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Loyal companions Local GOP Elderly find love, company, aid with pets • FAMILY, E1 WARM SPRINGS

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Tribes race to break ground on biomass facility

Lawmakers ready bills to bridge $3.5B shortfall once ‘11 session convenes By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs are racing to break ground on a huge new biomass power plant before the year ends and tens of millions of dollars in federal subsidies go up in smoke. The tribes are finalizing a deal with Bellevue, Wash., power developer Northwest Energy Systems Co. (NESCO) to build a 35-megawatt power plant on the reservation that is nearly twice the size originally planned. But because 30 percent of the $120 million project would be paid for through a federal grant program that ends Dec. 31, the tribes need to act fast, said Jim Manion, general manager of Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises. “We’re really under a very, very tight timeline,” said Manion, who predicted a final agreement would be reached in the coming weeks. “We’ve been working on it with a partner who is very supportive of the concept of a larger facility.” The tribes first announced plans for a 20-megawatt biomass plant more than four years ago, but decided to expand the project’s size after partnering with NESCO, Manion said. Because American Indian tribes don’t pay federal taxes, Warm Springs needs to partner with a private developer to qualify for the federal grant. See Biomass / A5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

B

arbara Stith and her two grandchildren, Santiago and Isabela Quesada, admire one of the dozens of gingerbread houses on display in the Sunriver Lodge on Thursday. The Gingerbread Junction display benefits The Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine

Schools. The junction is on display through Dec. 26. For more information, call 541-593-4609.

TOP NEWS INSIDE SOUTH KOREA: Official resigns as nation weighs defense plan, Page A3

leaders strategize on budget SALEM — In six weeks, the 2011 Legislature will start grappling with a projected $3.5 billion shortfall in the state budget, and Bend-area lawmakers are already brainstorming ways to help close the gap. In some ways, that’s not that different from two years ago, when lawmakers faced a projected $4 billion gap. But there are two big differences. First, this time the federal government seems highly unlikely to send Oregon billions in extra funding, as it did last year. Second, this year the Bend area Rep.-elect is represented solely by Republi- Jason Conger, cans who are looking forward to R-Bend wielding unaccustomed clout. Earlier this month, Republican challenger Jason Conger ousted incumbent Democrat Judy Stiegler for the right to represent Bend in the state House of Representatives. His victory was part of an overall Republican pickup of six seats in the House, dividing its seats 30-30, as well as a gain of Sen. Chris what appears to be two seats in Telfer, R-Bend the Senate, making for a 16-to-14 Democratic edge. The Senate results are not final, and two seats, for Clackamas and Jackson County, could be subject to a recount. Whatever the final Senate count, however, it’s clear that Republicans are going to enjoy more influence in both houses of the Rep. Gene Legislature. Whisnant, “I’m definitely more optimis- R-Sunriver tic,” said Rep. Gene Whisnant, RSunriver. “I think the 30-30 (split) means that we have to work together and we have to compromise and put things out that are reasonable.” Last session, he added, Republicans “were never really listened to.” To take advantage of the Republican-leaning region’s new clout, Whisnant, Conger and state Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, are readying bills that they say will help the state tame its budget. See Shortfall / A4

CLIMATE CHANGE

Scientists worried City threatened by rising Atlantic tides about dwindling food for salmon By Leslie Kaufman

David Caywood, a worker for Excel Paving Corporation, pumps water from a construction site during high tide in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 22.

New York Times News Service

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

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Vol. 107, No. 330, 68 pages, 7 sections

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By Les Blumenthal McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — With the number of salmon in the North Pacific having doubled in the past 50 years, scientists are increasingly concerned there may not be enough food to support them, and changing ocean conditions could make it even worse. On the surface, the mounting scientific evidence would seem to contradict conventional wisdom that salmon are a disappearing species. But as with everything salmon, it’s more complicated. While more than $13 billion has been spent since 1978 to try to restore endangered wild salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest, salmon

hatcheries in the U.S., Russia, Japan and Canada have expanded rapidly.

Rapid expansion In 1970, 500 million hatchery-raised salmon were released. In 2008, more than 5 billion hatchery fish headed out to sea. As with wild salmon, only a small percentage of the hatchery fish actually survive to spawn. Once in the ocean, the hatchery fish are competing for the same food as the wild salmon. While the North Pacific and the Bering Sea may be vast, salmon often congregate in the same feeding grounds. See Salmon / A4

NORFOLK, Va. — In this section of the Larchmont neighborhood, built in a sharp “U” around a bay off the Lafayette River, residents pay close attention to the lunar calendar, much as other suburbanites might attend to the daily flow of commuter traffic. If the moon is going to be full the night before Hazel Peck needs her car, for example, she parks it on a parallel block, away from the river. The next morning, she walks through a neighbor’s backyard to avoid the 2- to 3-foot-deep puddle that routinely accumulates on her street after high tides. For Peck and her neighbors, it is the only way to live with the encroaching sea. As sea levels rise, tidal flooding is increasingly disrupting life here and all along the East Coast, a development many cli-

Matthew Eich New York Times News Service

mate scientists link to global warming. But Norfolk is worse off. Situated just west of the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, it is bordered on three sides by water, including several rivers, like the Lafayette, that are actually long tidal streams that feed into the bay and eventually the ocean. Like many other cities, Norfolk was built on filled-in marsh.

Now that fill is settling and compacting. In addition, the city is in an area where significant natural sinking of land is occurring. The result is that Norfolk has experienced the highest relative increase in sea level on the East Coast — 14.5 inches since 1930, according to readings by the Sewells Point naval station here. See Tides / A5


A2 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Virtual healing for the real world Simulations allow patients to confront phobias in controlled and safe settings

their area, depending on what it has learned.”

My avatar, myself

By Benedict Carey New York Times News Service

OTTAWA — His talk was going just fine until some members of the audience became noticeably restless. A ripple of impatience passed through the several dozen seated listeners, and a few seemed suddenly annoyed; then two men started to talk to each other, ignoring him altogether. “When I saw that, I slowed down and then stopped what I was saying,” said the speaker, a 47-year-old public servant named Gary, who last year took part in an unusual study of social anxiety treatment at the University of Quebec. The anxiety rose in his throat but subsided as his therapist, observing in the background, reminded him that the audience’s reaction might have nothing to do with him. And if a question stumped him, he could just say so: No one knows everything. He relaxed and finished the talk, and the audience seemed to settle down. Then he removed a headset that had helped create an illusion that the audience was actually there, not just figures on a screen. For more than a decade, a handful of therapists have been using virtual environments to help people to work through phobias, like a fear of heights or of public spaces. But now advances in artificial intelligence and computer modeling are allowing them to take on a wider array of complex social challenges and to gain insight into how people are affected by interactions with virtual humans — or by inhabiting avatars of themselves. Researchers are populating digital worlds with autonomous, virtual humans that can evoke the same tensions as in real-life encounters. People with social anxiety are struck dumb when asked questions by a virtual stranger. Heavy drinkers feel strong urges to order something from a virtual bartender, while gamblers are drawn to sit down and join a group playing on virtual slot machines. And therapists can advise patients at the very moment those sensations are felt. In a series of experiments, researchers have shown that people internalize these virtual experiences and their responses to them — with effects that carry over into real life. The emerging field, called cybertherapy, now has annual conferences and a growing international following of therapists, researchers and others interested in improving behavior through the use of simulations. The Canadian military has invested heavily in virtual-reality research; so has the U.S. Army, which has been spending about $4 million annually on programs with computergenerated agents, for training officers and treating post-traumatic stress reactions. The trend has already generated a few critics, who see a possible downside along with benefits. “Even if this approach works, there will be side effects that we can’t anticipate,” said Jaron Lanier, a computer scientist and author of “You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto” (Knopf, 2010). “And in some scenarios I would worry about defining humans down: defining what’s normal based on what we can model in virtual environments.” But most researchers say that virtual therapy is, and will remain, no more than a therapist’s tool, to be used only when it appears effective. “There’s a real and understandable distrust of technology as a shortcut for good clinical skills,” said Albert Rizzo, a psychologist at the University of Southern California, “but I think, deep down, most therapists will want any tool that can help them do their work, and they’ll be open to using virtual approaches.”

Virtual humans, real therapy “My abilities are somewhat limited,” says a female voice. “For example, I can speak and listen to what you say, but I can’t do any physical activity.” In an office at the Institute for

Photos by Michal Czerwonka / New York Times News Service

Sin-Hwa Kang, co-author of the Angelina study, a virtual interaction therapy program, demonstrates the software at the Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, on Oct. 20.

The face in the mirror does not look familiar; it has a generic, computer-generated look. Yet it does appear to be staring out from a mirror. Lift a hand and up goes its hand. Nod, wave, smile, and it does the same, simultaneously. Now, look down at your own body: And there, through the virtual reality headset, are a torso, legs, clothes identical to those in the mirror. In a matter of minutes, people placed in front of this virtual mirror identify strongly with their “body” and psychologically inhabit it, researchers at Stanford University have found. And by subtly altering elements of that embodied figure, the scientists have established a principle that is fundamental to therapy — that an experience in a virtual world can alter behavior in the real one.

‘Mini-Me’ in action

Josh Williams, left, and Andrew Smith demonstrate a new therapy program designed to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, at the Institute for Creative Technologies. Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California, a virtual woman named Angelina is addressing a college student from a computer screen. Angelina looks to be about 30 or so, a pretty, athletic figure with an open, intelligent face framed by short black hair. Her eyes and expression, guided by video cameras and microphones, stay in sync with the student’s, as an empathetic therapist’s would. “What are some of the things you hate about yourself?” asks the voice. The student stalls for a moment. “Well,” she says, in a video of the exchange, “I don’t like that I can be really quiet in social situations. Sometimes people take that as me being rude, but it’s just me being quiet.” Angelina nods sympathetically and then asks another question, about what the student fears most. The figures are clearly not human; some are balky with language, others mute. Many have a 2-D graphic-arts quality. But the faces are mobile, blinking, alive, the body language and

Williams demonstrates a new therapy program designed to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, at the Institute for Creative Technologies.

“There’s a real and understandable distrust of technology as a shortcut for good clinical skills. But I think, deep down, most therapists will want any tool that can help them do their work, and they’ll be open to using virtual approaches.” — Albert Rizzo, psychologist, University of Southern California gestures seemingly natural; in some cases, the voice recognition and choice of replies are good enough to conduct a stiff but convincing conversation. The result is a living presence that is responsive but not judgmental. In a recent study using this virtual confidant, researchers at USC have found that Angelina elicits

Arno Hartholt interacts with two virtual characters inside a simulated Old West saloon at the Institute for Creative Technologies.

from people the crucial first element in any therapy: self-disclosure. People with social anxiety confessed more of their personal flaws, fears and fantasies to virtual figures than to live therapists conducting video interviews, the study found. The researchers are incorporating the techniques learned from Angelina into a virtual agent being developed for the Army, called SimCoach. Guided by languagerecognition software, SimCoach appears on a computer screen and can conduct a rudimentary interview, gently probing for possible mental troubles. Using SimCoach on a laptop, veterans and family members would anonymously ask about difficulties they’re having, whether due to post-traumatic stress or other strains of service. “It does not give a diagnosis,” said Jonathan Gratch, a co-author of the Angelina study with SinHwa Kang, also of USC. “But the idea is that the SimCoach would ask people if they would like to see a therapist; and if so, could then guide them to someone in

In the virtual studio at the University of Quebec, patients wearing a headset can have a short conversation with a diminutive, attentive virtual therapist. Except for slight stature, it is a ringer for Bouchard: the same open face, the same smile, the same pelt of dark hair around a bald pate. “Mini-Me, we call it,” Bouchard said. The hologramlike figure seems at first to be minding its own business, looking around, biding time. Then it approaches slowly, introduces itself and kindly asks a question, like some digital-age Socrates: “What is the best experience you’ve ever had?” For now, Mini-Me cannot do much more than cock its head at the answer and nod, before programmers begin to guide the conversation; the scientists are adding more language-recognition software, to extend interactions. Yet Mini-Me offers a glimpse of where virtual humans are headed: three-dimensional forms that can be designed to resemble people in the real world. “You could scan in a picture of your mother or your boss or someone else significant and, with some voice recording samples, use a system that would automatically and quickly re-create a virtual facsimile of that person,” said Rizzo of USC, where programmers have set up an Old West bar scene, complete with a life-size, autonomous virtual bartender, a waitress and a bad guy. “Then, perhaps, we’d be able to stage interactions that might closely resemble those in a patient’s life to help work through challenging issues.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 A3

T S Arrests increase pressure on Afghan officials Defense official resigns after deadly attack SOUTH KOREA

By Rod Nordland and Sangar Rahimi

New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Sharply intensifying a conflict over the results of parliamentary elections, the government of President Hamid Karzai issued arrest warrants Thursday for several top election officials and accused a U.N. worker of leading a bribery ring. The warrants, announced by Deputy Attorney General Rahmatullah Nazari, were part of a broader sweep that included the arrests Thursday of three people

identified as officials of the I ndependent Election Commission and two moneychangers, all Afghans. Nazari said Hamid Karzai the U.N. official who was wanted by the authorities worked at the organization’s “election monitoring office.” The reason he was not arrested was that he sought refuge in the U.N. compound, according to an Af-

ghan official. The Karzai government’s actions greatly stepped up pressure on election officials a day after the Independent Election Commission announced the final results from the country’s Sept. 18 parliamentary elections, which proved to be deeply controversial with nearly all political factions. Within hours of the announcement of the results Wednesday, Attorney General Mohammed Ishaq Aloko denounced the election commission, saying it had prematurely released the results, and he sharply criticized the

U.N. mission here for endorsing the returns. Aloko suggested that his office might annul the results, or bring criminal charges against candidates who he believed had won seats by fraud. U.N. and Afghan election officials say that under the Afghan Constitution, the final say on election decisions rests with the Independent Election Commission, which manages elections, and the Electoral Complaints Commission, which investigates reports of violations of election law.

POLICE CLASH WITH DRUG TRAFFICKERS IN RIO DE JANEIRO

Felipe Dana / The Associated Press

A policeman runs for cover from shooting as another aims his weapon during an operation against drug traffickers in Vila Cruzeiro slum, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Thursday. Police in Rio entered a heavily fortified slum Thursday in an effort to apprehend drug gang leaders they blame for days of widespread violence in the city.

Deal may bring Russia in on defense system By Christi Parsons McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — As he flew to Yokohama, Japan, earlier this month, President Barack Obama was unknowingly on the way to the sleeper event of the fall, a peripheral get-together almost entirely overlooked in a battery of colossal global summits. Even the president’s team didn’t realize Obama and Dmitry Medvedev were on the brink of a deal that could eventually bring the Russians in on a plan to build a missile defense system in Europe — in cooperation with the treaty organization whose longtime mission was to keep the

Russian nuclear threat in check. For weeks, Russian negotiators had been putting the brakes on missile talks. One top Obama adviser was ready to drop back on it for at least a year. The presidents and their top advisers arranged themselves around a long table in a small meeting room of the InterContinental Yokohama Grand Hotel, and started talking about previously negotiated items — Afghanistan, trade, the START arms treaty they’d signed but not ratified. On missile defense, Obama knew the negotiators in Brussels had not worked out the impor-

tant issues, like how to agree on common threats or resume joint defense exercises. He turned the conversation there anyway. As he did, advisers in the room with him were surprised by Medvedev’s demeanor. “He was leaving himself wiggle room,” said one senior administration official who was there, “and not committing to anything. But he was clearly very friendly and open to what the president was saying.” Four days later, his NATO point man called from Brussels to report a development. The brakes were off, Ambassador Ivo Daalder told the team.

Indeed, at the final summit of the month, of NATO leaders in Lisbon, the Russians shook hands on some surprising plans, though the details have yet to be worked out. Medvedev agreed to work toward cooperation with a NATO missile shield designed to protect Europe and the U.S. against missile attack, beginning with a study of each side’s technologies and how they might interweave. No longer a problem in U.S. and NATO relations with Russia, said Daalder, missile defense was now “a means to foster greater cooperation with Russia.”

By Martin Fackler and Mark Mcdonald

engagement were similarly restrained. South Korean defenses New York Times News Service on five coastal islands in the YelSEOUL, South Korea — Re- low Sea had been set up primarsponding to growing public ily to guard against possible amcriticism after a deadly North phibious landings by North KoreKorean attack, President an troops. Critics said Thursday Lee Myung-bak accepted the that the military had not anticiresignation on Thursday of pated the possibility of an attack his defense minister and an- by North Korean artillery batternounced changes in the mili- ies, which are reportedly in caves tary’s rules of engagement to along the North’s coastline. make it easier for South Korea “Now an artillery battle has beto strike back with greater come the new threat, so we’re reforce, especially if civilians assessing the need to strengthen are threatened. defenses,” Lee told lawmakers. The government also an- The new measures he outlined nounced plans to increase the include doubling the number of number of troops and heavy howitzers and upgrading other weapons on Yeonpyeong Is- weaponry. land, where two marines and The new rules of engagement two civilians died Tuesday in will be based on whether milian artillery fusillade from the tary or civilian sites are the tarNorth. gets, said Hong, But Lee, who the presidential came to office “North Korea has spokesman, two years ago nothing to lose, adding that the vowing to get move was made tough with the while we have to “change the North, has little everything to lose. paradigm of maneuver ing responding to room in formu- Lee Myung-bak North Korea’s lating a response. has no choice provocations.” While the attack P r e v i o u s l y, appears to have but to soften his South Korean pushed anti- tone to keep this forces were alNorth Korean to respond country peaceful. lowed sentiment here to only in kind — if its highest level It is not an the North fired in years, there appealing choice, artillery, the is little public South could ansupport for tak- but it is the only swer only with ing military ac- realistic choice.” artillery — to tion against the contain any disNorth that might — Kang Won-taek, pute. Now, oflead to an escala- professor, Seoul National ficials said, the tion of hostilities. University military would “North Korea be allowed to has nothing to respond with lose, while we have everything greater force. to lose,” said Kang Won-taek, The aftermath of this week’s a professor of politics at Seoul artillery attack was not the first National University. “Lee time Lee has come under critiMyung-bak has no choice but cism for sitting on his hands in to soften his tone to keep this the face of a deadly provocation country peaceful. It is not an by the North. Two years ago, appealing choice, but it is the when a South Korean tourist only realistic choice.” was shot by a sentry at a North The South’s powerful neigh- Korean mountain resort, his govbor is also counseling restraint. ernment’s response amounted to The Chinese prime minister, a slap on the wrist: suspending Wen Jiabao, said Thursday tours to the resort and barring that Beijing opposed any pro- South Korean civic groups from vocative military behavior by visiting the North. either side on the Korean PenLee was widely blamed in insula, Xinhua, the state news South Korea for having provoked agency, reported. the Cheonan episode by ending On Thursday, while North unconditional aid to the North at Korea warned through its of- the start of his presidency. ficial news agency of further “Before, the public saw him as military retaliation if pro- too hard, and now they see him voked by South Korea, Lee as too soft,” said Yoo Ho-yeol, a said only, “We should not professor of North Korean studdrop our guard in prepara- ies at Korea University in Seoul. tion for the possibility of another provocation by North Why pay retail? Korea,” according to his chief 541-385-5950 spokesman, Hong Sang-pyo. New Bend Location: “A provocation like this can recur anytime.” 2nd & Greenwood The changes in the rules of

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HOLIDAY DOUBLE Secondhand smoke kills more

FIRST STUDY OF GLOBAL SCOPE

DEAL OF

than 600,000 people a year By Maria Cheng The Associated Press

LONDON — Secondhand smoke kills more than 600,000 people worldwide every year, according to a new study. In the first look at the global impact of secondhand smoking, researchers analyzed data from 2004 for 192 countries. They found 40 percent of children and more than 30 percent of non-smoking men and women regularly breathe in secondhand smoke. Scientists then estimated that passive smoking causes about 379,000 deaths from heart disease, 165,000 deaths from lower respiratory disease, 36,900 deaths from asthma and 21,400 deaths from lung cancer a year. Altogether, those account for about 1 percent of the world’s deaths. The study was paid for by the Swedish National Board

of Health and Welfare and Bloomberg Philanthropies. It was published Friday in the British medical journal Lancet. “This helps us understand the real toll of tobacco,” said Armando Peruga, a program manager at the World Health Organization’s Tobacco-Free Initiative, who led the study.

165,000 children He said the approximately 603,000 deaths from secondhand smoking should be added to the 5.1 million deaths that smoking itself causes every year. Peruga said WHO was particularly concerned about the 165,000 children who die of smoke-related respiratory infections, mostly in Southeast Asia and Africa. “The mix of infectious diseases and secondhand smoke is

a deadly combination,” Peruga said. Children whose parents smoke have a higher risk of sudden infant death syndrome, ear infections, pneumonia, bronchitis and asthma. Their lungs may also grow more slowly than kids whose parents don’t smoke. Peruga and colleagues found the highest numbers of people exposed to secondhand smoke are in Europe and Asia. The lowest rates of exposure were in the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean and Africa. Secondhand smoke had its biggest impact on women, killing about 281,000. In many parts of the world, women are at least 50 percent more likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke than men. While many Western countries have introduced smoking bans in public places, experts said it would be difficult to legislate further.

N IN W WIIG G!! I B B VE E AV !! S SA G G I B BI

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A4 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

DEMOCRATIC PROCESS

Ranked-choice voting stirs up controversies By Lee Romney Los Angeles Times

OAKLAND, Calif. — Rankedchoice balloting, in which voters select candidates in order of preference instead of picking just one, is growing in popularity around the country. Backers laud it for eliminating costly runoffs with historically poor turnout, discouraging negative campaigning and allowing voters to back candidates they believe in without fear of a spoiler effect. But the results of this month’s Oakland mayor’s race and two San Francisco contests have heightened scrutiny of the system. Although some question its fairness, all agree it will transform the nature of campaigning. Under ranked balloting, if no one candidate emerges with more than 50 percent of votes when “first choices” are tallied, the lowest vote-getter is eliminated. Each vote for the losing candidate is then transferred to the voter’s second choice. The process continues until a winner emerges with a majority of votes in play.

Oakland mayor race In the Oakland race, former state Sen. Don Perata unexpectedly lost to Councilwoman Jean Quan, even though he got far more first-choice votes than she did. She ended up with more total votes and was declared the winner. Perata denounced ranked voting as confusing. Both former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown and current Mayor Gavin Newsom have spoken out against it. But proponents of the system shot back, saying it worked exactly as it should, awarding victory to candidates with the broadest voter support, even if they lagged in first-choice picks. “Perata losing has just rocked the establishment,” said Steven

Hill, the architect of rankedchoice voting in the Bay Area and co-founder of the nonpartisan FairVote, which promotes the system. In San Francisco, which became the first sizable U.S. city to adopt ranked-choice voting six years ago, candidates who have historically led in firstchoice rounds have tended to win once the counting was done. Not so this time. A supervisorial candidate in the upscale Marina district who had wrapped up the city’s political and institutional endorsements lost her comfortable lead among first choices when the second-place opponent received more second- and third-choice votes of lesser, like-minded candidates.

4th-choice win And in the city’s Bayview Hunter’s Point district, a candidate who was in fourth place when first-choice votes were tallied eked out a victory in a 21-candidate field. The vast number of candidates meant that many voters’ ballots were “exhausted” — all their choices were eliminated — allowing the victor to prevail with a relatively small percentage of total votes cast. “I got more votes for class president in high school,” quipped political consultant John Whitehurst, who helped run Perata’s campaign. But nowhere are feelings running hotter than in Oakland. The Bay Area cities allow voters to rank their top three choices. Perata had led all polls and far outspent his nine opponents in the 10-candidate mayoral race. When first choices were tallied, he had captured 34 percent of the vote, leading Quan by a solid 9 points. Then the system worked its methodical math. As the second and third

choices of voters whose top candidates were knocked from the running were added to the tally, the seasoned politician slipped. After nine rounds of calculations and as many days of uncertainty, a razor-slim victory was handed to Quan, who had appealed to voters to leave the polarizing Perata off their ballots and persuaded backers of other candidates to place her second or third.

70 percent of Oakland OK’d new method Perata, meanwhile, had banked on winning a fat enough margin of first-choice picks to pull off victory. In conceding to Quan, he said that “the results are pretty clear, and you play by the rules and win or lose by them.” He nevertheless called for greater scrutiny of the voting system, whose implementation he sought to delay. Nearly 70 percent of Oakland voters chose in 2006 to make the switch. Whitehurst concedes that Quan’s strategy prevailed fair and square. Yet he stands firm in believing that the system dealt “an injustice” to voters by denying them a robust airing of issues possible in a traditional two-candidate runoff. Although all systems are flawed, San Francisco State associate professor of political science Francis Neely said, this one “uses more information from voters about their preferences and produces an outcome that many would argue is better, because we often have more than just a single candidate who we approve of.” Meanwhile, Minneapolis debuted ranked-choice voting last year, touting it as “highly successful,” and more U.S. cities, including Memphis, Tenn., and St. Paul, Minn., have signed on to adopt the system. It has long been in use in London, Ireland and Australia, with some variations.

Salmon Continued from A1 “Many hatcheries were built on the premise that the ocean had an unlimited capacity to support all salmon,” said Gregory Ruggerone, a fisheries scientist who works for Natural Resources Consultants in Seattle. That may not be true. With nearly 650 million adult Pacific salmon swimming in the ocean at any given time, the competition for food is increasing, and the already shrinking wild stocks could be crowded out. “It could lead to a reduction in wild stocks,” said Randall Peterman, a professor in the School of Resource and Environment Management at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia. Studies over the past several years suggest competition for food is affecting salmon runs up and down the West Coast, from Puget Sound chinook to Bristol Bay, Alaska, sockeye. In some instances, the fish are smaller when they return, making them more susceptible to predators. In others, runs are actually declining. The competition between wild

Shortfall Continued from A1 Their ideas range from the familiar category, such as tax cuts, to the guaranteed-friend-loser kind — like the bill that Telfer is working on. She wants to limit the number of lawmakers who receive a per diem — a payment meant to cover the cost of a legislator’s food and lodging for each day the Legislature is in session. Telfer wants to eliminate the per diem for any lawmaker who lives within 50 miles of the Capitol. The per diem, which for the coming year is $116, comes on top of legislators’ $21,612 salary. Telfer says about 60 lawmakers live close enough to Salem that they go home at night and therefore don’t need the per diem. She says the state could save $1.2 million by restricting the payments. “Why should we pay someone per diem when they’re not using it?” she said. “I’d rather see legislators be cut than some mental health facility be closed.” She said the idea is probably

“This concern about competing for limited resources may become considerably more acute if the North Pacific area occupied by salmon decreases due to climatic change.” — Article featured in American Fisheries Society and hatchery salmon is nothing new. Wild salmon are considered heartier and more resistant to disease than their hatchery-raised counterparts. If the salmon you buy at the fish counter isn’t farm-raised, it’s likely hatchery-raised silver, coho or chinook. Fishermen are expected to toss back any wild ones they catch. Before a salmon is released from a hatchery, one of its fins is clipped to distinguish it from wild ones. The fins can be clipped by hand or using a laser device. “We know stocks from all over the Pacific intermingle and overlap,” Ruggerone said. “There is a melting pot. But there is a lot we

dead on arrival, saying, “I’m not going to make friends on this, (and) chances are it will never get a hearing — but I think it’s the way we ought to be behaving.” Besides that, Telfer hopes to float bills that change the way the state budgets. She also wants to insert a “sunset” clause in all fees so they have to be renewed every four years, to make sure they’re still needed. Whisnant, who has served in the Legislature since 2003, has already drafted a bill that would eliminate the state’s capital gains tax on investment profits for five years. He knows the idea is unlikely to get anywhere in its current form, but says “we can negotiate, we can compromise.” He noted that several Democrats, including Gov.-elect John Kitzhaber, have talked about at least reducing the tax. He also wants to push privatization and strip out entire layers of management in the state bureaucracy, such as by eliminating all deputy directors. “We’ve got to look at what the agencies are doing,” he said. Conger, the area’s newest law-

don’t know.” The issue of too many salmon and too little food is an international one, with Japanese hatcheries releasing mostly chum salmon, which are valuable for their roe, and the Russian releasing pink salmon. “Five years ago at a conference in Russia, a guy stood up and said I was trying to start a war between Russia and the U.S.,” Ruggerone said. Since the mid-1970s, the waters of the North Pacific have been slightly warmer, creating an upwelling that brings zooplankton, krill and other salmon food favorites to the surface. But a 20to 30-year weather cycle known as the Pacific decadal oscillation could soon reverse itself, and colder waters means less food for the salmon. Climate change is causing even greater uncertainty. “This concern about competing for limited resources may become considerably more acute if the North Pacific area occupied by salmon decreases due to climatic change,” according to an article co-authored by Ruggerone and Peterman published this fall in a technical journal published by the American Fisheries Society.

maker, said he’s already talked with Telfer about potential legislation, such as reforming the state’s Public Employees Retirement System, which has increased in cost to public agencies as the stock market has cooled. He also is considering a bill to slash the number of boards and commissions supported by the state, an idea that Gov. Ted Kulongoski floated earlier this year. But he said he wants to be thoughtful about the bills he introduces, to make sure they have a shot at passing. As far as cutting commissions, he said, “We’re in the process of trying to understand what some of the commissions even do.” He plans to also advance proposals authored by a committee of advisers he put together called “Ideas for Central Oregon,” which held six “idea raisers” to solicit input on what sorts of legislation could help the region. He will receive the group’s final report in the next couple of weeks, he said. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Tides Continued from A1 Climate change is a subject of friction in Virginia. The state’s attorney general, Ken Cuccinelli II, is trying to prove that a prominent climate scientist engaged in fraud when he was a researcher at the University of Virginia. But the residents of coastal neighborhoods here are less interested in the debate than in the real-time consequences of a rise in sea level. When Peck, now 75 and a caretaker to her husband, moved here 40 years ago, tidal flooding was an occasional hazard. “Last month,” she said recently, “there were eight or nine days the tide was so doggone high it was difficult to drive.” Larchmont residents have relentlessly lobbied the city to address the problem, and last summer it broke ground on a project to raise the street around the “U” by 18 inches and to readjust the angle of the storm drains so that when the river rises, the water does not back up into the street. The city will also turn a park at the edge of the river back into wetlands — it is now too saline for lawn grass to grow anyway. The cost for the work on this one short stretch is $1.25 million. The expensive reclamation project is popular in Larchmont, but it is already drawing critics who argue that cities just cannot handle flooding in such a oneoff fashion. To William Stiles, executive director of Wetlands Watch, a local conservation group, the project is well-meaning but absurd. Stiles points out that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has already spent $144,000 in recent years to raise six houses on the block. At this pace of spending, he argues, there is no way taxpayers will recoup their investment. “If sea level is a constant, your coastal infrastructure is your most valuable real estate, and it makes sense to invest in it,” Stiles

Biomass Continued from A1 The program was created through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, better known as the stimulus bill. Earlier this month, NESCO announced plans for an identical biomass power plant in Klamath Falls. A company representative couldn’t be reached for comment on Tuesday afternoon. A power plant the size planned by Warm Springs could have a hard time finding enough woody debris to fuel the operation, said Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council Program Manager Phil Chang. “Either they would have to have trainloads of municipal wood waste or they would be looking at pretty substantial off-reservation supply,” said Chang, who has worked with several groups looking to develop biomass plants in the region. “That’ll raise a lot of eyebrows.” Manion said the tribes plan to use several sources to fuel their plant: waste from the tribes’ sawmill, material taken from tribal forests, municipal wood waste from Central Oregon and the Willamette Valley and material harvested as part of forest health projects on nearby federal lands. Tribes have the authority to thin some federal forests adjacent to tribal lands to reduce fire danger, under federal law. “We’re trying to focus on forest health issues and getting that as the premise behind this,” Manion said. “We’ve got actually a small army out right now securing the fuel sources.” “We’re well on our way to securing the fuel and getting agreements in place to get that portion of it nailed down,” he continued. The Warm Springs project could find itself in competition other planned biomass plants. Biogreen Sustainable Energy plans to open a 25-megawatt plant in La Pine (although it plans to use material harvested on private land). Another project is in the works for Prineville, Chang said. If the agreements are finalized in time, the project would take about 18 to 20 months to complete, Manion said, with most of the work starting sometime next year. The project would employ between 75 people and 100 people to gather woody debris and transport it to the power plant, Manion said. “There’s plenty of jobs to be had, and these are long-term jobs,” Manion said. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

said, “but with sea level rising, it becomes a money pit.” Many Norfolkians hope their problems will serve as a warning. “We are the front lines of climate change,” said Jim Schultz, a science and technology writer who lives on Richmond Crescent near Peck. “No one who has a house here is a skeptic.” That statement is also true for the city of Norfolk, where officials are overlooking state politics and tackling the sea-rise

problem head-on. In August, the Public Works Department briefed the City Council on the seriousness of the situation, and Mayor Paul Fraim has acknowledged that if the sea continues rising, the city might actually have to create “retreat” zones. Kristen Lentz, the acting director of public works, prefers to think of these contingency plans as new zoning opportunities. “If we plan land use in a way that understands certain areas are prone to flooding,” Lentz

said, “we can put parks in those areas. It would make the areas adjacent to the coast available to more people. It could be a winwin for the environment and community at large and makes smart use of our coastline.” Lentz believes that if Norfolk can manage the flooding well, it will have a first-mover advantage and be able to market its expertise to other communities as they face similar problems. But she also acknowledges that for the businesses and

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 A5 homes entrenched on the coast, such a step could be costly, and that the city has no money yet to pay them to move. In the short run, the city’s goal is just to pick its flood-mitigation projects more strategically. “We need to look broadly and not just act piecemeal,” Lentz said, referring to Larchmont. To this end, Norfolk has hired the Dutch firm Fugro to evaluate options like inflatable dams and storm-surge floodgates. But to judge by the strong pref-

erence in Larchmont for action at any cost, it may not be easy for the city to choose which neighborhoods might be passed over for projects. Neighborhood residents lobbied hard for the 18-inch lifting of their roadway, even though they know it will offer not much protection from storms, which are also becoming more frequent and fearsome. Many say that housing values in the neighborhood have plummeted and that this is the only way to stabilize them.


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Auto News Envisioning a new class of ultra-light vehicles, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

INSIDE Let your smart phone help with the shopping this year, see Page B2

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Holiday revelers find time to shop WASHINGTON — The lines were shorter and there were no maddening battles for parking like the chaos so often associated with Black Friday, but Thanksgiving Day proved to be a formidable bargain-hunting opportunity day in its own right for some consumers. Over the last five years, retail experts say, more stores have opened on Thanksgiving because they find that as long as they can get employees to work, it can give them a competitive advantage. Last year, 18 million people nationwide said they shopped at stores that were open on Thanksgiving Day, according to the National Retail Federation, an industry trade group. And with poor retail sales for the last few years and a stilldragging economic recovery, some retailers saw being open as a sales boost. This holiday season, retail sales are expected to rise 2.3 percent to $447 billion. That’s up from last year, when sales grew by .4 percent, according to the National Retail Federation. Some major retailers, including Gap, Kmart, Old Navy and Sears were among those who opened some of their stores on the Thanksgiving Day holiday.

Stabilizing local neighborhoods Federal program helps low-income residents, nonprofits buy foreclosed homes By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Since July, the city of Bend has approved about 75 transactions that will help low-income residents and nonprofits purchase foreclosed homes and land as part of a federal program to prevent blight. The city, which administers the program for Central Oregon, has allocated about 75 percent of $2.3 million in funds coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, according to Jim Long, affordable housing manager for the city

On the Web For more information about the Neighborhood Stabilization Plan, visit the city of Bend’s website at www.ci.bend.or.us/ and follow the link to the program in the middle of the page.

of Bend. About $571,000 remains for use in parts of Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. To qualify, properties must be located in certain census tracts.

The transactions include 47 individual foreclosed homes and several subdivisions, including one in southeast Bend with 10 lots that sold for $250,000. One of the lots has a home on it. “We got 47 homes off the rolls of empty houses,” Long said. Some of the homes had never been lived in, he said, and some had been lived in for only a few years. Many were priced in the $120,000 to $140,000 range. “They’re almost all less than 5 years old,” Long said. See Homes / B5

A fall from affluence

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday. Station, address Per gallon • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.06 • Chevron, 1001 Railway Ave., Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.06 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . . . .$3.08 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.10 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

By Michael J. de la Merced and Peter Lattman New York Times News Service

Del Monte Foods agreed on Thursday to sell itself for $5.3 billion, including debt, to a group of private equity firms led by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts in what is the biggest leveraged buyout this year. The deal by KKR and two other firms, Vestar Capital Partners and the buyout arm of Centerview Partners, is also the latest in a streak of food-related mergers and acquisitions. The takeover of Del Monte — whose product line is now dominated by pet foods like Kibbles ’n Bits rather than fruits and vegetables — would also be among the largest consumer-goods buyouts in recent years. See Del Monte / B5

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Steve Hebert / New York Times News Service

Nick Martin, a former millionaire, checks out the young grape vines at the Highland Community College vineyard in rural Wamego, Kan. Though Martin lost a $14 million windfall to extravagant spending and the recession, he has reason to give thanks — he has landed a job at 59.

How a family went from $14M to broke in little more than a decade By Geraldine Fabrikant New York Times News Service

WAMEGO, Kan. — Grateful to have found work in this tough economy, Nick Martin teaches grape growing and winemaking each Saturday to a class of seven students in a simple metal building here at a satellite campus of Highland Community College. Then he drives 14 miles in an 11-yearold Ford Explorer to a sparsely furnished tract house that he rents for $900 a month on a dead-end street in McFarland, a smaller town. Just across the backyard is a shed that a neighbor uses to make cartridges for shooting the prairie dogs that

infest the adjacent fields. It is a far cry from the life that Martin and his family enjoyed until recently at their Adirondacks waterfront camp at Tupper Lake, N.Y. Their garage held three stylish cars, including a yellow Aston Martin; they owned three horses, one that cost $173,000; and Martin treated his wife, Kate, to a birthday weekend at the Waldorf-Astoria, with dinner at the “21” Club and a $7,000 mink coat. That luxurious world was fueled by a check Martin received in 1998 for $14 million, his share of the $600 million sale of Martin Media, an outdoor advertising business begun by his father in

California in the 1950s. After taxes, he kept about $10 million. But as so often happens to those lucky enough to realize the American dream of sudden riches, the money slipped through the Martins’ fingers faster than they ever imagined. They faced temptations to indulge, with the complexities and pressures of new wealth. And a pounding recession pummeled the value of their real estate and new financial investments, rendering their properties unaffordable. The fortune evaporated in little more than a decade. See Affluence / B5

“When people look at Chrome OS, they’re going to be like, ‘It’s just a browser, there’s nothing exciting here.’ Exactly. It’s just a browser, there’s nothing exciting here — that’s the point.” — Linus Upson, the vice president for engineering in charge of Chrome

With Google’s Chrome OS, the browser does everything By Claire Cain Miller New York Times News Service

GASOLINE

Del Monte Foods sells for $5.3B

Bend resort reviews deal to sell acreage along river to land trust

Investors push for foreclosure resolution Mortgage-backed securities holders are pushing for a resolution of a 50-state probe of foreclosure practices, according to attorneys general in Iowa and Arizona as talks with lenders and servicers expand to include investors. “The mortgage backed securities are worth pennies on the dollar, so any kind of recovery would be better,” Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard said in an interview. Owners of mortgage-backed securities are “one of the players urging a resolution,” he said. State officials have begun informal talks with some investors, Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller said. All 50 states are investigating whether banks and loan servicers used false documents and signatures to justify hundreds of thousands of foreclosures. The probe, announced Oct. 13, came after JPMorgan Chase and Ally Financial’s GMAC mortgage unit said they would stop repossessions in 23 states where courts supervise home seizures and Bank of America, the nation’s largest lender, froze foreclosures nationwide. — From wire reports

B

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — When a Google engineer gave top executives computers running the company’s new Chrome operating system, Sergey Brin, Google’s co-founder, tried to hold on to his computer running an older version. “I reached to take the old one, and he reaches to grab it,” recalled Linus Upson, the vice president for engineering in charge of Chrome. “Then he realizes, ‘I don’t need it.’ ” That is because Chrome stores everything that people have on their computers — like documents, photos and e-mail — online, or in tech parlance,

in the cloud. In Google’s vision of a world where all computers run on its Chrome OS, anyone can walk up to any computer with an Internet connection and gain access to all their information. If Brin was momentarily confused, it is no wonder that Google users and analysts are struggling to wrap their heads around what Google is trying to do with Chrome. It is all the more confusing because Google already has a Web browser named Chrome. And Google already has an operating system, called Android. Google says it will become clearer by the end of the year,

when the company will introduce to the public a lightweight netbook computer that runs Chrome. Though Google declined to give details of the device, it is expected to be manufactured by another company and branded by Google, similar to the way Google released its Nexus phone, which runs on Android. Google has high hopes for Chrome, and as the company weathers criticism for relying too much on search advertising for revenue, its executives have been describing Chrome as one of Google’s new businesses with huge potential. See Chrome / B5

A proposal to sell 26 acres of Deschutes River frontage owned by the Seventh Mountain Resort to the Trust for Public Land is under review by the resort’s Association of Unit Owners. The unit owners reviewed the preliminary proposal from the Papé Group of Eugene during a meeting Saturday at the resort, southwest of Bend. The AUO owns the 26-acre property, but the Papé Group and its subsidiary resort management company, Inspired, sent a letter of intent to the unit owners seeking to exchange its ownership in nearly half of the resort’s condominiums for the river frontage property. “The proposal was to let Inspired take over the land before it is sold, and in exchange Inspired would let the AUO take over their (Papé Group) ownership in the condos,” said Chris Otto, general manager of Seventh Mountain Resort. Here’s how the deal would work, according to Otto: The Papé Group would trade its condo properties to the AUO for the river frontage. Then the Papé Group would sell the river frontage to the Trust for Public Land, which in turn would sell the property, located east of the resort’s lodging, restaurants and aquatic area, to the U.S. Forest Service for public use. See Land / B5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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B2 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

EUROPEAN DEBT CRISIS

Merkel, Sarkozy are confident in future of euro By Melissa Eddy and Juergen Baetz The Associated Press

BERLIN — The 16-nation euro currency will survive the debt crisis, German Chancellor Angela Merkel vowed Thursday, and a senior central banker said the European Union would be willing to increase its 750 billion euro ($1 trillion) bailout fund if necessary. Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy also called for a swift conclusion of the negotiations for an Irish bailout. Axel Weber, the head of Germany’s central bank and a leading rate-setter at the European Central Bank, said Thursday that European nations would be willing to boost the emergency fund by as much as 100 billion euros ($133 billion) to fully cover the total public debt load of Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. But when Merkel and Sarkozy discussed the eurozone’s troubles on the phone Thursday evening they said the 750 billion euro emergency fund for the euro would remain unchanged until it expires in 2013, German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said in a statement. The leaders of Germany and France, the eurozone’s twin economic engines, said their governments are working “under high pressure on a joint proposal for a crisis mechanism that is to replace the current one beyond 2013,” the statement said. Merkel and Sarkozy were impressed by the austerity budget presented by the Irish government, adding they agreed that the negotiations involving the Irish government, the EU and the International Monetary Fund

“should swiftly be brought to a conclusion,” Seibert said. Amid the ongoing sovereign debt crisis in the eurozone, the 16-nation currency wallowed near two-month lows against the dollar Thursday, trading at $1.3364 — down from a recent high of $1.4244 on Nov. 4. Some analysts predicted it would drop further as other heavily indebted countries, like Portugal and Spain, risk following Greece and Ireland in needing massive bailouts. But Merkel said the euro currency will survive the debt crisis. “I’m more confident than this spring that the European Union will emerge strengthened from the current challenges,” she told business leaders in Berlin, referring to May’s 110 billion euro ($146 billion) bailout of Greece by the EU and the International Monetary Fund. She said the crisis has strengthened the eurozone, leading EU leaders to agree on new rules for a tougher growth and stability pact, and bringing into operation the 750 billion euro ($1 trillion) emergency fund. “We now have a mechanism of collective solidarity for the euro,” she said. “And we all are ready, including Germany, to say that we now need a permanent crisis mechanism to protect the euro,” Merkel added. Experts say that while rescuing Greece, Ireland or even Portugal is manageable for the EU’s emergency fund, bailing out Spain — whose economy is five times larger than any of the other three countries — would test its limits and threaten the euro’s existence.

With new shopping apps, ‘the future of online is offline’

New York Times News Service ile photo

Ankit Agarwal, chief executive of Micello, demonstrates his company’s smart phone app at a mall in Santa Clara, Calif. Indoor Maps allows users to locate items in a mall and then get walking directions to them.

Smart phones help consumers compare prices, navigate malls By Patrick May San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

Armando Franca / The Associated Press

People use ATMs Thursday in downtown Lisbon. Portugal is bracing for an increase in speculative trades against it as some investors expect it to be the next European nation to need a bailout now that Ireland is taking a massive loan to prop up its banks.

Ireland refuses to raise low corporate tax rate By Liz Alderman New York Times News Service

DUBLIN — Cut Ireland’s minimum wage? Check. Collect more in property taxes from beleaguered homeowners? Check. Raise the corporate tax rate, which could plug the gaping hole in Ireland’s tattered balance sheets even faster? Well, no. The austerity plan Ireland unveiled on Wednesday to secure a bailout from its international partners makes one thing clear: Much of the 15 billion euros (or $20 billion) in savings the government has pledged to find over the next four years will come from the welfare state and the working class. But the measures will not touch large businesses like Microsoft, Intel and Pfizer, which have created thousands of jobs and fueled exports in Ireland for years, thanks to one of the lowest corporate tax rates in Europe. Germany, France and other European countries have long complained that Ireland’s tax structure has distorted competition. Some politicians have seized on the troubles by pushing for an increase as part of a rescue package of about 85 billion euros (or $114 billion), the terms of which are still being negotiated. Some of that external pressure subsided this week as the political crisis in Ireland worsened. But if Ireland cannot meet its budget-cutting targets, or if

its troubled banks require even more financing than expected, some countries might push the issue back into the spotlight. From Ireland’s perspective, any future effort by its European partners to revive the issue would damage the country’s prospects for recovery once the banking crisis eases. “The corporate tax is one of the pillars of Ireland’s economy, because it drives exports and jobs, and creates tax revenues for the government,” said Paul Duffy, a vice president at Pfizer in Ireland, one of the biggest multinational employers here. Raising the tax could scare away companies and “would damage a recovery and our ability to repay the massive debts we’ve taken on,” he said. Critics, however, say that in addition to siphoning business from countries with higher corporate tax rates, some multinationals operating under Ireland’s tax rules use complicated schemes to move profits in and out of subsidiaries there. In some cases, that allows them to lower their effective tax rate, they say. That has opened Ireland to criticism from countries like Germany, where Chancellor Angela Merkel must justify why taxpayers should help pay for another bailout package. The argument is that Ireland could be collecting more money from the companies it has lured.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — For a growing number of shoppers this holiday season, the difference between offline and online will be no line at all. With an avalanche of new smart phone apps just in time for Black Friday, these handheld shopping tools are redefining the art of consumption, blurring the distinction between the instore experience and the virtual world of information now available in the palm of your hand. Advances in location-based technology, bar-code scanning, price-comparison apps and social-networking tools have turned the mobile device into a sweaty-palmed third channel of commerce, empowering consumers while challenging retailers to rethink the way they do business. “The future of online is offline,” said Cyriac Roeding, cofounder and CEO of Shopkick, a popular shopping app. “These apps are encouraging people to interact in brand-new ways with products and with the store itself, fundamentally changing the shopping experience.” The appetite for new apps seems voracious. A recent survey by comparison-shopping site PriceGrabber revealed that 36 percent of consumers plan to use their mobile phones for shopping-related activities this holiday season. Recession-wary consumers are embracing new tools that can instantly call up product specs, reviews, price comparisons and input from Facebook friends and Twitter followers, all while they’re standing in the aisle. And Manish Rathi, with the consumer electronics shopping site Retrevo, says its surveys show that consumers using cell phones to make purchases jumped among respondents from 10 percent in February to

Some apps to help you shop As the deal-seeking masses descend on the malls and Main Streets of America this holiday season, more of them than ever before will be using their iPhones, Androids and BlackBerry devices as shopping aids. Here’s a sampling of free shopping tools pulled from the bulging inventory of shopping-related apps:

MICELLO INDOOR MAPS Ankit Agarwal, CEO of Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Micello, says his app does for the inside of shopping centers what Google Maps has done for the world outside. It’s fairly simple — sort of an interactive map that allows you to locate products inside a mall and then get walking directions to your destination. It’s easy to use, with a clean interface that removes much of the aggravation shoppers experience as they navigate through the increasingly cluttered realm of the modern shopping center. “You’re essentially carrying the mall directory in your pocket,” said Agarwal.

SHOPKICK Co-founder and CEO Cyriac Roeding of Palo Alto, Calif.,-based Shopkick calls his app “the first program that rewards you simply for walking into a store or a mall. The biggest challenge for retailers in America is getting people in the door. So why don’t retailers reward people for visiting their stores? Now they can.” Without your having to actually buy anything, Shopkick rewards you with “kickbucks,” or redeemable credits, the moment you walk past a sensor at the door of one of its partners, which includes many large retailers. I download the app in my iPad, walk into the Best Buy at San Jose’s Santana Row shopping center, and I’m instantly rewarded with 75 kickbucks and a $2 discount on “Cardiology,” the new CD by Good Charlotte. I simply show my on-screen reward to the cashier to redeem it.

MYSHOPANION Why go holiday shopping alone when you can now bring 500 of your closest friends along with you? This smartly designed app offers users what Philippe Suchet, CEO of San Francisco-based Zappli, its maker, calls “virtual shopping buddies. Two-thirds of our largest purchases are influenced by friends and family. You find something interesting in a store, but your friends aren’t there with you, so how do you solve that?” His app, that’s how. “Looking for shoes, for example, I can now take a picture of them and broadcast that to everyone in my Facebook, Twitter or e-mail community. I can also scan the bar code or type in the name of a printer, for example, and then access reviews of it from multiple sites.” Then, he says, the user can “push” the photo or description to their Facebook site, where friends can click on it and add their two cents’ worth. This can give you much more insight into a product before you decide to buy it or not.” — By Patrick May, San Jose Mercury News

20 percent in June. “We think mobile purchasing has arrived, and it’s evolving quickly,” Rathi said. “People who walk into your store now are no longer comparing you to the next brick-and-mortar site but to everything else offline and on. Shoppers are shopping and comparing prices on a global level.” Even for those already using their iPhones and Droids as

digital tool kits, some of the new apps are downright mesmerizing as they twist and bend the way we shop. One mapping app helps you find a product in a mall and takes you to it with a virtual escort leading the way. Another locates your car in the parking lot, thanks to the photo you’d taken of it and the GPS that locked its location into your phone. One

app rewards you with a discount for stepping into a particular store, while another coaxes you to a dollar-off discount for a product in the back-row Siberia of a big-box retailer. “We call it a virtual endcap,” said CEO Mark DiPaola of CheckPoints, referring to the shelves at the end of an aisle. His app earns you rewards simply for scanning bar codes on certain items. “Even though the product may be way in the back, we feature it in your phone and make it feel like it’s right up front when you walk in to the store. At the same time, we’re making money by driving tens of thousands of users to these products, breeding new customers for the manufacturer.” With thousands of third-party shopping applications available for the iPhone — and Android and BlackBerry trying to catch up — these mobile magic tricks are presenting retailers with challenges along with benefits. If a customer can now instantly compare your price to thousands of others, and if a user’s 200 closest Facebook friends can weigh in on that pair of shoes you’re trying to sell her, the technology prompts a question: As apps continue to blur the online-offline wall, what will the store of the future look like? Anne Zybowski, an analyst at Kantar Retail, says that a few years ago “retailers spent a ton of time trying to make their online stores look and act like their physical stores. Now they’ve sort of reversed course, and the challenge is how to take that online shopping experience that’s so personalized, socially connected and heavily layered with data, and essentially bring it into a physical environment.” Major retailers like Target are experimenting with on-site “glorified kiosks where they take the online product information and reviews and bring them to life in the store,” Zybowski said. “Europe is ahead of us,” she said, “with pure online retailers who have started to open up small 3,000-square-foot stores that essentially enable you to pick up stuff you’ve ordered online, or place an online order with a clerk’s assistance.”

In Britain, tensions rise as bonus season nears By Julia Werdigier New York Times News Service

LONDON — Investment banking revenues are down and irritation at large bonuses is up, and that has bankers in London bracing for a drop in their annual payouts. A handful of senior investment bankers surveyed by DealBook said they expected the bonus total this year to be 20 to 30 percent lower than 2009. It is not only that revenue has dropped; there is also growing pressure from the government for the banks to avoid paying

large bonuses just as the deepest public spending cuts since World War II are taking effect and endangering 500,000 public sector jobs. “There is a big fear that the bonus pools are going to be quite weak because of weaker deal flow but also driven by banks that want to soften the blow from a public relations point of view,” said David Archer, associate director at Circle Square, a financial recruitment company in London. Public anger against bankers has subsided slightly since

June 2009, when protesters hung bankers in effigy and smashed windows at the Royal Bank of Scotland during the Group of 20 meeting in London. But verbal attacks have continued. In September, Vince Cable, the Liberal Democrat who serves as business secretary in Britain’s coalition government, called some bankers “spivs and gamblers,” and other lawmakers have repeatedly called on banks to be sensitive to the public’s sacrifice when handing out bonuses. To some extent, compensation for British bankers has changed

already. Many banks, including UBS, Barclays Capital and HSBC, have increased base salaries, after a one-time bonus tax last year under which banks paid a 50 percent levy on all bonuses exceeding 25,000 pounds. Banks ended up paying the government a total of 3.5 billion pounds. In addition, there is a new 50 percent income tax bracket for top earners this year that will further cut into remuneration. The government said these measures were created to raise revenue, though banks viewed them as punishment.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 B3

A N Market for muscle cars is starting to tone up

New York Times News Service photos

ABOVE: The Maybach DRS, an “electric-powered rickshaw,” would be controlled by a computer that’s connected to city’s transport infrastructure. The assignment for this year’s Design Challenge was to envision a four-passenger vehicle of less than 1,000 pounds, less than half that of the original Mazda Miata, a tiny two-seater.

By Rob Sass New York Times News Service

Prices of vintage American muscle cars peaked, along with real estate values, in early 2008 or late 2007 — the year when a 1971 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda convertible sold for an astounding $2.4 million at auction. But by 2009, prices of rowdy big-engine cars had plunged while the broader market in collectible cars underwent a comparatively mild correction. Since then, the collector car market has generally settled into two parts. Highly desirable, top-notch cars in impeccable condition — with thorough historical documentation — have no trouble finding buyers at strong prices. Cars that are questionable, or in lesser demand, are languishing. There are indications that the muscle-car market has also been firming up, based on reports of private sales and a few isolated auctions, like a Mecum Auctions sale in Indianapolis in May. An auction last weekend in Gainesville, Ga., may have verified this upturn. The Nov. 13 sale of 55 prime American vehicles — most of them made after World War II and largely consisting of muscle cars — provided a temperature reading for the market in advance of the closely watched auctions in the Phoenix area in January. The cars sold in Georgia, from a collection amassed by Milton Robson, who made a fortune in the food-service business, included some of the rarest and most desired American cars of the postwar period. Sales at the auction, conducted by RM Auctions of Blenheim, Ontario, totaled more than $9.1 million. Donnie Gould, a partner in RM, suggested that the cars’ high quality was a primary factor. He said Robson had “a stellar reputation built over 25 years for only buying the best stuff, the best colors and engine and transmission options.” Alluding to strong sales at the August auctions in California — where European sports cars did particularly well — Gould said, “We expected the trend from Monterey to continue, with people feeling better about the economy and more comfortable spending money on good-quality cars.”

LEFT: The Nissan iV got its name because it would be built of ivy, along with spider silk composite.

Hefty ideas for light vehicles By Phil Patton New York Times News Service

Each year, the auto design studios of Southern California compete in the Design Challenge in conjunction with the Los Angeles auto show. Because the entries are digitally produced — no full-size or scale models required — participants can let their imaginations run free. But for 2010, the seventh year for the challenge, the designers were put on a diet. This year’s assignment was to envision a four-passenger vehicle of less than 1,000 pounds, roughly a quarter of the weight of a Chrysler 300C and less than half that of the original Mazda Miata, a tiny two-seater. Furthermore, the vehicle would have to be — conceptually, at least — “both comfortable and safe, while delivering satisfactory driving performance, without sacrificing the styling consumers demand.” As they sought to meet this daunting challenge, the first move of most designers was to throw away the engine. Many entries featured vehicles propelled by compressed air — a mode of propulsion that may work fine for party balloons, but not one many auto engineers take seriously, given the energy required to compress

the air. This year, in addition to the usual entries from the California studios of automakers, Mercedes-Benz studios from Germany and Japan took part. The winning designs were announced last week. The four judges, three of whom head university-level design programs, selected the Cadillac Aera and the Smart 454 as co-winners. The Aera (a combination of Aero and Era) would be built around a latticework frame, like a sort of geodesic dome morphed into a car. The skin would be polymer, and the power plant would run on compressed air. The Smart entry, designed by the Mercedes-Benz studio in Germany, looked like a futuristic pod. Designed to be made of carbon fiber, it would be “knitted” by robots. Here are some of the other entries: Honda Air: Part roller coaster, part wing suit for skydiving, this entry from the Honda Advanced Design Studio in Pasadena, Calif., was said to weigh, hypothetically, less than 800 pounds. Mazda MX-0: Mazda would use electric motors for propulsion and save weight by sharply reducing the number of parts. Mazda promised

The Cadillac Aera was one of two winners of the Design Challenge, which is held in conjunction with the Los Angeles auto show. The Aera would be built on a latticework frame and run on compressed air.

nothing less than “impossible acceleration.” Maybach DRS: The MercedesBenz design center in Japan offered an “electric powered rickshaw,” for some reason wearing the name of Maybach, the company’s unsuccessful high-end brand. The Maybach DRS is a sort of huge Segway, which, the designers said, would be “controlled by an onboard computer plugged into a megacity’s transport infrastructure.” Mercedes Biome: Instead of metal or carbon fiber, the Mercedes North American design center imagined using plant material for its “biome” (bio plus

me) concept, grown from genetically engineered seeds that would contain “Mercedes-Benz DNA.” The vehicle would be powered by a system to collect energy from the sun and store it in a fluid called BioNectar 4534. Nissan iV: Nissan’s effort was also inspired by plants. Called iV, it is built of ivy, along with spider silk composite. The materials make up what Nissan designers call “organic synthetics,” a new form of manufacturing. Toyota Nori: Toyota’s Calty studio also thought botanically for a concept called Nori, like the seaweed. It “presents the idea that the body and chassis

are one as a Podular form; that is designed to be strong, light and beautiful.” Volvo Air Motion: Volvo took the idea of compressed air further, envisioning a novel infrastructure of “air replenishment sites” — huge wind turbines high in the air would gather energy to run electric motors for air compressors. The car would have a clamshell structure of carbon fiber. Compressed air may be just the right metaphor for the tone of this year’s entries: They may not have much substance, but there is a lot of airy thinking packed into small volume.

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New collectors Colin Comer, a Milwaukee dealer and author of “Million Dollar Muscle Cars” (Motorbooks, 2007), said he had seen higher muscle car prices in private sales in recent months, “with roughly three times the demand as last year for rare cars.” Comer also noted that the Robson auction was a concentrated one-day sale with no reserves, meaning the cars would be sold regardless of price. “People flew across the country to be there, not wanting to lose the opportunity to get a great car at a market price,” he said. “Of course, when there are three guys aggressively bidding on one car, the market price goes up.” Many of the best-known muscle-car collectors were there, Comer said, though more often than not first-time buyers ended up with the cars. In the past, novices often made purchases that proved less than savvy. That may no longer be the case, as more bidders take advantage of information — like previous sale prices — on the Internet. In most cases, the amounts paid at the RM sale were in line with the market or perhaps a bit stronger. While the results of the Robson sale do not necessarily signal a return to the freewheeling days of three years ago, they indicated that trends in the overall collector car market have extended to the world of muscle cars. Great cars are once again bringing significant interest, but buyers remain very picky, and strong prices for the very best cars are not yet pulling up the value of lesser examples.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Homes Continued from B1 The money comes from the second round of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, which has been funded three separate times, in the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008, in the Recovery Act of 2009 and in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, according to the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department website. Statewide, Oregon received $6.8 million, with $2.3 million for Central Oregon, from the second round authorized in the Recovery Act, according to HUD. The money provides no-interest deferred-payment loans to help low-income residents buy bank-owned foreclosed homes. They can get up to 20 percent of the purchase price or $35,000, whichever is less, according to the city’s website. To qualify, an applicant’s total household income cannot exceed 120 percent of the area’s median income, which in Deschutes County equals $75,480 for a family of four, Long said. In Crook County, the amount is $62,040 for a family of four, according to the city’s website, and in Jefferson County, $60,720. Income limits are adjusted for family size. About 11 percent of Central Oregon’s amount must be used to help residents who earn 50 percent of the median income or less. Homeowners must repay the

Del Monte Continued from B1 Private equity firms have been on a tear this year, buoyed by billions of dollars in their war chests and the bond market boom that has supplied them with cheap debt to finance their deals. Earlier this week, TPG Capital and Leonard Green & Partners announced a deal to take over J. Crew for about $3 billion. About $10 billion worth of leveraged buyouts were announced this week, the most in one week since the height of the private equity boom in the summer of 2007, according to data from Capital IQ. Still, the relatively steady stream of takeovers has topped out at about $5 billion, a far cry from the $10 billion-plus deals during the buyout boom earlier this decade. While the junk bond markets have recovered from their lows during the financial

Chrome Continued from B1 With Chrome OS, Google is stepping once again into the territory of its archrivals, Microsoft and Apple, both of which make operating systems as well as widely used desktop software like Microsoft Office and Apple iPhoto and iTunes. That software would not work on Chrome computers. Instead, Chrome users would use Google’s Web-based products, like Docs, Gmail and Picasa for word processing, e-mail and photos, or software from other companies, like Microsoft’s cloud-based Office 365. Google also plans to open a Chrome app store for software developers to dream up other Chrome tools. The Chrome browser, which is installed on 8 percent of all PCs, shares a name because the operating system is, essentially, the same thing as the browser. “When people look at Chrome OS, they’re going to be like, ‘It’s just a browser, there’s nothing exciting here,’ ” Upson said. “Exactly. It’s just a browser, there’s nothing exciting here — that’s the point.” Computers running Chrome OS will start in seconds, not minutes, and then users will see a browser through which applications and data can be used. Yet while Google imagines a Web-based future, analysts wonder whether Chrome’s time has passed — before Google netbooks even hit the market. When Google first talked about Chrome last year, netbooks — small, low-cost laptops with keyboards — were all the rage. But since then, smart phones and tablets — slate PCs with touch screens, like the iPad — have crushed that market. “When Google made their decision early on with the Chrome OS project, Android was in its

money when the home is sold, Long said, and deed restrictions prohibit them from selling in a year or so and pocketing all the profit, should it appreciate. The amount must be shared with the city and returned to the affordable housing fund, he said. The program will not provide funding to investors or rental property owners. Rules, however, allow money to be spent on vacant land, according to Long and HUD documentation. Habitat for Humanity programs in Redmond and Sisters were approved for funding for multiple lots. Central Oregon Veterans Outreach also got a commitment. Building Partners for Affordable Housing, a Bend nonprofit affiliated with the Central Oregon Builders Association, received $250,000 to buy the 10-lot subdivision in southeast Bend. The nonprofit plans to build energy-efficient homes that would sell for between $140,000 and $159,000. Separately, the city has agreed to provide $500,000 for short-term construction financing. With the project, the group expects to put construction workers back on the job. To spread the work to as many builders as possible, no contractor will be allowed to build more than three homes, according to city documents. “It’s been a good program,” Long said, referring to the entire stabilization program, “an incredibly good program.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

crisis, private equity firms are still unable to raise the money needed to strike giant leveraged buyouts. Under the terms of the deal, the buyout group will pay $19 a share for Del Monte, a 40 percent premium to the food company’s three-month average stock price. The private equity firms will also assume about $1.3 billion of Del Monte’s debt The deal is expected to close in March, although under the provisions of a so-called goshop period, the company will have until Jan. 8 to find a better offer. A deal for Del Monte represents another trip into private ownership and a return to the fold of KKR, still led by two of its founders, Henry R. Kravis and George R. Roberts. The private equity firm had sold the brand in 1990 as part of its landmark $25 billion takeover of RJR Nabisco. Del Monte passed through other ownership changes before being taken public by TPG in 1999.

infancy and the tablet market didn’t really exist,” said Ray Valdes, a research vice president at Gartner who studies Internet platforms. “Now things have changed, and I think Google is likely recalibrating its strategy and product mix to take that into account.” Google’s hugely successful Android operating system for mobile phones and tablets adds a level to the confusion. Chrome and Android are built by separate Google teams and the company says there is no conflict between the two. But its executives acknowledge they are not entirely sure how the two will coexist. “We don’t want to call the question and say this one does one thing, this one does another,” said Eric E. Schmidt, Google’s chief executive. “So far the model seems to be the Android solution is particularly optimized for things that involve touch in some form and Chrome OS appears to be for keyboard-based solutions.” But Upson said that Chrome OS would be a computing platform stretching to hand-held devices, tablets and TVs. “We are starting with laptops and we will expand in both directions,” he said. Though some people might worry about storing their private information on Google’s servers instead of their own computers, Google says Chrome is safer because security updates happen automatically and if people lose their computers, their data is inaccessible once they reset their passwords. Even if Google missed the netbook craze, it may in fact be ahead of its time in imagining a Web-based future, Gartenberg said. “Android, where everything is very applicationdependent, is a response to the things that are here today,” he said. “Chrome is preparing for a future when everything can be delivered through the Web.”

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 B5

Steve Hebert / New York Times News Service

Nick Martin, a former millionaire, goes for a walk with his son, Edward, 13, in McFarland, Kan. Edward moved with Martin to Kansas for a new job while Martin’s wife and daughter stayed in New York, where the family had poured millions into a property they purchased and later had trouble selling.

Affluence Continued from B1 While many millions of Americans have suffered through this recession with only unemployment benefits to sustain them, Martin has reason to give thanks — he has landed a job at 59, however far away. He also had assets to sell to help tide his family over. Still, Martin, a strapping man with a disarming bluntness, seemed dazed by it all. “We are basically broke,” he said. Though he faulted the conventional wisdom of investing in stocks and real estate for some of his woes, along with poor financial advice, he accepted much of the blame himself. “We spent too much,” he conceded. “I have a fourth-grader, an eighth-grader and a girl who just finished high school. I should have kept working and put the money in bonds.”

Windfall to woes Kate Martin recalled the summer night in 1998 when the family was having a spaghetti dinner at home in Paso Robles, in central California, and a bank representative called to ask where to wire the money. “It seemed like an unbelievable amount,” she said regretfully. Soon after the money arrived, the family decided to leave Paso Robles, amid some lingering tensions that Martin felt with his brother and brother-in law, who had run the business. Martin had never been in management at the billboard company, though he had been on the board and worked at Martin Brothers Winery, another family business. First, the Martins bought a house in Somerset, England, near the home of Kate Martin’s parents, and he decided to write a novel. At about the same time, they spent $250,000 on the 3.5acre camp with four structures on Tupper Lake, deep in the Adirondacks, as a summer home. They began extensive renovations at the lake, adding a stunning threestory boathouse and two other buildings. Clouds gathered quickly. Life in England turned sour when Nick Martin’s novel, “Anthony: Conniver’s Lament,” did not sell, and

Land Continued from B1 “It is very premature,” Kristin Kovalik, project manager out of the Bend office of the Trust for Public Land, said of the proposal by Papé Group. “We have had two conversations with representatives of the Seventh Mountain about 26 acres of frontage along the Deschutes River. If our conversations were to proceed, and if there were an interest among the owners to sell, we would need to have the property appraised.” She said a figure of $6 million was mentioned during a meeting with representatives of Inspired and the Papé Group, but she said that figure did not reflect the depressed market value of property in Central Oregon. While the resort currently allows public access to a trail that runs through the riverfront property, Kovalik said converting it to public ownership would ensure it remains open to public use in the future. “The $6 million figure was

the family’s living costs — school fees, taxes and even advice for filing tax returns — swelled. In 2002, fed up with England, the Martins chose a new base, Vermont, and plunked down about $650,000 for a home there, as renovations continued on the Tupper Lake property. By March 2007, the Martins were determined to move to the lake full-time. They managed their expenses for a while, but the costs mounted and mounted some more as they worked at refurbishing the Adirondack property — eventually totaling a staggering $5.3 million, Martin said. He poured another $600,000 into the Vermont property, he said. He vacillates between blaming the builders and blaming himself for letting costs get out of hand. “We should have built something quite modest,” he conceded.

A brewing storm

market for $4.9 million, then quickly slashed the price by half. Last month, the Martins got an offer for just half of the latest $2.5 million asking price. They have stopped making payments on their $1.1 million mortgage and their $53,000 in annual property taxes in the Adirondacks as well as the mortgage and taxes on their Vermont home. They cannot afford those obligations on Martin’s current salary of $51,000. Their household income is down from $250,000 four years ago. At the moment, they are working with a loan modification unit at their bank. The lender proposed a new payment of $3,550 a month, reduced from $7,400. Given his current status, Martin argued that it does not make much sense. He predicts that the house will ultimately be sold or taken over by the bank. Meanwhile, for the Christmas holidays and some of next summer, the family has found renters for the main house to help cover some of the costs.

Tensions rose in 2007 as summer came without any offers for the Vermont home. “I thought that housing was going into a tailspin,” he said. “I had the feeling that something bad was happening.” So “we started selling cars, shotguns, antique furniture, whatever,” Martin said. The Aston Martin fetched $395,000. With a big gap in his employment history, he found a job teaching English at Paul Smith’s College near his home in Tupper Lake for $14,000 a year. For an additional $7,000, he coached the school’s cross-country runners. Then came the financial crisis. The markets plunged, as did the value of the Martins’ trust. By fall 2008, with much of the family’s net worth tied up in housing, Martin faced a series of margin calls. He needed more cash in his brokerage accounts because he had been tapping into a credit line with his investments as collateral. In January 2009, he cashed in a retirement account worth roughly $91,000. The houses could not be sold quickly. Though if they had been, some of the pressure would have lifted. “To maintain those things, you have to have a pretty good cash flow,” Martin said. The family ultimately put the Adirondacks property on the

Over lunch recently at Barleycorn’s Downtown Bar and Deli in Wamego, Martin said he believed “the worst is behind us.” Perhaps. But a forced restructuring can be difficult for children and spouses even in long-standing marriages. Sometimes he and his wife took it out on each other, he said. “She bought a bunch of horses. I blamed her for the horses. I bought cars. She blamed me for the cars — and the house being too big. We had a rough time,” he acknowledged. “But I think we have gotten over that.” Until Christmas, when she plans to join him, Kate Martin continues to work as a substitute teacher with autistic children at an Adirondacks elementary school: a $12,000-a-year job she loves in a place she says she is hesitant to leave. With their younger daughter, she has moved into a smaller building on their big property. A lively woman who loves bike riding and horses, she has built a close network of friends. “What is the place in Kansas like?” she asked a reporter with some trepidation before her first visit at Thanksgiving. Nick Martin, who moved to

thrown around by Inspired, but looking at how much land values have dropped, we all knew that was not a purchase price or final offer,” Kovalik said. Seventh Mountain Resort includes 222 condo units that have generally been sold in one-sixth shares to investors who comprise the AUO. Otto said the Papé Group and Inspired have held a voting majority in the AUO by virtue of a combination of their large share of ownership and proxy voting rights in the resort and condo units. Otto noted lawsuits in years past over a $15 million resort renovation project supported by the Papé Group over the objections of some unit owners who opposed paying assessments levied to pay for the renovations. That renovation began in 2006 and the restoration of facades on 15 of the 21 condo buildings funded by assessments on unit owners is nearing completion, Otto said. Each condo building contains 13 to 20 condo units. The Papé Group funded a new registration building and im-

provements to other common facilities, such as pools, restaurants and meeting rooms. Otto said. “There is a history of lawsuits here, but that’s not what this case is about. This time, AUO members have access to website postings with all of the information,” Otto said. Otto said the AUO formed a committee to explore all the different aspects and options of the proposed property swap. Members of the AUO committee declined to comment on the proposal until a review is completed. Papé Group officials were not available for comment Wednesday. “The AUO board entered into discussions to determine if it is a viable option to swap the land for the condo interests,” Otto said. “There is a letter of intent to review to see if it makes sense.” The Trust for Public Land is working on another high-profile property with the planned purchase of the Miller Landing property, which also runs along the Deschutes River, directly across the river from McKay Park.

Period of adjustment

Kansas last April, brought the couple’s 13-year-old son, Edward, to join him in the fall. He has been counting the days until his wife and Sophia, 9, come permanently. The older daughter, Kate Martin’s from a previous marriage, has found work in Florida after finishing high school.

Lingering anger In the meantime, Nick Martin is also overseeing a 1-acre vineyard beside the Oregon Trail Road, drawing on his knowledge of the wine industry from his California days. He does what he can to lessen the family strains. “I have a temper. I have to control my temper,” he said. “I could drink like a fish, but if you have problems in your life, drinking does not help.” And he recites a quotation he holds dear: “The measure of a man is not whether he falls down, but whether he gets up again.” Still, Martin is prone to ruminate over the loss of so much money. He is furious at the banks and the bankers, who he thinks gave him bad advice, and he still sounds angry at his brother and others who decided to sell the company and who he says gave him little voice. Some of them got more than $100 million each, he said, while he got $14 million, as did his father and his sister Ann, because they were all minority shareholders. His brother-in-law David Weyrich said that if Martin had objections to the sale, he did not voice them. Kate Martin says she believes the move from California was motivated in part because he resented his brother and brother-in-law’s bigger role in the community. She also speculates that the Adirondacks estate was alluring partly as a way of keeping up. “I think he wanted to show his brother and brother-in-law that he had a big home, too,” she said over dinner recently in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Nick Martin disagreed. “We are Irish Catholics, and we thought it would be a compound for our family over generations,” he said. After the cramped rooms at their house in England, he liked the big rooms, he said. “Sometimes, things don’t work out.”

“We are purchasing the Miller Landing property for $1.8 million, and we have $55,000 left to raise,” Kovalik said. She said the Miller Property is a high priority for the Trust for Public Land because it is one of the gaps in public access to the Deschutes River Trail system. “We have to get Miller Landing done first, before we can even think about another property,” she said. The land trust has developed a “Greenprint” for property acquisition priorities, and the Seventh Mountain Resort property falls within that prioritization, Kovalik said. The Trust for Public Land only works with willing sellers, so the organization won’t pursue a purchase of the Seventh Mountain Resort property unless the unit owners support it, Kovalik said. “We are watching that situation (at the Seventh Mountain) with interest,” she said. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Please call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 SW Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500.

THURSDAY LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-

383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/. MANAGING DAY-TO-DAY PERFORMANCE: Managers and team leaders can learn skills to identify performance gaps and increase productivity; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or noncredit.cocc.edu. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG INSPIRED HOME: Learn to achieve beauty, efficiency and conservation of energy and resources in a smaller space. Registration requested by Dec. 2; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-480-7303 or bsullivan@ earthadvantage.org. REPRESENTATION, PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES: Study for the Enrolled Agent IRS exams in courses offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department. Registration required. 541-383-7270. Class continues Dec. 3; $480 plus $145 for required text available at first class; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. GREEN BUILDING TOUR AND ANNUAL MEETING: Join the High Desert Branch of Cascadia for its annual meeting, an evening of networking and a tour of The Oxford Hotel; 5-7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-410-9845. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 3 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by Polar Bear Gas and Wash; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-5393. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG GREEN HOME: Learn to optimize home sustainability through space planning, proper selection of materials and fixtures, and green building techniques. Architect Michael Klement will showcase exceptional

projects; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275 or www. earthadvantage.org/education-events. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 7 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 8 PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATOR WORKSHOP: Oregon State University Extension will conduct a pesticide prelicense workshop to assist pesticide users in preparing for the private applicator exam; $20 for the workshop, manuals available for $22.50; 8:30 a.m.-noon; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-475-7107 or http:// oregonstate.edu/dept/coarc. TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@danamics.net or 541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend.

THURSDAY Dec. 9 TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT:

Home improvement for the holidays By David Kaplan Houston Chronicle

Traditionally known as places to pick up lumber and paint, home improvement stores are becoming holiday shopping destinations. And today, the day after Thanksgiving, they’re expecting big crowds of people in search of items for decorating their homes and yards, as well as gifts for doit-yourselfers and tinkerers. Shoppers heading for places like Lowe’s and The Home Depot will join the throngs hitting stores of all kinds on the day that’s come to be known as Black Friday, because retailers count on holiday season profits to put their annual books in the black. The Home Depot, Lowe’s and other home improvement chains have widened the floor space for natural and artificial Christmas trees, lighting, yard displays, ornaments, wreaths and poinsettias. “Between 2004 and 2009 sales

of our holiday decorative items grew 217 percent, and it will grow even more this year,” said Home Depot regional vice president Tim Wilkerson. Home Depot expects to sell more than 2 million live trees this season,” Wilkerson said, noting a shift in preference from artificial to natural trees. Lowe’s, too, has a wider assortment of Christmas decorations and other holiday items. “We’ve become a destination for stocking-stuffer gifts priced under $10 and $5,” said Lowe’s spokeswoman Colleen Carbott. For example, a Black & Decker 10-piece nut driver set is under $5, she said, and a MagnoGrip magnetic wristband grip for holding nails and screws is under $10. Both The Home Depot and Lowe’s open at 5 a.m. today and feature Black Friday specials. “Home improvement stores have been selling trees and deco-

rations for a long time, but what’s different is the increased focus on the holidays and how items are more themed for the season,” said Brian Dodge, a spokesman for the Retail Industry Leaders Association, a trade group that typically represents large retail companies. “At the register small impulse items like tape measures might be marketed as stocking-stuffers,” Dodge said, “and gift cards have holiday logos. If you go to their websites you’ll see holiday wish lists.” Home improvement stores also are marketing higher-priced products like appliances as Christmas gift items. In the old days they were called “hardware” stores, Dodge said, and the change to “home improvement” reflects their evolution. “They’ve become more of a family affair, and retailers recognize the importance of offering a more diverse product assortment,” he said.

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Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@ danamics.net or 541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Dec. 7; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY

www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Dec. 22

Dec. 16 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 17 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY Dec. 23 BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

TUESDAY Dec. 28 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY

Dec. 10

SATURDAY

Dec. 30

FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

Dec. 18

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

MONDAY Dec. 13 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Dec. 20 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

FRIDAY Dec. 31 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.


L

Inside

C OREGON Fourth-generation doctor balances work, kids, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Oregon tech pioneer Winningstad takes life, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

BEND CITY COUNCIL

Merkley seeks deductions Water treatment decision on tap for breast-feeding pumps By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend city councilors are scheduled to decide Wednesday on what water treatment method they want to include as part of a proposed $73 million overhaul of its Bridge Creek infrastructure that supplies about half the municipality’s annual water supply. The city, in order to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations, must

begin treating its water by 2012 to account for micro-organisms, such as Cryptosporidium, which can cause human illness. City officials and engineering consultants have suggested two treatment options for councilors to choose from. One is to use ultraviolet lights to basically alter the DNA structure of micro-organisms so they can no longer reproduce and make people sick. See Water / C5

Should be eligible HSA expense, senator says By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

An Oregon senator has joined the fight to have breast-feeding equipment included as an eligible expense for flexible health spending accounts and considered deductible on tax returns. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Oregon, sent a letter to the Internal Revenue Service

on Tuesday urging the department to reverse a ruling stating breast pumps and supplies do not provide enough preventive health benefits to qualify as a medical care expense. “This decision by the IRS is at odds with the growing body of medical evidence showing that breast-feeding has proven health benefits for both mothers and babies,” he wrote in the letter. Merkley penned the letter with Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and nine senators have since signed on in support. In addition, 34 House members have

supported the repeal of the ruling. Mike Westling, Merkley’s press secretary, said it’s an issue the senator’s been involved with for many years. “In the (Oregon) Legislature he worked with new mothers and listened to them about their concerns, and he helped promote breast-feeding at the state level by promoting a provision that requires employers to set aside a space and time for mothers to breast-feed or pump milk at work,” Westling said. See Breast-feeding / C5

IN CONGRESS

Hot line has food, shelter options

EYES ON THE PIES

Central Oregon 211 serves those in need By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

People gather for a post-run slice of pie after completing the I Like Pie fun run and walk Thursday morning in the River Front Plaza. Many participants brought homemade pies, which were judged in a pie contest; winners received $30 gift certificates to FootZone.

Hundreds brave ice to run, walk and eat for a good cause

Runners and walkers make their way down Northwest Brooks Street toward Riverfront Plaza while participating in the I Like Pie fun run and walk Thursday morning.

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Despite freezing weather and slick, icy streets, more than 600 runners and walkers set out to complete the fourth annual I Like Pie fun run and walk in Bend on Thursday. Of course, there were unusually tempting treats waiting at the finish line: roughly 80 pies, ranging from traditional pumpkin and pecan, to a lemon tart and various cream pies, crowded onto a line of tables. Race director Dave Thomason predicted this year’s event would outpace last Know an act of kindness year’s, both in number happening in Central Oregon? of participants and Contact The Bulletin at the amount of food dguernsey@bendbulletin.com and money raised and we’ll try to spread the word. for NeighborImpact. Thomason expected more than 600 people participated in the event. FootZone organized the fun run and walk so that people could exercise on Thanksgiving, and also “to draw attention to pie, instead of turkey,” Thomason said. The run, which included 2K, 5K and 10K options, started at Brooks Street behind FootZone, and made a loop on the First Street trail in northwest Bend. Last year, participants contributed 2,850 pounds of food and $2,885, said Steve Murray, the food bank coordinator for NeighborImpact. The Central Oregon nonprofit provides a variety of services, from a food bank to rent assistance and foreclosure prevention counseling. “We really appreciate the FootZone doing this,” Murray said. Food donations are starting to ramp up

SPIRIT OF THE SEASON

Steve Mangin, left, and his son, Michael Mangin, load bags of food donated by participants in the I Like Pie fun run and walk into a small trailer Thursday morning, behind FootZone. Food and financial donations from the event will go to NeighborImpact. with the holiday season, Murray added, and NeighborImpact will likely fill every nook and cranny of its storage space.

Nonetheless, that food will eventually run out and people need help with food year-round. “The food that we’re collecting now, we’ll pretty much run this out by spring time,” Murray said. People who donated food and money to NeighborImpact — a contribution of $5 and 5 pounds of food was recommended — also brought homemade and store-bought pies, some to enter in a competition and some just to share with other runners and walkers. Winners of the pie contest, which took place during the run, received $30 gift certificates to the FootZone. Kim Ward, 21, of Bend, was the winner in the apple pie category, for her apple-cranberry pie with “crumble topping.” Ward said the recipe came from her aunt, and her family makes it every year for Thanksgiving and Christmas. “I’m glad I get to share it,” Ward said. The other winners were Laura Breit in the pumpkin pie category, Savannah Stalker in the cream pie category and Ruth Ann Clarke in the miscellaneous category, for her pecan pie. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Social service agencies are anticipating a surge in demand for emergency assistance with the arrival of cold weather and the holiday season, and are hopeful a relatively new service can help point those in need in the right direction. Launched in early 2009, Central Oregon 211 is intended to serve as a one-stop clearinghouse for information about emergency shelter, food assistance, free or discounted medical care and other social services provided by governments and charitable organizations. People needing help can call 211 to be connected to an operator who will provide information about where to go, or do their own research by visiting www.co211.info online. Matt Kinshella, spokesman for 211info.org, said the Central Oregon service is part of a broader effort to provide nonemergency information hot lines to communities around the country and across the state. In Central Oregon, three local partners — the United Way of Deschutes County, the Partnership to End Poverty, and the Family Resource Center — are responsible for identifying local agencies and organizations able to provide services to callers. Outside of Central Oregon, the program currently provides information about services in Clackamas, Lane County, Multnomah and Washington and Yamhill counties, as well as Southwest Washington. Calls are handled through a single call center in Portland, though until recently, 211info.org had planned to open call centers around the state. Kinshella said the multiple call center approach proved to not be cost-effective, but training provides the operators with a basic understanding of the geography of the different parts of the state. Interestingly, Central Oregon leads the state in online 211 inquiries. Ken Wilhelm, executive director of United Way of Deschutes County, said the number of calls to 211 normally spikes when the weather is coldest. “Typically at this time of year it’s going to be utility assistance as well as shelter information, housing information,” Wilhelm said. “Those always come with the season.” See 211 / C5

On the Web Individuals needing help can call 211 or do their own research by visiting www.co211.info online.


C2 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAN HURT IN ARMORED TRUCK ROLLOVER

Portland company makes high-tech wooden bikes By Candice Ruud The Oregonian

Diane Stevenson / Statesman-Journal

The wreckage of an overturned armored truck sits off Highway 99 after it went off the road and rolled near Monmouth on Wednesday. Police say 22-year-old Joseph Michael Pablo Jr., of Corvallis, was in the back of the truck, and was taken by helicopter to Good Samaritan Regional Hospital, where he was in critical condition. The Statesman Journal reports that the driver, 22-year-old James Russell, of Carlton, was cited on allegations of careless driving. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

First fraternity formed in 1825 The Associated Press Today is Friday, Nov. 26, the 330th day of 2010. There are 35 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Nov. 26, 1950, China entered the Korean War, launching a counteroffensive against soldiers from the United Nations, the U.S. and South Korea. ON THIS DATE In 1789, this was a day of thanksgiving set aside by President George Washington to observe the adoption of the Constitution of the United States. In 1825, the first college social fraternity, the Kappa Alpha Society, was formed at Union College in Schenectady, N.Y. In 1842, the founders of the University of Notre Dame arrived at the school’s present-day site near South Bend, Ind. In 1910, two dozen young women were killed when fire broke out at a muslin factory in Newark, N.J. In 1933, a judge in New York decided the James Joyce book “Ulysses” was not obscene and could be published in the United States. In 1943, during World War II, the HMT Rohna, a British transport ship carrying American soldiers, was hit by a German missile off Algeria; 1,138 men were killed. In 1949, India adopted a constitution as a republic within the British Commonwealth. In 1965, France launched its first satellite, sending a 92-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y pound capsule into orbit. In 1973, President Richard Nixon’s personal secretary, Rose Mary Woods, told a federal court that she’d accidentally caused part of the 18 1⁄2 -minute gap in a key Watergate tape. In 2008, teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in Mumbai, India, leaving at least 166 people dead in a rampage lasting some 60 hours. TEN YEARS AGO Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris certified George W. Bush the winner over Al Gore in the state’s presidential balloting by a 537-vote margin. Haiti held its presidential election; former president Jean-Bertrand Aristide won by a huge margin. FIVE YEARS AGO Four members of the Chicago-based aid group Christian Peacemaker Teams — an American, a Briton and two Canadians — were taken hostage in Iraq. (The American, Tom Fox, was later killed; the others were released.) Stan Berenstain, who with wife Jan wrote and illustrated the Berenstain Bear books, died in suburban Philadelphia at age 82. ONE YEAR AGO An investigation ordered by Ireland’s government found that Roman Catholic Church lead-

ers in Dublin had spent decades sheltering child-abusing priests from the law and that most fellow clerics turned a blind eye. A man stuck upside-down in a cave in Utah for more than a day died despite the efforts of dozens of rescuers. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Ellen Albertini Dow is 92. Impressionist Rich Little is 72. Singer Tina Turner is 71. Singer Jean Terrell is 66. Pop musician John McVie is 65. Actress Marianne Muellerleile is 62. Actor Scott Jacoby is 54. Actress Jamie Rose is 51. Country singer Linda Davis is 48. Blues singer-musician Bernard Allison is 45. Country singermusician Steve Grisaffe is 45. Actress Kristin Bauer is 37. Actor Peter Facinelli is 37. Actress Tammy Lynn Michaels Etheridge is 36. Actress Maia Campbell is 34. Country singer Joe Nichols is 34. Contemporary Christian musicians Anthony and Randy Armstrong (Red) are 32. Actress Jessica Bowman is 30. Pop singer Natasha Bedingfield is 29. Rock musician Ben Wysocki (The Fray) is 26. Singer Lil Fizz is 25. Singer Aubrey Collins is 23.

PORTLAND — In his Southeast Portland workshop, Ken Wheeler makes serious road, touring and mountain bikes — out of wood. Skeptical engineers and cyclists scoff at the idea, but Wheeler and his company, Renovo Hardwood Bicycles, are slowly proving them wrong. For 3½ years, he’s been rolling out his tailor-made, hollow-framed wooden bikes — the only ones of their kind, he said — converting cynics along the way. The idea of a wood bike is nothing new, but they’ve been clunky or dangerous in the past, not meant for constant pounding. Engineers have argued that because of wood’s properties, it can’t make an effective bicycle frame like metal can. But to Wheeler, wood is an ideal material for building custom bikes because of its stiffness and natural shock absorption, a bike’s two most important qualities. “It’s the smoothest ride of any bike, coupled with stiffness, which we can vary to suit the rider,” he said. “A lightweight person needs a less stiff frame than a heavy person. We can tailor to the exact body type.” It took Wheeler a year and a half to get the process down, and he acknowledges it wouldn’t be possible without computer technology. After the wood is carefully inspected, each frame is designed on a computer, then sent to a computer-controlled machine that cuts two mirrorimage halves. The two pieces are bonded together, sanded and laminated. Even the species of wood is customized. Purpleheart is stiffer and works better for heavier riders. Sapele is more flexible, better for a lighter person. “Most people who make steel

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“It’s fun to convert skeptics. It’s fun when they ride one: ‘It’s light! It’s stiff! I had no idea.’ ” — Ken Wheeler, Renovo Hardwood Bicycles in Portland bikes never have to think about this; it’s all engineered and laid out for them, but it has to enter our minds,” Wheeler said. In his office, Wheeler pulled out the third edition of “Bicycling Science,” first written in 1974 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor David Gordon Wilson. “The most used design book in the industry says you can’t make a wooden bike,” Wheeler said. Wilson argued that metals such as carbon fiber and aluminum work because their fibers are helical (think of a double helix; the fibers wrap around), so they carry a load with equal strength in all directions. But wood’s fibers are linear, so Wilson argued they can’t carry a load in the same way, that wooden bikes can be made but not effectively. He was wrong, Wheeler said. “You have to have a larger tube size and more material — enough material to carry the load.” Thicker tubes of wood also make the frames sturdier, so they withstand fatigue and pressure tests better than thinner metal frames. “It’s fun to convert skeptics,” he said. “It’s fun when they ride one: ‘It’s light! It’s stiff! I had no idea.’ ” The frames run $1,500 to $3,000 and take a few months to arrive after ordering. Customers have been annoyed by the long wait, but the pricing seems to work in Wheeler’s favor: “These are expensive bikes. When we say our bikes are smoother than other bikes, our customers have ridden all these really high-end bikes, so

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they know the difference.” “If anything, I think they’re underpriced,” said Dave Guettler, owner of Southeast Portland’s River City Bicycles and an enthusiastic woodworker who took a Renovo bike on a 50mile test ride. “If I could justify it in the least, I would buy one.” Guettler said he stocks bamboo bikes in his shop: “They’re light and responsive — not like this, though.” The company has developed a local following as cyclists discover that the wooden bikes aren’t just artistic conversation pieces. Marc Gaudin, a Renovo customer and owner of the Joinery, which sells handcrafted wood furniture in Southeast Portland, bought a Renovo bike last summer. “I thought the bike was the most beautiful bike I’ve ever seen, and it rides nicer than my $7,000 carbon-fiber bike,” Gaudin said, adding that he logged about 3,000 miles on the Renovo before he injured his neck. Wheeler, who in his former life designed and produced composite airplanes, isn’t an avid cyclist or even a woodworker; he was intrigued by the idea of reviving wood as an engineering material. In fact, the name Renovo is Latin for “I renew,” Wheeler said. “I liked the concept because we kind of renewed wood for bikes.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 C3

O O  B Coffee shop employee kills robber, police say EUGENE — Eugene police say a coffee shop employee shot a robber who died at the scene. Police say the man and an accomplice tried to rob the Dutch Bros. Coffee drive-thru about 9 p.m. Wednesday. Police Lt. Doug Mozan tells The Oregonian that a struggle apparently began after the robber forced his way inside the kiosk. The accomplice fled after the shooting. Police identify the dead man as 27-year-old Sirus Combs, of Eugene. The name of the shop employee has not been released.

Former Sen. Hatfield in D.C.-area hospital PORTLAND — A longtime top aide to former Oregon Sen. Mark Hatfield says the 88-yearold has been hospitalized for observation at a National Institutes of Health hospital unit named for him in Bethesda, Md. Gerry Frank told The Oregonian on Wednesday that Hatfield has been at the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center for several weeks. Frank declined to provide any details. The Republican Hatfield also served as Oregon’s governor, secretary of state and as a state legislator during his 46 years in elective office. He retired from the Senate in 1997.

Phone call from police lobby leads to arrest EUGENE — The young man apparently just wanted to phone his parents. But his mistake came when he made the call from the Eugene police station lobby. Police say an officer working a desk assignment Wednesday recognized the man from surveillance footage of Tuesday’s robbery of a Wells Fargo bank branch. The officer notified detectives, who arrested the man nearby. Police say 23-year-old Nathan Alan Bramlage was booked into the Lane County Jail for investigation of second-degree robbery and violating probation. Detective Ralph Burks tells the Register-Guard, “I just assume that he didn’t believe that we’d recognize him.”

Earthquake 200 miles off Coos Bay not felt COOS BAY — The National Earthquake Information Center reports a 4.6 magnitude earthquake Wednesday evening in the Pacific Ocean nearly 200 miles west-northwest of Coos Bay. Geophysicist Dale Grant says the Golden, Colo.-based center has received no reports that the quake was felt or caused any damage. He says such quakes are routine in that area, known as the Cascadia Gap. It’s part of a region known as the Juan de Fuca Plate.

Man in shootout died from smoke inhalation PORTLAND — Portland police say an autopsy shows that a man found dead after a gunfire exchange with police and a house fire died of smoke inhalation. The state medical examiner’s office determined Wednesday that 46-year-old Craig Boehler had been shot but that smoke inhalation caused his death. Police Chief Mike Reese has said Boehler fired as many as 25 shots at police from a house early Tuesday before a fire started and an officer shot into the house. Police went to the house after a 911 call from a 76-year-old man who reported that his stepson and stepdaughter were fighting and he had accidentally shot his stepson, Boehler. Reese says officers entered the home as they were being fired upon and rescued the older man’s wife and stepdaughter. The officer who fired was identified as Officer Peter McConnell, who has been placed on administrative leave. Sgt. Pete Simpson says an investigation continues. — From wire reports

Family practice Fourth-generation doctor balancing work, child-rearing By Larry Bingham The Oregonian

PORTLAND — It’s a hectic afternoon at Metropolitan Pediatrics on the edge of Southeast Portland and Clackamas County, and the newest doctor in the practice is getting busier by the minute. In Exam Room 16, a 4-yearold in brightly striped socks slips on a dressing gown and hops onto her mom’s lap to wait for an annual checkup. Out in the hallway, a boy about kindergarten age moseys toward Exam Room 15 in a straw hat with a silver sheriff’s badge on the brim. Dr. Megan Wills Kullnat — 30 years old and four months on the job — scans her laptop screen. A colored-coded system tells her who is waiting to be seen and who is with her medical assistant. In a flash, two more patients pop up on the calendar. If ever there was a person destined to enter this busy, demanding job, it’s the athletic young woman wearing a polka-dot maternity blouse and a stethoscope. Her father is a physician, as were her grandfather and great-grandfather. But as she sets out to carry on the family tradition, she hopes to keep the grueling hours in check to make room for a family of her own.

Ups and downs Despite the many rewards of being a doctor, from the money to the deep satisfaction of helping people, her parents didn’t exactly promote the profession. “We knew the ups and downs that came with it,” says her mom, Laurie Wills, a former Multnomah County public health nurse for 24 years. “It’s not a 9-to-5 job.” “I really didn’t get behind her going to medical school until after her first year,” says her father, Dr. David Wills, who has practiced family medicine in Tigard for 30 years. “Before that, I wasn’t crazy about it. It’s easy to let medicine consume your whole life. It can be intoxicating to help people ... and easy to forget you have a family, too.” Ninety years ago, when her great-grandfather graduated from one of the first classes at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine,

Michael Lloyd / The Oregonian

Dr. Megan Wills Kullnat, a pediatrician and fourth-generation physician, examines Inessa Malimon, 4, who was accompanied by her mother, Lyubov Malimon, of Portland. no doctor could expect to work four days a week or be home in time to tuck his young children into bed. In her grandfather’s day, doctors did everything from delivering babies to tending the dying. Though his practice was based in downtown Portland, he traveled wherever his services were needed, recalls her grandmother, Marjorie Irvine. Irvine’s husband joined his father and a brother in the practice after the Korean War. When the three moved their office to the then-burgeoning Hollywood District in Northeast Portland, the profession continued to become more family-friendly.

Hooked as a child Though she witnessed firsthand the long hours a doctor works — she and brother, Eric, often sat on a fire hydrant after dinner to wait for their dad to come home — the occupation hooked her as a child. “I knew he was working late because he was helping people,” she says. “I admired what he did. I saw the respect people had for him.” She decided to become a doctor after going to “take your daughter to work” day with her dad. She has always liked children and being busy — attributes tailor-made for the life of a pediatrician. In middle school, she was once involved in three sports in a single season. She made excellent grades in high school while cheering for the football team, playing junior varsity soccer, serving as junior class president, acting in plays and volunteering at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and Legacy Emanuel Medical Center.

The teen, who worked as a lifeguard at the Dishman pool, became an EMT as a college student. Busy as she was, she found time to baby-sit even after she moved back in with her parents to attend OHSU’s School of Medicine. At OHSU, where the three generations of doctors before her studied, she met Jon Kullnat, who became her husband.

‘Family is forever’ At one time, she considered an intense field such as pediatric cardiology. Then she thought of other things she wanted from the job, such as long-lasting relationships with patients and their parents, and her dad’s advice. “Patients come and go,” he said, “but your family is forever.” She decided becoming a pediatrician would be intense enough. On this Friday, she makes rounds at the hospitals affiliated with her clinic, checking in on two babies born during the night, before she goes into the office. She sees nine patients by midafternoon, treating standard complaints — coughs, colds, pink eye and constipation. At the end of this workday, the new doctor with a daughter at home — and another child due Christmas Day — stays 30 minutes late so she won’t have to take her notes home. She lives in Northeast Portland, a few blocks from the house where she grew up and her parents still live, and she gets home in time to bathe 19month-old Madeline and put her to bed. Only twice in four months on the job has the new doctor gotten home past her daughter’s 7:30 p.m. bedtime. That’s pretty good, she thinks.

Woman’s long-lost birth certificate found By Paul Fattig Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — The long-missing birth certificate of Medford resident Vanessa Driskell, who has spent the past four years trying to obtain the document to prove her U.S. citizenship, has finally been located. It was found in a warehouse in Illinois where the U.S. Air Force had stored it and other documents after it evacuated Clark Air Base in the Philippines when Mount Pinatubo erupted there on June 15, 1991. Driskell was born on the base, where her father was stationed at the time. Finding the document means that Driskell, 21, can now obtain a driver’s license, cash a check without a hassle and apply for a passport so she can live her dream of traveling abroad. “It’s going to be a very special Thanksgiving, the most special I have ever had,” said the 2007 graduate of Rogue River High School. “This makes me feel ecstatic. I’m very relieved,” she said. A spokesman for U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said Tuesday morning that Driskell will have her certificate soon. “The paperwork she needs to put her life back together will be mailed to us this week. Vanessa should have it middle to end of next week,” said Tom Towslee, Wyden’s communications director in Oregon. Since the Mail Tribune ran an article about Driskell’s plight on

Feb. 10, Wyden’s staff has been working with various agencies to try to find the missing document. “The documents are coming to us from the National Archives in St. Louis,” he said. “We had contacted them about this case. To their credit, they began an extensive search. They found it in a box in a warehouse in Illinois that was part of the base closure file.” Towslee, who didn’t know where the warehouse was located in Illinois, credited Wyden staffer Chris Maier with pursuing the case until it was solved. Maier had worked with several agencies, he said. “This thing has been sitting there collecting dust all this time,” he said, adding the staff at the National Archives was just as determined to find the document as Wyden’s crew. “It makes us feel good,” he said. “You always want to be able to solve people’s problems. This was not just case work. It was a personal victory for us as well as for her.” Driskell was born Sept. 9, 1989, on Clark Air Base in the Philippines to Kevin Driskell and Socorra Gonzalez, both U.S. citizens married to each other. Her father was a military police officer on the base. When the volcano erupted in the late spring of 1991, it killed 800 people and left an estimated 100,000 homeless. The 18,000 U.S. military personnel and

their families at the base were transported to the U.S. Navy base at Subic Bay. Most, including her parents, would return to the states. None of her three siblings, all born in the states while their father was in the service, ever encountered any documentation problems. Their parents, who met while in high school in Happy Camp, Calif, have since divorced. He lives in the Rogue River area; their mother in Chico, Calif. However, Vanessa Driskell said her citizenship was never an issue until she turned 16 and wanted to get her driver’s license. She lacked the identification needed by the state to process a license, she said. Over the next few years, she contacted federal officials from immigration to the State Department to find the documentation, all to no avail. Now, thanks to Wyden’s office and the National Archives staff, her problem is solved. In addition to her birth certificate, officials found the application made by her parents for a consular record for a birth abroad, she said. “Now I’m going to get my ID and start a bank account,” she said. “I’m also going to learn how to drive and get a driver’s license. “I never learned how because I couldn’t get a license,” she added. “My parents want to teach me — and so do my brothers.”

Oregon 5th in nation for painkiller abuse PORTLAND — Oregon ranks fifth nationally for prescription painkiller abuse and has the highest rate in the country among 18- to 25year-olds, according to federal officials. Those figures were among the numbers presented at a drug abuse prevention summit in Portland on Monday that brought together state and federal officials, physicians, pharmacists and law enforcement, The Oregonian reported. In 16 states and the District of Columbia, data from 2007 showed there were more deaths and injuries from drugs than motor vehicle accidents, said Tom Condon of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. A 2009 national survey of drug abuse indicated prescription drugs outpaced marijuana in 2008 and 2009 as the first drug used by people 12 and older. The majority of those users obtained the prescription pills from somebody they knew. “This says we sure are in the middle of an epidemic,” Condon said, speaking to a group that included Gov. Ted Kulongoski, Oregon Attorney General John Kroger and U.S. Attorney Dwight Holton, who organized the meeting. The national survey found it’s mostly dentists who are prescribing painkillers to 15-

to 19-year-olds, an age group that has not fully developed the part of their brain that regulates inhibitory control, Condon said. A prescription drug monitoring program approved by Oregon lawmakers last session is scheduled to begin operating in April. The program will be Webbased and available to physicians and pharmacists to determine who is prescribing and dispensing drugs, and how much patients receive. The information will be updated once a week, and contain a three-year prescription history on patients. Law enforcement will have access to the database only by court order, which concerned Kroger. He said his Medicaid fraud investigative unit would like to use the data to determine how much prescription drug abuse is being financed by Medicaid. He also pointed out there’s nothing in the state law that requires those with access to the data to inform law enforcement authorities if they spot someone doctor-shopping for pills. “I just don’t feel like our statute is set up to help us,” Kroger said.

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Monday, December 20, 2010 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationallyrecognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

Advertising space reservation deadline is Monday, December 6, 2010 CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ____________________________________________ Contact Person ____________________________________________________ Phone________________________E-mail ______________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________


C4 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Let nonprofit keep its cabins

O

utward Bound, which takes kids on wilderness expeditions, knows a thing or two about roughing it in harsh conditions. But these days, we suspect, no grizzly bear

or flash flood could strike as much fear into the nonprofit’s heart as the bundle of red tape that has ensnared its training facility near

Redmond. For many years, Outward Bound has operated a training facility on a 46-acre parcel next to the Deschutes River. Among the structures arrayed on the property are 13 tent platforms approved more than two decades ago. For many years, these platforms were topped with tents, erected in the spring and removed in the fall, which instructors used to store their equipment and sometimes themselves. This spring, Outward Bound began to build small cabins on the platforms, which it intends to use as it had used the tents. Unfortunately, it failed to secure the necessary permits before grabbing for the hammers and has been stuck in bureaucratic flypaper since April, when the owner of a neighboring property blew the whistle on its platform upgrades. Now, it may have to remove half of its new cabins, which are located within a zone created to protect a nearby eagle nesting site. The restricted area, by the way, was adopted after Outward Bound developed its property. If the response to Outward Bound’s actions seems more or less reasonable so far, buckle up your brain and prepare to drop into a bureaucratic rabbit hole. Cabingate eventually found its way before a county hearings officer, who decided that “permanent cabins will not have any greater effect on the eagles’ nesting activities than seasonal canvas tents, and may in fact have less effect than the tents because of the lack of activity associated with putting up and taking down the tents.” In other words, the eagles using the nearby nest might actually be better off with the cabins than with the tents. Nevertheless, the six or so cabins within the special eagle-protection zone have to go. That’s because, as the hearings officer wrote, the zone prohibits “additional structural development,” an “ambiguous” phrase that could arguably describe the replacement of canvas with wood. Forget about the fact that the “additional structural development” is no worse for the eagles than the flimsy tents the cabins have replaced — and could actually be better. The cabins still have to go. As bizarre as this result might be, the saga gets even stranger, thanks to a double standard buried in the regulatory tangle created to protect the nesting site. Steven Hultberg, a lawyer representing Outward Bound, noted in response to the hearings officer’s ruling that a number of houses have been built within the eagle-protection zone, some of which are even closer to the supposedly sensitive nesting site than any of Outward Bound’s contested cabins. “If a property owner in closer proximity to the nest can double the size of its house, build a new garage and ac-

While it’s easy to understand the origin of the double standard, the end result is still absurd. It’s beyond silly to decry the effect of Outward Bound’s cabins on a nesting site when houses are popping up even closer to the supposedly threatened birds. cessory structures,” wrote Hultberg, then “at a bare minimum” his group “should be permitted to replace tent structures with modest sheds on existing platforms.” He’s got a point. In fact, he told us this week, the largest of these houses in closer proximity to the nest (7,300 square feet, including garage, etc.) dwarfs the combined area of all of the nonprofit’s sheds, which is about 1,000 square feet. Outward Bound’s frustration is even easier to understand when you consider, as confirmed by county Senior Planner Paul Blikstad, that the houses within the protective zone that are closer to the nesting site were built after the organization set up its platforms. This inconsistency is the result of zoning, Blikstad explained. The land on which homes have been built is zoned for that purpose, while Outward Bound’s land is zoned for farming. In writing up its regulations, he says, the county had to balance the protection of property rights with the protection of the eagles’ nesting site. If the county had barred the construction of homes on lots zoned for that purpose, says Blikstad, “that could have been considered a taking.” While it’s easy to understand the origin of the double standard, the end result is still absurd. It’s beyond silly to decry the effect of Outward Bound’s cabins on a nesting site when houses are popping up even closer to the supposedly threatened birds. The County Commission has been asked to bring some common sense to bear on the situation. It should, which means doing what’s best for both Outward Bound and the eagles. The commission should allow the cabins to remain where they are.

U.S. needs less texting, more studying

F

or me, the most frightening news in The New York Times on Sunday was not about North Korea’s stepping up its nuclear program, but an article about how U.S. kids are stepping up their use of digital devices: “Allison Miller, 14, sends and receives 27,000 texts in a month, her fingers clicking at a blistering pace as she carries on as many as seven text conversations at a time. She texts between classes, at the moment soccer practice ends, while being driven to and from school and, often, while studying. But this proficiency comes at a cost: She blames multitasking for the three B’s on her recent progress report. ‘I’ll be reading a book for homework and I’ll get a text message and pause my reading and put down the book, pick up the phone to reply to the text message, and then 20 minutes later realize, ‘Oh, I forgot to do my homework.’ ” I don’t want to pick on Miller. I highlight her words only because they’re integral to a much larger point: Our unemployment today is not only because of the financial crisis. There are some deeper problems. If we’re going to get more Americans back to work, we will need more stimulus from the USG — the U.S. government — from the top down. But we will also need more stimulus from the PTAs — the Parent Teacher Associations — from the bottom up. The deeper problems fostering unemployment in America today can be summarized in three paragraphs: Global competition is stiffer. Just think about two of our most elite colleges. When Harvard and Yale were all male, applicants had to compete only against a pool of white males to get in. But when Harvard and Yale admitted women and more minorities, white males had to step up their game. But when the Cold War ended, globalization took hold. As Harvard and Yale started to admit

THOMAS FRIEDMAN more Chinese, Indians, Singaporeans, Poles and Vietnamese, both American men and women had to step up their games to get in. And as the education systems of China, India, Singapore, Poland and Vietnam continue to improve, and more of their cream rises to the top and more of their young people apply to Ivy League schools, it is only going to get more competitive for American men and women at every school. Then, just as the world was getting flattened by globalization, technology went on a rampage — destroying more low-end jobs and creating more high-end jobs faster than ever. What computers, hand-held devices, wireless technology and robots do in aggregate is empower better-educated and higherskilled workers to be more productive — so they can raise their incomes — while eliminating many lower-skilled service and factory jobs altogether. Now the best-educated workers, capable of doing the critical thinking that machines can’t do, get richer while the least-educated get pink slips. (We used to have a receptionist at our office. She was replaced by a micro-chip. We got voice mail.) Finally, just when globalization and technology were making the value of higher education greater than ever, and the price for lacking it more punishing than ever, America started slipping behind its peers in high school graduation rates, college graduation and global test scores in math and critical thinking. As Education Secretary Arne Duncan put it to me in an interview, 50 years ago if you dropped out, you could get a job in the stockyards or steel mill and

still “own your own home and support your family.” Today, there are no such good jobs for high school dropouts. “They’re gone,” said Duncan. “That’s what we haven’t adjusted to.” When kids drop out today, “they’re condemned to poverty and social failure.” There are barely any jobs left for someone with only a high school diploma, and that’s only valuable today if it has truly prepared you to go on to higher education without remediation — the only ticket to a decent job. Beyond the recession, this triple whammy is one of the main reasons that middle-class wages have been stagnating. To overcome that, we need to enlist both the USG and the PTA. We need teachers and principals who are paid better for better performance, but also valued for their long hours and dedication to students and learning. We need better parents ready to hold their kids to higher standards of academic achievement. We need better students who come to school ready to learn, not to text. And to support all of this, we need an all-society effort — from the White House to the classroom to the living room — to nurture a culture of achievement and excellence. If you want to know who’s doing the parenting part right, start with immigrants, who know that learning is the way up. Last week, the 32 winners of Rhodes Scholarships for 2011 were announced — America’s top college grads. Here are half the names on that list: Mark Jia, Aakash Shah, Zujaja Tauqeer, Tracy Yang, William Zeng, Daniel Lage, Ye Jin Kang, Baltazar Zavala, Esther Uduehi, Prerna Nadathur, Priya Sury, Anna Alekeyeva, Fatima Sabar, Renugan Raidoo, Jennifer Lai, Varun Sivaram. Do you see a pattern? Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Kids don’t use snow-covered roads the way they used to I JANET f there’s a Great Commandment for winter driving, it’s this: If you cause a wreck, you were going too fast. I was reminded of that Tuesday, when, caught without my snow tires on, I nearly slid into a roundabout and a car. And yes, though my speed was slow I was clearly going too fast. The city of Bend handles snow and ice pretty well, when you think of it. Even during times of tight budgets, major streets generally are plowed, sanded or de-iced in timely fashion, though side streets may be left untouched. That’s understandable: The city has miles and miles of paved roads, and grooming them all no doubt would be prohibitively expensive. In that respect — take care of the most heavily used roads first — not much has changed here over the years. I grew up in a house at the corner of

Northwest Seventh Street and Trenton Avenue, at the time just a block or so from the edge of town. There were no West Hills, no College Way, no Summit Drive in those days; in fact, city streets extended about one block south and one block west of my home. Moreover, most of the streets in the neighborhood were unpaved in the early 1950s. The city did not plow Northwest Fifth Street/Trenton Avenue, then the main road up the hill, above Portland Avenue, and with good reason. There simply weren’t enough people living on Awbrey Butte to justify the time and expense it would take to do so. Moreover, kids living in the neighborhood all walked to school, so making roads passable for school buses wasn’t an issue. There was no bus service, and moms did not routinely drive their offspring to class.

STEVENS

Still, our fathers had to get to work every day — I don’t recall a single mother in the neighborhood who worked outside the home — and I can tell you from personal experience that driving down Trenton/Fifth in winter could be one scary proposition. The result was that once Dad and the others got down the hill that first snowy morning of a storm, they didn’t drive up again until conditions improved. Instead, they parked at the bottom of the hill and walked up. I assume they brought groceries with them if

the need arose. If snowy roads were tough on dads in those days, they were a delight for children in the neighborhood. Well into my high school years in the 1960s, the city used to block off some streets for sledding. On the east side, Norton Avenue above Eighth was a sledding route, and there were others scattered around town. Barriers at the bottom and at cross streets were all it took to create mini recreation areas that were used by kids of all ages. In fact, I can recall an evening spent watching longingly as high schoolers sledded down the street that ran by our house. I was too young to join them, but I took vicarious pleasure from their enjoyment of nighttime sledding under streetlights. Nowadays no city official in his or her right mind would suggest doing some-

thing similar. In these contentious times the liability is simply too great, for one thing. And with so many more of us living here assuring a safe route carved out of city streets might be impossible in any event. That’s a loss for children, however. Free winter recreation right out the front door now is more limited than it used to be, and its lack gives children yet another reason to plop themselves in front of the television set or computer rather than doing something spontaneous and physical. If we have the cold, wet winter the forecasters promise, I’m sure we’ll be sick of snow by spring. Not now, though. Now, my car properly clad in snow tires, I’m still willing to enjoy — at slow speed — the white stuff while it lasts.

Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 C5

O Oregon technology pioneer D

N   Winningstad takes life at 85 Almeda (Richardson) Smith, of La Pine July 13, 1921 - Nov. 20, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Services are pending. Contributions may be made to:

Newberry Hospice, 51681 Huntington Rd. La Pine, OR 97739-9626

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Water Continued from C1 The other is to use a membrane filtration system that in essence would act like a strainer, taking out the micro-organisms and other debris. The city’s preferred option is to use the membrane system, which is more expensive, because it can filter out debris and still treat for harmful micro-organisms should a wildfire occur in the Bridge Creek watershed. With the UV system, city officials have said a wildfire would make treatment impossible because the water would be too murky for the lights to penetrate and debris couldn’t be filtered out. This would result in shutting off the system. Estimated costs for a membrane filtration treatment plant are around $30 million, while a UV system would run about $25 million. In addition to choosing one of these treatment options, the city will replace about 10 miles of aging pipelines that bring water from Bridge Creek, which is west of Bend near Tumalo Falls, to a facility about two miles west of the city off Skyliners Road before it’s diverted into town. This new pipeline is estimated to cost about $28 million. The city is also exploring the possibility of adding a $13 million hydropower plant to the system to generate energy

211 Continued from C1 Requests for season-specific services like free Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners and Christmas presents drive the call volume up further during the holidays, Wilhelm said. Wilhelm said local partners pay roughly $5,000 a month to allow access to the 211 service for Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson county residents. He said it’s difficult to know how many people who call 211 would have been able to find an agency that could help on their own. Evidence of how well it’s working is largely anecdotal, based on

The Associated Press NEWPORT — C. Norman “Norm” Winningstad, a computer entrepreneur and philanthropist considered to be Oregon’s “grandfather of technology,” died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his Newport home, police said Thursday. He was 85. Winningstad, who had been ill, died Wednesday of the wound, Newport police Lt. Dave Teem told The Associated Press. Winningstad started the computing company Floating Point Systems of Beaverton and was a co-founder of high-tech firms Lattice Semiconductor Corp. and ThrustMaster, a company that makes joysticks. He and his wife, Dolores, were major donors to arts and education in the state. The Dolores Winningstad Theater at the Portland Center for the Performing Arts is named for her. “Norm used his business skills and technical knowledge to successfully plant the seedlings for what we now call the Silicon Forest,” Gov. Ted Kulongoski said in a statement. “Norm will be forever remembered as the grandfather of technology here in Oregon

Breast-feeding Continued from C1 Merkley was also instrumental in adding a similar provision in the health care reforms passed this year; now, companies with hourly employees nationwide must offer break time and a private area to pump breast milk. The breast-feeding supplies weren’t allowed under old regulations, but other changes to flexible health spending accounts also go into effect in January, including the removal of many

If You Go What: Bend City Council meeting When: 5 p.m. work session, 7 p.m regular meeting Wednesday Where: Bend City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend

and his contributions and legacy will be realized for generations.” Raised in California, Winningstad graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1948 with an electrical engineering degree. “I graduated an expert in vacuum tubes, and that’s the year Bell Labs announced the transistor,” Winningstad told The Oregonian in 2007. “I graduated technically obsolete.” After several years at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, he moved to Oregon in 1958 to work for electronic instruments manufacturer Tektronix and became one of its chief innovators. An avid helicopter pilot who once owned four Ferraris, Winningstad “was more flamboyant than the Tektronix type,” Chuck Frost, Tek’s former vice president of administration, told the newspaper. “It fit him well. It didn’t look bad on him.” In 1970, he started supercomputing company Floating Point Systems. A decade later he helped launch Lattice Semiconductor, which remains one of Oregon’s largest tech companies, and in 1990 helped start joystick

manufacturer Thrustmaster. Carla Perry, who helped write Winningstad’s book, “Area of Enlightenment: Don’t Confuse Me With the Facts; I’ve Already Made Up My Mind,” told The Oregonian he “happened to have a great brain and became an electrical engineer at a time when electrical engineering was changing.” Perry said Winningstad had recently undergone spinal surgery. “I know he was in a lot of pain,” she said. The Winningstads moved to Newport in 1989 and kept a house near Portland. Winningstad would fly his helicopter back and forth. Teem said Winningstad was known in Newport as a friendly man active in the community who frequently could be found walking his two bulldogs. “We’d run into each other and sit and chat,” Teem said. “He was just a really nice guy.” When Winningstad’s wife stepped out to get the mail just before noon Wednesday, she returned to find he had locked himself in a bathroom, Teem said. She called police, who found him dead.

types of over-the-counter medicine from the list of reimbursable expenses. Westling said leaving out breast-feeding equipment simply doesn’t make sense. “It’s almost odd that it doesn’t include this equipment,” he said. “You can spend it on denture cream, or another example, I believe, is artificial turf (to replace grass for allergy and asthma sufferers). That’s all fine and there’s nothing wrong with those things. But if those are included then absolutely something like equipment for breast-feeding, which

is scientifically proven to benefit the health of both mother and infant (should be included).” In Merkley’s letter, he pointed to research showing breast-fed children have lower rates of various illnesses and infections. “This is one of those things with bureaucracy in Washington where things can fall through the cracks if we don’t make someone aware of the issue,” Westling said.

Frank Fenner dies at 95; tracked end of smallpox By William Grimes New York Times News Service

from the water rushing downhill from Bridge Creek to Bend. It was initially estimated this could generate up to $1.7 million in revenue in the first year of operation, but that number has since been revised to $700,000. City Manager Eric King said councilors likely won’t decide whether to include the hydropower plant as part of the overall project until sometime in January or February when a more detailed analysis of the project costs and rate impacts will be available. Depending on what councilors decide Wednesday and in the future for the Bridge Creek overhaul, ratepayers could see their monthly bills increase between 37.5 and 45.5 percent over the next five years, according to the most recent city estimates. Those increases would be added to water rate hikes over the past three years, including a 7.1 percent increase in July, that were approved to help the city set money aside for the project. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

reports from clients who tell him the service has provided them with useful information. Kinshella related one such anecdotal report, describing Bend residents who are receiving dental services from a clinic in Woodburn that caters to the low-income and uninsured people. Without the 211 service, it is unlikely they would have discovered the clinic on their own. With many service providers facing tight budgets due to heightened demand and flat or diminished giving, the 211 service can help direct those seeking assistance away from providers unable to help. A food bank that is temporarily out of food could contact the service, Wil-

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Frank Fenner, an Australian scientist who played an important role in the World Health Organization’s decadelong campaign to eradicate smallpox and who made the official announcement, in 1980, that the disease had been conquered once and for all, died Monday in Canberra. He was 95. His death was announced on the website of the Australian National University Fenner, a virologist and microbiologist who developed an interest in viruses while doing research on malaria during World War II, became a national hero in Australia in the early 1950s, when he helped direct a program to control the spread of the country’s 600 million feral rabbits, which were nibbling their way through the country’s pastureland. A pilot study to release the myxoma virus, shown to kill more than 99 percent of rabbits not previously exposed to it, caused public alarm when, by coincidence, mosquitoes began spreading encephalitis as well as myxomatosis. To reassure Australians that the myxoma virus would not infect humans, Fenner and two fellow researchers inject-

helm said, and alert operators to send people elsewhere until it is able to restock. “It’s not a perfected system, but now we have that capability, and we’re trying to perfect it,” he said. “We’re trying to reduce the amount of false hope and wild goose chases.”

ed themselves with samples potent enough to kill 1,000 rabbits. They survived and, with panic averted, the government initiated a pest-control campaign using the myxoma virus. The rabbit population shrank to 100 million, although the rabbits developed resistance to the virus over time and by the early 1990s had rebounded to more than 200 million. In 1969, after doing research on pox viruses, including the variola virus, which causes smallpox, Fenner began advising the WHO on its campaign to eliminate smallpox. The initiative had begun in 1967, a year in which the disease was reported in 42 countries and killed 2 million people. The WHO organized a campaign of mass vaccinations that evolved into a more focused approach: Infected patients were quarantined, and vaccinations were administered to those with whom they might have had contact. In 1977, Fenner was named the chairman of the Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication. As the campaign neared its goal, he was able to demonstrate that there were no animal carriers of the disease left, an important step in declaring victory over the disease.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Questions About Meth? www.methaction.org

541-388-4418


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 26

SATURDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

41

24

Western

Warm Springs 41/32

34/32

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

41/27

Camp Sherman 33/22 Redmond Prineville 38/25 Cascadia 40/26 37/36 Sisters 36/24 Bend Post 41/24

35/34

26/13

Rain, with snow above 3,000 feet today. Rain and snow tonight. Central

40/31 39/30

Oakridge Elk Lake

36/26

34/26



33/29

33/26

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

35/22

35/21

36/23

36/21

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

34/20

Fort Rock

Vancouver 39/37

33/22

Chemult 34/19

Seattle 43/39

47/40

Crater Lake

27/15

34/23

Grants Pass 42/35

Idaho Falls Elko

54/35

37/24





San Francisco

Mostly cloudy skies today. Snow developing late tonight.

32/23

Helena Boise

41/24

Redding

35/24

26/18



Bend

57/47

20/4

20/11



Reno

43/29



Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:14 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:30 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:16 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:30 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:50 p.m. Moonset today . . . 11:21 a.m.

Salt Lake City 27/19

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Last

New

Nov. 28 Dec. 5

First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Full

Dec. 13 Dec. 21

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 43/30/0.00 . . . . . . 49/39/r. . . . . . 46/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 19/-4/trace . . . . . . 30/18/c. . . . . . 34/24/sn Brookings . . . . . . 50/34/0.00 . . . . . 53/43/sh. . . . . . 50/40/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . .24/-4/0.00 . . . . . .31/23/rs. . . . . . 34/24/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 45/28/0.00 . . . . . . 47/40/r. . . . . . 45/36/sh Klamath Falls . . . 24/21/0.00 . . . . . . 37/25/c. . . . . . 35/21/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . .21/-8/0.00 . . . . . 33/23/pc. . . . . . 32/19/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . . 40/2/0.00 . . . . . 36/21/sn. . . . . . 34/20/sn Medford . . . . . . . 44/22/0.00 . . . . . . 46/35/r. . . . . . 45/34/rs Newport . . . . . . . 48/36/0.00 . . . . . . 50/47/r. . . . . . 49/46/sh North Bend . . . . . 46/30/0.00 . . . . . . 51/42/r. . . . . . 47/38/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . . 27/8/0.00 . . . . . 33/24/pc. . . . . . 37/29/rs Pendleton . . . . . . .21/3/trace . . . . . . 34/27/c. . . . . . 36/26/rs Portland . . . . . . .40/30/trace . . . . . . 44/39/r. . . . . . 44/36/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 34/14/0.00 . . . . . 40/26/sn. . . . . . 36/21/rs Redmond. . . . . . . .37/8/trace . . . . . . 40/26/c. . . . . . 36/22/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 45/28/0.00 . . . . . 47/39/sh. . . . . . 45/35/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 43/31/0.00 . . . . . . 46/39/r. . . . . . 45/36/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . . 38/5/0.00 . . . . . .36/24/rs. . . . . . 36/23/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 29/21/0.00 . . . . . . 32/31/c. . . . . . 38/29/rs

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37/20 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 in 1954 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -6 in 1993 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.16” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.52” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 9.65” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.17 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.98 in 1960 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .9:10 a.m. . . . . . .5:35 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:07 a.m. . . . . . .2:50 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:44 a.m. . . . . . .5:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .1:29 p.m. . . . . . .1:08 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:47 a.m. . . . . . .2:24 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:32 p.m. . . . . . .1:25 a.m.

0

LOW

41 23

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy.

38 17

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

Missoula

Eugene

Mostly cloudy skies today. Cloudy with a chance of snow tonight. Eastern





Portland

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

Calgary 33/12

37/23

29/15

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 50° Brookings • -8° Lakeview

Partly cloudy.

35 12

BEND ALMANAC

44/39

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

36/22

Brothers

Sunriver

LOW

37 15

NORTHWEST

Paulina

36/23

HIGH

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

A storm system just off the coast will result in rain in the west and snow northeast.

STATE

MONDAY

Cloudy, chance showers.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance mixed showers.

HIGH

SUNDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-40 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 46 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 58-60 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 3 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

. . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . 45-90 . . . . . . . . 29 . . . . . . 50-70 . . . . . . . 6-18 . . . . . . 10-14 . . . . . . 20-25

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 39/37

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 33/12

S

Saskatoon 25/10

Seattle 43/39

S Winnipeg 18/6

S

S

Thunder Bay 23/9

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 32/24

Halifax 42/33 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 45/27 31/18 35/27 St. Paul Green Bay 44/39 contiguous states): Boston 21/13 21/14 Boise 47/33 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 34/23 35/29 New York 36/17 • 94° 33/26 54/33 Des Moines McAllen, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 36/22 Chicago 44/24 35/23 55/32 32/22 • -23° Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 39/22 56/49 Bryce Canyon, Utah City 56/31 Las Denver Louisville 27/19 Kansas City Vegas • 4.23” 50/25 38/27 45/28 St. Louis 50/36 Charlotte Carmi, Ill. 40/29 64/30 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 44/21 69/45 51/27 42/29 50/29 Phoenix Atlanta 65/41 Honolulu 55/30 Birmingham 84/70 Dallas Tijuana 48/29 55/30 65/47 New Orleans 58/39 Orlando Houston 83/62 Chihuahua 55/33 67/35 Miami 81/68 Monterrey La Paz 69/42 80/50 Mazatlan Anchorage 86/60 21/8 Juneau 32/23 Bismarck 21/8

FRONTS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .65/35/0.00 . . .54/28/s . . . 64/37/s Akron . . . . . . . . .54/37/1.42 . 34/23/pc . . 37/25/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .33/21/0.00 . .43/26/sh . . .42/27/rs Albuquerque. . . .37/26/0.02 . . .44/21/s . . . 52/27/s Anchorage . . . . .35/31/0.34 . . .21/8/pc . . . 22/15/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .73/58/0.00 . .55/30/sh . . . 58/37/s Atlantic City . . . .51/39/0.01 . .59/34/sh . . . 44/36/s Austin . . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . .58/28/s . . . 64/36/s Baltimore . . . . . .48/40/0.04 . .55/29/sh . . . 47/30/s Billings. . . . . . . . . .21/5/0.00 . 31/18/pc . . 34/19/sn Birmingham . . . .75/61/0.29 . .48/29/sh . . . 56/28/s Bismarck . . . . . . . 13/-7/0.00 . . .21/8/pc . . 28/12/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .23/7/0.00 . . .34/23/c . . .38/28/rs Boston. . . . . . . . .41/31/0.00 . .47/33/sh . . 46/34/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .44/36/0.04 . .52/33/sh . . 46/33/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .43/31/0.05 . .35/29/sn . . 37/29/sn Burlington, VT. . .28/18/0.00 . .41/27/sn . . . 36/24/c Caribou, ME . . . .30/24/0.00 . .34/20/sn . . 31/14/sn Charleston, SC . .81/54/0.00 . .76/45/sh . . . 63/42/s Charlotte. . . . . . .58/46/0.05 . .64/30/sh . . . 57/31/s Chattanooga. . . .74/59/0.00 . .49/29/sh . . . 49/26/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .26/6/0.00 . 44/24/pc . . . 42/22/s Chicago. . . . . . . .39/26/0.01 . 32/22/pc . . . 33/25/s Cincinnati . . . . . .63/41/1.86 . 35/24/pc . . . 42/26/s Cleveland . . . . . .55/38/0.97 . .35/27/sn . . 37/28/sn Colorado Springs .35/3/0.00 . . .48/19/s . . . 52/25/s Columbia, MO . .48/24/0.00 . . .41/26/s . . . 49/29/s Columbia, SC . . .78/46/0.00 . .71/41/sh . . . 60/34/s Columbus, GA. . .77/60/0.00 . .64/32/sh . . . 60/36/s Columbus, OH. . .57/37/1.22 . 35/23/pc . . 38/24/pc Concord, NH . . . .38/23/0.00 . .45/22/sh . . 39/23/pc Corpus Christi. . .86/73/0.00 . 56/33/pc . . . 65/51/s Dallas Ft Worth. .74/39/0.01 . . .55/30/s . . . 62/38/s Dayton . . . . . . . .57/37/1.21 . 34/22/pc . . . 38/25/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .40/4/0.00 . . .50/25/s . . . 56/28/s Des Moines. . . . .29/16/0.00 . 36/22/pc . . . 41/27/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .47/39/0.64 . .33/26/sn . . 36/26/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . . .29/3/0.03 . . . .23/8/c . . 24/10/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .60/47/0.00 . . .54/22/s . . . 60/34/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .29/23/0.02 . . 10/-10/c . .10/-16/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 13/-6/0.00 . . .19/7/pc . . 24/16/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .29/13/0.00 . . .41/12/s . . . 47/21/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .43/34/0.24 . 31/24/pc . . 34/26/sn Rapid City . . . . . 21/-10/0.00 . 36/17/pc . . 39/20/pc Savannah . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . .77/43/sh . . . 63/42/s Green Bay. . . . . .38/20/0.09 . . .21/14/c . . 28/19/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .32/10/0.00 . . .43/29/s . . .43/24/rs Seattle. . . . . . . . .37/27/0.01 . . .43/39/r . . 43/36/sh Greensboro. . . . .53/41/0.02 . .60/30/sh . . . 55/31/s Richmond . . . . . .56/39/0.00 . .62/32/sh . . . 52/32/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .16/2/0.00 . 30/14/pc . . . 35/25/s Harrisburg. . . . . .41/37/0.39 . .48/27/sh . . 42/28/pc Rochester, NY . . .40/29/0.02 . .39/28/sn . . 37/30/sn Spokane . . . . . . . .22/7/0.19 . . .30/27/c . . 30/22/sn Hartford, CT . . . .41/31/0.00 . .46/28/sh . . 45/28/pc Sacramento. . . . .51/27/0.00 . . .57/37/s . . 53/38/sh Springfield, MO. .54/26/0.48 . . .43/26/s . . . 51/32/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .26/6/0.00 . 27/15/pc . . . 29/17/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .57/31/0.80 . . .40/29/s . . . 47/29/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . 77/58/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . . 83/68/s Salt Lake City . . . .24/6/0.00 . 27/19/pc . . . 32/26/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .64/32/s . . . 71/39/s Houston . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . 55/33/pc . . . 63/41/s San Antonio . . . .83/48/0.00 . . .58/29/s . . . 64/37/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .46/32/0.00 . . .51/29/s . . . 58/36/s Huntsville . . . . . .73/60/0.00 . .47/28/sh . . . 53/27/s San Diego . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .63/45/s . . 60/50/pc Washington, DC .53/43/0.03 . .56/31/sh . . . 48/33/s Indianapolis . . . .57/36/1.43 . 34/24/pc . . . 38/26/s San Francisco . . .52/37/0.00 . . .57/47/s . . 58/45/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .40/22/0.00 . . .48/25/s . . . 55/34/s Jackson, MS . . . .82/64/0.00 . .48/30/sh . . . 58/31/s San Jose . . . . . . .55/33/0.00 . . .59/42/s . . 57/44/sh Yakima . . . . . . . . 19/8/trace . . .29/25/c . . .36/21/rs Madison, WI . . . .38/21/0.01 . 27/15/pc . . . 30/19/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .37/24/0.00 . . .42/23/s . . . 49/20/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .60/47/0.00 . . .68/40/s . . . 72/47/s Jacksonville. . . . .82/63/0.00 . .80/51/sh . . . 66/43/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .39/35/0.04 . . 32/23/rs . . . 33/27/c Kansas City. . . . .34/19/0.00 . . .45/28/s . . . 50/34/s Amsterdam. . . . .41/32/0.05 . . .36/29/c . . .38/29/sf Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 96/73/pc . . . 95/70/s Lansing . . . . . . . .43/36/0.42 . . .30/24/c . . .34/24/sf Athens. . . . . . . . .65/52/0.00 . .67/57/sh . . 72/58/sh Mexico City. . . . .79/43/0.00 . 77/48/pc . . 78/47/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .48/33/0.00 . . .50/36/s . . . 57/44/s Auckland. . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .67/55/sh . . . 70/53/s Montreal. . . . . . .27/18/0.00 . . 31/25/rs . . .34/24/sf Lexington . . . . . .66/53/0.60 . 37/26/pc . . . 45/28/s Baghdad . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . . 81/50/s Moscow . . . . . . .39/34/0.23 . . 31/23/sf . . .30/21/sf Lincoln. . . . . . . . .32/13/0.00 . . .44/20/s . . . 48/28/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .92/77/s . . . 90/77/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .76/58/sh . . 75/58/sh Little Rock. . . . . .75/40/1.51 . . .50/29/s . . . 59/33/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .45/19/0.00 . 47/26/pc . . . 34/15/s Nassau . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . .84/73/s . . 83/71/pc Los Angeles. . . . .62/42/0.00 . . .69/45/s . . 63/48/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . 78/67/pc . . . 80/68/s New Delhi. . . . . .64/61/0.00 . . .79/61/s . . . 76/55/s Louisville . . . . . . .67/48/1.94 . 38/27/pc . . . 45/28/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .34/25/0.00 . . 34/26/sf . . .33/24/sf Osaka . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .54/43/s . . . 55/43/s Memphis. . . . . . .74/47/1.11 . . .46/31/s . . . 57/32/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.51 . .71/49/sh . . 65/48/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .19/14/0.00 . . . 12/5/sf . . . . 13/6/sf Miami . . . . . . . . .82/71/0.00 . 81/68/pc . . 82/69/pc Budapest. . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . . .38/25/c . . .36/24/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . .27/16/0.00 . . 29/25/rs . . .35/25/sf Milwaukee . . . . .43/26/0.03 . 29/18/pc . . . 30/20/s Buenos Aires. . . .86/59/0.00 . .86/64/sh . . 82/59/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .41/32/0.48 . . 38/28/sf . . . 36/26/c Minneapolis . . . . .27/6/0.00 . 21/13/pc . . 28/21/pc Cabo San Lucas .81/63/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 82/61/s Rio de Janeiro. . .84/75/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . 84/73/pc Nashville . . . . . . .72/54/0.21 . 42/29/pc . . . 50/28/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 82/61/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .54/41/0.44 . .54/45/sh . . 51/39/pc New Orleans. . . .82/70/0.00 . .58/39/sh . . . 60/38/s Calgary . . . . . . . .36/18/0.00 . 33/12/pc . . 27/11/pc Santiago . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . .86/55/s . . . 81/50/s New York . . . . . .44/39/0.06 . .54/33/sh . . 45/34/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 85/70/pc . . . .82/69/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . 80/64/pc . . . 83/63/s Newark, NJ . . . . .43/37/0.10 . .52/32/sh . . . 45/32/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . . 37/28/rs . . .35/28/sf Sapporo. . . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . .37/27/sh . . 36/27/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .62/42/0.00 . .67/37/sh . . . 53/35/s Edinburgh . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . .34/28/sn . . 30/25/sn Seoul . . . . . . . . . .43/28/0.00 . . .40/20/s . . .38/23/rs Oklahoma City . .43/32/0.00 . . .51/27/s . . . 56/30/s Geneva . . . . . . . .41/28/0.02 . .35/28/sn . . .37/29/sf Shanghai. . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 63/49/s Omaha . . . . . . . .30/13/0.00 . 39/22/pc . . . 47/28/s Harare . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.23 . . .79/62/t . . . .81/62/t Singapore . . . . . .88/73/0.27 . . .88/77/t . . . .89/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 . .83/62/sh . . 75/58/pc Hong Kong . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . .74/65/s . . 76/68/pc Stockholm. . . . . .25/23/0.00 . . . 19/8/sf . . . . 17/7/sf Palm Springs. . . .63/43/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . . 70/44/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .61/54/0.55 . .60/51/sh . . 67/56/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . 79/64/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .41/25/0.00 . 34/23/pc . . . 41/26/s Jerusalem . . . . . .78/37/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 81/53/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . . .71/61/s . . . 73/62/s Philadelphia . . . .44/37/0.08 . .55/32/sh . . . 44/32/s Johannesburg . . .72/54/0.02 . . .79/61/t . . . .82/61/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . 81/63/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .65/41/s . . . 69/46/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .70/61/s . . . 71/60/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . 61/50/pc . . 57/49/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .54/37/1.69 . 38/25/pc . . 36/25/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .54/46/sh . . 56/47/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . . 35/27/sf . . .39/30/sf Portland, ME. . . .41/25/0.01 . .45/27/sh . . 39/27/pc London . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . 36/26/pc . . .37/29/rs Vancouver. . . . . .34/27/0.28 . .39/37/sh . . 40/31/sh Providence . . . . .42/28/0.00 . .53/31/sh . . 46/31/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .52/30/0.00 . . .48/28/s . . 51/35/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . . 38/30/sf . . 35/26/sn Raleigh . . . . . . . .56/41/0.00 . .67/34/sh . . . 57/31/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.03 . . .85/76/t . . . .86/76/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .32/28/0.05 . . .35/26/c . . 37/29/sn

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S

D

Skiing Inside

American Resi Stiegler tries to get past her recent injuries and back on the slopes, see Page D4. www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

O LY M P I C S Security threat set to be severe at London in 2012 LONDON — Britain’s counterterrorism minister says the national terror threat will remain at a severe level during the 2012 London Olympics. The current threat classification means that an attack is highly likely in Britain. Minister Pauline NevilleJones says “we must work on the assumption that (the threat) will remain as it is.” She says the next — and most extreme level — is “critical.” Neville-Jones also told an Olympic security conference in London on Thursday that more needs to be done to combat cyber crime to ensure the games are not a “soft target.” — The Associated Press

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Arizona, Oregon may get wild Next up • Arizona at Oregon • When: Today, 4 p.m. • TV: ESPN • Radio: KBND-AM 1110

Wildcats, Ducks have had some big-impact games over the past few seasons By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

EUGENE — The wild, recent history between Oregon and Arizona seemed to peak last season when overzealous Wildcats fans readied to rush the field to celebrate what looked to be a victory over the Ducks. Instead, fans left disappointed after Oregon tied it with 6 seconds left and went on

to win 44-41 in the second overtime. The loss eliminated Arizona from any chance at the Rose Bowl — the Ducks’ ultimate destination. In 2007, the Ducks were ranked No. 2 in the nation when they visited Tucson, entertaining whispers about lofty offseason possibilities. But quarterback Dennis Dixon went down with a season-ending knee injury, Arizona won 34-24 and the Ducks spiraled with losses in three of their last four games. “Every year since I’ve been here our battles with Arizona have been real knockdown drag-outs and that’s what this is gonna be,” Oregon coach Chip Kelly said. See Oregon / D5

John Miller / The Associated Press

Arizona’s defense, seen here tackling USC’s Marc Tyler, is currently ranked No. 20 overall in the country in defense this season. They will take on the No. 1 offense from Oregon today at 4 p.m.

P R E P F O O T B A L L : C L A S S 5 A S TAT E P L AYO F F S

INSIDE NFL Patriots ....................................... 45 Lions........................................... 24 Saints ......................................... 30 Cowboys..................................... 27 Jets ............................................. 26 Bengals....................................... 10

Jets send Bengals to eighth straight loss Brad Smith scores twice for New York in a 26-10 win, see Page D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Boise State set to take on Nevada Broncos try to keep their national championship hopes alive when they battle Nevada tonight, see Page D5 Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain View running back Austin Sears set a school record with 2,169 yards rushing this season over the course of 11 games.

NBA Clippers cruise to victory over Kings Eric Gordon scores 28 points and Blake Griffin chips in 25 for L.A., see Page D4

Ground game Mountain View running back Austin Sears rushed for more than 2,000 yards this season and led the Cougars to the state semifinals

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

California knocks off No. 21 Temple

Getting Austin Sears to brag about his record-breaking football season is no easy task. A major part of Mountain View’s dominant offense this fall, the senior tailback has rushed for a school-record 2,169 yards and has scored 25 touchdowns in 11 games. Sears’ emergence as a first-year starting running back has helped Mountain View reach the state semifinals for just the third time in school history. The Cougars (11-0) have a chance to reach the state finals for the first time ever when they meet Sherwood (11-0) tonight in the Class 5A state semifinals at Willamette University in Salem.

Bears go on 16-1 run in second half en route to beating Owls, see Page D4

NHL Last-second score gives Oilers win Taylor Hall’s goal with 29 seconds left allowed Edmonton to beat Colorado, see Page D2

INDEX

Class 5A semifinals Who: Sherwood Bowmen (11-0) vs. Mountain View Cougars (11-0) Where: Willamette University in Salem When: Today, 7 p.m. Cost: $8 for adults, $5 for students Radio: KICE-AM 940, KBND-AM 1110 (joined in progress) • For more on the game, see Page D5

Banff Mountain Film Festival is hitting the road for world tour By Rich Landers The (Spokane) Spokesman-Review

Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 College basketball .................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Skiing ....................................... D4 College football .........................D5 Adventure Sports................. D5, 6

And just try to get Sears to put his stunning statistics ahead of his team’s accomplishments. “I honestly have no personal goals as long as we win,” says Sears. “It’s a team sport. If every play you get 11 people doing their job, we’ll get it done.” Sears might have seemed like an unlikely star heading into preseason camp this season. After all, most of his experience in two years of varsity football came as a cornerback. He did show glimpses of his running prowess late in the 2009 season: After senior starter Solomon Helms was injured, Sears ran for 212 yards and six touchdowns in two late-season games. See Cougars / D5

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Some of the most remote places and cultures on earth are coming to cities around the country. They’ll be featured in the work of intrepid filmmakers who match outdoor skills and creativity with state of the art imaging technology. Fresh from Alberta, the World Tour of flicks selected from early November’s Banff Mountain Film Festival are

On the web For more information on the Banff Mountain Film Festival’s World Tour, visit www.banffcentre.ca/mountainfestival/. The tour is scheduled to be in Bend at the Tower Theatre in April of 2011. heading out to be screened at theaters and auditoriums at 360 locations in 30 countries. See Film / D6

Ozturk & Richards Collection, from the ilm “As it Happens”

In the film “As It Happens,” two climbers attempt a first ascent of Nepal’s 6,000-meter high Tawoche Himal. The movie is one of the films often shown as part of the Banff Mountain Film Festival.


D2 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Football: Class 5A state semifinal, Mountain View vs. Sherwood, Willamette University, Salem, 7 p.m.

Midnight— PGA European Tour, Dubai World Championship, second round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 8 a.m. — College, Louisville at Rutgers, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, West Virginia at Pittsburgh, ABC. 11:30 a.m. — College, Auburn at Alabama, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, Colorado at Nebraska, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, UCLA at Arizona State, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Arizona at Oregon, ESPN. 7:15 p.m. — College, Boise State at Nevada, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Old Spice Classic, first semifinal, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — Men’s college, 76 Classic, first semifinal, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — Men’s college, NIT Season Tip-Off, consolation, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Season Tip-Off, final, ESPN. 2 p.m. — Men’s college, Old Spice Classic, second semifinal, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Charlotte, Bobcats, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans Hornets at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

SATURDAY GOLF Midnight — PGA European Tour, Dubai World Championship, third round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 4:30 a.m. — English Permier League, Aston Villa vs. Arsonal, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Boston College at Syracuse, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Michigan State at Penn State, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, Michigan at Ohio State, ABC. 9 a.m. — College, South Florida at Miami, ESPNU. 9 a.m. — UFL, Championship, Florida Tuskers vs. Las Vegas Locomotives, VS. network. 9:30 a.m. — College, Kansas vs. Missouri, FSNW. 11 a.m. — College, Grambling State vs. Southern, NBC. 12:30 p.m. — College, North Carolina at Duke, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Washington at California, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — College, Northwestern at Wisconsin, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Florida at Florida State, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, North Carolina State at Maryland, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m. — College, LSU at Arkansas, CBS. 1 p.m. — College, Texas Christian at New Mexico, VS. network. 4 p.m. — College, Mississippi State at Mississippi, ESPNU. 4 p.m. — College, South Carolina at Clemson, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, VS. network. 4:30 p.m. — College, Georgia Tech at Georgia, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, Houston at Texas Tech, FSNW. 5 p.m. — College, Notre Dame at USC, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Oklahoma State, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Duke vs. Oregon, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, USC at Nebraska, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Las Vegas Invitational, Arizona vs. Kansas, ESPN2.

SUNDAY GOLF Midnight— PGA European Tour, Dubai World Championship, final round, Golf Channel.

TENNIS 9:30 a.m. — World Tour Finals, final, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Green Bay Packers at Atlanta Falcons, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Philadelphia Eagles at Chicago Bears, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Kansas City Chiefs at Seattle Seahawks, CBS. 5:15 p.m. — NFL, San Diego Chargers at Indianapolis Colts, NBC.

SKIING 10 a.m. — Aspen Winternational (taped), NBC.

FIGURE SKATING 11 a.m. — ISU Gran Prix, NBC.

BOWLING 10 a.m. — Brunswick Cheetah Championship (same-day tape), ESPN.

BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. — Women’s college, Texas at Stanford, FSNW. 2:30 p.m. — Men’s college, College of Charleston at North Carolina, FSNW. 4 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at New Jersey Nets, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Old Spice Classic, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Florida at Florida State, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, 76 Classic, final, teams TBD, ESPN2.

IN THE BLEACHERS

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 9 2 0 .818 334 N.Y. Jets 9 2 0 .818 264 Miami 5 5 0 .500 172 Buffalo 2 8 0 .200 213 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 4 0 .600 268 Jacksonville 6 4 0 .600 220 Tennessee 5 5 0 .500 257 Houston 4 6 0 .400 244 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 7 3 0 .700 233 Pittsburgh 7 3 0 .700 235 Cleveland 3 7 0 .300 192 Cincinnati 2 9 0 .182 225 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 6 4 0 .600 243 Oakland 5 5 0 .500 238 San Diego 5 5 0 .500 274 Denver 3 7 0 .300 217 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 7 3 0 .700 284 N.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 253 Washington 5 5 0 .500 202 Dallas 3 8 0 .273 256 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 8 2 0 .800 256 New Orleans 8 3 0 .727 265 Tampa Bay 7 3 0 .700 209 Carolina 1 9 0 .100 117 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 7 3 0 .700 191 Green Bay 7 3 0 .700 252 Minnesota 3 7 0 .300 172 Detroit 2 9 0 .182 258 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 5 0 .500 185 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 177 Arizona 3 7 0 .300 188 San Francisco 3 7 0 .300 160 ——— Thursday’s Games New England 45, Detroit 24 New Orleans 30, Dallas 27 N.Y. Jets 26, Cincinnati 10 Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Washington, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Carolina at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Miami at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game San Francisco at Arizona, 5:30 p.m.

PA 266 187 208 276 PA 216 270 198 287 PA 178 165 206 288 PA 207 223 211 287 PA 226 220 245 301 PA 192 197 206 252 PA 146 146 226 282 PA 233 198 292 219

Thursday’s Summaries

Saints 30, Cowboys 27 New Orleans 17 Dallas 0

3 3 7 — 30 6 14 7 — 27 First Quarter NO—Ivory 3 run (Hartley kick), 13:09. NO—FG Hartley 50, 9:11. NO—Ivory 6 run (Hartley kick), 4:33. Second Quarter Dal—FG Buehler 21, 5:13. NO—FG Hartley 45, :43. Dal—FG Buehler 53, :00. Third Quarter Dal—Austin 60 run (Buehler kick), 14:01. NO—FG Hartley 28, 9:30. Dal—Barber 1 run (Buehler kick), 4:30. Fourth Quarter Dal—Choice 1 run (Buehler kick), 5:51. NO—Moore 12 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 1:55. A—93,985. ——— NO Dal First downs 21 24 Total Net Yards 414 457 Rushes-yards 21-81 32-144 Passing 333 313 Punt Returns 1-0 1-13 Kickoff Returns 1-22 5-110 Interceptions Ret. 1-4 1-10 Comp-Att-Int 23-39-1 30-42-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-19 1-0 Punts 2-60.0 2-55.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 7-2 Penalties-Yards 4-30 4-19 Time of Possession 25:19 34:41 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New Orleans: Jones 10-45, Ivory 7-38, Bush 1-1, Brees 3-(minus 3). Dallas: Austin 160, Jones 13-44, Kitna 5-20, Barber 10-19, Choice 1-1, Bryant 1-0, McBriar 1-0. PASSING—New Orleans: Brees 23-39-1-352. Dallas: Kitna 30-42-1-313. RECEIVING—New Orleans: Colston 6-105, Moore 5-39, Henderson 4-97, Graham 3-23, Jones 3-21, Meachem 1-55, Bush 1-12. Dallas: Witten 10-99, Jones 7-69, R.Williams 5-83, Austin 3-25, Bennett 2-17, Barber 2-8, Hurd 1-12. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Dallas: Buehler 59 (WL).

Patriots 45, Lions 24 7 14 21 — 45 10 7 0 — 24 First Quarter NE—FG Graham 19, 5:00. Det—C.Johnson 19 pass from Sh.Hill (Rayner kick), :00. Second Quarter Det—Morris 1 run (Rayner kick), 5:58.

NE—Green-Ellis 15 run (Graham kick), :45. Det—FG Rayner 44, :00. Third Quarter NE—Welker 5 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 10:58. Det—Morris 1 run (Rayner kick), 6:50. NE—Branch 79 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 5:12. Fourth Quarter NE—Branch 22 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 13:45. NE—Welker 16 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 6:42. NE—Green-Ellis 1 run (Graham kick), 3:14. A—60,965. ——— NE Det First downs 20 25 Total Net Yards 447 406 Rushes-yards 25-109 27-129 Passing 338 277 Punt Returns 3-47 1-8 Kickoff Returns 4-69 7-194 Interceptions Ret. 2-73 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-27-0 27-46-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-3 2-8 Punts 3-51.0 3-47.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-50 8-66 Time of Possession 28:55 31:05 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England: Green-Ellis 12-59, Woodhead 8-32, Tate 1-17, Brady 4-1. Detroit: Morris 9-55, A.Brown 13-36, Sh.Hill 4-23, C.Johnson 1-15. PASSING—New England: Brady 21-27-0-341. Detroit: Sh.Hill 27-46-2-285. RECEIVING—New England: Welker 8-90, Gronkowski 5-65, Branch 3-113, Woodhead 2-13, Crumpler 1-27, Hernandez 1-18, Morris 1-15. Detroit: Pettigrew 5-67, Morris 5-20, C.Johnson 4-81, A.Brown 4-29, Burleson 3-35, B.Johnson 2-26, Felton 2-7, Heller 1-13, D.Williams 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Detroit: Rayner 46 (WR).

Jets 26, Bengals 10 Cincinnati N.Y. Jets

0 7 0 3 — 10 0 3 14 9 — 26 Second Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 27, 9:01. Cin—Shipley 5 pass from C.Palmer (Pettrey kick), :43. Third Quarter NYJ—B.Smith 53 run (Folk kick), 14:13. NYJ—Holmes 13 pass from Sanchez (Folk kick), 4:09. Fourth Quarter Cin—FG Pettrey 28, 12:33. NYJ—B.Smith 89 kickoff return (Folk kick), 12:18. NYJ—Pryce safety, 6:52. A—78,903. ——— Cin NYJ First downs 13 18 Total Net Yards 163 319 Rushes-yards 20-46 37-170 Passing 117 149 Punt Returns 5-6 4-10 Kickoff Returns 5-97 4-129 Interceptions Ret. 1-11 2-11 Comp-Att-Int 17-39-2 16-28-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-18 2-17 Punts 7-41.4 8-44.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 2-25 8-64 Time of Possession 26:31 33:29 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Benson 18-41, C.Palmer 2-5. N.Y. Jets: Greene 18-70, B.Smith 3-55, Tomlinson 13-49, Sanchez 3-(minus 4). PASSING—Cincinnati: C.Palmer 17-38-2-135, Ochocinco 0-1-0-0. N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 16-28-1166. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Shipley 5-38, Ochocinco 4-41, Owens 3-17, Gresham 2-36, Leonard 2-3, Benson 1-0. N.Y. Jets: Holmes 5-44, Keller 4-49, Edwards 2-20, Tomlinson 2-14, B.Smith 1-23, Greene 1-11, P.Turner 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Cincinnati: Pettrey 27 (WL). N.Y. Jets: Folk 44 (WL).

Betting Line

New England 3 Detroit 7

Favorite REDSKINS Steelers

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Sunday 3 1.5 6.5 6.5

Underdog Vikings BILLS

TEXANS GIANTS BROWNS RAVENS Eagles FALCONS RAIDERS Chiefs BRONCOS COLTS

6.5 6.5 8.5 7 10.5 10 8.5 8 3.5 3.5 1.5 2 2 2 1 2 4 4 3 3 Monday 1.5 1

49ers

Titans Jaguars Panthers Buccaneers BEARS Packers Dolphins SEAHAWKS Rams Chargers CARDINALS

College Today AKRON TOLEDO W. Michigan N. Illinois PITTSBURGH Louisville Ohio U Smu ALABAMA ARIZONA ST NEBRASKA TULSA OREGON Boise St OHIO ST PURDUE MARSHALL MIAMI-FLA Mississippi St FLORIDA ST TENNESSEE S. Carolina C. Florida CONNECTICUT SYRACUSE WISCONSIN VANDERBILT Iowa NC State N. Carolina VIRGINIA TECH k-Missouri Hawaii Uab GEORGIA Michigan St OKLAHOMA ST CALIFORNIA UTAH STANFORD l-ARKANSAS Tcu TEXAS TECH USC La Tech SAN DIEGO ST FRESNO ST UL-MONROE MID TENN ST Kansas St FLORIDA INT’L TROY k-Kansas City, Mo. l-Little Rock, Ark.

1 PK Buffalo 4.5 4 C. Michigan 7 6.5 BOWLING GREEN 23 23.5 E. MICHIGAN 2.5 3 W. Virginia 3 3 RUTGERS 4 3.5 KENT ST 1.5 1 E. CAROLINA 4 4.5 Auburn 11.5 12.5 Ucla 20.5 17 Colorado 3.5 3.5 Southern Miss 17.5 19 Arizona 14.5 14 NEVADA Saturday 18 17 Michigan 3.5 3 Indiana 8 10 Tulane 12.5 11.5 S. Florida 2.5 2.5 MISSISSIPPI 2.5 2.5 Florida 3 3 Kentucky 3 3 CLEMSON 25.5 26 MEMPHIS 2 1 Cincinnati 2 3 Boston College 23.5 23.5 Northwestern 5 6 Wake Forest 15.5 15.5 MINNESOTA 2 2 MARYLAND 10 8.5 DUKE 23.5 23 Virginia 24.5 24.5 Kansas 26.5 26.5 NEW MEXICO ST 3.5 3 RICE 13 13 Georgia Tech 2 1 PENN ST 2.5 2.5 Oklahoma 7 7 Washington 10.5 9.5 Byu 15 14 Oregon St 4 3.5 Lsu 43.5 44 NEW MEXICO 10 9 Houston 4 4 Notre Dame 11 11.5 SAN JOSE ST 24 24 Unlv 12 11 Idaho 7 7 UL-Lafayette 4.5 5 Fla Atlantic 16.5 14.5 NORTH TEXAS 6 5 Arkansas St 11.5 13 W. Kentucky

College Schedule All Times PST (Subject to change) ——— Thursday’s Games SOUTH Tuskegee 17, Alabama St. 10 SOUTHWEST Texas A&M 24, Texas 17 Today’s Games EAST Louisville at Rutgers, 8 a.m. West Virginia at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. SOUTH SMU at East Carolina, 11 a.m. Auburn at Alabama, 11:30 a.m. MIDWEST N. Illinois at E. Michigan, 9 a.m. Buffalo at Akron, 11 a.m. W. Michigan at Bowling Green, 11 a.m. Ohio at Kent St., 11 a.m. Cent. Michigan at Toledo, 11 a.m. Colorado at Nebraska, 12:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Southern Miss. at Tulsa, 3:30 p.m. FAR WEST UCLA at Arizona St., 12:30 p.m. Arizona at Oregon, 4 p.m. Boise St. at Nevada, 7:15 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games

EAST Michigan St. at Penn St., 9 a.m. Boston College at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Cincinnati at Connecticut, 9 a.m. SOUTH South Florida at Miami, 9 a.m. Virginia at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Tulane at Marshall, 9 a.m. UCF at Memphis, 9 a.m. Kentucky at Tennessee, 9 a.m. Grambling St. vs. Southern U. at New Orleans, 11 a.m. Florida at Florida St., 12:30 p.m. North Carolina at Duke, 12:30 p.m. N.C. State at Maryland, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas St. at Fla. International, 12:30 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Louisiana-Monroe, 12:30 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Middle Tennessee, 12:30 p.m. W. Kentucky at Troy, 12:30 p.m. Mississippi St. at Mississippi, 4 p.m. South Carolina at Clemson, 4 p.m. Wake Forest at Vanderbilt, 4:30 p.m. Georgia Tech at Georgia, 4:45 p.m. MIDWEST Michigan at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Indiana at Purdue, 9 a.m. Missouri vs. Kansas at Kansas City, Mo., 9:30 a.m. Iowa at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m. Northwestern at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST LSU at Arkansas, 12:30 p.m. UAB at Rice, 12:30 p.m. Kansas St. at North Texas, 1 p.m. Oklahoma at Oklahoma St., 5 p.m. Houston at Texas Tech, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Hawaii at New Mexico St., noon Washington at California, 12:30 p.m. BYU at Utah, 12:30 p.m. TCU at New Mexico, 1 p.m. Oregon St. at Stanford, 4:30 p.m. UNLV at San Diego St., 5 p.m. Louisiana Tech at San Jose St., 5 p.m. Notre Dame at Southern Cal, 5 p.m. Idaho at Fresno St., 7 p.m. FCS Playoffs W. Illinois at Coastal Carolina, 10 a.m. Lehigh at N. Iowa, 10 a.m. South Carolina St. at Georgia Southern, 11 a.m. Robert Morris at N. Dakota St., 4 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 20, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (37) 10-0 1,467 1 2. Auburn (13) 11-0 1,430 2 3. Boise St. (10) 10-0 1,394 3 4. TCU 11-0 1,340 4 5. Wisconsin 10-1 1,197 6 6. LSU 10-1 1,192 5 7. Stanford 10-1 1,181 7 8. Ohio St. 10-1 1,086 8 9. Alabama 9-2 972 10 10. Oklahoma St. 10-1 959 12 11. Michigan St. 10-1 929 11 12. Arkansas 9-2 860 13 13. Virginia Tech 9-2 722 14 14. Oklahoma 9-2 652 16 15. Missouri 9-2 638 15 16. Nebraska 9-2 611 9 17. Texas A&M 8-3 575 18 18. South Carolina 8-3 560 17 19. Nevada 10-1 440 19 20. Arizona 7-3 270 23 21. N.C. State 8-3 240 — 22. Florida St. 8-3 233 — 23. Utah 9-2 213 25 24. Iowa 7-4 101 21 25. Mississippi St. 7-4 95 22 Others receiving votes: N. Illinois 72, West Virginia 26, Tulsa 12, Hawaii 7, Navy 7, Florida 4, Miami 4, UCF 4, Southern Miss. 3, Penn St. 2, Ohio 1, Oregon St. 1. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PST Conf. W L Oregon 7 0 Stanford 7 1 Oregon State 4 3 Arizona 4 3 USC 4 4 Washington 3 4 California 3 5 UCLA 2 5 Arizona State 2 5 Washington State 1 7 Today’s Games UCLA at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. Arizona at Oregon, 4 p.m. Saturday’s Games Washington at California, 12:30 p.m. Oregon State at Stanford, 4:30 p.m. x-Notre Dame at USC, 5 p.m. x=nonleague

W 10 10 5 7 7 4 5 4 4 2

Ov’ll L 0 1 5 3 4 6 6 6 6 9

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 23 15 6 2 32 Pittsburgh 23 13 8 2 28 N.Y. Rangers 23 12 10 1 25 New Jersey 22 7 13 2 16 N.Y. Islanders 21 4 12 5 13 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Montreal 22 14 7 1 29 Boston 20 12 6 2 26 Ottawa 22 10 11 1 21 Toronto 20 8 9 3 19 Buffalo 23 8 12 3 19 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 23 15 6 2 32 Tampa Bay 22 13 7 2 28 Atlanta 22 10 9 3 23 Carolina 21 9 10 2 20 Florida 20 9 11 0 18 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Detroit 19 13 4 2 28 Columbus 20 14 6 0 28 St. Louis 20 12 5 3 27 Chicago 24 11 11 2 24 Nashville 20 9 7 4 22 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 21 11 7 3 25

GF 84 70 68 43 44

GA 56 59 65 66 72

GF 57 58 53 47 58

GA 43 39 69 55 69

GF 77 70 70 65 53

GA 66 68 71 71 51

GF 67 59 54 73 48

GA 53 47 52 72 53

GF GA 62 58

Colorado Minnesota Calgary Edmonton

22 12 9 1 25 76 67 20 10 8 2 22 47 53 21 8 11 2 18 60 63 21 6 11 4 16 52 84 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Phoenix 21 11 5 5 27 62 59 Los Angeles 21 13 8 0 26 62 53 San Jose 20 10 6 4 24 60 54 Dallas 20 11 8 1 23 59 58 Anaheim 23 10 10 3 23 57 69 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Game Edmonton 3, Colorado 2 Today’s Games Carolina at Boston, 9 a.m. New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 10 a.m. Calgary at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 2 p.m. Detroit at Columbus, 4 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Montreal at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at New Jersey, 10 a.m. Calgary at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 4 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Nashville, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 6 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Thursday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT 76 Classic First Round Murray St. 55, Stanford 52 Oklahoma St. 60, DePaul 56 Virginia Tech 72, CS Northridge 56 Carrs/Safeway Great Alaska Shootout First Round Arizona St. 73, Houston Baptist 55 Old Spice Classic First Round Boston College 67, Texas A&M 65 California 57, Temple 50 Notre Dame 89, Georgia 83, 2OT Wisconsin 50, Manhattan 35

Women’s college Thursday’s Games ——— SOUTH Georgetown 67, Georgia Tech 58 Grambling St. 73, Dillard 55 Iowa St. 66, Virginia 48 Tennessee 82, Missouri 44 West Virginia 62, TCU 49 SOUTHWEST Florida Gulf Coast 73, Virginia Tech 65 Iowa 67, James Madison 61 Penn St. 70, Utah 58 Wis.-Green Bay 78, Hartford 44

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— ATP WORLD TOUR FINALS Thursday London Round Robin Singles Group B Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Andy Murray (5), Britain, beat David Ferrer (7), Spain, 6-2, 6-2. Standings: x-Federer 3-0 (sets 6-0), x-Murray 2-1 (4-2), Soderling 1-2 (2-4), Ferrer 0-3 (0-6). Group A Standings: Rafael Nadal 2-0 (4-1), Tomas Berdych 1-1 (2-2), Novak Djokovic 1-1 (2-2), Andy Roddick 0-2 (1-4). Doubles Group A Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and Leander Paes (3), India, 6-3, 6-4. Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski (6), Poland, def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Philipp Petzschner (8), Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (7). Standings: x-Fyrstenberg-Matkowski 3-0 (6-1), x-Bryan-Bryan 2-1 (5-2), Melzer-Petzschner 1-2 (2-5), Dlouhy-Paes 0-3 (1-6). Group B Standings: Daniel Nestor-Nenad Zimonjic 2-0 (4-0), Mahesh Bhupathi-Max Mirnyi 1-1 (2-2), Wesley MoodieDick Norman 1-1 (2-2), Lukas Kubot-Oliver Marach 0-2 (0-4). x-advanced to semifinals

DEALS Transactions FOOTBALL National Football League TENNESSEE TITANS—Signed G Ryan Durand to the practice squad. Released CB Pete Ittersagen. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed RB Andre Brown. Signed OL Jacob Bender to their practice squad. Placed RB Clinton Portis on the reserved/injured list. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Reassigned F Jon Matsumoto to Charlotte (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS—Reassigned F Hunter Bishop from Wheeling (ECHL) to Hamilton (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Granted F Rick Rypien an indefinite leave of absence. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned D Brian Fahey and G Braden Holtby to Hershey (AHL). ECHL KALAMAZOO WINGS—Announced D Ryan McGinnis was assigned to the team by Manitoba (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer VANCOUVER WHITECAPS—Traded D-MF Nathan Sturgis to Toronto FC for a 2011 first-round draft pick.

RADIO TODAY

Oilers get past Avalanche

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — College, Arizona at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m. — High school, Class 5A state semifinal, Mountain View vs. Sherwood, KICE-AM 940, and joined in progress on KBND-AM 1110.

The Associated Press

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans Hornets at Portland Trail Blazers, KRCOAM 690.

SATURDAY BASKETBALL 1 p.m. — College, Duke vs. Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCOAM 690.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 1 p.m. — NFL, Kansas City Chiefs at Seattle Seahawks, KBNW-FM, 96.5.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at New Jersey Nets, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

John Ulan / The Associated Press

Edmonton Oilers’ Taylor Hall celebrates his winning goal against the Colorado Avalanche during the third period of Thursday’s game in Edmonton.

EDMONTON, Alberta — Taylor Hall and Jordan Eberle gave the Edmonton Oilers a glimpse at their future. The top overall pick in the June draft, Hall scored with 29 seconds left to give the Oilers 3-2 victory over the Colorado Avalanche on Thursday night. “It was definitely a big goal for our team, no matter who got it,” said Hall, who took a nice feed from fellow rookie Eberle on the goal. “Especially, to get a home win like this. To put our sticks up at the end of the game and know we played our hearts out.” Hall has five goals this season. He also had an assist. “What I like about Taylor is that he is going to shoot it through the net when he has an opportunity like that,” coach Tom Renney said. “He’s not just going to get it there. He’s got everything on it. It was a great play all around just to get it to him.” Gilbert Brule and Andrew Cogliano scored in the first 3:51 to stake the Oilers to a 2-0 lead, but Colorado rallied to tie it on goals by Kevin Shattenkirk in the first and Matt Duchene in the second.

NHL Martin Gerber, making his first start of the season, made 35 saves for the victory, his first in the NHL in almost 20 months and the Oilers’ first at home since Oct. 10. Gerber was called from Oklahoma City of the American Hockey League after starter Nikolai Khabibulin went down with a groin injury. “It is a great feeling to even get to start a game at this stage in my career,” said the 36-year-old Gerber, who spent last season playing in Russia. “It’s a great opportunity and it felt great to be in there. The guys played really well in front of me and it made it a lot easier. Gerber also had an assist on the winning goal. The Avalanche have lost two straight, but remain tied with Vancouver for the Northwest Division lead. The Avalanche tied it on a power play 3 minutes into the second period when the puck got caught up in defenseman Theo Peckham’s skates and Duchene swooped in and sent it into a wide-open net.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 D3

NFL ROUNDUP

S  B

Football • Behind Gray’s 223 yards, Texas A&M beats Texas: Cyrus Gray rushed for 223 yards and had two long touchdown runs to help No. 17 Texas A&M beat Texas 24-17 on Thursday night in Austin, Texas, sending the Longhorns to their first losing season since 1997. Gray had touchdown runs of 84 yards in the second quarter and 48 yards in the third. Von Miller intercepted a tipped pass at the Texas A&M 11 with 2:37 left to kill what looked like a drive for the tying touchdown. Jeff Fuller also caught a touchdown pass and Randy Bullock kicked a 50-yard field goal for the Aggies (9-3, 6-2 Big 12). Texas’ fifth home loss of the season means the Longhorns (5-7) won’t be eligible for a bowl just one season after playing for the national championship.

Basketball • Grizzlies’ center, girlfriend charged with assault: Police say Hamed Haddadi of the Memphis Grizzlies and his girlfriend have been charged with assault following an altercation between the two. Memphis police were called Thursday morning to a downtown apartment building and found Haddadi, a backup center from Iran, and his girlfriend with bruises and scratches. The arrest report says a verbal disagreement turned physical, and both Haddadi and Goolnaz “Asal” Karbalaeinematmoeeney were taken to the Regional Medical Center for treatment. • Warriors’ Lee medically cleared to do conditioning: Golden State Warriors forward David Lee has been medically cleared to resume light conditioning a week after undergoing a second procedure on his left elbow to treat an infection. He has had stitches and a catheter for IVs removed from his right arm, the team said Thursday.

Cycling • Contador again pleads his innocence over doping: Alberto Contador reiterated his innocence Thursday over his failed doping test at the Tour de France and slammed the Astana team for abandoning him once the news broke. The 27-year-old Spanish cyclist is facing a twoyear ban and risks losing his third Tour title after testing positive for the banned drug clenbuterol, which he claims came from contaminated meat. Contador labeled the charges as “absolutely ridiculous” and felt the entire episode had discredited him.

Sailing • Swiss group Alinghi to sit out next America’s Cup: Vanquished America’s Cup champion Alinghi, of Switzerland, says it will not try to win back the oldest trophy in international sports in 2013. Alinghi spokesman Paco Latorre says in a statement that the Swiss syndicate thinks “the existing conditions make it impossible for the team to participate in the 34th America’s Cup.” Latorre refused to elaborate when reached by phone. Alinghi won the America’s Cup in 2003 and successfully defended it in 2007. The Swiss were routed in two races by American syndicate BMW Oracle Racing off Valencia, Spain, in February. The racing in giant monohulls was the culmination of a bitter 2½-year court fight between two of the world’s richest men.

Tennis • Murray, Federer advance to semis at ATP finals: Roger Federer and Andy Murray easily secured spots in the semifinals of the ATP World Tour Finals on Thursday with straight-sets victories in their last round-robin matches. Federer continued his dominance over Robin Soderling, beating the Swede 7-6 (5) 6-3 to earn the top spot in Group B of the season-ending tournament. Murray followed up by recovering from a shaky start to beat David Ferrer 6-2, 6-2 to hand the Spaniard his third straight loss in the group phase. Their semifinal opponents will be decided today, when the last round-robin matches in Group A are played. • Serena Williams withdraws from Australian Open: Two-time defending champion Serena Williams has withdrawn from the Australian Open because of a foot injury. Tournament director Craig Tiley released a statement Thursday saying Williams had pulled out of the Hopman Cup international mixed teams competition in Perth and the Australian Open in January. It is the second consecutive Grand Slam tournament Williams will miss, and the loss of 2,000 rankings points could cost the 29-year-old star her place in the top 10.

Golf • Karlsson leads South Korean teen Noh by 1 in Dubai: Sweden’s Robert Karlsson shot a 7-under 65 Thursday for a one-shot lead over 19-year-old South Korean Noh Seung-yul after the first round at the Dubai World Championship in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. European money leader Martin Kaymer, of Germany, was another shot back at 5 under in the European Tour’s $7.5 million, season-ending tournament. The 25-year-old’s only challenger for the Order of Merit title is Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell, who struggled for much of the day on his way to an even 72. McDowell bogeyed the ninth, 11th and 12th holes before bouncing back with two late birdies.

Soccer • African women’s team accused of fielding men: The Nigerian Football Federation has made an official complaint to the African governing body accusing Equatorial Guinea of fielding two men on its women’s soccer team. “The protest is on. We have lodged our protest with CAF. We are waiting for the response,” NFF spokesman Robinson Okosun told The Associated Press on Thursday. An official at the Confederation of African Football would not immediately comment on the issue. Equatorial Guinea’s federation has denied the allegations against captain Genoveva Anonma and striker Salimata Simpore, saying the claims stem from an “inferiority complex” among rival teams because of the recent success of the tiny west African nation. — From wire reports

Jets beat Bengals, take record to 9-2 The Associated Press EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Even missing a shoe, Brad Smith didn’t miss a step. The Jets’ Mr. Everything sparked New York to its second-best start after scoring on an 89-yard kickoff return — during which a cleat slipped off — and also had a 53-yard touchdown run in a 26-10 victory over the Cincinnati Bengals on Thursday night. “He’s a phenomenal athlete,” coach Rex Ryan said. “Everything we ask him to do, he does.” With or without all of his footwear. “I think all that running in the background with no shoes on with my brother,” the versatile wide receiver said with a big grin, “that helped.” Hours after New England beat Detroit to improve to 9-2, New York matched the Patriots. The two meet for the AFC East lead in their next game, a meaty Monday night matchup Dec. 6 at New England. “We have our work cut out for us, but I think this team will respond,” running back LaDainian Tomlinson said. “They took care of their business and got to 9-2 and we had to take care of our business.” The impressive start is eclipsed only by the 1986 squad that won 10 of its first 11. And the Jets did it by overcoming a sluggish first half and sending the struggling Bengals (2-9) to their eighth straight loss. “We’re trying to make the most of it,” Bengals receiver Terrell Owens said. “It’s something different in every phase of the game every week. We find ways to put ourselves in the hole. I’m out of answers.” New York has beaten Cincinnati three times in less than a year, including the regular-season finale that got the Jets into the playoffs, then in the wild-card game the following week. Santonio Holmes scored his fourth touchdown in three games on a 13yard reception from Mark Sanchez after Cincinnati’s Andre Caldwell had a punt deflect off him while he was blocking. Sanchez was 16 for 28 for 166 yards with the TD and an interception. Smith had three carries for 55 yards, a catch for 23 yards and the long kickoff return, accounting for 200 all-purpose yards. “We call him ‘Slash,’ ” Jets safety James Ihedigbo said. “The guy can do anything he’s asked to do.” It looked as though New York was headed for yet another frenzied finish after consecutive road overtime victories were followed by getting the winning touchdown Sunday with 10

Bill Kostroun / The Associated Press

New York Jets wide receiver Santonio Holmes (10) celebrates after scoring a touchdown as teammates Dustin Keller (81) and Tony Richardson (49) look on during the third quarter of Thursday night’s game in East Rutherford, N.J. The Jets won the game, 26-10. seconds left against Houston. But it took New York only two plays to go ahead after halftime. Sanchez hit Holmes for 16 yards, then Smith used superb blocks by Dustin Keller and D’Brickashaw Ferguson to speed down the left sideline untouched for a 53-yard TD run. “I had some tremendous blocks and I would’ve felt sick if I didn’t score because of how well it was executed,” Smith said. The Jets’ defense followed with a three-and-out, but Sanchez gave it back with a terrible pass to linebacker Rey Maualuga. “A terrible decision,” Sanchez said. “I should have sailed that into the stands and hit Fireman Ed.” Maualuga’s 11-yard return to the Jets 37 set up the Bengals in good shape, and they were aided by a 15yard roughing-the-passer call against Ihedigbo on fourth down. Faced with another fourth down, Cincinnati sent Aaron Pettrey out for a tying 27-yard field goal, but he was wide left.

Ihedigbo made up for his penalty on the next drive when Steve Weatherford punted and officials ruled it hit Caldwell and Ihedigbo recovered at the 14. Bengals coach Marvin Lewis surprisingly did not challenge the play. After a 1-yard run by Shonn Greene, Sanchez found Holmes — his favorite target lately — zipping across the middle of the end zone for a touchdown and a 17-7 lead. “I should be doing backflips in here and celebrating,” Sanchez said. “But as a competitor I know we should have won this going away. We didn’t because of the poor play of the quarterback.” In other games on Thursday: Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 ARLINGTON, Texas — Drew Brees and New Orleans blew a 17-point lead, then went back ahead following a quick, long drive with 1:55 left and held on for a victory over Dallas when the Cowboys’ David Buehler narrowly missed a 59-yard field goal.

New Orleans coach Sean Payton appeared to try calling timeout as the ball was snapped, which would’ve given Dallas another chance. But the officials didn’t give it to him, so the play stood. The Saints, playing on the holiday for the first time, won their fourth straight and fifth in six games to improve to 8-3. The Cowboys (3-8) lost for the first time in three games since Garrett became interim coach. Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 DETROIT — Tom Brady threw a season-high four touchdown passes, all in the second half, and had a perfect quarterback rating of 158.3 for New England. Brady was 21 of 27 for 341 yards — just short of his season high — with no interceptions to become the first to have a perfect passer rating this season with a minimum of five attempts, according to STATS LLC. Brady also had a perfect rating in 2007 when he threw a career-high six TD passes in a victory over Miami.

Big 12 farewell felt in Seahawks’ run defense NFL locker rooms, too struggling in recent weeks By Arnie Stapleton The Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Denver Broncos tailback Correll Buckhalter is going to have to find a new smack-talking partner to replace teammate Daniel Graham. Their alma maters meet Friday when Colorado visits Nebraska in the last Big 12 game for both schools, and they’re not scheduled to meet again anytime soon. Graham’s Buffaloes are bolting to the Pac-12 and Buckhalter’s Cornhuskers are heading to the Big Ten next year, ending the rivalry after 69 games — unless or until they play each other down the road in a nonconference game. The schools played six games early last century before beginning their run of annual meetings in 1948. So, Graham will have to turn his trash talk on teammates who went to maybe USC or UCLA, and Buckhalter will have to find somebody from Michigan State or Minnesota to razz. “Well, I can smack talk against them I guess, but it’s not the same doing it with guys that I played against,” Buckhalter said with a laugh. “It’s a little different.” While the series has been close lately with Colorado winning four times in the last nine years, it was lopsided during Tom Osborne’s time. He lost to the Buffs just three times in 23 years. Overall, the Huskers lead the series 48-18-2, though the Buffaloes have had their moments like in 2001, when they whipped Nebraska 62-36 to knock the Cornhuskers out of the top spot in the BCS standings and pave the way for Colorado’s only Big 12 title. Like Buckhalter, Broncos offensive linemen Russ Hochstein went to college in Lincoln, Neb., but he was hesitant to discuss his feelings with a reporter this week. “I don’t want to get into a war of words with Graham,” he said. “I’m excited and I hope they win.” Buckhalter and Graham said they were both sorry to see their schools leave the Big 12 and for the annual rivalry game played on the day after Thanksgiving to end. “Every year, we always looked forward to that big game, the rival game and hopefully we can end it off with a

blast this Friday,” Graham said. “Nebraska was our rival game and there’s still trash-talking with me and Russ and Buck. We all remember those games, the years that I was there it was always a close game.” After Friday, all they’ll have are the memories. “Yeah it is a bummer,” Graham said. “Every year, I think both teams always looked forward to that game. It was always a big game and it was always played the day after Thanksgiving. Everybody’s watching. So, just that whole atmosphere, it’s going to be a hard loss.” That one thing he and Buckhalter can agree on. “Yeah, I don’t even know who the rivalries are going to be with once they go to the Big Ten,” Buckhalter said. Graham said it’s going to be strange watching the Buffs in a new conference. “I think next year, the first year, is going to be weird, just not seeing any Big 12 schools. That’s the only thing I’ve known is the Big Eight, Big 12, I didn’t play in the Big Eight, but you know just growing up watching so it’s going to be real different just seeing all of the Pac-10 schools,” he said. Buckhalter feels the same about having to turn his attention to the likes of Wisconsin and Ohio State. “Seeing them play a whole new conference is going to be different. I’m pretty sure every guy that went to Nebraska feels that way,” he said. “I think it will be good. A different change. A lot of Big Ten guys talk about the Big Ten and I’m going to be interested to see Nebraska go in there and see what success we have.” Colorado athletic director Mike Bohn has indicated he’d like to try to schedule Nebraska in the future, although that might prove difficult as both schools will have tough-as-nails conference schedules already and might be more in the mood to schedule cupcakes than an old rival. “It would be tough,” Graham said, “but at the same time it wouldn’t be the same, I don’t think, because every year the game was always after Thanksgiving. We always knew when that game was and if we set them up as a nonconference game, it would be, what, the first few days or so?” “Yeah,” Buckhalter said. “It wouldn’t be the same.”

By Tim Booth

when the Cardinals ran for 114 yards. Including RENTON, Wash. that game, four of Seat— This is not the best tle’s last five opponents week for Seattle to sudhave topped 100 yards, denly start questioning including 239 yards rushthe problems with its run Next up ing allowed to Oakland defense. and 197 to the New York • Kansas City Not with the best Giants. at Seattle ground team in the NFL Now come the Chiefs, coming to town Sunday. who lead the league aver• When: Seattle’s ability to stop aging 164 yards per game Sunday, the run, a strength of the on the ground and are 1 p.m. Seahawks for the first third in the league with half of the season, has • TV: CBS nearly 5 yards per carry. suddenly become a li- • Radio: In its six wins, Kansas ability. Last week against City is running for nearly KBNW-FM New Orleans, poor tack192 yards per game. 96.5 ling allowed Chris Ivory Charles has an outside to run for 99 yards and shot at a second-straight helped dictate the tenor of 1,000-yard season on the Saints’ 34-19 win. Sunday, needing 152 to reach the Now, Seattle is faced with try- benchmark. Jones has rushed for ing to correct its problems against 644 yards. Kansas City’s duo of Jamaal “You’re dealing with a wide variCharles and Thomas Jones. ety of skill players back there and “We saw on the tape there are they all have different attributes some things we are starting to they bring,” Seattle defensive coorgo away from as far as technique dinator Gus Bradley said. “We just and fundamentals,” Seattle safety have to talk about really keep leverLawyer Milloy said. “So now at age on them, getting 11 hats on the this point of the season, the last ball when they do run and we’re six games, it’s more so focusing going to have to swarm to them.” on the things you do good, getting Seattle came out of New Orleans back to the basics, stuff like that. frustrated because its inability Playing well at home. It’s really to slow down Ivory made the day simple. That game we didn’t do a easier for Drew Brees, who prolot of things right, especially on ceeded to pick apart a leaky pass the defensive side of the ball. It’s defense for 382 yards and four easy to correct.” touchdowns. The worry isn’t much There are multiple reasons for different this week with Kansas Seattle’s sudden turn in stopping City quarterback Matt Cassel, the the run. Through their first five second-highest rated passer in the games, the Seahawks didn’t al- entire league the past five weeks. low any opponent to run for 90 or Seattle brought back Amon more yards. Gordon, who was with the team in Then injuries began mounting, training camp, to add some depth especially on the defensive line. along the defensive line and add Defensive tackle Brandon Mebane a bit of competition up front. Carmissed four games with a calf in- roll said he planned to continue jury and while he was out, defen- with the same group, but perhaps sive end Red Bryant was lost for change the rotations to try and the season to a torn knee ligament. awaken a run defense that carried Fellow defensive tackle Colin Cole the Seahawks early in the season. also suffered a high-ankle sprain “We did a lot of things uncharand isn’t expected back until the acteristic,” Milloy said of the loss middle of December. to New Orleans. “Are we going to Seattle’s win over Arizona on fix it right away? I don’t know. But Oct. 17 first exposed the issue we need to.” The Associated Press


D4 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

SKIING

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Stiegler returns to slopes after three injury-riddled seasons By Pat Graham The Associated Press

VAIL, Colo. — There was a time when U.S. skier Resi Stiegler stepped into the starting gate and visualized every twist and turn on the slalom course before careening down the hill. Now all she sees are the crashes. Three straight injury-riddled seasons have caused Stiegler to ski scared, imagining the worst awaits her at every gate — another broken bone in her leg, tearing another knee ligament, fracturing another arm. Possibly being laid up for months, then going through arduous rehab. And possibly the uncertainty of whether she would even make it back to the slopes. Stiegler, 25, is taking the first steps necessary to get on with her skiing career, seeing a sports psychologist to help her conquer the fear of falling. She still has nightmares about crashing, still thinks about what could happen before loading into the chute for a race. But at least she’s climbing into the gate again. To her, that’s progress; a sign she’s recapturing the form that led her to make the U.S. Olympic squad in 2006. “I’m trying to learn how to ease away from the trauma of a crash,” said Stiegler, who plans to race in the slalom during the World Cup stop in Aspen this weekend. “It’s hard not to think you might get injured again when you don’t think you’ll ever get injured and you do.” Stiegler’s succession of injuries began in December 2007, when she wiped out during a giant slalom run in Lienz, Austria. She caught an edge, went through the fencing, did a cartwheel and collided with a stump, breaking her right leg, left arm and tearing all the ligaments in her right knee. On the verge of coming back the following season, she fractured her right leg in the waning moments of a soccer game, keeping her off the hill until the ’09 World Championships, where she finished in 19th place in the slalom. Soon after that, though, Stiegler had another off-theslopes mishap. Running into her house in flip-flops, she slipped on a step, breaking her foot. More rehab. More training

Reinhold Matay / The Associated Press

Temple forward Rahlir Jefferson blocks the shot of California forward Harper Kamp (22) during Thursday’s game in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. The Bears beat the Owls, 57-50.

California hands Temple first loss The Associated Press

their first two games, but their schedule isn’t getting any easier. No. 1 Duke, No. 7 Villanova, No. 16 Georgetown and Maryland are all upcoming for the Owls. Not exactly the start they were hoping for on this tough stretch. “We had some pretty open shots that we missed,” Allen said. “The offense started getting stagnant a little bit. We did a bad job on defense. We gave them a couple open 3’s and they hit them. It killed us. We did a bad job of maintaining the lead and a bad job of finishing off the game.” In other games on Thursday: Murray State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 ANAHEIM, Calif. — B.J. Jenkins scored 15 points, including two free throws in the final 25 seconds, as Murray State held on for a victory over Stanford in the first round of the 76 Classic. The Racers (3-1) led 29-18 at halftime and scored 18 points off 18 turnovers by the Cardinal (3-1). Arizona State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Houston Baptist . . . . . . . . . . . 55 ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Trent Lockett scored 18 points as Arizona State fought off Houston Baptist in the first round of the Great Alaska Shootout. Kyle Cain had a double-double of 13 points and 17 rebounds for the Sun Devils (2-1). Keala King scored 13 and Rihards Kuksiks 12.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — So much for rebuilding. Harper Kamp scored 13 points, Allen Crabbe had 12 and a young California team beat No. 21 Temple 57-50 on Thursday night in the opening round of the Old Spice Classic for a huge early season spark. “Since day one, we just told people that we’re going to surprise a lot of people,” said Cal center Markhuri Sanders-Frison, who had eight points. “Everybody thought that we didn’t have that much firepower coming back because we lost a lot of our good players last year. I think this win opened a lot of eyes to people around the world.” The Golden Bears (3-0) were propelled by a 16-1 run late in the second half to help the defending Pac-10 champions hand the Owls (2-1) their first loss of the season. Crabbe ripped the ball away from Rhalir Jefferson with about 30 seconds remaining, and he hit two free throws to give Cal a six-point lead and seal the victory. Lavoy Allen had 13 points, and Jefferson scored 10 for a Temple team whose non-conference schedule is only getting tougher. Cal will play Notre Dame today. Temple will face Georgia in the loser’s bracket of the tournament. The Owls had cruised through

Alessandro Trovati / The Associated Press

American Resi Stiegler, 25, seen here in February, 2009, is taking the first steps necessary to get on with her skiing career, seeing a sports psychologist to help her conquer the fear of falling. time lost. Entering last season, an Olympic year, Stiegler was finally healed and healthy. A spot on the U.S. squad heading to Vancouver seemed almost a certainty for the skier who’s been on the team since she was around 16 years old. But in a giant slalom training run last November at Copper Mountain, her aspirations were derailed. Stiegler hooked a gate and her ski failed to pop off, slamming her into the snow so forcefully she fractured the inner part of her left femur and the outside of her tibial plateau. Some of her doctors had never seen a break quite like this before. She wouldn’t be allowed to walk for 18 weeks. And her confidence was wrecked. “You’re helpless,” said Stiegler, who’s from Jackson Hole, Wyo. “It’s the worst feeling, not being able to do anything.” Even in her dark moments, though, she never really thought her career was finished. “I love to give myself a good challenge,” Stiegler said. “I’m a very driven person.” Following her first major spill

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Thursday’s Games

Hawks 116, Wizards 96 WASHINGTON (96) Hinrich 4-7 0-0 8, Blatche 4-10 4-4 12, McGee 2-8 3-3 7, Wall 3-12 4-4 10, Arenas 7-18 3-3 21, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0, Young 8-14 4-6 20, Booker 1-3 0-0 2, Gee 1-4 0-0 2, Seraphin 2-7 22 6, Martin 2-5 2-2 6, N’diaye 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 34-88 24-26 96. ATLANTA (116) Williams 3-7 0-0 6, Smith 8-14 4-4 20, Horford 6-11 3-3 15, Bibby 1-5 0-0 2, Johnson 8-16 2-2 21, Ja.Crawford 4-9 6-7 15, Evans 28 2-2 7, Pachulia 1-4 2-3 4, Powell 3-4 2-2 8, Jo.Crawford 4-8 0-0 9, Teague 1-1 0-0 2, Collins 1-1 4-4 7. Totals 42-88 25-27 116. Washington 18 18 27 33 — 96 Atlanta 28 25 36 27 — 116 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-17 (Arenas 4-9, McGee 0-1, Hinrich 0-2, Young 0-2, Wall 0-3), Atlanta 7-18 (Johnson 3-5, Collins 1-1, Jo.Crawford 1-1, Evans 1-4, Ja.Crawford 1-5, Williams 0-1, Bibby 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 47 (McGee 10), Atlanta 57 (Smith 14). Assists—Washington 18 (Arenas 8), Atlanta 23 (Bibby 6). Total Fouls—Washington 23, Atlanta 24. Flagrant Fouls—Armstrong. A—15,042 (18,729).

Clippers 100, Kings 82 SACRAMENTO (82) Greene 3-7 1-2 8, Landry 7-11 4-6 18, Dalembert 1-2 0-0 2, Evans 2-13 4-7 8, Head 5-10 3-4 15, Cousins 3-8 1-2 7, Udrih 3-7 2-3 8, Casspi 2-5 4-6 9, Thompson 0-1 1-2 1, Jackson 1-3 0-0 2, Jeter 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 29-71 20-32 82. L.A. CLIPPERS (100) Aminu 5-8 2-3 12, Griffin 7-11 11-15 25, Jordan 4-5 1-3 9, Bledsoe 3-8 0-0 6, Gordon 8-17 11-12 28, Foye 0-1 0-0 0, Gomes 1-2 0-0 2, Smith 4-7 3-3 11, Cook 2-4 0-0 4, Warren 0-0 0-0 0, Butler 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 35-69 28-36 100. Sacramento 25 25 19 13 — 82 L.A. Clippers 30 24 30 16 — 100 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 4-11 (Head 2-4, Casspi 1-1, Greene 1-3, Udrih 0-1, Evans 0-2), L.A. Clippers 2-13 (Gordon 1-3, Butler 1-4, Foye 0-1, Cook 0-1, Smith 0-1, Aminu 0-1, Bledsoe 02). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 43 (Landry, Cousins 6), L.A. Clippers 53 (Griffin 15). Assists—Sacramento 21 (Head 7), L.A. Clippers 19 (Gordon 6). Total Fouls—Sacramento 26, L.A. Clippers 25. Technicals—Sacramento defensive three second, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—11,504 (19,060).

LEADERS Through Thursday’s Games ——— SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 13 119 110 368 28.3 Nowitzki, DAL 14 134 91 369 26.4 Rose, CHI 13 134 57 342 26.3 Anthony, DEN 14 127 90 356 25.4 Bryant, LAL 15 128 103 379 25.3 Ellis, GOL 15 143 68 375 25.0 Gordon, LAC 14 110 101 335 23.9 James, MIA 15 117 105 354 23.6 Martin, HOU 14 90 119 329 23.5

Stoudemire, NYK Westbrook, OKC Scola, HOU Gasol, LAL Howard, ORL Bargnani, TOR Gay, MEM Granger, IND Williams, UTA Wade, MIA Beasley, MIN

16 15 14 15 14 15 15 13 16 14 15

132 106 126 130 108 120 127 97 111 98 127

92 122 59 71 91 67 49 48 95 88 48

361 338 311 331 307 328 324 278 340 296 317

22.6 22.5 22.2 22.1 21.9 21.9 21.6 21.4 21.3 21.1 21.1

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG FGA 110 179 63 103 108 181 60 103 78 134 93 162 66 115 124 219 57 101 66 118

PCT .615 .612 .597 .583 .582 .574 .574 .566 .564 .559

Horford, ATL Gasol, MEM Howard, ORL Warrick, PHX Young, PHL Odom, LAL Ibaka, OKC Millsap, UTA McGee, WAS Fields, NYK

Love, MIN Noah, CHI Evans, TOR Howard, ORL Gasol, LAL Camby, POR Griffin, LAC Bogut, MIL Odom, LAL Scola, HOU

REBOUNDS G OFF DEF 16 77 155 13 60 114 14 62 114 14 38 131 15 53 127 14 53 106 16 62 118 12 46 85 15 44 112 14 36 100

ASSISTS G Rondo, BOS 12 Paul, NOR 14 Williams, UTA 16 Kidd, DAL 14 Nash, PHX 13 Wall, WAS 10 Westbrook, OKC 15 Rose, CHI 13 James, MIA 15 Felton, NYK 16

TOT AVG 232 14.5 174 13.4 176 12.6 169 12.1 180 12.0 159 11.4 180 11.3 131 10.9 156 10.4 136 9.7 AST 171 141 157 133 123 91 125 108 124 128

AVG 14.3 10.1 9.8 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.0

Atlantic Division L 4 8 9 10 12

Boston New York Toronto New Jersey Philadelphia

Orlando Atlanta Miami Washington Charlotte

W 10 9 8 5 5

L 4 7 7 9 10

Chicago Indiana Cleveland Milwaukee Detroit

W 8 7 6 5 5

L 5 6 8 9 10

GB — 3½ 5 6 8

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str W-2 W-5 W-4 L-1 L-2

Home 6-1 2-4 4-3 3-4 2-4

Away 5-3 6-4 2-6 2-6 1-8

Conf 9-2 5-3 5-4 3-7 3-9

Away 3-2 5-2 2-4 0-7 3-5

Conf 7-2 6-4 6-4 3-9 3-7

Away 3-4 3-2 3-4 2-5 2-7

Conf 2-2 5-4 6-5 4-3 2-4

Southeast Division Pct .714 .563 .533 .357 .333

GB — 2 2½ 5 5½

L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 L-3 L-1 L-2

Home 7-2 4-5 6-3 5-2 2-5

Central Division Pct .615 .538 .429 .357 .333

GB — 1 2½ 3½ 4

L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-1 W-2 W-1 L-4 L-2

Home 5-1 4-4 3-4 3-4 3-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio New Orleans Dallas Memphis Houston

W 13 11 10 6 4

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 11 10 8 8 4

L 1 3 4 9 10

Pct .929 .786 .714 .400 .286

GB — 2 3 7½ 9

L10 10-0 7-3 7-3 4-6 4-6

Str W-12 L-2 W-3 W-2 W-1

Home 7-1 7-0 5-3 4-4 2-4

Away 6-0 4-3 5-1 2-5 2-6

Conf 7-1 7-3 5-3 4-5 2-7

Away 6-2 5-1 3-5 4-4 1-8

Conf 5-5 5-4 6-4 4-5 2-7

Away 5-1 2-6 4-5 2-4 0-7

Conf 9-2 4-4 6-4 1-7 3-9

Northwest Division L 5 5 6 6 12

Pct .688 .667 .571 .571 .250

GB — ½ 2 2 7

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 5-5 3-7

Str W-3 L-1 W-2 L-1 L-3

Home 5-3 5-4 5-1 4-2 3-4

Paciic Division

SCHEDULE 2010-11 Portland Trail Blazers All Times PST Friday, Nov. 26 New Orleans, 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 28 at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 30 at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 1 at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 3 at Washington, 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 5 L.A. Clippers, 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 7 Phoenix, 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 9 Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 10 at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 12 at San Antonio, 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 13 at Memphis, 5 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 15 at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 17 Minnesota, 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 18 Golden State, 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 20 Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 25 at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27 at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 28 at Denver, 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30 Utah, 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 2 Houston, 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 4 at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 5 at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 7 at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 9 Miami, 6 p.m.

Pct .733 .500 .400 .333 .200

L.A. Lakers Golden State Phoenix Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 13 7 7 4 3

L 2 8 8 10 13

Pct .867 .467 .467 .286 .188

fore, never broke a bone before. For me, they all came at once,” said Stiegler, whose brother Seppi is a member of the University of Denver ski squad that’s won three straight NCAA titles. “You can’t think too hard about it.” These days, she’s trying to regain her confidence, not dwell on crashing and focus on the course. The counseling is helping her put the fear of falling behind her. “Some days are super bad and I can’t even ski,” said Stiegler, who will concentrate primarily on the slalom this season. “Every day is different.” The sight of her back on the slopes is a welcome one to her teammates. “So many people would give up,” said Julia Mancuso, who won two silver medals at the Vancouver Olympics. “When I had my back injury, it was really difficult to push my body to the limit. ... I think when you finally feel your body is good, that’s when the fear goes away.” Stiegler certainly hopes. “It’s difficult to mentally push it out of your head,” she said. Can she? “Ask me again in three months,” she said, grinning.

NBA ROUNDUP

EASTERN CONFERENCE W 11 8 6 5 3

in 2007, Stiegler moved to Maui to recoup and rehab. She took up photography and creative writing. She also met her boyfriend, professional windsurfer Kevin Pritchard, dabbling in that sport as well. Stiegler discovered that there was more to life than just skiing, more to her than just how fast she went down the mountain. “I’ve become more independent and creative with who I am,” she said. “When these big things happened, and I wasn’t going to be skiing for a while, I had to figure out what to do. This had led me to different parts of life.” Stiegler has always been around the slopes. Her father, Pepi Stiegler, won multiple Olympic medals for Austria, including gold in the slalom at the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck. She was skiing by 2 years old and racing four years later. Over her career, Stiegler has won national titles, junior world races and European Cup competitions, and was closing in on possibly making the podium at a World Cup event, finishing fourth several times. And then the injuries hit. “I’ve never been injured be-

GB — 6 6 8½ 10½

L10 Str 8-2 W-5 3-7 L-4 5-5 L-1 1-9 L-3 2-8 W-2 ——— Thursday’s Games

Atlanta 116, Washington 96

Home 8-1 5-2 3-3 2-6 3-6

L.A. Clippers 100, Sacramento 82 Today’s Games

Houston at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 6:30 p.m.

Cleveland at Orlando, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Indiana, 5 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Portland, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games

Atlanta at New York, 10 a.m. Memphis at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Golden State at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Milwaukee, 6 p.m.

Orlando at Washington, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Sacramento, 7 p.m. ——— All Times PST

Duo leads Clippers to win over Kings Blake Griffin scores 25 points, grabs 15 board for L.A. The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Eric Gordon scored 28 points and Blake Griffin had 25 points and 15 rebounds for the Los Angeles Clippers, who took full advantage of their new one-two punch to beat the Sacramento Kings 100-82 on Thursday night. Center Chris Kaman was sidelined for the eighth straight game because of a sprained left ankle and point guard Baron Davis was sidelined for the 12th time in 13 games because of a swollen left knee. But the Clippers, coming off a 99-95 victory over New Orleans on Monday that snapped a ninegame losing streak, posted consecutive wins for the first time since a three-game stretch last February. Carl Landry scored 18 points for Sacramento, which has lost nine of its last 10 games after a 3-1 start. It was the fifth time this season that the Kings’ high-point man had fewer than 20. Tyreke Evans, who averaged 23.7 points in his three games against the Clippers last season, had just eight points and five assists in 37 minutes. Evans, the 2009-10 rookie of the year, missed his first eight shots and played more than 25 scoreless minutes before getting the benefit of a goaltending call against DeAndre Jordan on a layup with 4:02 left in the third quarter and the Kings trailing 75-59.

Gus Ruelas / The Associated Press

Sacramento Kings guard Luther Head (9) gets by Los Angeles Clippers guard Eric Bledsoe, back left, on a fast break in the first half of Thursday’s game in Los Angeles. Two games removed from his 44-point, 15-rebound, seven-assist tour de force against the New York Knicks last Saturday at Staples Center, Griffin once again showed the athletic artistry that no doubt will make the Clippers a more attractive team for the television networks to spotlight than in the past — even if they keep losing. Displaying a pent-up fury that needed to be unleashed after missing all of last season with a knee injury, the former Oklahoma star and first overall pick in the 2009 draft pick shot seven for 11 from the field. He is averaging 19.3 points and 11.3 rebounds in his first

16 games — including nine double-doubles. The only other players averaging at least 18 points and 11 rebounds are Pau Gasol, Dwight Howard and Kevin Love. The Clippers extended their 54-50 halftime lead to 69-56 with a 15-6 run capped by Gordon’s finger roll with 6:45 left in the third quarter. Reserve forward Craig Smith helped salt it away midway through the fourth with seven points in a 1:33 span, increasing the margin to 97-74. Luther Head had 15 points and a season-high seven assists for the Kings. No Sacramento player had more than five assists in any of the team’s previous four games, but Head surpassed that total when he set up a short jumper by rookie DeMarcus Cousins with 3:26 left in the second quarter. Cousins, the fifth overall pick in the draft, had seven points and five rebounds in a foulplagued 25 minutes. Also on Thursday: Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 21 points, Josh Smith added 20 with 14 rebounds and Atlanta beat Washington to snap a three-game losing streak. Al Horford finished with 15 points and 13 boards for the Hawks, who won their 11th straight over Washington. They have lost seven of nine overall. Gilbert Arenas scored 21 and Nick Young added 20 for the Wizards, who have yet to beat a team with a winning record this season and still seek their first road victory.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 D5

Continued from D1 The No. 1 Ducks (10-0, 7-0 Pac-10) can clinch a BCS berth today when the No. 20 Wildcats (7-3, 4-3) visit Autzen Stadium. Oregon can also lock up at least a share of the conference title with a victory. Oregon, with its famously fast, highscoring offense, is ranked atop the nation with an average of 50.7 points a game, and the team’s averaging 542.2 yards total offense. But Arizona could prove problematic for the Ducks. There are questions surrounding running back LaMichael James, who leads the nation with 158 rushing yards a game. After Oregon’s last game, a 15-13 squeaker over California, the Heisman Trophy hopeful was on crutches with a leg injury. He was able to rest the injury over a bye week and practiced on a limited basis. James said earlier this week he was still feeling some pain, but he was not listed on Oregon’s injury report. Arizona is ranked No. 20 nationally in total defense, allowing an average 319.3 yards, and 14th in run defense, allowing 112.9. And, also coming off a bye, the Wildcats have had a chance to both rest and game-plan for the Ducks. Defensive coordinator Greg Brown joked when asked how his unit planned to slow down Oregon. “Thirteen guys,” he said. “We’ve got a special petition into the NCAA to see if they’ll go for it.” On offense, Arizona’s strength is quarterback Nick Foles, who has thrown for 601 yards with four touchdowns and an interception over his last two games. He is completing a conference-high 71.0 percent of his passes. But the Wildcats lost those two games, to Stanford and USC — both of whom Oregon easily defeated. Arizona will be without receiver Bug Wright, suspended indefinitely this week for violating team rules. Wright had two touchdown catches this season. Stoops said the Wildcats learned from last year’s encounter with the Ducks. “I think our players understand how good you have to play as a team and how disciplined and how quick they can strike,” coach Mike Stoops said. “We had pretty good control of that game a year ago and they came back and scored two touchdowns in the fourth quarter and executed very well. We just got a couple of guys out of place, and the next thing you knew, they were scoring.” Oregon showed vulnerability in a low-scoring game against Cal, and no doubt the Wildcats have committed the film on the game to memory. But quarterback Darron Thomas said the narrow victory in a season of blowouts didn’t rattle the Ducks. “Nothing’s really changed. We expect Arizona to come out and do some similar things that Cal did, so we just have to be ready this time,” said Thomas, who has thrown 23 touchdown passes in Oregon’s unique spread-option. This one will likely produce higher scores for both teams. Over their last four meetings, Arizona has scored 120 points (40 points per game), while Oregon has had 126 points (42). In the end, weather could ultimately be a factor for Arizona. The forecast for today calls for rain and temperatures in the 40s. That would mean the Wildcats — used to a considerably warmer and drier climate — might not be able to rely so much on their passing attack, which is averaging just over 300 yards a game. “I think in big games, the excitement of the situation keeps you focused on the task at hand. The excitement of the game, the totality of it, has a lot to do with the atmosphere,” Stoops said. “It might be uncomfortable for us, not what we’re used to, but it shouldn’t have any effect on the game.”

Cougars Continued from D1 But did anybody think Sears was bound to break former Mountain View star Ash Gibson’s single-season school record of 2,109 yards set in 2007? “He didn’t surprise myself or (running backs) coach (Taylor) Vallerga, but I think he surprised everybody else,” says Mountain View coach Steve Turner. “We saw as a freshman what he could do. “You never expect someone to do what he is doing (in breaking records). But we expected him to be at least as good as the guys we’ve had before him.” Sears, though, might not have been so sure. “It has definitely been a big surprise,” Sears says of his success as a ball carrier. “This whole thing has been a great opportunity.” Sears, who was born in Anaheim, Calif., and moved with his family to Bend before his first birthday, has always been a good athlete. One of his accomplishments includes winning the Six Pac USA 2004 Nationals 12-and-under roller-hockey championship with the Bend Bullets. Sears played five years for Bullets coach Butch Roberts, and Roberts and Sears remain close. Roberts says that Sears has quali-

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ALPINE SKIING MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-3880002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

BIKING Gary Kazanjian / The Associated Press

Nevada’s Colin Kaepernick looks to become the first player in NCAA history to rush for 1,000 yards and pass for 2,000 in three consecutive seasons.

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore, a Heisman Trophy contender, leads the No. 3 ranked Broncos into Reno to battle Nevada today.

Win over Nevada could help give Boise State a title shot By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

RENO, Nev. — The president of the university spoke up for Boise State, going where coach Chris Petersen won’t. Someone had to make a statement for the Broncos, who do nothing but win even if the computers at the Bowl Championship Series don’t appreciate perfection. Now the No. 3 Broncos have what figures to be the best chance to speak for themselves tonight when they meet once-beaten Nevada in the biggest game ever played in the Biggest Little City in the World. At stake could be something far greater than a conference title. Depending on what happens earlier in the day, it’s conceivable that Boise State could be playing for a spot in the BCS title game, something no team from the puny Western Athletic Conference could ever have thought possible. Not that Petersen would ever admit the impossible is closer to possible than ever before. “There is a lot riding on this, no question,” Petersen said. “But I think one of the things our guys have done so well is they’ve treated every game that we’ve played like a big game. And you know, the more you win the bigger they get each week. That’s how it’s been for us. Now we have a really big game against probably the best team we’ve played all year. That’s how you like it at the end.” Things would have to break Boise State’s way for the Broncos (10-0, 6-0 WAC) to make the Jan. 10 title game in Arizona, but for the first time all season there seems to be a path leading there. The top two teams in the country are playing games they could lose today — particularly Auburn against Alabama — and TCU has no more big tests left to cement a precarious hold on the No. 3 spot in the BCS standings. If Auburn or Oregon were to lose and Boise State beats No. 19 Nevada, the Broncos, now fourth in the BCS, could move into one of the top two

spots with just one game left at home against lightly regarded Utah State. And home is a place where Boise State has won its last 61 games, including a 51-0 pasting of Fresno State last week that left opposing coach Pat Hill wondering how the Broncos could be kept out of the title game. “What else do they have to do? They’re on the verge of their fourth undefeated season in six years, you got to be kidding me,” Hill said. “Now someday we’ve got to wake up and say we can’t just listen to the people who get all the money. We’ve Next up got to listen to the • Boise State people that have at Nevada the best teams. They’re a great • When: football team.” Today, 7:15 Just how great p.m. Boise State may be • TV: ESPN is the question that has dogged them all year. They’re No. 3 in all the polls, but the computers that make up part of the BCS equation dropped them just behind TCU in the BCS standings because of a relatively weak schedule highlighted by an opening game against Virginia Tech. The scheduling debate erupted again this week when Ohio State president Gordon Gee declared neither Boise State nor TCU should be allowed into the title game because schools from bigger conferences don’t play the “Little Sisters of the Poor.” That drew an angry response from Boise State’s president, Bob Kustra, who said teams like Ohio State refuse to even play Boise State because they’re afraid of getting beat by schools they believe they’re superior to. “It’s easy for the presidents to talk, but ask the ADs when’s the last time that they seriously entertained taking requests or inviting Boise State to (play them),” Kustra said. “If you’re Boise State or TCU, they’re going to want to steer way clear of you.” Nevada hasn’t steered clear of Boi-

Class 5A semifinals A look at the Class 5A state football semifinal game between Mountain View and Sherwood: Sherwood player to watch: Bowman senior fullback Michael Balfour last week ran for 256 yards and two touchdowns in a 39-13 quarterfinal win over Jefferson. Balfour has run for 1,330 yards and 19 rushing touchdowns this season in Sherwood’s run-oriented wing-T offense. Mountain View player to watch: Cougar junior quarterback Jacob Hollister helped Mountain View keep a balanced offense by completing 11 of 21 passes for 140 yards and two touchdowns in last week’s 25-22 quarterfinal win over Corvallis. Hollister has passed for 1,778 yards and 25 touchdowns this season. Noteworthy: Sherwood won the Northwest Oregon Conference this season with a 7-0 record without being challenged. The Bowmen have scored fewer than 40 points just once in 11 games and have not allowed more than 28 points in a game. Sherwood’s closest game was a 42-28 season-opening win over Skyview High in Vancouver, Wash. Sherwood and Mountain View have not played a common opponent this season. Mountain View is trying to earn its first berth into a state championship game. The Cougars played in the state semifinals in 1985 and 2007 but lost both games. Sherwood reached the state title game in 1993, 2004, and 2005 but lost all three contests. ties uncommon for an 18-year-old that help him excel in sports. “Quiet confidence,” Roberts replies when asked to describe Sears’ personality. “He’s a pretty rare kid in terms of being disciplined and focused AND able. He is very, very capable. Just pick a sport and watch him do anything.” At 5-feet, 10-inches tall and 181 pounds, Sears is not particularly big. Nor is he a speed back. But Turner compares Sears to former NFL great Emmitt Smith in that he is deceptively elusive and strong. “He doesn’t run away from people

too many times, and he doesn’t run over people,” Turner says. “But you hand the ball off (to Sears on first and 10), and (then) it’s second and two.” Sears also possesses something that all good athletes have in common. “Get him between the lines and he is going to compete like a son of a gun,” Turner says. “I don’t care what it is. He’s a heck of a soccer player; he’s a heck of a roller (-hockey player).” Sears, though, is not quick to give himself credit. Sears points out that others have helped him compile his gaudy

se State, mostly because they play in the same conference. But the Wolf Pack hasn’t had any success against the Broncos this decade, losing 10 straight games, including four at home in Reno. Oddsmakers figure that streak will continue, making Nevada a 14point underdog despite the fact the only loss the Wolf Pack (10-1, 5-1 WAC) have this year was in a close game on the road against Hawaii. Like Boise State, Nevada has been an offensive force, with senior quarterback Colin Kaepernick running coach Chris Ault’s pistol offense with great efficiency. Nevada is ranked in the AP Top 25 for the first year since 1948 and is playing its highest ranked opponent ever at home. What makes the game even more interesting is that the Wolf Pack played a competitive game in Boise last year, losing 44-33 after falling behind early. “There’s ways to win. We have to find those ways,” Ault said. “We know for us to win, the type of game we have to play. We have to execute our game. Quite frankly, we’ve got to execute better than we ever have.” Kaepernick’s execution so far this season has bordered on flawless. The 6-foot-6 inch QB has completed 66 percent of his passes for 2,412 yards and 19 touchdowns, and needs just 16 yards rushing to become the first player in NCAA history to run for 1,000 yards and pass for 2,000 in three consecutive seasons. Boise State runs a more traditional offense, and quarterback Kellen Moore runs it so well that he is a Heisman contender. Even more startling than his 72 percent completion percentage this year is his career record of 36-1, with the lone loss in the 2008 Poinsettia Bowl to TCU, 17-16. “He is cool. You don’t flap him. He is one of those guys who is going to stand in there, run a game plan and execute it,” Ault said. “Their offensive front is awful good. They surround him with some pretty doggone good players.”

statistics. “It’s all because of the linemen, fullbacks and great coaching,” Sears says. “We’ve always been a strong running team,” he adds. “This year, it’s great we’re more balanced. We do have an amazing passing game, too. I think that is one thing that sets this Mountain View team apart from some of the past teams.” Sears wants to go to college after high school, but he has yet to decide if he is interested in playing football once he gets there. He also has not had much time to reflect on his achievements this season — which include being named the Intermountain Conference offensive player of the year. “I’m just trying to take it one game at a time, and I’ll look back at it after,” he says. That next game happens to be a big one against undefeated Sherwood. If Mountain View wins, the Cougars will reach the state finals for the first time in school history. Maybe then Sears will look back at his own remarkable accomplishments. “Senior year, you can’t hope for anything more than an undefeated season and making it to the semifinals,” Sears says. “We just want to keep going.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-6177868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23. Riders will be grouped based on age and ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-335-1346. CROSSAFLIXION CUP CYCLOCROSS SERIES: For youths through masters, and beginners through experienced riders, Nov. 27 at Seventh Mountain Resort; races start at 9 a.m.; registration on race day or at http://signmeup.com; $10-$25 except for kiddie cross race (12-and-under), which is free; contact Gina Miller at 541-318-7388 or gina@FreshAirSports.com. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org; 541-678-3865.

MISCELLANEOUS THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-962-2862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options from Dec. 6 to Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www. bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC FALL DRYLAND TRAINING AND CONDITIONING PROGRAM: For ages 11 through high school age; through November; 541-3880002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive west of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18 began Nov. 17; Youth Club for ages 7-11 starts Dec. 4; times vary; www. bendenduranceacademy.org; 541-678-3865.

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@ lavacityrollerdolls.com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at dedwards@ bendbroadband.com or 541-419-0889. FLEET FEET GROUP RUN: Every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports in Bend; free; www.fleetfeetbend.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11-minute miles can be accommodated; Sundays at 9 a.m.; locations vary, Bend; free; 541-317-3568 or jenny@footzonebend.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOWBOARDING DRYLAND SNOWBOARD CLASS: At Acrovision Sports Center in Bend; Mondays and Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.; instruction by Justin Norman, guest appearances by technique rider Jonah Owen and others; 541-388-5555. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.


A DV EN T U R E S P ORT S

D6 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Film

From the ilm “WildWater”

In the film “WildWater,” daring kayakers run a 15-mile stretch of the North Fork of the Payette River in Idaho, which was running at 9,000 cubic feet per second.

Running wild in Idaho World-class kayakers run rain-swollen Payette River in “WildWater” film By Eric Barker Lewiston (Idaho) Tribune

Anson Fogel calls it one of the most significant feats in kayaking history. In June, when rain was pounding the Northwest and swelling rivers beyond their banks, a cadre of kayakers slipped their hard-shell boats into the snarling, churning mess of white water that is the North Fork of the Payette River along U.S. Highway 55 south of Cascade, Idaho. Fogel, a kayaker himself and a professional adventure filmmaker from Carbondale, Colo., captured the high-water run. It is part of his film “WildWater,” which is being featured in the Banff Mountain Film Festival’s World Tour. “I’ve never seen anything like it at that level. It’s almost incomprehensible. It’s definitely one of the most significant pieces of white water at high water,” Fogel said. On June 9 and 10 the river was pushing 9,000 cubic feet per second. Two kayakers ran the entire 15-mile stretch known

DANSKO

UGG

Fogel was filming in Washington just before the run but got wind of the high water and drove nine hours to reach Idaho in time to film the event. He and his crew quickly scouted locations and tried to figure out how to stage the shoot. The boaters were running the river for fun and not the cameras. “It’s so fast and so difficult, you only really have one chance,” he said. “Following you just have to be really quick. It took a while to figure out how to capture that.” Fogel did not make the run himself. “I’m not a world-class boater and that river, that section of the North Fork of the Payette at 8,000 cfs, is for world-class boaters only,” he said. “It was a historic event and a pretty incredible thing to be a part of. The guys running it deserve an immense amount of credit. No one had ever run it at that level. Who knows if anyone will again?” Eric Barker can be reached at ebarker@ lmtribune.com or at 208-848-2273.

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as the Upper Five, Middle Five and Lower Five and the biggest rapid, Jacob’s Ladder/ Golf Course, “one continuous, nonstop mile of class V-plus, class VI, massive chaotic whitewater.” It’s difficult water at any stage but at high flows it is rated Class V-plus, the hardest, most technical and most dangerous white water that can be run. Class VI is considered unrunnable. Tristan McClaren, of McCall, Idaho, and James Byrd, of Montana, ran the entire stretch. Other McCall-area kayakers who ran all but Jacob’s Ladder/Golf Course include Brian Ward, Fred Coriell, Ryan Casey and Erik Boomer. Fogel called them world-class kayakers and said the film would not have been possible without the cooperation and help of local boaters. “We really, really appreciate the community helping us out and give credit to the athletes, it’s all about the river and the athletes and not about us,” he said.

Continued from D1 The films will lift audiences to the top of K2, the world’s secondhighest peak, and drop them into the depths of the earth’s caving frontiers. In between, viewers can expect to go paddling, skiing, boarding, biking along with some great story telling and insights on mountain culture. “As usual, the evenings will be sprinkled with suspense, awe, laughter and amazement at what people can risk and survive,” said Phil Bridgers of Mountain Gear, which sponsors the World Tour in Spokane, Wash. Bridgers was in Banff for the festival and a film-watching bender. He said he personally viewed 31 of the festival’s film competition finalists earlier this month. The 35th annual Banff festival was a showcase for the world’s best films on mountain subjects: climbing, culture, environment, exploration, adventure and sport. This year’s event attracted 257 entries from 35 countries. Judges whittled the field to about 60 films screened during the nine-day festival before a jury awarded more than $40,000 in cash and prizes. “Once again, the quality of the films and the grass roots productions have risen to another level because of the quality of cameras and editing,” Bridgers said. Michael Boge of Mountain Fever in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, also attended the festival. “The films this year were excellent and probably the best I have seen in Banff in the last seven years,” he said. Boge sponsors the World Tour in Coeur d’Alene and Sandpoint during winter to raise money for youth charities in Peru and North Idaho. The exact lineup of films is different at each showing, but there’s a core of award winners that tend to be featured. Expect to pucker up when a daredevil BASE jumper wearing a wing suit and helmet cam leaps out of a helicopter over The Matterhorn and jets down along a ridge sometimes skimming just 5 to 10 feet above the rocks. “The Swiss Machine” (www.youtube.com/ watch?v=VUWBbepsdmY/), features Ueli Steck, perhaps the greatest speed alpinist, posting record-breaking ascents in the Alps before joining Honnold in Yosemite, where the duo makes a vertical sprint up The Nose of El Capitan in 2 hours, 47 minutes. “Most good climbing teams take three days,” Bridgers said, putting the feat in perspective. “Crossing the Ditch” (www.crossingtheditch.com.au/) tells of the 1,400-mile muscle-powered voyage in the treacherous Tasman Sea. “They had a high-tech kayak with things like solar panels,” Bridgers said. “They paddled outside but had an enclosed cockpit. They finished in 62 days, including something like 11 days when they were trapped in a huge eddy so strong they couldn’t paddle out of it.” They were on the water so long, barnacles began forming on the bottom of their kayak. But when they got in the water to clean them off and improve the performance of their boat, they attracted sharks. The latest technology plays a big role in “As It Happens” (camp4collective.com/?p=30/), as two climbers file video dispatches from their attempt at the first ascent of Nepal’s 6,000-meter-high Tawoche Himal. In contrast, “Last Paradise” (www.lastparadisefilm.com/) relies largely on archival film starting in the 1960s to follow a bunch of kids that launches its surfing prowess into extreme sport innovations from sea to snow. “For example, they used their surf boards for snowboards, but they didn’t have bindings, so they were using suction cups to fasten themselves on their boards,” Bridgers said. As always, terse films will add spark to the theater. “The Longest Way” (www.thelongestway.com/extras/thevideo/), winner of the award for best short mountain film, travels 4,000 miles across China in five minutes. It tells a complex story in a spare and creative way featuring a stop-motion chronicle of Christoph Rehage’s face and unleashed facial-hair growth.

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F

Family DVD

Inside

“The Last Airbender” pits heroic boy against evil forces, Page E3

FAMILY INSIDE

End the holiday shuffle

Dear Abby Mother does a slow burn picking up smokers’ trash, Page E2

‘Not the best’ Bristol Palin’s “Dancing” success defies easy explanation, Page E2

Too many families, not enough time?

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz Chicago Tribune

For Angela Smith, Christmas is among the least wonderful times of year. Smith, who lives in a Milwaukee suburb, spends the holiday shuttling among four sets of parents: her divorced parents, plus her husband’s divorced parents, none of whom gets along with the others but all of whom expect a Christmas visit. Then there’s Grandma, who also doesn’t get along with the rest of the family and requires a separate trip. Smith, her husband and their toddler daughter manage by splitting Christmas Day between her husband’s mother and father, and Christmas Eve between Smith’s mother and father, stopping by Grandma’s on the way home — and worrying all along about how many hours to spend and how much food to eat at each household to make sure they save room for the next meal. Making it all worse, Smith said, are the extended family members (including an uncle who drinks too much and is known to talk about pornography at the dinner table), who don’t seem worth Smith’s effort given that they’re not part of her life the rest of the year. “Holidays are a nightmare,” said Smith, 29. “We were hoping having a toddler would make it easier because we have an excuse, but then it’s like, ‘We don’t get to see her!’ ”

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Extended pacifier use may impact speech A child who uses a pacifier for a prolonged period of time may be negatively affecting his or her speech skills, according to research presented at the American SpeechLanguage-Hearing Association’s recent convention. The pacifier is believed to interfere with how the tongue tip movement develops, which is needed for a child to produce certain sounds. Pacifier use after age 2 may also cause the front teeth to protrude, according to a study in the Journal of the American Dental Association.

Oregon in middle for tobacco prevention

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

Tree lightings Families can pick from festive tree lighting ceremonies in Sisters, Sunriver and Bend tonight.

Kids’ Day at the nature center If your family hasn’t been to the Sunriver Nature Center, Saturday might be a good day to go. The center is offering free admission to those ages 12 and younger.

Christmas parades Both Sisters and Redmond will host family-friendly holiday parades Saturday. The Sisters’ parade takes place at 2 p.m.; Redmond’s parade takes place at 5 p.m.

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

When it comes to funding programs to help smokers quit and to prevent kids from trying tobacco, Oregon falls right in the middle of the states. Oregon is 25th in the nation when it comes to funding. The information is based on a report from a group of public health organizations, which included the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and the American Heart Association. According to the report, the states collected $25.3 billion from taxes on tobacco and settlements related to tobacco this year and will spend about 2 percent of that amount on tobacco prevention. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

Set boundaries

Therapeutic

friendship For many elderly, pets provide love, companionship and help with mental acuity By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

I

n May, Peggy Morrison moved to Bend from her well-loved Sacramento home after 43 years. The 79-year-old now lives in an apartment at Whispering Winds Retirement community in Bend to be closer to her daughter and grandchildren. The move was a huge step, but Morrison was grateful to have company — her dog Lady Speedbump. “I don’t think I could have really done it without her,” said Morrison. The golden retriever-Labrador mix has been a constant companion for Morrison during the past six years. “I never feel like I’m alone when she’s here.” Whispering Winds Marketing Director Angela Vanderpool estimates that 35 to 40 percent of the residents have pets. She says they provide companionship and unconditional love. Pet ownership has been shown to contrib-

ISSUES IN AGING

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

ute to health in a variety of ways, including boosting immunity, according to Stephanie LaFarge, senior director for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals counseling services. The emotional support animals offer can be great, but pet ownership also comes with responsibility and challenges. See Pets / E6

Peggy Morrison is grateful for the companionship of Lady Speedbump at Whispering Winds in Bend. Morrison says the Lab mix’s fondness for blocking doorways or hallways inspired her name.

Overwhelming family demands can sour holiday spirits faster than week-old eggnog. Even reasonable families on good terms are rife with holiday expectations, forcing many people to face an unpleasant choice between disappointing loved ones and losing their minds. How do you cope when everyone wants dibs on your precious holiday time? The key is learning to set boundaries — even to say the unthinkable “No,” if necessary — so that you’re not stuck trying to spread comfort and joy at the expense of your own. “You have to do what feels good to you and what feels good to the relationship,” said Constance Ahrons, a San Diego psychologist and author of “We’re Still Family: What Grown Children Have to Say About Their Parents’ Divorce” (Harper, $14.99). See Holiday / E6

Coping strategies Rather than banish family completely during the holidays, sometimes it helps to set boundaries. A few tips: • Be selfish: Avoid round-theclock family obligations by carving out time for yourself to work out, visit a friend or spend alone time with your spouse or partner, advised psychologist Joshua Coleman. • Play referee: Head off issues you anticipate arising. If you want to stay at a hotel instead of a house packed with relatives, or if you dislike how your parents treat your kids, have a conversation about it before the visit, Coleman said. If you discuss it in a clear, lighthearted tone, always saying something appreciative before delivering any critical feedback, it likely will be received better. • Host at home: Take control by hosting a holiday in your home. Invite the family, suggests psychologist Constance Ahrons, and be prepared if some of your relatives decline.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mother does a slow burn picking up smokers’ trash

Palin’s ‘Dancing’ success defies easy explanation By David Bauder The Associated Press

Dear Abby: My husband and I returned to our hometown and bought a bungalow in a cute older neighborhood. The homes are close together, separated by a single driveway. Our neighbors on both sides of us are smokers. They smoke on their front porches and flick their smoldering butts onto the driveway and yard. The ground is littered with them, which my two toddlers want to put into their mouths every time they go outside. Often I’ll go out with a bag and collect the butts, but it’s annoying having to pick up someone’s easily discarded trash — particularly trash that has been in someone’s mouth. My neighbors are pretty rough, and I’m afraid a confrontation could result in an escalation of the problem. Should I continue gathering up the butts and keep my mouth shut? Or should I just “butt out”? — Bothered in Missouri Dear Bothered: If you are concerned about a hostile reaction from your neighbors, do not approach them — particularly if you’re afraid that doing so could become confrontational. Instead, plant hedges or bushes between your property and theirs, and have your children play — under your supervision — in the backyard. Dear Abby: My mom has three sisters, two of whom I am very close to and love dearly. The problem is the third sister, “Aunt Sandy.” She had a falling out with Mom a few years ago and is now considered the black sheep of the family. At my grandmother’s funeral, I had the chance to sit and talk with her, and I didn’t feel I was doing anything wrong. However, my mom told me later she was “hurt” because I had talked to Aunt Sandy knowing the family is upset with her. Mom said she’d appreciate it if I didn’t do it

DEAR ABBY again. I tried to explain that the way she feels about her sister shouldn’t have anything to do with our relationship, but Mom refuses to understand. I want a connection with my Aunt Sandy without hurting my mom. Please help. — We’re Still Related Dear Still Related: I wish you had told me in more detail why your mother is angry with Sandy, and why the rest of the family is cooperating in isolating her. However, you are an adult. Whom you choose to befriend is your business, not your mother’s. If you wish to pursue a relationship with Aunt Sandy, you are free to do so. And if you don’t want your mother to be “hurt,” don’t discuss it with her. Dear Abby: I was walking to lunch a few days ago and approached the entrance of a restaurant a couple of seconds after a man approaching from the opposite direction. He was a gentleman and held the door for me. I said thank you and walked inside. Even though he was there first, I wound up in front of him in a long line. Are there rules of etiquette for this? I felt a little awkward essentially cutting in line after he was so chivalrous. — Nicole in Denver Dear Nicole: There is no rule of etiquette that dictates it, but you could have offered the gentleman a chance to be in line in front of you. However, if you did, he might have extended his chivalry further and refused. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

A shadow political campaign or an “attagirl” for a struggling amateur? Bristol Palin’s success on this season’s “Dancing With the Stars” defies easy explanation. Either way, Bristol has something to brag about if talk at the Palin dinner table turns toward vote-getting ability. Just like her mom, Sarah, and her campaign for the vice presidency two years ago, however, Bristol fell short at the end. She finished third to champion Jennifer Grey of “Dirty Dancing” fame during the ABC competition’s two-hour finale Tuesday. Runner-up was Disney Channel star Kyle Massey. Palin’s march, shimmy and cha-cha to the finals put “Dancing With the Stars,” of all programs, into the nation’s political cauldron. Clearly, Bristol drew support from many people who admire her mother, who frequently appeared in the show’s studio audience to root for her daughter. Sarah Palin supporters helped organize campaigns to keep her daughter on the show, like radio talk host Tammy Bruce’s “Operation Bristol.” Conservative blogger Kevin DuJan’s Hillbuzz.org website also led a get-out-the-vote effort and wrote after Tuesday’s results that Palin “drove the Left crazy for three months. Score!” Bristol’s success only intensified the spotlight on Sarah Palin to an extraordinary degree for an out-of-office politician, largely in ways that have nothing to do with politics. Besides the “Dancing With the Stars” exposure, Palin’s TLC series about Alaska is in the midst of airing, and she has a new book due out. Jason Gershman, a mathematician from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauder-

Charles Sykes / The Associated Press

“Dancing with the Stars” winner, Jennifer Grey arrives for an appearance Wednesday on ABC’s “Good Morning America” in New York.

ABC via The Associated Press

Bristol Palin and her partner, Mark Ballas, perform on the celebrity dance competition series, “Dancing with the Stars,” on Monday in Los Angeles. dale, Fla., who studied some of the telephone voting patterns, said he believed Bristol Palin’s support was largely political, given that it appeared she got more votes during the weeks that Sarah was in the studio audience. He said he sensed a backlash brewing against Palin by fans who thought the best dancer should win, and they coalesced around Grey, who kept winning perfect scores from the judges despite fighting through injury. “If her name was Bristol

Smith or Bristol Jones, she would not be on the show or she would not have gotten this far,” he said. “She went from being a bad dancer to a mediocre dancer. But she was not the best dancer.” Luke Londo, a 22-year-old college student from Marquette, Mich., said he felt sympathy for Bristol Palin for having her

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dancing ability denigrated and even receiving death threats. He called in to vote for her in the finals. He also voted for McCainPalin in 2008, calling Sarah “a fantastic woman.” Gretchen Offord, a women’s crisis counselor from Shasta Lake, Calif., said she detested the condescension that was directed Palin’s way by many of the professional dancers and judges on the show. “I tend to have sympathy for people who have the odds stacked against them,” she said. Offord voted for Bristol. She doesn’t particularly like Sarah. Susan Gonzalez, a 26-year-old teacher from Washington, D.C., said she and many of her friends became fans of Bristol as the season went along. “There’s something about her that I think every girl in her 20s can relate to,” she said.

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Rudy Maxa Steves’ Europe

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7:00

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons The Simpsons The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

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››› “Happy Feet” (2006, Adventure) Voices of Elijah Wood. ’ Å 20/20 (N) ’ Å School Pride (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Enchanted” (2007, Fantasy) Amy Adams. Premiere. ’ Å CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Å Blue Bloods Samaritan ‘PG’ Å Blue Bloods Privilege ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Happy Feet” (2006, Adventure) Voices of Elijah Wood. ’ Å 20/20 (N) ’ Å TV’s Funniest Holiday Moments: A Paley Center for Media Special ‘PG’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Monk The death of a skydiver. ‘PG’ Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know ’ Å School Pride (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Enchanted” (2007, Fantasy) Amy Adams. Premiere. ’ Å Smallville Ambush ’ ‘PG’ Å Supernatural ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With

Moment-Luxury Washington W’k

Paint Paper BBC Newsnight

Sewing-Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å

Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Need to Know ’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Austin City Limits (N) ’ ‘G’ Å News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Austin City Limits (N) ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds Demonology ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Omnivore ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Haunted ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Reckoner ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds The Crossing ’ ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å (4:30) ››› “The Perfect Storm” (2000, Suspense) George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg, John C. Reilly. A fish- ›› “Deep Blue Sea” (1999, Science Fiction) Thomas Jane, Saffron Burrows, Samuel L. Jackson. Smart The Walking Dead Vatos Rick’s mission is ›› “Deep Blue Sea” (1999) Thomas 102 40 39 ing boat sails into the storm of the century. Å sharks turn a research lab’s staff into fish food. jeopardized. Å Jane, Saffron Burrows. Life Creatures of the Deep ’ ‘PG’ Life Insects ’ ‘PG’ Å Life Primates ’ ‘PG’ Å Life Plants ’ ‘PG’ Å Life Primates. ’ ‘PG’ Å Life Primates ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Life Mammals finding prey. ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. Å ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) George Clooney. Å ››› “Fight Club” (1999, Suspense) Brad Pitt. Men vent their rage by beating each other in a secret arena. 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? (7:04) The Dukes of Hazzard ’ (8:07) The Dukes of Hazzard ’ Cheerleaders Bret Michaels (10:13) World’s Strictest Parents (N) ’ Cheerleaders 190 32 42 53 (3:24) CMT Music Awards 2010 ‘PG’ ››› “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room” (2005, Documentary) Remington Under Fire Crime Inc.: Counterfeit Goods Porn: Business of Pleasure Get Rich Now! 1 Minute-Makeup 51 36 40 52 Made-Millions Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Dr. Gupta: Michael J. Fox ›› “School for Scoundrels” (2006) Billy Bob Thornton, Jon Heder. Å Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity ‘14’ Å Jeff Dunham Christmas Special The Comedy Central Roast Larry the Cable Guy. ‘MA’ Comedy-Roast 135 53 135 47 (3:00) Beerfest Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck I’m in the Band Suite/Deck Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 The Suite Life on Deck ’ ‘G’ Å Deadliest Catch Bitter Tears ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Shipwrecked ‘14’ Swamp Loggers Put to the Test ‘PG’ Swamp Loggers Truck Wars ’ ‘PG’ Deadliest Catch Shipwrecked ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å (7:15) College Football Boise State at Nevada (Live) (10:15) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter 21 23 22 23 (4:00) College Football Arizona at Oregon (Live) NBA Basketball Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies (Live) NFL Live (N) NFL Live Å NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Charlotte Bobcats 22 24 21 24 NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Charlotte Bobcats Up Close Å Up Close Å Firestone Chats Up Close (N) Up Close Å Up Close Å Up Close Å Up Close Å Up Close Å Up Close Å One on One One on One One on One 23 25 123 25 Up Close Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter (Live) Å Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “A Boy Named Charlie Brown” (1969) Voices of Peter Robbins. ››› “Snoopy, Come Home” (1972) Voices of Chad Webber. Å The 700 Club ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ››› “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl” Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 Diners, Drive Bensinger College Football UCLA at Arizona State Seahawks The Final Score Huskies The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Beavers Football Runnin’ With PAC My Own Words › “Are We Done Yet?” (2007, Comedy) Ice Cube, Nia Long. ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. ›› “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. Sons of Anarchy June Wedding ‘MA’ 131 Celebrity Holiday Homes ‘G’ Å 15 Fresh Handmade Gift Ideas ‘G’ 30 Holiday Decorating Hits & Misses Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Carter Comes Home ‘G’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Dogs (N) ‘PG’ Å Top Gear Cobra Attack ‘PG’ Å Gangland Hell House ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ ›› “Beauty Shop” (2005) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. Å ›› “No Reservations” (2007) Catherine Zeta-Jones, Aaron Eckhart. Å “Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit” 138 39 20 31 ›› “Lucky 7” (2003) Kimberly Williams-Paisley, Brad Rowe. ‘PG’ Å Vegas Undercover Raw 2 Vegas Undercover Raw 3 Vegas Undercover Raw 4 Predator Raw: The Unseen Tapes Predator Raw: The Unseen Tapes Vegas Undercover Raw 1 56 59 128 51 Vegas Undercover Raw 1 Teen Mom Standing Up ‘14’ Å Teen Mom Baby Steps ’ ‘14’ Å Teen Mom Catelynn and Tyler work on letting go. ‘PG’ 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å When I Was 17 ››› “8 Mile” (2002) Eminem. ’ 192 22 38 57 Teen Mom A Little Help ‘PG’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iDo ’ ‘G’ iCarly iStart a Fan War ’ ‘G’ Å Victorious Freak the Freak Out ‘G’ My Wife and Kids Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å Ways to Die (8:15) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die (10:11) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 (4:13) ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. ’ ››› “Tomorrow Never Dies” (1997, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Pryce. Å WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Sanctuary Breach (N) ’ Å ››› “You Only Live Twice” Å 133 35 133 45 Spy-Loved Me Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Behind the Scenes Å 205 60 130 Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›››› “The Wizard of Oz” (1939, Fantasy) Judy Garland. Å (DVS) (10:15) The Office (10:45) The Office (11:15) Glory Daze ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ››› “The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly” (1967, Western) Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef. Three violent, determined (8:15) ››› “Days of Heaven” (1978, Drama) Richard Gere, Brooke Adams. Teenage ››› “Burn!” (1969, Adventure) Marlon Brando, Evaristo Marquez, Renato Salvatori. A 101 44 101 29 men vie for a $200,000 treasure. Å farm workers cross paths with a wheat farmer. Å British colonist urges revolution on a Caribbean island. What Not to Wear Teresa ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Vikki ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Leanne ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Homemade Millionaire Kitchen ‘PG’ What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear Tamara ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford. Terrorists hijack the president’s plane. Å ››› “Michael Clayton” (2007, Drama) George Clooney, Tom Wilkinson. Premiere. Å Three Kings Å 17 26 15 27 (4:00) ›› “U.S. Marshals” (1998) Tommy Lee Jones. Young Justice (N) ‘PG’ “Firebreather” (2010) Voices of Jesse Head. ‘PG’ Sym-Bionic Titan King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” (2008) Voices of Matt Lanter. 84 Million Dollar Yachts ‘PG’ Å RV 2010 ‘G’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures Gettysburg ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Super Yachts ‘G’ Å Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Sanford & Son Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ››› “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart. Å ›› “Semi-Pro” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Woody Harrelson. Premiere. 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Shine a Light” (2008) Mick Jagger. The Rolling Stones perform at New York’s Beacon Theatre. 191 48 37 54 (4:30) ››› “Back to the Future Part III” (1990, Comedy) Michael J. Fox. PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ››› “Bolt” 2008 ‘PG’ Å (6:15) ››› “Rookie of the Year” 1993 Thomas Ian Nicholas. ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Sandlot” 1993 Tom Guiry. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:45) ›› “Space Jam” 1996 Michael Jordan. ‘PG’ (11:15) ››› “The Rookie” 2002 Fox Legacy (5:22) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (7:52) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (10:22) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Slammed Rampage Evolution The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons Insane Cinema The Daily Habit (3:30) European PGA Tour Golf Dubai World Championship, Second Round Golf Central Caddy for Life Duel in the Sun Planet Jack Planet Jack (4:00) “Naughty or Nice” (2004) ‘G’ “All I Want for Christmas” (2007, Romance) Gail O’Grady. ‘PG’ Å ›› “A Family Thanksgiving” (2010, Drama) Daphne Zuniga. ‘PG’ Å “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008) Candace Cameron Bure. ‘PG’ Å (4:30) ›› “The Secret Life of Bees” 2008, Drama Queen Lati- ›› “Post Grad” 2009 Alexis Bledel. A recent graduate moves ›› “It’s Complicated” 2009, Romance-Comedy Meryl Streep, Steve Martin. A divor- ››› “Gran Torino” 2008, Drama Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang. A HBO 425 501 425 10 fah, Dakota Fanning. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å back in with her eccentric family. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å cee is caught between her ex and an architect. ’ ‘R’ Å veteran faces his longtime prejudices. ’ ‘R’ Å (5:15) ›› “Vice Squad” 1982, Crime Drama Season Hubley. ‘R’ Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ ›› “Kalifornia” 1993, Suspense Brad Pitt, Juliette Lewis. ‘R’ Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. IFC 105 105 (4:30) › “Miss March” 2009 Zach Creg- › “Bride Wars” 2009 Kate Hudson. Weddings scheduled the ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam Witwicky ›› “Four Christmases” 2008 Vince Vaughn. A couple must Lingerie (N) ’ MAX 400 508 7 ger, Trevor Moore. ’ ‘R’ Å same day turn best friends into enemies. ‘PG’ holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å somehow fit in four holiday visits with family. Å ‘MA’ Å Grand Canyon Skywalk ‘PG’ On Board Marine One ‘PG’ Hoover Dam Reinvented ‘PG’ Grand Canyon Skywalk ‘PG’ On Board Marine One ‘PG’ Hoover Dam Reinvented ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Corvette ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel in, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Savage Wild Hunting Count. On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009 Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Michael McDonald: Model Citizen (iTV) ››› “The Road” 2009, Drama Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee. iTV Premiere. A › “Next Day Air” 2009 Donald Faison. iTV. A delivery man gives “Cocaine Cowboys SHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ Å Clive Owen. ‘PG-13’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å father and son wander through a post-apocalyptic world. ‘R’ a package of drugs to the wrong people. ‘R’ II: Hustlin’” Pinks - All Out (N) ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ SPEED 35 303 125 Black Hawk (5:25) ›› “The Fast and the Furious” 2001 ‘PG-13’ (7:15) ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009, Comedy, Keith David ‘G’ ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010, Fantasy Johnny Depp. ‘PG’ “Lord of the Rings” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:25) ›› “A Walk on the Moon” 1999, (6:15) ›› “Seven Girlfriends” 1999, Romance-Comedy Tim Daly, Olivia d’Abo. A chef ›› “Fanboys” 2008 Sam Huntington. “Star Wars” fans take their ›› “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” 2002, Comedy Ryan (11:05) “Deep in the Valley” 2009, ComTMC 525 525 Drama Diane Lane. ’ ‘R’ confronts ex-flames over why their love fizzled. ’ ‘R’ Å dying pal to Skywalker Ranch. ‘PG-13’ Reynolds, Tara Reid, Tim Matheson. ’ ‘R’ edy Chris Pratt. ’ ‘R’ Å Buck Stops Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Buck Stops Here Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. Dangerous Game Dangerous Game VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Mean Ghost ‘PG’ The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P’ G   M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

People crowd around the holiday tree in 2007 on Riverfront Plaza for the annual tree lighting and the beginning of the holiday season in Bend. This year’s event, featuring carolers, live music and Santa, kicks off at 6 p.m. today at the intersection of Wall Street and Newport Avenue.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. TODAY WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www. wonderlandexpress.com. GRAND ILLUMINATION: Kick off the season with one of Central Oregon’s largest holiday light displays; featuring sleigh rides, live music and Santa; free; 4 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or www.sunriver-resort.com. HOLIDAY ART WALK: Featuring a showcase of local art and music at various downtown stores; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-9235191. CHRISTMAS TREE-LIGHTING CEREMONY: The annual tree-lighting ceremony features carolers, the bell choir and speeches; donations of canned food encouraged; 5:30 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street, Sisters; 541-5490251. BEND HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING: With carolers, live music and dance; Santa will light the Christmas tree; 6 p.m.; intersection, corner of Wall Street and Newport Avenue; www. downtownbend.org/holiday-treelighting. “RENT�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. DAVID JACOBS-STRAIN: The Eugene-based blues musician performs; $5 to $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www. wonderlandexpress.com. KIDS DAY AT THE NATURE CENTER: A day of nature, science talks and fun activities; free ages 12 and younger with adult; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Bring your pet to have photos taken with Santa; proceeds to benefit Humane Society of Redmond; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-548-4428 or redmondhumane.org. SISTERS CHRISTMAS PARADE: The annual Christmas Parade down Hood Avenue will feature dozens of floats and entries, along with Santa Claus; free; 2 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541549-0251. REDMOND STARLIGHT HOLIDAY PARADE: Themed “The Polar Express�; free; 5 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS�: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $49, $40 ages 12 and younger; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “RENT�: Bend Experimental Art Theatre performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. COSY SHERIDAN AND TR RITCHIE: The Utah-based songwriters

The Bulletin ile photo

perform; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. OBSERVATORY OPEN HOUSE NIGHT: Media presentation followed by night-sky viewing at the observatory; $6, $4 ages 2-12, free for observatory members; 8-10 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center &

Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541593-4394.

MONDAY HOLIDAY CONCERT: Holiday concert featuring the Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene,

Story times, library youth events for Nov. 26-Dec. 2 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m.

Wednesday. • TEEN THURSDAYS: Grades 612; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. • COUNCIL OF LIBRARY OF TEENS MEETING: Get involved with library activities; grades 6-12; 3 to 4 p.m. Wednesday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday. • TEEN GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger). • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger). CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 2 p.m. Tuesday. BETWEEN THE COVERS: 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-3854766: • STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496.

TUESDAY YOUTH CHOIR CONCERT: Youth Choir of Central Oregon’s Singers School performs a winter concert; free; 5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-385-0470.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAGâ€? LECTURE SERIES: Art history professor Henry Sayre presents the lecture “Value in Art: Manet and the Slave Trade,â€? which will explore the multiple meanings of Édouard Manet’s painting, “Olympiaâ€?; free; noon1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www. OSUcascades.edu/lunchtimelectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALEâ€?: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Out Stealing Horsesâ€? by Per Petterson; bring a lunch; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE PARSON RED HEADS: The Portland-based folk-pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND: A performance of gumbo-flavored holiday favorites and images that express the spirit and style of New Orleans; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org.

THURSDAY CERAMICS SALE: COCC art students, faculty and volunteers present uniquely handcrafted ceramics for sale in Pence Hall; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7510. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Fortunate Son� by Walter Mosley; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http:// bendpac.org. HOLIDAY CONCERT: Holiday concert featuring the Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel; free; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. POETRY READING AND OPEN MIC: An hour-long open mic, followed by a reading by students of the college; free; 7-9 p.m.; Kilns College, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, #44, Bend; 541-7718794. “MOON OVER BUFFALO�: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY CHRISTMAS: The Los Angeles-based hipsters perform yuletide classics; $40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. MYSTIC ROOTS BAND: The Chico, Calif.-based reggae band performs, with One Love Community Band and MC Mystic; $8; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541749-2440 or www.randompresents. com.

F  DVD   W ‘Airbender’ pits heroic boy against evil forces The Washington Post “The Last Airbender� (PG, 95 minutes): Noah Ringer plays the title role of Aang, a messianic child with the power to manipulate all four elements. Meant to be something akin to the young Dalai Lama, Aang is still an avatar in training. Having run away from the monastery where he was being groomed for his role, Aang left before he had mastered control of water, earth and fire. His only real expertise is in the “bending� of air. That means he can stir up mini-tornadoes with his hands, and blast people with puffs of strong wind.

The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Katara and Sokka (Nicola Peltz and Jackson Rathbone), a teenage earthbender and her brother, team up with Aang to do battle with firebender Zuko. Zuko is hoping to capture Aang so that his people, known as the Fire Nation, can suppress the Earth, Air and Water tribes. He has been banished by his father, the Fire Lord Ozai (Cliff Curtis), until he returns with the prize. Contains martial arts and mildly violent action. DVD extras: “Origins of the Avatar� featurette; deleted scenes and gag Paramount via The Associated Press reel. Extended featurettes on Noah Ringer plays the heroic Aang in a scene from “The Last two-disc Blu-ray edition. Airbender,� in this film publicity image.

Disney Enterprises Inc. via The Associated Press

Rapunzel, voiced by Mandy Moore, right, and Flynn, voiced by Zachary Levi are shown in a scene from the animated Disney feature, “Tangled.�

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘TANGLED’ Rating: PG for brief mild violence. What it’s about: Rapunzel slips out of her tower to experience a little of the big, wide world, in the company of a charming rogue. The kid attractor factor: Disney animation, a “Disney Princess,� songs and a very funny horse. Good lessons/bad lessons: Good parents protect their kids from the worst of the world, bad parents don’t let them experience the world at all. Violence: A frying pan, a noggin, you do the math. Language: Disney clean. Sex: Rogue meets princess, sparks fly. Eventually. Drugs: Flagons of ale are consumed. Parents’ advisory: This adheres to that Disney animation credo, “suitable for all ages.�

‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ Rating: PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence, frightening images and brief sensuality. What it’s about: The wizards and witch are a long way from Hogwarts, on the run as they try to foil You Know Who’s plans. The kid attractor factor: The Harry Potter epic winds down with an “Empire Strikes Back� dose of gloom and doom. Good lessons/bad lessons: Education builds the character we need to make it through life’s trials. Violence: Bloody, in a couple of instances. Language: The occasional mild oath. Sex: Near nudity in one scene of “brief sensuality.� Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: The PG-13 is for blood and violence and one slightly racy hallucination. Suitable for 10 and older.

‘The Next Three Days’ Rating: PG-13 for violence, drug material, language, some sexuality and thematic elements. What it’s about: A husband

believes in his wife’s innocence so completely that he sets out to bust her out of jail. The kid attractor factor: A prison break, thoughtfully considered, thrillingly executed. Good lessons/bad lessons: The average person does not have what it takes to plan a violent crime or commit one. Thankfully. Violence: A beating, shootings, blood. Language: Pretty clean, considering. Sex: Suggested. Drugs: Alcohol is consumed. Parents’ advisory: A bit too sophisticated to work for younger kids, suitable for 12 and older.

‘Unstoppable’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of action and peril, and some language. What it’s about: Two railroad workers try to catch and stop a runaway train. The kid attractor factor: A runaway train! Good lessons/bad lessons: Companies lay off their most experienced “heroes� every day. Violence: Injuries, an off-camera death. Language: Some profanity, understandable, considering the circumstances. Sex: Hooters Girls are ogled. Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: A very positive, family-friendly action picture, OK for 8 and older.

‘Megamind’ Rating: PG for action and some language What it’s about: A supervillain discovers life isn’t all that after he finally foils his superhero foe. The kid attractor factor: Animation in the chatty, wacky Dreamworks style Good lessons/bad lessons: “As long as there’s evil, good will rise up against it.� Violence: Cartoonish. Because it’s a cartoon. Language: A famous AC/DC song about a certain highway is played, but otherwise.... Sex: Nope Drugs:None Parents’ advisory: A Dreamworks kids’ comedy that’s Disney/Pixar clean. Suitable for all ages.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Nov. 26, 2010: This year, many opportunities appear because you are adventurous enough to make them occur. You will find a way, tuning in to your ingenuity. Your abilities to revise a situation and reorganize problems allow a great deal of success, especially if you tap into an expert. If you are single, you could meet someone who is fascinating and has great depth. This person comes from a different background than you. You could learn and grow a lot from this experience. If you are attached, the two of you benefit from planning a special trip or taking a workshop together. LEO opens doors. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You have an attitude as if the weekend already has begun. If you can play it out and stay home, all the better. Otherwise, you might cause yourself a lot of distress ultimately. Is it really worth it? Only you can answer that question. Tonight: Let your hair down. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Be aware that in every situation there are limitations. Some are worse than others. You can dip into your ingenuity and sort through any issue if you so choose. Be honest if you are too tired to follow through on plans. Tonight: Happily at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep working at getting

your point across. Not everyone is always in agreement, nor will they ever be. Still, you are enough of a maverick to head in your own direction. Don’t close down in a serious talk. Tonight: Visit with a friend or loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Be more in touch with your expenses and spending. A partner has many suggestions that you might feel are inappropriate. Recognize what you really want to do, and don’t cover the act with false explanations. Tonight: Add a new item to your wardrobe. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You wake up knowing that you have snap, crackle and pop. Ask anyone if they want to test your energy, intellect or luck right now. Someone might, and though you are not undefeatable, you’ll come up with unusually dynamic ideas. Tonight: Out on the town. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Pulling back and taking inventory might be smart. You have many ideas; your creativity is unusually high during this period. You are trying to come from a grounded point of view. Give yourself the space to absorb what is happening and to center. Tonight: Take a night off. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You know what you want and where you are going. Honor a longtime friendship when making weekend plans. Still, a meeting today could be instrumental. You are unusually dynamic in the manner in which you express yourself. Others listen. Tonight: Where the action is.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH A must appearance might not be as difficult as you thought. Open up to new possibilities, and have an important conversation. This talk could change your mind about many matters. Take your time before reacting. Tonight: In the limelight. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH The urge to go out on a limb or try something very different could take over. You need to pick and choose where this behavior is appropriate. For instance, play it conservative financially; emotionally, a risk might be OK. Tonight: Follow the music. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH A sense of togetherness follows you because of a key relationship, whether you are with this person or not. Express contentment at the appropriate moment. A higher-up or parent might have an attitude. This, too, will pass. Tonight: Dinner for two. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Others surround you, and in this bevy of people, you sort through what you must do and what you cannot do. A friend plays a rather significant role, paving the way to make a goal a reality. Tonight: Continue with the theme of teamwork. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Focus on getting as much done as possible. You will want to leave for the weekend able to relax and not worry about what wasn’t done. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with a family member. Tonight: A must appearance. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Pets

petting soothes people.

Continued from E1

Challenges

Lady Speedbump Morrison got Lady Speedbump about six years ago. Many of Morrison’s loved ones had died in a short period of time and it felt like “too many losses.” When her son came to visit, he suggested they go to the local animal shelter to pick out a dog. Morrison was hesitant, but agreed to go along. She had owned dogs for most of her life and loved them dearly, but she hadn’t owned a dog in quite a while. Morrison walked down the aisle of kennels, which included one labeled “Lady.” Even though Lady’s kennel-mate was barking up a storm, she just sat there quietly, with her paws crossed one over another, looking very much like a little lady. Morrison thought Lady was perfect. She found out the dog had been given up for adoption because her owners were never home and Lady kept escaping from the yard. She also learned that Lady had been scheduled to be put down the next day. Morrison says Lady is smart, affectionate and sweet. She got the second part of her name, Speedbump, from her knack for blocking doors, hallways and sidewalks. “It’s my excuse for not moving too fast,” said Morrison.

Benefits “Animals just love you no matter what,” said Marion Somers, geriatric care manager in California and author of “Elder Care Made Easier.” Somers says animals can comfort people in mourning or experiencing sadness. She believes they can help prevent people living on their own from becoming isolated. And the tasks of caring for an animal, such as feeding and brushing it, she said, can also keep people engaged in life. “I think it helps with mental acuity.” The National Institutes of Health also report health benefits associated with pet ownership. For instance, one study looked at patients who had experienced a heart attack. A year later, those who owned dogs were much more likely to be alive than non-dog owners. Another NIH study showed that people who owned pets were more likely to have lower heart rates and blood pressure. One study specifically looked at pet ownership and older individuals ages 71-82. Those who walked dogs tended to walk faster and more often than those who didn’t walk regularly. These individuals also had greater mo-

Holiday Continued from E1 While splitting holidays between divorced parents is a sure exercise in diplomacy and time management, juggling in-laws, siblings, grandparents and any number of geographic obstacles also can complicate holiday arrangements. Even in divorced families, negotiating holidays isn’t so bad when dealing with flexible people. In amicable divorces, it’s becoming increasingly common for exes to spend the holidays together so as not to complicate the lives of their children, Ahrons said. Other adult children of divorced parents are happy sticking with a custody schedule — for example, Mom’s house on odd years, Dad’s house on even years — so that it’s all fair and they don’t have to renegotiate the rules each year. The situation gets tougher when family members are warring, jealous or unwilling to share time. Single people often have a harder time dealing with those situations because, without families of their own, they’re often treated like kids and expected to go where they’re told, Ahrons said. But having your own children doesn’t always lessen the obligations, because then everyone wants to see the grandkids.

Empower yourself Rather than get sucked into the role of mediator or trying to please everyone, Ahrons said, sometimes you have to draw the line. One option is to hold the holidays at your home and announce that whoever wishes is welcome to come by. No one gets along? That’s their problem to work out, Ahrons said. If mixing families is untenable, and no one’s willing to budge, sometimes it’s best to take a holiday away from family altogether. “I think it’s very important for adult children (of divorced parents) to empower themselves,”

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Peggy Morrison walks her dog, Lady Speedbump, to a special pet area at Whispering Winds in Bend on Tuesday. bility in general. Pets can greet people and offer understanding without words, LaFarge said. She’s heard from many older people who say their pets give them a reason to get up in the morning. First thing in the morning, before breakfast or coffee, Morrison takes Lady Speedbump outside. She has to take the pooch out three or four times a day. Morrison appreciates the push to get active. “I might not do it for myself sometimes, but I would never keep her from what she needs.” LaFarge believes having a pet can also help older people confront their own aging and coming death. As the animal ages, the individual may need to think about the pet’s health and may even need to make a decision to euthanize it. The senior may also be more willing to think about his or her own death through the lens of what will happen to the pet after he or she dies. “It’s a framework for talking about their own situation,” LaFarge said. Dogs can also offer some protection and help with safety concerns, and they can help people reach out socially. Strangers will come up and ask to pet the senior’s dog, children will smile and laugh. “It gives you a reason for conversation with other people,” said LaFarge. Morrison says she and Lady have made several friends, and people often stop to talk with her about the dog. Jennifer Horsman sees the benefits older individuals receive from animals firsthand when she visits local assisted-living facilities and nursing homes

Ahrons said. “You may not get along, but you may not ruin my life because of it.” Ann Marie and Beth Klacko, sisters who live in Chicago, put the kibosh on family holidays after Thanksgiving 2008, when they visited their dad and their mom threw a fit. They were tired of the guilt trips, the frustrating bus schedules to the suburbs, and the last-minute pleas that the girls swing by one parent’s house after they visited the other. Now, on Thanksgiving and Christmas, the sisters take house-sitting jobs, and later meet up with friends at a bar. “We’ve started our own tradition,” said Ann Marie Klacko, 28. “It’s liberating. We’ve just gained a little more control.” Their parents were confused by their decision, but they haven’t responded angrily, Klacko said. The sisters make time on weekends and special occasions throughout the rest of the year to visit their parents, just not on emotionally loaded holidays. While watching out for your sanity is important, San Francisco psychologist Joshua Coleman worries that some people are too quick to extricate themselves from their families. He works with many parents who have been cut off by their grown children. “When they don’t get visited, it’s heartbreaking for them,” he said. Conflict is an unavoidable part of being in a family, Coleman said, but increasingly people figure they don’t need to maintain relationships they don’t enjoy being in. “The obligatory sense that other people in our lives matter has been replaced by this filmy bond of whether this relationship makes me feel good,” said Coleman, co-founder of the Council on Contemporary Families and author of “When Parents Hurt: Compassionate Strategies When You and Your Grown Child Don’t Get Along” (William Morrow, $15.95). “It makes relationships more fragile and more individualistic.”

with her therapy dogs, as part of the Compassionate Canines of Central Oregon program. Often older individuals, even those with serious memory issues, begin reminiscing about their own

childhood memories involving animals. Horsman says it brings out the stories and helps refocus the seniors. “It takes them out of their present situation.” She also thinks the repetitive motion of

Having a pet involves a certain amount of upkeep. As people become more frail, they will need more support to maintain a pet. Some older people need to be careful about mobility issues and animals. Some small dogs can become a tripping hazard. Pets can also become costly, which is something to consider and calculate. Problems can arise when people don’t make a contingency plan, according to LaFarge. A health crisis hits and the person has no idea what to do with his or her pet. LaFarge has heard of people walking out of emergency rooms against doctors’ orders in order to take care of pets. “Older people can become insensitive to smells,” said LaFarge. Unwashed dogs, litter boxes, cat food, feces: These are all things that can create noxious smells. LaFarge says the older individual should be willing to listen to feedback about the odors and try to do something to maintain a clean area. Pet ownership, however, is not like a prescription to end loneliness, says LaFarge. It depends on the person, and people who do

not have a history with pets are unlikely to connect with an animal. “The person’s history with animals matters a great deal.” Despite these challenges, Somers believes pet ownership is typically worth it for older adults. “The work, to me, does not outweigh the joy, comfort and companionship.”

Tips Relatives should not give an animal as a gift, says LaFarge, because it’s important for the person and animal to feel a connection. Older people should avoid getting a puppy or kitten because they will require a lot of attention and energy, according to LaFarge. She thinks older pets are typically great matches for older individuals. Relatives can offer to help support pet ownership in a variety of ways, for instance, cleaning a litter box, taking the animal to veterinarian appointments or buying pet food. “It takes a village to raise a dog, in a way,” said LaFarge. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 F1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

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200 202

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Boston terrier/pug mix male puppy for sale. 8 months old. Brindle with beautiful markings. Sweet boy, great personality, house trained but you do need to kennel him during long hours away, not quite able to hold it for 8 hours a day. Asking $200. Only serious inquiries. 541-977-6770

Golden Retriever pups AKC, $400. shots, wormed vet-checked. (509) 281-0502.

WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted: Clean canning jars, Ball or Kerr, please call 541-617-1533. Wanted: Old Fashioned Angel Hair Christmas Decoration, 541-317-4985,541-280-0112 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

203

Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows SUNRIVER RESORT HOLIDAY MARKETPLACE 70+ artisans Friday 11/26, noon - 6 p.m. Saturday 11/27, 9:30 -4:30 The Homestead/Great Hall

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

20,000 crickets 4 weeks old .03 cents each. I ordered too many. my loss your gain. call Terry @ 541-350-8949 2 Baby Bearded Dragons, $50 each. 2 Baby Chameleons, $50 each. 541-350-8949

AKC Golden Retriever puppies, 1st shots, dewclaws, $475-550, 541-1108, Saphronsserenity.blogspot.com Aussie Toy Sheltie mix small male pup. 15 weeks, very cute. $125. 541-390-8875. Black Lab & puppies. de-wormed. cute. $100.

GREAT PYRENEES 18 mo. female, friendly and protective, $100. 541-416-0425. Huskey Male 9 mo. old beautiful dog, really good natured and good with other animals. Moving can’t take with us asking $150. Call Mike (541) 598-4565, in Redmond. Invisible Fence, new, $150, extra collar, $25, 503-933-0814, local.

Boston Terrier puppies, Adorable, 6 weeks old, wormed, 1st shots, dewclaw, 5 males $400, 1 female $500. Details 541-536-3741.

Jack Russell Puppies, 2 mos, 1st shots, $150 each. 541-610-9951 541-390-1616

KITTENS & great cats avail. for adoption through Cat ResBrittany (AKC) 3 yr. old cue, Adoption & Foster Team, neutered male Fr. the area's only no-kill, all fully trained. Points, backs volunteer cat/kitten group. retrieves. Very experienced. Petco on Black Friday, Tom$900. 541-480-7850. Tom Motel (call 815-7278; N. 3rd St. by Sonic) on Sat./Sun Cavalier King Charles Spaniel noon-4, & at CRAFT, 65480 puppies, Blenheim & tri78th St., Bend, Sat/Sun 1 to color, 8 wks old. AKC reg., 4. Many needing homes, so champion lines. Parents adoption fees remain low heart/eye certified annually. thru Nov. Altered, vacci541-410-1066; 541-480-4426 nated, ID chipped, etc. Give a deserving kitten or cat a new home for the holidays! 541-389-8420 or 598-5488, www.craftcats.org. Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chinese Crested Pups (2), & 1 Crest Doxie, 3 mo., $275 ea., 541-433-2747 or 420-7088. Chi-Pom puppies, 1 boy, 1 girl, 1st shots. $175 each. Call Brooke, 541-771-2606 Cockapoo pups AKC parents. Low shed, great family dogs. $275. 541-504-9958 Companion cats free to seniors! Altered, shots, ID chip, 541-389-8420;541-598-5488 craftcats.org Dachshund AKC mini puppies, www.bendweenies.com,mocha green eyes,$350,541-508-4558

Lab AKC Puppies Ready to Go! Excellent family/hunting dogs. For details call 541-601-8757 LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250 to $450. 541-954-1727

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260

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269

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Papillons (3), 6 mo. female, black Log Bed, Custom, in Pine, queen size, $400, call /white, $300, 4.5 yr. female, H & H FIREARMS 541-480-3068. red/white, $250,5 yr. male, can Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign be papered,$350, 361-443-2156 Across From Mattress, Queen size,dbl. pillowor alvinoshields@yahoo.com Pilot Butte Drive-In top,dark floral, like new, stored 541-382-9352 Pitbull Male only 9 mo. really in plastic, $3000 new, sell for sweet dog great with kids $350, 503-933-0814 local. Juniper Rim Game and other animals. Moving Preserve - Brothers, OR can’t take with us. Asking a Med-Lift Recliner Chair, large & Our Chukars are ready to fly! comfortable, brown. Pur$75 fee. Call Mike (541) chased new 9/2010, used 4x, Bring a shotgun, give ‘em a try! 598-4565 we are in Redmond They’re on special this fall $1200 obo. 541-420-1294 so just give us a call! Poodle mix rescued pups. ApMini-Loveseat/hide a bed, tan, 541-419-3923;541-419-8963 prox 8 months old. I've had unique, perfect for RV, $150 them fixed and shots. Need Ruger 338 M-77 S/S, synthetic OBO 503-933-0814, local loving homes. On smaller stock, Nikon 4.5-14 scope, size $50 each 541 350-1684 Pro-grade stainless refer, range, $675 OBO. 541-420-9063 micro, dishwasher; Washer & Poodle purebred, 2 tiny toy RUGER BLACKHAWK .357 magdryer. 10 mos use. Storage females, cinnamon red, 8 num, single action, perfect cabs. $2400. 541-678-1963 wks, $225. 541-306-1807. shape, comes with leather POODLES AKC Toy. Also Refrigerator, Kenmore, 21 cu ft, holster & alternate cylinder top freezer, white, great that allows you to shoot Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. cond, $250. 541-389-5408 9mm rounds. All stock from 541-475-3889 541-325-6212 Ruger. $450. 541-420-0801. Second Hand Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. Mattresses, sets & Find It in 541-280-1537 singles, call http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Rescued kittens still available! Social, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Nice adult cats also avail. Visit at 65480 78th, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by appt. See www.craftcats.org for map/ photos/more. 541-389-8420 or 598-5488 for info, lv. msg. Schnoodle pups, males, smart & loving, 8 wks, $200 each. 541-306-1807. Shih Tzu AKC, adorable, spoiled pups. Beautiful markings, dew clawed, $400, avail. 11/24, showing 11/20,541-514-8160 Shih Tzu puppies, 3 girls, 2 boys, 1 very small female, $450-$750. 541-788-0090 Silky Terrier Female AKC 5 months old. $125 541-316-0638 Welsh Terrier puppy, Adorable Female, ready Dec. 15th for Christmas. $800. Call 541-910-3020.

Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & cute, 10 weeks old, $180 cash. 541-678-7599

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 BEAUTIFUL THROW RUG 5x9, $100 541-876-5106. BEDROOM SET: dark mahogany, 2 nightstands, chest of drawers, lrg dresser w/mirror, $700 (bed not included) 541-876-5106. COFFEE TABLES, one with glass top, $50 ea; Antique rocking chair, $50. 541-876-5106. Ekornes Stressless Recliner & Ottoman, burgundy leather, $500. 541-385-9646

Doxie, Shih-Tzu, part Pug mix Lhasa Apso puppies! 1 male & 4 females, multi-color, ready pups, 1st shots. $200 each. now. $175 ea. 541-416-1123 ready now. 541-389-0322.

Entertainment Center 54 x 48 x 19. The TV area is 31 wide x 28 tall $50. King Bookcase Headboard $25. call 541-408-1223

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372 Free boy kittens, Maine Coon mix, will be large. 541-389-0322, 541-480-5228. German Shepherd Puppies, 4 white, $700-$800, 4 dark mahogany, $500, great disposition, parents on-site, no papers, Gene, 541-610-5785.

Walker Hound 1st shots & German Shepherd Puppy (1) 9 6 wks & really wk female, black, parents on (541) 382-7567 site, $300. 541-536-5538

Entertainment center solid Oak/glass, like new $225. 541-389-5408 Mini-Dachshund pups, PUREBRED Rare Dapples & black/tan. 2 males & 1 female. Strong, healthy, home nurtured. 1st shots, ready to be your companion, $300 & $350 541-848-5677,541-771-1165

Sofa/Loveseat Set, clean, attractive, contemporary style, $300, 541-389-8697 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

TV, 32” Samsung, color, Free. 541-593-5927 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

212

Lhasa Apso Pup, 8 weeks, female, 1st shots, & dewormed, $300, 541-548-5772.,

English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

541-598-4643.

Fridge, Admiral, 21cu ft, black, ice maker, like new, $100 OBO. 541-408-2749 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Kenmore 600 Gas Dryer, white, extra lg capacity, multi dryer Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure settings, 2 yrs old, works bred, 8 weeks old, Black & great! $100. 541-633-7802 Tan, 4 males $400/ea and 1 La-Z Boy Lift Seat recliner, female $500. up-to-date, on brown, used 2 weeks. $1500 shots. Pics available. new; sell $850. 541-620-1502 541-633-6148 (leave msg)

Antiques & Collectibles 3 Ornate Antique table lamps, $45 ea. 2 floor lamps, $75 ea. Handmade beaded shade, $95. 541-389-5408 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? N o n-c o m m e r cial a d v e r ti s e r s c a n place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. The Bulletin Classifieds! JEANS: WOMAN’S NEW 541-385-5809 size 8, traditional fit, $20. 541-330-9070 Ruger P345 .45 acp, 2 clips, as NEED TO CANCEL new in box. Includes K&D OR PLACE YOUR AD? holster, $500 cash. Call The Bulletin Classifieds 541-598-4467 has an "After Hours" Line Wanted: Collector seeks high Call 383-2371 24 hrs. quality fishing items. Call to cancel or place your ad! 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads 255 • 3 lines - 3 days Computers • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised THE BULLETIN requires commust equal $200 or Less puter advertisers with mul- • Limit one ad per month tiple ad schedules or those • 3-ad limit for same item selling multiple systems/ advertised within 3 months software, to disclose the 541-385-5809 • Fax name of the business or the 541-385-5802 term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIndefined as those who sell one tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, computer. Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, 257 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 Musical Instruments Women’s Jean Jacket, light yellow M/L, never worn, $20 Appalachian Dulcimer, like OBO. 330-9070. new. includes case. $110. 262 541-330-9070. FIDDLE/VIOLIN STAND, Brand new folds flat for transport $30. 541-330-9070

260

Misc. Items 7’ Artificial Tree w/dozens of ornaments/lights, used 2 yrs, perfect! $50. 541-330-5819

Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures HP Office Jet 6500, wireless all in one printer like new $100, new in box HP keyboard $20, 541-389-0340

263

215 Gold Coin: 1876, 1 oz., George T Morgan, $100 Gold Union, struck in 2005, Ultra Cameo, NGC Certified, $2200, 541-410-4447

WANTED TO BUY

541-322-7253

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre BUYING AND SELLING 1964 silver coins, bars, All gold jewelry, silver and gold rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & sets, class rings, sterling sildental gold. Diamonds, Rolex ver, coin collect, vintage & vintage watches. No colwatches, dental gold. Bill lection too large or small. BedFleming, 541-382-9419. rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

242

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Exercise Equipment

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Total Gym 1700, complete, like, new, $125, please call 541-504-4588.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing .44 mag RUGER SUPER BLACKHAWK HUNTER, stainless, wtih scope, as new, in box. $750 OBO. Also: .44 Mag SW 629 Mountain Gun, stainless, as new cond., $650 OBO. 541-647-8931. AR15, 16" preban A1 upper on Stag lower $499. Jack 541-610-7997

541-389 - 6 6 5 5

264

Snow Removal Equipment Ariens 2006. Big job capable 11.5 hp 28". Electric start. $750. 541-330-8285. Big Angle Snowplow blade, w/lift cylinder from ex -state truck, $450. 541-410-3425 Snowblower, John Deere 826D 26” cut, 8HP, like new, asking $600, 541-504-8484. SNOW BLOWER - Signature, like new. Paid $750; selling for $350. 541-536-3537 Snow Blower - 'Snow Joe' Electric. New in box. No gas/oil mess. Easy to use. Effective up to 10" deep, 18" wide. $150. 383-8936

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! Husqavarna 395XP, $595! 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

Well-seasoned lodgepole pine. Split and delivered. Eager to sell. Delivery available all Thanksgiving weekend. $150 per cord. (541)475-3685

Charter Arms Undercover .38Spl $250. 350rds Wolf .223 55gr HP ammo $90. Jack 541-610-7997

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Found female black cat with yellow/green eyes and studded collar, found east of Bend. 541-312-3389. FOUND hunting Rifle, Powell Butte area October 30. Call 541-771-6558. FOUND set of keys, near Aspen Ridge. 541-389-8995. Lost “Miley” Yellow Lab 2 yrs female with tuft of hair on top of head, small (50#) OWW area. 541-280-5292. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

280

Estate Sales Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802 282

Sales Northwest Bend Black Friday Moving Sale Fri-Sat, 9-4, all inside. Must sell everything! Quality Oak furniture, household items, knife sets, leather bags, lots of Christmas gift items, artworks, TV set & other electronics. Come see how far your dollar will go! Follow signs from Hwy 20 @ Gist Rd, to 66620 W. Cascade.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

BarkTurfSoil.com

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP

d Large empty metal COFFEE CANS d (2 or 3 lb. size) and C A N D L E S

FOUND a pigeon or dove, near Dry Canyon in Redmond. call 541-420-6606.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Antique ladies gold pin with blue stone, lost on 11/18 in Bend. Reward. 541-388-1781.

269

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

d WARM CLOTHING - Rain gear, Boots d

270

Lost and Found

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter: d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

• Receipts should include,

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Bersa .22LR two-tone pistol $350. Romanian M1969 .22LR bolt action rifle $75. Jack 541-610-7997

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

266

Heating and Stoves

Tools Good 2200-Watt Gas Generator, on wheels, reduced to $110. Call 541-410-3425

Coins & Stamps

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Carrier 3 ton Heat Pump and Furnace, $1000. Bradford White 80 gallon elect water heater, $125. 541-480-6900.

GARDEN SHELF, 3/4 circular, 3 folding shelves, green powder coated, $49. 330-9070.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

These work as a make-shift heater inside a tent

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Sears riding lawnmower 14 HP + 5 attachments, manual, and a few spare parts, all for $386. 541-475-2031

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 F3 476

Finance & Business

Employment Opportunities EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

476

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

John Deere 10’ seed drill, grass and grain and fertilizer boxes, 7” spacing, exc. cond., $3,450 OBO; 2006 Challenger 16x18 in-line baler, low bale count, exc. cond. $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Small bale orchard/alfalfa mix, $160/ton. Volume discounts, delivery avail. 541-480-8648. Premium Orchard grass, & Premium Oat grass mix. 3x3 midsize bales, no rain, no weeds. Orchard @$65/bale; Oat @$50/bale 541-419-2713

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com A

STORE WIDE SALE is going on at Riding In Style! Everything in the store, excluding feed and supplements is 20% off regular price, till Nov 30th. Located in Tumalo on Cook Ave next to Bellataza Coffee. 541-617-9243. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

English Riding pants, from England “Harry Hall”, size 28, like new $20 OBO. 330-9070 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Stalls/paddocks (2) avail. Family barn, 3 mi. west of Redmond, daily turnout, arena, round pen, ride to river, hay available. 541-480-5260.

358

Farmers Column 12x24 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1743 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Orchard Grass, $165/ton, Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, $160/ton, Feeder Hay, $100/ton, cheap delivery avail., 541-891-4087.

541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Caregiver w/20+yrs exp seeks job; all ages/aspects of care. Pets, too! Great rates, ref’s, bkgrnd check. 541-419-7085

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions 24-hour In-home Caregiver needed. Experience preferred. State paid. Must have valid driver’s license. 541-548-0333

476

Employment Opportunities Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Caregivers Visiting Angels seeks compassionate, reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. Experience req’d. Must pass background check & drug test. Apply at our office located within Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend. No phone calls, please.

500 600

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities Groomer

d d d d d d d

HOODOO SKI AREA

507

616

Real Estate Contracts

Want To Rent

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

528 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

GROOMER - Full-time, at least 1 yr. exp req'd email jim@hoodoo.com for more info print off app from website www.hoodoo.com

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Part-Time Position Circulation Retention Representative. Immediate part-time opening in the Circulation Department for a Retention Representative. Responsibilities include: Making outbound calls to customers to insure customer satisfaction of newspaper delivery, to secure payments, and customer retention. This position will also provide backup support to the Customer Service team. Support includes, but is not limited to, providing customer service to Bulletin subscribers over the phone entering transactions into the PBS system, running reports, and outbound calling. Applicant must be computer literate, have strong communication, sales and phone skills, be able to multi-task, be customer oriented, and be a team player. Shift will include weekends and some holidays. The Bulletin offers an excellent benefit package and opportunities for advancement. Monthly bonus incentives are available. Pre-employment drug screen is req. EOE. Send resume to: PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Attn: Customer Service Manager or email ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Receptionist - Full Time, at Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic in Redmond. Wage depends on exp. Medical/Retirement benefits. Some evenings and Saturdays. Send letter of application and/or resume to Dena at 2630 S. Canal Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756. Deadline for applications is December 3, 2010.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Trucking John Davis Trucking in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: CDL Class A Drivers & Maintenance Mechanics. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or www.jdt3d.net Volunteer Coordinator Newberry Habitat for Humanity, 20 hours per week, exp. recruiting and orienting volunteer workers in a non-profit environment. Visit www.newberryhabitat.org/ca reers.html for position details. Submit letter of interest and resume to: careers@ newberryhabitat.org. No phone calls please, EOE.

Rentals

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

630

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

573

TownHome Upstairs room, $300 mo+$300 dep 1/3 util. Redmond Dez, 541-610-9766

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Customer Service

636

642

658

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Cute Duplex, SW area, 3 Bdrm 2 bath, garage, private fenced yard, W/D hkup. Half off 1st month! $700/mo.+ deposit. Call 541-480-7806.

Houses for Rent Redmond

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

631

Fully furnished loft apt.

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilites paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced yard, central heat, fully landscaped, $675+dep. 541-545-1825.

648

Houses for Rent General

Largest Auto/Home/Busi- Long term townhomes/homes Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry ness Glass Replacement included, Spacious 2 & 3 on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, 3/2.5; garage, fenced, in DRW, Company in the Country, bdrm., with garages, $725 mo., 1st, last, security $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or now searching for new fran541-504-7755. dep. $250, cleaning $250, 541-389-9867. chise owners in the Bend both refundable, pets negomarket. No industry experi632 tiable. Avail. 541-536-2985. River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW ence required. Full training, Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, Cozy 2+2, strong systems & excellent Apt./Multiplex General dbl. garage, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, support. Call Justin Poston, w/decks, lots of windows, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. The Bulletin is now offering a at 254-745-2526. wood stove & gas heat, all 541-280-7188. MORE AFFORDABLE Rental appl. incl. W/D, near Lodge rate! If you have a home or $775, 541-617-5787 Part-Time News Assistant apt. to rent, call a Bulletin 638 Classified Rep. to get the The Bulletin is now offering a Apt./Multiplex SE Bend The Bulletin is looking for a resourceful, self-motivated pernew rates and get your ad LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE son to work in the newsroom, assisting the reporting staff. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Rental rate! If you have a 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new Duties will include data entry, proofreading for Bulletin & Ashome to rent, call a Bulletin carpet/paint, W/D hookups, sociated Press style and other clerical work. This person WEST SIDE STUDIO. Private Classified Rep. to get the storage, deck, W/S paid, $550 should like working in a fast-paced environment and be able fenced yard, 2 decks, launnew rates and get your ad +dep. no pets, 541-480-4824 to meet tight deadlines. dry, newly remodeled, instarted ASAP! 541-385-5809 1 Mo. Free Option. cludes utilities. $625 month. Excellent writing, understanding of grammar, good organiza541-317-1879. 650 tion, flexibility and basic computer skills are essential. Atten640 Houses for Rent tion to detail is necessary. 634

Must enjoy working with the public and understand the importance of accuracy and thoroughness in all duties. College degree or previous related experience preferred. Submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Dec. 6, 2010, to Marielle Gallagher at mgallagher@bendbulletin.com, or drop off or mail to The Bulletin, 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1085 NE Purcell - Pilot Butte Village 55+ Community 2 bdrm rentals @$850, in hospital district. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Operate Your Own B usiness

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today &

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H The Bulletin is accepting applications for a position in its Circulation Department. This position is full time. The applicant must be computer literate, have strong communication, sales and phone skills, be able to multi-task, be customer oriented, and a team player. Shift will include weekends and some holidays.

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 1st week Dec., 541-389-6720.

** Pick your Special ** Chemical System Operators Suterra is currently seeking Chemical Systems Operators, to operate a series of chemical reaction and purification units and associated equipment. All work is done according to defined standard procedures to meet production goals in a 24 hrs x 7 days per week operation. Candidates must have some previous industrial or manufacturing experience. Fax resume to 310-966-8310 or go to http://www.suterra.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., fireplace, W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1 $725. 541-420-0208

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

636 1 Bdrm. $420+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902.

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

NE Bend

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

1800 sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 1 bath, family room, clean, close to hospital & shopping, elect./nat. gas heat, poss. small pet. 1150 NE 6th St. $950/mo, $800 dep., no smoking, 541-389-4985.

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, all appls, W/D hkup, garage, fenced, w/s/g pd. Half off 1st mo! $650 mo + dep; pet neg. 541-480-7806

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330. 900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single car garage, all utils incl, W/D hkup, in country, very quiet. No smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st + $300 dep. 541-480-9041

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautifully furnished 6 Bdrm, 3 Bath, granite kitchen, fenced yard. Skyliner Summit. $2500 includes water/garbage; min 6-mo lease. 541-944-3063

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe. piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1450. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295, 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

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Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

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Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

3 Bdrm, 1 bath, single car attached garage, dishwasher, range and fridge, located at end of cul-de-sac, no smoking, no pets. $700/mo. 948 SE Polaris Ct. Available immediately. 541-389-6793.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

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Houses for Rent Redmond

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

GSL Properties

Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $775 mo.+ dep. 834 NE Modoc Ct., Call (503) 803-4718

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to Older 1 Bdrm cottage, garage, rent, call a Bulletin Classified large yard, no pets, washer & Rep. to get the new rates and dryer incl, refs & credit get your ad started ASAP! check, $525, 1st/last/dep. 541-385-5809 541-382-3672 leave msg.

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

managed by

Eagle Crest behind the gates 10th Fairway, 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. Call 541-923-0908; 541-480-7863

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

personals As of Nov. 23, 2010, I, Darline Clark, am no longer responsible for any debts other than my own.

The Bulletin offers an excellent benefit package and opportunities for advancement. Monthly bonus incentives are available. Pre-employment drug screen is req. EOE. Send resume to: PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Attn: Customer Service Manager or email ahusted@bendbulletin.com

DENTAL ASSISTANT Our busy practice is looking for a dental assistant who is a team player with a great attitude. Xray certification and some experience preferred. Great staff and benefits. Call 541-504-0880 between 10 am and 4pm. or evenings before 8pm - 541-548-9997. Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS

PRINCIPAL, Powell Butte Char ter School. Position closes 12/3/10. Info at www.pow ellbuttecharterschool.org or 541-548-1166. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Adult Care

Debris Removal

Handyman

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

JUNK BE GONE

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Drywall Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CCB# 177336

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Construction Contractors Clearing, Demolition, UtiliBoard (CCB). An active ties, Asphalt Patching, Gradlicense means the contractor ing, Land & Agricultural Deis bonded and insured. velopment. Work Weekends. Verify the contractor’s CCB Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning

The Bulletin Classiieds

Excavating

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Re placement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Holiday Lighting EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal •Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Pet Services Serious On-site Horse Care Full service sitting w/options for more in-depth care. Call EquiCare, 541-706-1820 (leave message if no answer)

Remodeling, Carpentry Moving and Hauling Harris Custom Crating: We provide custom crating, palletizing, strap & wrap and arrange shipping if required. 541-390-0704,541-390-0799

Repair & Remodeling: Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 Tenant Improvement Structural remodel - 23 yrs exp Quality • Dependable • Honest Armstrong Gen’l Contractor CCB#152609 • 541-280-5677


F4 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE Housing Works will hold a Board Meeting on Wednesday, December 8, 2010 at 3:00 p.m. in the Board Room of Housing Works, located at 405 SW 6th Street, Redmond, OR 97756, and with electronic communication with Board members. Principal subjects anticipated to be considered include general business. A draft agenda for the meeting will be posted under Legal Notices on the Housing Works web site www.housing-works.org. If you have any questions or need special accommodations, please contact Rebecca Thomas at (541) 323-7420. For special assistance due to motion, vision, speech and hearing disabilities, the toll free number of Qwest's services for customers with disabilities is 1-800-223-3131. Cyndy Cook, Executive Director Housing Works (abn Central Oregon Regional Housing Authority)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Lorraine Sedeyn has been appointed Administrator of the Estate of Elmer F. Neale, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under case number 10PB0134SF. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC at 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, Attn.: John D. Sorlie, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following-named attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: November 12, 2010. JOHN D. SORLIE BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC 591 SW MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OR 97702

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $3,143.00, Case #10-10-65612 seized 09/30/10 from Alejandro Cardona Flores. IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $6,210.00, Case # 10-036484 seized 02/23/10 from Tyler Brown.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JAMES L. HANZELY AND ANGELA R. HANZELY. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Four (104), RED HAWK UNIT ONE, City of Redmond, recorded March 18, 1993, in Cabinet C, Page 754, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 29, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-81752 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,102.75 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2009 through August 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $191,618.03; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2009; plus late charges of $199.70; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m.

Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30443). DATED: September 17, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A. TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39525 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,965.58 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $330,330.25; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from Au-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26264-5 Loan No.: 0146797048 Title No.: 4503788 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Thomas J. Bennett, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated 07/24/2007, recorded on 07/31/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-42230 and Loan Modification Recorded on 03/13/2009 as Instrument No. 2009-10403, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 8 IN BLOCK JJ OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PORTION OF LOT 41 OF BLOCK JJ, PLAT OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 41, BEING A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 34° 11' 17" EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 104.47 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 38° 59' 00" WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 41 A DISTANCE OF 15.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE OF SAID LOT SOUTH 26° 40' 17" WEST 109.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Account No.: 107315 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60475 Umatilla Circle, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,897.90 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $377,415.26 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 01/06/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 8-26-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage Inc. c/o Mortgage Lender Services Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue #225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. (RSVP# 203305, 11/12/10, 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10 )

gust 15, 2008; plus late charges of $2,079.43; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: BARRY BERGMAN AND JOAN BERGMAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), COPPER CANYON PHASE 1, recorded March 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 625, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-39526 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $502.22 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $64,923.00; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $569.34; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the

trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30546). DATED: September 15, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN J. WARREN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), PLEASANT RIDGE, recorded July 29, 1993 in Cabinet D page 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 29, 2007. Recording No. 2007-47388 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,683.93 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of February 2010 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note

which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $362,348.07; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from January 15, 2010; plus late charges of $502.48; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30316). DATED: September 22, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET HEARING A public hearing on a proposed supplemental budget for the City of Bend, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, for 2009-2011 Biennial Budget period beginning July 1, 2009 will be held in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend. The hearing will take place on the 1st day of December, 2010 at 7:00 pm. The purpose of the hearing is to discuss the supplemental budget with interested persons. Copies of the proposed supplemental budget are available for review at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, during normal business hours. Summary of City of Bend Supplemental Budget Internal Service Fund: Information Technology Division

Increase

Requirements: Expenditure Appropriations Reserves

Decrease

$ 100,000 $

100,000

To reduce reserves for future capital expenditures and increase expenditure appropriations to provide funds for an information technology organizational and needs assessment.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8007 T.S. No.: 1303408-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Byron K. Ames and Lisa A. Ames Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated October 18, 2007, recorded October 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-56560 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9, block 7, Lazy River South, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16677 Sprague Loop La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,789.06 Monthly Late Charge $78.52. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $252,819.78 together with interest thereon at 5.980% per annum from June 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on February 15, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 16, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-351208 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/03

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A.TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66613 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Biweekly payments in the amount of $1,221.21 each, due biweekly each month, for the months of December 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $451,056.91; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2008; plus late charges of $964.87; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B. TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KARL F. ALDINGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY.

Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One Hundred Sixty-two (162), AWBREY VILLAGE, PHASE 3, recorded June 19,2001, in Cabinet E, Page 642, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 2, 2006. Recording No. 2006-66614 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $606.08 each, due the fifteenth each month, for the months of January 2009 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $80,973.29; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2008; plus late charges of $341.57; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 3, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by

payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30775). DATED: September 23, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust (hereafter referred to as the Trust Deed) made by: Kristi Rae Rucker, as the Grantor, and CitiBank, N.A., as the Beneficiary, dated February 9th, 2007, and recorded February 23rd, 2007, as Doc No. 2007-11119 in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 84, BLOCK 6, LAZY RIVER SOUTH, IN THE CITY OF LA PINE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, for the real property described above is purported to be: 52854 Timber Lane Loop, La Pine, Oregon 97739. The Tax Assessor's Parcel Number (Property Tax ID) for the Real Property is/are purported to be: 127019 and/or 245176. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, Sia Rezvani, have elected to foreclose the above referenced Trust Deed and sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and a Notice of Default and Election to Sell has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). All right, title, and interest in the said described property which the grantors had, or had power to convey, at the time of execution of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the grantors or their successors in interest acquired after execution of the Trust Deed shall be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of sale, including the compensation of the trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of trustee's attorneys. The default(s) for which foreclosure is made is (1) the grantor's failure to make regular payments to the beneficiary, such default beginning May 3rd, 2010, and continuing through the date of this Notice, and (2) failure to carry, and/or provide evidence of, extended coverage hazard insurance, in violation of the Trust Deed, and (3) any defaults or breaches occurring after the date of this document is executed. The current balance of payments now due, together with late charges, attorney and trustee fees, costs, title expenses, and other allowed charges is $4,035.05 together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due, periodic adjustments to the payment amount, any further sums advanced by the beneficiary to protect the property or its interest therein, additional costs and attorney fees as provided by law, and prepayment penalties/premiums, if any, together with defaulted amounts owed to senior lienholders. The amount required to cure the default in payments to date is calculated as follows: From: 5/03/10; No. Payments: 4; Amount per: $466.44= Total of past-due payments: $1,865.76 Total Late charges: $93.29 Trustee's/Attys Fees and Costs: $2,076.00 Total necessary to cure default in payments to date: $4,035.05 + proof of insurance + proof taxes are current + proof seniors are current or tender of sufficient funds to cure any/all senior defaults. Please note this amount is subject to confirmation and review and is likely to change during the next 30 days. Please contact Rezvani Law Office to obtain a "reinstatement" and/or "payoff" quote prior to remitting funds. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed due and payable. The amount required to discharge this lien in its entirety to date is: $203,596.20. Said sale shall be held at the hour of 11:10 a.m. on January 4th, 2011, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, and pursuant to ORS 86.745(7) shall occur at the following designated place: INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, IN THE CITY OF BEND, OREGON. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation(s) of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. The mailing address of the trustee is: Rezvani Law Office, LLC, P.O. Box 865, Gresham, Oregon 97030, the telephone number for the trustee is 503-666-3407. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" and/or "grantors" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Actual payoff and/or reinstatement amounts may change on a daily basis and therefore any payoff/reinstatement is subject to the Trustee's final review and confirmation. Dated this 25th day of August, 2010. By: /s/ Sia Rezvani, Successor Trustee (203655 11/19/10, 11/26/10, 12/03/10, 12/10/10)

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Pamela Reeves, as Grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Bill Sonnabend, as Beneficiary, dated July 24, 2008, recorded July 25, 2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-31397 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED EIGHT (108), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 8 PART II, RECORDED JULY 5, 1967, IN CABINET A, PAGE 137, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15750 Sparks Dr., La Pine, Oregon 97739. Both the beneficiary and the successor trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 28, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $466.34 Monthly Late Charge $27.98. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $72,468.27 together with interest thereon at 7% per annum from December 2, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any stuns advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, George B. Heilig the undersigned successor trustee or his designee will on March 9, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 am, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the 1164 NW Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by her of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required Under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is March 9, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260. Dated: 11/12/2010 By: George B. Heilig, Successor Trustee, HEILIG MISFELDT & ARMSTRONG, LLP, 310 NW 7"' Street, Suite 100, Corvallis, Oregon 97330, (541) 754-7477, www.hmalaw.net.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, November 26, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

700 800 705

850

Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Arctic Cat Mountain 800 2004, injected, battery-free ignition, electric start, lefty throttle, high-output new battery, 151”x2” track, ice scrapers, cover, belts, storage wheels, etc. Ready! $3900 OBO. 541-536-5456

719

Real Estate Trades

NEW HOME at 20114 Carson Creek, Bend. 3 bdrms, 2.5 bath, 1488 sq. ft., corner lot. Will consider trades. Call 541-480-7752. Price $159,900

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

745

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S HARLEY Davidson NOTICE Fat Boy - LO 2010, All real estate advertising in Health forces sale, 1900 this newspaper is subject to mi., 1K mi. service done, the Fair Housing Act which black on black, detachable makes it illegal to advertise windshield, back rest & lug"any preference, limitation or gage rack, $13,900, Mario, discrimination based on race, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such HARLEY Davidson preference, limitation or disFat Boy - LO 2010, crimination." Familial status Health forces sale, 1900 includes children under the mi., 1K mi. service done, age of 18 living with parents black on black, detachable or legal custodians, pregnant windshield, back rest & lugwomen, and people securing gage rack, $13,900, Mario, custody of children under 18. 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras basis. To complain of disincl. pipes, lowering kit, crimination call HUD toll-free chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. at 1-800-877-0246. The toll 541-944-9753 free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Sunriver Lease option, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/ decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge $230,000. 541-617-5787

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $112,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

750

Redmond Homes Eagle Crest behind the gates 10th Fairway, 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. Call 541-923-0908; 541-480-7863 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

865

ATVs

870

880

882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; 2 Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, 1/2 acre lots, 1 buildable w/ also boots, helmet, tires, well, south of Sunriver, poss. avail., 541-410-0429 trade for Bend sgl. level, same value. 509-585-9050

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Travel 1987,

Queen

Wet-Jet personal water craft, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights, 2 for $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

“WANTED”

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $3350. 541-548-3628

The Bulletin

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

4 good studless 215/70R15 snow tires, mounted on rims with wheel covers, $400 541-815-0665 (4) Michelin 205/65/15 X-Ice snow tires on Audi/VW alloy wheels. $450 obo 541-350-9582 or 541-598-3807.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. 4 Michelin LT245x16E LTX all Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, season, 20% tread, never damframe on rebuild, repainted aged $100. 509-710-4616 original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, (4) Studded snow tires, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 185/70R13, on rims, fits Suor make offer. 541-385-9350. zuki, $200. 541-923-6449

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $295. 541-447-1668 Tires (4), Studless Mud/Snow, 235/60R-17, mounted on Raclin Black custom wheels, 17x7.5, $400, 541-504-8085.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

VW Super Beetle 1974

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Tires on Rims, (4), Schwab, 265/75R16, siped, studs, factory Ford wheels, $600, 541-389-3511.

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

932

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Antique and Classic Autos

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 Cyl. eng. w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500, please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

VW Super Beetle 1974

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Kelley Blue Book Prices as of 11/22/2010 $

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

NOW

8,849

2000 Audi A6

The Bulletin Classiieds

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

14,995

MONTANA 2000 36’

WAS $17,995 NOW

2009 VW Beetle

17,495

NOW

21,495

2007 Mini Cooper S

2009 VW Jetta TDI

Low Miles, Full Options

VW Certifed Mini Van. Stk. 3514, Kelley Blue Book $18,525

Only 16k Miles, Nav., Moonroof.

Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876.

Kelley Blue Book $20,630

Kelley Blue Book $21,565

WAS $23,995 NOW

NOW

21,995

$

2005 Volvo XC90

22,995

2007 Audi A4

Available on every vehicle.

AWD, Loaded, 3rd Row

Audi Certified, Low Miles.

Stk. 71031K, VIN 51200237.

Stk. 3465, VIN 125841.

Kelley Blue Book $22,475

Kelley Blue Book $24,610

CarreraAutoOutlet cars you can get into

GREAT VALUES ON RECENT TRADE-INS! WAS $5,995

$

5,495

2000 VW Beetle Great Value. Stk. 90201A VIN M72269.

Kelley Blue Book $6,370

$

NOW

WAS $7,995

6,995

$

1999 Infinity I30

7,495

11,995

2004 MAZDA3

Custom Wheels, Great Buy.

Kelley Blue Book $6,470

Kelley Blue Book $9,815

Stk. 3533 VIN T758691.

WAS $18,995

Stk. 71002A, VIN 1175683.

WAS $19,995

17,995

19,495

$

NOW

$

1 Owner, Low Miles, Like New!

$ Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

$

18,395

885

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

All Wheel Drive, Low Miles. Stk. 3520, VIN F410694. Kelley Blue Book $16,500

$

VIN R501073.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Canopies and Campers

2003 Mercedes C320 4-Matic

VW Certified, Low miles. Stk. 3519, VIN M505864. Kelley Blue Book $15,295

WAS $18,495 NOW

$

$

15,495

$

14,995

2009 VW Routan

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

WAS $15,995 NOW

$

VW Certified, One Owner. Stk. 70066C, VIN M524831. Kelley Blue Book $15,185

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

2007 VW Jetta

VW Certified. Great Buy. Stk. 3421, VIN 071339. Kelley Blue Book $14,025

WAS $15,295 NOW

2007 Beetle Convertible

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

2007 VW Beetle

NOW

$

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 541-604-1808 Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

13,895

$

VW Certified. Stk. 90102A, VIN M504921. Kelley Blue Book $12,465

Must See, Great Condition. Stk. A31035B, VIN 128314. Kelley Blue Book $8,850

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

WAS $13,995 NOW

NOW

12,395

$

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Allegro

16,995

WAS $17,995

16,995

$

WAS $17,995

16,495

$

2008 Smart 2005 Acura 2004 GMC 2005 GMC Fortwo MDX Yukon Yukon Passion Model, Low Miles.

One Owner, Must See!

Loaded! DVD, 3rd Row Seat.

Incredible Condition & Value.

Kelley Blue Book $12,210

Kelley Blue Book $18,625

Kelley Blue Book $20,810

Kelley Blue Book $19,695

Stk. 3534 VIN K178943.

WAS $22,995

$

WAS $17,995

$

21,995

Stk. A31036A, VIN H526917.

WAS $27,995

$

27,495

Stk. 71023A, VIN J295729.

WAS $29,995

$

28,995

Stk. 71056B, VIN J174687.

WAS $38,995

$

37,995

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Navigation, One Owner, Low, Low Miles. 882

Fifth Wheels

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

C-10

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Motorhomes

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

541-322-7253

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

CarreraBelowBlueBookSale!

880

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

10’ Seaspray plastic row boat, new oars, fits easily in pickup bed, $199. 541-316-1574

Vale, OR. 151 acres irrigated land w/150 acres dry hillside pasture. 4 Bdrm home, outbuildings & corrals. Irrigation well & 1884 water rights from creek. Near Bullycreek Reservoir w/fishing, boating & camping. Area known for pheasant, quail & chukkar hunting; deer & elk hunting nearby. Shown by appt only! $1,250,000. 1-208-466-8510.

541-385-5809 Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Travel Trailers

Boats & Accessories

FARM FOR SALE!

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. (541) 610-4472 • 1-541-689-1351

2 hangars at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 planes. $536 annual lease. Reduced to $125,000 or make offer! 541-815-6085.

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition Reduced to $5000. 541-548-7572.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

870 773

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

Find It in

881

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Acreages

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

875

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

925

Watercraft

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161, 541-788-3896.

908

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Utility Trailers

RV Consignments

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

900

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

(Private Party ads only)

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Autos & Transportation

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Stk. A31040A, VIN C366044.

Kelley Blue Book $20,035

2006 Ford F-150 XLT Super Cab, Low Miles. Stk. 90131B, VIN FZ78172

Kelley Blue Book $22,530

2007 Nissan 2006 Ford F250 Pathfinder Super Cab

One Owner, Like New. Diesel, 4x4, Canopy, Stk. 71055A, Low Miles. VIN C621723

Kelley Blue Book $26,090

Stk. 91047A VIN EA47639

Kelley Blue Book $31,620

Porsche | Audi

2008 GMC Acadia

2008 Chevy Tahoe LTZ

Full Power Options, 3rd Seat.

Loaded! Nav, DVD, Low Miles.

Kelley Blue Book $33,050

Kelley Blue Book $41,220

Stk. 99110A VIN J202189

Stk. 3295B VIN J190601

VW | BMW M O T O R S

Find every car on the lot at www.carreramotors.com 10 4 5 S E 3 r d S t . | B e n d | 5 41-3 8 2-17 11


F6 Friday, November 26, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

933

933

933

Pickups

Pickups

Pickups

935

935

975

975

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford Expedition 2000, 4WD, 131K mi., exc. cond., new traction tires, 3rd seat, $4995. 541-480-3286

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $21,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

GMC ENVOY 2005 4 WHEEL DRIVE, 49,000 miles. V6-auto. $14,897 541-598-3750

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

GMC Yukon 2001 SLE 4x4 with Autoride, 70,000 miles, like new, $11,750. Studded tires also available. 541-546-3330

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2008 ALL WHEEL DRIVE moonroof, leather. $20,970 VIN#C222473

Chevy Blazer 2004,

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

V6, auto, 4WD, tow pkg., very good cond, extra clean, A/C, non-smoker owned, loaded, etc, etc, $4800, 503-539-7554 (Bend).

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Chevy Tahoe 2006 LT

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111. Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, Reg cab w/long bed, white, V6, 4.3 L, 20mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune-up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4950 obo. 541-633-6953

DLR 0225

leather, DVD system, loaded, 46, 000 miles. KBB retail $27,850. Our price …

FORD F250 XLT 2000 4X4

$24,887

7.3 diesel, X-Cab, 92,000 miles, matching canopy, excellent condition.

541-598-3750

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com 4 wheel drive. Super clean and ready for next weeks winter storm. $17,757

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

’04 DODGE 2500 QUAD CAB SHORT BED

PLEASE CALL FOR PRICE

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111 Jeep Wrangler 2006. Only 10,000 miles. Like new. 6 cylinder, 6 speed, lift, extras. $16,300. 541-419-7540

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Toyota FJ Cruiser 2007 4x4 Yellow 6 spd, never off-road, Red, like new, only 68k, seats Sat-Nav/DVD/Sirius, 96k all 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 hwy, $18,250. 541-549-8036 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty Low Miles, Automatic

22,999 VIN: 721838

’03 TOYOTA SEQUOIA

’07 SUBARU IMPREZA OUTBACK SPORT

13,999

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Auto, All Weather Pkg.

$

16,988

VIN: 147883

VIN: 805276

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK XT TURBO LIMITED

’03 SUBARU FORESTER

Leather, Loaded, Very Clean, Manual

23,488

Automatic, AWD

$

12,999

VIN: 301669

VIN: 760719

’04 FORD F-250 SUPER CAB

’02 TOYOTA RAV4

4x4, Automatic, Short Box

16,999

’05 VOLVO XC90 AWD

$

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.02 LIMITED

’02 SUBARU OUTBACK LL BEAN

Low Miles, Auto, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Nav

16,488

19,998

$

12,488 VIN: 622300

’02 VW JETTA

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty

$

18,999 VIN: 304770

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Low Miles, Gas Saver, Loaded, Leather, Moonroof, Auto

$

9,899 VIN: 007554

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty Automatic

$

25,999

$

6 Year/100k Powertrain Warranty Low Miles, Automatic

$

25,888

23,999

VIN: 710761

VIN: 337014

This Weekend! $

15,999

All Weather Pkg, Alloy Wheels, Automatic

$

15,999 VIN: 718659

Leather, Low Miles, Automatic

$

13,999 VIN: 209336

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.02 LIMITED

’01 HONDA CIVIC

Low Miles, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Automatic

5-Speed

$

19,998

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Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

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Biggest Automotive SALE of the year! ’06 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5i

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Certifi ed Pre-Owned

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Saab 9-3 SE 1999

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Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

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Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

Toyota Matrix XR 2005,

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 6.5’ Proline flatbed, $37,000. 541-447-3393 see @ craigslist

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If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

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automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641. Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 spd, sunroof, gold color, good running cond, reduced, now $1500. 541-923-0134.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Loaded, Leather, Moonroof

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’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 WAGON

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Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

’10 SUBARU OUTBACK PREMIUM

VIN: 052822

’05 SUBARU LEGACY GT Low Miles, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Automatic

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires/rims, no htr; dashbrd heater instead. Runs great! $999. 541-388-4167

9,998 VIN: 075212

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Sport 1995, excellent cond. moonroof, 4 dr., leather interior, low milage, $5000. (541) 549-1014

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Certifi ed Pre-Owned

$

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Loaded, Leather, Moonroof, Very Very Clean

VIN: D03912

Automatic, Low Miles, Loaded

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Buick Regal Grand

975

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

***

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

CHECK YOUR AD

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4x4, Auto, Very Clean

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Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

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$

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Automobiles

Certifi ed Pre-Owned

Bedliner, Manual, 5.9L, Hard to Find 4X4

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

VIN#A74168

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

$

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Buick LeSabre 2004,

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Dodge Ram 2001, short

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940

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Ford Escape XLT2008 DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Vans

VIN#251359

541-598-3750

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $15,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

The Bulletin Classifieds Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80k miles, tow pkg. $15,600. 541-848-7876

DLR 0225

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Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

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FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

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Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 4x4 28k mi. Loaded! $25,437

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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’05 PONTIAC SUNFIRE

’06 FORD F150 EXT. CAB

Low Miles

Clean, Low Miles

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We don’t sell cars, we help you buy them!

$

6,999 VIN: 206405

$

17,999 VIN: A16283


R E S T A U R A N T S : A review of Shari’s Restaurants, PAGE 10 EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN NOVEMBER 26, 2010

Jazzing up the holidays

M O V I E S : ’Tangled’ and three others open, PAGE 25

Tower Theatre welcomes Preservation Hall, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, PAGE 3


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Cover photo illulstration by Greg Cross, Althea Borck / The Bulletin Submitted photo

RESTAURANTS • 10

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• A review of Shari’s Restaurants

• Make your plans for later on • Talks and classes listing

FINE ARTS • 12

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy headline big week for holiday music • McMenamins welcomes Parson Red Heads • Lucero plays the Domino Room • Casey Neill brings roots-rock to McMenamins • HarmonyHouse hosts Cosy Sheridan, TR Ritchie • Jacobs-Strain and Mystic Roots plan Bend appearances • Empty Space Orchestra takes over MadHappy Lounge

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8

• Bend Performing Arts Center presents “A Bend Christmas Celebration” • High Desert Chamber Music hosts Spotlight on Wine tonight • “Don Pasquale” encore is at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 • CTC previews “Moon Over Buffalo” • High Desert Gallery exhibits ”Teeny Tiny Art Show” • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• This week’s bazaars

OUT OF TOWN • 21 • Leonard Cohen performs in Portland • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 24 • A review of “Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25 • “Tangled,” “Burlesque,” “Faster” and “Love and Other Drugs” open in Central Oregon • “Eat Pray Love,” “Expendables,” “Flipped” and “I’m Still Here” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

OUTDOORS • 15

• Guide to area clubs

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

CALENDAR • 16

• Take a look at recent releases

HOLIDAY BAZAARS • 20

• A week full of Central Oregon events

Fresh Cut Noble Christmas Trees • Storybook Lane

DD Ranch

• Christmas Decor, Wreaths and Garland • U-build Wreaths Call Diann

Celebrates the 11th Country Christmas

• Hay Rides & Pony Rides • Hay Maze • Petting Zoo & Kids Korral • Visits with Santa on Weekends • Café open Weekends

fied Beef USDA Certi r ng orders fo & Pork. Taki dinner. ay lid your ho

Dec. 4 – Dec. 23 Open Daily 9am-5pm

541-548-1432

“A Country Christmas for the Whole Family”

3 miles East of Terrebonne Visit our website for more information. on Smith Rock Way www.ddranch.net


G O ! M A G A ZI N E •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

PAG E 3

music

Submitted photo

T h e Preservation Hall Jazz Band has been playing New Orleans jazz around the world for decades. Ben Jaffe, far left, is the group’s artistic director.

CreoleChristmas Preservation Hall Jazz Band brings a little New Orleans to the Tower Theatre By Ben Salmon • T h e B u lletin

A

n interview with Ben Jaffe is like taking a historical talking tour of one of

America’s greatest cultural cities. The curly-haired 39-year-old is not only the director and tuba player for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band — which will bring its popular Creole Christmas show to Bend next week (see “If you go”) — but he grew up around the corner from the legendary New Orleans jazz venue Preservation Hall, which his parents founded in the heart of the city’s famous French Quarter, three blocks from the Mississippi River. So when Jaffe talks about his — and the hall’s, and the band’s — home town, his words are soaked with authenticity and adoration, especially when he’s asked about the recent, post-Hurricane Katrina surge in respect and interest in Preservation Hall. “We had a choice after Katrina. Either this was going

to become your life and a battle cry and something you were going to die for, or you were just going to accept things and just move on with your life, and I … found myself choosing to fight for what I believed in,” Jaffe said in a jet-lagged telephone interview last week from San Francisco. (He’d just flown in from playing for the king of Thailand.) “I believe in New Orleans. I believe in our way of life. I believe in what New Orleans stands for. I believe in our history. I believe in our culture. I believe in red beans and rice and Mardi Gras and 98-percent humidity,” Jaffe said. “I believe in all the things that make me who I am, and you only find those things in New Orleans.” Also only in New Orleans: Preservation Hall, an oldschool music room with no fancy sign out on the sidewalk, no significant updates to the interior, no food and drink for sale. It’s an austere music venue where the focus is on the music, which is provided nightly by some of New Orleans’ finest jazz musicians. Continued Page 5

If you go What: Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s Creole Christmas When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $37 and $42, available through the Tower Contact: 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org

Wait, there’s more! Read about the upcoming BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY SHOW and find out what OTHER HOLIDAY ENTERTAINMENT is happening in December, Page 5.


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

music

k c a B h t r o f & Lucero Courtesy Alan Spearman

Blue-collar

rock

The Parson Red Heads Submitted photo

Portland’s Parson Red Heads play easy, breezy indie-pop By Ben Salm o n The Bulletin

Tennessee’s Lucero visits the Domino Room P By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

W

hither alt-country? The genre — a collision of punk/rock crunch and Southern/country twang rooted in Gram Parsons, Steve Earle and Uncle Tupelo — has experienced ups and downs over the past several years, after being the consensus next big thing in the late 1990s. That era produced a lot of bands (Whiskeytown, Old 97s, etc.) that were great, but never “big.” The movement sagged throughout much of the 2000s, but seems to be mounting a comeback, thanks to crescendo-happy string bands like The Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons, plus Springsteen acolytes such as The Gaslight Anthem and the band that will headline the Domino Room on Tuesday, Lucero. As long as we’re talking history, Lucero — from one of the crescents of American music, Memphis, Tenn. — sounds a lot like another one of those classic late-’90s bands, Slobberbone. But Lucero has its own deep roots, with a gang of independently released albums dating back to 2000, which attracted mostly positive reviews and built the band a foundation of devoted fans across the country. However, Lucero’s first major-label effort, 2009’s “1372 Overton Park,” is its best yet. Here, the band comes into sharper focus; frontman Ben Nichols’ small-town tales ring truer, the nails in his throat sound perfectly rusty, and the band’s scruffy jams

If you go What: Lucero, with Drag The River and I Can Lick Any SOB in the House When: 8 p.m. Tuesday, doors open 7 p.m. Where: Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $15 plus fees in advance, $16 at the door. Advance tickets available at Ranch Records (541389-6116) in Bend, plus www.bendticket.com and all TicketsWest outlets Contact: 541-390-8648 or markiewirges@gmail. com

sound tighter, fuller and more ambitious than ever. The addition of a horn section is a nice touch, too. Ah, the spoils of big-label money. The horns will come with Lucero to Bend, in the form of accomplished Memphians Jim Spake (who has played with Al Green) and Nashon Benford. Also on Tuesday’s bill: Two fine and like-minded bands, Colorado’s Drag The River and Portland’s I Can Lick Any SOB in the House. If there’s any time to dig out that old flannel shirt and non-ironic trucker hat, this is it. Ben Salmon can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 7 7 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

laying instruments. Writing songs. Recording them. Getting in a van and touring. Getting along with each other while stuck in that van. There are plenty of steps to become a full-time rock ’n’ roll band, and many of them are tough to overcome. But the toughest of all may be the most intangible: vibe. Lots of bands are talented, but have a sketchy vibe. No need to list them here. The Parson Red Heads, on the other hand, have good vibe in buckets. It’s a product, no doubt, of their dual homes; the band formed in the mossy, folksy Willamette Valley, and relocated to the sun-drenched indie playground of Los Angeles a few years back. In 2010, the Parsons moved yet again, back to Portland so that they could play with folks who still lived there. With them, they brought some of the most easy-on-the-ears songs around. The band mines a long-lost sound of Southern California, intermingling the hazy jangle of 1970s country-rock with the psychedelic buzz that perme-

If you go What: The Parson Red Heads When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com

ated the late 1960s. The result is near-perfect, easygoing pop that should fit in perfectly in the Rose City’s redhot scene. Parson Red Heads songs will dig their way into your head until you just can’t help but clap and/or sing along, and that’s the ultimate testament to the band’s all-inclusive philosophy; hit their MySpace page (www .myspace.com/redheads) to see a list of nine official members (not all of whom play every show) and dozens of “honorary Parsons.” While you’re there, click “Play” and fall in love with the sound. Ben Salmon can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 7 7 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

music

Celebrate the Season Big Bad Voodoo Daddy H oliday concerts come in all shapes and sizes, and the vintage-cool jazz of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band isn’t the only reindeer game in town this week. On Thursday, the Tower Theatre will host the second night of its retro-spiked, one-two punch as those zoot-suited cats from Big Bad Voodoo Daddy bring their Wild and Swingin’ Holiday Party to town. BBVD is best known for its breakthrough performance in the movie “Swingers” and the hit songs “You & Me & the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight (Baby)” and “Go Daddy-O.” But the band’s holiday show features reworked classics like “Blue Christmas,” “We Three Kings” and “Jingle Bells,” plus lesser known but equally seasonal songs such as “Zat You Santa Claus.” The whole point of a BBVD show is to dance the night away, and the Tower will facilitate such fun by removing the first three rows of seats to make plenty of room for the Lindy Hop, the Balboa, the St. Louis Shag and other specific swing dances I had to look up on Wikipedia. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s Wild and Swingin’ Holiday Party; 7 :3 0 p.m. Thursday; $40, available through the venue; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. — Ben Salmon

From Page 3 Jaffe’s parents, Allan and Sandra, opened the hall in 1961 in an effort to help preserve and perpetuate New Orleans-style jazz, which was waning in popularity thanks to rock ’n’ roll and more modern forms of jazz. The Jaffes were a young white couple who’d just moved to a segregated New Orleans from the north, but they jumped in with both feet, building their life’s work around music being made by older African-Americans. “They never set out to create a music venue or to create a part of American history,” Ben Jaffe said. “They set out to be involved in a movement that they felt passionately about, and it led them down this path.” Fifty years later, the hall is as strong as ever, though it hasn’t always been a smooth ride. Allan Jaffe died in 1987, and Preservation Hall experienced some “dark years,” Ben Jaffe said, due to lack of leadership. Jaffe took on that leadership role in 1993, and he’s been leading the venue’s renaissance in recent years. “My biggest fear in the world is (the hall) becoming a museum piece,” he said. “That’s not what New Orleans music is to me. New Orleans music is vibrant and it’s alive and it’s a living, breathing tradition.” To that end, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band — which has performed across the country in various incarnations for decades — has spent the past several months touring with My Morning Jacket and Del McCoury and working with Mos Def, Lenny Kravitz and Trombone Shorty. The band just released a limitededition 78 RPM record — yes, 78 RPM — with Tom Waits. Earlier this year, it released “Preservation,” a benefit compilation featuring collaborations with An-

drew Bird, Ani DiFranco, Brandi Carlile, Merle Haggard and Steve Earle, among others. It’s that kind of effort that has raised Preservation Hall’s profile and dragged this defiantly throwback institution into the 21st century. “An institution is a hard thing to change the direction of. You don’t make a turn in a car going 100 mph,” Jaffe said. “It involves people and personalities and … a cultural tradition that needs to be respected and honored along the way, and at the end of the day, it’s also a business. “There’s lots of bands making great music that aren’t popular and can’t survive because they can’t make a living. So it’s a real balancing act. Just because something deserves to be here doesn’t always mean it will be here,” he said. “I’ve found a way to make Preservation Hall commercially successful while honoring the tradition.” Tradition drives the band’s Creole Christmas program, which is rooted in the Jaffe family’s annual custom of gathering some musicians — Allan Jaffe called this the Santa Claus Band — and taking a trip around the French Quarter to play Christmas carols and other favorites. “Christmas became this bonding time for me and my family, when we came together and we gave music back to the community,” said Ben Jaffe, who grew up Jewish. “Creole Christmas isn’t some big revue. It’s the Preservation Hall Jazz Band playing songs of the season and some of our traditional favorites. It’s us getting a chance to just share what the holidays mean to us.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0367 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

Nutcracker Blend Beneits the Central Oregon School of Ballet

Other holiday entertainment The Christmas season is filled with other holiday-themed music and theater events. Here’s a selection. Check the Calendar for details. Nov. 29, Dec. 2 — Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel, Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496. Dec. 2-5, 9-12 — “A Bend Christmas Celebration,” Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.bendpac. org. (See Story, Page 12) Dec. 3 — Christmas play “Mary, Did You Know?”, Real Life Christian Church, 2880 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-312-8844. Dec,. 4-5 — “The Nutcracker” by The Central Oregon School of Ballet, Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www.centraloregonschoolof ballet.com. Dec. 4-5 — High Desert Nutcracker by Redmond School of Dance, Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957. Dec. 8 — Béla Fleck and the Flecktones holiday concert, Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541322-0863 or www.kpov.org. Dec. 10, 12 — Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale with soloist Lindy Gravelle, Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3888103 or www.coril.org. Dec. 10, 12 — High Desert Chorale holiday concert, Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037 or www. sisterschorale.com. Dec. 11 — Handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. Dec. 17-20 — “A Christmas Carol” by Bend Experimental Art Theatre, Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. Dec. 17 — Holiday Bluegrass Jamboree, Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

A Sustainable Cup - Drink it up! www.strictlyorganic.com

6 SW Bond @ Arizona • 450 Powerhouse Dr. @ the Old Mill


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

music Casey Neill plays McMenamins

Casey Neill & the Norway Rats Submitted photo

You can read about a couple of bands who cook with twang over on Page 4, but there is perhaps no act in Bend this week that falls more squarely into the roots-rock bin than Portland’s Casey Neill & the Norway Rats. Neill’s a Northwest scene veteran whose songs will remind alt-country fans of Jay Farrar, sometimes leading late-era Uncle Tupelo, and other times fronting The Pogues. Indeed, the Norway Rats are an Americana band, but one that mixes in a healthy helping of Celtic sounds. Add in Neill’s perfectly raspy voice, some punk-rock pluckiness and a group of skilled players and you’ve got one of the most elegant and underrated acts in Portland’s bustling scene. Steve Earle called Neill’s songs “stories well told.” You can hear them at www.casey neill.org or for free Thursday at Bend’s McMenamins branch. What a bargain. Casey Neill & the Norway Rats; 7 p.m. Thursday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

ESO: Loud band, small room, ugly sweaters I’ve seen local quintet Empty Space Orchestra in expansive venues like the Tower Theatre, Century Center, and even outdoors, where there are no walls and ceilings to contain the band’s spacey, psychedelic post-rock. No matter where I see them, they are loud. So I can only imagine how loud they’ll be inside the cozy confines of MadHappy Lounge, where they’re going to play an Ugly Sweater Jam tonight. The band has had a busy few months, recording its new album in Sacramento, Calif., and touring the Northwest with local dude Eric Tollefson. Tonight, though, ESO is all about keeping things compact and sweaty. Says guitarist Shane Thomas: “We wanted to throw the craziest rock show possible in a room that’s way too small for us, pack it full of crazy people, and play loud enough to explode the heart of a goat.” OK! Continued next page

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

Upcoming Concerts Dec. 4 — Grant Sabin (folk-blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Dec. 8 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones (banjo-technics), Mountain View High School, Bend, 541-3220863 or www.kpov.org. Dec. 12 — Brother Ali and The Grouch (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Dec. 16 — Dick Dale (guitar hero), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 17 — Sweatshop Union (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Dec. 18 — Crown Point (poprock), JC’s, 541-383-3000. Dec. 18 — The Quick & Easy Boys (funk-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Dec. 29 — Reverend Horton Heat (psychobilly), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Jan. 8 — Jon Wayne and The Pain (funk-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Jan. 10 — The Steep Canyon Rangers (bluegrass), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Jan. 14 — The Wailers (reggae), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Jan. 22 — LJ Booth (folk), HarmonyHouse concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Jan. 22 — Cicada Omega (trance blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Jan. 29 — Beth Wood (folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Feb. 4 — Tom Russell (Americana), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. Feb. 4-5 — Hillstomp (junkyard blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Feb. 19 — Johnsmith (folk), Harmony House concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Feb. 25 — Moira Smiley & VOCO (a cappella Americana), Sisters High School, 541-549-4979 or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. March 19 — The Hollands (folk), HarmonyHouse concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 7

music

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Cosy Sheridan, left, and TR Ritchie Submitted photo

From previous page So, yes, it’s going to be a cool scene. Wear your earplugs, etc. But here’s the most interesting part, I think: The band will be giving away a dozen cards with secret links to a website where you can stream and/or download their new album. Now that is nifty. I want one of those. Empty Space Orchestra, with Eric Tollefson; 10 tonight; free; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or info@emptyspaceorchestra .com.

pick-me-up, consider hitting The Summit Saloon & Stage (125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend), where Cali-based Mystic Roots will play their lively mix of roots-reggae, dub, rock and hip-hop. Get there early, because One Love Community Band and MC Mystic are opening the show. Unless reggae makes you drowsy, too. If that’s the case, maybe you should just drink some soda. 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m. $8.

Jacobs-Strain, Mystic Roots return to town

The HarmonyHouse concert series in Sisters rolls on this Saturday night with a post-Thanksgiving show by acclaimed Utah singer-songwriter Cosy Sheridan, along with her partner TR Ritchie. Sheridan’s tunes range from cleverly funny to somberly poignant, focused on themes of love, loss and life, with several popular numbers — “Botox Tango,” for example — about aging as a female. (She also wrote a one-woman show called “The Pomegranate Seed: An Exploration of Appetite, Body-Image and Myth in Modern Culture.”) As is often the case, Sheridan will be joined at the HarmonyHouse by Ritchie, a former winner of the Sisters Folk Festival’s songwriting contest. Find more at www.cosy sheridan.com and www.trritchie .com. Cosy Sheridan and TR Ritchie; 8 p.m. Saturday, doors open 7 p.m.; $15 suggested donation; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. — Ben Salmon

A couple of regulars on the local scene are stopping in for shows this week. The details: • It seems to have become tradition that Oregon-based blues prodigy David Jacobs-Strain plays Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend) the weekend after Thanksgiving. This year is no different, as the still-only-twentysomething musician brings his entrancing combo of virtuoso guitar skills, ultra-earthy blues tunes, and stately, soulful singing voice back to town tonight. Presumably, he’ll be playing songs from his brand new album “Terraplane Angel,” a collaboration with the well-known Nashville producer Ray Kennedy. 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m. $5-$10. • Everyone knows eating turkey makes you drowsy. Sometimes for a whole week! OK, maybe not for a week, unless you eat a lot of it. But if next Thursday rolls around and you feel like you need a post-holiday

HarmonyHouse hosts folkie Cosy Sheridan

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

area clubs FRIDAY

BEND

SATURDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

SUNDAY

Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

Blacksmith After Dark, 10 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p Out of the Blue, 9 pm r/p

61303 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend, 541-388-8178

Out of the Blue, 9 pm r/p

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5 pm j

2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777

Karaoke, 8 pm

1020 N.W. Wall St., 541-385-8898

David Jacobs-Strain, 9 pm, $5-10 b (P. 7)

Southside Pub 61160 S. U.S. Highway 97, 541-383-7672

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

Tart Bistro 920 N.W. Bond St., 541-385-0828

Third Street Pub 314 S.E. Third St., 541-306-3017

Tumalo Feed Co. 64619 U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-2202

Ladies night with DJ Harlo, 9 pm dj Casey Neill + Norway Rats, 7 pm a (P. 6)

Chris Chabot, 6:30 pm r/p

Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill

125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

THURSDAY

Erin Cole-Baker, 7 pm f

portello winecafe

The Summit Saloon & Stage

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Ladies night w/ Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj

25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

r/p

Open mic, 8 pm

Players Bar & Grill

Silver Moon Brewing Co.

Metal Punk

WEDNESDAY

The Parson Red Heads, 7 pm r/p (P. 4)

Mountain’s Edge Bar

19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

p

Empty Space Orch., 10 pm r/p (P. 6)

700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174

River Rim Coffeehouse

m

The Reputations, 8 pm r/p

McMenamins Old St. Francis

62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

j

Hip-hop Jazz

OpenFate, 8 pm r/p

642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Northside Pub

h

Hilst & Coffey, 6 pm f

JC’s

850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

dj

Lucero, Drag the River, I Can Lick..., 8 pm, $15-16 a (P. 4)

51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

Madhappy Lounge

c

Blues Country

Two Thirds Trio, 7:30 pm j

Domino Room

845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

b

Betty Berger Big Band, 6 pm, $7 j

Crossings Lounge

Jackson’s Corner

MONDAY

MU SI C T Y P E :

Doug Rychard, 6 pm r/p

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar The Blacksmith Restaurant

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

Pat Thomas, 9 pm c

Velvet 805 N.W. Wall Street

The Prairie Rockets, 9 pm, $5 a

Saint Andrews Day celebration

Arridium, 9 pm r/p DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Bobby Lindstrom, 7 pm r/p Hi Desert Hooligans, and more, 8 pm p Pat Thomas, 9 pm c Joseph Balsamo, 8 pm b

Open mic, 8 pm

Mystic Roots & more, 9 pm, $8 r/p (P. 7)

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

REDMOND Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 1 pm

SISTERS Slick’s Que Co. 240 E. Cascade, 541-719-0580

The Prairie Rockets, 6 pm a Forever Growing, 7 pm, $5 r/p

Poor Man’s Roses, 8 pm, $5 a

Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

Live jazz, 6-8 pm j

Thyme at FivePine 1011 Desperado Trail, 541-588-6151

SUNRIVER Owl’s Nest 1 Center Drive, 541-593-3730

The Reputations, 9 pm r/p

The Reputations, 9 pm r/p

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY LOCAL MUSIC NEWS & REVIEWS


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

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PAGE 9

music releases Sugarland

Kings of Leon

THE INCREDIBLE MACHINE Mercury Records Nashville No country act struggles more with its countryness than Sugarland. Jennifer Nettles, the lead singer, has a showstopping voice, a slick howl that feels effortless. Kristian Bush, her partner, plays sweet, cheerful guitar. Their brand of country-pop is shiny and overwhelmingly optimistic, filling and simple. Sugarland is a duo, though really only in name: it’s Nettles’ show, and it’s been an impressive one since its 2004 debut, “Twice the Speed of Life.” But on “The Incredible Machine,” the fourth Sugarland album, Nettles is in retreat, taking pains to undermine her monster of a voice, perhaps the best in country music today. She softens its punch by pulling away from some syllables on “All We Are.” On “Tonight,” she adopts a breathy, slightly gothic 1980s theatricality. Most peculiar is the reggae patois she slips into on “Every Girl Like Me” and the single “Stuck Like Glue.” This all amounts to an unwelcome unraveling of the Sugarland formula. As a country duo, the members of Sugarland are

COME AROUND SUNDOWN RCA Records Before they became the Grammy-winning torchbearers for American Rock, Kings of Leon were wholly unpredictable, wildly uneven and all sorts of fun. Then came the anthemic, omnipresent one-two punch of “Sex on Fire” and “Use Somebody” and suddenly the Followill brothers — singer-guitarist Caleb, bassist Jared, drummer Nathan — and guitarist cousin Matthew Followill had something to lose. And their new album, “Come Around Sundown,” sounds like a misguided attempt to simply hang on to as many of those casual chanters of “This sex is on

Elton John and Leon Russell THE UNION Decca Records It’s not the most natural collaboration, but the new Elton John/Leon Russell record makes for a fascinating listen. It has some uplifting songs, some clever lines, some lovely vocal interplay. And while the two pianists’ voices couldn’t be more dissimilar, they make these songs work. The mutual admiration between John and Russell is obvious. John spends four pages in the liner notes telling their story — from their first meeting at the Troubadour in 1970 to the creation

surefooted. As tweakers of Nashville orthodoxies, they’re goofy and fun, but clumsy. “Stuck Like Glue” opens with a bit of pseudobeatboxing, though it’s notable more for being irksome than for being novel. “Find the Beat Again” sounds like a No Doubt homage. And there are blatant errors of judgment on this album, particularly the increased vocal presence of Bush, whose anguished scrape is a heavy anchor pulling down “Stand Up,” “Wide Open,” and the many songs on which he sings harmony at the chorus. Sugarland wrote most of this album on its own, but the group is typically better with help: Words are not its forte. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

of this record, which spanned multiple continents and involved the talents of mega-Americana producer T Bone Burnett. And it’s a treat to listen to these boys’ jams, especially since their songwriting voices are as distinctive as their physical voices. “If It Wasn’t For Bad” is a rollicking, fun-loving jaunt that benefits from Russell’s signature sense of humor. The song’s key, titular line brings on a smile: “If it wasn’t for you, I’d be happy ... If it wasn’t for bad, you’d be good.” John’s “The Best Part of the Day” is a memorable ballad that works off Bernie Taupin’s clever lyrics: “I hear you singing ‘I Shall Be Released’/ Like a chainsaw runnin’ through a masterpiece/ But that’s all right, that’s OK/Grab.K./ Grab the bottle and slide my way.” Even if this “Union” looks strange on paper, John knew what he was talking about when he first called Russell. These legendary piano men needed to make a record together, and don’t be surprised if this CD spawns an expansion of their now-limited tour schedule. — Ricardo Baca, The Denver Post

fire!” as possible. The odd, messy single “Radio Active” shows promise with its driving bass line and Caleb’s mishmash of Important Rock Band vocal approaches. It’s the most successful of the U2- influenced atmospheric songs (“The

End,” “The Face,” “The Immortals”) the band rolls out like Xeroxed copies, each generation getting slightly duller than the one before it. Even when they return to their Southern-rock roots for the pretty, gospel-tinged, acoustic ache of “Back Down South,” it sounds too clean-shaven to have come from them. Maybe it’s a production issue from Angelo Petraglia and Jacquire King. Only on the brilliant “Mary,” with its Spector-ish wall-of-guitars and Stones strut, does the band sound like it was interested in trying something new. Surely the “Sex on Fire” guys have more daring left than that. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

is the key to Swift’s success. Her third album, “Speak Now,” is meant to be her masterpiece of major declarations. Confessing affairs with several fellow stars of the moment, she presents herself as a modern young woman who stashes clothes for the morning at her boyfriend’s place

and isn’t above calling a rival a mattress gymnast. The musical range of “Speak Now” expands beyond countrypop to border both alternative rock and the dirty bubblegum pop promulgated by producers like Lukasz “Dr. Luke” Gottwald. A companionable tone is Swift’s strongest point. She makes memorable music by homing in on the tiny stuff: the half-notes in a hummed phrase, the lyrical images that communicate precisely what it’s like to feel uncomfortable, or disappointed, or happy. Swift’s artistry isn’t in question. Next she should confront the realities that remain, for her, in the dark. — Ann Powers, Los Angeles Times

Taylor Swift SPEAK NOW Big Machine Records Taylor Swift sleeps with a night light on. She makes this confession — hardly the flashiest on her new album “Speak Now,” but possibly the most revealing — in “Never Grow Up,” a delicate tearjerker in which the singer follows herself through a childhood she’s loath to abandon. “I could still be little,” she sings, teeth clenched. Swift, nearly 21, knows that she’s lying to herself. She is one of the world’s biggest pop stars; many say the fate of the conventional music industry rests on her often artfully displayed white shoulders. Yet her impossible commitment to staying little

The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger ACOUSTIC SESSIONS Chimera Records Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl have spent enough time in the spotlight together to seem pretty well pegged: the diffident rock scion and the slyly ethereal fashion model, a downtown couple of eccentric chic. The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger is their musical guise, a partnership that extends to the songwriting, the singing and the playing of various drawing-room instruments. It’s not awful. But while “Acoustic Sessions” carries the hush of

Here and there Jan. 28 — The Woods, Portland; 503-890-0408 or www.thewoodsportland.com.

a whispered secret, it divulges little beyond the fact of its stylish presence. Not, perhaps, for lack of trying. Some of these songs, with their Surrealist intimations and counterintuitive chord changes, reflect obvious care. “Jardin du Luxembourg,” originally released in a 1960s-mod version produced by Mark Ronson, appears here as a lilting reverie, unnervingly sweet.

Elsewhere the psychedelicfolk jangle can become gratingly precious, like an overwrought spread in the Anthropologie catalog. — Nate Chinen, The New York Times


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

restaurants

Family friendly Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Shari’s Restaurants offer more than 20 types of pies at their establishments.

Shari’s Restaurants in Bend, Redmond are always open By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

T

here’s always Shari’s. Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the Oregon-born-and-bred family restaurant chain puts a Pacific Northwest spin on nearly everything that its kitchens produce. Now based in Beaverton, the company was established in Hermiston in 1978 by Shari and Ron Bergquist. Today there are 104 Shari’s Restaurants in six Western states, 45 of them in Oregon, including two in Bend and another in Redmond. The trademark of Shari’s Restaurants is a distinctive six-sided design; every one of its stores is built to this model. At each one that I’ve visited, the mood is the same: casual, family-friendly, well-lit and well-maintained. Relaxing, easy-listening music is piped throughout. I have recently dined twice at the Shari’s in south

Bend, on South Third Street opposite the intersection of Murphy Road, and once at the north Bend establishment, adjacent to the Bend River Promenade. In each case, my experiences were similar. Service was homespun and efficient. The fare was not gourmet, but it was solid comfort food. I only wish that dining at Shari’s didn’t require wading through a cumbersome 18-page menu with more than 180 items, accompanied by photographs.

Dinner in south Bend On our first visit to Shari’s in south Bend, my dining companion and I were greeted and seated promptly at a window booth. Certainly, the hexagonal design allows for more window seats than most restaurants can provide. Continued next page

Shari’s Restaurants Location: 61135 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 3098 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 1565 Odem Medo Road, Redmond Hours: Always open Price range: Breakfast $6.19 to $12.99, lunch $7.99 to $9.99, dinner $8.69 to $13.99 Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes; also an extensive menu for seniors Vegetarian menu: Other than salads, options are very limited Alcoholic beverages: Beer and wine Outdoor seating: No Reservations: No

Contact: 541-389-2405 (south Bend), 541-382-0674 (north Bend), 541-923-0400 (Redmond); www.sharis.com

Scorecard OVERALL: B+ Food: B. Solid comfort fare; entree dishes and sandwiches are better than salads and appetizers. Service: B+. Homespun and generally efficient, if sometimes inconsistent. Atmosphere: A-. Friendly and welllit; distinctive hexagonal design for more window seating. Value: B+. Prices are reasonable; breakfast specials are the best deal on the menu.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

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restaurants From previous page We were offered coffee or tea to drink, but not water, for which we made a special request. Our orders were taken quickly; delivery, on the other hand, was slow, an indictment not of the server but of the cooks. We each began with a house salad, a very ordinary dish of chopped iceberg lettuce mixed with a little red cabbage and shredded carrot. The salads had two large slices of red onion and two plum tomatoes, but no cucumbers. A square of cornbread was some of the best that either of us had tasted in any restaurant. Sweet and smooth with honey, it was very moist and didn’t crumble like some cornbread. Instead, it melted in our mouths. My companion was very pleased with her “home-style pot roast and Willamette Valley vegetables.” The slow-cooked beef, served in brown gravy, was fall-apart tender. It was presented with a generous portion of whipped red potatoes, just a little bit lumpy, and fresh garden vegetables: baby carrots, pearl onions and celery. I ordered the “flat iron steak and shrimp with stuffed hash browns.” The steak was thicker than I had anticipated, cooked medium-rare as I like. Some bites were a little bit gristly, but all in all, it was a decent piece of meat. The half-dozen frozen shrimp, however, were not grilled, but breaded and deep-fried. And I could have done without the potatoes. Greasy, breakfast-style hash browns were wrapped around sour cream and cheese, topped with bacon bits and green onions, like a baked potato.

Lunch at the mall Another friend joined me for a substantial lunch at the north Bend restaurant. We began with Shari’s “signature sampler” of appetizers, allowing us to choose four starters from among a half-dozen options. Most were deep-fried. The “golden shrimp” were the same style as I previously had eaten with my flat-iron steak. Onion rings and calamari rings were coated in an identical, thick and crispy breading. The sweet-chili pot stickers were the best choice of the quartet; the pan-fried wonton wrappers were stuffed with a pork filling, but they were too spicy for my companion to enjoy. Each of the three accompanying sauces — a sweet-chili plum sauce, a spicy chipotle aioli and a cocktail sauce with horseradish — had more zest than I think

many diners can handle. Milder options could be offered at the time orders are delivered. Personally, I like a peppery flavor, so I was very happy with my Baja chipotle chicken sandwich. A grilled chicken breast with melted pepper-jack cheese was served in a firm hamburger bun spread with chipotle aioli, dressed with two avocado slices, two tomato slices and a leaf of lettuce. A half of a dill pickle, sliced lengthwise, came on the side. The menu had also promised “tangy” cole slaw. I had to ask for it, and when it was delivered, it wasn’t tangy. My friend ordered baked wild Pacific salmon, described as a “fresh, center-cut salmon with lemony dill sauce.” It was clear that the fish was not fresh; it had been frozen and thawed before preparation. Nevertheless, she enjoyed every bite. The light, buttery sauce suited her perfectly, as did a medley of vegetables: broccoli, baby carrots, snap peas and yellow squash, perfectly cooked. Instead of a trademark cranberryalmond rice pilaf, she accompanied her meal with a baked potato. Service early in the meal had been excellent — but when we finished dining, we couldn’t find our server anywhere to bring us a check. We finally walked to the counter to pay.

customers during her years of service. “Would you like coffee?” she immediately asked. “Medium or dark roast?” In no time, a full pot of medium-roast coffee appeared on the table, the perfect start for a breakfast. Unfortunately, the food didn’t match the service on this occasion. I would gladly return to Shari’s to order from its short list of $3.99 breakfast specials, but $8.99 for everyday dishes was too much. I selected one of several eggs Benedict options. Two poached eggs were served with folded ham slices and fresh leaves of spinach, atop halved (but untoasted) white English muffins. A buttery pesto Hollandaise was spooned over all. It sounded better than it tasted. Noting that Shari’s is well known for its pies, my companion ordered a classic quiche, listed on a dietary chart as one of the restaurant’s least fattening items. When it arrived, she quipped: “No wonder it’s low calorie. Look how tiny it is.” But looks were deceiving. This was a rich quiche, heavy with cheese as well as bacon, mushrooms and green onions. It was served with a small cup of fruit — large red grapes, cantaloupe and honeydew melons that were not quite ripe.

Back for breakfast

About those pies: In April, the Shari’s group entered the National Pie Championships for the first time and came away with blue ribbons for its Montana sweet cherry pie and its original S’mores Galore pie. I didn’t try either of those. But I did sample the Northwest berry trio pie and the pecan pie. And I am not a fan of either. Although the crust was appropriately flaky, the filling of

My regular dining companion returned to the south-side Shari’s with me for breakfast. Our server on this occasion was a pleasant veteran waitress who expressed surprise that she’d never seen us in the restaurant before. A plaque that we later discovered on a wall indicated that she had been honored for memorizing the names of 1,500

Shari’s pies

Next week: Letzer’s Deli Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants. each of these pies was more jam than fruit. The pecan pie had a single layer of nuts atop the filling. I could only distinguish a few blueberries and marionberry seeds in the berry pie. I’m sure they are not bad pies, but they are not my style. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES Bend’s new Brickhouse restaurant is scheduled to open Tuesday. Owner Jeff Porad said the steakhouse, overlooking the Deschutes River in the former location of Fireside red and the River Mill Grill, will feature the same menu as the original Redmond restaurant, with steak and seafood entrees priced $16 to $32. Well-known restaurant host Ron Lybeck, formerly of 900 Wall and Trattoria Sbandati, is general manager. Open 4 p.m. to close every day; 803 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541728-0334, www.brickhouseredmond.com. 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar has in-

troduced a new lunch menu designed on a theme of Asian street food. Partner Howie Long said the menu features small plates of dishes offered at stalls in east and southeast Asia, including sushi-quality seafood chirashi, Kobe beef sliders and Malaysian laksa soup. Open 11:30 a.m. to close Monday to Friday, 4 p.m. to close Saturday and Sunday. 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328, www.bend5spice.com.

RECENT REVIEWS Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker (B+): A good option for enjoying a light meal while watching the big game, Rivals is succeeding in a venue where other restaurants have failed. Reasonably priced burgers, prompt service and a laid-back ambience extend to a large poker room in the rear. Open 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-5507771, www.rivalsbend.com. Anthony’s at the Old Mill (B): Despite a highly professional wait staff, Anthony’s falls short of its considerable promise. Grilled fish and chowder are good but the recipes are unimaginative, the menu overpriced and the ambience lacking in intimacy. Open 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 9:30 p.m. Sunday. 475 S.W. Powerhouse Drive (The Old Mill District), Bend; 541389-8998; www.anthonys.com/ restaurants/info/bend.html.

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Pronghornclub.com ~ 541-693-5300 ~ reservations@pronghornclub.com ~


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

f in e a r ts

CAROLS & MIRACLES

M ichael John will host “A Bend Christmas Celebration” through Dec. 12 at Bend Performing Arts Center. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bend theater stages interactive holiday show By David Jasper The Bulletin

T

ake one veteran stage performer with strong improvisational skills, add a caroling quartet and storytellers, throw in singalongs and audience participation, and set it in a theater transformed into a winter wonderland, and you have the ingredients for “A Bend Christmas Celebration.” Billed as an interactive, family-friendly holiday show, “A Bend Christmas Celebration” opens Thursday at the Bend Performing Arts Center and runs through Dec. 12 (see “If you go”). If you’re looking for a show to help foster that Christmas spirit, this may be the one for you.

“We wanted to do something ‘holiday,’ and we wanted it to be something that was a very low price point, and different from just going in and watching a concert or watching ‘A Christmas Carol’ or watching ‘The Nutcracker,’” said Innovation Theatre Works’ producing artistic director, Chris Rennolds. She and Brad Hills, executive artistic director of Innovation Theatre Works, came up with the holiday-themed show, which will run about 90 minutes. The host, Michael John, will bring their idea to life. Hills calls him a “fantastic performer and entertainer.” Continued next page

If you go What: “A Bend Christmas Celebration” When: Opens at 7 p.m. Thursday and runs through Dec. 12; Thursday and Friday performances at 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday performances at 2 p.m. (Note: Both Friday performances are sold out.) Where: Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend Cost: $10 for adults, $5 for kids 12 and younger; $25 family pass available for up to six; available at www.bendpac.org, by calling 541-504-6721 or the theater box office, open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday Contact: 541-504-6721 or www.bendpac.org


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 13

fine arts From previous page John is a Bend resident whose 35-year performing career includes warming up crowds for Ray Charles and Milton Berle as well as being a corporate motivational facilitator known for his ways with audiences; he first came to Central Oregon in the early 1990s to serve as director of entertainment at Sunriver Resort. He only had that gig for a year, but he’s continued to perform live music every summer in Sunriver. He also serves on the board of Innovation Theatre Works. “He’s given us so much,” said Rennolds. “He doesn’t mind if we call him up and say, ‘Oh jeez, we have a SpeakEasy (storytelling event) tonight, and we need a microphone.’ And he comes and brings his microphone,” added Hills. And if he can’t, said Rennolds, he’ll talk a friend into doing it for him. In “A Bend Christmas Celebration,” John will sing Christmas songs, sometimes along with a caroling quartet com-

“We wanted to do something ‘holiday,’ and we wanted it to be something that was a very low price point, and different from just going in and watching a concert or watching ‘A Christmas Carol’ or watching ‘The Nutcracker.’” — Chris Rennolds, producing artistic director for Innovation Theatre Works posed of Sherrie Neff, Steve Osterkamp, Glenn Swearingen and Sally Graeber. “The carolers will sometimes back up Michael, sometimes sing on their own, sometimes Michael will sing on his own,” said Hills. The show will also include storytelling by Rennolds and Liam O’Sruitheain, including a version of “The Gift of the Magi.” “It’s not done very much, and that’s a great story,” Rennolds said. “It’s familiar to many people, and new and exciting to many others.” Songs included in the show include traditional Christmas songs such as “Little Drummer Boy,” “Do You Hear What I Hear?” “Jingle Bells,” “Rudolph

Spotlight on Wine event set for tonight

grid Lustig, Patty Freeman-Martin, Sue Favinger Smith, Lisa Kaser, Shannon Weber, Jacob Norris, Morgan Madison, Donald Yatomi, Valerie Winterholler, Janet Rothermel, Cheyenne Malcolm, Sheldon Prescher, Bill Bolstad and others. A reception with the 18 artists will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 3 during the First Friday Gallery Walk. High Desert Gallery is located at 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., in downtown Bend. Contact: 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com.

High Desert Chamber Music will host a Spotlight on Wine event from 5 to 8 tonight at Allyson’s Kitchen (375 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend). Admission is $10 and includes six food and wine pairings. A portion of all of the store’s sales that evening will benefit HDCM’s educational outreach program, Spotlight Chamber Players. Contact: 541-306-3988 or www.highdesertchambermusic .com.

CTC to preview ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ Greenwood Playhouse, located at 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., in Bend, will open its doors at 7:30 p.m. Thursday for a preview performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s latest production, the Ken Ludwig comedy “Moon Over Buffalo.” The screwball comedy about two aging stars hoping to stage comebacks opens Dec. 3 and runs through Dec. 19, with evening performances at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays. Admission to Thursday’s performance is $10. Contact: 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and a few spiritual songs as well. “A Bend Christmas Celebration” will also include an excerpt from a Christmas show John wrote in 1993 and performed in Sunriver. “We’re going to do a part of that,” John explained. “There’s one part in the story that talks about a miracle and the fact that Christmastime is a time that, for some reason, miracles happen.” “It’s the fruitcake,” Rennolds said, referencing one of the songs from the program, getting a laugh from John, who added,

Submitted photo

Ingrid Lustig’s original monoprint on paper will show as part of “Teeny Tiny Art Show,” opening Thursday at High Desert Gallery in Bend.

‘Teeny Tiny Art Show’ makes a big splash High Desert Gallery’s annual exhibit of miniature art and craft, “Teeny Tiny Art Show,” kicks off with a holiday open house at 5 p.m. Thursday, and runs through Jan. 4. According to the gallery’s website, the show includes works by Paul Alan Bennett, Kathy Deggendorfer, Grace Bishko, Kimry Jelen, Glen Corbett, In-

Opera series continues at Regal Old Mill The Metropolitan Opera’s encore performance of Donizetti’s comedy “Don Pasquale” will be transmitted to the big screen Wednesday, making for a highbrow, high-definition night at the movies at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. The production stars Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in the title role. Admission is $18, and the show starts at 6:30 p.m. Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 is located at 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, in Bend. Contact: 541-382-6347. — David Jasper

“It’s in that damn fruitcake.” Added Hills, “‘Interactivity’ is one of the key words of the whole thing, which makes it so special that we have Michael John, because (he) is a tremendous interactive performer. He works so beautifully with his

audiences, and he has the capability of changing up his performances according to what kind of audience he has.” That flexibility will allow them to change the performance ever so slightly from show to show, depending on the audience. “That allows us to skew it a little more towards kids if there are a lot of kids, or a little more towards adults if there aren’t a lot of kids.” “It will change,” said John. “Even the carols we do, because there will be singalong parts, we want people to be a part of it. They are the show. We’re just sort of the master of ceremonies.” Said Hills, “I think our whole vision of the show is, we wanted to give a gift to the community. Something that really was a nice, but very old-fashioned, kind of Christmas for people to just be able to come and forget about all the presentbuying and running around.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring works by glass blower and fuser James Landgraf; through Tuesday; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-6337488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring “Fish, Birds, and Buddhas,” works by John Hillmer; through Tuesday; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Broadsides,” mixed-media and two-dimensional works emphasizing text and image; through November; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.com. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Art of Photography”; through January; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BLUE STAR SALON: Featuring “Native American Portraits; In A New Light,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through November; 1001 N.W. Wall St., #103, Bend; 541-306-4845. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-

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The watercolor “California Poppies” hangs in an exhibit of Mike Smith’s paintings, on display through the holidays at the Sunriver Lodge Betty Gray Gallery. 1299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. FOOTZONE: Featuring images from the Wild Desert Calendar; through Tuesday; 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” mixed-media and oil paintings by Sandy Brooke; through Sunday; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring “Retrospective: A Passionate Journey with Paint,” works by Judy Hoiness; through Dec. 10; Pinckney Center for the

INDOOR SWAP MEET

Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “Conversations,” works by Karin Richardson, and “Dock Side,” works by Shannon Weber; Richardson is through Dec. 15, Weber is through Tuesday; featuring “Teeny Tiny Art Show,” miniatures by 17 Oregon artists; through Jan. 2, open house 5-8 p.m. Thursday; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape,” paintings and prints of the American West; through Jan. 3; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. HOT BOX BETTY: Featuring miniature custom-framed works by Nicole Samples; through Tuesday; 903 N.W. Wall St., #1, Bend; 541-383-0050. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage

paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Vibrant Colors”; through Tuesday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring paintings by Karen Lyn Manning; through Thursday; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “High & Dry,” a group show focused on Central and Eastern Oregon landscapes; through Tuesday; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. OREGON YERBA MATE: Featuring mixed-media collage and fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; through Tuesday; 528 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-504-8870. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. PAVE FINE JEWELRY: Featuring “Geisha Series,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through Tuesday; 101 Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-322-0500. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. QUILTWORKS: Featuring works by Wendy Hill and a group show, “Color Cascade”; through Tuesday; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring

“Creative Harvest,” works by Laura Jo Sherman, Will Nash and Annie Dyer; through Tuesday; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring works by Natasha Bacca; through Tuesday; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www. riverbendfineartgallery.com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “High Desert Palette,” works by members of the High Desert Art League; through Tuesday; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring mixed-media works by Ron Raasch; through Tuesday; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “Ice Gazing,” photography by Lynn Woodward; through December; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Cameron Kaseberg and Chandra vanEijnsbergen; through January; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Mike Smith; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TECHSPACE BEND: Featuring “Through the Lens,” works by the Bend Photographers Group; exhibit ends today; 906 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; info@techspacebend.com. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring KC Lockrem’s mixed media works on paper through Tuesday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Shared Vision,” works by Bruce Jackson and Tracy Leajgeld; through Tuesday; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.

EVERY SATURDAY 9-4 401 NE 2ND ST · BEND (Old St. Vincent DePaul building next to Bi-Mart)

10x10 SPACES · $25 541-317-4847

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Tumalo Creek trail

Sutton Mountain

T

his path, which begins behind Aspen Hall and heads north, is the road less traveled compared

to the busier trails to the south within Shevlin Park. With darkness coming on earlier this time of year, it’s the perfect spot for a lunch-hour walk. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: From Bend, head west on Shevlin Park Road and turn right into the parking lot at Shevlin Park. The trail begins behind Aspen Hall. Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Contact: 541389-7275 or www. bendparksandrec.org

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— Bulletin staff SE Armour Rd

If you go Getting there: From Prineville, drive east 47 miles to Mitchell, then turn left (north) on state Road 207. Note mile marker 16, and proceed one mile to a turnout on the right side of the road. (Milepost 15 may be missing.) The

trailhead is on the opposite side of the road. Cost: Free Difficulty: Moderate Contact: Bureau of Land Management, Prineville District, 541-416-6700

NOW OPEN!

SE Wilson Ave

541-306-3200 • 380 Bridgeford Blvd., Bend, OR 97701 (Suite c/ off Wilson or 9th Street)


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER THE BULLETIN 26, 2010 • FRIDA

this w CHRISTMAS EVENTS

THROUGHOUT THE WEEK

‘THE MAFIOSO MURDERS’

SATURDAY

OBSERVATORY O

SATURDA

What: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event. From left, Steve Meyer, Connie Norman, Monterey Morrissey, Karen Sipes and Brian Johnson as the mob. When: 6:30 p.m.

What: Featuring tree-lighting ceremonies in Sunriver, Sisters and Bend, parades in Sisters and Redmond, and a variety of holiday concerts. See individual listings for details. A crowd celebrates the lighting of the Christmas tree in downtown Bend in 2007.

TODAY WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www.wonderlandexpress.com. GRAND ILLUMINATION : Kick off the season with one of Central Oregon’s largest holiday light displays; featuring sleigh rides, live music and Santa; free; 4 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or www.sunriver-resort.com. HOLIDAY ART WALK: Featuring a showcase of local art and music at various downtown stores; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. CHRISTMAS TREE-LIGHTING CEREMONY: The annual tree-lighting ceremony features carolers, the bell choir and speeches; donations of canned food encouraged;

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8.

to $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 7)

SATURDAY 5:30 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street, Sisters; 541-549-0251. BEND HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING: With carolers, live music and dance; Santa will light the Christmas tree; 6 p.m.; intersection, corner of Wall Street and Newport Avenue; www.downtownbend. org/holiday-tree-lighting. “RENT”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org. DAVID JACOBS-STRAIN: The Eugenebased blues musician performs; $5

Nov. 27 WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www.wonderlandexpress.com. KIDS DAY AT THE NATURE CENTER: A day of nature, science talks and fun activities; free ages 12 and younger with adult; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Bring your pet to have photos taken with Santa; proceeds to benefit Humane Society of Redmond; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-

Where: Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend Cost: $49, $40 ages 12 and younger Contact: 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com

3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-548-4428 or redmondhumane.org. SISTERS CHRISTMAS PARADE: The annual Christmas parade down Hood Avenue will feature dozens of floats and entries, along with Santa Claus; free; 2 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251. REDMOND STARLIGHT HOLIDAY PARADE: Themed “The Polar Express”; free; 5 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $49, $40 ages 12 and younger; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www. buckboardmysteries.com. “RENT”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beatonline.org.

What: Media presentation followe by night-sky viewing at the observatory, pictured. When: 8-10 p.m. Where: Sunriver Nature Center &

COSY SHERIDAN AND TR RITCHIE: The Utah-based songwriters perform; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541548-2209. (Story, Page 7) OBSERVATORY OPEN HOUSE NIGHT: Media presentation followed by nightsky viewing at the observatory; $6, $4 ages 2-12, free for observatory members; 8-10 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394.

SUNDAY Nov. 28 NO EVENTS LISTED.

MONDAY Nov. 29 HOLIDAY CONCERT: Holiday concert featuring the Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene,


AY, NOVEMBER THE BULLETIN 26, 2010 • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

week

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

HOLIDAY CONCERT

MONDAY & THURSDAY What: Holiday concert featuring the Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel, pictured. When: 7 p.m. Where: Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. on

Monday, Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond on Thursday Cost: Free Contact: 541-382-5496 or 541548-3367

‘MOON OVER BUFFALO’

THURSDAY

OPEN HOUSE NIGHT

What: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback. The cast rehearses a scene in which the character Howard receives an unexpected welcome.

AY

d

PAGE 17

Observatory, 57245 River Road Cost: $6, $4 ages 2-12, free for observatory members Contact: 541-593-4394

1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496.

TUESDAY Nov. 30 YOUTH CHOIR CONCERT: Youth Choir of Central Oregon’s Singers School performs a winter concert; free; 5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-385-0470. LUCERO: The alternative country band performs, with Drag The River and I Can Lick Any SOB in the House; $15 plus fees in advance, $16 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-390-8648 or markiewirges@ gmail.com. (Story, Page 4)

WEDNESDAY Dec. 1 “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Art history professor Henry Sayre presents the lecture “Value in

HOLIDAY BAZAARS ‘Tis the season, Page 20. Art: Manet and the Slave Trade,” which will explore the multiple meanings of Édouard Manet’s painting, “Olympia”; free; noon1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www. OSUcascades.edu/lunchtime-lectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. (Story, Page 13)

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Out Stealing Horses” by Per Petterson; bring a lunch; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE PARSON RED HEADS: The Portland-based folk-pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND: A performance of gumbo-flavored holiday favorites and images that express the spirit and style of New Orleans; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 3)

THURSDAY Dec. 2 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Fortunate Son” by Walter

Mosley; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. (Story, Page 12) CASEY NEILL & THE NORWAY RATS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 6) HOLIDAY CONCERT: Holiday concert featuring the Cascade Brass Quintet and singer Michelle Van Handel; free; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. POETRY READING AND OPEN MIC: An hour-long open mic, followed by a reading by students of the

When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $10 Contact: 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org

college; free; 7-9 p.m.; Kilns College, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, #44, Bend; 541-771-8794. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. (Story, Page 13) BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY’S WILD AND SWINGIN’ HOLIDAY PARTY: The Los Angeles-based hipsters perform yuletide classics; $40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 5) MYSTIC ROOTS BAND: The Chico, Calif.-based reggae band performs, with One Love Community Band and MC Mystic; $8; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440 or www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 7)


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

planning ahead Right Around the Corner DEC. 3 — CERAMICS SALE: COCC art students, faculty and volunteers present uniquely handcrafted ceramics for sale in Pence Hall; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. DEC. 3-4 — I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS HOME TOUR: See a home decorated in holiday style, with more than 40 decorated Christmas trees, wall hangings and more, then visit a second nearby home; proceeds benefit the Children’s Vision Foundation, Deschutes Historical Center and Williams Syndrome Association; $5 in advance, $6 at the door; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; tour home, 21163 Clairaway Ave., Bend; 541-330-3907. DEC. 3 — CHRISTMAS KAYAKERS FLOAT: Kayaks and canoes decorated with lights paddle a loop beginning at the bridge at Galveston Avenue; free; 4:15 p.m. gathering, 5 p.m. float; Mirror Pond, Deschutes River at Drake Park, Bend; 541-330-9586. DEC. 3 — PEACE CENTER OPEN HOUSE: Open house and art walk featuring local artist Brianna Murphy and information about upcoming workshops; free; 5:309 p.m.; Peace Center of Central Oregon, 816 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541-325-3174. DEC. 3 — STARLITE GALA: Featuring live entertainment, gourmet dinner, live and silent auctions and dancing; proceeds benefit St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $60; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-3390. DEC. 3 — CHRISTMAS PLAY: A festive evening featuring the play, “Mary, Did You Know?”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Real Life Christian Church, 2880 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-312-8844. DEC. 3-5, 9-12 — “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; Dec. 3 and Dec. 10 shows SOLD OUT; 7 p.m. Dec. 3 and Dec. 9-10, 2 p.m. Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 11-12; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. DEC. 3 — “ELF” : A screening of the PG-rated holiday movie starring Will Ferrell; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. DEC. 3-5, DEC. 9 — “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3-4 and 9, 2 p.m. Dec. 5; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DEC. 4 — CROOKED RIVER RANCH OLDE FASHIONED CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: Includes visits with Santa, a parade, an illumination of the ranch Christmas tree and more; free; 10 a.m., 2 p.m. parade, 4:15 p.m. tree lighting; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-548-8939.

S ubmitted photo

Bé la Fleck & The Flecktones will perform Dec. 8 at Mountain View High School in Bend. DEC. 4 — TEMPLE GRANDIN: The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association’s annual convention presents worldrenowned cattle care advocate Temple Grandin; $10; 10:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-3111. DEC. 4 — FESTIVAL OF TREES: The 27th annual event showcases decorated Christmas trees, wreaths and more; music, refreshments, visits with Santa, an auction of trees, and more; proceeds benefit Redmond-Sisters Hospice; free daytime family festivities, $40 evening event; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. family festivities, 5 p.m. evening gala, 7:30 p.m. tree auction; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-7483. DEC. 4 — PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Get a photo of your pet with Santa Claus; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with donation to the Humane Society; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock; 541-923-0882. DEC. 4 — CIVIL WAR FOOTBALL GAME FUNDRAISER: Crook County Foundation hosts the civil war clash between the Ducks and the Beavers on Pine Theater’s big screen; games and tailgate party food included; $25; 11:30 a.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. DEC. 4 — JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK FOR ARTHRITIS : Runners and walkers don festive holiday costumes, tie jingle bells to their shoelaces for this yearly 5K run and walk; proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation; $20, $10 children 12 and younger; 9:30-11:30 a.m. registration, 11:30 a.m. costume contest, 11:30 a.m. Kid’s Fun Run, 11:40 a.m. 5K run, 11:45 a.m. 5K walk/1 mile walk; downtown Bend; 503-245-5695, klowry@arthritis.org

or http://bendjinglebellrun.kintera.org. DEC. 4 — BEND CHRISTMAS PARADE: Parade theme is “Christmas Carols on Parade”; free; noon; downtown Bend; 541-388-3879. DEC. 4 — CIVIL WAR FUNDRAISER: Watch the Ducks and the Beavers clash on a big screen; proceeds to benefit Ephesians Vision Ministries; $20 donation; noon; Ephesians Vision Ministries, 711 NE Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-323-2880. DEC. 4 — HAT AND SCARF SEW-ATHON: Cut and sew hats and scarves for children attending the Wonderland Express holiday party; free; 1-4 p.m.; Cynthia’s Sewing Center, 20225 Badger Road, Bend; 541-383-1999. DEC. 4-5 — BELLUS VOCIS CHOIR FALL CONCERT: The choir performs under Assistant Professor of Music James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. DEC. 4-5 — “THE NUTCRACKER”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet performs the classic dance; $17 in advance, $20 at door, $6 ages 12 and younger in advance, $7 at door; 7 p.m. Dec. 4, 3 p.m. Dec. 5; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-390-7549 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com. DEC. 4 — ART FOR INDIA: Fourth annual event features canvas art, an auction, slide show, live music and more; benefits underprivileged children in India; $10, free ages 9 and younger; 5 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. riseupindia.wordpress.com. DEC. 4 — ST. FRANCIS CHRISTMAS FAIRE: A spaghetti dinner, with a silent auction, raffle and food sale; proceeds

benefit St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church; free admission, $4-$22 for dinner; 5 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. DEC. 4 — BARN DANCE: Barn dance featuring music by Sisters band “Frenchy Z and the Lost Call”; sponsored by the Central Oregon ManKind Project; free; 6-10 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Road, Bend; 541-389-1783. DEC. 4 — LA PINE HOLIDAY LIGHTS PARADE: Conveyances of all types are decorated with lights; free; 6 p.m.; downtown La Pine; 541-5369771 or director@lapine.org. DEC. 4-5 — HIGH DESERT NUTCRACKER: Redmond School of Dance presents a Central Oregon version of the classic ballet; $5; 7 p.m. Dec. 4, 2 p.m. Dec. 5; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957. DEC. 4 — GRANT SABIN: The Colorado-based blues and indie folk act performs, with The Dela Project; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. DEC. 5 — OREGON OLD TIME FIDDLERS: Music and dance event featuring the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers; donations to benefit the nonprofit organization; free, donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-330-5557. DEC. 5 — CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs music by Leroy Anderson, Malcolm Arnold, and Percy Grainger under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-5931635 or www.cascadewinds.org.

DEC. 6 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Year-end book party; bring a favorite book or two to share with the group; free; noon-1 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEC. 7 — GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Blue Gold: World Water Wars,” an award-winning film about the world water crisis and the privatization of water; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. DEC. 8 — WHAT’S BREWING?: Crook County Foundation presents this series of programs to discuss matters important to the community; featuring Chris Telfer discussing ideas for balancing the state budget; free; 7-8 a.m.; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-6909. DEC. 8 — BÉLA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES: The bluegrass-jazz fusion act performs a holiday concert; proceeds benefit KPOV; $33-$47, with fees in advance; 7 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. DEC. 9 — RUBBISH RENEWED ECO FASHION SHOW: Sustainable fashion show fusing environmental responsibility and funky fashion; proceeds to benefit REALMS charter school’s arts program; $10; doors open at 5 p.m., first show starts at 6 p.m. for all ages, second show at 8 p.m. for ages 21 and older; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend. DEC. 9 — SPOKE-N-WORD: Storytelling forum as part of the Cross Culture arts festival celebrating bikes and art in Bend; free; 8:30 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777.

Farther Down the Road DEC. 10 — BICYCLE ART WALK: An art walk featuring businesses displaying bike-themed art; 5-9 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.visitbend.com. DEC. 10 & 12 — HOLIDAY MAGIC CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale performs under the direction of James Knox with soloist Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living; $15; 7 p.m. Dec. 10, 3 p.m. Dec. 12; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-388-8103 or www.coril.org. DEC. 10 & 12 — HIGH DESERT CHORALE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Concert featuring the choir perform traditional, classical and gospel selections; free; 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10, 2:30 p.m. Dec. 12; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-5491037 or www.sisterschorale.com. DEC. 11 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in a presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 19

planning ahead performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9:30 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. DEC. 11 — CENTRAL OREGON BARREL TASTING: Event celebrating the winery’s 2007 “M” cab-merlot blend wine; featuring taste tests and samplings of local foods plus an appearance by Santa; $10, free for children, $15 for both parents when accompanied by child; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464. DEC. 11 — MOTORCYCLISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON TOY RUN: Toy drive featuring kid games, arm wrestling competition, raffles, and a holiday motorcycle ride through Bend; proceeds to benefit Bend Elks and Central Oregon charities; donations of money and toys accepted; noon-4 p.m.; Cascade Harley-Davidson of Bend, 63028 Sherman Road; 541-280-0478. DEC. 11 — RING NOEL: Ring in

the season with handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. DEC. 11 — RING NOEL: Ring in the season with handbell choir

the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. DEC. 12 — HOW THE GROUCH STOLE CHRISTMAS TOUR: Hip-hop show featuring Brother Ali with

DEC. 16 — DICK DALE: The “king of the surf guitar” performs; ages 21 and older; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

Over 175 unique, locally owned businesses. Support your community. Holiday customers can PARK for FOUR hours for FREE in the downtown garage. More info at www.DowntownBend.org

Talks & classes OWL LEGENDS: The High Desert Museum’s new owl will fly along with a barn owl and great horned owl; $7 plus admission for nonmembers or $5 members; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. today and Saturday; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. KITCHEN COMFORTS: Anita Tracy teaches how to make soup and scone mixes for gifts; free; 1 p.m. Wednesday; register online at www.deschuteslibrary. org; Redmond Public Library; 541-312-1034. GOURMET GIFTS: Anita Tracy helps people make gourmet gifts; free; 6 p.m. Wednesday; register online at www. deschuteslibrary.org; Bend Public Library; 541-312-1034. HUMAN TRAFFICKING: Nita Belles will talk about human trafficking; potluck brunch; $5 suggested donation; 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 4; Rosie Bareis Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th Ave., Bend; register at cooath@ hotmail.com; www.cooath.org. GINGERBREAD HOUSE: Learn to build and decorate a gingerbread house; $69; 9 a.m.1 p.m. Dec. 4; Central Oregon Community College Grandview Kitchen; 541-383-7270. WREATH BUILDING: Learn how to create a wreath with Katy Meredith of Madras Garden Club; $10 includes supplies; RSVP by Thursday; 11 a.m. Dec. 4; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2068 or email info@ chsgardencenter.com. GLASS ORNAMENTS: Learn to make fused glass holiday ornaments; $59; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 4; Glass Guild, 568 N.E. Savannah Drive, Suite 7, Bend; 541-647-5744.

DJ Snuggles, The Grouch with DJ Fresh, Eligh and Los Rakas; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS!

Bend’s Home Theatre Specialists!

Animal Magnetism!

25 NW Minnesota Ave. #5 Downtown Bend

541-388-0155 We specialize in Audio & Video, Home Pre-Wire & Custom Installation

Est. 1980

Audio Video • Home Theatre Custom Design and Installation 1008 NW Bond Street • 541-382-9062 www.stereoplanet.com


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

holiday bazaars T

he following is a list of holiday bazaars for the upcoming week.

it to The Bulletin, Holiday Bazaars, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

A new list of upcoming bazaars will publish every Friday in

The deadline is the Monday before each Friday’s publication. Con-

GO! Magazine. To submit a bazaar that has not already appeared, send your information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or mail

tact: 541-383-0351. Admission to bazaars is free unless otherwise noted. proceeds benefit the St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church youth group; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2053 or 541-549-1840.

ONGOING CHRISTMAS AT COLLAGE: Gift items, decor, candles, cards, frames, clothes, jewelry and more; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday through Dec. 23; 339 S.W. Sixth St., Suite B, Redmond; 541-617-1259 or www.christmasatcollage.com. HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, novelties, clothing and more; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays; Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-923-8558.

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE ART MARKET: Handcrafted Native American art, jewelry, dolls and more; donation of nonperishable food required; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; The Museum At Warm Springs, 2189 U.S. Highway 26; 541-553-3331. ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692.

TODAY COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, gifts, glassware, quilts, jams and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 15520 S.W. Culver Highway, Culver; 541-546-6529. CHRISTMAS CRAFT AND GIFT BAZAAR: Christmas stockings, ornaments, cards, art and more; proceeds benefit the St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church youth group; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2053 or 541-549-1840. MUSEUM HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Homemade artisan crafts plus Native American jewelry and art; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Homemade crafts and food; noon to 7 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. TRADITIONS HOLIDAY MARKETPLACE: Pottery, jewelry, art, textiles and more from regional artists; noon to 6 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead and Great Hall Heritage rooms, 57081 Meadow Road; 541-593-4405. ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 2 to 8 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692.

NOV. 29 ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692.

NOV. 30

Thinkstock

CAMP SHERMAN HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Crafts, ornaments, decorations and food; 5 to 9 p.m.; Camp Sherman Community Hall, 13025 S.W. Camp Sherman Road; 541549-8933 or 541-408-1728.

NOV. 27 CAMP SHERMAN HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Crafts, ornaments, decorations and food; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Camp Sherman Community Hall, 13025 S.W. Camp Sherman Road; 541549-8933 or 541-408-1728. NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE ART MARKET: Handcrafted Native American art, jewelry, dolls and more; donation of nonperishable food required; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; The Museum At Warm Springs, 2189 U.S. Highway 26; 541-553-3331. RAKU POTTERY SALE: Handcrafted pieces, wall art, vases, sculpture and more; 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-317-1952. TRADITIONS HOLIDAY MARKETPLACE: Pottery, jewelry, art, textiles and more from regional artists; 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead and Great Hall Heritage rooms, 57081 Meadow Road; 541-593-4405. MUSEUM HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Homemade artisan crafts plus Native American jewelry and art; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, gifts, glassware, quilts, jams and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 15520 S.W. Culver Highway, Culver; 541-546-6529. ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692. CHRISTMAS CRAFT AND GIFT BAZAAR: Christmas stockings,

ornaments, cards, art and more; proceeds benefit the St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church youth group; 10 a.m. to noon; St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2053 or 541-549-1840. DESERT DREAM GARDENS HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Wreaths, crafts, woodwork and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Desert Dream Gardens, 61295 Obernolte Road, Bend; 541-382-9061. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Homemade crafts and food; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. HOME BUSINESS BAZAAR: Toys, purses, puzzles and games; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 65425 85th Place, Bend; 541-385-5386.

NOV. 28 CHRISTMAS CRAFT AND GIFT BAZAAR: Christmas stockings, ornaments, cards, art and more;

ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692. COUGAR SPRINGS HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Homemade jewelry, holiday wreaths, scented candles, baked goods and more; 2 to 4 p.m.; Cougar Springs Senior Living, 1942 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond; 541-316-4400.

DEC. 1 ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692.

DEC. 2 ART OF CHRISTMAS SALE AND SHOW: Handmade arts and crafts from local artisans; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Urban on 6th, 432 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4692. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE: Holiday decorations, gifts, glassware, quilts, jams and more; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 15520 S.W. Culver Highway, Culver; 541-546-6529.

Self Referrals Welcome

www.educate.com

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

541-706-6900


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 21

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

CANADIAN

STAR

Singer Leonard Cohen continues world tour at Portland’s Theater of the Clouds By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

A

fter a 15-year hiatus, critically acclaimed Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen returned to the live stage in 2008. With more than 250 performances under his belt since then, Cohen is finally wrapping up his world tour this December. An inductee of the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, Cohen will perform Dec. 8 at the Theater of the Clouds in Portland. A Montreal native, Cohen originally gained recognition as a poet and novelist. His works include “Let Us Compare Mythologies” (1956), “Flowers for Hitler (1964), “The Favourite Game (1963) and “Beautiful Losers” (1966). According to his official biography, “his songs have set a virtually unmatched standard in their seriousness and range.” Sung with a distinctive rich baritone voice, his lyrics feature themes of romance, religion and politics. His best known song is “Hallelujah.” According to his biography, the song has been covered by more than 150 artists including Jeff Buckley, k.d. lang, Rufus Wainwright and Willie Nelson. In September, Cohen released his newest album, “Songs From the Road.” Recorded while on the world tour, the album includes some of his most popular hits including “Hallelujah,” “Suzanne,” “Chelsea Hotel,” “Bird on the Wire” and “Famous Blue Raincoat.” The Portland concert will feature a six-piece band and backup singers Sharon Robinson and the Webb Sisters. Ticket prices range from $49.50 to $250, depending on seating location. To purchase tickets and for more information, contact 877-789-7673 or visit www.rosequarter.com. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-383-0350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

Noted Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen will perform Dec. 8 at the Theater of the Clouds in Portland. Courtesy Lorca Cohen

Concerts Nov. 26 — Fools for Rowan, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Nov. 26 — GWAR, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Nov. 26 — Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Nov. 26 — Susan McKeown, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Nov. 27 — The Frames, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Nov. 30 — John Butler Trio, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 2 — Raul Malo, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Dec. 3 — The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Books, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — Cherry Poppin’ Daddies, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Dec. 3 — An Evening with The Black Crowes, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 3 — The Gracious Few, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 4 — Hellyeah, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 4-5 — Christmas with the Trail Band: Featuring Linda Hornbuckle; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 5 — Hellyeah, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 5 — Misty River Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 6 — Oak Ridge Boys, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 7 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-6825000 or www.hultcenter.com. Dec. 7 — John McLaughlin & The Fourth Dimension, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 8 — Leonard Cohen, Theater of the Clouds, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 8 — The Posies/Brendan Benson/Aqueduct, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 9-12 — Holidays with Trail Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 10 — The Doobie Brothers/ Michael Franti & Spearhead/ Leon Russell, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 12 — The Dandy Warhols, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — Jewel, Roseland

Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 17 — Ty Curtis Band/Insomniacs, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 21 — Tomaseen Foley’s A Celtic Christmas, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Dec. 29 — Jim Brickman, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Dec. 30 — Reverend Horton Heat, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Andre Nickatina, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 31 — Brandi Carlile, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Gift of Gab/Marv Ellis, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 31 — Pink Martini, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Jan. 7 — Hell’s Belles, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW*

Lectures & Comedy Jan. 8 — Joan Rivers: Also featuring the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 21 — Jim Jefferies, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 25 — Elizabeth Strout: Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 503-227-2583 or www.literary-arts.org. Jan. 27-28 — Craft Conversation with Garth Johnson, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org.

Symphony & Opera Nov. 27-28 — “Cirque de la Symphonie for the Holidays”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 2 — “Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony”: Featuring music by Beethoven; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 5 — Yo-Yo Ma: Featuring music by Adams, Copland, Shostakovich and Rimsky-Korsakov; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; SOLD OUT; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 6 — Béla Fleck & The Flecktones: Performing with the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 10-12 — “Gospel Christmas”: Featuring the Northwest Community Gospel Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 11 — The Esquire Jazz Orchestra, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org.

Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

out of town From previous page Dec. 11-12 — Yuletide Celebration: Featuring holiday songs, Broadway style acts, an orchestra and tap-dancing Santas; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000

or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 18-19 — “Handel’s Messiah”: Featuring the Portland Symphonic Chamber Choir; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org.

Dec. 23 — “Comfort & Joy”: Holiday concert featuring the Pacific Youth Concert; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Dec. 30-31, Jan. 2 — “La Boheme”:

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Opera by Puccini; presented by the Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Jan. 9 — “Happy Trails”: Featuring music of the great American West; part of the Oregon Symphony’s Kids Concert Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 15-17 — “Emanuel Ax Plays Brahms”: Featuring Grammy Awardwinning pianist; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Jan. 18 — “The Fire and Passion of Tango”: Featuring musicians and dancers from Argentina; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org.

Theater & Dance Through Nov. 27 — “Hedda Gabler”: Play by Henrik Ibsen; adapted and directed by Craig Willis; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; 541-465-1506 or www.lordleebrick.com. Through Dec. 19 — “Mars on Life — LIVE!”: Late-night talk show starring Susannah Mars; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; 503-2411278 or www.artistsrep.org. Through Dec. 24 — “Ebenezer Ever After”: Musical by Don Flowers and Fred Walton; presented by Stumptown Stages; Theatre! Theatre!, Portland; 503-381-8686 or www.stumptownstages.com. Through Dec. 26 — “A Christmas Story”: Based on the classic motion picture; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Nov. 30-Jan. 2 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by Portland Center Stage; Ellyn Bye Studio, Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Dec. 2-4 — Jason Samuels Smith: Featuring tap dancer Jason Samuels Smith, winner of the 2009 Dance Magazine Award; presented by White Bird Dance; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Dec. 3-18 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Based on the true chronicles of David Sedaris’ experience as Crumpet the Elf in Macy’s Santaland display; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello; presented by the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company; Eugene; 541-465-1506 or www.lordleebrick.com. Dec. 3-19 — “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas”: A musical adaption of the 1954 film starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Dec. 9-23 — “A Tuna Christmas”: A sequel to the hit comedy, “Greater Tuna”; presented by the Oregon Repertory Theatre; Winningstad Theatre, Portland; TM*

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, 800745-3000, www.ticketmaster.com • TW — TicketsWest, 800992-8499, www.ticketswest.com Dec. 11-12, 17-18— “A Holiday Revue”: Featuring several Christmas standards; created in collaboration with Susannah Mars and Richard Bower; presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 11-24 — “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Dec. 12 — Posado Milagro: Celebration featuring Latin American traditions; Miracle Theatre Group, Portland; 503236-7253 or www.milagro.org. Dec. 17-18 — “A Musical Christmas”: Holiday revue presented by the Teen Musical Theater of Oregon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com. Dec. 17-19 — “The Nutcracker”: Presented by the Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Dec. 23 — Radio City Christmas Spectacular: Featuring the Radio City Rockettes; Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 28 — “Hair”: 2009 Tony Award winner for Musical Revival; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

Exhibits Through Nov. 27 — Henk Pander and Marlene Bauer, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-2262754 or www.laurarusso.com. Through Nov. 27 — Jim Koudelka, Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; 503581-3229 or www.zeekgallery.com. Through Nov. 28 — “Shihoko Fukumoto: Indigo is the Color of My Dreams”: Exhibit featuring textile artist Shihoko Fukumoto; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-2231321 or www.japanesegarden.com. Through Dec. 5— Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Christophe Goodstein: Inferno” (through Dec. 5), “Giuseppe Vasi’s Rome: Lasting Impressions from the Age of the Grand Tour” (through Jan. 2) and “Excessive Obsession” (through July 31, 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-3463027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 19 — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “PaleoLab — Oregon’s Past Revealed: Horses and Grasslands” (through Dec. 19), “Yellowstone to Yukon” (through Dec. 19) and “We are Still Here — Stephanie Wood on Baskets and Biography” (through June 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-346-3024


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

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out of town or natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 31 — “Jews@Work: Law and Medicine”: The exhibition focuses on the challenges Jews faced in their career choices as well as on the contributions they were able to make; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; 503226-3600 or www.ojm.org. Through Dec. 31 — Korey Gulbrandson and Jeff Butler, Laurence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; 541-764-2318 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Dec. 31 — Nancy Tipton and Neal Philpott, Lawrence Gallery Sheridan, Sheridan; 503-843-3633 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Jan. 2 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States” (through Jan. 2), “Lee Kelly” (through Jan. 9) and “Thomas Moran at Shoshone Falls” (through Jan. 16); Portland; 503-226-2811 or www.portlandartmuseum.org. Through Jan. 2 — ZooLights: Holiday light show features animal silhouettes and moving light sculptures; Oregon Zoo, Portland; 503-226-1561 or www.oregonzoo.org. Through Jan. 8 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Collateral Matters: Selections by Kate Bingaman-Burt and Clifton Burt” (through Jan. 8) and “Object Focus: The Book” (through Feb. 26); Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Through Jan. 10 — Pacific Northwest College of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Jungjin Lee: Wind” (through Jan. 10) and “Web of Trails” (through Jan. 10); Portland; 503-226-4391 or www.pnca.edu. Through Jan. 20 — “Outreach to Space”: Traveling exhibit exploring space and space travel; built by San Francisco’s Exploratorium; Science Factory, Eugene; 541-6827888 or www.sciencefactory.org. Through Jan. 23 — “Tinkertoy: Build Your Imagination”: Featuring giant replicas of the classic Tinkertoy construction set; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; 503-2236500 or www.portlandcm.org. Through Feb. 6 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Identity: An Exhibition of You” (through Feb. 6) and “Design Zone: Behind the Scenes” (through May 30); Portland; 503797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Dec. 2-24 — Carl Morris and William Givler, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-226-2754 or www.laurarusso.com. Dec. 3 — “Unwrapped”: A winter soirée that benefits the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; Wieden+Kennedy Atrium,

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

Portland; 503-242-1419, ext. 225 or www.pica.org.

Miscellany Through Dec. 12 — “Japanese Currents: The Samurai Tradition”:

Featuring the evolution of the samurai film genre; Northwest Film Center, Portland; 503-2211156 or www.nwfilm.org. Through Dec. 23 — Polar Express Train Ride: Featuring hot chocolate, cookies, a reading of “Polar Express”

and photos with Santa; Hood River; 800-872-4661 or www.mthoodrr.com. Nov. 27 — La Fête du Macaron: An allday celebration of everything macaron; Pix Pâtisserie, Portland; 503-2324407 or www.pixpatisserie.com.

Dec. 3 — Motorcycle Ice Racing, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; 877789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Dec. 4-7 — Rogue Winterfest, Evergreen Federal Bank’s Bear Hotel, Grants Pass; www. roguewinterfest.com.

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PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

gaming ‘Brotherhood’ takes the lead Series continues with new features that steal show in familiar setting

TOP 10 HANDHELD GAMES The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 handheld games for November: 1. “God of War: Ghost of Sparta” (PSP) 2. “Super Scribblenauts” (DS) 3. “Professor Layton and the Unwound Future” (DS) 4. “Mario vs. Donkey-Kong: MiniLand Mayhem” (DS)

By Matt Miller

5. “Sonic Colors” (DS)

Game Informer Magazine

6. “Kingdom Hearts: Birth By Sleep” (PSP)

E

zio Auditore is a master assassin, but before now his missions were almost always completed in isolation. As its name implies, “Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood,” a new game from Ubisoft, introduces a new wrinkle. The power Ezio now exerts reaches far beyond what he can touch with his sword or strike with a throwing knife. The assassins are spreading their influence across an entire continent, and he sits at the head of the movement. The themes of leadership carry over directly into gameplay. It starts by clearing your enemy’s influence over the city. As you kill the Borgia family’s minions and burn down their fortresses, the populace becomes rebellious and more willing to aid your cause. Particularly angry citizens will even strike back at the villains themselves. Aid these lone rebels, and they’ll join your cause. Once they’ve given you their allegiance, these fervent recruits will act upon your directives, striking from the shadows or leaping into melee at your side. Ezio can also send them out on missions across Europe and Asia to gain experience. When they return, you can upgrade their equipment to create even more powerful allies. The progression system is easy to grasp, and has just enough complexity to be interesting without overshadowing the action proper.

7. “Valkyria Chronicles II” (PSP) 8. “Ace Combat: Joint Assault” (PSP) 9. “Pokemon Ranger: Guardian Signs” (DS) 10. “Invisimals” (PSP) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood” refines the series’ existing mechanics. It’s a thrilling follow-up for series faithful, but new recruits should start with the earlier games. By the end, the men and women you pulled from the streets will stand at your side as fully initiated members of the order. Ezio’s menu-driven villa upgrades have been overhauled and transformed into a more robust economic simulation. When Ezio comes to Rome, it has fallen into decay through the abuses of the villainous Borgia family. As Ezio retakes the city, he can revive the metropolis by investing in shops and banks and repairing broken aqueducts and monuments. These renovations open up new shopping opportunities, and you’ll see the results of your efforts reflected in the people and buildings of the world. A boarded up square of storefronts once populated with kneeling beggars will become a bustling marketplace perused by finely dressed ladies.

EW I V E R

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Nov. 21: • “Marvel Superheroes 3D: Grandmaster’s Challenge” (Wii) • “Crazy Taxi” (X360) • “Gran Turismo 5” (PS3)

‘ASSASSIN’S CREED: BROTHERHOOD’ 9.25 (out of 10) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Ubisoft ESRB rating: M for Mature Though there aren’t a huge number of story missions, each one is meticulously designed to offer a unique encounter. Mission structures are more choreographed than in past “Assassin’s” games, asking you to follow particular checkpoints on the way to a target. The loss of freedom is worth it for the great scenes that those paths enable. Though the story may be short and the plot isn’t as impressive as the last game, the cast of characters is captivating, especially the devious and in-

• “Disney Tangled: The Video Game” (Wii, DS) • “Worms: Battle Islands” (Wii) • “Sherlock Holmes: The Silver Earrings” (Wii, PC) • “Majin and the Forsaken Kingdom” (X360, PS3) • “Splatterhouse” (X360, PS3) • “Red Dead Redemption: Undead Nightmare Collection” (X360, PS3) • “Michael Jackson The Experience” (Wii, DS, PSP)

cestuous intrigue of the Borgia family. Layered on top of this massive single-player experience is a story-tied multiplayer game unlike any other I’ve played. The Templars are using their Animus machines to train new recruits, and players adopt the role of these trainees to wander the streets of Renaissance Italy as they learn the arts of subtlety, cunning, and murder. Filled with new gameplay, storylines, mechanical improvements, and multiplayer, “Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood” is far more than an expansion. The series remains one of the most exciting properties in video games, and “Brotherhood” fills an essential step in the plot as the conspiracy-laden story continues. The moment you finish the game, you’ll be chomping at the bit for the inevitable “Assassin’s Creed III.”

• “Donkey Kong Country Returns” (Wii) • “Raving Rabbids: Travel in Time” (Wii) • “Sniper Elite” (Wii) • “Auditorium” (PS3) • “Pac-Man Championship Edition DX” (PS3) • “Hot Wheels: Track Attack” (Wii, DS) — Gamespot.com

Weekly download ‘SUPERSTARS V8 RACING’ For: PlayStation 3 via PlayStation Network From: Milestone/O-Games ESRB Rating: E for Everyone No one has benefitted from “Gran Turismo 5’s” legendarily long delay more than O-Games, which, in addition to poking brilliant fun at said delay, has softened the wait in just the right way. “Superstars V8 Racing” does not compare to the forthcoming “GT5” in terms of car roster, track selection, modes or single-player investment. But it has a lot of important bases adequately covered, with a championship mode, a modest handful of scenario challenges, and very customizable race settings for single-player and online multiplayer (12 players). Most important, the on-track action feels like the equivalent of what many $60 racing games get. It looks like a full-priced game, and the cars handle comfortably but feel nice and weighty. “V8” also does a nice job of accommodating players of different disciplines. Though it doesn’t run as deep as “Turismo,” it allows knowledgeable players to tune cars to their liking and ride purely, while also allowing those who want a more arcadey experience to turn on assists, turn off penalties, deactivate damage and ride as dangerously as they please. If “V8” develops a following, it could be a good online destination for serious and not-so-serious racing fans alike. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

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movies

The Associated Press

Rapunzel (voiced by Mandy Moore) and Flynn (voiced by Zachary Levi) join together for a fairy tale adventure in “Tangled.”

Not a bad hair day at all Family friendly ‘Tangled’ puts a comic twist on classic Rapunzel fairy tale

R

apunzel, the girl locked in a tower with only her long, golden locks for company, gets a sassy, spirited screen treatment from Disney with “Tangled,” an animated fairytale musical from the Not Pixar corner of the company. Disney has turned her into a missing princess — naturally — and it’s not a prince who waits below and calls out “Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair.” Her hair has magical powers of healing in this version, but only if she doesn’t cut it. Otherwise, they play the story pretty much straight out of the Brothers Grimm.

Soldiers pull up a magical flower to help an ailing queen through a difficult childbirth. But the witch who needs the plant to stay young steals the royal infant in revenge and raises the child as her own, never letting Rapunzel leave her high tower in the middle of the forest. “Why can’t I go outside?” always gets a “Mother knows best,” and “It’s a SCARY world out there” from this fake-mom (Broadway’s Donna Murphy). Naturally, she sings that sentiment. Rapunzel, voiced by Mandy Moore, sings her wish song, “When Will My Life Begin?” Her life begins, it turns out, when a

ROGER MOORE “Tangled” 93 minutes PG, for brief mild violence robber and rogue named Flynn (Zachary Levi) stumbles upon her and is blackmailed/threatened into showing her the great wide world. Flynn, meanwhile, isn’t at all smitten with the longhaired beauty. Not at first. “The only thing I want to do with your hair is get out of it — literally.” But the reluctant pair go on their quest, the witch pursues

them and sics Flynn’s cheated fellow robbers on them. And every so often, somebody sings. The story borrows elements from “Beauty and the Beast” (a rousing drinking song at the local tavern) and every fairy tale with a wicked, selfish witch in it. It’s all about letting kids grow up, building up (or knocking down) a child’s self-esteem, and having a dream. Even the bar ruffians have dreams — to be concert pianists, marry well, or become mimes. The Alan Menken songs are pleasant enough, if instantly forgettable. The comic elements shine in this ’toon. Crackling timing makes Rapunzel’s every use of her weapon of choice — a frying pan — Looney Tunes loopy. Chases and fights are animated with flair. And then there’s the horse.

An imperial warhorse named Maximus is part German Shepherd, part belligerent clown as he tracks the elusive Flynn like a bloodhound, gets into brotherly slap fights with the thief and generally steals the movie. “Tangled,” like most of Disney’s in-house cartoons, suffers most when compared to the best of Pixar. Animated musicals are only as good as their songs, and this one isn’t on a par with “Beauty and the Beast” or even “The Princess and the Frog.” But the laughs make the tunes pass by quickly, the emotional moments pay off and this version of Rapunzel lets down its hair just enough to deserve a place of honor with all the other glorious Disney “princess” tales. Roger Moore is a film critic for The Orlando Sentinel.


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

movies

Songs can’t save limited ‘Burlesque’ T The Associated Press

Driver, played by Dwayne Johnson, seeks vengeance against his brother’s killers in “Faster.”

‘Faster’ is thrilling, but that’s about it ‘F

aster” is a pure thriller, all blood, no frills, in which a lot of people get shot, mostly in the head. Rotate the plot, change the period, spruce up the dialogue and this could have been a hard-boiled 1940s noir. But it doesn’t pause for fine touches, and efficiently delivers action for an audience that likes one-course meals. Dwayne Johnson stars, in the kind of role he’s possibly been avoiding up until now. Once known as The Rock, he has developed a kinder, gentler screen persona that more closely fits him in real life. It’s a melancholy fact of Hollywood today that “Faster” could be a good career move for him, moving him onto the trail blazed by Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis. As the film opens, he’s being released from prison after a 10year term. He walks out the gate into a desert wilderness and begins to run — run — to a nearby city, where a circa 1970 Chevelle is waiting for him in a junkyard. This is because modern cars all look boring and most action heroes drive classics. He whips off the tarp and peels outta there. A private eye gives him a list of names, and he sets out to murder everyone on the list. His character is named Driver. A clue to this, and the title, is that he invariably drives at the top pos-

ROGER EBERT

“Faster” 98 minutes R, for strong violence, some drug use and language sible speed, and obviously never took driver’s ed in high school because he doesn’t know how to turn around and drive in the other direction except by slamming on the brakes, twisting the wheel and whipping through 180 degrees. Driver is soon wanted for one, then two, then three murders. The cops know who he is. This all takes place in Bakersfield. What are the odds a tattooed killer with a shaved head could elude the Bakersfield police for long while piloting a classic Chevelle at 80 mph and laying rubber all over town? Excellent. The cop on the case is Cicero (Carla Gugino). She finds herself saddled with a partner known as Cop (Billy Bob Thornton). He’s two weeks from retirement. As we all know, anyone two weeks

from retirement, be he cop, fireman, stunt man, prison guard or kindly old dad, will never make it. Cop is also mainlining heroin, for no better reason than to show him doing it. Cicero and Cop try to track down Driver, who seeks vengeance on those who squealed about a bank heist and killed his brother. These people have moved into other lines of work, most notably Preacher (Buzz Belmondo), who runs revival tent meetings. We find out more about them. And we meet the fatuous Killer (Oliver Jackson-Cohen), a British addict of extreme sports, who is a professional hit man for fun. This is some guy. He informs his girlfriend Lily (Maggie Grace) that he has “beaten” yoga, having mastered the most difficult three positions, and is ready to move on. As Driver tracks his victims, Killer tracks Driver, and Cop and Cicero track them all. Director George Tillman does a lean, efficient job of creating stark action scenes. Driver shows vestiges of a personality, reluctantly. Billy Bob creates a cop who looks like it’s been all downhill for him since “Bad Santa.” Gugino, a good actress, gamely pretends to be in a more nuanced movie. And the hits keep coming. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

he burlesque shows in “Burlesque” feature no nudity, no striptease, no baggy-pants comedians and no performers with names like Porsche Galore. Other than that, the shows are identical to the offerings at the Rialto and Follies burlesque houses that flourished on South State Street when I first visited Chicago as a sin-seeking teenager. This is burlesque if it died and went to heaven. Behind a tawdry side entrance on Sunset Strip, a club exists that would make a Vegas casino proud. It has the eerie expanding and contracting dimensions of fantasy. At first, the stage is the right size for an intimate cabaret; later, there’s enough space to present a production number with dozens of (unaccounted for) dancers descending a staircase worthy of Busby Berkeley. The audience is all shadowy extras, whose friends will have to look real hard to spot them. The Burlesque Lounge attracts the attention of Ali (Christina Aguilera), the proverbial small-town girl just off the bus from Iowa. She walks in just in time to see Tess (Cher) conveniently performing the number “Welcome to Burlesque.” The movie has a limited cast of broadly drawn characters, used to separate song and dance numbers. Tess co-owns the club with her ex-husband, Vince (Peter Gallagher). As a couple, they inspire games of What Is Wrong With This Picture? His function is to eagerly hope they can sell out to Marcus (Eric Dane), the realestate developer who wants to tear down the club and put up condos. The club bartender is Jack (Cam Gigandet), who wears eye-liner but turns out to be straight. He allows Ali to crash on his sofa, but there’s no sex because he has a fiancee in New York and also because the film has a PG-13 rating. The stage manager is Sean (Stanley Tucci). He’s gay,

ROGER EBERT

“Burlesque” 116 minutes PG-13, for sexual content including several suggestive dance routines, partial nudity, language and some thematic material except for one unforgettable night with Tess in Reno. Or Lake Tahoe. She forgets. The star dancer is Nikki (Kristen Bell), who grows instantly angry with Ali after the farm girl tells her she looks like a drag queen. There is also the nice girl named Georgia (Julianne Hough), who … well, a plot like this only leaves one thing for her, doesn’t it? On that first night, Ali sees a black girl standing, who smiles nicely to her. We see this same girl repeatedly during the film, but she never gets a name or any dialogue. She has the role of the Black Girl Who Is Seen But Not Heard as a Member of the Club Family. In the film, both Cher and Christina Aguilera are showcased in big song numbers, which I enjoyed on a music video level. Aguilera has an unforced charm in her early scenes, but as she morphs into a glamorous star, she becomes increasingly less interesting. We learn she is an orphan. That simplifies the back story. Is this the movie for you? It may very well be. You’ve read my review, and you think I’m just making snarky comments and indulging in cheap sarcasm. Well, all right, I am. “Burlesque” shows Cher and Christina Aguilera being all that they can be, and that’s more than enough. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 27

movies ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 30.

HEADS UP “Glenn Beck Live: Broke” — Radio and television host Glenn Beck returns to the silver screen. Broadcast live from Pittsburgh, Penn., the stage show will feature thoughts and ideas at the core of Beck’s new book, “Broke.” The event will screen at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Cost is $20. 120 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from National CineMedia

WHAT’S NEW

The Associated Press

J ake Gyllenhaal, left, and Anne Hathaway star in “Love and Other Drugs.”

Comedy turns to drama ‘Love and Other Drugs’ is confused by plot’s emotional weight, power

‘L

ove and Other Drugs” stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Jamie Randall, a pharmaceutical salesman who sells love, Zoloft, Viagra and other products with equal sincerity. He’s a charmer, determined to sell his way out of Ohio and into the big Chicago market, and if that involves flirting with the receptionists in doctors’ offices, it’s a tough job but somebody’s got to do it. The movie takes place at that point in the 1990s when Viagra was tumescing in the marketplace, and Jamie is riding the success of his employer, Pfizer. He infiltrates hospitals, befriends doctors, pushes drugs and sabotages the best efforts of his aggressive rival Trey Hannigan (Gabriel Macht), whose product Prozac is outselling Zoloft. Whether these products, or any of their products, works very well is not a concern of the salesmen. They sell. Jamie is egged on by his supervisor, Bruce Winston (Oliver Platt), and it seems quite possible he’ll make it to Chicago when his life makes an unexpected course cor-

rection. He’s buddies with Dr. Stan Knight (Hank Azaria), who introduces him as his intern and allows him to observe as he palpitates the breast of his lovely patient Maggie Murdock (Anne Hathaway). Strictly speaking, doctors aren’t supposed to do that. Maggie discovers the fraud, and in the course of an argument with Jamie about it they both grow so passionate that, well, they rip off each other’s clothes and fall upon the bed in a confusion of sheets and moans. Maggie and Jamie discover that they really, really like each other. She has something she wants to tell him. She is in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease. This introduces an unexpected note into what seemed to be a screwball comedy. Hathaway brings such tenderness and solemnity to her role that she moves the film away from comedy and toward “Love Story,” and from then on we never quite know where we’re headed. The emotional tug-of-war intensifies because of the presence of Jamie’s brother Josh (Josh Gad), who seems to have been import-

ROGER EBERT

“Love and Other Drugs” 112 minutes R, for strong sexual content, nudity, pervasive language and some drug material ed directly from an Odd Buddy Movie. Josh is helpless in the area of appropriate behavior and has a disastrous personal life. Although he could buy a hotel, he lacks the skill or the courage to check into one, and seems intent on living for the rest of his life on the sofa in Jamie’s small apartment. That would be permissible in another kind of movie. Not in this one, where matters grow serious between the two lovers — so serious, indeed, that they begin to discuss how their love will prevail through the difficult road ahead. The movie gives full weight and attention to the subject of Parkinson’s. But the more weight the story

of Maggie and Jamie takes on, the more distracting is the screenplay’s need to intercut updates on the pharmaceutical wars. Nor do we continue to care much about Bruce and Trey. The most effective single scene in the movie takes place at a meeting of people with Parkinson’s and their loved ones. The husband of a victim describes to Jamie in stark, realistic detail the possible course of the disease, and how it may affect the woman he loves. After this scene, the movie has definitively introduced a note that makes the rest seem trivial. The director is Edward Zwick, a considerable filmmaker. He’s essentially working with a screenplay (by Charles Randolph, Marshall Herskovitz and himself) that doesn’t work. Given that problem, you have to observe that he is a capable filmmaker even in bad weather. He obtains a warm, lovable performance from Anne Hathaway, and dimensions from Gyllenhaal that grow from comedy to the serious. As a filmmaker by nature, Zwick gives that scene its full weight, no matter that it’s not a good fit in his movie. That counts for something. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

“Burlesque” — Christina Aguilera plays the proverbial small-town girl from Iowa who gets on a bus and travels to Los Angeles hoping for stardom. She finds it in the Burlesque Lounge, a Sunset Strip club run by Cher. With a cornball story to showcase their musical numbers, it’s a cheesy entertainment of interest primarily because of the embedded music videos. Rating: Two stars. 116 minutes. (PG-13) “Faster” — A pure thriller, all blood, no frills, in which a lot of people get shot, mostly in the head. Dwayne Johnson stars as Driver, a just-released prisoner working his way down a hit list of those who betrayed him and killed his brother. Billy Bob Thornton is the heroin-addicted cop, close to retirement, on his trail, along with a detective played by Carla Gugino. Oliver Jackson-Cohen is the Brit hit man also on Driver’s trail. Efficiently delivers action for an audience that likes one-course meals, but that’s about it. Rating: Two and a half stars. 98 minutes. (R) “Love and Other Drugs” — Jake Gyllenhaal plays a gung-ho pharmaceutical salesman in the 1990s, not above flirting with doctors’ receptionists if it gets him through the door. Anne Hathaway plays the beautiful patient of one doctor. They meet under shady circumstances, but nonetheless fall in love, and she reveals she’s in the early stages of Parkinson’s. This fact changes the course of a comedy into something much more serious. With Oliver Platt, Hank Azaria, Josh Gad and Gabriel Macht. Directed by Edward Zwick. Rating: Two and a half stars. 112 minutes. (R) “Tangled” — Rapunzel, the girl locked in a tower with only her long, golden locks for company, gets a sassy, spirited screen treatment from Disney.

Continued next page


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

movies Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME

Beast” or even “The Princess and the Frog.” But the laughs make the tunes pass by quickly, the emotional moments pay off and this version of Rapunzel lets down its hair just enough to deserve a place of honor with all the other glorious

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Like most of Disney’s in-house cartoons, “Tangled” suffers most when compared to the best of Pixar. Animated musicals are only as good as their songs, and this one isn’t on a par with “Beauty and the

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Disney “princess” tales. Rating: Three stars. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel

STILL SHOWING “Due Date” — Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis star as a mismatched odd couple who find themselves sharing a rental car on a drive from Atlanta to Los Angeles. In a comedy that’s as near as makes no difference to a down-market retread of “Planes, Trains and Automobiles,” they create big laughs and have some funny stops along the way, but we don’t much want to see the journey continue. Directed by Todd (“The Hangover”) Phillips. Rating: Two and a half stars. 95 minutes. (R) “Fair Game” — Sean Penn and Naomi Watts star as Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame, a couple embroiled in controversy in the early days of the Iraq War. Wilson, sent to Niger to find evidence of uranium sales to Saddam, found none, and said so in a New York Times op-ed bombshell. Plame was then outed as a CIA agent, apparently by an aide of Dick Cheney. The situation placed great pressure on their marriage, which is largely the focus of the film. The movie may work better the more you walk in agreeing with it. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (PG-13) “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” — Lisbeth Salander spends the first half of the film recovering from what happened at the end of the previous one. That’s all right, because a wounded silence is her medium. Now members of the “Section” want to silence her once and for all. Rating: Three stars. 148 minutes. (R) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” — Harry, Hermione and Ron have grown up and the horrors they met at Hogwarts are but nostalgic memories. They are cast out now into the vastness of the world, on their own, and Voldemort and his Death Eaters draw ever closer. Also drawing near is an equally unsettling phenomenon, sexual maturity. A handsome and sometimes harrowing film that will be completely unintelligible for anyone coming to the series for the first time. Rating: Three stars. 146 minutes. (PG-13) “Inception” — An astonishingly original and inventive thriller starring

Leonardo DiCaprio as a man who infiltrates the minds of others to steal secrets. Now he’s hired to IMPLANT one. Ken Watanabe is a billionaire who wants to place an idea in the mind of his rival (Cillian Murphy). DiCaprio assembles a team (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tom Hardy, Ellen Page) to assist him, in a dazzling achievement that rises above the thriller level. Written and directed by Christopher Nolan (“Memento,” “The Dark Knight”). Rating: Four stars. 148 minutes. (PG-13) “Inside Job” — Exactly how Wall Street thieves eagerly sold bad mortgages, bet against them, and paid themselves millions in bonuses for bankrupting their own companies. An angry, devastating documentary. Rating: Four stars. 108 minutes. (PG-13) “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” — Zack Snyder’s film “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” is a gorgeous and occasionally exciting movie that loses some of its heart and forward momentum in clutter, laborious title included. Still, this variation on a theme by Tolkien is pretty daring, more demanding than your typical film for kids. Rating: Two and a half stars. 85 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Megamind” — Bright and amusing 3-D animation as two aliens (voiced by Will Ferrell and Brad Pitt) battle for control of Metro City. Tina Fey voices a local TV reporter, David Cross is a piranha-like sidekick for Megamind, and Jonah Hill is a put-upon TV cameraman who finds himself transformed into a third super being. The 3-D isn’t really necessary, but is well-handled. Rating: Three stars. 95 minutes. (PG) “Morning Glory” — Rachel McAdams transforms a conventional plot into a bubbling comedy with her lovable high energy. She plays an ambitious young producer on a last-place network morning news show, who forces a reluctant TV veteran (Harrison Ford) to do the kind of TV he despises. A lot of laughs, including Diane Keaton as Ford’s veteran co-anchor, Matt Malloy as a goofy weatherman and Jeff Goldblum as the boss who considers the show dead in the water. Rating: Three and a half stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13)

Continued next page

CourtesyWarner Bros. Pictures

Robert Downey Jr., left, stars as Peter Highman and Zach Galifianakis stars as Ethan Tremblay in “Due Date.”


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 29

movies From previous page “The Next Three Days” — Russell Crowe stars as an English teacher whose wife (Elizabeth Banks) is charged and convicted for murder. Despite compelling evidence for her guilt, he believes she couldn’t have done it. As appeals fail, he determines to break her out of jail, and in the process his character must somehow transform into a man capable of taking such action. Not a bad movie if you want a competent thriller. Not the level of achievement we expect from Crowe and writer-director Paul Haggis (“Crash”). Rating: Two and a half stars. 133 minutes. (PG-13) “RED” — Bruce Willis is a retired CIA assassin, but now is a target. So he reassembles his old team: Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren and Brian Cox. And

a telephone operator played by Mary-Louise Parker. Comic thriller, neither good nor bad. Rating: Two stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13) “Secretariat” — A great film about greatness, the story of the horse and the no less brave woman who had faith in him. Diane Lane stars as Penny Chenery, who fell in love with Secretariat when he was born, and battled the all-male racing fraternity and her own family to back her faith in the champion. A lovingly crafted film, knowledgeable about racing, with great uplift. Rating: Four stars. 122 minutes. (PG) “Unstoppable” — A runaway train hurtles at 70 mph, and the movie is as relentless as the train. Denzel Washington and Chris Pine try to stop it, and Rosario Dawson is the harddriving dispatcher. In terms of sheer

craftsmanship, this is a superb film. Directed by Tony Scott. Rating: Three and a half stars. 98 minutes. (PG-13) “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” — Gordon Gekko is back, and he may still be a little greedy, in Oliver Stone’s sequel to his 1987 hit.

Michael Douglas reprises his iconic role, and Shia LaBeouf is the hungry young trader who wants to marry his daughter (Carey Mulligan). Josh Brolin is a Wall Street predator who spreads rumors that destroy the firm of LaBeouf’s mentor (Frank

Langella). Entertaining story, but it seems more fascinated than angry. Have we grown used to greed? Rating: Three stars. 130 minutes. (R)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (unless otherwise noted)

Fo ll o w

the RED b a ll o on

Now Open Fridays 12-6

A Fun, Ever Changing Market Place Where You Will Find New & Old, Locally Made & Grown Items Of All Types • Hand Hewn Log Furniture, Stained Glass and Live Plants • Jewelry, Fashion Accessories and Lingerie • Home Decor, Candles, Antiques, Ironwork and Pottery • Local Organic Microgreens, Tomatoes and Peppers • Organic Meat, Fresh Eggs and Gluten Free Baked Goods • Coffee and Greek Food

Produce • Dog Treats • Alaskan Seafood NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES The following movies were released Nov. 23.

Visit Often, Always Something New • Special Holiday Events

EXIT 138 HWY 97/PARKWAY On/Off Ramp

Colorado Ave

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50 Scott St. SE, Bend OR 97702 • 1 blk east of the parkway at exit 138, Colorado turns into Scott at the Parkway for just two blocks. We are on the same property as Sparrow Bakery.

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97 N

t.

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

Photos with Santa Pilar Ash Photography will be taking photos starting Friday, Nov. 19 and every weekend and Friday until Christmas Eve. $15 for one image studio quality on disk. Suitable for use on your Holiday Cards!

tt S

ALSO OUT THIS WEEK: “The Expendables” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Nov. 30 include “Night and Day,” “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” and “Vampires Suck.” Check with local video stores for availability.

Kettle Korn • Dutch Cookies

o Sc

“Eat Pray Love” — Julia Roberts stars as a New York writer, rebounding from a ditched marriage and a failed love affair, who embarks on a year’s quest in Italy, India and Bali seeking balance of body, mind and spirit. During this journey, greatlooking men are platooned at her, she meets only nice people, and she eats Pavarottian plates of pasta. Like the meeting of a Harlequin romance and a mystic travelogue, but the 80 percent female audience I saw it with seemed to eat it up. DVD Extras: Featurette; Blu-ray Extras: Three additional featurettes, music video and movieIQ. Rating: Two stars. 141 minutes. (PG-13) “Flipped” — Juli (Madeline Carroll) has adored Bryce (Callan McAuliffe) ever since he moved into the neighborhood in the second grade. Bryce has been running away from her ever since. Now they’re 14 and they seem to be flipping: he more interested, she less. Rob Reiner’s warm human comedy tells their stories by showing the same crucial

events from both their points of view. He returns to the time of his “Stand by Me” with the same endearing insights. DVD Extras: Featurette; Blu-ray Extras: Three additional featurettes. Rating: Three and a half stars. 90 minutes. (PG) “I’m Still Here” — A sad and painful documentary that bears witness to the self-destruction of Joaquin Phoenix. His famous announcement that he would retire from acting and become a hip-hop artist was believed by some to be a hoax. Not on the basis of this film by his brother-inlaw Casey Affleck, who shows him spiraling out of control into cocaine, pot and unhinged narcissism. The film has extraordinary access to private and privileged moments. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Audio commentary, audio conversations, deleted scenes and an alternate ending. Rating: Three stars. 108 minutes. (R)

FRESHLY MADE ON SITE

Same Property as Sparrow Bakery

re . St He ne Park Au

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Javier Bardem and Julia Roberts star in “Eat Pray Love.”

to SE Wilson Ave.

The Associated Press


PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2010

movies

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN!

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Nov. 26

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. • There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. • Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

Coming to Video on Demand

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER Knight and Day – Nov 30

Vampires Suck – Nov 30

Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Ezylryb (voiced by Geoffrey Rush), center, prepares to take wing with his fellow owls in “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole.”

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6

Toy Story 3 – Dec 2

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse – Dec 4

Inception – Dec 7

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

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2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 4:20, 7:20 FAIR GAME (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:20, 9:45 Sun: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:25 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 7:15 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) Fri-Sat: 11:25 a.m., 2:35, 6:25, 9:25 Sun: 11:25 a.m., 2:35, 7:10 Mon-Thu: 4, 7:05 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:40 a.m., 2:45, 6:15, 9:20 Sun: 11:40 a.m., 2:45, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:10, 7:10 INSIDE JOB (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:35 am., 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:35 Sun: 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 5, 7:20 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 7 RED (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40 Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 4:25, 6:50

BURLESQUE (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 10 a.m., 12:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55 Mon-Thu: 12:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55 DUE DATE (R) Fri-Sun: 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 5:15, 8:05, 10:25 Mon-Thu: 1:55, 5:15, 8:05, 10:25 FASTER (R) Fri-Thu: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 5:20, 8, 10:25 GLENN BECK LIVE: BROKE (no MPAA rating) Thu: 8 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 10:20 a.m., noon, 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:20, 7:50, 9 Mon: Noon, 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:20, 7:50, 9:30 Tue, Thu: Noon, 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:20, 7:50, 9:30 Wed: Noon, 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:20, 7:50, 9:30 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (DP — PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 1, 3:40, 4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 10, 10:30 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) Fri-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:45, 7:25, 10:10 Mon-Thu: 1:50, 4:45, 7:25, 10:10 MEGAMIND (PG)

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

Fri-Sun: 11 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:40, 9:15 Mon-Tue: 1:20, 3:55, 6:40, 9:15 Wed-Thu: 1:20, 3:55 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:40 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:30, 9:50 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON PASQUALE (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) Fri: 10:10 a.m., 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 Sat: 10:10 a.m., 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 Sun: 10:10 a.m., 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 Mon: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 Tue-Thu: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 9:55 a.m., 12:50, 4, 7:05, 10:15 Mon-Thu: 12:50, 4, 7:05, 10:15 SECRETARIAT (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:10, 3:30, 6:35, 9:40 TANGLED (PG) Fri-Sun: 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:30, 7, 9:25 Mon-Thu: 1:40, 4:30, 7, 9:25 TANGLED 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 5, 7:55, 10:20

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) Fri-Sat: 1 Sun: 1, 3:30 Wed: 3:30 INCEPTION (PG-13) Sun, Tue-Thu: 6 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 9:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: The University of Oregon vs. Arizona football game will screen at 4 p.m. today (doors

open at 3 p.m.). The Oregon State University vs. Stanford football game will screen at 4:30 Saturday (doors open at 3:30 p.m.). Monday Night Football will screen at 5:30 p.m. Monday (doors open at 4:30 p.m.).

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 10:45 a.m., 2:15, 5:30, 9 Mon-Thu: 5:30, 9 MEGAMIND (PG) Fri-Sun: 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 TANGLED (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 10:30 a.m., 1, 4, 6:15, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 4, 6:15, 8:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1, 4:15, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 6 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 2:15, 5, 7:45 Mon-Thu: 6:45 RED (PG-13) Mon-Thu: 4:15 SECRETARIAT (PG) Fri-Sun: 1 Mon-Thu: 4:30 TANGLED (PG) Fri-Sun: 1, 3:15, 5:30, 8 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 3:30, 5:45, 8 Mon-Thu: 7

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Wed: 3:30, 7 Sat-Sun: Noon, 3:30, 7 Thu: 2


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1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


Bulletin Daily Paper 11/26/10