington, Texas, Big 12 vs. SEC, 5 p.m. (FOX) Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl at Birmingham, Ala., Big East vs. SEC, 9 a.m. (ESPN) Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl at San Francisco, Pac-10 vs. WAC, 6 p.m. (ESPN) Jan. 10 BCS National Championship game at Glendale, Ariz., BCS1 vs. BCS2, 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday VIKINGS 7 6 Bills DOLPHINS 4.5 4.5 Browns TITANS 2 3 Jaguars CHIEFS 7 8.5 Broncos GIANTS 7.5 7 Redskins Bears 3 4.5 LIONS PACKERS 10 9.5 49ers Saints 7 7 BENGALS Falcons 3 3 BUCCANEERS CHARGERS 13 13 Raiders SEAHAWKS 6 6 Panthers COLTS 6 6 Cowboys Rams 3 3.5 CARDINALS RAVENS 3 3 Steelers Monday PATRIOTS 3.5 3.5 Jets Favorite

COLLEGE Today CINCINNATI PK 2 Pittsburgh W. VIRGINIA 20 21 Rutgers S. FLORIDA 1.5 1.5 Connecticut BOISE ST 40 38.5 Utah St Nevada 12.5 8.5 LA TECH Usc 7 6.5 UCLA Washington 7 6 WASHINGTON ST Oregon 16 16.5 OREGON ST IDAHO 14 14 San Jose St HAWAII 34.5 35 Unlv Troy 4.5 4.5 FLA ATLANTIC FLORIDA INT’L 6.5 5 Mid Tenn St Conference USA Championship C. FLORIDA 9.5 9.5 Smu SEC Championship Auburn 5 5.5 S. Carolina ACC Championship Virginia Tech 4.5 4 Florida St Big 12 Championship Oklahoma 4.5 4.5 Nebraska

SOCCER Women’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Semifinals Friday, Dec. 3 At Cary, N.C. Notre Dame 1, Ohio State 0 Stanford 2, Boston College 0 Championship Sunday, Dec. 5 At Cary, N.C. Notre Dame vs. Stanford, 9 a.m.

Men’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Quarterfinals Friday, Dec. 3 North Carolina 1, SMU 1, North Carolina 4-2 penalty kicks Today, Dec. 4 Michigan at Maryland, 10 a.m. California at Akron, 1 p.m. UCLA at Louisville, 4 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Friday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Idaho 63, North Dakota 42 Portland 58, Montana 54 Kansas St. 63, Washington St. 58 MIDWEST Monmouth, N.J. 64, E. Michigan 63 SOUTH Georgia 66, UAB 64 EAST Connecticut 94, UMBC 61 Iona 94, Canisius 85 Marist 80, Niagara 72 Villanova 71, Saint Joseph’s 60

Women’s college Friday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 101, BYU-Hawaii 51 Bryant 79, Air Force 74 Gonzaga 101, E. Washington 74 Oregon 80, Boise St. 64 Pepperdine 57, Oregon St. 54 Saint Mary’s, Calif. 77, UC Santa Barbara 53 UC Riverside 68, Montana St. 63 UCLA 67, Loyola Marymount 43 SOUTHWEST Texas St. 64, Weber St. 54 UTEP 79, CS Northridge 59 MIDWEST Cleveland St. 66, W. Michigan 55 DePaul 76, SIU-Edwardsville 40 Missouri St. 72, E. Michigan 57 SOUTH CS Bakersfield 68, Fla. International 64 Georgia Tech 68, Middle Tennessee 48 Tulane 67, Saint Joseph’s 58

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 27 17 8 2 36 82 64 Philadelphia 26 15 7 4 34 87 64 N.Y. Rangers 28 16 11 1 33 82 74 New Jersey 25 8 15 2 18 46 74 N.Y. Islanders 24 5 14 5 15 51 80 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 26 16 8 2 34 68 52 Boston 24 14 8 2 30 70 47 Ottawa 26 11 14 1 23 58 79 Buffalo 26 10 13 3 23 67 73 Toronto 24 8 12 4 20 51 70 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 27 18 7 2 38 91 71 Tampa Bay 26 14 9 3 31 78 89 Atlanta 26 13 10 3 29 82 77 Carolina 25 11 11 3 25 73 79 Florida 24 10 14 0 20 62 65 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 23 17 4 2 36 82 59 Chicago 28 14 12 2 30 86 82 Columbus 24 14 9 1 29 65 62 St. Louis 24 12 9 3 27 63 68 Nashville 24 11 8 5 27 58 63 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 24 14 7 3 31 78 61 Colorado 25 13 9 3 29 86 76 Minnesota 25 11 11 3 25 60 72 Calgary 26 11 13 2 24 72 78 Edmonton 25 9 12 4 22 68 92 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 24 15 8 1 31 70 63 Phoenix 24 12 7 5 29 70 70 Anaheim 28 13 12 3 29 71 84 Los Angeles 24 14 10 0 28 66 59 San Jose 24 12 8 4 28 72 68 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games Calgary 3, Minnesota 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 2, N.Y. Islanders 0 Carolina 2, Colorado 1, OT Buffalo 5, Columbus 0 Vancouver 3, Chicago 0 Detroit 4, Anaheim 0 Today’s Games New Jersey at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. San Jose at Montreal, 11 a.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Columbus, 4 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Nashville, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 5 p.m. Florida at Phoenix, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour CHEVRON WORLD CHALLENGE Friday At Sherwood Country Club Thousand Oaks, Calif. Yardage: 7,052 yards; Par: 72 Purse: $5 million Second Round Tiger Woods 65-66—131 Graeme McDowell 66-69—135 Luke Donald 70-66—136 Rory McIlroy 66-70—136 Paul Casey 73-65—138 Nick Watney 72-67—139 Hunter Mahan 72-67—139 Sean O’Hair 72-67—139 Ian Poulter 72-67—139 Dustin Johnson 69-72—141 Zach Johnson 75-67—142 Stewart Cink 69-75—144 Bubba Watson 76-69—145 Anthony Kim 79-66—145 Jim Furyk 72-73—145 Camilo Villegas 70-75—145 Matt Kuchar 75-71—146 Steve Stricker 72-76—148

LPGA Tour LPGA TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP Friday At Grand Cypress Golf Club (North and South Courses) Orlando, Fla. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,518; Par: 72 Second Round 28 players did not finish the round Amy Yang 67-70—137 Seon Hwa Lee 67-73—140 Maria Hjorth 72-68—140 Julieta Granada 69-72—141 Morgan Pressel 73-69—142 Katherine Hull 72-70—142 Cristie Kerr 71-71—142 Se Ri Pak 74-69—143 Na Yeon Choi 73-71—144 Song-Hee Kim 71-73—144 Ilhee Lee 75-70—145 Angela Stanford 73-72—145 Laura Diaz 74-71—145 Taylor Leon 73-72—145 In-Kyung Kim 73-73—146 Suzann Pettersen 73-73—146 Brittany Lincicome 75-71—146 Beatriz Recari 74-72—146 Leta Lindley 70-76—146 Alena Sharp 76-71—147 Christina Kim 75-72—147 Juli Inkster 72-75—147 Yani Tseng 75-73—148 Sandra Gal 75-73—148 Candie Kung 74-74—148 Giulia Sergas 75-73—148 Amanda Blumenherst 76-72—148 M.J. Hur 79-70—149 Mika Miyazato 79-70—149 Becky Morgan 73-76—149 Stacy Prammanasudh 72-77—149 Eun-Hee Ji 71-78—149 Allison Fouch 78-72—150 Mina Harigae 77-73—150 Michele Redman 76-74—150 Maria Hernandez 76-74—150 Sophie Gustafson 75-75—150 Kristy McPherson 75-75—150 Gwladys Nocera 74-76—150 Jennifer Rosales 73-77—150 Momoko Ueda 77-73—150 Jimin Kang 74-76—150 Meaghan Francella 80-71—151 Karine Icher 78-73—151 Brittany Lang 77-74—151 Sun Young Yoo 76-75—151 Louise Stahle 76-75—151 Stephanie Louden 73-78—151 Stacy Lewis 78-74—152 Anna Nordqvist 81-71—152 Ai Miyazato 80-72—152 Jiyai Shin 77-75—152 Aree Song 77-75—152 Na On Min 76-76—152 Hye Jung Choi 76-76—152 Paula Creamer 75-77—152 Mi Hyun Kim 75-77—152 Stacy Lewis 78-74—152 Louise Friberg 74-78—152 Pat Hurst 79-74—153 Eunjung Yi 78-75—153 Anna Rawson 76-77—153 Sarah Jane Smith 75-78—153

Wendy Ward Mindy Kim Adrienne White Azahara Munoz Laura Davies Sarah Kemp Reilley Rankin Ashli Bunch Meredith Duncan Ji Young Oh Christi Cano Irene Cho Yoo Kyeong Kim Lorie Kane Vicky Hurst Leah Wigger Karen Stupples Tanya Dergal Janice Moodie Helen Alfredsson Paola Moreno Libby Smith Katie Kempter Beth Bader Diana D’Alessio Lisa Strom Natalie Gulbis Misun Cho Jimin Jeong Nicole Jeray

Did not finish Tania Elosegui Chella Choi Heather Bowie Young Mariajo Uribe Kyeong Bae Amy Hung Samantha Richdale Jessica Shepley Jin Young Pak Moira Dunn Jane Park Karin Sjodin Lisa Meldrum Paige Mackenzie Pernilla Lindberg Kris Tamulis Haeji Kang Silvia Cavalleri Katie Futcher Alison Walshe Nicole Hage Jean Reynolds Allison Hanna Jill McGill Mhairi McKay Sarah Lee Cindy Lacrosse Michelle Ellis Leaderboard 1. Amy Yang 2. Maria Hjorth 2. Seon Hwa Lee 4. Julieta Granada 5. Morgan Pressel 5. Kyeong Bae 5. Katherine Hull 5. Cristie Kerr 9. Se Ri Pak 9. Chella Choi 11. Mariajo Uribe 11. Na Yeon Choi 11. Song-Hee Kim 14. Ilhee Lee 14. Lisa Meldrum 14. Laura Diaz 14. Amy Hung 14. Angela Stanford 14. Taylor Leon

74-79—153 76-77—153 77-77—154 75-79—154 70-84—154 78-77—155 78-77—155 78-77—155 76-79—155 75-80—155 74-82—156 78-79—157 77-80—157 78-79—157 78-79—157 80-78—158 80-78—158 83-76—159 79-80—159 76-83—159 83-77—160 83-80—163 82-81—163 82-81—163 82-82—164 84-88—172 74—WD 82—WD 83—WD 80—WD 70—DNF 73—DNF 73—DNF 73—DNF 73—DNF 74—DNF 74—DNF 74—DNF 74—DNF 75—DNF 75—DNF 75—DNF 75—DNF 76—DNF 76—DNF 76—DNF 76—DNF 76—DNF 76—DNF 78—DNF 78—DNF 78—DNF 78—DNF 79—DNF 79—DNF 80—DNF 82—DNF 82—DNF SCORE -7 -4 -4 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

THRU F F F F F 14 F F F 17 15 F F F 13 F 17 F F

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Bergmann, RHP Brandon Duckworth, RHP Santo Luis, INF Nate Spears and INF Drew Suttonto on minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with 1B Adam Dunn on a four-year contract and with C A.J. Pierzynski on a two-year contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with RHP Jensen Lewis to a one-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with OF Ryan Sweeney on a one-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS—Named Spike Owen coach at Round Rock (PCL), Carlos Olivas trainer and Eric McMahon strength coach at Frisco (Texas). Promoted Jason Wood to manager and Brad Holman to pitching coach of Myrtle Beach (Carolina). Named Julio Garcia coach, Jeffrey Bodenhamer trainer and Ryan McNeal strength coach at Myrtle Beach, Storm Davis pitching coach, Corey Ragsdale coach, Jacob Newburn trainer and Anthony Miller strength coach at Hickory (SAL), Dave Chavarria pitching coach and TJ Nakagawa trainer at Spokane (NWL), Hector Ortiz manager and Oscar Mann Casey pitching coach for the Rangers (Arizona), Candaele special assignment coach, Mike LaCassa player development administration-Arizona Operations. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired RHP Carlos Villanueva from Milwaukee Brewers for a player to be named. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Acquired RHP Scott Linebrink from the Chicago White Sox for RHP Kyle Cofield. CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with RHP Bronson Arroyo on a three-year contract. COLORADO ROCKIES—Agreed to terms with LHP Jorge De La Rosa on a two-year contract. Acquired INF Jose Lopez from Seattle for RHP Chaz Roe. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Re-signed C Rod Barajas to a one-year contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with SS Ronny Cedeno and RHP Jeff Karstens on one-year contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Josh Byrnes senior vice president, baseball operations. Agreed to terms with RHP Luis Perdomo on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with OF Pat Burrell on a one-year contract. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Named Jorge Alvarez manager. FORT WORTH CATS—Signed RHP Wade Mackey. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Signed G-F Damien Wilkins. Women’s National Basketball Association WNBA—Announced the resignation of president Donna Orender, effective Jan. 1, 2011. Named Chris Granger interim president. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Find Houston S Bernard Pollard $40,000 for unnecessary roughness against Tennessee WR Justin Gage in a Nov. 28 game. Fined Arizona OT Jeremy Bridges $20,000 for unnecessary roughness against San Francisco LB Takeo Spikes. Fined Arizona LB Clark Haggans $10,000 for striking a 49er in the head and neck area with his helmet. Fined Green Bay LB Matt Wilhelm $5,000 for a major facemask against Atlanta KR Eric Weems and Baltimore OT Michael Oher for violating the league’s social media policy. BUFFALO BILLS—Placed LB Reggie Torbor on injured reserve. Claimed TE Scott Chandler off waivers from Dallas. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Placed QB Tony Pike on injured reserve. Signed QB Keith Null from the practice squad. NFL Players Association NFLPA—Suspended agent Gary Wichard for nine months for his role in a recruiting scandal involving the University of North Carolina. Revoked the agent certification of Teague Egan, who gave a ride across campus to Southern California RB Dillon Baxter, a violation of NCAA rules. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Placed F Aaron Voros on injured reserve. Recalled LW Matt Beleskey from Syracuse (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Recalled C Aaron Gagnon from Texas (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS—Assigned F Brayden Schenn to Brandon (WHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Recalled G Mark Dekanich from Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Reassigned D David Hale to Binghamton (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Recalled D Ian Cole from Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned D Matt Royto Norfolk (AHL). Recalled F Johan Harju from Norfolk. SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS—Declined the 2011 contract options on MF Claudio Lopez, MF Ciaran O’Brien and MF Peter Vagenas. FC DALLAS—Declined the 2011 contract options on F Jeff Cunningham and G Dario Sala. RED BULL NEW YORK—Declined the 2011 contract options for F Juan Pablo Angel, MF Luke Sassano and D Carey Talley. TORONTO FC—Declined the 2011 contract options on F Fuad Ibrahim, MF midfielder Amadou Sanyang and D Nick Garcia.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

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Baseball • Chicago Cubs great Ron Santo dies: Ron Santo, one of the greatest players in Chicago Cubs history and a longtime WGN radio announcer whose devotion to the perennial losers was made obvious night after night by his excited shouts or dejected laments, has died. He was 70. Santo died in an Arizona hospital from complications of bladder cancer, according to WGN Radio. Santo was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 18 and later lost both legs to the disease.A nine-time allstar in his 15-year career, Santo was widely regarded as one of the best players never to gain induction into the Hall of Fame. • Seattle brings back Bedard, sends away Lopez: Erik Bedard, surprisingly, and Josh Wilson are coming back to Seattle. Jose Lopez is on his way to Colorado. And Ryan Rowland-Smith is a free agent. It was a busy Thursday night for the Mariners, highlighted by the decision to bring back Bedard, their oft-injured left-hander who has never matched his potential, with a $1 million, one-year deal that includes an additional $6.35 million in performance bonuses. The contract is a nonguaranteed deal.Seattle also tendered contracts to closer David Aardsma, reliever Brandon League and left-handed starter Jason Vargas. Seattle had turned down a $4.5 million option on Lopez, signed as a free agent in 2000. He hit .239 with 10 homers, 58 RBIs and 29 doubles in 150 games this year for the Mariners, who used him as a third baseman. Lopez was traded to the Rockies for Chaz Roe, 24, a first-round draft pick in 2005, who was 9-13 with a 5.98 ERA in 27 starts this year at Triple-A Colorado Springs, striking out 115 and walking 53. Seattle offered Rowland-Smith a major league contract and a chance to make the club out of spring training, but he chose to look elsewhere. • Mets’ K-Rod pleads guilty: Mets closer Francisco Rodriguez pleaded guilty Friday to attempted assault to settle charges he attacked his girlfriend’s father at Citi Field last season in a deal that spares him jail time but sends him to additional anger management classes. The 28-year-old reliever had been charged with assault after he was accused of grabbing Carlos Pena, hauling him into a tunnel near the family lounge beneath the team’s ballpark and punching him in the face after an Aug. 11 game. He tore a ligament in the thumb of his pitching hand and underwent season-ending surgery after the altercation. The fight cost Rodriguez more than $3.14 million, in addition to more than seven weeks on the sidelines. And he’s spent months trying to repair his image, apologizing to fans and to the league repeatedly. • Rockies, De La Rosa reach deal: The Colorado Rockies have agreed to a $21.5 million, two-year contract with lefthander Jorge De La Rosa, a deal that includes a player option for 2013 that could raise its value to $32.5 million. Colorado also gets a club option for the 2014 as part of the deal announced Friday. The Rockies acquired De La Rosa from Kansas City in April 2008. He has gone 34-24 with a 4.49 ERA, 200 walks and 434 strikeouts in 81 games and 75 starts for Colorado.

Football • Miami wins MAC: Austin Boucher threw a touchdown pass to Armand Robinson with 33 seconds left and Miami of Ohio won the Mid-American Conference championship with a 26-21 victory over No. 24 Northern Illinois on Friday night in Detroit. The RedHawks (8-4) won the MAC for the first time since 2003 and their conference-best 15th title overall a season after they finished 1-11. Chandler Harnish threw three touchdowns for the Huskies (10-3), who had won eight in a row. • Texans’ Pollard fined $40K: Houston Texans safety Bernard Pollard has been fined $40,000 by the NFL for unnecessary roughness against Justin Gage of the Tennessee Titans. Pollard has been docked for striking Gage in the head area Sunday when the Titans receiver was defenseless. The amount of the fine was so hefty because Pollard is a repeat offender. • Seahawks’ Mike Williams expected to play: The Seattle

Seahawks are counting on receiver Mike Williams being able to play against the Carolina Panthers this Sunday. Williams was able to make it through practice on Friday for the first time since injuring his left foot in New Orleans two weeks ago. Coach Pete Carroll said that Williams will need to make it through pregame workouts on Sunday before a final determination is made. Williams leads the Seahawks with 52 catches for 654 yards on the season. • Jets’ Leonhard has broken leg: New York Jets safety Jim Leonhard has a broken right leg that will require surgery and likely sideline him for the rest of the season. The team has announced the injury Friday, three days before New York plays at New England for first place in the AFC East on Monday night. Leonhard, who calls the defensive signals in the secondary, was injured during team drills — which are closed to the media — and carted from the field.

Basketball • Heat-Cavs game draws 7.1 million viewers: LeBron James’ return to Cleveland was a boon for TNT. The cable network reported that the Miami Heat’s game against the Cleveland Cavaliers on Thursday night delivered a 4.2 rating, which translates to nearly 7.1 million viewers. James scored 38 points against his former team in the Heat’s 118-90 rout. It was the two-time league MVP’s first game in Cleveland since signing with Miami in the offseason. The game earned a 25.4 rating in Miami and a 14.9 rating in Cleveland. • Kentucky asks NCAA to review eligibility case: The University of Kentucky is asking the NCAA to take a second look at the eligibility of freshman center Enes Kanter. The school and the NCAA put out a joint statement Friday saying Kentucky has asked for an opportunity to submit additional information about Kanter’s eligibility. The NCAA studentathlete reinstatement staff ruled the 6-foot-11 Kanter permanently ineligible last month because he received benefits above his actual and necessary expenses while playing for a club basketball team in Turkey.

Tennis • Serbia, France tied in Davis Cup final: Novak Djokovic brought host Serbia back into the Davis Cup final against France by defeating Gilles Simon 6-3, 6-1, 7-5 to tie the opening singles 1-1 on Friday. Gael Monfils cruised past Janko Tipsarevic 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-0 to give France the opening singles. The doubles today could feature Serbia’s Nenad Zimonjic and Viktor Troicki against Arnaud Clement and Michael Llodra, but team captains could make changes in the lineup one hour before the match. The reverse singles Sunday are scheduled to start with Djokovic against Monfils, followed by Tipsarevic vs. Simon.

Soccer • Stanford to face Notre Dame in final: Camille Levin scored in the 48th minute and Stanford beat Boston College 2-0 to advance to the NCAA Women’s College Cup final in Cary, N.C.. The Cardinal (230-2), which reached the championship game for the second year in a row, next plays Notre Dame on Sunday. The Fighting Irish (20-2-2) beat Ohio State 1-0 in the other semifinal.

Skiing • Riesch wins downhill; Vonn 2nd: Maria Riesch of Germany captured a World Cup downhill Friday at Lake Louise, Alberta, holding off her best friend Lindsey Vonn and snapping her record win streak. Riesch finished the course in 1 minute, 28.96 seconds, just 0.12 ahead of Vonn, the top American finisher. Elisabeth Goergl of Austria was third in 1:29.17. Vonn, winner of five straight on the downhill course, has been so dominant at this venue that it’s known as “Lake Lindsey.” This was the 12th time she has earned a podium spot at Lake Louise, where she had her first career World Cup win in 2004. Teammate Julia Mancuso finished fourth, part of a strong showing by a U.S. squad that placed seven in the top 30. The women will race another downhill today and a super-G on Sunday. — From wire reports

Bend High blows out Eagle Point in girls hoops opener HITTING THE MAT

Bulletin staff report Twelve players scored for Bend High on Friday night as the Lava Bears routed visiting Eagle Point 65-13 in a nonleague girls basketball game. Mekayla Isaak posted a game-high 15 points and Katelyn Tolentino added eight for Bend, which was playing its season opener. “I liked our energy,” Lava Bear coach Todd Ervin said. “For a lot of kids, it was their varsity debut or first varsity game with a lot of minutes. With that in mind, it was a good night.” Bend (1-0) ran away with the game in the first quarter, taking a 20-4 lead before the second period. The Bears held Eagle Point to just five field goals while hitting 26 of their own. Bend High is back on the court today with a home nonleague game against Grants Pass. In other prep events Friday: GIRLS BASKETBALL Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Grants Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Mountain View received solid offensive efforts from twin sisters Jordan and Kersey Wilcox as the Cougars rolled to an easy win in their season opener. Jordan Wilcox led the home team with 13 points while Kersey added 10 points, five assists and four steals. Additionally, Kylie Durre recorded 10 points and 15 rebounds for the Cougars (1-0 overall). Mountain View hosts Eagle Point today in another nonconference matchup. Reynolds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 BEAVERTON — Leading 19-18 at halftime, Summit stumbled in the second half and dropped its season opener at the four-team Aloha Invitational. Taylor Pierce led the Storm (0-1 overall) with 14 points and one three-point field goal in the road loss. Summit is back in action today facing Rex Putnam in the tournament’s consolation game. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 South Wasco County . . . . . . . 30 MORO — The Bulldogs won their first game at the Sherman County Invitational, registering 32 steals in the victory over the Redsides. Kymber Wofford just missed out on a triple-double, as she recorded 14 points, 10 steals and eight rebounds. Sam Donnelly added nine points and eight boards for Culver, which will play in the tournament’s championship game today at 2 p.m. Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 LA PINE — The Hawks started their season with a loss in their own tournament, falling to Burns by 18 points. La Pine plays Dallas today in the tourney’s consolation game. Bend High freshmen . . . . . . . .32 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 The Grizzly’s Ashley James scored more than half of Gilchrist’s points, tallying 15 points after making 11 of 15 foul shots. Kendall Kramer recorded eight points to lead the Bend freshmen to the home win. Gilchrist is off until its own tournament next Friday. BOYS BASKETBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Eagle Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 EAGLE POINT — The Lava

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Blaine Livingston, top, slams Madras’ Neal Morningowl to the mat during their 152-pound match Friday in Redmond. Redmond went 3-0 during the Redmond Duals. See story, Page D1. Bears rallied after trailing by eight points in the first quarter. Hayden Crook was in mid-season shooting form, knocking down five three-pointers and scoring a game-high 29 points for Bend. Tyler Friesen added 19 while Taylor Raterman and J.C. Grim scored 13 points and 10 points, respectively. The Lava Bears (1-0), who outscored the Eagles in the final three quarters of play, are at Grants Pass today. Grants Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 GRANTS PASS — Mountain View’s season debut resulted in a narrow defeat at Class 6A Grants Pass. James Reid scored a game-high 18 points, for the Cougars, but he was the only Mountain View players to score in the double figures. The Cavemen led 34-23 at halftime, but Mountain View rallied and tied the game 52-52. Grants Pass won the game in the final seconds, though, when Taylor Griggs hit a jump shot to give the Cavemen a 54-52 advantage. David Larson added nine points for Mountain View and James Harper contributed eight. The Cougars are at Eagle Point today. Reynolds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 BEAVERTON — The Storm dropped their first game of the season despite a 22-point effort from senior wing Mitch Wettig. Summit point guard Blake Soto added nine points in his first varsity start, but no other Storm player scored more than six points in the nonconference game, which was a first-round contest at the Aloha Invitational. Summit (0-1) plays a consolation game today at 1:15 p.m. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 PRINEVILLE — The Cowboys, who went 0-23 last season, ended a 26-game losing streak

and improved to 1-1 on the season with the nonconference victory over the White Buffaloes. Senior Brandon Gomes scored a game-high 22 points and recorded six rebounds and five steals to lead Crook County. Travis Bartels added 12 points and six steals and Peyton Seaquist contributed 12 points and a teamhigh seven boards in the win. “It’s a long time overdue,” Cowboy coach Jeff Lowenbach said. Crook County led 29-27 at the half before outscoring Madras 17-10 in the third quarter to take control of the game. Lowenbach pointed out the defensive efforts of Bartels and Jordan Reeher, who held the White Buffaloes’ top scorer, Bobby Ahern, to zero points in the second half. Ahern led Madras with 15 points. Crook County is off until Saturday, Dec. 11, when the Cowboys host Mazama of Klamath Falls. The Buffs (0-1) are back in action Tuesday with a home date against Mountain View. La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 LA PINE — The Hawks won the opening game of their own tournament after getting 18 points and 10 rebounds from Jaron Kuehn. Austin Manley added 10 points and five steals and Austin Pierce registered 12 points, nine rebounds and two blocks. La Pine (1-0) led 33-15 at halftime. The Hawks face Dallas today in the tournament final at 5 p.m. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 South Wasco County . . . . . . . 40 MORO — Gabe Bolton’s teamhigh 11 points included five free throws in the fourth quarter as Culver held on for its first victory of the season in the opening round of the Sherman County Invitational. Bolton made five of six foul shots in the fourth period and seven of eight for the game for the Bulldogs (1-1), who got eight points from Clay Gib-

son, seven from Matt Swagerty and six from Eddie Calderon. Culver plays at 3:30 today in the tournament championship game. Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 La Pine freshmen. . . . . . . . . . . 23 LA PINE — Playing against one another for the second time in two days, the Grizzlies again defeated the Hawk freshmen, this time behind Tyler Shuey’s 24 points and 11 rebounds. La Pine led 21-19 heading into the fourth quarter, but Gilchrist outscored the host team 13-2 in the final period to post the win. Josh Stinson led the Hawk freshmen. The Grizzlies (2-0) play La Pine’s junior varsity on Friday in the first round of their own tournament. WRESTLING Bulldogs post win at first tourney of season ESTACADA — Wrestling in its first tournament of the season, Culver knocked off 13 teams to win the Ranger Classic hosted by Estacada High School. Noe Gonzalez (103 pounds), Jesus Retano (152) and Austin Barany (189) all won their brackets. The Bulldogs scored 207 points on the day, besting Estacada (177.5), La Grande (166) and Molalla (148), who finished second, third and fourth. Ryan Kasch (130), Josue Gonzalez (135), David Badillo (145) and Justin Hendrix (215) all posted runner-up finishes for Culver. The Bulldogs are back on the mat next weekend when they host their own twoday tournament. La Pine struggles in Burns duals BURNS — La Pine lost all four of its duals at Burns, but junior Zach Knabe (119 pounds) went undefeated for the Hawks and junior Garrett Searcy (189) posted a 3-1 record. La Pine stays out east today as the Hawks wrestle at Grant Union High School in John Day.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL Girls Friday’s results CLASS 5A NONCONFERENCE ——— EAGLE POINT (13) — Casie Johnson 6, Bradshaw 4, Caulpepper 3, Pena, Solorio, Camden, Martinez, Provenal, Hunsley, Bradshaw. Totals 5 3-12 13. BEND (65) — Mekayla Isaak 15, Tolentino 8, McConnell 7, Crook 7, Lundy 7, Maloney 5, Price 4, Rhine 4, Jones 3, Reeser 2, Froelich 2, Boehme 1, Mattox. Totals 26 10-17 65. Eagle Point 4 4 2 3 — 13 Bend 20 16 15 4 — 65 Three-point goals — Eagle Point: none; Bend: Jones, Lundy, Crook. ——— ALOHA INVITATIONAL ——— SUMMIT (43) — Taylor Pierce 14, Char 12, Phillips 7, Alhart 3, Edwards 2, Solomon 2, Gieber 2. Totals unavailable. REYNOLDS (50) — L. Strong 17, Rahn 10, Lozzata 8, Hickman 7, Tipsord 6, Blaylock 2. Totals unavailable. Summit 10 9 14 10 — 43 Reynolds 13 5 15 17 — 50 Three-point goals — Summit: Pierce, Char, Alhart; Reynolds: Tipsord 2, Rahn, Strong. ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— CROOK COUNTY (51) — Danni Severance 21, Pope 7, P. Buswell 5, B. Buswell 3, Crofcheck 3, McKenzie 2, Walker. Totals 17 11-14 51. MADRAS (53) — Abby Scott 15, Wahnetah 9, M. Smith 9, J. Smith 5, L. Suppah 5, Sampson 4, Spino 2, Simmons 2, R. Suppah 2. Totals 22 7-11 53. Crook County 19 11 14 6 — 51 Pendleton 14 8 13 18 — 53 Three-point goals — Crook County: Severance 2, Morgan 2, P.

Buswell, Crofcheck; Madras: L. Suppah, Scott. ——— SHERMAN COUNTY INVITATIONAL ——— CULVER (42) — Anglen 6, Kymber Wofford 14, Seehawer 3, Alley 2, Daugherty, Hanslovan 5, Fulton 2, Donnelly 9, Jones 1. Totals 15 12-21 42. SOUTH WASCO COUNTY (30) — Popehack 8, Kelly, Baily, Morrelly 2, Dibartolo 3, Killam 2, Porcia Anderson 15. Totals 12 5-9 30. Culver 12 9 10 11 — 42 South Wasco Co. 6 7 9 8 — 30 Three-point goals — Culver: none; SWC: Dibartolo. ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— GRANTS PASS (35) — Aguilera 12, Smith 7, Johnson 7, Edgar 6, Davidson 2, Daniels 1, Luku, Phillips, Dean, Rice. Totals 13 6-25 35. MOUNTAIN VIEW (57) — Jordan Wilcox 13, K. Wilcox 10, Durre 10, Cashman 6, Rogers 6, Ridling 6, Noel 5, Scevers 1, Abbey, McCadden. Totals 19 12-21 57. Grants Pass 13 3 12 7 — 35 Mountain View 12 18 11 16 — 57 Three-point goals — Grants Pass: Aguilera 2, Smith; Mountain View: unavailable.

Boys Friday’s results CLASS 5A NONCONFERENCE ——— BEND (76) — Hayden Crook 29, Tyler Friesen 19, Taylor Raterman 13, J.C. Grim 10, Connor Scott 3, Seth Platsman 2, Tanner Torkelson. Totals 29 8-9 76. EAGLE POINT (74) — Winter 26, Bolston 19, Holmes 16, Flores 4, Reid 6, Snow 3, Hartman, Chavez. Totals 33 4-6 74. Bend 14 22 15 25 — 76 Eagle Point 22 17 12 23 — 74 Three-point goals — Bend: Crook 5, Friesen 2, Raterman 1, Scott 1. Eagle Point: Bolston 3, Snow 1. ———

GRANTS PASS (54) — Mahr 12, Griggs 12, Bennett 7, Rich 5, Emptage 5, Fields 5, Etheridge 3, Evens 3, Meadows 2. Totals 20 10-22 54. MOUNTAIN VIEW (52) — James Reid 18, Larson 9, Harper 8, Bosch 4, Gentry 3, Carroll 3, Medin 3, Booster 2, Siefken 2. Totals 14 20-31 52. Grants Pass 16 18 4 16 — 54 Mountain View 10 13 10 19 — 52 Three-point goals — Mountain View: Reid 2, Larson, Harper. Grants Pass: Mahr, Rich, Griggs, Fields. ALOHA INVITATIONAL ——— SUMMIT (41) — Laubacher, Soto 9, Catell, Peters 2, Hamann, Bishop, Michalski, Cramer 6, Minefee, Mitch Wettig 22, Moore 2. Totals 17 2-4 41. REYNOLDS (48) — Fanning 2, Brown, Walsh 5, Keltner 2, Kompospos 8, Quitoriano 8, Childs 16, Anderson 3, Lambert. Totals 20 5-9 48. Summit 11 9 10 11 — 41 Reynolds 14 14 11 9 — 48 Three-point goals — Summit: Wettig 2, Cramer 2, Soto; Reynolds: Childs 2, Walsh. ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— MADRAS (44) — Bobby Ahern 15, Conner 2, Haugen, Brown, Palmer 1, Borja, McConnell 2, Zacarias 11, Quintana 2, QuephamaMehlberg 11. Totals 16 11-18 44. CROOK COUNTY (63) — Mooney 3, Seaquist 12, Bartles 12, Henry, Brandon Gomes 22, Morales 5, Simpson 2, Brewer, Washchek, Reeher 10, Dees. Totals 19 18-21 63. Madras 10 17 10 7 — 44 Crook County 14 15 17 17 — 63 Three-point goals — Madras: Ahern; Crook County: Bartels 2, Gomes 2, Reeher 2, Morales. ——— LA PINE TOURNAMENT ——— BURNS (40) — McConnell 4, Pierce 2, Callohan 9, Stanwyck 4, Stenkampe 2, Cooper 3, Bentez 4, First-Rand 1, Parker 11, Bazer, Ridenour. Totals 167-14 40.

LA PINE (66) — Lavine 8, Ebner 4, Jaron Kuehn 18, Manley 10, Boen 6, Pierce 12, Parsons 2, O’Casey 2, Hanna, Smith, Pajunen 4. Totals 28 10-16 66. Burns 3 12 10 15 — 40 La Pine 16 17 11 22 — 66 Three-point goals — Burns: Cooper; La Pine: none. ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— GILCHRIST (32) — Cox, Martinez, Trinton Koch 2, Taran Koch 4, Tyler Shuey 24, Stine, Boone, Link 2. Totals 13 6-9 32. LA PINE FRESHMEN (23) — Haddad, Miller, Wieber 4, Smith 5, Fogel 2, Ferris 2, Ramirez 2, Josh Stinson 8. Totals 9 5-9 23. Gilchrist 7 2 10 13 — 32 La Pine frosh 5 6 10 2 — 23 Three-point goals — none ——— CULVER (44) — Gabe Bolton 11, Gibson 8, Swagerty 7, Calderon 6, Talbert 4, Funk 4, Gonzalez 3, Sledge 1, Slaght, Fritz. Totals 13 16-24 44. SOUTH WASCO COUNTY (40) — Creel 12, Weyand 10, Hull 9, Zipprick 4, Ocacio 3, Duling 2, Morelli. Totals 15 6-8 40. Culver 10 9 9 16 — 44 South Wasco Co. 4 13 7 16 — 40 Three-point goals — Culver: Swagerty, Gonzalez; South Wasco County: Creel 2, Weyand 2.

WRESTLING Dual Meet at Redmond High School REDMOND 60, MOUNTAIN VIEW 15 NORTH MEDFORD 50, BEND 20 MADRAS 36, BEND 24 MOUNTAIN VIEW 48, BEND 27 MOUNTAIN VIEW 48, MADRAS 30 REDMOND 56, NORTH MEDFORD 24 REDMOND 62, MADRAS 15 Redmond (individual records) 103 — Brandon Short 3-0; 112 — Ty George 3-0; 119 — Ryan Haney 3-0; 125 — Ben Coles 2-1; 130 — Chance Lindquist 3-0; 135 — David Peebles 2-1; 140 — Colby Fultz 3-0; 145 — Boomer Fleming 3-0; 152 — Blaine Livingston 2-0, Austin Alvarez 0-1; 160


D4 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Blazers fall to Wizards, lose their sixth straight The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Portland Trail Blazers coach Nate McMillan’s manner was calm, his voice steady. He sounded more resigned than riled up after his club’s sixth consecutive setback, an 8379 loss to the Washington Wizards on Friday night, when the Trail Blazers made a seasonworst 33.3 percent of their shots and were held to 10 points in the third quarter. “Evidently, they’re not responding to me, because all these games look similar. We have a pretty decent first half, and in the second half, we struggle to score, to get stops,” McMillan said. “I’ve said that the last five, six games. I asked them, ‘Is it clear? What we’re asking you to do?’ They didn’t say anything. They don’t have to say anything. The games show that we’re not getting it done.” On a night that No. 1 overall draft pick John Wall struggled in his return to Washington’s starting lineup — three-for-13 shooting, 10 points, career-low two assists, four turnovers — and Gilbert Arenas moved into a reserve role at his own suggestion, the Wizards turned in their best defensive performance of the season. In their previous game, the Wizards allowed a season-high 127 points in a loss Wednesday at Toronto, an effort coach Flip Saunders called “embarrassing” and “just very disappointing.” “Go figure: Give up 131 two days ago, and give up 79 today,” Saunders said Friday, only slightly embellishing how bad his team was against the Raptors. “All we did yesterday was work on defense. Our offense kind of showed it. If you want to be good in this league, you’re going to have to learn how to play defense, so right now, that’s our point of emphasis.” After shooting five for 21 in the third quarter — 24 percent — Portland went through a fourth-quarter drought of more than 6½ minutes without a field goal until LaMarcus Aldridge’s tip-in with less than 1½ minutes remaining in the game. So while the Blazers led 46-34 at halftime, they trailed 57-56 entering the fourth quarter and faded. This is their longest losing streak since dropping eight games in a row to end the 2005-06 season. “We’ve lost six in a row, and we still haven’t figured out what the problem is. It’s tough. I don’t really know — 19 games in, and we’re losing the same way,” said Brandon Roy, who scored 18 points but missed 12 of 21 shots. “Everybody is at a loss for words. Coach, he doesn’t know what to say to us. And we don’t know what to say to one another.” Aldridge finished with 16 points and 15 rebounds, but he shot only six for 17. Andre Miller’s 12 points came mostly from the foul line, because he was two for 12 on field goals. He was the only Portland player to take a free throw before the fourth quarter. Making his first start in more than a week, Wall was rusty. He missed two games with a bruised right knee, then played against Toronto on Wednesday but did not start. He didn’t gather his first assist until the third quarter. “Just missing open shots. ... I might be a little winded,” Wall said. “You’re going to have one of those. It was frustrating.” That’s a word that was used plenty in the other locker room Friday. “We have a lot of talent, and losing right now is kind of hard to deal with,” Aldridge said. “We haven’t figured it out and that’s the frustrating part. Everybody is pretty frustrated now.” Also on Friday: Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 22 points, Pau Gasol added 16 despite a strained left hamstring, and the Lakers easily snapped a four-game losing streak. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 PHOENIX — Channing Frye scored a season-high 29 points, Jason Richardson added 21 and Phoenix rallied to beat road-weary Indiana. Mavericks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 SALT LAKE CITY — Dirk Nowitzki scored

Jacquelyn Martin / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers guard Brandon Roy (7) loses the ball while being guarded by Washington Wizards’ Kirk Hinrich, right, during the fourth quarter of Friday’s game in Washington. 26 points on 12 of 18 shooting, Caron Butler added 16 points and Dallas extended its winning streak to eight games. Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan scored 22 points and had 10 rebounds to help San Antonio rally from a 15-point deficit to beat Minnesota. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 DENVER — Carmelo Anthony scored 26 points, J.R. Smith had 21 and Denver held off Los Angeles to win their sixth straight and give coach George Karl his 998th career win. Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 BOSTON — Kevin Garnett scored 20 points with a season-high 17 rebounds, and Rajon Rondo scored 12 and had 19 assists to lead the Celtics to their sixth straight win. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 NEW ORLEANS — Amare Stoudemire had 34 points and 10 assists to power New York to its eighth win in nine games. Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 TORONTO — Andrea Bargnani had 26 points and 12 rebounds for his first doubledouble of the season and Leandro Barbosa scored a season-high 22 points. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Brandon Bass scored a career-high 27 points, and Orlando overcame a stomach virus that sidelined four key players. Orlando was without star center Dwight Howard, and Jameer Nelson, J.J. Redick and Mickael Pietrus were also unavailable because of the stomach bug. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Kyle Lowry scored a career-high 28 points and matched his career best with 12 assists. Kevin Martin also had 28 points, while Brad Miller contributed a seasonhigh 23 points in Houston’s sixth straight win over Memphis. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Stephen Jackson scored 25 points, Boris Diaw added a careerbest 16 rebounds and Charlotte recovered from a fourth-quarter meltdown. After the Bobcats blew a seven-point lead with just over a minute left in regulation, Jackson hit four straight free throws in the final 31 seconds of overtime. Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 ATLANTA — Al Horford’s three-point play with 31 seconds remaining gave Atlanta its first lead and Atlanta won its fifth straight.

No. 5 Kansas State holds off Washington State, 63-58 PULLMAN, Wash. — This time, No. 5 Kansas State got away with an off night from preseason all-American Jacob Pullen. Barely. Rodney McGruder scored 15 points, hitting two key 3-pointers midway through the second half, Curtis Kelly also had 15 points and the Wildcats made up for an off night from their star in a 63-58 victory over Washington State on Friday night in the Big 12/Pac-10 Hardwood Series. Pullen rarely got open looks and when he did, his shot was off. Pullen was just two of 11 from the field and finished with eight points, just the second time in 44 games dating to his sophomore season Pullen has failed to score in double figures. Less than two weeks ago, Pullen suffered through the second-worst shooting game of his career, missing 11 of 12 shots in Kansas State’s loss to No. 1 Duke. Friday night

wasn’t much better. But he calmly hit two free throws with 9.1 seconds left that put the Wildcats (7-1) up by four and finally ended the Cougars’ upset bid. Klay Thompson led Washington State (5-1) with 16 points, and Reggie Moore, in his first action of the season, added 10 points. Also on Friday night: No. 7 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 UMBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 HARTFORD, Conn. — Kemba Walker had 24 points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists for his first career triple-double, leading Connecticut to a victory over Maryland-Baltimore County. No. 12 Villanova. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Saint Joseph’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 VILLANOVA, Pa. — Antonio Pena had 14 points and a career-high 14 rebounds and Corey Stokes scored 17. Five different players scored for the Wildcats (6-1) during a 13-0 run early in the second half.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Friday’s Games

Wizards 83, Blazers 79 PORTLAND (79) Matthews 2-9 0-0 5, Aldridge 6-17 3-4 16, Camby 0-2 0-0 0, Miller 2-12 8-8 12, Roy 9-21 0-0 18, Marks 1-3 0-0 2, Fernandez 0-2 0-0 0, Batum 4-10 0-0 11, Mills 3-10 0-0 7, Przybilla 2-2 0-0 4, Cunningham 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 31-93 11-12 79. WASHINGTON (83) Gee 1-3 1-2 3, Blatche 7-13 5-6 19, McGee 4-6 5-6 13, Wall 3-13 4-4 10, Hinrich 4-10 2-2 11, Thornton 0-2 0-0 0, Arenas 6-16 3-3 15, Armstrong 3-3 0-0 6, Yi 0-1 0-0 0, Martin 2-5 1-3 6, Booker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-72 21-26 83. Portland 24 22 10 23 — 79 Washington 18 16 23 26 — 83 3-Point Goals—Portland 6-21 (Batum 3-7, Aldridge 1-1, Matthews 1-4, Mills 1-4, Fernandez 0-1, Cunningham 0-1, Roy 0-3), Washington 2-12 (Hinrich 1-3, Martin 1-3, Wall 0-2, Arenas 0-4). Fouled Out—Arenas. Rebounds—Portland 59 (Aldridge 15), Washington 51 (McGee 10). Assists—Portland 19 (Mills 6), Washington 15 (Arenas 6). Total Fouls—Portland 19, Washington 18. Technicals—Matthews. A—13,408 (20,173).

Lakers 113, Kings 80

TOP 25 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

The Associated Press

SUMMARIES

SACRAMENTO (80) Greene 2-7 0-0 5, Thompson 9-13 1-5 19, Dalembert 1-2 2-2 4, Evans 5-15 2-4 15, Head 0-3 0-0 0, Udrih 2-6 0-0 4, Garcia 1-4 0-0 3, Cousins 3-9 3-4 9, Landry 2-6 2-4 6, Jackson 0-0 0-0 0, Casspi 1-5 2-2 4, Jeter 5-7 1-1 11. Totals 31-77 13-22 80. L.A. LAKERS (113) Artest 1-3 0-0 2, Odom 7-13 2-3 16, Gasol 6-8 4-5 16, Fisher 2-4 1-1 5, Bryant 9-18 4-8 22, Blake 4-7 0-0 11, Caracter 5-8 0-0 10, Brown 6-11 2-2 14, Walton 1-4 0-0 2, Barnes 1-2 2-2 4, Ebanks 4-4 1-1 9, Vujacic 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 47-83 16-22 113. Sacramento 16 19 17 28 — 80 L.A. Lakers 21 31 30 31 — 113 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 5-16 (Evans 3-7, Garcia 1-2, Greene 1-3, Head 0-1, Casspi 0-1, Udrih 0-2), L.A. Lakers 3-14 (Blake 3-6, Barnes 0-1, Odom 0-3, Brown 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 52 (Thompson 10), L.A. Lakers 45 (Odom 7). Assists—Sacramento 15 (Casspi 4), L.A. Lakers 27 (Gasol 5). Total Fouls—Sacramento 21, L.A. Lakers 20. Technicals—Thompson. Flagrant Fouls—Brown. A—18,997 (18,997).

Mavericks 93, Jazz 81 DALLAS (93) Butler 6-12 2-4 16, Nowitzki 12-18 1-1 26, Chandler 1-3 0-0 2, Kidd 6-8 0-0 15, Stevenson 0-1 0-0 0, Haywood 2-3 0-2 4, Terry 5-12 2-2 12, Marion 4-10 0-0 8, Barea 3-8 2-2 8, Novak 0-0 0-0 0, Cardinal 0-0 0-0 0, Mahinmi 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-76 7-11 93. UTAH (81) Kirilenko 2-5 1-2 5, Millsap 6-10 9-14 21, Jefferson 8-20 2-3 18, Williams 4-13 3-3 12, Bell 1-5 0-0 2, Miles 3-8 1-2 9, Elson 2-2 0-0 4, Fesenko 2-3 1-2 5, Price 0-3 0-0 0, Watson 0-4 0-0 0, Evans 0-0 0-0 0, Hayward 1-1 3-4 5. Totals 29-74 20-30 81. Dallas 23 16 27 27 — 93 Utah 20 23 19 19 — 81 3-Point Goals—Dallas 6-19 (Kidd 3-5, Butler 2-2, Nowitzki 1-3, Stevenson 0-1, Barea 0-2, Terry 0-6), Utah 3-14 (Miles 2-6, Williams 1-3, Kirilenko 0-1, Bell 0-1, Price 0-1, Watson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 43 (Chandler 8), Utah 52 (Jefferson 8). Assists—Dallas 25 (Kidd 7), Utah 20 (Williams 7). Total Fouls—Dallas 20, Utah 16. Technicals—Barea, Chandler, Haywood, Dallas defensive three second, Fesenko. A—19,623 (19,911).

Raptors 111, Thunder 99 OKLAHOMA CITY (99) Green 6-14 4-5 17, Ibaka 2-6 2-2 6, Krstic 58 0-0 10, Westbrook 9-19 2-2 20, Sefolosha 1-6 1-2 3, Collison 4-5 0-0 8, Harden 5-14 7-8 20, Maynor 3-6 0-0 8, White 0-1 0-0 0, Peterson 1-3 0-0 2, Ivey 1-4 0-0 3, Mullens 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-87 16-19 99. TORONTO (111) Weems 5-10 0-1 10, Johnson 5-5 4-4 14, Bargnani 11-20 3-4 26, Calderon 4-7 0-0 8, DeRozan 6-13 2-2 14, Davis 3-5 0-0 6, Barbosa 7-12 6-9 22, Bayless 2-6 3-4 7, Kleiza 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 45-82 18-24 111. Oklahoma City 25 34 18 22 — 99 Toronto 28 24 34 25 — 111 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 7-18 (Harden 3-7, Maynor 2-2, Ivey 1-2, Green 1-4, Westbrook 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2), Toronto 3-15 (Barbosa 2-5, Bargnani 1-3, Weems 0-1, Bayless 0-1, Kleiza 0-1, Calderon 0-2, DeRozan 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 41 (Sefolosha 7), Toronto 54 (Bargnani 12). Assists—Oklahoma City 22 (Westbrook, Green 7), Toronto 29 (Calderon 15). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 24, Toronto 18. A—16,774 (19,800).

Suns 105, Pacers 97 INDIANA (97) Granger 2-13 4-6 8, McRoberts 6-9 0-0 16, Hibbert 4-6 0-0 8, Collison 1-3 3-3 5, Rush 916 0-0 21, S.Jones 2-4 1-2 5, Ford 4-10 2-3 10, Dunleavy 6-11 2-2 16, Posey 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 37-79 12-16 97. PHOENIX (105) Hill 2-9 4-4 8, Barron 2-9 2-6 6, Frye 11-16 2-3 29, Nash 3-7 6-6 12, Richardson 7-11 4-4 21, Dudley 5-7 0-0 12, Childress 0-2 0-0 0, Dragic 38 2-4 9, Turkoglu 1-4 4-6 6, Warrick 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 35-78 24-33 105. Indiana 28 31 17 21 — 97 Phoenix 20 32 22 31 — 105 3-Point Goals—Indiana 11-26 (McRoberts 4-6, Rush 3-6, Dunleavy 2-5, Posey 2-6, Granger 0-3), Phoenix 11-22 (Frye 5-8, Richardson 3-5, Dudley 2-4, Dragic 1-4, Turkoglu 0-1). Fouled Out—Posey. Rebounds—Indiana 52 (McRoberts 9), Phoenix 46 (Dragic 6). Assists—Indiana 24 (Ford 9), Phoenix 25 (Nash 11). Total Fouls—Indiana 30, Phoenix 22. Technicals—Barron, Phoenix defensive three second. A—16,991 (18,422).

Spurs 107, T’wolves 101 MINNESOTA (101) Beasley 12-24 4-4 28, Love 8-18 8-11 25, Milicic 2-10 0-0 4, Ridnour 5-7 4-4 14, Johnson 1-7 1-2 4, Telfair 2-4 0-0 4, Brewer 5-14 3-4 14, Tolliver 0-1 0-0 0, Koufos 3-8 0-0 6, Ellington 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 39-94 20-25 101. SAN ANTONIO (107) Jefferson 5-13 3-4 15, Duncan 9-14 4-5 22, Blair 0-1 2-2 2, Parker 7-14 6-6 20, Ginobili 1-10 13-13 16, Bonner 1-4 0-0 3, Hill 7-12 57 20, Splitter 0-0 0-0 0, Udoka 0-0 0-0 0, Neal 1-2 0-0 3, McDyess 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 34-75 33-37 107. Minnesota 25 29 32 15 — 101 San Antonio 25 28 18 36 — 107 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 3-12 (Brewer 11, Love 1-3, Johnson 1-4, Beasley 0-1, Ridnour 0-1, Koufos 0-1, Telfair 0-1), San Antonio 6-23 (Jefferson 2-6, Neal 1-2, Hill 1-3, Bonner 1-4, Ginobili 1-7, Parker 0-1). Fouled Out—Milicic. Rebounds—Minnesota 63 (Love 18), San Antonio 42 (Jefferson, Duncan 10). Assists—Minnesota 18 (Milicic 4), San Antonio 23 (Parker, Duncan 5). Total Fouls—Minnesota 24, San Antonio 21. Technicals—San Antonio Coach Popovich 2. A—18,581 (18,797).

Celtics 104, Bulls 92 CHICAGO (92) Boozer 4-10 4-6 12, Deng 5-13 2-4 15, Noah 5-8 4-7 14, Rose 7-17 5-5 20, Bogans 0-1 0-0 0, Brewer 2-4 2-4 6, Gibson 3-8 4-4 10, Watson 2-5 3-3 8, Korver 2-6 0-0 4, Asik 1-2 1-1 3, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Scalabrine 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-74 25-34 92. BOSTON (104) Pierce 8-16 2-2 18, Garnett 7-11 6-6 20, S.O’Neal 5-6 2-4 12, Rondo 6-11 0-0 12, Allen 5-12 4-4 14, Davis 3-6 0-0 6, Daniels 3-7 2-4 8, Erden 3-3 1-2 7, Robinson 2-6 0-0 5, Wafer 1-3 0-0 2, Harangody 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-81 17-22 104. Chicago 19 29 19 25 — 92 Boston 31 22 29 22 — 104 3-Point Goals—Chicago 5-13 (Deng 3-4, Watson 1-2, Rose 1-5, Bogans 0-1, Korver 0-1), Boston 1-9 (Robinson 1-3, Wafer 0-1, Allen 0-2, Pierce 0-3). Fouled Out—S.O’Neal. Rebounds— Chicago 43 (Noah 10), Boston 52 (Garnett 17). Assists—Chicago 18 (Rose 8), Boston 29 (Rondo 19). Total Fouls—Chicago 17, Boston 23. Technicals—Noah, Garnett, Boston defensive three second. A—18,624 (18,624).

GOLF ROUNDUP

Atlantic Division Boston New York Toronto New Jersey Philadelphia

W 15 11 8 6 5

L 4 9 11 14 14

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 15 13 12 7 6

L 4 7 8 12 12

Chicago Indiana Cleveland Milwaukee Detroit

W 9 9 7 6 6

L 8 9 11 12 14

Pct .789 .550 .421 .300 .263

GB — 4½ 7 9½ 10

L10 8-2 8-2 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str W-6 W-3 W-2 L-3 L-1

Home 9-1 3-5 6-4 4-5 4-4

Away 6-3 8-4 2-7 2-9 1-10

Conf 12-2 7-4 6-6 3-10 4-11

Away 6-2 7-2 3-5 3-7 0-9

Conf 12-2 9-4 10-4 4-8 3-12

Away 4-6 5-4 3-5 2-8 2-9

Conf 2-4 5-4 6-8 5-4 3-8

Southeast Division Pct .789 .650 .600 .368 .333

GB — 2½ 3½ 8 8½

L10 9-1 7-3 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str W-6 W-5 W-3 W-1 W-1

Home 9-2 6-5 9-3 4-5 6-3

Central Division Pct .529 .500 .389 .333 .300

GB — ½ 2½ 3½ 4½

L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 3-7 2-8

Str L-2 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-4

Home 5-2 4-5 4-6 4-4 4-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 16 15 13 8 7

L 3 4 6 12 12

Utah Denver Oklahoma City Portland Minnesota

W 15 12 13 8 4

L 6 6 7 11 15

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 14 10 8 4 4

L 6 9 11 13 16

Pct .842 .789 .684 .400 .368

GB — 1 3 8½ 9

L10 8-2 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 W-8 L-1 L-2 W-2

Home 8-2 8-3 8-2 6-5 4-4

Away 8-1 7-1 5-4 2-7 3-8

Conf 10-3 9-3 8-5 6-6 5-8

Away 7-2 3-5 7-3 4-8 1-10

Conf 7-6 8-4 6-5 4-6 2-10

Away 5-4 5-6 3-7 2-5 0-9

Conf 10-5 8-5 5-7 1-8 4-12

Northwest Division Pct .714 .667 .650 .421 .211

GB — 1½ 1½ 6 10

L10 8-2 8-2 7-3 2-8 2-8

Str L-1 W-6 L-1 L-6 L-6

Home 8-4 9-1 6-4 4-3 3-5

Paciic Division Pct .700 .526 .421 .235 .200

GB — 3½ 5½ 8½ 10

L10 Str 6-4 W-1 5-5 W-2 2-8 L-2 1-9 L-6 3-7 L-1 ——— Friday’s Games

Charlotte 91, New Jersey 84, OT Washington 83, Portland 79 Orlando 104, Detroit 91 New York 100, New Orleans 92 San Antonio 107, Minnesota 101 Phoenix 105, Indiana 97 Dallas 93, Utah 81

Home 9-2 5-3 5-4 2-8 4-7

Toronto 111, Oklahoma City 99 Atlanta 93, Philadelphia 88 Houston 127, Memphis 111 Boston 104, Chicago 92 Denver 109, L.A. Clippers 104 L.A. Lakers 113, Sacramento 80 Today’s Games

Atlanta at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 5 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.

Charlotte at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games

Boston at New Jersey, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 3 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 4 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 5 p.m.

New York at Toronto, 10 a.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 4 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Portland, 6 p.m. All Times PST

Knicks 100, Hornets 92 NEW YORK (100) Chandler 5-14 0-0 14, Gallinari 5-12 0-0 13, Stoudemire 15-22 4-5 34, Felton 6-13 3-4 17, Fields 2-5 2-3 6, Douglas 1-5 0-0 3, Walker 0-2 0-0 0, Mozgov 0-3 0-0 0, Williams 5-7 0-0 13. Totals 39-83 9-12 100. NEW ORLEANS (92) Ariza 9-21 3-3 21, Smith 5-8 2-2 12, Okafor 3-4 5-10 11, Paul 4-9 7-7 17, Belinelli 4-12 0-0 9, Green 2-5 0-0 4, Thornton 0-2 2-2 2, Jack 2-8 2-4 6, Mbenga 1-1 2-2 4, Pondexter 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 33-77 23-30 92. New York 21 34 24 21 — 100 New Orleans 26 27 20 19 — 92 3-Point Goals—New York 13-30 (Chandler 4-8, Williams 3-4, Gallinari 3-6, Felton 2-4, Douglas 1-4, Fields 0-2, Walker 0-2), New Orleans 3-14 (Paul 2-3, Belinelli 1-5, Thornton 0-2, Ariza 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 41 (Stoudemire 10), New Orleans 57 (Okafor 14). Assists—New York 27 (Felton 13), New Orleans 18 (Paul 10). Total Fouls—New York 19, New Orleans 16. Technicals—Gallinari, Ariza. A—14,020 (17,188).

Rockets 127, Grizzlies 111 HOUSTON (127) Battier 4-8 2-2 12, Scola 6-11 3-4 15, Hayes 1-4 0-0 2, Lowry 11-15 2-2 28, Martin 7-13 9-9 28, Budinger 1-5 0-0 3, Lee 7-9 1-2 16, Hill 0-2 0-0 0, Miller 7-7 6-7 23, Smith 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-74 23-26 127. MEMPHIS (111) Gay 9-13 9-9 29, Randolph 6-12 2-4 14, Gasol 7-9 6-7 20, Conley 7-16 5-6 19, Henry 3-4 22 8, Mayo 1-5 0-0 3, Thabeet 1-1 2-2 4, Vasquez 2-5 1-1 5, Arthur 3-9 1-2 7, Young 0-2 0-0 0, Allen 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-77 28-33 111. Houston 38 31 29 29 — 127 Memphis 31 29 30 21 — 111 3-Point Goals—Houston 16-23 (Martin 56, Lowry 4-5, Miller 3-3, Battier 2-3, Lee 1-2, Budinger 1-4), Memphis 3-12 (Gay 2-2, Mayo 1-3, Randolph 0-1, Young 0-1, Vasquez 0-2, Conley 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Houston 38 (Miller 7), Memphis 37 (Randolph 8). Assists—Houston 26 (Lowry 12), Memphis 18 (Conley 8). Total Fouls—Houston 25, Memphis 18. Technicals—Memphis Bench. A—14,577 (18,119).

Magic 104, Pistons 91 ORLANDO (104) Richardson 5-12 2-2 15, Lewis 6-14 1-2 15, Gortat 7-9 0-0 14, Duhon 3-6 0-0 6, Carter 10-15 3-4 25, Bass 11-12 5-7 27, Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0, Allen 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 4372 11-15 104. DETROIT (91) Prince 11-15 6-7 30, Maxiell 3-3 0-0 6, Wallace 1-2 2-4 4, Stuckey 3-9 5-5 11, Hamilton 3-9 1-2 10, Monroe 3-6 0-0 6, Gordon 2-11 0-0 5, McGrady 2-3 0-0 4, Villanueva 6-11 0-1 15, Daye 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-70 14-19 91. Orlando 24 30 24 26 — 104 Detroit 26 29 18 18 — 91 3-Point Goals—Orlando 7-22 (Richardson 3-8, Carter 2-5, Lewis 2-5, Williams 0-2, Duhon 0-2), Detroit 9-18 (Hamilton 3-5, Villanueva 3-7, Prince 2-3, Gordon 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 42 (Gortat 11), Detroit 32 (Gordon 9). Assists—Orlando 24 (Carter 9), Detroit 24 (Stuckey 7). Total Fouls—Orlando 17, Detroit 18. Technicals—Prince, Detroit defensive three second. A—18,433 (22,076).

Hawks 93, 76ers 88 PHILADELPHIA (88) Iguodala 4-12 2-2 10, Brand 7-16 2-3 16, Hawes 4-7 1-2 9, Holiday 2-7 0-0 4, Meeks 23 3-4 9, L.Williams 5-12 1-3 12, Turner 5-7 1-1 11, Speights 4-7 0-0 8, Young 2-8 2-2 6, Battie 1-4 1-2 3, Kapono 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-83 13-19 88. ATLANTA (93) M.Williams 7-12 8-8 22, Smith 4-15 0-1 9, Horford 5-15 5-5 15, Bibby 3-8 0-0 7, Evans 2-8 0-0 5, Ja.Crawford 5-8 4-6 15, Pachulia 3-7 2-2 8, Teague 1-3 4-6 6, Powell 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 33-79 23-28 93. Philadelphia 26 28 20 14 — 88 Atlanta 18 28 23 24 — 93 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 3-12 (Meeks 2-3, L.Williams 1-3, Young 0-1, Turner 01, Iguodala 0-2, Holiday 0-2), Atlanta 4-12 (Smith 1-1, Bibby 1-3, Ja.Crawford 1-3, Evans 1-4, M.Williams 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 55 (Brand 14), Atlanta 49 (Horford 13). Assists—Philadelphia 26 (Iguodala 8), Atlanta 25 (Horford 6). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 22, Atlanta 15. Technicals—Ja.Crawford. A—12,140 (18,729).

Bocats 91, Nets 84 NEW JERSEY (84) Outlaw 7-17 6-6 21, Humphries 2-6 0-0 4, Lopez 3-10 7-10 13, Farmar 6-18 3-3 16, Morrow 7-18 2-2 19, Uzoh 1-4 2-2 4, Favors 2-4 0-0 4, Petro 0-3 0-0 0, Murphy 0-2 1-2 1, Graham 0-4 0-0 0, Ross 0-0 0-0 0, James 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 29-91 21-25 84. CHARLOTTE (91) Wallace 5-14 1-4 12, Diaw 5-13 0-1 11, Mohammed 6-14 2-2 14, Augustin 5-12 3-3 15, Jackson 5-13 12-13 25, McGuire 1-7 0-1 2, K.Brown 0-2 0-2 0, Thomas 4-7 4-6 12, Livingston 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 31-86 22-32 91.

N.J. 16 16 16 31 5 — 84 Charlotte 18 15 27 19 12 — 91 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 5-25 (Morrow 3-8, Farmar 1-5, Outlaw 1-8, Graham 0-1, James 0-1, Murphy 0-2), Charlotte 7-15 (Jackson 3-5, Augustin 2-4, Wallace 1-2, Diaw 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 57 (Murphy, Humphries 8), Charlotte 74 (Diaw 16). Assists—New Jersey 17 (Farmar 10), Charlotte 21 (Diaw 8). Total Fouls—New Jersey 27, Charlotte 24. Technicals—New Jersey defensive three second 2. A—12,183 (19,077).

Nuggets 109, Clippers 104 L.A. CLIPPERS (104) Aminu 2-6 1-2 7, Griffin 7-18 3-5 17, Jordan 3-4 0-1 6, Bledsoe 3-8 3-4 9, Gordon 7-21 9-10 24, Gomes 1-4 0-0 2, Davis 4-9 0-3 8, Kaman 4-5 2-2 10, Butler 1-3 0-0 2, C.Smith 3-5 0-0 6, Cook 4-7 2-2 13. Totals 39-90 20-29 104. DENVER (109) Anthony 6-18 13-18 26, Williams 0-2 4-4 4, Nene 3-7 5-6 11, Billups 3-9 9-10 17, Afflalo 4-8 0-0 9, Andersen 1-1 5-8 7, Harrington 0-4 3-6 3, J.Smith 6-10 6-7 21, Lawson 4-6 0-0 11, Forbes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 27-67 45-59 109. L.A. Clippers 29 19 29 27 — 104 Denver 25 24 32 28 — 109 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 6-20 (Cook 3-6, Aminu 2-4, Gordon 1-4, Davis 0-1, Gomes 0-1, Bledsoe 0-1, C.Smith 0-1, Butler 0-2), Denver 10-24 (Lawson 3-4, J.Smith 3-5, Billups 2-7, Anthony 1-3, Afflalo 1-3, Harrington 0-2). Fouled Out—Nene. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 58 (Griffin 12), Denver 56 (Nene 7). Assists—L.A. Clippers 25 (Bledsoe 8), Denver 17 (Billups 5). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 37, Denver 23. Technicals—L.A. Clippers defensive three second, J.Smith, Denver defensive three second. A—15,829 (19,155).

LEADERS Through Thursday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 16 142 130 437 27.3 Bryant, LAL 19 171 138 507 26.7 Rose, CHI 15 149 69 387 25.8 Ellis, GOL 19 183 81 474 24.9 Nowitzki, DAL 18 169 96 447 24.8 Westbrook, OKC 19 152 157 467 24.6 James, MIA 20 160 143 483 24.2 Gordon, LAC 17 134 120 409 24.1 Stoudemire, NYK 19 164 124 457 24.1 Anthony, DEN 17 139 103 394 23.2 Martin, HOU 18 115 139 407 22.6 Granger, IND 17 133 67 377 22.2 TEAM STATISTICS Team Offense G Pts Phoenix 18 1966 L.A. Lakers 19 2056 New York 19 2033 San Antonio 18 1918 Denver 17 1801 Houston 18 1871 Oklahoma City 19 1963 Utah 20 2040 Golden State 19 1927 Miami 20 2026 Atlanta 19 1915 Memphis 19 1914 Toronto 18 1813 Boston 18 1813 Minnesota 18 1804 Chicago 16 1602 Indiana 17 1693 Orlando 18 1783 Washington 17 1670 Dallas 18 1763 Philadelphia 18 1751 L.A. Clippers 19 1848 New Orleans 18 1722 Charlotte 18 1716 Portland 18 1714 New Jersey 19 1799 Detroit 19 1794 Cleveland 18 1698 Sacramento 16 1509 Milwaukee 18 1644

Avg 109.2 108.2 107.0 106.6 105.9 103.9 103.3 102.0 101.4 101.3 100.8 100.7 100.7 100.7 100.2 100.1 99.6 99.1 98.2 97.9 97.3 97.3 95.7 95.3 95.2 94.7 94.4 94.3 94.3 91.3

Team Defense G Orlando 18 New Orleans 18 Dallas 18 Boston 18 Miami 20 Milwaukee 18 Portland 18 Utah 20 Charlotte 18 Indiana 17 Atlanta 19 San Antonio 18 New Jersey 19 Chicago 16 Philadelphia 18 Detroit 19 L.A. Lakers 19 Sacramento 16 Cleveland 18 Memphis 19 Toronto 18 Oklahoma City 19 Denver 17 L.A. Clippers 19 Houston 18 Washington 17 Golden State 19 New York 19 Minnesota 18 Phoenix 18

Avg 91.1 91.3 92.2 93.0 93.1 93.6 96.4 96.9 97.1 97.2 97.8 98.3 98.4 99.0 99.7 100.3 100.6 100.8 100.9 102.1 102.3 102.9 103.0 104.1 105.9 106.1 106.5 106.8 109.6 111.3

Pts 1640 1644 1660 1674 1862 1685 1735 1938 1747 1652 1859 1770 1870 1584 1794 1906 1912 1613 1817 1940 1841 1956 1751 1977 1907 1803 2024 2029 1973 2003

Woods extends his lead with 66 The Associated Press THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — Tiger Woods is starting to look like his old self at the Chevron World Challenge. Woods got off to a blazing start Friday and a solid putting stroke enabled him to play bogey-free in the second round for a 6-under 66 that gave him a four-shot lead going into the weekend of his final tournament this year. Woods was at 13-under 131, his best 36-hole score this year by six shots. And the four-shot lead over U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell had to be a refreshing change for a guy who has been at least nine shots back through 36 holes in seven tournaments this year. “I’ve been here before, so it’s not a strange feeling,” Woods said. “It’s just one of those things where tomorrow is the same game plan, just go out there and plot my way along and take care of the par 5s.” He did that again on a pleasant day in the Conejo Valley, and now has played the five par 5s at Sherwood Country Club in 10 under through two rounds. That included an eagle on the second hole, and perhaps Woods’ most impressive shot of the day, if not the year. He hit a 4-iron from a hanging lie so severe that it caused Woods to stumble down the hill after impact. The ball landed 8 feet away to the right of the pin. McDowell was at 9-under 135, and will be paired with Woods in the final group today. Q-school through third round ORLANDO, Fla.— Ben Martin had a 4-under 67 on Friday and opened a three-shot lead over Kyle Stanley as the final stage of PGA Tour qualifying reached the halfway point. Martin was at 201 as he tries to finish among the top 25 at Orange County National and earn PGA Tour cards for 2011. Westwood leads in Sun City SUN CITY, South Africa — Lee Westwood opened a threeshot lead with eight birdies in a second-round 64 Friday at the Nedbank Golf Challenge. The top-ranked player went bogey-free at the Gary Player Country Club, finishing 12 under and three strokes ahead of fellow Englishman Ross Fisher (68). Edoardo Molinari (67), Miguel Angel Jimenez (69) and overnight leader Padraig Harrington (72) are six off the lead in a tie for third.

Yang keeps lead at LPGA Tour Championship ORLANDO, Fla. — About the only thing going low at the LPGA Tour Championship is the temperature. Well, that and Amy Yang’s scorecard. Yang shot a 3-under 69 in a safe and solid second round Friday, good enough to hold a three-shot lead when play was called for darkness. Only 10 of the 120 players in the field were under par. The near-freezing conditions and a competitive course has tested players more than they could’ve imagined. Maria Hjorth (68) and Seon Hwa Lee (73) were three shots back, and world No. 1 Jiyai Shin (75) is projected to make the cut on the number to keep her chances of holding the ranking at season’s end alive. Five in the field have a chance to grab the LPGA player of the year award. Shin and Na Yeon Choi would be the first Korean to win the LPGA’s top honor. Cristie Kerr could become the first American since Beth Daniel in 1994 to claim the award, Yani Tseng would be the first from Taiwan, and Ai Miyazato of Japan is also in contention. Kerr (71) is five shots back, Choi (71) is seven off the lead, Tseng (73) is 11 back and Miyazato (71) is 14 off the pace. — The Associated Press


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NHL ROUNDUP

Auburn plays for one title, and a shot at bigger one By Paul Newberry

most overwhelming winner ever. • South Carolina is trying to claim its ATLANTA — Gene Chizik was still in • SEC title first SEC title, and has a guy on the sideline game: No. 2 his I’m-only-talking-about-the-game mode who knows a thing or two about conference Friday, even though Cam Newton has been championships; Spurrier captured six of Auburn vs. cleared to play by the NCAA. No. 18 South them at Florida. So it was left to Steve Spurrier to discuss “It’s a challenge trying to do some things Carolina Auburn’s star quarterback. that have never been done before,” the Head “We’re glad he’s playing,” the venerable • When: Ball Coach said. “That’s the fun part for Today, 1 p.m. me.” South Carolina coach said on the eve of the Southeastern Conference championship • TV: CBS He reacquainted himself with a once-fagame. “He’s played all year, and it wouldn’t be miliar routine Friday, posing for pictures right for him not to play when the championwith Chizik in front of the trophy that goes ship’s on the line. I remember Joe Paterno saying one to the winner during their news conference at the time, ‘You want to beat the other team when all their Georgia Dome. Spurrier peeked around to get a look best players are playing.’” at the front of the massive wood-and-bronze award, Newton will definitely be on the field today for the then patted it from behind before facing the cameras. No. 2 Tigers (12-0). The NCAA made sure of that by While the Gamecocks coach gave off his usual deciding, in a series of rapid-fire decisions this week, carefree vibe, Chizik was the exact opposite — stoic, that while the player’s father had solicited illegal pay- tightlipped and in no mood to talk about Newton’s ments during the recruiting process, his son knew NCAA case beyond a brief reference to it in his opennothing about it and was therefore eligible. ing statement. That removed one bit of intrigue from this game, “I’m glad the NCAA was in agreement with us but left plenty of other storylines: that Auburn University and Cameron Newton had • Auburn, which is atop the BCS standings, can done nothing wrong,” the Tigers coach said. “Camlock up a spot in the championship game at Glendale, eron will be our starting quarterback tomorrow, as he Ariz., with a victory over No. 18 South Carolina (9-3). has been the previous 12 weeks. I think that’s pretty • No. 3 TCU could become the first non-BCS team self-explanatory.” to play for the title if the Gamecocks pull off the upset, Newton has been unstoppable for the Tigers, director No. 1 Oregon loses its regular-season finale against ing the most potent offense in the SEC (41.6 points Oregon State. and 490.1 yards a game). He leads the conference in • The NCAA ruling likely removes any stigma from rushing (1,336 yards) and ranks second nationally in Newton’s Heisman Trophy campaign, and one more passing efficiency, completing nearly 68 percent of his off-the-charts performance might just make him the throws for 24 touchdowns, with just six interceptions.

Luongo, Canucks shut out ‘Hawks

Next up

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Butch Dill / The Associated Press

Auburn tight end Philip Lutzenkirchen (43) celebrates a touchdown on Saturday, Nov. 26, against Alabama. The Tigers play for the Southeastern Conference Championship today against South Carolina.

Teams resort to faking injuries to slow Oregon By Pete Thamel New York Times News Service

EUGENE — Early in the second quarter of Oregon’s victory at California on Nov. 13, Cal defensive lineman Aaron Tipoti looked toward a coach on the sideline, suddenly grabbed the back of his knee and tumbled awkwardly to the ground without being touched. Tipoti’s flop will not garner an Oscar nomination. His attempt to fake an injury to slow Oregon’s high-octane offense was so blatant and unwieldy that it has been viewed nearly 400,000 times on YouTube, complete with a circus soundtrack. He is the highest-profile victim of Oregon’s innovative no-huddle spread offense, a steamroller that has been one of the biggest on-field stories of the season. The Ducks are averaging an NCAA-best 50 points per game while running a dizzying 80 plays per game, and a win at Oregon State today would complete their run to the Bowl Championship Series title game. The Ducks are ranked No. 2 in the BCS standings; Auburn is No. 1. But Tipoti’s flop illustrates the sportsmanship conundrum for opponents attempting to slow the Oregon offense: Is it savvy, or unethical, to instruct a player to fake an injury to slow the other team? “It’s very cut and dry,” said Greg Dale, a professor of sports psychology and ethics at Duke. “It’s unethical and it’s desperate. That just shows that you are desperate as a coach if you have to resort to tactics like that to win a football game.” Oregon receiver Jeff Maehl does not like the obvious flops, but he says he under-

Civil War Continued from D1 And there’s no better time to play the ultimate spoiler’s role than in the regular-season finale between the two longtime rivals. “This is it,” said Beavers senior cornerback James Dockery. “We’ve got to figure out a way.” It won’t be easy. Oregon State has had an uneven season at best, and has dropped three of its last four games, including a disheartening loss to lowly Washington State and a 38-0 shutout by Stanford last weekend. After breaking in new quarterback Ryan Katz this season, the Beavers were hurt when they lost senior receiver James Rodgers to a season-ending knee injury in early October. Rodgers, the older brother of running back Jacquizz Rodgers, was averaging 176.8 yards of total offense before he was injured. Little brother Quizz says his own season hasn’t met his expectations. He is averaging just under 100 yards rushing per game, down from his average of about 111 last year. “I don’t think I’ve played to my potential,” he said. “Three games (out of) four, I haven’t gotten into the end zone. I gotta change that this week.” The Beavers have had an admittedly difficult schedule. Three of Oregon State’s losses came to opponents in the top 10 this week — TCU, Stanford and Boise State. But the Beavers also beat Arizona, which at the time was ranked ninth, and Southern California, which was No. 20

stood why teams do it. “We push the pace harder than anyone else in the country,” Maehl said. “Teams understand that. I look at it like a lot of respect when other teams do that.” Oregon plays so fast that it is not uncommon for it to snap the ball 7 seconds into the 40-second play clock, long before defenses are accustomed to being set. That is so quick that opponents have no ability to substitute between plays, and fans at home do not have time to run to the fridge. The Ducks’ offense has caught the nation’s attention, too. Florida coach Urban Meyer calls their tempo “mesmerizing” and Oregon coach Chip Kelly said Ohio State coach Jim Tressel called at midseason to pick his brain about tempo. “If there’s one team you don’t want to play right now, it’s Oregon,” Meyer said. Cal was not the only team accused of flopping to slow the Ducks. An Arizona State linebacker, Vontaze Burfict, limped off so many times against Oregon in September that Kelly sarcastically compared the feigning of injuries to the World Cup, where flopping was a common occurrence. Stanford linebacker Chase Thomas was booed heartily by the Oregon crowd when he ran back onto the field one play after falling over to stop the clock and limping off. (Kelly can be seen on television replays angrily telling an official that he was willing to bet him a thousand dollars that Thomas would come back on the field the next play.) But the problem is that there is no explicit penalty in the rulebook for faking

injuries. That is probably because officials are not trained to distinguish an actual injury from a faked one. The rulebook does address the topic, however, in its ethical code: “An injured player must be given full protection under the rules, but feigning injury is dishonest, unsportsmanlike and contrary to the spirit of the rules. Such tactics cannot be tolerated among sportsmen of integrity.” They certainly are not tolerated by Oregon fans. They have become so fed up with the fake injuries that they booed a legitimately injured player last week when Arizona cornerback Joe Perkins cramped up. To boo or not to boo has become a hotbutton talk radio topic in Portland. “When someone goes outside the rules to disengage the motor from the engine, that’s frustrating,” said the former Oregon coach Mike Bellotti, now an analyst with ESPN. “Certainly, if you’re an Oregon coach you’re frustrated by it.” Cal ultimately suspended its defensive line coach, Tosh Lupoi, for instructing Tipoti to fake the injury. But the decision came only after the Pacific-10 encouraged Cal to investigate the incident. The league’s commissioner, Larry Scott, said he was pleased that the university came to a swift and strong conclusion. “I am certain that a strong message has been sent to everyone in our conference and also nationally,” Scott said. “It isn’t a Pac-10-isolated issue.” The former Michigan coach Lloyd Carr faced Oregon when Kelly was the offensive coordinator and said he could understand why coaches instructed players to fake

Civil War preview No. 1 Oregon (11-0, 8-0 Pac-10) at Oregon State (5-6, 4-4 ), 12:30 p.m. (ABC) Line: Oregon by 16½. Series Record: Oregon leads 57-46-10. Last Meeting: 2009, 37-33 Oregon.

WHAT’S AT STAKE If the No. 1 Ducks win, they’re a lock for the national championship game in January. Oregon has already wrapped up at least a share of the Pac-10 title. The Beavers, who have lost three of their last four games, need a victory just to become bowl eligible and avoid their first losing season since 2005.

KEY MATCHUP Oregon’s fast spread-option against Oregon State’s defense. Oregon leads the nation in both points per game (50.5) and total yards per game with 541.7. Oregon State’s passing and rushing defense both rank in the bottom half of the Pac-10.

PLAYERS TO WATCH Oregon: RB LaMichael James. The Heisman Trophy candidate leads the nation with 154.8 yards rushing per game. He has rushed for 19 touchdowns and is the national leader with an average of 12 points per game. Oregon State: RB Jacquizz Rodgers. Quizz has run for 1,162 yards this season, but that’s off last season’s 1,502. He’s averaging just under 99.7 yards a game, again under last season’s average. The junior is ranked eighth in the Pac-10 for career yards rushing with 3,793.

FACTS & FIGURES It is the 114th Civil War, a series dating back to 1894. It is the seventh-most contested rivalry in the nation. The two teams have met more than any other rivals in the Pac-10. ... The Beavers have been to the postseason for the past four straight years. ... The Ducks have won the last two Civil Wars, but the teams have split the last 12 meetings. ... Oregon’s offensive line has allowed seven sacks all season. when the Trojans fell in Corvallis 36-7. “We know we’re going to get their best shot. They were home against SC, so we talked today about how we’re going to get that team that played SC,” Oregon linebacker Casey Matthews

said. “They’re not just going to roll over and let the season slip away. They need that sixth win to get bowl eligible, so we know they’re not going to just give this game up.” Quizz’s counterpart on the Ducks, running back LaMichael

injuries, because it created an extra timeout. That allows defenses to substitute and adjust, which they do not have time to do because of Oregon’s pace. But Carr disagreed with coaching and teaching the practice of faking injuries. “If you’re doing that, you’re violating the ethics of the game,” Carr said. “One of the jobs as a coach is to uphold the ethics of the game.” Oregon’s offense has been so productive that it has spread to high schools; coaches from Texas, Utah and Michigan have traveled to Eugene to learn the nuances of the offense from Kelly. It is especially popular in the Portland area: Steve Coury, the coach at Lake Oswego High School, said five of the six teams in his league ran a version of it. Coury said he had not seen any high school teams fake injuries, but he worried that it may start. “It really does bother me,” Coury said. “It really stretches the rules that it’s kind of a legal illegal way to do things. It’s going to sneak down into the next level like everything does.” For now, Scott hopes that the problem has been contained. Oregon’s game with Oregon State, with its national title implications, will be watched closely, “It’s a lot of gray area,” Scott said. “I was very impressed and pleased with the statement that Cal made by investigating and suspending a coach. It sets a high standard for ethics that I hope everyone is paying attention to.” If they are not, the next flopper Oregon sees will get plenty of attention on YouTube.

James, is having a season that has put him in the race for the Heisman Trophy. James is averaging a BCSlevel best 154.8 yards rushing a game for Oregon (11-0, 8-0 Pac10). He is also leading the nation in scoring with an average of 12 points a game. The sophomore has rushed for 1,548 yards and 19 touchdowns this season. James teams with quarterback Darron Thomas on Oregon’s blazingly fast spread-option offense, which is averaging 50.5 points, a national best. The offense also leads the country with 541.7 total yards per game. Oregon’s defense has been just as good, at least in the second half of games. The team has allowed just 64 points after halftime this year, and only 14 in the fourth quarter. The Ducks, who have already claimed at least a share of the Pac-10 title, have shown vulnerability just once this season, when they squeaked by California 15-13. Last season was arguably the most hyped Civil War. Dubbed the “War of the Roses,” either team would clinch a Rose Bowl berth with a win. The Ducks claimed the trip to Pasadena with a 37-33 victory. The year, before the Beavers were headed to the Rose Bowl with a victory in the final game, but the Ducks romped to a 65-38 win in Corvallis. “We know we’re going to get their best game. We’re going to get a lights-out performance,” Oregon linebacker Spencer Paysinger said. “It’s just going to be playing against that home crowd of theirs, they’re going to be

hyped and they probably have some animosity towards us. We know we’re going to get their best shot and we just have to be ready for them.”

CHICAGO — Roberto Luongo made 32 saves for his second shutout of the season and 53rd overall, leading the Vancouver Canucks to their fourth straight victory, 3-0 over the Chicago Blackhawks on Friday night. Stanley Cup champion Chicago suffered its eighth regulation loss at home, matching its regular-season total from last season. The Blackhawks are 6-8-0 at home after going 29-8-4 last season at United Center. Tanner Glass, Christian Ehrhoff and Henrik Sedin scored to give the Canucks and Luongo the all the offense they needed to avenge a 7-1 home loss to the Blackhawks on Nov. 20. Sedin’s goal was his first since Nov. 4 and ended an 11game drought. Chicago has eliminated Vancouver from the playoffs in the past two seasons, each time in the second round. Also on Friday: Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 NEW YORK — Henrik Lundqvist earned his fourth shutout of the season, and Marc Staal scored in the second period to help the New York Rangers sweep the home-and-home series. Sabres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Ryan Miller made 19 saves for Buffalo for his first shutout of the season and 18th overall, and Drew Stafford had a goal and an assist in his return from a shoulder injury. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Rene Bourque and Alex Tanguay scored in a shootout to lift Calgary. Tanguay and Mark Giordano scored in regulation for the Flames. Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 RALEIGH, N.C. — Brandon Sutter scored at 1:15 of overtime, rookie Jeff Skinner had his eighth goal of the season and Cam Ward made 34 saves to help Carolina even its record at 11-11-3. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jimmy Howard made 41 saves for his fifth NHL shutout and Johan Franzen scored on Detroit’s first shot of the game. Tomas Holmstrom, Dan Cleary and Valtteri Filppula also scored for the Red Wings.


D6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fourth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and cannot be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

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RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


For homes online

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S AT U R D AY, D E C E M B E R 4 , 2 0 1 0

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www.bendhomes.com

ADVERTISING SECTION E

New Homes Starting at $94,990

Exceptional luxury on 2+ acres in Bend Upgrades, charm and quality abound in this immaculate Gary Norman custom home. Highly functional 4175 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3.5 baths with wrap-around deck on 2.5 acres for $835,000. Fantastic entertainer’s kitchen, ofice with separate entry or 5th bedroom, family room, guest suite, built-in’s and storage galore. Large master with soaking tub, balcony and Pilot Butte view. Visit for a personal tour on Sat., 12-2pm. From Hwy. 97, go east on Empire, left on NE 18th, right on Royal Oak. Call Kryste Adams, Broker, (541) 706-1556.

Situated in NW Redmond & located near the bypass, shopping, and medical facilities, Vista Dorado offers new homes for only $94,990! Hayden Homes continues its reputation of offering signature quality homes at an exceptional value, and with five well appointed home plans available, you are certain to find the one to call your own. Directions: from the bypass - east on NE Hemlock, north on NE 9th, west on NE Negus, north on NE 5th, west on NE Spruce. Model home: 454 NE Spruce. Call 541-548-5011 or at www.hayden-homes.com for more information.

VISTA DORADO WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES. COM 541-548-5011

Oregon Homeowner Help Comes to Central Oregon The State of Oregon will begin accepting applications for mortgage payment assistance beginning Friday, Dec.10. SALEM — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) has launched a new website (www.oregonhomeownerhelp.org) and identified local partners in every county to deliver the state’s Mortgage Payment Assistance (MPA) program. The funding for this program comes from the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Housing Finance Agency Innovation Fund for the Hardest Hit Housing Markets. The MPA program will pay the mortgages for select applicants who are unemployed and otherwise financially distressed homeowners for up to one year or a maximum of $20,000. At least 5,000 Oregon homeowners will receive assistance through the MPA program. On Friday, Dec. 10, OHCS will open an online application for the MPA program at www.oregonhomeownerhelp.org. NeighborImpact will provide resources and assistance to homeowners in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties as they complete the application. “We are pleased to have a strong group of organizations that span the entire state ready to help homeowners who are struggling to pay their mortgages,” said Victor Merced, OHCS Director. “With our network of partners, we can ensure that eligible homeowners in Oregon have an opportunity to get help with their mortgages while they look for work.” For the most current information about the program, including eligibility criteria, visit www.oregonhomeownerhelp. org. The website will serve as the primary source of information about the MPA program and Oregon’s other foreclosure prevention programs. The U.S. Department of Treasury established the Hardest Hit Fund in February to provide aid to homeowners in states hit hard by the economic and housing market downturn. In total, the Treasury awarded $220 million in foreclosure prevention resources to Oregon. For information about the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative and to sign up for e-mail updates, visit www.oregonhomeownerhelp. org. Homeowners needing immediate help should call the Homeowner’s HOPE™ Hotline at 888-995-4673.

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CHANGE is key to success. by Colleen McNally, RE/MAX Key Properties

It can be said that the real estate business is facilitating change: one’s location, home size and features, ownership and investment strategy. According to veteran real estate broker Bill Duffey, CEO and principal Broker of RE/MAX Key Properties, to be successful in a constantly evolving industry, it’s essential for those in the real estate business to change as well. That’s been the strategy of local boutique office Taft Dire Real Estate Resources, which was officially franchised as RE/MAX Key Properties of Bend on Dec. 1. “Joining together with RE/MAX fits perfectly with our strategy,” said Duffey. “We worked hard to develop our presence in Central Oregon. Now, we’re bringing that presence to a whole new level with a globally recognized brand, industry-leading Internet marketing, and customer and agent

support systems that are just exceptional.” “When we first opened as Taft Dire, we specifically positioned ourselves to serve the new home segment of the market, and it made sense. Given the increased share of the Central Oregon market to existing home sales, we knew we had to grow with the change,” said Duffey. According to Duffey and partner Pat Huber, CFO and broker, in the last two years their brokerage significantly expanded its client services, number of listings and broker support with such offerings as in-house professional marketing and business management. The partners also invested in improving the firm’s location with a retail office on Franklin Avenue in downtown Bend. With a staff of three and more than 20 agents, the brokerage more than tripled in size in two years.

TAFT DIRE expands to bring RE/MAX KEY PROPERTIES to Central Oregon.

Duffey sites franchise positives as the RE/MAX commitment to national advertising and marketing efforts, the remax.com website which consistently ranks at the top of real estate search engine results, and agent and consumer tools that offer the latest technology in the industry. “On top of all that, we’re still the same people with the same local ownership and professional expertise as always,” said Huber. “We’re full service for our customers and our agents alike.” Different from other national real estate franchises, RE/MAX has always functioned as a privately owned company. “RE/MAX has been operated by the same owners for the last 37 years,” said Huber. “There’s an appreciation of local ownership and operation, and it is fully supported within the organization. That was critical to us.”

With other franchise offices in Redmond, Sisters and Sunriver, RE/MAX sought out Duffey and Huber to return the brand to Bend. “Unfortunately, in 2008 with the sudden turn in the market, RE/MAX closed its Bend office,” said Duffey. “Not locally owned or managed, it became difficult for the office to weather the drastic market fluctuations. RE/MAX Key Properties is different. We’re Central Oregonians who love where we live and love doing business here. We are 100 percent invested in this community and see good things ahead. It’s that simple.” “We’re proud to be bringing RE/MAX back to Bend,” said Huber. “With the level of increased services offered at RE/MAX Key Properties, it’s a triple hit — great for our firm, great for our agents and most importantly, great for our customers in Bend.”

“With the level of increased services offered at RE/MAX Key Properties, it’s a triple hit — great for our firm, great for our agents and most importantly, great for our customers in Bend.”

Bill broker and CFO, owner, er, in the ok Pat Huber, br l pa ci owner/prin ted on Duffey, CEO, Proper ties of fice loca y Ke . ax m nd new Re Downtown Be Fr anklin in

All brokers are licensed in Oregon


E2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 634

636

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

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RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 631

Rentals

600

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

1042 NE Rambling Ln. #2 2 bdrm, all appliances +micro, w/d hook-up, gas heat/ fireplace, garage, landscaping included, small pet ok. $695 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1085 NE Purcell - Pilot Butte Village 55+ Community 2 bdrm $799, in hospital district. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

130 NE 6th 1 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no smkg or pets, close to Bend High. $495+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

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Roommate Wanted Seeking responsible roommate, no smoking/drugs. $300/mo + $200 deposit and ½ utilities. Call 541-279-0779 Share 2bdrm 2½ bath home near Broken Top, fully furn. $550+ ½ util. 949-940-6748 Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

616

Want To Rent

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District www.ThePlazainBend.com

OPEN HOUSE Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing Call 541-743-1890 Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

632

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

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BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 bdrm, 2 bath near hospital, open floorplan, w/s/g paid. Extra storage. $630 mo. Call Katie Kelley at Kelley Realty 541-408-3220. 854 NE Hidden Valley #1 & #2 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + W/D, gas heat, garage, w/s/g paid, small pet OK. $710. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Close to downtown & shops, 2 Bdrm 1 bath in triplex. Quiet neighborhood, fenced yd, gas stove, W/S & hot water paid. $520. Cat OK. 541-419-4520

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany d 1 bdrm $495 d d 3 bdrm $610 d Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. 541-382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

642

$395 2/1, close to shopping, on site coin-op laundry, patio, court yard maint, w/s/g paid. 709 NW Birch Ave $595 2/2, single garage w/opener, w/d hookups, gas forced air heat, yard maint 1913 NW Elm Ave. $625 2/2, single garage w/ opener, forced air, gas fireplace, fenced, yard maint, 1113 SW 29th St. $625 3/2, w/d hookup, w/s/g paid, single garage. 1222 SW 18th St. $675 2/2, single garage, w/d hookups, fenced, patio, sprinkler system. 2938 SW 24th Ct.

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

642

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648

650

650

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

1124 NE Ulysses

1131 NE Locksley

3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., w/d hookup, fenced yard, extra storage, garage, pet considered. $850. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

3 bdrm, 2½ bath, bonus room, gas heat/fireplace, fenced yard, 1798 sq. ft., dbl. garage, extra storage, pet cons. $1075. 541-382-7727

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

GSL Properties

Clean 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath duplex for rent. Fenced backyard, single car garage, Small pet ok upon approval. $660 per month plus deposit. 1620 SW Rimrock Way #A. 541-480-7783 for showings.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

1/2 Off 1st Mo. Rent! 20732 Patriot Lane 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appl. incl. w/d, dlb. garage, wood floors, $995/mo.+ dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

•Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1 bath with private fenced back yard & patio. No pets. $425 includes WSG. • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apt. W/D hookups. Small fenced yard. End Unit. Pets considered. $495 WST in1435 NE Boston cluded. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath gas frplce, all kitchen appl 2 bath, garage w/opener. Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. incld small pet neg. 1300 sq. ft., w/d hookup, $495/mo. Includes WSG. $895+dep. fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. • Near Old Mill Dist. - Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs unit CR Property Management $700 dep. 541-604-0338 w/balcony. On-site laundry. $495 mo. incl. CABLE + WST. 541-318-1414 •1/2 Off Move-in Rent! Spacious Hillside Apt. Floor-level with balcony & fireplace. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. Laundry facilities on 1657 NE Carson Way 648 site. Central Location. $495 includes WST & Basic Cable. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, new paint & Houses for • Adorable Hide-a-way. Bright. Cheerful 2 bdrm/1bath Apt. carpet, wood fireplace, dble above garage in NE. $500 includes WS. Rent General garage, 1467 sq ft., pets neg. •Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 bath apts. Off-street parking. Nice shade $995+dep trees. Onsite laundry. Near hospital. $525 includes w/s/g BEND RENTALS • Starting at CR Property Management • Townhome Near Downtown & River. 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath. $450. Furnished also avail. 541-318-1414 W/D Hook-Ups. Lg. Private Enclosed Deck w/extra storage. For virtual tours & pics ONLY $550 includes WST. apm@riousa.com 1743 NE Diablo • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy 541-385-0844 $900 – 3 bedroom 2 bath, bed. $550 includes WST/wireless newly remodeled, new car• Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 Bdrm/2 bath. pet, linoleum & fresh paint; W/D included. No Pets. $550 w/s Included. large yard and garage. • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. Heaters and wood stove. Fenced backyard. Country kitchen. $625 per month. Available soon! • Cute NE Duplex w/ Vaulted Ceilings. 2 Bdrm/2 Bath. Gas ABOVE & BEYOND PROP Fireplace. W/D Hook-ups. Sgl. Garage. Private Deck off master. MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com Fenced yard. Pets? $675 includes WS. •Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 master Bdrm Suites + ½ bath downstairs. W/D incl. Huge kitchen and dbl. garage. Wood 1800 sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 1 bath, TERREBONNE family room, clean, close to burning fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. $895 3/2 - Move In Spehospital & shopping, cial! 1st month rent $495. • LOTS OF SPACE IN & OUT. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath SE Home on elect./nat. gas heat, poss. 1/2 acre. EFA. Fireplace in formal Living Room. Dbl. garage. Views! dbl garage, w/d small pet. 1150 NE 6th St. 1700 sq. ft. $845 per mo. hookups, deck, fenced, $950/mo, $800 dep., no • Very Private NE Home in cul-de-sac. Close to Costco. 3 1423 Barberry smoking, 541-389-4985. Bdrm/2 Bath. Large lot. Triple car garage. 1515 sq. ft. No fridge. Large pantry. $925 per mo. CROOKED RIVER RANCH 3/2 House, large kitchen, great room 1500 sq.ft., large yard $675 2/2 Views! 1 Acre, •Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. With media room downstairs and extra space upstairs. Garage and access to commuwith sprinklers. Pets neg. single garage w/ opener, nity pool. W/D included. $995 per mo. 21336 Pelican Dr. $950 + w/d hookups, deck, fence. • Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath NE home off Boyd Acres. Corner lot. deposit. Call 541-322-0708 8797 Sand Ridge Rd. Double car garage. Mtn. views. Gas dryer HU. 2300 sq. ft. ap$750 2/2 Views, 1.5 acres, prox., $1150. Pet? 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, pellet w/d, loft, large deck, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas 12599 SW Spur Pl. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** stove, new paint, carpet & 541-923-8222 CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. www.MarrManagement.com www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com Mike 541-408-8330.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new carpet/paint, W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 1-Month Free Option!

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., fireplace, W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1 $725. 541-420-0208

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1225 NW Stannium 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, w/d hookup, gas fireplace, w/s/g paid, garage, cat OK. $695. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Apt./Multiplex General 1 Bdrm. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT throughout. W/D incl. no smoking. No pets. Sewer/ Lawncare paid. 1 yr. lease. $795 mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth Ave. in Bend. 541-382-3813

Fully furnished loft apt.

2508 NE Conners "C"

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! 605

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

$420+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902. 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

330 SE 15th St. #9 Close to schools & shopping 1 bdrm, appliances, on-site coin-op laundry, carport, w/s/g paid. $495. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. 1 Bdrm $425 • 2 Bdrm $525 All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1264 Silverlake Blvd. #200 Old Mill 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + w/d, gas heat/fireplace, 1236 sq. ft., garage. W/S paid, cat ok. $795. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

642

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Avail now, unfurnished 1 Bdrm condo at Mt. Bachelor Village. W/S/G/elec, amenities, lower level, no smoking/pets $650+dep. 541-389-1741 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

AWBREY BUTTE HOME SUNDAY 1-5PM Beautiful Awbrey Butte home in private setting w/separate guest house. Home features 3096 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, main level master, den/ 3051 NW Winslow, Bend office, loft, woodshop Directions: Up Mt. Washington downstairs & much more. Dr, left on Summit, right on Farewell, right on Winslow.

$799,000 Hosted by: DEBBIE TEBBS Broker

541-419-4553


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 650

658

693

745

750

762

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Homes for Sale

Redmond Homes

Homes with Acreage

900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single car garage, all utils incl, W/D hkup, in country, very quiet. No smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st + $300 dep. 541-480-9041

1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot, close to dwntwn. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 10th Fairway Eagle Crest behind the gates 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. 541-923-0908 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 $875 3Bdrm 2Bath, dbl garage, fenced, all appls, woodstove & heat pump. W/S pd, no smkg. Crooked River Realty, Nancy Popp, 541-815-8000.

335 NE Greenwood Ave. Prime retail/office space, Greenwood frontage, 1147 sq. ft., ample parking, includes w/s. $1200 mo. 541-382-7727

10th Fairway Eagle Crest behind the gates 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. 541-923-0908

Beautiful Prineville home, wood and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, master on main level, bonus room, office, 6.87 acres, conveniently located between town & lake, $415,000. 541-771-3093

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 63842 Johnson Rd. Country Home! 3 bdrm 3 bath house, 3500+ sq. ft., all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, landscaping maintained, pet OK. $3000 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

925 NW Poplar Ave. $775 3 bedroom / 2 bath, newly remodeled, 2-car garage, gas fireplace, open floor plan, gas stove, built in microwave, ceiling fan, large yard with patio. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

541-322-7253

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

660

Houses for Rent La Pine

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

347 NE Greenwood Ave. 400 sq. ft. office space, private entrance & restroom, 3 small offices + reception area, ample parking, includes water/sewer/ electric. $500! 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

541-385-5809 Sunriver Lease option, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/ decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge $230,000. 541-617-5787

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1500 sq.ft. on 1.1 acre, attached & detached garage, huge dog run, heat pump, A/C, dishwasher, fridge, micro, W/D, secluded, quiet, $900, refs, credit, background checks req., 541-815-9893.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville

www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

773

Acreages

OWN 20AC. LAND! $99/month! $0-Down, $12,900, great deal! Near El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures. 800-343-9444.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Marilyn Rohaly, Broker 541-322-9954 marilynr@johnlscott.com

510 NE Third St.

1001 SE 15th #184Darling 1992 Marlette in the wonderful 55+ park, Suntree Village. Home features vaults, dry wall and lots of windows. Nice kitchen with ample cupboards and bar area. Includes all appliances plus extra large utility with washer & dryer. $30,000. 1188 NE 27th St #116. Value in Snowberry Village. Corner lot, this home has many features including FA gas heat & air cond., vaulted ceilings, lots of windows make it light and bright, 2-car attached garage, sep laundry room, dining room. $75,000 1188 NE 27th St. #1212000 Silvercrest in Snowberry Village. Huge kitchen w/lots of cabinets and storage. Includes all appliances. Front porch, oversized backyard patio. Finished attached 2-car garage. New interior, new exterior paint, and carpet throughout. $88,750 2375 NE Buckwheat CtMtn View Park. Ideal floor plan, separation of bedrooms. Private w/ covered front porch, low maint. backyard, huge entertaining deck. Vaults, custom cabinets, tile entry, skylight, solar tube, walk-in pantry, A/C & more. $141,500

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

541-389-7910

Beautifully furnished 6 Bdrm, 3 Bath, granite kitchen, fenced yard. Skyliner Summit. $2500 includes water/garbage; min 6-mo lease. 541-944-3063

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend $1385/mo 2456 sq.ft., 3/2.5 Super clean home in Sunmeadow Hot tub, Pool, walk to park & Jewell school. 3 car gar Avail 12/10 $1400 deposit pets ok w/deposit Keith 771-0475

20371 Rocca Way 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, 1675 sq. ft. gas fireplace, fenced yard, pets ok! $950 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

20659 Daisy Lane 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, + w/d, gas heat, fireplace, fenced yard, large dbl. garage. $875. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

21183 Copperfield Ave $1050 - 3 bedroom 2 bath single story home with large yard, two car garage, full size laundry in great SE neighborhood. Available soon. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

3 Bdrm, 1 bath, single car attached garage, dishwasher, range and fridge, located at end of cul-de-sac, no smoking, no pets. $700/mo. 948 SE Polaris Ct. Available immediately. 541-389-6793.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

105 NW Greeley Avenue • Bend, OR 97701

www. hunterproperties.info $695 2/1 double garage w/opener, W/D, covered patio, bay window, fenced. 795 NE Ochoco Ave

LAWNAE HUNTER, Principal Broker/Owner

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

682

Farms, Ranches and Acreage

$365,000

$100,000

New on the Market! Enjoy the Serenity of Lane Knolls. Majestic 2 1/2 acres, 2-car garage TONA RESTINE, BROKER 541-610-5148

Price Reduced! Open floor plan makes for comfortable living. Close to schools and shopping. SUSAN PITARRO, BROKER 541-410-8084

Gorgeous view on 2.8 acres btwn Bend/Redmond. 3bdrm 2ba updated 1999 mnfd hm. Room for animals/toys. $1050 mo to mo rent. 541-306-1648

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ Alley Access, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

$194,900

$110,000

New on the Market! One acre parcel, surrounded by trees. RV parking, two shops & room to grow! AARON BOEHM, BROKER 541-647-2545

An Excellent Value! Newer 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath. Close to schools and shopping. SUSAN PITARRO, BROKER 541-410-8084

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

$150,000

$339,000

Easy Living! 4 bedroom, 2 bath. This is a must see! MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

Backs up to BLM Open floor plan, vaulted ceilings. Overlooks Rock Ridge Park. MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

19584 Manzanita 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1152 sq. ft., w/d hook-up, carport, storage, 1 acre lot that backs up to canal $625 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2/1 House, 3/4 acre, appl, sunny deck overlooks Baker Pond, W/S/G paid, $800 1st, last, dep, Call Geri, 541-280-2947 e-mail:gerim@bendcable.com 2 Bdrm 1 Bath mnfd. home on quiet cul-de-sac, with heat pump, fenced yard. W/S/G paid. $595/mo + security deposit. 541-382-8244.

60950 Ashford Rd. $750 Nice 3 bdrm 2 bath mnfd home, approx 1200 sq ft, lg detached garage, pellet stove, tile kitchen, gas frplc & forced air heater. Huge yard; access to club house & pool. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Elkhorn, Avail. now, 1200 sq.ft, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, dbl. garage, fenced, forced air, gas fireplace, all appl., $850, 541-389-1416.

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

$468,000

$119,000

.72 Acre Lot 2500 sq. ft., RV parking, shop & much more!. MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Adorable New Home Low maintenance. Must See! GRANT LUDWICK, BROKER 541-633-0255

Lots & Land LAWNAE HUNTER, PRINCIPAL BROKER, 541-550-8635 $327,900 - 22 Improved lots; Ready to build.

$140,000 - 7 contiguous lots; utilities in; Priced to sell!

$599,000 - 13.4 acres; Residential; utilities in.

$751,100 - 29 fully approved lots; Ready to build!

$179,000 - Retail & mixed use; Sisters

$1,560,000 - 39 fully approved Westside lots; Ready to build!

$20,000 - Lot 1; Excellent Opportunity; utilities in.

$112,000 - 7 Lots fully approved. Nice established neighborhood!

MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER, 541-390-0098 • Call today for more details 7 Lots off 27th St., Utilities in place and ready to build! Priced from $29,000

What is a Short Sale? A short sale is a sale from seller (owner) to buyer that the Lenders agree to take a pay-off less than the existing loan amount. Owners benefit by avoiding a foreclosure on their credit, lenders get the house sold & the buyer generally receives a home that has been occupied & may be in better shape than a foreclosure home. There are many advantages to a Short Sale for all parties. Hunter Properties Brokers have a very high closing rate in this type of a sale. Call for Details! 541-389-7910


E 4Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

www.bendhomes.com

SEARCH. Find acres of properties with slideshows offering up to 10 photographs per home to showcase unique features, home interiors and exteriors, quickly and easily.

FIND. Find homes in The Bulletin’s classified listings as well as standard MLS listings. Advanced search options allow you to locate homes based on architectural style, neighborhood amenities, views and more.

BUY. Use financial tools, such as the mortgage calculator, to estimate an approximate mortgage amount and provide insight into how much you can afford.

making Central Oregon real estate, real easy.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 E5

Live. Work. Play. THE CENTRAL OREGON WAY

COAR MEMBERS - REALTORS® AND AFFILIATES – ARE YOUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS. We’ve helped thousands of people find their dream home right here in Central Oregon. REALTORS® don’t just sell homes, we sell communities — we sell quality of life. Central Oregon REALTORS® believe we can build better communities by supporting planned growth and seeking sustainable economies and housing opportunities that embrace the environmental qualities we cherish, while protecting the property owner’s ability to own, use, buy and sell property. We are invested in our communities; that’s why so many of our members invest their time and resources in local charities, from United Way to Boys and Girls Clubs. Our members believe that together we can build a better place to live, work and play. So when it’s time to invest in a home of your own, remember to contact a COAR member. You’ll be putting a professional, trained community member to work for you.

egon r O l a r t n e C t Curren stics i t a t S l a i t n e Resid

...... 2,926 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. s: .... Active Listing Pending/ ......... 900 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ct: .. Under Contra Homes Sold ........... 4,332 .. .. .. .. .. .. : ) s th (past 12 mon

2112 NE 4th St. Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6027 | E-mail: info@coar.com | www.coar.com WHAT ARE THESE SQUARES?

Introducing the mobile barcode. Now you can visit www.BendBulletin.com via your smartphone! The Bulletin is your gateway to the Web. Using your iPhone, Android, Blackberry or other smart phone device, download a current barcode reader App, (visit www.mobile-barcodes.com) then point your phone at one of the barcodes, scan it, and you will be directed to The Bulletin’s online edition.


E6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE SU OPE ND N AY 103

SE BEND | $225,900

Bank owned, clean and ready. Call me direct for the many purchase incentives. Craftsman single level, open floor plan, distinctive wood cabinetry, easy landscape, deck, hardwood floors. MLS#201009959 60837 Sawtooth Mtn Ln.

486 SW Bluff Dr.

Bend, OR 97702

REALTOR

West Ridge | $269,500 Rivers Edge Village | $99,000

SE Bend | $99,000

Manufactured Home Lot | $120,000

SW Bend | $125,000

Fresh new carpets and vinyl. Great bonus room or possible 3rd bedroom. Enclosed patio or greenhouse and two storage buildings. Conveniently located near shopping. Only $99,000 - better then rent! MLS#2908455

Woodriver Village is the location of this lot which is .40 of an acre and you could sub-divide into 3 lots. Just south of Farewell Bend Park and the Deschutes River. Great location, close to the Old Mill. MLS#201005580

5 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, eating bar & dining area. Appliances, washer/dryer, A/C, gas forced air heat and gas fireplace. Close to the Old Mill on Bend’s SW side. MLS#201009976

SAT O UR PEN DA Y1 -4

541-382-4123

Perfect condition, 2 bedroom, 2 bath with Enjoy the sunrise from this large east Ponderosa Pines & peek-a-boo mtn. views. No facing view lot. Some City, maintenance, large private lot. New interior & Smith Rock and southern views. exterior paint, carpet, electrical, plumbing. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $99,000! MLS#201008710 MLS#201008580 DIRECIONS: West on Century Drive, right on Campbell, right on West Ridge. 61575 West Ridge Ave.

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050 541-815-0436 541-480-5159

JIM MORAN, P.C., Broker 541-948-0997

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

Two Masters | $150,000

NE Bend | $169,500

SE Bend | $169,900

LaPine | $175,000

Stonebrook | $184,500

Redmond | $192,900

CHECK THIS PRICE!! Can’t be beat NE condo with double garage, clubhouse with pool, spa & tennis. 2 master suites, over 1600 sq. ft. & fresh paint. MLS#2911178

Nice, well maintained home on a quiet cul-de-sac. 1812 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, master on main level plus a bonus room. Fully fenced yard. MLS#201009980

$5,000 in closing costs and pre-paids. New construction in Westbrook Meadows located in SE Bend. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, great room with fireplace, quiet neighborhood, single-level, RV parking. MLS#201008412

3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1536 sq. ft. home located on .97 of an acre. Immaculately maintained. 30 x 24 shop and park-like setting. MLS#201009050

Beautiful landscaping surrounds this modern feeling NE Bend home. Open floor plan, gas fireplace, 1841 sq. ft. Back yard pond and RV parking. Bank owned. MLS#201009299

3 bedroom, 2 bath home in Cascade View Estates. Very well maintained-one owner single story. Skylights & solar tube, light & open floor plan. .27 of an corner lot, beautiful landscaping. 3-car garage. MLS#201007994

DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers 541-383-4349

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR 541-420-1111

Advantage Green

NE Redmond | $269,900

Single-Level | $199,000 NE Bend Duplex | $225,000 Awbrey Butte | $229,900 Mountain High | $259,000

MUST SEE, loaded with charm. Vaulted ceilings, wood floors, skylights, tile counters. Sun room, new wood stove, private yard backs to Larkspur trail. Cul-de-sac, great neighborhood. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. MLS#201009585

View of Pilot Butte, large back decks. Quiet neighborhood on a cul-de-sac. Each unit is 2 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1058 sq. ft. and has washer/dryer hook up. Nice sized living rooms. Window coverings included. MLS#2900544

Desirable Awbrey Butte lot in NW Bend. Beautifully treed .66 of an acre with views of Mt. Jefferson. Enjoy the peaceful setting in this low traffic area. Perfect for your dream home A must see, Great price! MLS#201008091

Easy Living on the Fairway! Private, peaceful setting in gated community with Golf Course Views on beautifully treed lot. Single-level, 2 bedroom + den, 2 bath. MLS#201001975

New and existing homes are better buys with a few improvements. As a Real Estate Professional, NAR GREEN designee, trade ally of Energy Trust and an Earth Advantage S.T.A.R. certified broker, I can help.

Rural setting north of Redmond with beautiful Cascade mountain views, 2+ acres, 2000 sq. ft., gorgeous kitchen w/slab granite countertops, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths and triple garage. MLS#201009144

CATHY DEL NERO, Broker 541-410-5280

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

JOY HELFRICH, Broker, e-Pro, GRI, GREEN 541-480-6808

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

King’s Forest | $290,000

Sunriver | $319,000

NW Bend | $325,000

SE Bend | $330,000

Nice 4 Bedroom, 2.75 Bath, 3200+ sq. ft. great room plan. Master bedroom on main level. Upstairs 20 x 30 bonus room, loft, bedroom, bath & office. 4-car tandem garage, RV parking, flat backyard, 1/2 acre. MLS#201008568

Charming Sunriver cabin well maintained & upgraded, very popular rental. Gas fireplace in great room. Large covered front porch with hot tub & view of lawn and pool. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. New appliances. MLS#201006982

One of the nicest small acreage subdivisions. Great views from this level parcel with 1 acre irrigation. Well & power to the home site, existing log structure and stall/storage building. Owner terms. MLS#201005418

Full on views of the lake at Painted Ridge. Ideal floor plan with great room and master suite on main level, upstairs loft area, 2 bedroom suites and office. Huge decks with privacy and views. MLS#2709663

Unbeatable downtown, riverfront location! Single-level condo right on the Deschutes River and 1 block to Downtown. Gas fireplace, large deck off kitchen. Single car attached garage. MLS#2901699

You won’t ever want to leave home! Private .37 acre lot with great living space inside. Natural light flows in and good energy abounds. This is a must see. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2439 sq. ft. MLS#201002061 60646 SE Teton Ct.

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

LESTER FRIEDMAN, P.C., Broker 541-330-8491

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

NW Bend | $350,000

NW Bend 12 Plex | $700,000

SW Bend | $379,500

NW Bend | $384,000

Mountain High | $399,900

Sunriver | $425,000

Gorgeous townhome with master on main level located in Northwest Crossing. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Great room, large kitchen with island, breakfast bar, & dining room. MLS#201009881 2523 NW Crossing Dr.

1 & 2 bedroom units, 6 structures, 2 tax lots, $700,000 for all. Excellent NW Bend location, superb rental history, professionally managed. Call John for more info. MLS#201008131

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2481 sq. ft. Westside home close to river & recreation trails. Hardwood floors, stainless steel kitchen appliances. Cascade Mountain views, vaulted ceilings & large master suite. MLS#2902962

Beautifully remodeled home. 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2374 sq. ft., great room & spacious master suite. Stainless steel appliances, granite, tile, gas fireplace & deck. Easy access to downtown. MLS#201010051

Spacious 3052 sq. ft. home on .42 of an acre wooded lot. Traditional sunken living room with fireplace & a great room/family room. Private setting at back of cul-de-sac. Large master suite. Brand new roof. MLS#201004189

2131 sq. ft. custom 3 bedroom, 2 bath with large deck & retractable awning. Wet bar, 2 dining areas, stone fireplace and large solarium entry. Oversized garage with office & shop area. tourfactory.com/638467 MLS#201006729

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

SU OPE ND N AY 123

RE PR DU ICE CE D

5 Acre Homesite | $374,900 Luxury Townhome | $470,000

NW Bend | $475,000

GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-322-2404 541-383-4361

Tumalo Small Acreage | $479,000 Remodel In Sisters | $495,900 NW Crossing Beauty | $499,000 Best of Sunriver | $519,000 Eagle Crest | $539,850

Great location near market, shops and park in Northwest Crossing. Great room plan, large kitchen, 4 bedrooms with master on main. Quality finishes. Fenced back patio and extra parking area. MLS#201000475

Great room living, master on main, game room, light & bright art studio. Extensive decks overlook pastures & mountain views. 2 stall barn, storage/shop, in-ground irrigation, mature trees. Bend schools. MLS#201009531 63825 W Quail Haven

Beautiful remodeled home with incredible mountain views! New windows and trim, siding, paint, flooring, lighting and baths have been updated. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, plus huge bonus room. Horse ready too! MLS#201009496

4+ bedrooms plus office, 2634 sq. ft. home on a quiet block in Northwest Crossing. Hardwood oak and cherry floors, Granite counters and master bedroom on main floor. Fenced and landscaped. Nice. MLS#201010037

Standout home! Major remodel in 2001 added “WOW factor” throughout including room over garage. Perfect for multigenerations or two families. Good location & value. 2221 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 3 bath. MLS#201004074 5 Tokatee

This spacious home will delight you with all of its wonderful features. Situated on .39 of an acre backing to over 3 acres of common area. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, sunroom, bonus room, 3-car garage, and views. MLS#201008461

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

MELANIE MAITRE, Broker 541-480-4186

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

SE Bend | $599,000

SW Bend | $625,000

Single-level home on 4.71 acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2124 sq. ft. 5-stall barn, close to BLM land. Recently remodeled. MLS#201008335

4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2943 sq. ft. contemporary, “Green” home is an oasis in the woods. Tucked away on a private .25 of an acre with a built-in pool & hot tub surrounded by expansive mahogany decking. MLS#201009639

Nestled in the pines, see & hear the Deschutes River from your patio. NW style, 1 level, perfect condition. Knotty alder, concrete countertops, large master, paver patio and drive. MLS#201008343 19448 Charleswood Lane

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

River Rim | $699,200 Awbrey Butte | $720,000 Awbrey Village | $749,000 Broken Top | $850,000

Stunning home on .96 of an acre, Cascade Superb finishes embrace stunning views. Casual & formal living spaces. mountain and city views! Dream kitchen, Great room, sitting room, open kitchen wine bar, 2 dining options, main level with nook, library/office & bonus room. master, separate guest suites, 3-car 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 3539 sq. ft. garage, shop and unfinished bonus area. MLS#2909149 MLS#2902704

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

JUDY MEYERS, Broker, GRI 541-480-1922

26 Acres/NW Bend | $950,000 Commercial Parcel | $970,000 Broken Top | $979,000 NW Bend | $1,200,000 Estate With Mtn Views | $1,799,900

Single-level contemporary home overlooks the 3rd green at Broken Top. Canadian maple floors, all bedrooms are suites. Hot tub, water feature and 3 fireplaces. 4 bedrooms, 3.75 baths, 3285 sq. ft. MLS#201003659

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487

SE Bend

Seller Financing Available Big views, prime location, very private...1st time offering. Lupine Meadows Ranch, 20 acres Swalley Irrigation. 3440 sq. ft. home, deck facing mountains. 30’ x 60’ barn, 4 separate paddocks, 3 ponds. MLS#201005990

Camp Polk Rd. Bank owned Downtown Sisters commercial Project. 9.29 acres with Mixed Use Master Plan in Place. One of the last large opportunities left in Sisters. Call Dave 541-390-8465 or John 541-948-0062 MLS#201008753

Wonderful home on the 17th fairway. Expansive deck with all the views, mountain, lake and golf course. 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, master on main, bonus/game room. Abundant Storage. BRING ALL OFFERS!! MLS#201006774

23+/- Private Easy Care Acres, custom built home with outstanding Cascade views. NEW TERMS: Owner will finance second depending on terms and conditions. MLS#201006284

Live the Central Oregon dream in this exquisite 5831 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath European-inspired estate. 56 acres, 46 irrigated. 1800 sq. ft. RV shop, guest quarters with kitchenette over garage. Sisters schools. MLS#2812770

New single level 3 bedroom, 2 bath with upgrades. $139,900 MLS#201003736 New 3 bedroom, 2 ½ bath with upgrades. $149,000 MLS#201004072

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 F1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. Super Healthy. 1st shots & dewormed. $100 382-7567

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppies, Blenheim & tricolor, 8 wks old. AKC reg., champion lines. Parents heart/eye certified annually. 541-410-1066; 541-480-4426 www.djcavalierkennels.com

Boston Terrier, AKC 12-wk male, family raised, 1st/2nd shots, $400. 541-610-8525 Chesapeake Pups AKC, shots, dew claws, great disposition, $500-$600 ea. 541-259-4739

Boston Terrier puppies, Adorable, 6 weeks old, wormed, 1st shots, dewclaw, 5 males $400, 1 female $500. Details 541-536-3741.

Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows Boxer Puppies, AKC, 7 wks, 2 males @$400 ea; 6 females @$500 ea. 541-408-5230

Chihuahua Puppies, unique colors, great with kids, $300. 541-977-4817 Email jesse1215@gmail.com

205

Items for Free Coffee Table, Needs stain & polish, in good cond., you haul, call 541-325-3005. Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie/Shepherd pups 6 wks, (3) 2 are Blue Merle. $100 each. Call 541-536-4440, or 503-310-2514 Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Aussie Toy Sheltie mix small male pup. 15 weeks, very cute. $125. 541-390-8875. Beagle Puppies - 10 weeks, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids. $175 (541)419-4960.

Carmel had been abandoned & was rescued just days before giving birth to one tiny kitten, Bosco. They are now ready for a new inside home, and we would love to have them stay together. Both are social, altered, vaccinated & ID chipped. Reduced adoption fee if they stay together. www.craftcats.org, 541 389 8420, or visit them & the other CRAFT kitties Sat/Sun 1-4 @ 65480 78th, Bend. Cat rescue group remains buried in cats/kittens since the big local shelters are refusing cats - we need YOUR help! We're nonprofit, all-volunteer, with no govt. funding or subsidies. We're trying to help the animals that have been abandoned or are most at risk, but need good quality kitten & cat food, litter, cleaning items, etc. & funds for vet bills. Also need volunteers to help a little or a lot, and of course great new homes for the cats & kittens. www.craftcats.org, e-mail info@craftcats.org, call 541 389 8420, 598 5488, or visit the sanctuary Sat/Sun 1-4, 65480 78th St., Bend; call re: other days. Thanks for supporting your local kitten/cat rescue group & the forgotten animals of this area!

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Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Building Materials

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

German Shepherd Pups, 3 white, 1 dark mahogany, 1 white donated to Sisters Wrestling team, $500 ea., 541-610-5785.

Rescued kittens still avail. for adoption! Social, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Playful 'teenage' kittens & nice adult cats, too! 65489 78th, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by German Shorthair Puppies, AKC appt. See www.craftcats.org 9 wks old, 6 males, shots/ for map/photos. Info: 541 wormed. 5 dogs in the GSP 389 8420, 598-5488, lv. msg. Hall of Fame in their pedigree; excellent hunt/show or Scottish Terriers, AKC, 1 male, family dogs. Well socialized, 1 fem., brindle, shots, dew$500. Also 1 4-yr male, $800; claws & dewormed. $400 ea. and 1 4-month female, $800. Will deliver! 541-447-1304 541-923-8377; 541-419-6638 S H I H - T Z U, 8 mo., male. German Wirehaired Pointer, $350. male pup. $300 or trade for 541-678-8760. guns. 541-548-3408 Shih Tzu/Poodle mix, 14-week Golden Retriever English Cream male, $250. Great ChristAKC, Christmas pups! males, mas present! 541-233-8202 12 wks, $700. 541-852-2991 Great Pyrenees purebred pups Shih Tzu puppies, 3 girls, 2 boys, 1 very small female, ready week of Christmas. 3 F $450-$750. 541-788-0090 3M, $500-$600. Ranch raised, parents on site. 541-576-2564 Griffin Wirehaired Pointer, male pup, 6 mo., both parents AKC, good hunters, great hunting potential & good natured, $500, loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-934-2423.

LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflush retrievers.com Labradoodles $499; Goldendoodle Puppies view at http://doodlesrfun.tripod.com 541-938-8765 Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Sponsors needed to help with the cost of surgery for sweet little Tallulah, who was abandoned at a dumpster. We thought she had a huge abscess on her side, but the vet said it was a hernia. Her kidney was protruding & this could only have happened if she was kicked very hard. She had surgery to put everything where it belongs & will be adoptable after recovery. 541 389 8420, 598 5488, Box 6441, Bend 97708, info@craftcats.org, or visit www.craftcats.org. Thanks for your support during these difficult economic times.

10 ga Ithaca semi auto shotgun w/26” bbl; $150 ammo incl. All $575. 541-419-5565 ROLL TOP DESK - $950 (obo) Solid Oak. BEAUTIFUL! 541-504-7189.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. Sofa & Loveseat, clean, attractive, contemporary style, pic. avail. $200, 541-389-8697 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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Antiques & Collectibles Antique Dressmaker’s Dummy, great for clothing display? Excellent condition, $350. 541-317-4985; 541-280-0112

Toy Poodle Puppies for sale at an affordable price. Call Cindy at 541 771-0522. Labrador pups, quality purebred English, beautiful yellow & rare fox-red yellow, home raised, happy, $550-$600 ea 541-461-1133; 541-510-0495

Male Malamute Puppy. 7 weeks old. He has beautiful markings and loves to cuddle and play. He has everything you would need for a new puppy. I am so sad to have to get rid of him but I am allergic $400 call/text 541-508-8191 Miniature Schnauzer pups, purebred, salt & pepper, black, ready for Christmas, $300-$350, 541-771-1830.

Chinchilla for sale. Handled, friendly. Cage included. Needs friendly home. $125. Gray, 3 yrs. 541-593-2960

Papillon pups just in time

English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1200. 541-325-3376.

Poodle Puppies, purebred, small Toy, black males, 4 mo, shots, pre-spoiled! $225. 541-567-3150; 503-779-3844

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY Female, AKC Registered 6 months old, all shots & microchipped . $800. (541) 416-0375

O r e g o n

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Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure bred, 8 weeks old, Black & Tan, 4 males $400/ea and 1 female $500. up-to-date, on shots. Pics available. 541-633-6148 (leave msg)

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372

B e n d

Pets and Supplies

Malamute/Lab puppies for sale! 8wks old, ready now. Need loving homes! 5 males 1 female $100 each, 541-923-1180 call between the hours of 4pm and 8pm

Chihuahua, Applehead, male, last one! $200, 541-593-0223.

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CHIHUAHUA, 10 weeks, 2 females. $200 each. 541-678-8760.

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686.

C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

The Bulletin

203

OPEN HOUSE SAT., 12/4 10 ‘til 2. AVON inventory reduction sale, 40-60% off! RENDI per sonalized gifts for everyone! 141 SW 15th & Simpson, off Century Drive - follow signs.

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

for St Nick to put under tree. $300. Taking deposits. Call 541-504-9958

POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. 541-475-3889 541-325-6212

We have a beautiful 12-wk -old white German Shepherd for sale. First 2 sets of shots, worming and vet check. All kinds of stuff to go with her, too. $400. If interested please call Rayna at (619) 971-8795. White German Shepard Pups, AKC, absolutely gorgeous, 1 male, 1 female, born 10/1, $1500 w/papers, $999 without, 541-536-6167.

Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & cute, 10 weeks old, $180 cash. 541-678-7599 Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $450, 541-536-3108

210

Furniture & Appliances

COWGIRL

RESALE

Gently Used Western Wear Turquoise, Old Pawn Squash Blossoms, Cuffs 541-549-6950 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

215

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

AUCTION Sun. Dec. 12 at 10am 121 Deady Crossing – Sutherlin Equipment, Trucks, Trailers, Pickups, Cars, ATVs, Firearms, Tools & More.

www.I-5auctions.com (541) 643-0552 Browning Gold Hunter 12 ga. semi-automatic, shoots 3½”, $500. Scott, 541-508-6327 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Custom Enfield Model 19-17 375 H&H, heavy barrel, $850 OBO. Uberti 1848 3rd gen dragoon black powder pistol, MSRP $409, & holster $70; asking $400 both, OBO. 541-390-1010 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed.Dec. 8th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Pheasants (both roosters/hens) & Chukars, all on special! 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963

PARKER TROJAN 12 gauge, 50% plus. $1300 OBO. 541-728-1036 Ruger #1 22-250 varmitter $699. Taurus .44 mag SS, 8” barrel $369. 541-419-5830

Ruger P345 .45 acp, 2 clips, as new in box. Including K&D holster. $475 cash. Call 541-598-4467

S&W 44 Mag Model 629 $665. Colt Mark V .357 Mag $495. Dan 541-410- 5444. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchester Model 70 XTR 7 mm Magnum with 3x9 Tasco Pronghorn Scope $450 Call 541-923-4196

247

Coins & Stamps

Sporting Goods - Misc.

WANTED TO BUY Lifetime free-standing Basketball Hoop, good condition, US & Foreign Coin & Currency $25. 541-382-0890 collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, Sage Fly Rod, Z-AXIS490-4 sterling flatware. Gold coins, 9’ 4-piece, 4 weight, Sage bars, jewelry, scrap & dental 2540 Reel, extra spool, line, gold. Diamonds, Rolex & new, $625, 541-884-6440 vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bed255 rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 240

Crafts and Hobbies

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Over- Over 60 Dies & Patterns for tooling leather goods, great stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s gift! $125 cash 541-382-2194 Maytag, 541-385-5418

541-389 - 6 6 5 5

1911 .45CAP Clone Rock IsBUYING land Emory Serial Lionel/American Flyer trains, #R1A857299. Shot 1,000 accessories. 541-408-2191. rounds, good condition, no mods, iron sights w/wood Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! grips. $450.OBO w/2 mags; 5 MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! mags extra $$. Call or txt Husqavarna 395XP, $595! 541-306-7126. 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! 9mm Desert Eagle Baby Israeli 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, Military, holster and ammo. $295! 541-280-5006 $650. 541-647-8931

Ruger 338 M-77 S/S, synthetic stock, Nikon 4.5-14 scope, $675 OBO. 541-420-9063

Furniture

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Computers

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Like new cash register; very nice Open & Close sign & remote control; hydraulic styling chair in very good cond; nice built-in hairdrying chair, all $500. 541-325-9476 NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Viking #1 Plus Sewing machine, good condition. $800. Please call 541-382-7790 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Wii Fit like new, $125. Console, board, 2 controllers, charger. Sisters, 541-549-8422.

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Tools Construction tools, over $450 worth, sell for $175, or trade for .22 Rifle, 541-410-4596

264

Snow Removal Equipment

241 GENERATE SOME excitement in Bicycles and your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to Poodles Standard - AKC, Accessories advertise in classified! browns & blacks, AKC champ English Mastiff puppies, regis385-5809. 260 sired, health & tempermant In time for Christmas! Men’s tered. 8 months, 1 female, 1 guaranteed, raw fed, parti Glider Rocker with matching Hard Rock Mountain Bike, exc Misc. Items male, Brindle. $600 ea inpups soon, 877-385-9120 or cond, $50. 541-382-0890 stool, light green, like new, cluding Spay/Neuter. Willow marsanpoodles@gmail.com Bedrock Gold & Silver $45. 541-548-0291 Farms Mastiff 541-279-1437. BUYING DIAMONDS & Portuguese Podengos,very rare Schwinn 7 speed girl’s bike, R O L E X ’ S For Cash Free Mini Australian Shepherd breed, small 10” size, 10-12 Pro-grade stainless refer, range, 24” wheel, good condition, micro, dishwasher; Washer & 541-549-1592 to loving home. Good comlbs, 2 females & 1 male; can $50. 541-383-4231. dryer. 10 mos use. Storage panion, good with kids. hold for Christmas! Call BUYING AND SELLING cabs. $2400. 541-678-1963 Needs space to run. Call 541-389-2636. See photos at 243 All gold jewelry, silver and gold 541-504-8247 www.bodeankennels.com Recliner, Brown, microfiber, coins, bars, rounds, wedding Ski Equipment good shape, $75; Loveseat sets, class rings, sterling silFree to seniors, companion cats, Queensland Heelers recliner, tan microfiber, w/ Alpina women’s x-country ver, coin collect, vintage social, fixed, shots, ID chip, Standards & mini,$150 & up. shoes, black, size 8, like console, exc. shape, $200, watches, dental gold. Bill ready for you! 541-389-8420 541-280-1537 new! $20. 541-598-7397 541-548-0324. Fleming, 541-382-9419. www.craftcats.org http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Heater, Holmes digital oil-filled on wheels, like new in box, $40 / trade? 541-388-1533 JOTUL Gas stove GF600DV Firelight, like new, black in color. $1000. 541-504-4666 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $140/cord split - delivered in Bend, Sunriver & LaPine. 1½ cord minimum. Fast service! 541-410-6792; 541-382-6099 CASH price: Rounds $119; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/MC: $129 or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole: $150/cord rounds, $175/cord split, Free Delivery, please call 541-610-6713. Dry Lodgepole For Sale $170per cord rounds; $190 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269 SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

266

Heating and Stoves

SNOW THROWER John Deere, runs exc., 5.5 HP, 22” path. $275 obo. 541-388-7555

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can.

The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter: d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


F2 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Farm Market

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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270

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Lost and Found Found Key: 11/29, On Greenwood between 5th & 6th, call to ID, 541-480-5851. Found keys for Dodge + house keys? NW 19th & Ivy, Redmond, 11/30. 541-526-7246 Found Painting, 11/8 at Sunriver. Call to I.D. Can claim until 5/8/11. 541-390-3423 HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

325

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment

400 ASPC Shetland Ponies: Palomino Gelding, gentle and ready to start, $150; Palomino Stallion halter champion $300. Hold until Christmas. 541-548-2887/788-1649 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com HORSES FOR SALE! Looking for good homes for TB, Clydes, Arab, QH. Call and come see. 541-420-3186.

CAUTION

421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

NELSON back-to-back wallmounted automatic waterers including plumbing kit & insulation, Model 760-10W $850 541-948-3170

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

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Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Huge Garage Sale. Lots of Indoor Swap Meet Christmas Decorations, gift- Every Sat., 9-4, 401 NE 2nd St., ables, and horse tack. 3105 Bend (old St. Vincent DePaul NE OB Riley Rd, Bend. Sale bldg, next to Bi-Mart) 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847 located upstairs above the indoor pool at the Shilo hotel. Fri. & Sat. 8 am-4pm.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Retiring, young quarterhorses for sale, 2 1-ton flatbed pickups, 1 Dodge 1/2-ton, & 1 Toyota Diesel pickup, 2 rubber tired backhoes, 2 Crawler tractors & 2 semi trucks with trailers, evenings 541-382-7995.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Looking for Employment

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Caregiver w/20+yrs exp seeks job; all ages/aspects of care. Pets, too! Great rates, ref’s, bkgrnd check. 541-419-7085

(Private Party ads only) 454

The Bulletin Classifieds

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

DENTAL ASSISTANT Our busy practice is looking for a dental assistant who is a team player with a great attitude. Xray certification and some experience preferred. Great staff and benefits. Call 541-504-0880 between 10 am and 4pm. or evenings before 8pm - 541-548-9997.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

General - NOW HIRING! THR & Associates a multi-national company has hundreds of salaried positions, many that offer bonuses. Local and national positions. Looking for professional, friendly, self motivated individuals. Customer service oriented with sales experience. Many salaries starting at $45,000. To learn more & apply visit: www.thrassociates.com GeneralSell Sunday editions of the Newspaper in popular street corners in Bend. You work Sundays ONLY from 9am till 3pm-4pm. You get paid cash that same day at the end of the shift. We are looking for motivated and charismatic individuals. Call 541-306-6346 for a phone interview.

The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom writing briefs, editing letters to the editor and managing the archive. Duties also include editing for Bulletin and AP style, assisting the public with archive searches and other clerical duties. This person should enjoy working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Supplement Your Income H

NOTICE

Operate Your Own Business

Requirements include excellent grammar and organizational skills, flexibility of schedule, and proficiency with computers.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

www.bendbulletin.com

286

Sales Northeast Bend

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit

Model Home Furniture Sale: Sun. 11 am-4 pm, 20678 NE Patriot Ln., Hwy 97, E. on Cooley, S. on Boyd Acres, W. on Patriot Ln. 503-679-6517.

292

Sales Other Areas Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

CHRISTMAS VILLAGE SALE! Sat-Sun, 9-4 indoors. 16715 Bitterbrush Lane, Sisters off Hwy 126, turn on Bradley.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

383

Produce and Food Wild Alaskan Salmon Fresh-Frozen Coho and Sockeye Sockeye $13.50/lb Coho $12.00/lb available for delivery From the fisherman to you! Kelvin Vaughan 907.209.2055

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H

Bend, Prineville & Madras H

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

ATTENTION WORK PART TIME HOURS, FULL TIME PAY

Wanna Make Bank??? AND HAVE FUN? No Experience Necessary No Car, No Problem, Only 30 Hours Per Week PM Shifts & Weekends Available

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. Submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Dec. 6 to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin .c om or mail to The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97702; or drop off at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend.

Independent Contractor

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com Owner/Operators needed. Local haul. Home daily. Contact 541-419-1125 or 541-546-6489.

Part-Time News Assistant The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated person to work in the newsroom, assisting the reporting staff. Duties will include data entry, proofreading for Bulletin & Associated Press style and other clerical work. This person should like working in a fast-paced environment and be able to meet tight deadlines. Excellent writing, understanding of grammar, good organization, flexibility and basic computer skills are essential. Attention to detail is necessary.

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. College degree or previous related experience preferred.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

Submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Dec. 6, 2010, to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin.com, or drop off or mail to The Bulletin, 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Sales

Call Right Now 541-306-6346

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off re-Independent Contractorsume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. HOUSE CLEANER - wanted for Jack Miller, DMD home cleaning service. DrivBranden Ferguson, DDS ers license, no smoking, bondable, no weekends, no Driver needed for local run. holidays. 541-815-0015. Home every day. Must be willing to work swing shift & have Class A CDL w/doubles NEWSPAPER endorsement. 541-419-1125 Full-time or 541-546-6489.

Independent Contractor

Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

News Assistant

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

The Bulletin

H

282

Sales Northwest Bend

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

LOCAL GROWN BEEF - Natural pasture raised, no hormones /antibiotics, USDA inspected, ¼, ½ or whole. $2/lb hanging weight + C & W. Excellent gift idea! 541-548-1219

Orchard Grass, $165/ton, Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, $160/ton, Feeder Hay, $100/ton, cheap delivery avail., 541-891-4087.

READERS:

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Hay, Grain and Feed

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds LOST Black/White Shih Tzu fe65 lb. bales, $160/ton; male “Bailey” Thanksgiving 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson morning, Eagle Crest. Needs Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 meds. Reward. 360-518-2126 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, Lost: Grey & White large Cat, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay male,12 yrs, Cauliflower ears, mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. VolN. Redmond, 541-548-7624. ume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Premium Orchard grass, & Reach thousands of readers! Premium Oat grass mix. 3x3 Call 541-385-5809 midsize bales, no rain, no The Bulletin Classifieds weeds. Orchard @$65/bale; Oat @$50/bale 541-419-2713 Lost Ring: Heirloom, green stone w/small diamonds around it, Wheat Straw: Certified & BedRedmond/Bend area, early as ding Straw & Garden Straw; Sept., 541-447-5389 Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. The Bulletin Identify 541-382-8893. To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to Find exactly what www.bendbulletin.com you are looking for in the 341 CLASSIFIEDS REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

341

Horses and Equipment

Sales

NEED A JOB? If You Can Answer YES To These Questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do you talk too much? 2. Do you like to have fun? 3. Do you want to make a lot of $$? 4. Are you available Wed.-Fri., 4pm-9pm & all day Sat. & Sun.?

Work part time with full time pay! DON'T LAG, CALL NOW! 541-306-6346 Independent Contractor

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 SALES - Part-time position. Seeking salesperson who is self-motivated, familiar with computers and physically able to lift 50-100 lbs. Must be able to fill a flexible schedule. Knowledge of firearms, tools, electronics or jewelry is a plus. Please fax resume to 541-318-0808.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Teacher for Youth Challenge program located 9 miles east of Bend. Must be able to teach multiple subjects. Oregon certification needed. Must be creative and work well in a team setting. For application packet & info call Cascade Educational Services, 541-771-5616.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 476

Employment Opportunities The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

Boats & RV’s

500 800 507

850

Real Estate Contracts

Snowmobiles

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

Motorcycles And Accessories 528 The Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Inc. (OMEP) is conducting a search for its Executive Director (ED). OMEP’s mission is to be the principle source of high performance business and technical assistance for Oregon’s small to mid-sized manufacturers and the partner of choice for the economic development community.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Position Summary – The ED is responsible for OMEP financial, personnel, and legal obligations as well as all operations, marketing, strategic planning, policy development, and board relations. A key responsibility is to build and maintain strong relationships with Federal, State, and regional partners as well as the manufacturers and industry groups served and to work with the Oregon state legislative processes to secure appropriations. Required Qualifications - Bachelors degree in business or related field; graduate degree preferred. General knowledge of NIST, MEP, Oregon Business, the Oregon State Legislature and experience working with them or similar organizations is required. Knowledge of manufacturing, specifically Oregon manufacturing is desired. Experience – Only candidates with senior leadership/management experience will be of interest. Management of a similar organization to OMEP, work with government agencies, corporate or small businesses and experience in leading the financial and operational growth of an organization are required. A candidate must have proven ability to mentor and counsel colleagues and team members. Please see our web site http://www.omep.org/contact/jobs for additional information and to apply. Applications will be accepted until January 3, 2011.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 RETIRING Dust Control Road Treatment Business. Business base commercial & rural home & farm owners. $450,000 Call Butch 541-567-3203 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

865

880

881

ATVs

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

870

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Boats & Accessories

860

Loans and Mortgages

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 F3

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, GREAT WINTER PROJECT. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

“WANTED”

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

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ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881 YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161, 541-788-3896.

Travel Trailers

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Wet-Jet personal water craft, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights, 2 for $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

541-385-5809

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. (541) 610-4472 • 1-541-689-1351

Adult Care

Drywall

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CCB# 177336

Barns

Excavating

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Snow Removal

Handyman

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

I DO THAT!

Holiday Lighting

Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal •Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. 2 hangars at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 planes. $536 annual lease. Reduced to $125,000 or make offer! 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

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Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

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Utility Trailers

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931 Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (4) 205-65/R15 Goodyear all season tires, 60% tread left. $75. 541-923-8627 4 Michelin studless snow tires on Toyota rims, 175-70x13, exlnt! $195. 541-312-9725

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Michelin X-Treme weather/ All season studless. 225/60-R16 4 for $150. 541-617-8850. Tires, 4 Brand New cond., Les Schwab Winter Cat XT Studded, 91T 205/55R16 for 16” rims, $200, 541-617-0940. Tires, 4 Studded, 215/70R16, on 16” Toyota 5-lug alloy wheels, good tread, $475, 541-388-8841.

Wheels, Milanni 20’s,fit Mustang, Veutus SportK104,245/402R20 95Y, $1250, 541-408-7972

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Antique and Classic Autos

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Canopies and Campers

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

Painting, Wall Covering

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn great, $12,500,541-280-5677 bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as Chevy Suburban unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Tenant Improvement Structural remodel - 23 yrs exp Quality • Dependable • Honest Armstrong Gen’l Contractor CCB#152609 • 541-280-5677

Special Offer

Dodge RAM 2500 2006 4x4 CUMMINS DIESEL, VERY CLEAN and Road Ready. 84k miles VIN #200992

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $15,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F-250 XLT 1986, X-Cab, 4x4, everything works, runs good, $1250 OBO, please call 541-815-5618.

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Pickups *** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Ford F350 Crew Cab 4WD 2007. Lariat. Diesel. Auto. Canopy. LOADED! 37K. Estate. $31,500. VIN EA30127 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $21,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side,low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4300 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer - below wholesale pricing

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Chevy Wagon 1957, 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 6.5’ Proline flatbed. Below OBO, trades, please call Bluebk $35,500 541-447-3393 541-420-5453.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Smolich Auto Mall

935 Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Sport Utility Vehicles

MASONRY

Repair & Remodeling:

366

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Remodeling, Carpentry

541-749-4025 • DLR

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

VW Super Beetle 1974 Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Dodge RAM 1500 4x4 2004 NEW PRICE $16,777

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

885

Masonry

Special Offer

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $3350. 541-548-3628

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

MONTANA 2000 36���

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Smolich Auto Mall

It’s a HEMI, 39k miles Vin #106043

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

personals Whatever happened to Jim Zerbo’s screenplays: “The Fighting Nurses” & “Aviation Story”? Both Overdue at the box office. 541-318-7260.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

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Pickups

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

RV Consignments

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Fifth Wheels

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

932

Antique and Classic Autos

900

882

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Autos & Transportation

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Chrysler Aspen 2008 SUV AWD LIMITED EDITION. 41k miles. Vin #132288

Now Only $19,998

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366


F4Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item $ 00

Under 200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item to be sold.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 4, 2010 F5

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer - 2 pre-owned in stock

Special Offer Winter Bargains

Special Offer

Special Offer

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, Red, like new, only 68k, seats 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 price reduced to $7950, Look: www.SeeThisRig.com 541-593-4437. JEEP COMPASS, 2009 13,200 miles, 4x4, 5 speed. Asking $16,000. 541-280-5866.

Example:

Dodge NITRO 4WD 2007 Starting @ Only $12,999

Ford Expedition 2000, 4WD, 131K mi., exc. cond., new traction tires, 3rd seat, $4995. 541-480-3286

smolichmotors.com

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

VIN #642750

Mazda MIATA 1999 Now Only $7750

Nissan Murano AWD 2003 V6, family SUV, loaded with leather & more. 66K Miles! Vin #217483

541-389-1178 • DLR

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

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Suzuki XL7 2008 Premium Now Only $17,789

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

940

Vans

Reach thousands of readers!

Ford Bronco 1990 4WD w/1998 motor; engine & trans good cond, new brakes & exhaust sys; $1600 in improvements. $2250 OBO 541-323-1872

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

The Bulletin Classifieds

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

LOADED, Roof Rack, 7 Passenger, 39K Miles! Vin #106479

Now Only $14,999

NISSAN NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80k miles, tow pkg. $14,000. 541-848-7876

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

It fits under the Christmas tree! 39k miles Vin #128198 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Richard E. Forcum has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of Henry Gordon Young, deceased, by the circuit court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, Probate No. 10 PB 0132 BH. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them with proper vouchers attached, to the personal representative, Richard E. Forcum, Attorney at Law, 141 NW Greenwood Ave. Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97701, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the court records, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative. DATED and first published: November 27, 2010. RICHARD E. FORCUM, OSB #640340 Attorney for Personal Representative 141 NW Greenwood Ave. Ste. 101 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: 541-389-6964 Fax: 541-389-6969 E-mail: info@forcumlaw.com Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily LEGAL NOTICE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (DEQ) REQUEST FOR COMMENT PROPOSED GENERAL PERMIT FOR INJECTION OF GEOTHERMAL WATER COMMENTS DUE: January 7, 2011 Renewable energy companies have begun evaluating the potential to generate electrical power from Oregon geothermal resources. During the drilling and testing phase of their exploration efforts, these companies produce geothermal water which may be mineralized enough that it would be unwise to discharge it to land, surface water, or to groundwater. Oregon DEQ is proposing to issue a general permit that allows companies to reinject the geothermal water they have extracted back into the same geothermal reservoir. HOW TO COMMENT: DEQ is accepting comments on the proposed general permit until 5 p.m., January 7, 2011. The proposed general permit and supporting documents can be found online at: http://www.deq.state.or.us/ wq/uic/permits.htm or can be obtained by contacting Bill Mason via mail at DEQ's Eugene office at 165 E 7th Ave., Ste. 100, Eugene, OR 97401, via telephone (541-687-7427), or via email (mason.bill@deq.state.or.us) . A public meeting will be held upon written request by ten or more persons or by a group with a membership of 10 or more. THE NEXT STEP: DEQ will consider all public comments received by the date and time stated above before making a final decision regarding the proposed general permit. ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION: DEQ is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Please notify DEQ of any special physical or language accommodations or if you need information in large print, Braille or another format. To make these arrangements, contact DEQ Communications & Outreach (503) 229-5696 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452-4011; fax to 503-229-6762; or e-mail to deqinfo@deq.state.or.us. People with hearing impairments may call DEQ's TTY number, (800) 735-2900 or 711.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: NEESHA MARIE GRANT. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Sixty-three (63), EMPIRE ESTATES, recorded November 22, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 935, Deschutes County,Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 14, 2007; Recording No.: 2007-15163 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,660.30 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $284,234.74; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $1,049.64; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m.

Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30342). DATED: October 1, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: ANNETTE M. WHITSON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee for STERLING CAPITAL MORTGAGE

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A.TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JESSICA L. CATON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 22, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-19696 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,185.17 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of October 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 4. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $224,069.60; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from September 15, 2008; plus late charges of $1,180.73; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B.TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JESSICA L. CATON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 22, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-19697 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $181.25 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of October 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 4. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $29,855.14; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from September 15, 2008; plus late charges of $405.00; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. C. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Four (4), Glacier Ridge, Phase II, recorded September 23, 1999, in Cabinet E, Page 320, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. D. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. E. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. F. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30334). DATED: October 1, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

COMPANY. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Four (4), Block EE, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, recorded March 22, 1962, in Plat Book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: September 9, 2003. Recording No. 2003-62432 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for fail-

ure to pay: A payment of $800.00 for the month of April 2010; plus regular monthly payments of $838.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of May 2010 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $104,816.76; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from March 1, 2010; plus late charges of $$83.96; plus ad-

vances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Diamond Built Homes, LLC, as grantor, to AmeriTitle as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated January 11, 2007, recorded January 12, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2007-02293, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: All of the blocks Three (3), Four (4), Five (5) and Six (6) of Bonne Home Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon, EXCEPTING THEREFROM, the Easterly 300 feet of Block 3, Bonne Home Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH that portion of vacated 17th Street and vacated alleys which inure thereto. ALSO TOGETHER WITH that portion of vacated Lexington Avenue which inures thereto by reason of Ordinance No. NS-1589, Recorded May 5, 1993 in Book 297, Page 2260, Deschutes County Records. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the City of Bend by Warranty Deed recorded July 7, 2004, in Volume 2004, Page 40201, Deschutes County Records. And now known as Lots One (1) through Forty (40), NEWPORT LANDING, recorded October 20, 2007, in Cabinet H, Page 536, Deschutes County, Oregon. Real property commonly known as 1804, 1808, 1812, 1816, 1820, and 1805 NW Element Place, Bend, OR 97701; 1301, 1297, 1293, 1289, 1285, 1281, 1277, 1276, and 1294 NW Criterion Lane, Bend, OR 97701; 1717, 1713, 1709, 1705, 1701, 1697, 1693, 1689, and 1685 NW Precision Lane, Bend, OR 97701; 1214 NW Rockwood Lane, Bend, OR 97701; Lots 1, 7, 16-17, 19, 29-35, 37-38, and 40. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. 89761: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of September 8, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $4,293,300.00; Interest $1,242,910.34; Total $5,536,210.00*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $2,146.65 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011, at the hour of 2:10 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch, P.O. Box 470, Salem, OR 97308-0470. Dated: 23rd, September: 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Erich M. Paetsch, Trustee. State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch, Attorney for said Trustee. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. They buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERT AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale.) Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT THE SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you must apply your security and any rent you paid in advance against current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 817 N.W. Hill Street, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or call toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-678-6944. DATED: 23 day of September, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.

days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and

Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to

http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30317). DATED: September 28, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Diamond Built Homes, LLC, Golden Crest Development, LLC, Robert J. Green, and Mary G. Green, as grantors, to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated August 25, 2005, recorded September 12, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Documents No. 2005-61188 and last modified on October 8, 2008, recorded December 11, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2008-48563, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: Lots 1 and Fifty-two (52) through Fifty-six (56), CENTENNIAL GLEN, RECORDED FEBRUARY 15, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 612, Deschutes County, Oregon. Real property commonly known as 692 SE Gleneden Pl., 690 SE Reed Market St, 682 SE Reed Market Rd., 674 SE Reed Market Rd., 664 SE Reed Market Rd., and 656 SE Reed Market Rd., Bend, OR 97702. The Real Property tax identification numbers are Map and Tax Lot Nos.: 18 12 04 CD 00102; 18 12 04 CD 00153: 18 12 04 CD 00154; 18 12 04 CD 00155; 18 12 04 CD 00156; and 18 12 04 CD 00157. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Master Note No. 83663, Loan Nos. 90259: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of July 20, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $70,500.00; Interest $20,409.75; Total $90,909.75*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $35.25 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. Master Note No. 83663, Loan Nos. 95117: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of April 30, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $191,935.38; Interest $42,730.90; Total $234,666.30*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $85.97 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. The total balance due and owing to cure the defaults consists of the total sums identified above for Loan Nos. 90259 and 95117 combined. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011, at the hour of 2:00 PM., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch, P.O. Box 470, Salem, OR 97308-0470. Dated: 24, September, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Erich M. Paetsch, Trustee. State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch, Attorney for said Trustee. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. They buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERT AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale.) Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT THE SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you must apply your security and any rent you paid in advance against current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 817 N.W. Hill Street, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or call toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-678-6944. DATED: 24th day of September, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.


F6 Saturday, December 4, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 975

975

975

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Smolich Auto Mall BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Special Offer

Ford Focus SES 2009 4 door, loaded. Leather, Moonroof, Alloys & more. 32k miles. Vin #243146

975

975

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer - below wholesale pricing

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2007

Special Offer

Now Only $18,898

Hyundai Elantra GLS 2007

NISSAN

541-389-1178 • DLR

Like NEW but Priced much BETTER! 14k miles. VIN #250097

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Smolich Auto Mall

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Special Offer Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

The Bulletin Classiieds

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Chevy Impala Luxury 2009 PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Now Only $11,379

975

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Chrysler Sebring 2007 Super Nice, 37k miles Vin #590806

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

366

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires/rims, no htr; dashbrd heater instead. Runs great! $999. 541-388-4167

366

WAS $13,995 NOW

2007 VW Jetta

2007 VW Beetle

VW Certified. Great Buy.

VW Certified.

Stk. 90102A, VIN M504921.

Stk. 3421, VIN 071339.

Kelley Blue Book $12,565

Kelley Blue Book $14,025

NOW

The Bulletin

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

2007 Beetle Convertible

2009 VW Beetle

VW Certified, One Owner.

VW Certified, Low miles.

Stk. 70066C, VIN M524831.

Stk. 3519, VIN M505864.

Kelley Blue Book $15,260

Kelley Blue Book $15,370

WAS $18,495 NOW

17,495

$

17,995

$

2008 VW Beetle

2009 VW Routan

2007 Mini Cooper S

VW Certifed Mini Van.

Low Miles, Full Options

Stk. 3520, VIN F410694.

Stk. 90162A, VIN C366044.

Stk. 3514, VIN R501073.

Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

Kelley Blue Book $16,500

Kelley Blue Book $17,035

Kelley Blue Book $18,475

Kelley Blue Book $20,730

19,995

$

$

NOW

19,995

$

$

NOW

21,495

$

NOW

21,495

2006 BMW Z4

2001 Porsche Boxter

2009 VW Jetta TDI

2005 Audi A6 Quattro

Top Down Fun to Drive!!

Low Miles, Well Equipped.

Only 16k Miles, Nav., Moonroof.

Immaculate, Hard to Find.

Stk. N1030, VIN LW91534.

Stk. 3371B, VIN P1710675.

Kelley Blue Book $22,775

Kelley Blue Book $21,125

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876.

Stk. A30149A, VIN N081500.

Kelley Blue Book $21,615

Kelley Blue Book $21,920

NOW

$

2005 Volvo XC90 AWD, Loaded, 3rd Row.

Available on every vehicle.

Model AFE-01 MSRP $24,319 VIN: AG724297

$

24,999

Model AFI-02 MSRP $27,643 VIN: AH904963

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Premium

$

Automatic All-Weather Pkg

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Base

$

20,988

Automatic

Model AFB-01 MSRP $22,890 VIN: AH797957

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Base

$

22,995

2007 Audi A4 Quattro Audi Certified, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $22,750

Kelley Blue Book $24,785

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Premium

$

22,888

Automatic

Model AFF-02 MSRP $24,922 VIN: AH744802

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Sedan Premium

cars you can get into

$

Automatic

GREAT VALUES ON RECENT TRADE-INS! WAS $11,995

7,495

11,495

$

NOW

12,995

$

WAS $17,995

WAS $17,995

15,995

14,995

$

2002 Isuzu Trooper 4x4

2008 Smart Fortwo

2002 Ford F-150 Super Cab

2005 Acura MDX

2004 GMC Yukon

Stk. 3371J VIN P1710672.

Stk. 3534 VIN K178943.

Stk. 99110B VIN CA79670.

Stk. A31036A, VIN H526917.

Stk. 71023A, VIN J295729.

4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

One Owner, Must See!

Model AJD-11 MSRP $20,844 VIN: AH515391

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Sedan Premium

Kelley Blue Book $12,285

Kelley Blue Book $13,195

Kelley Blue Book $18,575

Kelley Blue Book $20,810

WAS $17,995

WAS $18,995

WAS $19,995

WAS $22,995

WAS $27,995

15,995

17,495

$

2005 GMC Yukon

Incredible Condition & Value. Stk. 71056B, VIN J174687.

19,495

$

2004 Jeep 2006 Ford F-150 XLT Super Cab, Grand Cherokee

Navigation, One Owner, Low Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $19,895

Stk. A31040A, VIN C366044.

Kelley Blue Book $19,960

Low Miles. Stk. 90131B, VIN FA78172

Kelley Blue Book $22,655

Porsche | Audi

$

20,995

2007 Nissan Pathfinder

$

27,495

2006 Ford F250 Super Cab

One Owner, Like New.

Diesel, 4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $25,265

Kelley Blue Book $31,820

Stk. 71055A, VIN C621723

Stk. 91047A VIN EA47639

VW | BMW M O T O R S

Find every car on the lot at www.carreramotors.com 10 4 5 S E 3 r d S t . | B e n d | 5 41-3 8 2-17 11

18,688

Automatic

Model AJD-11 MSRP $20,979 VIN: AH508160

Loaded! DVD, 3rd Row Seat.

Kelley Blue Book $7,755 $

18,488

$

$ Passion Model, Low Miles.

21,088

Model AFB-01 MSRP $23,100 VIN: AH912204

Stk. 3465, VIN 125841.

NOW

22,999

Model AFF-02 MSRP $25,314 VIN: AH743512

Automatic

Stk. 71031K, VIN 51200237.

$

21,999

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Limited

WAS $23,995 NOW

21,995

$

Manual All-Weather Pkg

14,995

WW Certified, Only 9k Miles.

NOW

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Premium

$

All Wheel Drive, Low Miles.

Low Miles, Affordable!

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

SUBARUS!!!

Special Offer

CarreraAutoOutlet

***

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $14,750 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

2003 Mercedes C320 4-Matic

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

CHECK YOUR AD

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K Subaru Forester 2007 AWD, mi, $3495. 541-382-8399 man. trans, immac cond, 55K auto chk, reduced to $15,750 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212 auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

WAS $15,295 NOW

WAS $17,995 NOW

16,945

$

15,495

Buick Regal LS 2001 sedan. V-6. Leather. CD. Alloys. 85K. Silver. Compare at $4999. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. VIN-139644

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

smolichmotors.com

14,995

13,895

$

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

94,188k miles Vin #302694

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

NOW

$

$

WAS $15,995 NOW

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

4 Motion AWD!

Smolich Auto Mall

Loaded and hard to find V6. 30k miles. VIN #407550

VW Passat Wagon 2004 Now Only $9,999

Kelley Blue Book Prices as of 12/01/2010 NOW

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Buick LeSabre 2004,

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Now Only $18,895

smolichmotors.com

12,395

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

CarreraBelowBlueBookSale! 2010 BLOW-OUT PRICING! $

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Hyundai V6 SONATA 2009

NOW ONLY $10,888

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Automobiles

Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

42K Miles! Vin #209196

HYUNDAI

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Special Offer

$3,950 541-923-8627.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. excellent condition.

Now Only $10,325

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Now Only $9,999

smolichmotors.com

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Find It in

25K Miles! VIN #617085

Loaded like you want it. 40K miles! Vin #613716

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

NISSAN

Dodge Caravan Stow-N-Go 2009

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Now Only $12,998

940

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Sedan Premium

$

Manual All Weather Pkg

20,399

Model AAC-02 MSRP $22,384 VIN: A1244901

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Premium

$

23,688

Automatic, All Weather Pkg

Model AFF-02 MSRP $25,641 VIN: 796316

CALL 888-701-7019 CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through December 5, 2010. Subject to vehicle insurance; vehicle availability.


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/04/10