Page 1

Flare on the flat track

Roller derby girls slammin’ in Central Oregon • SPORTS, D1

Skinny dips Light and tasty tips AT HOME, F1

WEATHER TODAY

TUESDAY

Cloudy with mixed rain and snow showers High 45, Low 29 Page C6

• November 9, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Sawyers enter not guilty pleas By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Amanda L. Smith / For The Bulletin

Tami Sawyer, left, laughs as she leaves the federal courthouse in Eugene with husband Kevin Sawyer’s attorney, Shaun McCrea, after her arraignment on Monday.

Broken Top one step closer to foreclosure with notice

EUGENE – Kevin and Tami Sawyer appeared in federal court for the first time Monday, where they were arraigned on federal charges of money laundering, bank fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud and false statement to a financial institution. The pair, flanked by their criminal defense attorneys, stood before Judge Thomas Coffin in the Wayne L. Morse

Cour thouse in Eugene and did not speak during the arraignment. C o f f i n entered not guilty pleas on behalf of Kevin Sawyer the couple. Tami, 47, worked as a real estate broker. Kevin, 56, rose to the rank of captain with the Bend Police Department be-

fore retiring in March 2009. He was placed on paid leave in February 2009 because of an FBI investigation. The Bend couple was indicted on Oct. 21. The indictment alleges that between January 2004 and January 2009 they used investor money to pay for personal expenses and to fund their other companies and ventures. According to the indictment, investors allegedly lost more than $4.4 million. See Sawyers / A4

Frolicking in foliage

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Minnesota-based company that holds Broken Top Club’s debt has sent a notice of default to the private Bend golf course. Thrivent Financial confirmed Monday that it has sent the notice to the struggling golf club, but refused to comment further on the future of Broken Top. A notice of default is the first step of the foreclosure process. An electronic search Monday afternoon of the Deschutes County Clerks Office’s database did not return an official notice of default. Jim Wolfe, chairman of Broken Top’s board of directors, was not available for comment Monday. Thrivent loaned memberowned Broken Top $5.5 million in 2008 to purchase the club, according to documents filed in the Deschutes County Clerks Office. Last month, Broken Top cut staff, including its general manager and head professional, as it tried to cut costs and negotiate its future. A letter to members laid out three possible options for Broken Top: a sale, bankruptcy or foreclosure. See Broken Top / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE INDIA: Obama backs country’s presence on security council, Page A3

E2

E5

Business

B1-6

Calendar

E3

Classified

G1-6

Obituaries

C5

Comics

E4-5

Oregon

C3

C1-6

Movies

E3

Community E1-6

Sports

D1-6

Consumer

Stocks

B4-5

A2

Crossword E5, G2

TV listings

E2

Editorial

Weather

C6

C4

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 313, 42 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

ing at Drake Park in Bend on Monday morning. Yanalcanlin was teaching a group of youngsters for the East Cascades Audubon Society’s Birding For Preschoolers program.

Snow is forecasted for elevations as low as 3,500 feet. For a closer look at the forecast, see the article on Page C1.

Higher premiums and copayments expected for 2011

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

WASHINGTON — For millions of Americans who get their health insurance through their job, autumn brings not only falling leaves and cooler breezes, but also difficult choices. That’s because it’s the time when many employers present workers with their insurance options for the coming year. The selection is likely to be even less appealing this year than last. According to experts and industry insiders, recent trends suggest rates will continue to rise and employers will continue to shift more of the cost of health insurance onto workers — asking them to shoulder a larger share of premiums, for instance, or increasing out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles and co-pays. This past year, overall premiums for employersponsored coverage — meaning the amounts paid by employer and employee combined — rose a relatively modest average of 3 percent for family coverage, according to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research & Educational Trust. See Health care / A4

Union contract nearing for DAs By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Deschutes County officials and representatives of the newly formed Deschutes County Deputy District Attorneys Association appear to be close to signing off on a labor contract. At a bargaining session Monday, both sides expressed general agreement about a proposal that includes a “just cause” provision for the discipline and dismissal of deputy prosecutors by the district attorney — an item that’s been a top priority for the union since it “A lot has formed earlier this fall. happened in Specific information about the terms of the last several the contract was not months and we available, as meeting participants declined have several to provide copies of the individuals who proposals submitted by the county or the union. are quite fearful, Generally, however, (wondering) just cause provisions should they opt require a manager — in this case, the district in, should they attorney — to take spe- not opt in.” cific steps and provide reason before disciplin- — Becky Gallagher, ing or dismissing his or attorney, Deschutes her employees. County Deputy District The union’s EugeneAttorneys Association based attorney, Becky Gallagher, has said members of the group hope such a provision might provide security during a leadership change in the District Attorney’s Office. Patrick Flaherty, who defeated longtime District Attorney Mike Dugan in the May election, will take office in January. He has said publicly that he plans to make some staffing changes in his office and believes Oregon law is clear on the right of district attorneys to hire and fire their deputies. In August, Flaherty notified one chief deputy district attorney, who is not a union member, that he will not be employed once Dugan is out of office. More recently, he sent an e-mail to current deputy district attorneys, informing them that they need to reapply for their jobs if they want to keep them. See Contract / A4

U.S. SPACE PROGRAMS

NASA looking closer at Mercury, Mars By Kenneth Chang New York Times News Service

The Washington Post

Horoscope Local

I

ly Martin, 2, left, laughs with Mary Yanalcanlin, 53, both of Bend, after some leaf throw-

By N.C. Aizenman

INDEX Abby

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

DESCHUTES

On Earth, 2011 will be another tumultuous year for NASA: Its space shuttles will be retired, and it will have to wrangle with Congress and the Obama administration over a rocket and a destination for the United States’ human spaceflight program. In space, though, NASA will have a less contentious time pursuing its science missions. Planetary scientists will finally get their first extended look at Mercury. After a trip of six and a half years through the inner solar system, NASA’s Messenger spacecraft will finally pull into orbit around Mercury on March 18. The spacecraft has zoomed past Mercury three times, its camera photographing about 98 percent of the surface. Its other instruments have collected intriguing data regard-

ing the magnetic field and the tenuous atmosphere of molecules that are blasted off the planet’s surface by the Sun’s radiation. But each of those fly-bys lasted just hours, while the orbital phase of the mission will go on for at least a year. That will allow Messenger to gather enough data to identify elements and minerals in the rocks on Mercury and to observe changes in the atmosphere and magnetic fields as the Sun’s 11-year sunspot cycle emerges from its quiet period. “We’ve got the instruments to do that, but we need time in orbit,” said Sean Solomon, the principal investigator of the mission. Most intriguing is what Messenger will find when it peers into craters near Mercury’s poles. See NASA / A5

NASA

View of the north polar region of Mars from orbit in an undated handout photo. As funding for space programs dwindles, NASA is shifting focus from manned space travel to monitoring Mars and Mercury.


A2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

F / Consumer

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

How to reach us

541-633-2157 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com E-MAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com E-MAIL THE NEWSROOM Business. . business@bendbulletin.com City Desk . . . . news@bendbulletin.com Community Life . . . . . communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports . . . . . . sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Mailing address: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Street address:

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool 541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black 541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa 541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Director Jay Brandt. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson. . 541-383-0324 Human Resources Sharlene Crabtree . . . . . . 541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even . . . 541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR At Home, GO! Julie Johnson . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0308 Business Editor John Stearns . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7822 City Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0348 Community Life Editor Denise Costa . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0356 Editorials Erik Lukens. . . 541-617-7816 News Editor Jan Jordan. . 541-383-0315 Photo Editor Dean Guernsey . . . . . . . . 541-383-0366 Sports Editor Bill Bigelow . 541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address: 226 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond, OR 97756. Mailing address: P.O. Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Phone 541-504-2336 Fax 541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month, $11 Print only: $10.50

By mail in Deschutes County: One month, $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month, $18 E-Edition only: One month, $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5809 Advertising fax . . . . . . . . 541-385-5802 Other information. . . . . . 541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints. . . . . . . . . 541-383-0358 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7825 Back issues . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

7 11 14 34 35 47 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $6.4 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Watching movies at home was once a simple process: Stop at Blockbuster to pick up a VHS tape or DVD, bring it home, watch it, return it. But video-rental behemoth Blockbuster in just a few years went from dominating home movie rentals to filing for bankruptcy protection. That highlights how quickly and dramatically consumers are changing the way they get their movie entertainment. Today, movie watchers are using video-subscription services, such as Netflix; vending-machine movies, such as Redbox; and ondemand movies from their TV subscriptions. And consumers increasingly watch Hollywood productions on their computers or stream online movies to their TVs with help from a variety of set-top boxes. Some are even watching movies on the go with hand-held devices and laptops as they commute to work or travel for business and pleasure. Behind the scenes in the movie industry, a number of players, including movie studios, premium cable channels and movie-delivery companies, are scrambling to create partnerships, carve niches and preserve profits. While the evolving new age of home video is perplexing, it’s worth exploring your options because you could be spending less, or getting better value, on movie entertainment. “I’ve been surprised on what’s out there,” said Larry Behrens, a father of four and author of the “Poor Dad Tech” blog, poordadtech.com. Here is a sampling of ways to watch movies at home.

DVD rentals • Redbox, redbox.com: Price is the allure with these vending machines that dispense DVD movies for a buck a night plus sales tax, or

Computer

Paul Sakuma / The Associated Press ile photo

A Netflix customer holds up a movie in Palo Alto, Calif. Netflix, which provides subscribers with streamed video as well as DVDs by mail, service is just one of the many ways to rent movies. $1.50 for a higher-quality Blu-ray disc. The downside is you must return the DVDs or face additional charges, but you can return them to any Redbox nationwide. The return trip can also cost you in gasoline and convenience. • Netflix, netflix.com: This wildly popular DVDs-by-mail service is relatively inexpensive, with plans starting at $9 per month. As a subscriber, you build an online queue of movies you want to watch, and Netflix mails you the top DVD with a prepaid return envelope. Another benefit is Netflix Watch Instantly, an on-demand streaming service that allows you to instantly play many, but not all, movies. A downside to Netflix is that many newly released DVDs and streaming movies are delayed by several weeks compared with some other methods. To compare the cost of Netflix to Redbox or other services, you’ll need to figure your cost per mov-

Professor’s class examines why Americans work, buy stash, eat to such excess By Kathleen Megan The Hartford Courant

Americans don’t know when to stop. Anything. They eat too much, shop too much, hoard too much, work too much. That’s the viewpoint of a Southern Connecticut State University assistant professor who sees a connection between all this “too muchness” and the American Dream. “We overdo pretty much everything,” said Gayle Bessenoff, who teaches psychology. “There’s something about the American Dream that leads to overdoing everything.” Bessenoff became so intrigued by the concept that she shaped an entire course around it: “The Psychology of Overconsumption,” which is being offered for the first time this fall. We talked with her on the phone and via e-mail to hear about her theories and her new class. How did you get inspired to teach this class? I do research on “workaholism” and on women’s responses to the thin ideal in the media. Both are related to social norms, ideals that are almost impossible to meet, but really ingrained morally in our society. While I was trying to think of a class I could do to tie these areas together, I began to notice the recent influx of television shows about hoarding and addiction. These ideas about consuming too much are becoming important in the media. The course developed into one centered on the concept of “Affluenza” (from the PBS show), that the pursuit of the American Dream has led to an epidemic of stress, overwork, waste and indebtedness. So how did the American Dream lead to this situation? The American Dream has changed over the course of history. It originated as freedom of religion and freedom from oppression. The Protestant work

Q: A:

Q: A:

ethic has become embedded in our society: You can succeed through hard work. We are an individualistic society: If you’re not successful, it’s your own fault because everyone should be able to do it — which of course is not true, but we buy into it. It has become the American Dream of fruitless pursuit. ... Now we believe it means: You are entitled to own a home, to have a big car, to have a 50-inch flat screen TV. Do we define who we are by what we own? A lot of research suggests this. If you lose a possession, you feel like you’ve lost your arm. But we also buy objects to create and display our identity. People buy certain cars, jewelry ... to say “this is who I am.” I’m a Lexus kind of person, or I’m a Hummer. What is “debtaholism,” and is it related to “shopaholism”? It’s really just people who get into serious debt and don’t seem to be able to climb out of it. It’s obviously related to shopaholism. But it is also related to our culture of credit. People believe that money buys happiness. People think: I need this, I need this. ... Pretty much anything is within your grasp if you have a credit card, you can buy it. They know they have to pay it back, but that’s in the future. It’s instant gratification and the enjoyment of getting things. Do you see the tendency to overconsume or overdo reflected in your students’ lives? It gets reflected in things like: what possessions they choose to own. It’s interesting to see what they choose to spend their money on. In general, brand names are a big deal; technology, cell phones are a big deal. I think here at Southern, students are pretty self-aware. This course is not meant to be anti-capitalistic or anti-American. My goal is to examine the psychological consequences of having these values, not judge whether the values themselves are right or wrong.

ie, which depends on how quickly you watch and return DVDs, and how many streaming movies you watch. A service called feedfliks. com, which has a free version, can help with the math. It links to your Netflix account and reports your cost per movie, accounting for both DVDs and streamed movies. • Library: It’s not a new method, but if saving money is your goal, don’t forget the public library as a source of free or low-cost DVD movie rentals. • Video store: Video stores still do a good business, accounting for about half of all DVD rentals in 2009, said Sean Bersell, a spokesman for the Entertainment Merchants Association, a homeentertainment industry trade group.

On-demand boxes • TV service-provider box (cable box): This is probably the sim-

plest method for most Americans who get TV service from a cable, satellite or telephone company. To watch on-demand movies, most customers won’t have to set up a different account or buy and install additional set-top boxes. But if you have minimal service, you might need to upgrade your service and your set-top box. Depending on your provider, ondemand movies often cost about $5 each, sometimes more for a high-definition version. On-demand services can also offer a selection of free movies • Video boxes: Apple TV ($99, apple.com/appletv) and Roku ($60 to $100, roku.com) both released updated versions of their black boxes recently. After hooking these devices to your TV with cables, you can browse and order movies on your TV with a remote control. Movies for Apple TV come from the iTunes store, and content for Roku comes from a variety of sources, but current

You can use your computer to download movies and play them, or to stream online movies. Often, this means hooking a laptop computer to your TV. Newer computers and TVs can use a single cable for video and audio, called HDMI. You can get one online from places like Amazon.com and Monoprice. com for less than $5. ITunes and Amazon VOD movies will play on a computer, as well as those at a variety of Web sites, including hulu.com and YouTube (youtube. com/movies). Some on-demand boxes can help stream content wirelessly from your computer to your TV. So, what’s the best way to get your movies? It depends on what you want, when you want it and what hassles you’re willing to endure. If you want to dip your toe in the world of online movie delivery, get a free trial subscription to Netflix or Blockbuster By Mail, which gives you DVD deliveries plus the ability to stream movies to your computer and TV via devices you might already have. Find trials and introductory deals on each service’s Web site or through a deal aggregator, such as Savings.com.



 Handcrafted in the USA

Bend’s Finest Office Furniture On Sale! Home Office to Complete Commercial Office Design Dovetails will build to suit your design needs!

Q: A: Q: A:

Amish Built Cabinets

Q: A:

Highest Quality in Kitchen Cabinet Construction • Kitchens • Bath • TV Stands Come see what we can do for you. DOVETAILS FURNITURE

97

541-382-3006

.

NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

Chicago Tribune

DR

541-382-1811

movies will be primarily from Amazon Video on Demand. Both require wireless Internet access, and both will also stream Netflix movies if you have a Netflix subscription. • Gaming consoles: Wii, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game machines all can stream movies from Netflix if they have wireless Internet access. PS3 and Xbox also have their own builtin movie rental stores. Playon (playon.tv) is software you can add to your gaming machine, and some other supported devices, to stream Internet content. Playon costs $40 for the first year and $20 per year after that.

By Gregory Karp

EN

GENERAL INFORMATION

Deals await amid home-movie options

AU S

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

CL

STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

63830 Clausen Drive, Suite 102 10:00-5:00 Monday - Saturday



Next to Globe Lighting

CL AU S

EN

GR AN DV IEW

DR .

DR

.

COOLEY RD. COOLEY RD.

97


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 A3

T S Obama backs India for U.N. security seat

PEACE TALKS

Israel plans 1,000 new housing units in east Jerusalem

By Sheryl Gay Stolberg New York Times News Service

By Isabel Kershner New York Times News Service

JERUSALEM — Israel has published plans for some 1,000 new housing units in a contested area of Jerusalem, advancing the approval process at a delicate time when the United States is pressing Israel to renew a freeze in settlement construction and get stalled peace negotiations with the Palestinians back on track. The plans were published for public review in the advertising sections of local newspapers Friday. The advertisement of the plans, a necessary step ahead of final approval, was picked up and given prominent exposure by the Haaretz news site and other Israeli news media on Monday. Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu, who traveled to the United States for the annual convention of the Jewish Federations of North America, met Vice President Joe Biden on Sunday and was expected to meet Secretary of State Hillary Clinton later this week. “We were deeply disappointed by the announcement,” said the State Department spokesman, Philip Crowley. “It is counterproductive to our efforts to resume direct negotiations between the parties.”

Stephen Crowley / New York Times News Service

Fred Bartlit Jr., chief investigator for the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, speaks during a public hearing in Washington on Monday. Bartlit said he had found no evidence of shortcuts taken to save money by anyone involved in drilling the well.

Panel: No signs of shortcuts that led to BP oil rig explosion By John M. Broder New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The lead investigator for the presidential panel delving into the BP oil spill said Monday that he had found no evidence that anyone involved in drilling the doomed well had taken safety shortcuts to save money. Fred Bartlit Jr., a prominent trial lawyer hired to lead the panel’s inquiry, disputed the findings of other investigators, including plaintiffs’ lawyers and members of Congress, who have charged that BP and its main partners, Transocean and Halliburton, had cut corners to

speed completion of the well, which cost $1.5 million a day to drill. “To date we have not seen a single instance where a human being made a conscious decision to favor dollars over safety,” Bartlit said Monday as he opened a detailed presentation on the causes of the April 20 disaster on a drilling rig off the Louisiana coast, which killed 11 workers and led to the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history. “They want to be efficient, they don’t want to waste money, but they also don’t want to get their buddies killed.” Bartlit noted that a number of

Jury urges death for man who raided home, slew 3 By William Glaberson New York Times News Service

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — A jury voted Monday to impose the death penalty on a habitual criminal who took part in a home invasion in Cheshire, Conn., that left a woman and her two daughters dead, a crime of such inexplicable cruelty and randomness — the family was apparently chosen after being spotted in a shopping center parking lot — that it upended a debate about capital punishment. For nearly two months, jurors learned every searing detail of the night and morning in July 2007 when two men armed only with a BB gun that looked like a real pistol burst into the colonial-style home of a successful doctor and put him and his family through an ordeal of beatings and sexual abuse that ended as flames tore through the house where the girls, still alive, had been strapped to their beds. Their mother had already been strangled. Only the father — William Petit Jr., dazed and bloodied after being beaten with a baseball bat in his sleep — managed to escape. He was in the front row Mon-

“It was just so heinous, and just so over the top and so depraved. Here’s a case where somebody doesn’t deserve to remain on the face of the earth.” — Herbert Gram, juror

day, slumped forward, as the defendant, Steven Hayes, sat motionless at the defense table. The court clerk announced, again and again, that jurors believed the crimes Hayes had committed required that he be put to death.

Jurors saw ‘images of depravity and horror’ In thanking the jurors, Judge Jon Blue of state Superior Court said they had been “exposed to images of depravity and horror no human being should have to see.” The verdict came at the beginning of the fourth day of deliberations in the trial’s penalty phase. Only one person has been

executed in Connecticut since 1960. “This is a verdict for justice,” Petit said afterward. “The defendant faces far more serious punishment from the Lord than he can ever face from mankind.” One juror, Herbert Gram of Madison, said the panel experienced little disagreement during deliberations. “It was just so heinous, and just so over-the-top and so depraved,” he said of the crime. “Here’s a case where somebody doesn’t deserve to remain on the face of the earth.”

Second defendant A second defendant, Joshua Komisarjevsky — whom Hayes’ defense lawyers portrayed as the leader to their client’s hapless, drug-addled follower — will be tried separately. Jurors found that all six of the capital felony counts of which Hayes had been convicted Oct. 5 required a death sentence. Hayes, a parolee when the crime occurred, has spent much of his adult life as a prisoner. Blue set Dec. 2 as the date he will officially impose the sentence.

AIRBUS EMERGENCY LANDING

Oil leaks found in 3 A380s; fleet grounded McClatchy-Tribune News Service NEW YORK — Qantas Airways Ltd. said Monday its fleet of Airbus A380s will remain out of service until the middle of the week, after the discovery of oil leaks in three Rolls-Royce Group PLC engines for the superjumbo jet. Rolls-Royce, for its part, said it has made progress in isolating the cause of the engine failure that sparked the inspections. On Thursday, a Qantas A380 made an emergency landing in Singapore after one of its Trent 900 engines broke apart. Qantas blamed Rolls-Royce

for the mishap, saying it was due to either material failure or the manufacturer’s design. The statement from Rolls-Royce on Monday neither affirmed nor denied those comments. “It would be premature to seek to pinpoint cause, as we have said we are making progress in understanding the cause, but have not concluded that process,” said Rolls-Royce spokesman Josh Rosenstock. Rolls-Royce added it was still working in close cooperation with Airbus, a unit of EADS, Qantas and aviation authorities. Shares of Rolls-Royce reversed

earlier losses and rose about 3 percent in London. The stock had been off by around 11 percent since the Thursday incident. At a news conference Monday in Sydney, Qantas Chief Executive Alan Joyce said three engines were removed from another three A380 planes for testing after they were found to be leaking oil. Such leaks were “beyond normal tolerances,” Joyce said, adding that the engines weren’t performing to expected parameters. The engines were reportedly on one plane grounded in Sydney and two others in Los Angeles.

critical questions about the accident remained in dispute, including the cause of the failure of the cement at the bottom of the well, why BP and its partners went ahead with trying to close in the well after it failed an important pressure test, and why crew members failed for too long to recognize that oil and gas were gushing up the well bore. He indicated that a number of the contributing causes of the explosion might remain a mystery, because the evidence sank with the drilling rig or because the causes arose from decisions made by men who were killed or badly injured in the blowout.

NEW DELHI — President Barack Obama announced here on Monday that the United States will back India’s bid for a permanent seat on an expanded U.N. Security Council, a major policy shift that could upset China, which opposes such a move. Obama made the announcement — a priority for Prime Minister Manmohan Singh — during a late afternoon speech to Parliament. “The just and sustainable international order that America seeks includes a United Nations that is efficient, effective, credible and legitimate,” Obama said. “That is why I can say today — in the years ahead, I look forward to a reformed U.N. Security Council that includes India as a permanent member.” Members of Parliament reacted with sustained applause. But neither the president nor his top advisers offered a timetable for how long it would take to reform the council, or specifics about what steps the United States would take to do so. Last month, India won a two-year non-permanent seat on the council, which currently has five permanent members: Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States. But expanding the body will be a complicated endeavor that will require the cooperation of other countries and could easily take years. “This is bound to

Saurabh Das / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama, left, and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh embrace after making a joint statement and speaking at a press conference at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, India, on Monday. be a very difficult process, and it’s bound to take a significant amount of time,” William Burns, the undersecretary of state for political affairs, said here. Obama is on a 10-day trip to Asia that will take him to four countries, all democracies; it is no accident that China is not on the list. The president’s announcement on Monday underscored how the United States is trying to promote India as a global power at a moment when both countries are concerned about the increasing influence and assertiveness of China.


A4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Ohio eggs recalled over salmonella concerns By P.J. Huffstutter Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — More than a quarter of a million eggs from an Ohio farm have been recalled from eight states because of Salmonella concerns. Cal-Maine Foods Inc., the nation’s leading egg seller and distributor, said Monday that it was recalling 288,000 eggs that the Jackson, Miss., firm had bought from Ohio Fresh Eggs. Cal-Maine said in a statement that the federal Food and Drug Administration alerted the company Friday that its Croton,

Contract Continued from A1 In an earlier bargaining meeting, some prosecutors said they’re concerned about Flaherty making decisions about his staff before he’s had time to work with them and assess their job performance. On Monday, Gallagher told county officials that Flaherty’s recent actions have left some deputy district attorneys concerned that their union membership could harm their job prospects. “A lot has happened in the last several months and we have several individuals who are quite fearful, (wondering) should they opt in, should they not opt in,”

Broken Top Continued from A1 Broken Top and Thrivent are still in discussions with Tetherow Golf Club in Bend to sell Broken Top. If that would occur, Broken

Health care Continued from A1 But the share of such premiums covered by the worker increased from 27 percent to 30 percent, with the result that the amount paid by workers rose an average of 13.7 percent. The most comprehensive statistics on plan offerings for 2011 won’t be available for months. But a September survey of employers by Mercer, a leading benefits consulting company, suggests last year’s patterns will continue.

Employees pay more Overall, the employers said that they expected their health care costs to increase between 9 and 12 percent — but that they planned to use cost-saving measures to effectively bring that increase down to 6 percent. Some 57 percent said one way they would do this would be to have their employees pay a greater share of the cost of coverage. Many employers also said they would try to lower their costs by prompting employees to improve their health: Forty-four percent said they will add health management or wellness programs. An additional 38 percent said they will add incentives for employees to participate in existing programs. Tracy Watts, a partner at Mercer, said this often involves lowering employee premiums or giving them gift cards for participating in health assessment surveys. These reviews alert workers to steps they could take to improve their health. “There may even be incentives to achieve your ideal biometrics — blood pressure and body mass index, for instance,” she said. “That’s very encouraging, because it suggests that employers believe that focusing on members’ health is a good thing to do.” Because this is the first major open-enrollment period since key provisions of the new health care law started taking effect, many workers will wonder how much of the plan changes they see is due to the legislation. Not much, say analysts. The law’s most market-altering changes — including provisions that may or may not control premiums — don’t kick in until 2014. “We’re three years away from that,” said economist Paul Fronstin of the nonprofit Employee Benefits Research Institute. “For the most part, the plans don’t know what they’re going to be doing ‘in response.’ It’s just too soon.” There is a notable exception: On their next annual renewal date, all plans will be required to comply with certain mandates such as eliminating lifetime dol-

Ohio-based supplier had a routine sample test positive for salmonella. Cal-Maine had bought about 24,000 dozen unprocessed eggs from Ohio Fresh, which were then processed and repackaged at Cal-Maine’s facility in Arkansas from Oct. 9 to 12. “The company was only notified today,” Cal-Maine said in the statement. The eggs involved were distributed to food wholesalers and retailers in Arkansas, California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. There have

been no confirmed illnesses related to the purchased eggs. New FDA rules governing egg safety went into effect July 9, too late to prevent the recent widespread salmonella outbreak. “In some respect the fact that recalls are occurring shows that the FDA and some companies are taking salmonella and the egg rule seriously,” said food safety attorney William Marler, who represents 105 people who tested positive for Salmonella enteritidis linked to Wright County and Hillandale eggs.

Gallagher said. County Counsel Mark Pilliod and Assistant County Counsel Chris Bell agreed to review the proposal and keep the process moving forward within the next few days. Gallagher said she would take the documents to union members and expected that most would be supportive. The union must vote on the draft before an agreement goes to a vote of the Deschutes County Commission. Information about pay, benefits and other provisions in the contract was not available. Meanwhile, Dugan and officials from the Oregon Department of Justice are still working on another issue related to the

leadership change. Last week, Dugan announced that he would ask the DOJ to prosecute any cases in which Flaherty or other members of his firm are serving as defense counsel. He said Flaherty’s decision to make prosecutors re-apply for their jobs has left his staff with an ethical conflict. Flaherty called the move “vindictive” and said it was a tactic to prevent a smooth transition. Tony Green, a DOJ spokesman, said Monday that his department had not yet come to an agreement with the DA’s office.

Top and Tetherow would be operated by Tetherow, and likely offer playing privileges on both courses to members of each club. “The discussions aren’t going great, but we are still in discussions,” Chris van der Velde, managing partner at Tetherow,

lar limits on benefits and allowing parents to put adult children up to age 26 on their plan. Insurers that make certain changes to existing plans or employers that switch insurance carriers will have to offer additional benefits such as free preventive services. It’s possible that bare-bones employer-sponsored plans — particularly small-group plans bought by businesses with only a few employees — may need to substantially increase premiums to cover the extra cost. And a number of insurers have already blamed the law for coming large rate hikes. But estimates by researchers suggest that on average premium increases for employer-based plans due to the new requirements will be less than 2 percent. “And we’re talking less than 1 percent in many cases,” said Sara Collins, head of the insurance program at the Commonwealth Fund, a health care research group. Watts was less sanguine, noting that the small businesses surveyed by Mercer expected the new law’s requirements to add 3 percent to their costs. “As someone who works with employers, I can say it’s hard to get even a 1 percent increase out of your plan costs” through cost-saving measures, she said. But she and other analysts agree that the most significant cause of increased cost to workers this year will likely be the same as those in the recent past: rising health care expenses and the sluggish economy.

Self-insured companies For large employers that selfinsure, the main issue may be spikes in the prices charged by health care providers. At other companies, particularly mid-size and smaller ones, the workers’ health status may be the determining factor. “For instance, if someone got sick in your group, especially with a disease that ‘your insurer’ thinks is going to continue, they will take that into account when they set your premiums, and you are going to take a whack for it,” said Gary Claxton, who directs the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Marketplace Policy Project. Large companies can be affected by shifts in the makeup of their work force. “A company will look at, for instance, are they going to be hiring or downsizing?” said Claxton. “Do they have a bunch of early retirees who are going to move from one plan to another?” Similarly, if the economic downturn has cut into a company’s profits, it may feel a need to shift more health care costs onto workers even if overall premiums haven’t gone up. That’s the position that Liz

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

said Monday. “We are interested, and it is just a question of how to make it work with both clubs financially. And if we can’t, then we don’t do it.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

Parker and her husband found themselves in this year. Owners of the Tulsa Rib Co., a restaurant and catering business in Orange, Calif., they have been insuring their regular workers since they opened nearly 30 years ago. “My husband has been working in restaurants since he was 13, and he would see a lot of owners just buy fancier cars when they started making money and not think of their workers,” she said. “So from the start we made a choice that once we became profitable, we would make sure to take care of the employees first.” But Parker’s commitment has been tested in the face of annual premium increases that have ranged from 15 to 45 percent even as the benefits have gotten less generous. This past year Parker, who paid 100 percent of her 14 regular workers’ premiums and 90 percent of their dependents’ premiums, spent nearly $100,000 on an HMO plan that charges her workers a $45 co-pay for each doctor’s visit, $500 for emergency room visits and has a deductible of $2,500. “It’s horrible. Some of our dishwashers make $18,000 a year. So they’re really going to hesitate before, say, bringing in their baby for an earache,” she said.

GAYS IN THE MILITARY

Repeal of ‘don’t ask’ policy faces struggle Lame duck Senate, McCain may delay open service By Elisabeth Bumiller and David M. Herszenhorn New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Prospects for Congress to authorize repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy face new uncertainties as time runs out for the Senate to act and strong objections remain among Republicans and the most senior ranks of the military. The murky picture on Capitol Hill comes even as Defense Secretary Robert Gates said for the first time that he would like the Senate to vote to authorize the repeal before the end of the year, and a not-yet-released Pentagon survey of active-duty forces and their families showed that the majority did not care if gay men and women served openly, which the policy forbids. Two main forces are working

Sawyers Continued from A1 Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Bradford read the charges and maximum penalty for each of the allegations against the couple. The 15 charges of wire fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, bank fraud and false statement to a financial institution carry maximum penalties of up to 30 years in prison, up to $1 million in fines and five years of supervised release for each count. Tami Sawyer is also charged with six counts of money laundering; Kevin Sawyer is charged in only two of those counts. That crime is punishable by up to 10 years in prison, up to $250,000 in fines, and three years of supervised release. Shaun McCrea, who represents Kevin Sawyer, told the judge that up to now she has represented him on retainer, and said he now was unable to

against repeal on Capitol Hill. One is the simple matter of the congressional calendar. There will be very little time in the lame-duck session that begins next week for the Senate to vote to authorize the repeal of the policy and reconcile its measure with a version passed by the House. The other obstacle lies in the concerns of Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the senior Republican on the Armed Services Committee. McCain and other Senate Republicans blocked consideration of a defense bill in September that included a provision allowing repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” and in recent days he has been in negotiations with Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., chairman of the Armed Services Commit-

pay for an attorney and needed court-appointed counsel. She told Coffin he had provided financial documents to demonstrate his financial need. Marc Blackman has represented Tami Sawyer in civil litigation and last week represented her at a hearing on the possible revocation of her real estate license. He told Coffin she had submitted financial documents last week applying for court-appointed counsel and expected to be approved. Both McCrea and Blackman said they’d be willing to remain the Sawyers’ attorneys, and Coffin approved the court-appointed representation pending his review of the financial documents. McCrea asked that after reviewing the financial documents, they be sealed; Coffin said he would do that. If the couple’s financial circumstances change, Coffin said they may be responsible for repaying some or all of their defense costs.

tee, on whether the “don’t ask, don’t tell” provision should be stripped from the bill entirely. The chiefs of the Army, Navy and Air Force have all expressed some reluctance about ending the ban, as has the former commandant of the Marine Corps, but the comments of the current commandant, Gen. James Amos, are the most vivid to date. In comments to reporters in California this weekend, Amos said that ending the ban in the middle of two wars would involve “risk” for Marines, who, unlike other service members who generally have private quarters, share rooms to promote unity. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, effectively rebuked Amos. “I was surprised by what he said and surprised he said it publicly.”

Kevin and Tami Sawyer were released on several conditions, including that they have no contact with a list of people including investors, alleged victims and potential witnesses in the case. The defendants also were asked to surrender their passports; Blackman noted the passports had already been surrendered to their attorneys because of a pending contempt of court charge. The Oregon Court of Appeals is expected to make a decision on the contempt of court charges in December. The Sawyers’ trial on the 21 federal charges is set for Jan. 11. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950 New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com

Better alternative When her insurer told her she could expect her rates to rise anywhere from 18 to 38 percent in 2011, Parker spent hours searching for a better alternative. The new HMO she found offers slightly more generous benefits and actually costs less. And through the new law, Parker estimates she will also get several thousand dollars from a federal subsidy for small businesses offering insurance. Yet she still felt the need to increase the share of premiums her workers pay for their dependents from 10 percent to 50 percent. Business at her 50-seat restaurant has been stagnant, she said, in part because competitors that don’t offer their workers health insurance have been slashing their prices. She is hopeful that her insurance costs will go down further in 2014, when key provisions of the new law take effect: Individuals will get incomebased subsidies to help pay for their insurance, and state-based exchanges will allow small businesses or their workers to buy plans at prices possibly kept in check by the competition. But until then, Parker expects her costs to keep rising. “Our CPA sat down with us and said, ‘If this keeps up, you’re going to go bankrupt,’ “ she said. So paying for more of their insurance, she said, “is something our employees are going to have to get used to.”

OPEN HOUSE! NEW LOCATION!

We’ve Moved! Now located next to Sears

Bend Bend River Promenade (541) 389-3381

Sale price valid on the ME-2000S (each aid). Good at participating locations. No other offers or discounts apply. Discount does not apply to prior sales. Now valid through 11/19/10.


C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 A5

SCIENTIFIC ADVANCEMENT

Expect the unexpected as fields heat up of the pancreas, which secrete digestive enzymes, into the very different endocrine cells of the pancreas, which make hormones like insulin. The value of being able to transform one type of cell into another, Klausner said, is that now scientists have “a totally novel source” of cells that they can convert. “I find it so wild,” Klausner said, “You go from nobody being able to do this to everybody being able to do it.”

By Gina Kolata New York Times News Service

About 25 years ago, before I came to The New York Times, I had a job interview at U.S. News & World Report. I really wanted the reporter position, and it seemed to me that things were going well. Then I was asked, “What will be the important medical news next year?” I replied that the reason science reporting is exciting is that the big discoveries are so unpredictable. But, the interviewer pressed, surely there must be some stories I was following that were on the verge of a breakthrough. I realized I had to come up with something, so I said: “Gene therapy. It is likely that next year gene therapy will be shown to work and medicine will be transformed.” Well, I am still waiting for that to happen. And, for whatever reason, I never heard from U.S. News again. But was I right to say advances are unpredictable? Yes and no, scientists say. “I’ve learned over the years that the best predictor for what will be new and exciting is, ‘Expect the unexpected,’” said Dr. Joseph Goldstein, a Nobel laureate who is professor and chairman of the department of medical genetics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. But even if it’s impossible to predict a particular major discovery, one can sometimes sense when a particular area of science is taking off, says Dr. Richard Klausner, a former head of the National Cancer Institute who is now a managing partner in the Column Group, a venture capital firm. “It gets on a Moore’s Law curve,” he said, referring to an observation in computer science that the speed of computing keeps increasing exponentially. When that happens, Klausner said, “barriers and unknowns seem to be falling,” and it is pretty much predictable that even more exciting discoveries will be made.

Scoring for grants Matthew Cavanaugh / New York Times News Service

A researcher with Cubist Pharmaceuticals works in a lab at the company in Lexington, Mass., in October. That’s happening now in stem cell research, he said, although not in the much-heralded sense of using embryonic stem cells to treat diseases. Rather, the accelerating discoveries relate to what determines a cell’s fate — is it going to be a heart cell, a liver cell, a brain cell? — and how to turn one type of cell into another.

‘Field took a turn’ The field came to life in 1998 when scientists found very versatile cells, stem cells in embryos that could turn into any cell in the body. As they worked on finding ways to direct those cells to turn into various types of cells, suddenly, Klausner said, “this whole field took a turn.” In 2007, two groups of scientists discovered they did not have to start by plucking stem cells from embryos. Instead, they could turn an already developed cell, like a skin cell, into a stem cell by adding four genes. Then other researchers learned that they did not need to add the genes — they could add instructions from genes instead. At this point the idea was to take a cell, like a skin cell, make

it sort of reverse its development and turn into a stem cell, then direct that stem cell to develop into a different kind of cell, like a nerve cell. But was it really necessary to go through that process of backward, then forward, development? With what Klausner sees as a sign of the breathless pace of this field, scientists found over the past two years that they could do what they call “transdifferentiation.” They are now taking cells, like nerve cells, and turning them into other types of cells, like muscle cells. In theory, of course, it should be possible. All cells in the body have the same genes — what makes a nerve cell different from a muscle cell is that some genes are silenced in a nerve cell and others are silenced in a muscle cell. Only specific subsets of a cell’s genes are used. But it is one thing to know this in theory. It is quite another to turn one cell type into another. Yet now, three groups of researchers have done it. One group turned connective tissue into nerve, another turned connective tissue into heart muscles, and a third turned exocrine cells

So maybe the likelihood of unpredictable discoveries can be predicted, once a field really gets going. But often, the unpredictable is just that — unpredictable. The result is a well-recognized problem in deciding what research to finance. The National Institutes of Health, which pays for most research, evaluates grant proposals with committees, called study sections, that give them scores. The highest-scoring grants get financed. The difficulty, says Dr. Rudolph Leibel, head of the Division of Molecular Genetics and co-director of the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbia University Medical Center, is the way grants must be written. Scientists must state the problem and explain how they will approach it experimentally, giving a relatively narrow view of what will be accomplished and predicting success. “If you don’t do that in a grant application, the study sections — despite all the blandishments to do otherwise — will probably say your aims are too diffuse,” Leibel said. The result, he said, is that scientists abide by what he calls the “Kabuki-like presentation.” But all along, he adds, “the unwritten message is, ‘Boy, we hope we stumble upon something that is novel and unique.’”

NASA Continued from A1 The day side of Mercury reaches 800 degrees Fahrenheit, but within the shadows of the polar craters, where the Sun never shines, temperatures are thought to be around minus 300 degrees. That means there could be large deposits of water ice on Mercury. Radar measurements from Earth have already given suggestions of water, but some scientists believe that the deposits could instead be sulfur or silicates, which could produce the same radar results. “We hope to have great fun,” Solomon said. On the space shuttle front, NASA hopes to launch Discovery for a final time at the end of this month, carrying supplies to the International Space Station. In February, the shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to make the same trip, bringing up the final piece of the station, a particle physics experiment known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. And then, finally, the space station, already occupied for a decade, will be complete. At that point, the six people living there will be able to focus more on what is to be the primary mission for the next decade: a zero-gravity science laboratory. So far, experiments on the station have produced a stream of interesting but not Earth-shaking results, and many scientists criticize the $100 billion cost as money that could have been better spent on research on Earth. Julie A. Robinson, the program scientist for the space station, said that was unfair, akin to criticizing a 20-yearold for all the time and cost of parenting and college and not yet living up to his or her career potential. “That’s exactly where the space station is,” Robinson said. “The fact is, we’ve done relatively little research on the space station.” But now, more attention will turn to whether the experiments — which include grow-

ing crystals, studying the bone loss experienced by the inhabitants, and looking at how combustion occurs differently without gravity — pay off for the investment. On Mars, scientists will be looking to NASA’s once-and-future rovers, including vehicles that landed there nearly seven years ago and may or may not have life left in them. The vigil continues for the Spirit, the rover that may already be dead. Trapped in sand, it fell silent this year when its solar panels could no longer produce enough electricity as the Martian winter approached and days shortened. The Spirit will probably never move again, but could still prove valuable as a stationary science outpost. The hope is that the rover was able to conserve enough energy to keep its heaters running and that, as the days lengthen again, it will revive and get back in touch with Earth. “At some point, you start to worry when you haven’t heard from it,” said John Callas, the project manager. If the Spirit is still silent come March and April, when its solar panels should be producing the greatest amount of energy, then hope will start fading. Still, the mission has already been a remarkable success for a machine that was designed to last only three months. Meanwhile, the other rover currently on Mars, the Opportunity, should be nearing its next destination, a huge crater named Endeavour, by the end of next year. It has been on a three-year drive covering about a dozen miles. If the Opportunity survives that long, it will be able to investigate terrain that is deeper — and hence, older — in Mars’s past. NASA’s next Mars rover, Curiosity, is to blast off late in 2011. Technical difficulties during its development have delayed the launching for two years, but it is expected to get to Mars about eight months after liftoff, providing planetary scientists with the most detailed exploration to date of the Martian surface.

The name is new, but the faces are familiar. At Columbia State Bank, you’ll find the same exceptional service you always have, delivered by familiar faces you’ve come to know. You’ll also find a commitment to the local community that has never wavered. And along with all that, you’ll rest easy knowing you’re banking with one of the safest and most secure banks in the Northwest. So you can bank on a good night’s sleep, too.

Bend - Wall Street Branch 541-322-4401 1133 NW Wall St

Bend - Third Street Branch 541-330-1701 1701 NE Third St

www.ColumbiaBank.com

Belinda Britt

You’ll notice the difference.

Brooke Garcia

Wendy McGrane

Commercial Banking Officer 541-322-9233

Commercial Banking Officer 541-322-4436

Treasury Management Officer 541-322-4431

Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

Kristen Warner-Lee

John Boylen

Third Street Branch Manager 541-322-4510

Wall Street Branch Manager 541-322-4410

Neil Bone Commercial Banking Officer 541-322-9238

Gary O’Connell Commercial Banking Team Leader 541-322-4428


A6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Auction bidding runs through November 14 at 8 p.m.

TIME IS LIMITED. THE HIGHEST BID WINS! You Could Save a Bundle on These and Hundreds of Other Items!

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

$250 Gift Certificate

$200 Framing Certificate

$500 Electrical Service Certificate

$500 Home Furnishing Certificate

$100 Gift Certificate

$200 Gift Certificate Toward Ski Jacket

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Desperado

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Sage Custom Framing

RETAIL VALUE: $500 FROM: Quality Builders Electric

RETAIL VALUE: $500 FROM: Great American Home Furnishings

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Powderhouse Ski & Snowboard

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Bagboy Compact Lx Push Cart

Complete Brake Service

Mountain Hardware Light Wedge 3 Tent

Snowmobile Pre-Season Tune-Up

$200 Gift Certificate

Four Goodyear Wrangler Radial Tires

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Pro Golf

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Bryan’s Automotive

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Mountain Supply

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: JD Powersports

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Ken’s Sporting Goods

RETAIL VALUE: $459 FROM: Wright Ford

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Maytag Front Load Washer & Dryer Set

Oreck Halo UV-C Vacuum Cleaner

$400 Pest Control Gift Certificate

RV Service Certificate

Remote Car Starter with 3-Channel Alarm

10’x10’ Premium Storage Building

RETAIL VALUE: $2098 FROM: Lance and Sandy’s Maytag

RETAIL VALUE: $599 FROM: Oreck

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Dan’s Pest and Wildlife

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Courtesy RV

RETAIL VALUE: $374 FROM: InTune Audio

RETAIL VALUE: $ 5,375 FROM: HiLine Homes

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

$1000 Carpet and Pad Certificate

Two Night Stay in Junior Suite

$200 Photography Gift Certificate

3-Night Stay in Waterfront Suite

Cooking Class for Two

Wedding Accessory Package

RETAIL VALUE: $1000 FROM: Carpetco Flooring

RETAIL VALUE: $390 FROM: Pronghorn

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Whippersnappers Studio

RETAIL VALUE: $800 FROM: The Lodge at Suttle Lake

RETAIL VALUE: $150 FROM: Allyson’s Kitchen

RETAIL VALUE: $130 FROM: Bend Wedding & Formal

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

$500 Smartlipo Certificate

$100 Shoe and Accessory Certificate

Therapeutic Massage with Footbath or Sauna

Barrel Table with Drawers

$100 Bead Certificate

$100 Toward PANDORA Purchase

RETAIL VALUE: $500 FROM: Aria

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Birkenstock of Bend

RETAIL VALUE: $90 FROM: The Center for Integrated Medicine

RETAIL VALUE: $798 FROM: Edman Fine Furniture

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Azillion Beads

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Saxon’s Fine Jewelry

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-382-1811


B

Tech Focus A new kind of Web browser, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,580.05 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +1.07 +.04%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

t

11,406.84 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -37.24 -.33%

t

1,223.25 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -2.60 -.21%

s

BONDS

By Diana Henriques

A decrease in first-time claims for unemployment and an uptick in hiring pushed a state economic index up slightly in September for the first time since June, according to a report released Monday. The University of Oregon Index of Economic Indicators rose 0.2 percent in September, but overall, its components point to a weak economy. While first-time jobless claims dipped, the overall level remains high, according to the report authored by Timothy Duy, director of the Oregon Economic Forum at UO. The slight increase in hiring was largely for temporary jobs. The broader employment levels remain weak. Duy is scheduled to be a speaker at today’s Bend Chamber of Commerce 2010 Economic Forecast Breakfast, which begins at 7:30 a.m. at The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center.

Ten-year CLOSE 2.56 treasury CHANGE +1.19%

s

$1402.80 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$5.50

Low rates hurt bonds for affordable housing Senior citizens, low-income families may feel effects

Oregon economic index inches up

New York Times News Service

It is not just retired savers who are struggling with a sharp reduction in their investment income as interest rates hover near zero. Hundreds of affordable housing projects across the country are feeling the pain, too. That sets them apart from most borrowers in the municipal bond market, who see today’s low rates as a rare spot of cheer

B

amid shrinking tax revenues and rising pension costs. But this battered collection of public borrowers is learning that low rates can be a two-edged sword — one that can slice their credit ratings to the bone, as detailed in a report to be released today by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services. These borrowers, primarily affordable housing projects across the country that are allowed to raise money in the tax-ex-

empt bond market, had been relying on the interest they earned on their spare cash to help them pay off their outstanding bonds. Like other investors, they are now earning far less on those cash reserves than anticipated. As a result, their bond ratings are being cut sharply, reducing the value of their bonds to investors and potentially making affordable housing less available or more expensive for senior citizens and lowerincome families who rely on such projects for shelter. See Bond rates / B2

EXECUTIVE FILE

Helping nonprofits tap donors online

Chrysler narrows losses, raises forecast DETROIT — Chrysler, the smallest of the Detroit automakers, said Monday that it reduced its losses to $84 million in the third quarter and raised its financial forecast for the year even though it is still in the early stages of revamping its vehicle lineup. Chrysler officials said the company was running ahead of the targets it laid out a year ago, although it has yet to earn a profit, and remained on track to go public in the second half of 2011.

s

$27.428 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.684

Patience wears thin at security checkpoints Some worry screening will discourage travel By Susan Stellin New York Times News Service

As the Transportation Security Administration scrambles to address vulnerabilities in procedures for screening cargo, it is facing growing criticism from travel industry groups over the escalating security measures for passengers. In recent weeks, representatives from the International Air Transport Association, the U.S. Travel Association, the Allied Pilots Association and British Airways have criticized the TSA, saying it adds intrusive and timeconsuming layers of scrutiny at airport checkpoints, without effectively addressing legitimate security concerns. The U.S. Travel Association, in fact, is worried that the more onerous screening process will discourage air travel. “The system is broken, it’s extremely flawed and it’s absurd that we all sit back and say we can’t do anything about it,” said Geoff Freeman, executive vice president of the association. The group has convened a panel of transportation leaders to recommend a better way to balance security with a more efficient and honed screening process. See Screening / B5

Spaceship factory to break ground LOS ANGELES — A production facility that would build the world’s first fleet of commercial spaceships is set to begin construction today at the Mojave Air and Space Port. The 68,000-square-foot facility, one of the first aircraft assembly plants to be built in the region in decades, will be home to The Spaceship Co., or TSC — a joint venture owned by Mojave-based Scaled Composites and British billionaire Richard Branson’s space tourism company, Virgin Galactic. TSC hopes to complete the complex by September. It expects to build three White Knight aircraft — which resemble massive flying catamarans because each has two fuselages — and five smaller SpaceShipTwo rocket planes. — From staff and wire reports

Unemployment The monthly unemployment rate for the past 13 months: 10.2 percent 10.0 9.8

9.6%

9.6 9.4

New York Times News Service

A passenger goes through a security checkpoint at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

John Murphy, founder and CEO of Zuri Group, looks over his schedule on his laptop at his office in Bend on Monday morning. Murphy flies 50,000 to 60,000 air miles a year working with nonprofit clients across the United States and Canada. The payoff has been a doubling of the company’s annual revenues and employees for three consecutive years.

Zuri Group has seen ‘extraordinary growth’ since starting in 2007 By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

John Murphy isn’t exactly a Pied Piper, but he has lured a loyal customer following of nonprofit groups to his Bendbased Zuri Group with a blend of online fundraising tools that he says has generated millions of dollars each year for the organizations’ causes. Murphy founded Zuri Group in 2007 to fill an unmet need he recognized during his 20-year career working for large technology companies like Xerox in Portland, and others in Southern California. He is president and CEO of Zuri Group; his wife, Sara, is a partner and director of marketing. He noticed that big technology companies provided software and Web services for nonprofits, but they didn’t

The basics What: Zuri Group Where: 328 N.W. Bond St. Employees: 20 Phone: 866-941-9874 Web site: www.zurigroup.com

assign representatives to work with the nonprofits and didn’t show any personal interest in them or commitment to helping them reach their goals. In addition to giving nonprofits access to strong, stable online fundraising technologies at a reasonable cost, Murphy said he wanted Zuri Group to function as a partner to the nonprofit groups.

He wanted to get to know the people running them, attend their meetings, provide input for planning their online fundraising campaigns and provide training and technical assistance to help nonprofits carry out their missions. During his career at Xerox and other tech companies, Murphy said he gained experience doing everything from Web coding and implementing of software and websites, to managing large-scale teams and projects. “I had 200 people reporting to me,” Murphy said. When Murphy took the entrepreneurial leap — quitting his job in San Diego and moving to Bend to launch Zuri Group — he had one client and a staff of two, including himself. See Zuri / B5

2009 2010

Monthly net change in nonfarm, payroll employment: In thousands

Do workers’ rights extend to Facebook?

600 400

NLRB says fired employee had protected right to post critical comments

200 0 -200

By Steven Greenhouse

-400

New York Times News Service

2009 2010 Note: figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Labor

AP

In what labor officials and lawyers view as a groundbreaking case involving workers and social media, the National Labor Relations Board has accused a company of ille-

gally firing an employee after she criticized her supervisor on her Facebook page. This is the first case in which the labor board has stepped in to argue that workers’ criticisms of their bosses or companies on a social networking site

is generally a protected activity and that employers would be violating the law by punishing workers for such statements. The labor relations board announced last week that it had filed a complaint against an ambulance service, American

Medical Response of Connecticut, that fired an emergency medical technician, accusing her, among other things, of violating a policy that bars employees from depicting the company “in any way” on Facebook or other social media sites in which they post pictures of themselves. See Rights / B5

Travelers face sticker shock as airfares climb higher By Nicola Clark New York Times News Service

In the 10 years they have been together, Charissa Benjamin and her Serbian husband have always flown from their home in Washington to spend the winter holidays in the warmth of her native Antigua. But with the lowest economyclass fare this year advertised at about $1,500 — more than twice the $700 she paid in 2009 — Benjamin is considering ringing in 2011 with her husband’s family in decidedly chillier Belgrade. Flights there cost half as much as those to the Caribbean. “It’s hard for me to bite the bullet when it’s only 1,700 miles” from Washington to Antigua, she said. “That’s just under 90 cents per mile.” As Benjamin and others have been discovering in recent months, airfares in most of the world are on the rise as the global economy picks up and demand for air travel climbs, particularly for business trips. Airlines, meanwhile, have been reluctant to add more flights to meet that growing demand. That is increasing pressure on ticket prices and making for packed planes and longer standby lines as the year-end travel season approaches. See Airfare / B2


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  EUROPE

Central bankers warn of uneven growth By Jack Ewing New York Times News Service

BASEL, Switzerland — Central bank chiefs warned Monday that economic growth remained uneven, especially in industrial countries, as new data reinforced fears of a slowdown in Germany, Europe’s biggest economy. “There is a degree of uncertainty which is the mark of the present time,” the European Central Bank president, Jean-Claude Trichet, said during a news conference after a meeting of central bankers, held under the auspices of the Bank for International Settlements. “Colleagues share this sentiment that we have to accept we are in a universe where there are risks.” Trichet, serving as spokesman for the group, did not refer to any specific countries, but said there was a divergence between the advanced economies and “impressive” growth in emerging markets. In Europe, Germany’s export strength has been helping to lift growth across the continent and compensate for the negative effects of the sovereign debt crisis. Data released Monday, however, showed that German industrial production fell 0.8 percent in September from August, as a decline in manufacturing outweighed gains in construction and energy. At the same time, German exports, which include services and financial transfers as well as manufactured goods, rose 3 percent from August, the Federal Statistical Office said. “The upswing in industry has clearly lost considerable momentum in the past few months,” Ralph Solveen, an economist at Commerzbank in Frankfurt, said in a note. “The growth rates of the first half of the year are unlikely to be achieved again that quickly.”

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BEND CHAMBER 2010 ECONOMIC FORECAST BREAKFAST: Join fellow Chamber of Commerce members as Timothy Duy, adjunct assistant professor and director of the Oregon Economic Forum at the University of Oregon, and Jeff Auxier, founder of Auxier Asset Management, share their visions for 2011. Pricing available online; 7:30-9:15 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. BEST PRACTICES FOR NEW HOMES: Energy Trust New Homes Trade Allies and building professionals are invited to learn about the most up to date energy efficiency building techniques; free for New Homes Trade Allies and crews, $30 general admission; 8 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. ZOOM TAX SMALL-BUSINESS SEMINAR, CASH FLOW TECHNIQUES AND PLANNING: Learn tax-survival strategies in a tight economy. Presented by Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA, owner of Zoom Tax. Registration requested. Free for existing clients; $25 at the door; 4-5 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax.com. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps to starting a business in a workshop offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Business Development Center. Cost includes handouts. Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Maida Bailey Old Library Building, 151 Spruce St., Sisters; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. WEB GRAPHICS WITH PHOTOSHOP/ DREAMWEAVER: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Learn about 2010 tax law changes from speakers Gary Kronmiller and Mathew Hamlin of Jones & Roth; free for Chamber of Commerce members; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave.; www.bendchamber.org. INDIVIDUAL TAX UPDATE: Edward Jones live broadcast for tax practitioners. Program is eligible for CPE/CFP/CA credit. Lunch provided. Register online at www.allstartax.com; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. ZOOM TAX SMALL-BUSINESS SEMINAR, OUTSOURCING, THE UNORTHODOX EQUATION: Learn

to make more by spending less. Presented by Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA, owner of Zoom Tax. Registration requested. Free for existing clients; $25 at the door; 4-5 p.m.; Redmond Chamber of Commerce, 446 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax.com. BANKS & OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about the different kinds of financial institutions in our community. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY “EFFICIENT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.buildinggreencouncil.org. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Visible Changes Salon & Spa, 636 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-504-4505.

TUESDAY Nov. 16 ZOOM TAX SMALL-BUSINESS SEMINAR, OUTSOURCING, THE UNORTHODOX EQUATION: Make more by spending little. Presented by Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA, owner of Zoom Tax. Registration requested. Free for existing clients; $25 at the door; 4-5 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax.com. REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, 888 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; 541-548-2151. SMOOTH MOVE-OUTS: Learn what you can do as a landlord to make sure a move-out goes well. Sponsored by Central Oregon Rental Owners Association, event includes a light supper. Registration suggested by Nov. 12. To register, call Plus Property Management 541-389-2486; 5:30-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend.. SOCIAL MEDIA, MANAGING YOUR SITES: Third in the Online Marketing Series offered by Central Oregon Community College. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 17

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506.

ZOOM TAX SMALL-BUSINESS SEMINAR, CASH FLOW TECHNIQUES AND PLANNING: Learn survival skills for a tight economy. Presented by Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA, owner of Zoom Tax. Registration requested. Free for existing clients; $25 at the door; 4-5 p.m.; Redmond Chamber of Commerce, 446 S.W. Seventh St.; 541385-9666 or www.myzoomtax.com. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series, providing a general overview of credit including the pros and cons of using it, the kinds of credit available and the importance of maintaining a good credit record. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Nov. 15

Nov. 18

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. RELEASE THE PARKING BRAKE : Learn what may be holding you back from becoming all that you want and can be. Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Space is limited. For more information and to register, visit mail.savyconnect.com; 8 a.m.noon; First American Title Insurance Co., 395 S.W. Bluff, Bend.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by Nancy Popp and her staff. Admission is free and you do not have to be a chamber member to attend; 5:30 p.m.; Crooked River Realty, 5135 Clubhouse Road; 541-923-2679.

SATURDAY

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Crook County

Barry and Janet Rheault to Mark H. Zornow and Marjorie R. Grafe, Partition Plat No. 1996-06, Parcel 1, $235,000 Deschutes County

Erich M. Paetsch to West Coast Bank, T 16, R 11, Section 25, Minor Partition, Parcel 2, $243,591.59 Erich M. Paetsch to West Coast Bank, T 16, R 11, Section 25, $792,145 Jeffrey S. and Athena L. Kleihauer to Michael E. and Debbie J. Everidge, Parks at Broken Top, Lot 51, $294,643 Zeke Holder to Edgar H. Lion, trustee of Lion Family Trust and Barbara J. Humphreys, trustee of Barbara J. Humphreys Trust, RiverRim Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 51, $195,000 Michael and Susan Carr to Rivers Northwest Inc., NorthWest Crossing Phase 12, Lot 577, $185,000 Fidelity National Title Insurance Co. to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee, Glenshire Phases I & II, Lot 3, $205,236.55 Dorothy K. Briley and Jacqueline Kelley to David A. and Penny Ueeck, Cascade View Estates Phase 9, Lot 116, $330,000 Kirsten M. Giacomini to Irwin S. and Abigail P. Murray and Katherine E. Hardesty, Fairway Crest Village Phase III, Lot 26, Block 15, $537,500 Gene Robles, trustee of Gene Robles Revocable Living Trust to Albert J. and Sandra L. Kouba, trustees of Albert J. & Sandra L. Kouba Revocable Living Trust, RiverRim Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 70, $272,000 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee to Barkris LLC, Canyon Rim Village Phase 5, Lot 102, $174,000 Carrie L. Larsen to Maybelle Clark MacDonald Fund, Vision Plaza Condominiums, Unit 205 and Vision Plaza Condominiums Parking Spaces P6 and P7, $262,000

Joseph S. and Debra A. Doe to Katie K. and Jeff P. MacDonald, Mountain Village East IV, Lot 12, Block 24, $315,000 Mak S. and Carey J. Garber to Carey J. and Mark S. Garber, trustees of Garber Family Trust, Meadow Village, Lot 1, Block 22, $649,501.26 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to CLB Homes Inc., Gardenside Planned Unit Development Phase 2, Lots 50-51, $176,001 Peter W. and Jane C. Melhuish, trustees of Peter & Jane Melhuish Living Trust to Pensco Trust Co., custodian for James A. and Cheryl A. Cox, Ridge at Eagle Crest 15, Lot 47, $265,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Thomas G. and Sara E. Kuhn, Davis First Addition, Lot 4, Block 8, $164,500 Doug A. Mishler and Amy L. Altick, to Martin J. and Therese M. Johnston, T 14, R 13, Section 11, $215,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Alan S. Fraser, Ridgewater Phases 1 and 2 Planned Unit Development, Lot 40, $179,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Louis III and Rita Bunting, Summit Phase One, Lot 11, $197,500 Brian D. and Kerry A. Bergler to James J. MacAfee and Susan Lefferts, Partition Plat 200510, Parcel 1, $225,000 Vergent LLC to Nickolas E. and Jessica L. Smith, Blue Ridge, Lot 11, $259,000 John J. and Barbara W. Halle to Christian D. and Lezlie P. Ellertson, Glaze Meadow Homesite Section, Lot 30, $766,000 Regional Trustee Services Corp., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Brier Ridge, Lot 1, $162,038 Regional Trustee Services Corp., trustee to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee, Partition Plat 2001-49, Parcel 1, $271,300.05 Shawn Hill to David B. and Cathleen

E. Doeleman, Courtyard Townhomes at Broken Top, Lot 21, $150,000 Deschutes Land Co. to Maxine M. Hoggan, Townsite of Redmond, Lots 7 and 8, Block 17, $310,000 Theodore R. and Karyn L. Lynch to Robert B. and Deborah S. Eimstad, Highland Addition, Lot 21, Block 8, $300,000 Richard S. Kebler and Laurel B. Yocom, trustees of Richard Kebler & Laurel Yocom Trust to Jospeh A. Emerson and Ann M. Brayfield, trustees of Ann M. Brayfield Revocable Trust, Shevlin Commons Planned Unit Development Phases I, II and III, Lot 40, $245,000 Redames A. and Heidi L. Jimenez to Susan A. Wilson and Virginia L. Silvey, Squaw Creek Canyon Recreational Estates, Lot 10, Block 7, $210,000 Philip D. Labbe to Jerrold K. and Gertrude R. Longerbeam, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 29, Block U, $215,000 James A. Sleznick and Colette Whelan to John Stockham, Second Additon to West Hills, Lot 8, Block 4, $350,000 Triad Homes Inc. to John W. III and Susanna R. Ross, Rocky Point Phases 1 & 2, Lot 9, $540,000 Mary E. Beal, trustee of Beal Family Trust to Timothy P. and Cynthia A. McCollister, Odin Crest Estates, Lot 14, Block 3, $150,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phase 2, Lot 99, $305,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Bank of America NA, Eagle Rock, Lot 8, $709,561.62 Gisela Kinney to James Sander, Bend Park Addition, Lots 1 and 2, Block 3, $176,000 Craig J. and Kristina L. Glazier to Jonathan Phelan, Tanglewood Phase VII, Lot 28, $305,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Jarret I. Katter, Starlight Estates, Lot 1, $173,000 Daniel A. Mancino to Michael

S. and Barbara Croy, T 16, R 12, Section 30, $310,000 Cheryl A. Hunt by Loree T. JodanMacias, conservator to Al and Marcia Steward, Sundance East Phase III, Lot 3, Block 11, $435,000 Schumacher Construction Inc. to Brent and Julie Irwin, Fairway Crest Village II, Lots 7-8, Block 1, $250,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Heather Terry, Sun Meadow No. 3, Lot 102, $205,000 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corp. to Greentree Servicing LLC, Summer Meadows Estates Phase 2, Lot 22, $369,174.68 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to Aurora Loan Services LLC, Pines at Pilot Butte Phase 5, Lot 42, $256,611.59 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to US Bank NA, North Addition CW Reeve Resort Tract, Lot 8, Block 1, $179,786.04 Bank of the Cascades, representative for the estates of William C. and Irene S. Govers to Douglas, Cathy and Dennis Holly, Townsite of Laidlaw, Lots 4-6, Block 30, $150,000 Michael J. Haber to Ray G. Gertler, River Glen, Lot 7, $300,000 JPMorgan Chase Bank NA to Ronald E. Ross, Highland Addition of Bend, Lot 10, Block 23, $218,000 Dane and Gina Buck to Douglas L. and Heather M. Franz, Elkhorn Estates Phases 14-16, Lot 186, $198,000 Richard W. and Mona F. Divine, trustees of Richard W. & Mona F. Divine Revocable Trust to James Robinson Family LLC, Broken Top Phases IV-A, IVB, IV-C, Lot 438, $646,500 Laurie K. Tom to Jon D. and Kathryn S. Fournier, Ridge at Eagle Crest 43, Lot 19, $257,800 Federal National Mortgage Association to Paul R. Powers, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Lot 56, Block 31, $198,000

Airfare Continued from B1 This has been a boon, of course, for an industry that is expected to roar back into profit this year, to the tune of $8.9 billion. That comes after airlines collectively lost nearly $26 billion during the previous two years, according to the International Air Transport Association, an airline industry group. Many of the world’s leading airlines are reporting that the three-month period ending Sept. 30 was one of their most profitable quarters in years. The degree of sticker shock varies significantly by region and by class of seat, with fares

Bond rates Continued from B1 The magnitude of the pain is clear in the report from Standard & Poor’s, one of Wall Street’s largest creditrating agencies, of a sweeping review begun last spring of nearly 600 tax-exempt housing bonds. The changes are stark. The number of AAA-rated bonds, the blue chips of the bond market, fell by more than half, to 271 from 552. The number of bonds in the “junk” category — too low to be considered investment grade — rose to 46 from just nine, and the agency said it anticipated that 10 of those issues could default over the next decade. The ratings for 256 more bond issues were withdrawn, either because they were no longer outstanding or because the issuers did not respond to the agency’s request for more information. “We have seen years of record-low short-term interest rates cause stresses across the housing revenue bond spectrum,” said Valerie White, senior director of taxexempt housing at the rating agency. “We have observed this to be particularly true of bonds whose revenues or cash flows rely on investment earnings from short-term investments such as money market funds.” As a result, although the mortgages that secure the bonds are federally insured, the projects that issued the bonds are at greater risk of falling short of the cash needed to repay bondholders, the S&P analysts said. One of the most severe downgrades was for the Riverside Plaza apartment project in downtown Minneapolis, a high-rise project once used as the backdrop for “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” For the project, which is home to more than 4,000 people, the AAA rating on its outstanding bonds was cut to CCC, almost as low as a rating can fall unless the bond is on the brink of default. That six-step tumble was the most severe in the final round of S&P downgrades, announced in late October, but five other projects in the final round of reviews had their ratings fall at least two steps. The downgrade for Riverside Plaza came as it was preparing to refinance the affected bonds, explained George Sherman, the president of Sherman Associates, which owns and manages the project, a linchpin in the city’s

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

on some routes still at or below those of a year ago, despite some large increases in traffic. Average domestic and international fares worldwide are up by less than 4 percent from a year ago, according to figures from the transport association. And while fares may continue rising for some time, industry executives say the increases next year are likely to be smaller. “All of the airlines have done a good job, as demand has picked up, of not adding very many more seats,” said Christa Degnan Manning, head of research at American Express Business Travel. “I expect them to continue to manage that very closely.”

supply of affording housing. “Just to have the issue off the table,” he said, his private company “will step up in December and cover the small interest shortfall” the project faces, which he estimated at a few thousand dollars. But not every project downgraded has access to that kind of emergency cash. The new Riverside Plaza bonds will be issued based on “much more conservative assumptions — essentially assuming zero investment income,” Sherman said. Moody’s Investors Service, another major credit-rating agency, undertook a similar review of its ratings on housing bonds this year, but its downgrades were not as steep or as numerous. According to a summary from that agency in June, more than 80 percent of the roughly 200 reviewed issues kept their original ratings. But Moody’s analysts warned then that “if interest rates continue to remain at current levels, we would anticipate further downgrades.” Since so many of the downgraded issues had glittery AAA ratings before the latest review, there has been some grousing in the market that the rating agencies were overreacting to criticism that they were too generous in rating the controversial mortgage-backed bonds that blew up in the financial crisis of 2008. “Some people say they are like the cat that got burned stepping on the stove and now won’t even go back in the kitchen,” said Bernard Beal, chief executive of M.R. Beal & Co. in New York, an investment bank that is an active underwriter of housing revenue bonds. “But I think they are being legitimately cautious about the opportunities for these housing issues to make a comeback in the short run,” Beal said. “The deals are going to be more difficult to do, and there simply will not be the large-scale issuance we’ve seen in the past.” He cited a deal in his own firm’s pipeline. “Three years ago, it would have been a no-brainer. Now, with the very same project, we are finding very, very few lenders for it.” The tighter rating standards may cause more housing-bond issuers to go to market without a rating — a step that narrows the market for the bonds and can raise the cost of new housing projects. “You pay up in a number of ways if you go to market unrated,” Beal said. “But that may be better than having a low rating that can affect your entire portfolio.”

cPh

s Turf, Inc.

SERY ” R U ro w n N c a ll y g

M

W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

o

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

541-322-CARE

541-546-9081 2019 SW Park Lane • Culver


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 B3

T F Startup unveils a browser for social networking era Netscape alumni unveil program that integrates sites like Twitter and Facebook

Device will be released in China but could be sold in U.S. eventually, company says New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

A social approach At first glance, RockMelt looks like an ordinary browser, a digital windowpane onto the Web. But along the side of its main window are two thin rails with icons, one showing a user’s friends on the left, and another displaying a user’s favorite social sites, including Twitter and Facebook, on the right. A “share” button makes it easy to post a Web page, a YouTube video or any other items, to Facebook, Twitter or other sites. Similarly, users can update their status or keep tabs on their friends’ activities on any social network right on their main browser window. They can also easily add and remove friends, or chat with them, on the left-side rail. When a user searches the Web using Google, RockMelt not only delivers the Google search results, but also fetches the pages associated with those results, so a user can preview those pages quickly

New York Times News Service

The Rockmelt Web Browser features two rails — one showing a user’s friends on the left, and another providing quick links to a user’s favorite social sites on the right. and decide which to click to. “Had we known about Facebook and Twitter and Google back in ’92 or ’93, we would have built them into the browser,” Andreessen said, referring to Netscape. “This is an opportunity to go back and do it right.” Like other browsers, RockMelt will be free, and like the popular open-source browser Firefox, it plans to make money by earning a share of the revenue from Web searches conducted by its users.

Getting heard For all its modern features, the challenges facing RockMelt are enormous. The browser market has become intensely competitive in recent years and is dominated by giants like Microsoft, Apple and Google, as well as Mozilla, which makes Firefox. “Getting heard above the noise is going to be hard,” said David Yoffie, a professor at the Harvard Business School and the co-author of “Competing on Internet Time,” a book that chronicled the battle between Netscape and Microsoft. Consider the fate of Chrome, the latest major competitor in the browser market, which Google introduced two years ago. Despite good reviews and being heavily promoted by Google — through ads and links on the company’s home page, the most visited page on the Web — Chrome has captured just 8 percent of the browser market, according to NetApplications, which tracks browser usage. Even Microsoft, considered a laggard in innovation for much of the last decade, has revamped Internet Explorer in recent years and is expected to release a new and improved version soon. A test version of the product was downloaded 10 million times in just six

Eye-Fi Connect X2 is handy for the mobile photographer By Bridget Carey McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Product: Eye-Fi Connect X2, a camera memory card for wireless photo and video uploads. Features: When the camera is turned on and in your Wi-Fi hotspot, the Eye-Fi memory card inside will send the photos and videos you take to your computer. It also can send files to several photo-sharing websites, including Facebook, Flickr and Picasa. Price: $49.99. Ups: No need to ever connect the camera to the computer to back up your pictures. Just turn the camera on when you enter your Wi-Fi network, like at home, and it starts transferring. You don’t even need to have your computer turned on. The photos will start uploading to the computer the next time the computer is on and connected to the Internet. Downs: Because this has Wi-

these books in color through its Kindle application for LCD devicE-book readers are light- es. Sony is also taking a wait-andweight and use little power, see approach. but most have a distinct disad“On a list of things that people vantage to colorful tablet com- want in e-readers, color always puters: their black-and-white comes up,” said Steve Haber, displays. president of Sony’s digital readBut on Tuesday at the FPD ing business division. “There’s no International 2010 trade show question that color is extremely in Tokyo, a Chinese company logical. But it has to be vibrant will announce color. We’re not that it will be willing to give up the first to sell “On a list of things the true blacka color display and-white reading using technol- that people want experience.” ogy from E Ink, in e-readers, color But Sriram Pewhose blackruvemba, an E Ink and-white dis- always comes up.” vice president, is plays are used not upset by the — Steve Haber, president reluctance of the in 90 percent of the world’s e- of Sony’s digital reading market leaders readers, includ- business division to adopt his color ing the Amatechnology. “I’m zon Kindle, convinced that a Sony Readers and the Nook lot of times it takes one company from Barnes & Noble. to prove the market,” Peruvemba While Barnes & Noble re- said. cently announced a color Nook While barely known in this and the Apple iPad has a color country, Hanvon is the largest screen, both devices use LCD, seller of e-readers in China. Its the technology found in televi- founder and chairman, Liu Yingjisions and monitors. The first an, says Hanvon has a 78 percent color e-reader, from Hanvon share of the Chinese market. Technology, based in Beijing, Hanvon’s first product using a has an E Ink display. 9.68-inch color touch screen will “Color is the next logical step be available this March in China, for E Ink,” said Vinita Jakhan- starting at about $440. It will be wal, an analyst at iSuppli. “Ev- positioned as a business prodery display you see, whether uct, with Wi-Fi and 3G wireless it’s a TV or a cell phone, is in connectivity. color.” “It’s possible that we’ll sell Jennifer Colegrove, direc- this in the U.S. as well,” Liu said. tor of display technologies at Hanvon sells other products, like DisplaySearch, said it was a tablets and e-readers, to Amerimilestone moment. “This is a cans online and through Fry’s, a very important development,” regional electronics chain. Colegrove said. “It will bring eE Ink, based in Cambridge, readers to a higher level.” Mass., was bought by Prime E Ink screens have two ad- View Holdings of Taiwan in 2009 vantages over LCD — they use and was recently renamed E Ink far less battery power and they Holdings. To create the color imare readable in the glare of di- age, E Ink uses its standard blackrect sunlight. and-white display overlaid with a However, the new color E color filter. As a result, battery life Ink display, while an important is the same as its black-and-white technological breakthrough, is cousins, measured in weeks rathnot as sharp and colorful as er than hours, as with the iPad. LCD. Unlike an LCD screen, the colors are muted, as if one were looking at a faded color photograph. In addition, E Ink cannot handle full-motion video. At best, it can show simple animations. These are reasons Amazon, Sony and the other major Huge Selection! e-reader makers are not yet UP TO 50% OFF embracing it. Amazon says it will offer color E Ink when it is Amish Crafted Dining Sets ready; the company sees color Solid Lumber ~ Heirloom Quality as useful in cookbooks and children’s books, and it offers

By Eric A. Taub

By Miguel Helft MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Silicon Valley is awash in tales of the “PayPal Mafia,” the tight-knit group of PayPal alumni who have helped one another start and finance a crop of new companies. But William Campbell, who is something of a godfather figure in the Valley, said, in a rare interview, “There is a ‘Netscape Mafia,’ too.” And as Mafia families sometimes do, the Netscape Mafia is coming together for a reunion. On Monday, RockMelt, a company founded and financed by a group of Netscape alumni, released a new Web browser, 16 years after Netscape introduced the first commercial Internet browser, and 12 years after the company was sold to AOL after its defeat by Microsoft in the socalled browser wars. “We think it is a fantastic time to build a company around a browser,” said Marc Andreessen, who co-founded Netscape, and whose venture capital firm, Andreessen Horowitz, is the principal financial backer of RockMelt. Although most people spend more time using their Web browser than any other program on their computers, most browsers have not kept up with the evolution of the Web into a social media hub, Andreessen said. He and Campbell, a former Netscape board member who is advising the new company as well as investing in it, say RockMelt is a browser for the Facebook era.

New e-reader takes ‘next logical step’ — a color E Ink display

Fi technology built into it, this memory card will drain your camera’s battery slightly more than a regular card when it transfers files. And transferring a large video file can drastically drain a battery in minutes. For it to transfer photos, you first need to connect the card with your laptop and program the Wi-Fi network’s name and password into the card. So unless you have your laptop with you, there’s no way to log in to any Wi-Fi network you stumble upon Bottom line: The technology is pretty nifty. But aside from the benefit of never having to plug it into your computer when you get home, it’s more worth the cost for someone who wants to share photos often online and who also carries a mobile hotspot with them — since you probably won’t be taking your laptop along on most trips.

weeks, Microsoft said. “There is no reason to suggest that the momentum that we have seen in the past six weeks is going to slow,” said Ryan Gavin, senior director for Internet Explorer at Microsoft.

ers will be required to log into RockMelt. “This is the beginning of what we think browsers will look like in the next decade,” Vishria said.

A history of browsing

RockMelt is not the first browser built around social networking features. Three years ago, Flock introduced a browser that also makes it easy to share items with sites like Facebook and Twitter. While Flock gained a loyal following, it never broke into the big leagues of the browser market, though it has recently released a well-reviewed upgrade. Industry insiders say that Flock may have been ahead of its time, since it was developed before social networks became mainstream. RockMelt’s timing may give it a better chance at success. “If they build a browser that matches the way people work, it will get some adoption,” said John Lilly, the former chief executive of Mozilla. “But it is hard to make people change their habits.” RockMelt’s backers acknowledge that getting the browser into users’ hands will be a big challenge, but they say that if the product is good enough, it will spread through recommendations. “You hope it is going to happen by word of mouth,” said Cambpell. Noting his ties to Apple, which makes the Safari browser, and Google, which he advised for many years, Campbell added, “I don’t want to be poking at Chrome and Safari, but this is unique.”

RockMelt’s ties to Netscape run deep. The company was cofounded by Tim Howes, 47, and Eric Vishria, 31. Howes, the chief technology officer, is a former Netscape executive who developed some of the most widely used Internet technologies. Vishria did not work at Netscape but was a senior executive at Opsware, the company Andreessen, Howes and Ben Horowitz, Andreessen’s venture capital partner, founded after they left Netscape. Then there is Campbell, a former chief executive of companies like Intuit; Go, a renowned but failed maker of a pen computer; and Claris, which made software for Macintosh computers. He is known in Silicon Valley as the coach. Campbell once coached Columbia’s football team, but he earned the moniker more recently for his role as a behind-the-scenes adviser to a long list of young entrepreneurs and veteran executives, including Steve Jobs of Apple, on whose board he serves, and Eric Schmidt of Google. Campbell is now helping Vishria and Howes with recruitment, organization and management. Howes and Vishria built RockMelt using Chromium, the same open-source browser technology that Google used for Chrome. But unlike Chrome and other major browsers that run entirely on a user’s PC, RockMelt will manage users’ interactions with sites like Facebook and Twitter in its data center. To make that possible, us-

Changing habits

HOLIDAY DINING SET SALE

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

AMISH HOUSE 2620 NE Hwy 20 • Bend Next to Costco • 541-388-4651 www.amishhouse.net


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds AcmePkt h AcordaTh AcornIntl ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdvClayCv AecomTch Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AmLorain AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise Amerisafe AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev AnchBWI h Angiotc gh Anglgld 13 AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArthroCre ArubaNet ArvMerit AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEntRs AsiaInfoL AspenIns AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros Athersys AtlPwr gn AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn

8.05 +.47 23.55 -.34 0.48 21.44 -.23 1.28 61.11 -.77 12.67 -.01 11.76 1.20 57.18 -.58 20.80 +.02 44.42 -.03 1.76 39.00 -.18 0.20 14.01 +.14 16.29 -.20 1.12 30.48 +.33 4.83 +.04 8.76 -.11 26.10 +1.18 6.25 -.21 0.27 33.36 -.84 1.68 29.18 -.09 16.20 +1.09 10.16 -.23 1.94 -.08 0.18 15.12 +.12 8.90 +.20 0.05 20.40 +.02 3.40 +.57 1.76 50.45 -.47 0.70 47.24 +.21 0.42 7.11 +.01 3.55 +.11 26.83 -.35 .72 -.03 0.72 19.90 -.07 0.90 44.98 -.69 6.38 -.16 41.62 -.18 27.70 +.66 0.99 5.84 +.46 1.82 -.03 0.15 11.88 +.58 0.04 23.56 -.41 0.52 53.37 -.13 17.91 -.10 29.29 +.15 0.36 32.84 -.86 0.24 65.97 +.34 4.03 +.04 12.59 -.40 8.14 +.10 1.26 +.16 0.06 4.51 -.16 6.62 +.08 1.13 18.40 +.07 27.76 -.07 6.49 -.05 14.01 -.13 24.67 -.03 1.23 +.01 0.04 31.26 +.23 90.87 -.09 5.46 -.05 4.52 -.09 3.37 +.20 36.18 -.20 0.18 82.51 +2.57 0.11 84.79 -.36 1.96 87.21 +.56 7.46 -.06 7.22 +.20 0.40 9.80 +.04 1.00 68.62 +.06 7.47 0.18 34.64 +.98 54.14 +.86 .51 +.06 5.35 +.06 55.10 -.78 0.86 10.66 +.01 0.56 52.88 -.22 0.34 37.28 +.05 3.20 -.08 0.12 13.96 -.04 3.95 165.77 -1.43 29.01 +.17 1.26 36.65 +.03 1.40 74.21 +.14 7.08 +.30 72.73 +.01 .98 +.01 18.24 -.26 11.91 -.19 0.60 23.63 +.08 0.72 54.01 -1.91 0.75 48.75 -.44 0.20 69.48 -1.34 62.52 -.43 4.34 -.13 0.48 8.36 -.03 1.51 25.05 -.22 1.58 37.22 -.41 .99 +.16 27.95 +.48 0.80 59.93 +1.16 5.81 +.28 4.56 +.22 19.36 -.13 0.80 31.03 -.24 3.14 +.08 48.26 +3.81 2.26 -.04 0.40 7.48 -.07 0.66 5.95 +.04 0.25 15.95 -.05 .67 +.05 0.24 33.81 +.62 0.48 19.73 -.03 1.52 25.87 -.24 0.15 8.93 -.12 2.68 +.03 4.23 144.32 +.80 3.14 +.13 171.99 +1.22 .52 +.02 26.97 27.68 +.46 1.54 29.54 -.29 44.39 +.63 1.31 59.20 -.28 1.19 +.06 10.53 +.42 1.35 33.17 -.22 5.60 29.37 -.06 7.59 -.07 0.44 16.52 +.04 1.84 36.93 -.31 0.08 11.27 -.14 0.72 43.90 -.17 0.65 31.42 -.27 6.38 7.53 -.17 44.63 -.98 2.84 +.07 19.30 -.16 9.62 +.05 2.99 +.01 37.24 +.25 52.37 +.45 0.88 24.72 -.09 0.72 54.45 -.57 17.91 -.41 0.32 31.45 -.23 0.36 56.20 -.38 55.29 -.13 6.84 +.05 0.06 52.48 -.40 13.35 +.30 0.36 64.71 -2.90 5.98 +.05 1.27 -.02 0.88 35.42 -.11 .75 +.22 .27 -.01 3.00 56.72 +.67 0.18 49.93 +.62 0.49 60.79 -.77 3.25 58.42 +.43 24.22 -.13 2.60 17.80 -.11 1.45 +.09 47.67 +1.61 1.57 +.09 .97 -.03 0.92 7.11 +.04 0.60 41.47 -.31 9.91 -.05 0.60 109.51 +.82 0.40 25.46 +.02 36.77 +1.03 1.12 11.19 -.22 318.62 +1.49 .98 +.07 0.28 12.80 -.18 11.05 +.17 1.86 +.09 0.62 21.82 -.11 .29 -.03 0.75 36.12 90.02 +.10 0.40 29.61 +1.31 0.60 31.19 -.16 1.53 -.02 1.40 17.25 +.01 3.71 -.05 19.59 -.18 0.12 25.01 -.49 0.12 17.02 -.24 1.44 7.38 +.10 49.61 -.22 10.12 -.01 31.03 -.25 .91 -.02 5.97 -.01 28.97 +.50 23.15 +.02 18.18 -.34 4.82 +.40 10.11 -.59 0.60 55.80 +4.86 10.70 +.51 20.60 +.14 0.60 29.19 +.11 0.04 13.40 -.12 0.68 14.78 -.32 0.64 41.22 -.17 0.18 19.69 -.32 0.52 12.83 -.34 2.41 49.69 -.41 40.80 -.25 32.65 -.35 2.88 +.12 1.09 13.71 +.11 61.03 -.16 31.72 +1.22 1.40 19.85 -.08 10.46 +.18 1.36 30.31 -.10 36.35 +.85 4.02 -.08 8.03 +.43 26.54 +.16

Nm Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B2B Inet BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp Ballanty BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkLtdD BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BttmlnT BovieMed BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNA Sure CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb h Cardero g CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardioNet Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g

D 35.41 -.27 1.40 75.67 -.36 1.36 45.47 -.37 242.85 +2.98 21.03 -.54 25.25 -.12 3.57 110.65 -2.68 4.96 +.17 0.80 37.43 -.56 4.28 -.10 13.81 +.02 1.00 21.90 -.17 31.04 -.40 0.88 29.23 -.55 2.58 +.05 0.84 35.92 -.01 .74 -.03 0.60 25.27 -.31 0.68 12.81 -.85 1.83 33.24 -.16 36.93 -1.53 0.48 7.96 +.35 1.74 90.97 -1.17 1.74 79.01 -.93 36.02 +1.37 42.78 -.19 46.34 +.17 9.82 43.23 -.56 4.17 +.05 1.50 45.70 -.21 0.10 15.12 +.04 5.88 +.82 23.36 +.27 110.40 +1.60 0.60 50.32 +.38 0.68 44.29 -.32 0.40 65.55 -.51 7.07 -.48 37.10 -.66 0.57 11.91 -.36 0.51 22.32 -.18 0.80 11.90 -.04 0.33 15.57 +.26 0.88 13.87 -.13 0.04 12.60 +.24 7.25 +.20 2.72 +.14 2.16 26.49 +.27 1.80 45.06 -.37 1.04 2.47 -.11 2.80 60.45 -.17 0.36 28.07 -.10 .90 -.05 0.04 1.87 +.02 46.61 +.24 24.66 -.04 82.77 -.87 8.65 +.65 0.22 18.55 -.32 69.12 +.54 11.29 +.15 0.72 84.75 -.25 1.00 14.77 +.05 0.32 19.07 -.24 0.48 51.21 +2.00 12.35 +.54 1.16 51.46 -.06 .27 4.65 +.14 0.10 6.66 -.01 0.76 54.85 -.30 1.48 77.56 +.02 44.96 -.17 6.32 +.06 0.92 31.52 -.22 0.28 28.15 -.39 82.32 -1.40 0.30 37.93 +.62 0.60 44.83 +.08 30.19 +.07 38.40 +1.23 5.44 +.19 2.01 +.13 63.03 +.25 25.74 +.03 0.68 18.98 -.29 1.61 -.02 4.61 +.07 1.28 11.99 +.13 42.15 -.61 4.00 169.09 -4.06 0.32 4.04 +.03 0.98 9.02 -.07 2.28 19.53 -.11 0.17 2.22 +.04 1.36 10.85 -.01 1.05 17.74 +.14 1.09 14.14 -.26 0.40 14.08 -.07 0.60 12.35 +.13 27.89 -.11 1.68 70.21 -1.06 0.40 8.10 +.12 .84 +.06 1.23 +.01 59.12 -.14 0.04 5.52 -.10 2.00 89.33 -.82 6.79 -.13 18.74 -.14 2.64 +.37 9.98 +.22 0.60 12.05 -.15 23.61 +.35 1.56 20.60 +1.18 15.63 +.54 0.44 18.51 -.13 23.56 +.39 9.18 +.15 1.71 -.04 0.56 18.84 -.05 0.40 26.12 -.19 1.28 26.47 -.22 42.09 +.78 0.32 42.48 +.14 0.60 21.39 -.12 1.89 -.04 6.06 5.55 +.15 20.06 -.46 0.52 31.55 -.01 0.56 18.63 +.06 0.34 10.20 7.50 +.02 0.32 23.03 15.35 0.05 17.18 -.26 0.16 18.74 -.83 0.80 34.00 +.14 0.10 72.03 -1.74 0.46 55.37 +1.17 48.90 -.29 0.92 59.81 -.44 0.16 23.58 +.12 19.90 +.05 6.35 +.01 0.80 18.37 -.10 0.40 24.87 +.22 0.20 16.82 -.19 20.85 +1.06 0.40 124.77 +2.30 1.00 72.17 +.38 0.04 36.83 -.53 42.87 -.59 1.00 31.64 -.07 4.60 295.82 +.79 0.84 18.25 -.13 28.08 -.40 23.62 +.26 5.99 -.06 5.28 233.67 +4.24 0.26 24.08 +1.24 1.04 62.23 +.43 0.52 23.00 -.53 0.34 8.31 -.18 11.67 -.05 0.35 31.23 +.29 22.95 -.16 0.50 29.32 +.62 0.12 32.54 +.36 8.04 +.14 8.53 -.08 5.30 -.05 1.14 13.24 +.02 0.60 8.48 -.02 0.63 9.25 -.02 15.44 +.12 0.04 7.25 -.04 5.66 -.08 12.48 +.08 2.69 -.13 1.80 52.32 -.35 0.28 35.74 +2.48 45.90 -.23 1.10 36.39 -.22 1.08 63.93 -.57 0.30 39.53 +.07 1.08 65.17 -.63 16.28 +.43 .36 48.03 -.10 4.49 -.04 0.20 40.08 -.28 0.93 8.62 -.08 0.04 6.41 -.07 1.66 11.65 -.03 .79 1.43 +.09 0.78 35.22 +.01 4.69 -.11 5.66 -.17 17.52 -.34 23.42 -.69 17.76 +.27 0.68 36.68 -.06 32.88 +.53 0.40 43.95 -.75 24.65 +.16 28.55 +.50 0.54 39.46 -.29 42.85 -.59 1.76 83.12 -.42 0.04 14.67 +.08 35.54 +.34 0.36 6.59 +.10 .70 +.04 0.20 38.87 -.20 5.86 +.04 9.26 +.10 60.96 -.26 .40 +.01 4.84 +.14 0.43 9.80 +.14 0.86 17.90 0.80 29.44 +.04 22.65 +.02 0.78 16.55 -.13 1.56 14.30 -.06 25.74 -.45 0.01 19.04 +.26

Nm CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaArc h ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChCBlood n ChinaDir ChiElMot n ChinaFd ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinaInf h ChinaIntEn ChIntLtg n CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinaNRes ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRitar ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTDv lf ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinWind n ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogentC Cogent Cognex CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s Compellent CompPrdS CmptrPr CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costamre n Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrimsnEx n Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crucell Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CushTRet Cyclacel CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DDi Corp DG FastCh DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom

D 14.65 -.16 2.90 42.43 -.14 6.25 -.07 65.91 -.20 21.83 -.10 11.01 +.06 88.09 +.27 32.67 +.72 31.39 -.07 3.81 +.28 43.35 18.50 +.26 29.80 4.80 -.06 3.58 -.12 1.70 19.55 +.86 0.30 22.70 +.43 2.88 84.80 -.18 28.44 +.48 0.16 10.94 +.43 46.05 +1.11 0.69 4.01 -.04 15.87 +1.16 .85 +.05 4.33 +.57 17.48 +.60 2.33 +.13 13.80 +.19 4.16 +.19 1.39 +.06 6.18 +.53 0.26 35.23 +.52 1.91 +.14 8.58 +1.00 6.47 +.16 .61 +.04 9.74 +.55 3.30 +.20 17.92 -.40 1.54 70.50 +1.70 23.05 +1.25 6.79 +.13 21.25 +1.64 12.24 -.16 1.85 53.13 +.09 6.94 -.05 15.57 +2.27 0.28 5.37 +.25 16.91 +2.14 7.65 +.45 2.79 100.31 -1.19 1.73 +.09 3.26 +.07 5.92 +.07 2.89 +.08 4.79 +.09 2.51 +.18 0.23 14.20 -.09 11.24 +.74 5.12 +.48 0.35 27.07 -.14 27.65 +1.76 229.90 -.66 12.29 -.16 1.48 58.92 -.55 1.27 24.59 +.27 0.68 66.17 +.16 3.44 -.06 14.47 +.10 0.32 80.96 +1.08 2.61 -.01 1.60 30.37 -.37 0.84 18.57 +.22 0.49 28.10 -.10 13.64 -.25 24.39 +.13 4.44 -.05 .66 +.00 65.38 +.07 0.40 56.18 +.07 4.99 +.01 1.74 +.05 15.49 +.14 1.40 21.57 +.17 6.53 -.40 0.56 70.89 -.21 2.20 63.11 +.53 19.81 +1.03 0.60 53.02 +.10 0.48 24.75 +.14 1.76 62.46 -.12 24.71 +1.23 11.81 +.17 10.50 +.01 0.32 29.27 -.32 62.99 -.37 8.02 +.22 0.96 17.19 -.19 0.72 9.10 +.02 1.20 14.60 -.18 61.59 -.15 3.47 -.07 2.12 77.52 -.05 16.89 +.22 0.60 18.91 -.56 0.38 20.91 -.13 0.38 19.71 -.15 0.20 38.82 +.18 0.94 38.52 -.28 0.48 14.70 +.14 16.04 +.51 2.00 26.23 -.09 32.17 +.72 32.55 +.30 30.62 +.42 0.35 40.64 -.31 24.24 +.58 26.89 +.30 1.44 49.30 +2.05 0.60 48.97 -.77 10.24 -.04 24.64 +.41 6.63 -.82 0.40 34.41 -.91 0.92 22.26 +.12 15.45 +.50 77.73 +.81 53.97 -.08 1.45 -.01 2.20 62.41 +.60 0.40 40.71 +1.41 2.38 50.68 -.32 23.80 -.24 20.04 -.03 0.96 30.58 -.14 50.04 +.11 11.83 -.06 .46 1.08 53.86 -.36 0.42 21.81 +.23 1.09 50.67 -1.19 2.30 28.59 +.03 34.68 +.19 1.09 24.83 -.07 0.24 82.08 +.31 18.32 +.09 4.16 +.13 0.56 44.41 +.60 0.20 18.98 +.10 1.65 35.93 -.40 25.98 -.27 13.89 -.01 11.40 -.35 0.82 64.81 -.59 8.31 -.04 1.75 23.60 0.12 7.68 +.03 44.53 +.15 1.50 15.47 -.18 26.52 +1.65 0.80 41.35 -.38 6.15 +.26 1.70 127.52 +.91 1.85 44.13 +.33 0.32 3.01 +.01 55.48 +.99 3.11 +.13 15.82 +1.36 .23 +.01 0.28 8.95 +.06 42.58 -.37 32.79 +.29 32.18 -.32 .35 -.01 47.39 -.13 23.49 +.05 1.80 55.33 -.42 1.05 95.40 -.99 0.01 138.67 -1.16 0.90 9.75 +.01 1.51 -.09 4.02 15.35 +.02 2.40 13.61 -.09 .87 +.01 0.05 51.12 -1.38 .51 +.02 4.38 -.11 0.28 5.00 +.03 0.40 11.11 +.37 27.07 -.67 .73 +.06 0.78 10.00 -.01 1.21 26.75 -.31 0.15 12.02 +.04 0.60 43.15 -.15 38.35 +.02 2.24 46.48 -.35 14.79 -.23 0.08 44.29 -.71 14.32 +.51 1.28 48.03 -.16 10.30 -.18 72.03 +.26 0.20 47.46 +.09 18.52 +.07 10.36 -.19 62.66 +.10 11.84 +.22 1.20 78.67 -.43 .35 -.01 0.36 15.47 +.80 9.13 +.50 14.29 -.17 14.09 -.17 .82 +.03 1.00 22.37 +.12 18.71 +.11 34.23 -.84 2.80 +.29 3.48 -.01 0.20 31.27 -.45 5.19 +.08 0.93 58.40 -.58 13.68 +.09 42.36 +.86 8.10 -.18 0.08 13.85 -.23 0.64 71.56 +.78 6.88 -.02 11.01 +.16

Nm

D

Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DuoyGWat Duoyuan Dynavax Dynegy rs

2.38 74.93 -.35 0.50 72.29 +2.49 0.03 10.85 -.20 14.03 +.41 31.03 +1.28 2.12 54.97 -1.77 38.02 +.56 0.16 28.40 -.06 51.39 +.05 23.22 -.08 42.83 +.11 6.26 44.60 +.32 5.68 42.80 -.43 19.49 +.07 0.20 17.75 +.23 30.45 -.40 0.01 43.64 +.06 20.82 +.20 10.63 +.21 25.90 -.58 7.35 40.10 -.41 3.41 61.30 -1.01 4.77 60.55 -.14 9.89 +.05 8.06 65.03 -.29 5.06 45.14 +.58 0.08 18.94 +.03 40.97 -.14 35.69 +.06 .23 +.02 2.00 20.05 -.76 0.35 37.06 -.14 0.24 39.97 +.10 69.23 -.28 28.38 +.38 47.82 -.31 52.69 -.29 1.83 43.09 -.41 15.47 +.32 1.00 82.72 +.78 0.50 51.05 +.05 1.04 17.79 -.13 1.66 -.16 1.97 0.40 18.13 -.11 1.10 54.54 -.54 0.60 32.35 -.15 1.00 36.58 -.57 7.03 -.66 34.66 -.76 24.43 +.13 38.82 +.44 0.52 4.72 +.02 74.34 +1.11 1.72 +.04 4.85 +.16 1.64 48.37 +.19 0.48 24.30 -.45 0.98 18.43 -.06 0.68 12.83 -.10 13.43 +.14 2.78 +.03 2.12 +.06 4.46 +.02

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch ETF Pall n EV Engy EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc s EchoGLog EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts eMagin EBrasAero Emcore EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPtrs EnCana g s EncoreEn EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTEq EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entercom Entergy EntPrPt EntGaming EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar EpiCpt rsh EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EtfSilver Eurand EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FairIsaac FairchldS FalconStor FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird 51job Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCashFn FstHorizon FstInRT FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr

0.25 17.40 +.10 15.20 -.10 30.84 -.03 21.88 +.31 26.99 -.36 2.51 45.73 -.61 0.62 89.46 +.85 0.88 38.55 +.19 7.13 -.43 70.52 +2.10 3.03 38.33 -.18 5.45 +.07 0.10 7.33 -.01 0.64 9.17 -.10 0.04 18.76 -.05 1.76 79.75 +.03 4.88 +.05 2.32 93.36 -.52 0.72 31.50 -.25 1.39 16.73 +.12 1.80 13.39 -.09 1.23 14.63 -.11 1.62 12.04 -.02 1.53 11.55 +.01 1.56 12.85 -.01 1.60 13.40 -.08 26.28 +1.10 11.26 -.64 21.70 +.05 0.62 49.67 +.02 1.34 51.92 +.33 1.26 37.56 -.66 0.20 7.89 -.11 66.16 +.53 3.20 +.22 0.04 13.45 -.01 26.39 -.20 1.64 34.89 +.29 5.53 -.04 0.05 18.94 +.11 16.53 +.20 4.27 +.14 0.38 30.58 -.64 1.34 +.07 1.38 56.86 -.42 .78 -.02 11.06 +.11 11.42 +.14 4.11 61.96 -.13 0.80 29.52 +.49 2.00 20.02 +.18 1.25 -.02 6.41 +.54 35.77 -.12 1.00 43.85 -.60 4.55 -.05 30.56 -.16 70.11 +2.51 4.55 +.09 3.60 +.03 2.16 40.06 +.21 23.22 +.05 4.70 +.07 2.16 29.19 -.47 0.68 25.12 -.17 27.63 +.01 1.40 50.30 +.16 6.58 +.20 7.93 -.35 3.32 75.21 -.19 2.33 43.77 -.25 .40 -.01 2.60 49.61 +.43 2.95 +.22 9.14 -.01 10.73 -.11 .54 -.06 9.58 +.07 0.64 34.70 -.04 84.92 +1.65 0.88 18.72 -.21 1.35 50.17 -.67 0.28 10.67 -.22 0.55 71.83 -.33 27.64 +.95 11.05 -.64 1.92 87.98 -.84 .79 -.09 1.02 +.09 6.33 -.19 15.77 -.64 6.42 +.06 0.16 18.74 +.40 4.20 -.16 2.10 41.34 +.17 6.25 +.12 7.37 -.06 0.28 28.02 +.72 0.40 51.26 -.52 14.57 +.20 53.04 +.28 2.78 +.07 22.08 -.71 0.33 17.14 -.18 2.95 -.08 1.76 70.32 +.32 25.02 +.55 122.82 -.18 22.40 -.84 28.64 +.03 0.50 77.03 +.15 78.53 +.47 0.48 9.09 -.11 3.01 -.12 33.76 0.08 25.18 -.30 12.52 -.05 2.39 -.14 0.62 48.43 0.84 53.18 -.56 0.48 90.31 +.31 2.68 82.03 -.51 0.24 6.07 -.03 0.96 25.39 -.07 6.56 -.04 15.19 +.34 18.40 -.31 0.72 13.80 -.30 0.20 27.76 -.19 1.26 12.12 +.08 0.04 13.05 +.02 49.33 +4.29 19.50 +.21 0.16 15.99 -.18 0.24 14.35 -.25 .33 +.02 30.14 +.20 0.72 10.55 +.15 7.94 +.14 0.60 12.30 -.14 140.26 +1.43 0.03 25.16 +.08 2.20 36.05 +.16 0.64 18.40 -.33 55.71 -.07 1.31 +.04 7.17 -.04 1.96 -.08 0.80 25.88 +.25 1.16 105.67 +1.49 0.50 55.72 +1.19 26.15 +.15 0.64 56.06 +.68 0.60 16.45 -.16 5.20 -.03 16.41 +.20 7.74 +.24 3.25 51.35 15.82 +.12 32.84 -.40 34.47 +.33 10.71 +.18 30.98 -.31 5.02 -.01 0.76 54.27 +.07

Nm

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt FreshMkt n Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Funtalk n Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GSI Tech GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt Geeknet GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr wi vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenesisEn Genoptix Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp Gerdau GeronCp GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GblXChCon GblX Gold GblX Uran GlbXLith n GlbXSilvM GlblXChiM GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn Grtbatch GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GugGTimb GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HQ SustM HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HghwyH HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HooperH HorizTFn n Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH

D 63.97 +1.75 27.57 +.36 1.77 23.91 -.22 0.88 121.92 -2.67 2.00 105.28 +.44 .04 +.00 0.20 22.50 +.20 32.04 -.07 9.29 +.69 0.75 9.12 +.12 14.81 +.21 1.90 27.80 -.07 36.45 -.02 1.56 +.29 0.28 21.24 -.40 0.12 9.22 -.19 6.90 +.48 8.05 +.40 5.03 +.03 10.40 +.05 1.12 32.85 -.58 0.20 4.80 -.09 4.46 +.07 26.02 +.29 7.23 +.06 9.46 +.62 0.84 14.92 -.07 0.48 5.53 1.68 18.47 +.10 0.14 17.49 -.42 1.28 28.48 -.35 20.53 +.54 6.91 -.20 0.16 12.84 +.38 0.40 20.71 -.10 0.20 61.47 +.42 1.50 30.49 -.68 31.58 +.21 .36 3.91 +.13 33.76 -.69 2.14 +.03 17.75 +.57 4.89 -.10 31.14 -.46 1.68 69.40 -.26 0.48 16.71 -.02 14.10 +.10 17.80 +.05 0.04 4.36 +.14 1.12 36.71 +.18 5.83 +.43 2.76 -.20 1.55 24.54 +.26 18.25 +.03 0.18 15.29 -.08 0.44 22.04 -.06 1.64 48.12 -.12 .52 -.01 11.96 -.47 71.06 -.63 25.69 -.72 0.21 13.53 +.14 5.77 +.17 1.70 27.89 +.07 38.83 -.12 2.00 40.50 -.35 2.47 +.08 0.40 8.21 -.12 2.86 -.12 6.46 +.28 0.08 40.93 +.60 4.65 -.32 21.16 +.06 17.33 +.53 19.13 +1.92 21.11 +.11 24.08 +1.20 15.98 +.25 0.15 17.10 +.22 0.40 17.55 -.34 0.16 17.23 +.37 0.36 47.61 +1.38 26.58 +.52 5.96 +.18 1.53 24.43 -.25 1.40 169.20 -1.87 1.16 86.10 -.26 13.54 +.13 10.66 +.19 626.77 +1.69 33.68 +.05 0.80 36.24 +.24 18.76 -.35 2.16 127.03 -1.16 2.34 +.10 7.49 +.03 18.50 +.30 0.52 26.46 +.16 2.02 -.03 3.88 +.10 2.99 +.05 0.07 7.20 +.06 0.83 19.38 -.03 22.39 -.21 34.40 -.23 11.98 +.17 19.63 +.07 38.76 +.56 1.08 -.07 16.09 -.25 0.52 23.40 +.23 0.64 41.64 +.43 0.03 33.38 +.25 0.05 21.03 +.05 8.78 +.08 10.43 +1.06 18.22 +.27 1.22 +.14 65.20 -.03 0.58 28.11 -.09 1.86 36.03 -.36 3.54 +.24 1.70 55.71 +.16 26.77 +.53 26.54 +.13 0.36 33.43 +1.51 7.35 -.14 25.36 +.07 1.20 1.55 -.01 50.97 -.57 21.49 -.29 0.40 32.42 -1.21 39.97 +.09 6.74 -.04 0.07 12.51 +.16 1.00 46.13 -1.20 0.82 23.92 -.22 0.20 26.24 -.18 1.00 47.32 +.06 4.60 29.97 +.02 1.24 23.14 -.20 7.33 +.13 3.78 -.03 2.76 50.47 +.19 8.70 +.07 1.20 24.43 -.51 29.35 +.67 18.20 -.18 27.95 +.13 0.08 15.27 -.20 4.47 +.14 8.96 +1.03 1.80 48.83 -.42 13.97 +.30 0.24 43.74 +.04 .50 -.00 57.66 +.26 1.00 66.65 +.97 2.72 +.07 0.20 6.08 -.15 1.28 48.46 -.03 12.24 -.05 0.40 70.47 +.49 0.32 44.25 +.53 17.74 -.41 24.66 +1.18 0.08 3.73 +1.08 1.70 33.52 -.40 0.41 40.16 -.27 0.75 21.37 -.05 0.60 32.92 +.67 13.94 -.11 16.28 +.45 0.95 31.49 -.43 45.10 -.84 35.74 +.76 36.36 +.61 1.21 49.11 -.17 .68 -.06 14.45 -.40 0.84 45.75 -.19 21.55 +.94 11.62 +.27

Nm Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubbelB HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 59.11 -.43 1.80 24.13 +.05 0.04 16.93 -.19 0.28 5.89 -.01 4.20 +.16 1.44 55.00 -1.24 0.60 11.76 -.22 1.37 20.97 +.48 24.48 -.83 59.62 +.06 0.48 37.16 -.08 0.04 5.96 +.02 0.40 13.68 -.03 41.38 -1.19 6.68 +.14 3.34 +.11

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 28.67 +.09 IAMGld g 0.06 18.58 +.08 ICICI Bk 0.53 56.93 -.64 IdexxLabs 62.68 +.87 IDT Corp 17.50 +2.00 IDT Cp C 17.38 +5.02 IESI-BFC g 0.50 22.32 +.33 iGateCorp 0.26 21.68 +.82 ING GRE 0.54 7.93 -.01 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.71 -.07 ING 11.07 -.04 INGPrRTr 0.31 5.86 +.12 ION Geoph 6.51 +.45 IPG Photon 25.99 +.79 iPass 0.07 1.28 +.08 iShGold s 13.80 +.15 iShGSCI 32.73 +.14 iSAstla 0.81 26.02 -.25 iSAstria 0.76 21.43 -.17 iShBraz 2.58 80.82 -.34 iSCan 0.42 30.15 +.14 iShEMU 0.96 37.12 -.34 iShGer 0.30 24.40 -.17 iSh HK 0.48 20.23 +.05 iShItaly 0.45 17.82 -.07 iShJapn 0.16 10.34 iSh Kor 0.39 57.13 -.31 iSMalas 0.25 14.21 -.13 iShMex 0.75 59.63 +.13 iShNeth 0.39 21.35 -.16 iShSing 0.38 14.35 +.04 iSPacxJpn 1.37 48.63 -.28 iShSoAfr 1.36 72.06 +.07 iSSpain 2.26 41.21 -.47 iSSwedn 0.61 29.60 -.27 iSTaiwn 0.21 14.36 -.05 iSh UK 0.44 17.70 -.16 iShThai 1.20 68.49 +.57 iShChile 0.68 78.30 +.07 iShSilver 27.15 +.95 iShS&P100 1.08 55.29 -.08 iShDJDv 1.69 49.05 -.25 iShBTips 2.56 111.65 +.15 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 65.50 -.06 iShChina25 0.68 47.93 +.10 iShDJTr 1.01 88.98 +.06 iSSP500 2.34 122.92 -.23 iShBAgB 3.70 108.57 -.05 iShEMkts 0.59 48.30 -.20 iShiBxB 5.30 112.80 +.06 iSh ACWI 0.64 46.33 -.18 iShEMBd 5.63 113.10 -.57 iSSPGth 1.13 64.42 -.06 iSSPGlbEn 0.82 37.26 -.11 iShSPLatA 1.22 54.49 -.04 iSSPVal 1.24 57.58 -.21 iShB20 T 3.83 98.42 +.44 iShB7-10T 3.23 99.43 +.03 iShIntSelDv 1.40 34.03 -.27 iShB1-3T 0.98 84.35 -.04 iS Eafe 1.38 58.84 -.37 iSRusMCV 0.83 43.43 -.09 iSRusMCG 0.52 53.65 +.07 iShRsMd 1.42 97.20 -.04 iSSPMid 0.99 86.00 -.04 iShiBxHYB 7.88 91.52 -.27 iShs SOX 0.44 53.21 -.01 iShNsdqBio 88.26 -.35 iShC&SRl 1.85 67.17 -.48 iSR1KV 1.28 62.81 -.18 iSR1KG 0.72 55.76 -.02 iSRus1K 1.11 67.85 -.07 iSR2KV 1.06 67.61 -.13 iShBarc1-3 3.16 105.00 -.11 iSR2KG 0.47 81.65 +.04 iShR2K 0.79 73.71 -.06 iShBShtT 0.08 110.22 iShUSPfd 2.89 39.61 -.06 iShDJTch 0.26 63.83 +.16 iShREst 1.88 57.34 -.28 iShDJHm 0.08 12.27 +.02 iShFnSc 0.59 55.97 -.39 iShSPSm 0.58 64.60 -.06 iShBasM 0.91 72.49 +.45 iShDJOE 0.28 50.56 +.46 iShEur350 1.02 40.47 -.34 iStar 5.50 -.18 ITT Corp 1.00 48.55 -.13 ITT Ed 61.45 +1.45 icad h 1.50 +.02 Icon PLC 20.19 +.10 IconixBr 17.66 +.52 iGo Inc 2.77 +.08 Ikanos 1.27 +.15 ITW 1.36 48.60 +.24 Illumina 57.18 +.89 Imax Corp 22.50 +.63 Immucor 18.73 +.84 ImunoGn 8.00 Imunmd 3.55 -.15 ImpaxLabs 18.69 -.16 Incyte 16.00 -.12 IndiaFd 0.09 40.59 -.24 IndoTel 1.25 36.81 +1.14 Inergy 2.82 40.28 +.33 Infinera 8.74 +.20 InfoSpace 7.77 +.07 Informat 41.00 +.15 InfosysT 0.90 67.98 -.98 IngerRd 0.28 41.06 +.03 IngrmM 18.18 -.08 InlandRE 0.57 9.19 InovioPhm 1.23 +.02 InsightEnt 13.46 +.39 InsitTc 22.93 +.29 Insmed h .73 InspPhar 7.00 Insteel 0.12 8.95 -.01 Insulet 14.30 -.14 IntgDv 6.35 +.03 ISSI 7.76 +.08 IntegrysE 2.72 52.40 -.92 Intel 0.63 21.23 -.01 InteractBrk 18.83 -.25 interClick 5.90 -.03 IntcntlEx 117.33 -.11 InterDig 36.61 +2.25 Interline 20.01 -.33 Intermec 12.74 +.15 InterMune 13.83 -.10 InterNAP 5.08 -.21 IBM 2.60 146.46 +.19 Intl Coal 6.39 +.23 IntFlav 1.08 53.62 +.39 IntlGame 0.24 16.35 -.20 IntPap 0.50 26.50 +.06 IntlRectif 27.67 +.17 IntTower g 8.47 +.05 InterOil g 80.26 +1.83 Interpublic 10.53 -.11 Intersil 0.48 13.56 -.08 IntraLks n 19.59 -1.44 IntPotash 32.51 +.13 Intuit 48.55 +.10 IntSurg 277.10 -1.17 Invesco 0.44 23.57 -.67 InvMtgCap 3.57 22.63 -.02 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.77 +.04 IridiumCm 8.96 +.27 IronMtn 0.25 22.82 -.08 IsilonSys 27.31 -.64 Isis 9.70 -.20 ItauUnibH 0.59 26.08 -.16 Itron 61.50 +.79 IvanhoeEn 2.71 -.01 IvanhM g 26.08 -.42 Ixia 16.87 +.16 JCrew 34.65 +.64 JA Solar 9.41 -.02 JDASoft 26.78 +.59 JDS Uniph 11.96 +.56 JPMorgCh 0.20 40.51 -.43 JPMAlerian 1.80 36.60 +.11 Jabil 0.28 15.66 +.03 JackHenry 0.38 27.98 -.06 JackInBox 22.87 -.61 JacksnHew 1.06 +.04 JacobsEng 42.76 +.28

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct n KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KandiTech KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LMI Aer LRAD LSB Inds LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeGaga n LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq Luminex LyonBas A LyonBas B

D 7.61 +.04 19.22 -.26 2.53 +.06 18.61 +.84 0.04 12.02 -.22 0.33 32.60 +.18 14.97 +.69 0.30 25.80 +.40 7.59 +.05 36.28 +.29 47.25 +.74 1.70 -.01 2.16 64.33 -.32 0.52 37.34 +.54 0.20 14.72 -.23 0.20 86.58 +.18 1.25 -.01 44.61 +.36 0.70 75.11 -.22 34.19 -.20 12.10 -.22 47.68 -.07 0.25 12.33 +.09 0.20 27.36 +.28 13.97 -.70 0.23 13.22 -.03 0.56 9.23 +.09 1.00 37.92 +.35 21.34 +.30 6.47 +.25 46.84 +.31 14.87 -.08 1.92 27.48 +.18 1.62 49.32 13.88 +.98 0.48 35.31 +.12 5.28 -.10 10.43 +.16 0.04 8.33 -.07 1.40 35.10 -.09 2.64 62.82 -.21 0.72 18.14 +.06 4.44 70.25 +.21 14.88 +.29 40.20 +.29 14.18 +.03 0.10 19.14 +.30 13.00 -.19 13.99 -.04 0.24 18.26 -.35 1.20 24.08 +.53 4.23 +.10 53.25 -.05 1.16 31.12 +.04 28.87 -.10 5.96 +.21 0.42 22.71 -.40 6.62 +.01 10.12 +.69 11.81 +.03 1.60 73.62 -.28 0.46 31.00 -.19 13.49 +.31 17.99 +.04 5.48 -.16 22.43 -.16 14.60 -1.70 2.73 +.16 23.57 +2.02 5.59 -.02 6.72 +.13 8.74 +.21 83.00 +.01 3.13 -.01 48.37 +.74 33.32 -.45 0.20 38.91 -.17 52.80 +.82 0.44 25.20 +.10 4.86 -.08 9.18 -.04 0.50 38.38 +.47 9.54 -.06 11.59 -.19 6.06 +.43 91.16 +1.16 2.10 +.12 0.24 34.73 -.68 1.08 20.39 -.11 0.40 30.76 +.04 0.16 16.13 +.28 0.60 41.75 +.09 27.23 -.07 .89 -.03 1.56 -.07 0.40 8.86 +.16 39.51 +.32 10.62 +.03 0.29 4.70 38.91 -.52 36.58 -.50 15.39 +.11 59.95 +.74 1.90 34.49 -.33 51.55 38.86 +.11 35.05 +.43 12.00 1.96 35.73 +.01 6.60 0.60 32.09 +.28 0.80 26.59 +.59 1.00 15.11 -.26 0.04 24.93 -.50 0.92 32.94 -.01 2.64 36.14 3.77 -.19 0.20 13.10 +.44 9.70 -.11 9.88 +.70 6.80 1.45 4.41 -.13 4.39 +.03 3.00 73.29 +.02 3.11 +.09 0.25 39.87 -.21 19.51 +.44 40.15 +.10 41.98 +.24 3.79 +.29 4.50 89.22 +.30 8.81 +.77 0.44 22.09 -.20 1.44 108.88 +.63 0.50 50.97 -.44 49.55 +1.46 21.78 -.16 16.80 28.85 +.50 28.81 +.47

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MMTrip n MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MkVNucEn MktV Indo MktV Viet

2.80 82.22 -.48 10.00 +.53 0.04 16.55 +.06 12.10 -.24 0.37 7.28 +.04 1.00 29.02 -.06 0.63 20.50 +.12 7.42 +.36 12.90 +.17 8.23 +.03 0.90 7.97 -.11 0.58 6.98 +.01 9.29 -.38 12.92 +.81 14.47 -.57 3.08 +.18 37.32 +.25 2.00 49.00 -.40 1.80 34.34 -.05 0.20 25.57 .62 +.12 48.96 +.19 2.98 55.67 -.35 0.50 3.45 +.10 4.33 +.09 1.20 99.80 +.34 5.00 +.08 32.00 -.09 11.48 +.12 0.08 11.89 +.02 5.45 -.09 0.74 57.00 -.50 0.52 15.31 +.55 1.00 33.93 +.01 26.54 +.26 0.11 61.77 +1.68 21.10 -.04 0.08 35.61 -.62 41.82 +1.31 0.42 52.00 -.04 0.45 62.69 -.79 0.42 24.79 +.93 0.18 91.19 +.76 0.04 25.13 -.14

Nm MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth MeridBio Mesab Metalico Metalline MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerPet Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NN Inc NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NamTai Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs Navarre NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus

D 0.31 2.56 0.35 0.84 0.04

43.59 +.79 41.10 +.62 39.47 -.08 25.98 +.01 5.54 4.45 +.11 1.60 89.07 +2.11 20.77 -.03 0.30 11.60 +.04 2.00 29.64 -.52 0.24 46.83 -.11 14.86 -.05 0.60 252.76 -3.53 0.75 23.91 -.03 0.84 23.02 +.35 3.28 +.04 1.04 44.81 +.11 15.97 -.15 2.44 79.31 +.01 0.94 38.64 -.67 0.72 65.62 -.68 16.93 +.10 47.33 +.01 0.90 59.23 -.21 0.12 9.93 +.03 0.92 26.73 +.27 25.51 -.48 14.39 -.30 18.50 -.04 60.00 +.88 6.95 -.08 0.80 11.51 +.12 12.33 +.05 0.24 28.15 -.62 24.39 +.34 11.75 -.30 0.90 35.34 -.01 6.86 +.29 0.36 25.91 -.03 10.94 +.01 65.12 +3.88 6.84 +.27 1.52 35.62 -.08 0.92 34.53 -.29 3.13 -.11 0.76 23.36 +.20 2.39 43.69 +2.03 4.70 +.16 .68 +.04 0.74 41.59 -.51 12.21 +.49 4.13 -.23 0.14 12.30 -.01 1.38 33.78 -.18 7.69 -.05 8.24 -.42 45.55 -.08 21.19 +.02 0.64 26.81 -.04 1.61 -.06 2.46 63.20 -.28 .65 +.04 4.73 -.04 7.24 93.06 -2.93 1.60 +.14 0.20 29.83 +.05 6.68 +.28 9.66 +.57 3.50 +.56 10.80 -.13 4.64 -.02 2.92 -.04 22.74 -.54 15.14 55.93 -1.15 0.70 21.69 1.12 50.28 +.03 35.21 -.30 16.10 -.25 15.14 -.34 1.12 62.30 +.03 19.25 -.55 0.36 19.38 +.12 0.42 28.07 -.71 0.20 27.21 -.07 1.20 17.54 -.13 7.06 -.21 0.20 70.94 +.16 8.15 -.05 29.86 +1.96 2.41 +.02 0.07 3.37 +.05 1.10 68.91 +1.07 19.99 -.15 20.72 +.01 14.69 -.14 32.12 +.73 0.60 16.33 -.03 .60 -.01 0.30 9.01 +.01 43.68 +.95 2.73 +.11 9.75 +.75 6.68 -.01 20.17 +.07 0.48 14.04 -.04 1.20 30.34 -.45 21.97 +.27 0.14 29.96 -.11 6.47 +.45 12.64 -.10 22.00 -.20 0.29 2.18 +.05 13.77 +.11 1.38 57.79 +.63 7.17 47.58 -.65 0.52 35.43 +.04 0.40 58.29 -.48 0.04 7.38 +.14 1.52 27.48 -.17 0.40 13.73 -.24 1.88 40.42 -.24 2.16 29.17 +.35 2.21 +.11 8.89 -.04 0.24 6.22 -.02 1.68 19.12 +.04 54.11 -.65 13.94 -.42 12.30 +.05 31.39 +.09 55.97 +.88 43.11 +2.02 26.99 169.13 +1.03 1.46 -.02 23.75 +2.08 1.62 -.03 7.57 -.10 14.52 -.20 6.22 +.05 .04 +.00 9.00 +1.36 .08 -.00 8.80 +.57 103.36 -.64 1.00 17.08 -.08 8.48 -.44 0.28 13.27 -.12 4.39 +.13 0.20 17.55 +.08 65.10 +.51 0.60 62.63 +1.01 5.90 +.17 15.05 +.27 0.15 14.33 -.17 0.15 16.21 -.12 0.20 21.77 +.04 2.00 54.45 -.28 0.92 17.50 -.13 1.86 46.63 -.80 1.08 83.61 -.50 15.18 +.49 0.90 37.51 +1.17 0.72 85.32 -.31 0.56 10.57 -.20 5.28 -.02 1.55 27.27 +.09 0.80 42.77 +.27 1.44 62.36 +.05 5.67 +.19 1.36 29.24 +.01 1.03 31.51 -.24 9.82 +.37 20.97 +.32 1.12 51.30 -.58 2.96 +.13 1.88 65.34 0.40 4.32 -.02 0.40 11.21 -.12 14.60 +1.24 1.99 57.98 -.65 10.32 +.20 2.42 +.09 5.72 -.06 30.84 +.21

D

NSTAR 1.60 42.24 -.33 NuSkin 0.50 31.91 -.18 NuVasive 24.00 NuanceCm 16.54 +.16 Nucor 1.44 40.28 -.12 NustarEn 4.30 66.15 -.24 NutriSyst 0.70 21.15 +.42 NvMSI&G2 0.75 9.15 -.03 Nvidia 12.66 +.05 NxStageMd 21.77 -.69 OGE Engy 1.45 45.50 -.24 OReillyA h 58.71 +.28 OasisPet n 23.00 -.52 OcciPet 1.52 84.27 +.04 Oceaneer 68.89 +.66 OceanFr rs 1.08 +.03 Och-Ziff 0.88 15.54 -.17 Oclaro rs 9.96 -.01 OcwenFn 9.42 +.02 OdysMar 2.12 -.06 OfficeDpt 4.60 -.09 OfficeMax 18.15 -.12 OilSvHT 2.66 127.64 +1.55 OilStates 54.69 +1.22 Oilsands g .43 +.02 OldNBcp 0.28 10.15 -.18 OldRepub 0.69 12.90 -.15 Olin 0.80 19.50 -.14 OmegaHlt 1.48 23.32 -.35 Omncre 0.13 25.75 +.17 Omnicom 0.80 46.56 -.18 OmniVisn 28.01 -.02 OnSmcnd 8.26 +.05 ONEOK 1.92 51.12 OnyxPh 30.27 +.63 OpenTxt 43.91 -.69 OpenTable 67.61 -.05 OpnwvSy 2.21 +.01 OpkoHlth 3.02 +.03 Opnext 1.40 -.03 Oracle 0.20 29.04 -.21 OrbitalSci 17.10 +.30 Orbitz 5.74 -.07 Orexigen 6.14 +.15 OrientEH 11.33 -.40 OrienPap n 7.28 +.38 OrientFn 0.16 12.10 -.17 OriginAg 9.33 +.08 OrionMar 14.32 +.07 Oritani s 0.40 10.95 +.01 Orthfx 26.81 -.02 Orthovta 2.16 -.03 OshkoshCp 30.54 +.44 OvShip 1.75 36.18 +.35 OwensM s 0.71 29.05 +.06 OwensCorn 28.36 -.09 OwensIll 29.08 +.61 Oxigene h .23 PDL Bio 1.00 5.57 -.05 PF Chng 0.63 47.43 +.43 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.87 -.71 PHH Corp 20.29 -.51 PMC Sra 7.88 -.09 PMI Grp 3.42 -.19 PNC 0.40 57.65 -.76 PNM Res 0.50 13.05 +.08 POSCO 1.43 107.58 -1.63 PPG 2.20 79.09 -.03 PPL Corp 1.40 27.01 +.01 PPL pfU 2.44 56.91 PSS Wrld 23.14 +.05 Paccar 0.48 54.73 -.52 PacerIntl 5.72 +.12 PacBiosci n 12.99 -1.57 PacCapB h .37 -.05 PacEth h .85 +.02 PacSunwr 5.94 -.11 PackAmer 0.60 25.74 -.19 Pactiv 33.15 -.04 PaetecHld 4.16 -.04 PallCorp 0.64 44.12 -.57 PanASlv 0.05 36.41 +1.83 PaneraBrd 92.66 -.72 ParagShip 0.20 3.94 +.04 ParamTch 22.41 -.29 ParaG&S 1.84 +.10 Parexel 21.95 +.29 ParkDrl 4.20 -.08 ParkerHan 1.16 80.82 -.59 PartnerRe 2.20 80.84 -1.16 PatriotCoal 15.99 +.67 Patterson 0.40 28.17 -.13 PattUTI 0.20 20.05 +.37 Paychex 1.24 27.87 -.33 PeabdyE 0.34 58.90 +1.15 Pegasys lf 0.12 27.71 -.18 Pengrth g 0.84 12.97 +.22 PnnNGm 34.36 +1.22 PennVa 0.23 15.77 -.04 PennWst g 1.80 23.11 -.47 Penney 0.80 33.13 +.54 PenRE 0.60 15.56 -.12 Penske 15.52 +.25 Pentair 0.76 33.61 -.26 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.52 -.17 PepBoy 0.12 12.44 +.28 PepcoHold 1.08 19.08 -.19 PepsiCo 1.92 65.11 +.03 PeregrineP 1.61 -.03 PerfectWld 31.81 -.19 PerkElm 0.28 23.77 -.23 Perrigo 0.28 64.03 +.12 Petrohawk 17.76 +.86 PetrbrsA 1.12 33.01 +.02 Petrobras 1.12 36.10 -.03 PetroDev 37.74 +1.79 PtroqstE 6.97 +.23 PetsMart 0.50 38.33 +.05 Pfizer 0.72 17.05 -.13 PhrmAth 3.20 -.16 PhmHTr 3.81 65.46 -.35 PharmPdt 0.60 25.65 +.09 Pharmacyc 6.47 +.07 Pharmerica 11.35 +.36 PhilipMor 2.56 60.22 -.22 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.70 -.25 PhlVH 0.15 65.01 +.69 PhnxCos 2.50 -.02 PhotrIn 6.17 -.65 PiedmOfc n 1.26 18.89 -.46 Pier 1 9.81 +.15 PilgrmsP n 6.58 -.06 PimCpOp 1.38 18.30 +.32 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.67 +.01 PinnclEnt 13.76 +.04 PinnaclFn 11.38 -.36 PinWst 2.10 41.74 -.40 PionDrill 6.56 +.16 PioNtrl 0.08 76.82 +.50 PitnyBw 1.46 23.54 +.16 PlainsAA 3.80 64.00 -.30 PlainsEx 29.13 +.11 Plantron 0.20 36.06 -.22 PlatGpMet 2.40 +.09 PlugPwr h .50 -.04 PlumCrk 1.68 39.06 +.18 Polaris 1.60 73.86 +.65 Polo RL 0.40 101.07 +1.45 Polycom 35.11 +.08 PolyMet g 2.25 +.29 PolyOne 13.38 +.01 Polypore 35.39 +.54 Poniard h .50 Popular 2.85 -.03 PortGE 1.04 21.52 Potash 0.40 140.84 -.22 Potlatch 2.04 35.37 -.53 Power-One 9.54 +.13 PSCrudeDS 58.13 +.33 PwshDB 26.48 +.07 PS Engy 25.56 +.03 PS Agri 30.71 +.38 PS Oil 26.91 -.01 PS BasMet 23.65 -.14 PS USDBull 22.31 +.13 PwSClnEn 10.58 +.09 PwSLgCV 0.39 18.44 -.07 PwSWtr 0.11 18.07 -.05 PSFinPf 1.30 18.19 -.03 PSWindEn 10.34 -.08 PSBldABd 1.24 26.10 +.06 PwShPfd 1.02 14.36 -.03 PShEMSov 1.62 28.47 -.07 PSIndia 0.12 26.25 -.40 PwShs QQQ 0.33 53.74 +.07 Powrwav 2.23 +.01 PranaBio 1.58 +.21 Praxair 1.80 93.62 +.68 PrecCastpt 0.12 141.03 -3.97 PrecDrill 8.07 +.25 PremExhib 2.08 +.08 PrmWBc h .41 Prestige 11.15 -.03 PriceTR 1.08 59.01 -1.45 priceline 388.58 -.29 PrideIntl 33.03 -.26 PrimoWt n 13.35 +.40 PrinctnR 1.19 -.36 PrinFncl 0.55 29.46 -.34 PrivateB 0.04 11.86 -.12 ProShtS&P 45.41 +.09 PrUShS&P 25.52 +.09 ProUltDow 0.40 52.56 -.33 PrUlShDow 21.70 +.10 ProUltQQQ 79.25 +.20 PrUShQQQ 12.12 -.04 ProUltSP 0.43 45.27 -.15 ProUShL20 34.99 -.29 ProUSEM rs 32.06 +.26 ProUSRE rs 18.00 +.17 ProUSOG rs 45.14 -.45 ProUSBM rs 22.53 -.30 ProUltRE rs 0.41 52.28 -.54 ProUShtFn 16.97 +.22 ProUFin rs 0.09 62.67 -.87 PrUPShQQQ 33.31 -.12 ProUltO&G 0.23 38.76 +.41 ProUBasM 0.10 44.39 +.59 ProShtR2K 34.52 -.01 ProUltPQQQ 142.27 +.36 ProUSR2K 14.48 +.01 ProUltR2K 0.01 37.77 -.06 ProSht20Tr 42.71 -.14 ProUSSP500 21.66 +.13 ProUltSP500 0.48 187.98 -1.14 ProUltCrude 11.60 -.06 ProUSGld rs 28.69 -.66 ProUSSlv rs 13.18 -1.00 ProUShCrude 11.30 +.04 ProSUltSilv 132.37 +8.73 ProUltShYen 15.75 -.05 ProUShEuro 18.89 +.33 ProceraNt .49 ProctGam 1.93 64.75 -.25 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.00 -.14 ProgsvCp 1.16 21.75 -.19 ProLogis 0.45 14.77 +.20 ProspctCap 1.21 10.55 +.03 ProspBcsh 0.70 33.04 -.71 ProtLife 0.56 25.10 -.02 ProvET g 0.72 8.10 +.11

Nm

D

Prudentl Prud UK PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PPrIT

0.70 54.99 0.61 20.83 1.37 32.51 3.20 104.14 12.00 7.95 0.71 6.90

Nm -.65 -.22 -.51 -.60 +.01 +.09

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QiaoXing QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStrt n QwestCm RAIT Fin RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadOneD h RadioShk Radware RaeSyst Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin Reddy Ice Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc ResCare RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RigelPh RightNow RINO Intl RioTinto s RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RodmanR RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prS RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SMTC g SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Satcon h SauerDanf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchwUSMkt SchwEMkt Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SeahawkDr SealAir Sealy Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech SenHous Senomyx Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGp n ShandaGm Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoreTel SiderNac s Siemens SierraWr Sify lf SigaTech h SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair SinoCkg n SinoTech n Sinovac SiriusXM

0.02 33.31 -.15 18.84 +.16 1.87 +.10 23.01 -.47 18.39 +.16 0.76 47.80 -.53 18.00 +.15 3.44 -.03 .54 +.01 0.40 52.18 +.16 26.65 -.05 0.56 17.59 +.03 13.08 +.24 5.36 -.21 15.29 +.30 4.51 -.02 16.48 +.47 0.32 6.80 -.00 1.88 +.01 7.41 -.02 0.28 26.45 +1.46 0.84 21.20 -.25 3.83 -.03 8.22 -.20 31.06 +.10 26.29 -.17 0.01 8.82 -1.13 19.23 -.30 .46 +.00 1.18 +.20 0.25 20.65 +.08 34.14 +.34 1.60 61.47 -.16 20.54 -.14 0.17 98.08 +1.07 0.16 40.73 +1.33 10.59 -.10 0.44 30.49 -.22 2.16 54.31 -.01 1.50 48.33 +.18 27.00 +1.50 3.43 -.09 1.73 35.06 -.16 43.01 -.09 18.60 -.05 2.87 +.02 3.68 +.17 1.00 14.51 -.07 0.68 57.49 -.13 0.72 13.89 +.25 1.85 44.47 -.33 1.78 26.24 +.13 26.10 -.43 0.58 80.76 -.53 0.04 6.34 -.11 0.16 21.27 +.20 19.65 -.24 0.48 51.70 +.17 0.40 46.55 +.49 1.00 61.76 -.61 12.44 -.52 0.24 26.50 +.13 1.29 +.04 1.15 27.75 -.29 7.81 -1.26 0.80 28.45 -.59 13.11 +.01 56.50 +.83 33.13 -.27 1.00 6.77 +.11 1.68 102.49 -.57 15.36 -.06 10.90 -.34 1.09 -.02 3.92 66.12 -.68 8.00 -.10 27.28 -.02 16.19 -.41 0.90 70.62 -.18 .97 +.01 59.25 -.03 0.52 28.11 -.30 0.80 53.68 -3.16 1.40 66.33 -.14 0.96 60.32 +.04 36.32 +.17 3.28 +.12 1.28 36.18 -.36 0.38 71.39 -.31 31.06 +1.86 0.64 63.84 -.41 51.62 -.54 32.57 +.39 2.00 54.95 -.31 14.11 -.58 17.01 -.04 42.89 +.01 3.36 65.96 -.72 3.36 66.87 -1.04 0.36 53.40 +1.74 4.18 +.05 22.95 -.15 12.87 +.20 0.48 39.74 +.53 4.98 +.01 2.29 31.09 -.43 1.08 45.07 -.16 0.62 45.43 -.05 0.12 16.40 +.12 16.09 -.03 0.67 52.08 -.34 38.02 -.41 1.90 41.50 -.17 0.20 23.09 -.27 8.46 +.34 18.90 +.09 0.40 68.39 -1.88 12.52 -.16 0.10 48.92 +1.04 4.49 +.46 2.55 114.22 -.32 137.78 +1.40 0.42 29.65 -.23 1.54 156.42 -.04 2.31 122.49 -.24 1.68 52.03 -.29 0.12 16.63 -.03 0.11 24.05 -.14 4.21 40.91 -.21 0.44 24.29 +.04 45.85 0.30 23.80 -.19 0.57 45.45 +.15 0.20 47.12 +.49 0.35 61.89 +1.19 1.00 67.39 -.25 21.00 -.38 17.76 -.17 0.28 9.04 -.02 27.68 +1.95 47.06 -.11 0.48 23.34 -.40 20.00 -.46 38.84 +.15 11.83 -.29 114.50 +1.33 37.06 -.74 12.72 -.32 1.21 -.03 41.37 +.06 5.15 -.01 12.29 -.20 1.63 35.51 -.37 3.30 -.04 0.35 12.48 +.07 0.46 14.80 +.09 4.25 -.06 28.21 +.97 12.16 +.43 24.03 +.16 0.84 74.84 -.82 0.07 52.83 -.31 0.38 29.41 -.05 29.28 -.14 0.24 15.79 -.31 3.65 +.27 8.09 +.22 1.00 51.47 -.49 0.30 52.37 -.30 9.17 +.03 30.64 +.62 1.23 -.01 2.31 32.80 -.29 15.06 -.26 9.89 -.42 0.52 23.52 -.07 2.93 +.01 1.22 +.02 73.09 -.25 0.50 13.69 14.65 -.06 8.86 +.07 6.40 -.09 0.60 31.16 -.02 4.25 +.03 1.56 53.64 -.42 22.91 +.29 1.48 24.85 -.18 5.48 +.15 23.20 +.05 7.29 +.15 0.16 8.19 -.09 19.70 +.72 6.33 +.03 40.50 +.38 32.11 -.33 1.44 73.15 -.12 1.40 21.82 +.13 0.34 72.28 -.80 6.49 +.02 0.58 17.80 -.18 2.41 118.76 +.73 11.15 -.21 1.96 -.04 12.92 -.30 0.64 65.62 +.28 37.15 +.10 0.42 34.44 +.03 6.81 +.15 41.77 +.09 0.41 5.45 -.09 26.31 +.73 35.07 +2.12 0.08 12.72 +.83 2.40 106.25 +.48 62.60 +3.46 0.43 8.34 +.02 10.14 +1.59 5.97 -.58 4.16 +.11 1.55 +.03

SironaDent Skechers SkilldHcre SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SnapOn SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy Spansion n SpectraEn SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n StageStrs SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StMotr StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCell h Stericycle SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Strayer Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SunBcpNJ SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperGen SupEnrgy Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwRCmETR SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Symmetry Synaptics Synchron Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus Syntroleum Sysco TAL Ed n TAL Intl TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TOR Min rs TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio Taleo A TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TlcmArg TelcmNZ TelItalia Teleflex TelefEsp TelMexL Tellabs Telular TempleInld TmpEMI TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex TerNRoy n Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co TianliAg n TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany THorton g Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk Toreador TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi TowersWat Towerstm Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransGlb Transocn TravelCtrs Travelers TreeHse n Trex TriangPet TridentM h TriMas h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint TrueBlue TrueRelig Trustmk TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell

D 37.83 -.23 21.41 +.63 5.91 +.66 23.87 -.30 3.63 -.01 7.57 +.01 13.08 +.63 7.66 +.77 3.83 15.15 +.02 17.07 +.26 1.60 64.46 +.05 24.31 +.09 1.28 53.00 +.04 0.62 52.43 -.28 34.88 +3.00 80.32 +6.27 11.47 +.44 18.98 +.29 0.30 50.41 -.36 19.68 +.33 3.31 +.12 0.10 12.45 +.26 9.30 -.12 12.30 -.42 1.12 33.68 -.13 2.84 +.05 0.28 33.67 +.27 0.20 44.93 -.34 24.98 -.04 1.82 38.32 -.15 1.68 46.49 -.14 0.60 24.97 -.25 0.02 14.26 +.07 37.24 +1.15 18.79 -.21 1.00 24.54 -.16 19.06 -.21 16.73 +.64 4.00 +.01 11.11 +.33 12.57 +.22 0.30 14.10 -.01 1.05 36.41 +.09 0.58 31.37 -.08 0.77 29.06 -.05 0.43 36.45 -.06 1.00 62.50 +.19 0.16 15.46 -.12 0.60 33.29 -.14 0.31 25.12 +.02 1.27 31.87 -.18 0.20 13.22 +.11 4.27 +.04 1.36 62.79 -.23 0.36 20.46 -.33 0.20 3.16 1.91 +.13 0.52 30.63 -.24 0.20 58.52 -.77 0.04 44.75 -.72 1.02 21.33 -.22 0.30 15.95 +.02 0.16 9.03 +.10 .92 +.04 71.49 -.90 0.06 5.98 +.10 .54 -.00 0.08 16.92 +.13 49.60 -.82 20.98 +.75 18.33 -.25 5.00 4.00 141.82 +6.25 0.60 52.09 -.34 28.87 +.60 .20 -.02 5.81 -.10 4.18 +.03 9.41 +.04 1.44 29.36 +.01 0.40 35.95 +.27 .31 -.00 0.60 38.48 +.26 7.33 +.14 14.39 +.07 13.99 +.10 4.04 -.11 10.93 +.07 9.25 -.05 0.04 26.33 -.14 2.74 +.00 28.17 +.40 0.35 10.59 -.16 6.23 -.13 0.04 8.38 +.13 6.19 +.02 10.19 +.08 8.80 +.03 36.08 +.63 18.55 +.41 17.56 +.36 0.20 11.26 -.21 8.57 -.06 29.12 -.04 27.08 +.08 1.13 58.60 -.03 30.40 -.01 25.75 -.09 0.04 2.04 -.07 1.91 -.04 1.00 29.23 -.80 16.04 +.49 1.60 29.86 +.53 0.92 24.69 -.36 0.20 13.98 -.18 0.20 17.56 -.16 0.82 17.61 +.02 8.69 -.29 4.14 -.02 0.71 34.00 -.71 0.60 46.05 -.89 13.04 +.86 50.42 +1.05 13.68 +.05 17.34 +.04 0.47 11.00 -.18 11.33 +.20 10.55 -.06 23.44 -.04 32.06 -.18 0.25 19.80 -.10 1.55 50.51 -.45 7.26 +.23 2.15 31.11 -.16 1.00 54.90 -.25 4.57 -.10 4.11 0.32 30.51 +.73 1.66 50.21 +.05 45.69 -.51 0.10 5.15 -.01 0.40 50.15 +.43 1.27 32.37 -.18 1.28 12.58 -.06 13.33 -.27 5.03 -.06 1.65 15.17 +.10 0.90 24.50 -.94 0.85 8.26 -.10 0.68 14.33 -.09 1.36 55.35 -.26 5.25 77.60 -1.49 1.35 15.86 0.08 6.80 -.09 0.40 5.74 +.05 0.44 21.25 -.31 1.00 17.10 -.24 0.54 10.84 +.12 35.79 +.24 0.68 45.29 +.84 4.64 +.11 34.42 +.19 40.74 -.29 12.11 +.25 24.17 -.53 7.98 11.72 +.10 24.98 +.54 14.55 +.38 21.27 +.07 10.51 +.42 0.75 50.86 +.29 0.52 31.38 -.09 16.11 +.05 0.08 22.73 +.12 51.96 -.42 45.51 -.07 13.27 +.15 1.16 37.70 -.60 0.40 34.04 -.09 32.73 -.45 2.10 85.86 -.48 8.00 +.27 19.99 -.03 1.00 49.25 -.25 1.00 56.97 +.02 0.52 38.87 +.49 24.83 -.56 1.22 +.07 1.60 62.05 0.85 31.52 +.18 0.52 44.08 -.44 0.02 16.05 +.08 19.09 -.17 11.29 +.13 19.50 +.19 0.64 58.86 -.39 15.58 -.38 2.44 74.22 -.68 3.13 56.76 -.39 0.28 15.80 -.12 0.50 25.62 +.01 1.59 -.07 0.30 49.70 -.38 3.33 -.20 73.74 +1.10 0.28 41.84 +.15 6.18 +.09 1.60 37.20 -.19 0.84 53.03 -.79 3.38 +.14 15.15 +.52 67.02 +3.10 3.92 +.67 1.44 56.58 -.86 49.82 +1.41 18.70 +.18 5.75 -.02 1.84 -.06 17.00 +.71 37.63 -.28 29.19 +.56 0.32 24.19 -.50 10.64 -.01 16.63 +.09 19.35 +.35 0.92 23.18 -.36 5.39 +.18 1.20 47.53 +.70 0.66 19.42 +.11

Nm

D

TutorPerini TwoHrbInv TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

1.00 1.34 0.64 0.85 0.16

23.03 9.27 33.73 39.11 15.54

+.60 +.63 +.22 +.44

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It 0.10 9.17 +.02 UBS AG 18.03 -.02 UDR 0.74 23.67 -.38 UGI Corp 1.00 30.49 -.21 UIL Hold 1.73 30.32 -.08 UQM Tech 2.25 +.10 URS 41.69 +.15 US Airwy 11.23 -.34 US Geoth 1.30 +.20 US Gold 6.32 +.33 USA Tech h 1.21 -.07 USEC 5.18 +.12 USG 14.25 +.03 UTiWrldwd 0.06 19.67 UTStrcm 2.20 +.09 UltaSalon 33.03 +.73 UltraPt g 45.23 +1.43 Uluru .10 +.01 Umpqua 0.20 11.65 -.05 UndrArmr 51.76 +1.50 Unifi rs 14.80 -.15 UnilevNV 1.11 31.50 -.32 Unilever 1.11 30.91 -.21 UnionPac 1.32 91.98 +.76 Unisys 24.12 -.08 Unit 41.84 +.48 UtdCBksGa 1.79 -.02 UtdContl 28.59 +.73 UtdMicro 0.08 3.23 +.06 UtdNtrlF 36.57 -.17 UtdOnln 0.40 7.14 +.03 UPS B 1.88 69.48 -.31 UtdRentals 20.34 +.28 USNatGas 33.94 +.95 US Bancrp 0.20 25.70 -.40 US Enr 5.66 -.04 US NGsFd 5.89 +.23 US OilFd 37.53 -.12 USSteel 0.20 47.70 -.80 UtdTech 1.70 76.63 -.12 UtdTherap 59.18 -.05 UtdhlthGp 0.50 37.12 +.26 UnivDisp 23.12 -.75 UnvHlth s 0.20 41.95 +.02 UnivTravel 6.29 +.03 UnumGrp 0.37 22.35 -.53 Ur-Energy 1.74 +.17 Uranerz 3.70 +.49 UraniumEn 6.15 +1.54 UranmRs 2.30 +.55 UrbanOut 33.33 +.89 VCA Ant 22.18 +.40 VF Cp 2.52 84.33 -.64 VaalcoE 6.77 +.06 Valassis 32.52 -.26 Vale SA 0.76 33.82 Vale SA pf 0.76 30.01 +.12 ValeantPh 0.38 25.72 -1.43 ValenceT h 1.37 +.04 ValeroE 0.20 19.20 +.06 Validus 0.88 29.72 +.22 VlyNBcp 0.72 13.55 -.13 Valspar 0.64 32.51 -.05 ValueClick 15.51 +.06 VanceInfo 38.00 +.66 VandaPhm 7.68 +.02 VangSTBd 1.89 81.89 -.05 VangTotBd 2.94 82.63 +.02 VangGrth 0.67 59.81 VangSmCp 0.65 69.09 +.01 VangTSM 1.25 62.86 -.08 VangValu 1.32 51.72 -.16 VangREIT 1.83 56.98 -.31 VangDivAp 0.99 51.20 -.15 VangAllW 0.86 48.70 -.22 VangEmg 0.55 49.00 -.24 VangEur 1.91 52.34 -.42 VangNatR 2.20 26.16 +.10 VangEurPc 0.81 37.12 -.19 VantageDrl 1.86 +.08 VarianMed 64.80 -.20 VarianSemi 33.93 +.02 VascoDta 8.86 +.69 Vectren 1.36 27.47 -.22 VeecoIn

m m m w m M m

G

Mw

M W& O WM W W H W W O W R W M W W W W W W R W WR W W M W W W W W W MD W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W W W H WD W R W U W m W W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W mm D W m W D W W W D W W WW W W W W W W M W W m W G OM

R M R Ww m G m D

mm

w


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Zuri

adding programs where needed in order to maximize fundraising efforts.” Murphy agreed to answer some specific questions from The Bulletin.

Continued from B1 In three years, the staff has grown to 20: eight who work out of the Bend headquarters on Bond Street, as well as 11 regional managers and one sales representative who work in offices at strategic locations across the United States. “Zuri Group has seen extraordinary growth since opening in 2007,” Murphy said. “Our business has doubled each year we have been in business, and we anticipate seeing a similar growth pattern going forward.” He said Zuri Group provides services ranging from building and maintaining websites for nonprofits to building widgets to draw attention to their websites, managing their e-mail messages and programs and helping them create Facebook pages and other tools to enhance online fundraising. “We customize online programs for nonprofits,” Murphy said. “Each of our clients has different needs and systems in place. We work with our clients to help them be more effective with their current systems, while

Q: A:

Who was Zuri Group’s first client? Heifer International. Their goal is to end hunger and poverty and care for the earth.

Q: A:

What other nonprofits do you work with? Some of the groups we represent include Amnesty International, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Autism Speaks, ChildFund International, American Cancer Society, Canadian Cancer Society, The Children’s Hospital of Denver, The American Jewish Committee, and we were just hired by Human Rights Watch in New York City and Big Brothers Big Sisters in Philadelphia.

Q: A:

Why did you choose to locate in Bend? After living in Portland and San Diego for 20 years and only vacationing in Bend, when I founded Zuri Group it was the perfect opportunity to

Rights

A:

move to Bend for the lifestyle, to raise a family and be part of Bend’s future. What is your goal for Zuri Group? Our goal is to become an extension of our clients’ team and help them reach their online goals.

Each year during the holiday season, Google, PayPal and Amazon provide discounts or free transaction processing for nonprofits. We promote that as a benefit that assures more of the donation will go directly to the missions and programs of the nonprofits.

Q: A:

How much does Zuri Group charge? We work on a retainer basis. The client pays for the services they ask us to provide. In general, it ranges from $10,000 to about $500,000 per year.

Q: A:

How much do you travel for Zuri Group? When I first started the company, I was traveling one week out of six, but now I am traveling about three weeks out of every month.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

How can nonprofits afford your services? Nonprofits hire full-time staff. Depending on how often they use our services and the type of services they have us do, the annual cost in most cases is comparable to one to three full-time staff positions, but with our company they get the expertise of our entire staff, who probably have a broader range of knowledge and experience in all aspects of online fundraising.

Q:

How many air miles have you racked up? I’m logging between 50,000 and 60,000 air miles a year.

Q: A:

How do you spend your free time? I have four sons, and I just finished coaching two sons in flag football. I’ve also coached my sons’ baseball and basketball teams. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

What is the busiest time for online fundraising?

comments “drew supportive responses from her co-workers” and led to further negative comments about the supervisor. Kreisberg said: “You’re allowed to talk about your supervisor with your co-workers. You’re allowed to communicate the concerns and criticisms you have. The only difference in this case is she did it on Facebook and did it on her own time and her own computer.” An administrative law judge is scheduled to begin hearing the case Jan. 25. Marshall Babson, a member of the National Labor Relations Board in the 1980s, said a broad company rule that says one cannot make disparaging comments about supervisors is clearly illegal under labor law. But he said an employee’s criticizing a company or supervisor on Facebook was not necessarily protected activity. “There will arguably be cases where it is not concerted activity,” Babson said, suggesting that if a worker lashed out in a post against a supervisor but was not communicating with co-workers, that type of comment might not be protected. If the Facebook conversation involves several co-workers, however, it is far more likely to be viewed as “concerted protected activity,” he said.

“This is a fairly straightforward case under the National Labor Relations Act — whether it takes place on Facebook or at the water cooler, it was employees talking jointly about working conditions … and they have a right to do that.”

Continued from B1 Lafe Solomon, the board’s acting general counsel, said, “This is a fairly straightforward case under the National Labor Relations Act — whether it takes place on Facebook or at the water cooler, it was employees talking jointly about working conditions, in this case about their supervisor, and they have a right to do that.” That act gives workers a federally protected right to form unions, and it prohibits employers from punishing workers — whether union or nonunion — for discussing working conditions or unionization. The labor board said the company’s Facebook rule was “overly broad” and improperly limited employees’ rights to discuss working conditions among themselves. Moreover, the board faulted another company policy, one prohibiting employees from making “disparaging” or “discriminatory” “comments when discussing the company or the employee’s superiors” and “co-workers.” The board’s complaint prompted Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, a law firm with a large labor and employment practice representing hundreds of

— Lafe Solomon, acting general counsel, National Labor Relations Board companies, to send a “lawflash” advisory Monday to its clients, saying, “All private sector employers should take note,” regardless “of whether their work force is represented by a union.” The firm added, “Employers should review their Internet and social media policies to determine whether they are susceptible to an allegation that the policy would ‘reasonably tend to chill employees’ ” in the exercise of their rights to discuss wages, working conditions and unionization. American Medical Response of Connecticut denied the labor board’s allegations, saying they were without merit. “The employee in question was discharged based on multiple, serious complaints about her behavior,” the company said in a statement. “The employee was also held accountable for negative personal attacks against a co-worker posted

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 B5

publicly on Facebook. The company believes that the offensive statements made against the co-workers were not concerted activity protected under federal law.” The case involves Dawnmarie Souza, who had to prepare a response to a customer’s complaint about her work. Souza, the board said, was unhappy that her supervisor would not let a representative of the Teamsters, the union representing the company’s workers, help prepare her response. Souza then mocked her supervisor on Facebook, using several vulgarities to ridicule him, according to Jonathan Kreisberg, director of the board’s Hartford office, which filed the complaint. He also said she had written, “love how the company allows a 17 to become a supervisor” — 17 is the company’s lingo for a psychiatric patient. The labor board said that her

Screening Continued from B1 Travel industry representatives say they are primarily concerned that security procedures unnecessarily burden the vast majority of travelers and crew members. The government, they argue, should instead be using intelligence to develop a riskbased approach to screening passengers. Specifically, they point to the new body scanners that are replacing metal detectors — which have raised privacy and health concerns, as well as prompted legal challenges — and the more invasive pat-downs, which have set off complaints about disrespectful treatment by agents. “I think people want to say enough is enough, but they’re worried that they’re going to be perceived as weak on security,” Freeman said. TSA officials declined to discuss their checkpoint screening procedures, but sent an e-mail statement: “TSA is a counterterrorism agency whose mission is to ensure the safety of the traveling public. To that end, TSA deploys the latest technologies and implements comprehensive procedures that protect passengers while facilitating travel.” But the growing chorus of complaints from travel industry leaders suggests that frustrations with policies on shoes, laptops, liquids and pat-downs may have reached a limit.

Calls for an overhaul Giovanni Bisignani, chief executive of the International Air Transport Association, said in a speech at an aviation security conference in Frankfurt, Germany, last week that the airlines would like to see an overhaul of the checkpoint screening process — with a greater focus on finding bad people, rather than bad objects. “Discouraging travelers with queues into the parking lot is not a solution,” Bisignani said in his speech. “And it is not acceptable to treat passengers as terrorists until they prove themselves innocent.” Steve Lott, a spokesman for the International Air Transport Association, said the body scanners had resulted in longer lines because passengers had to take everything out of their pockets, not just coins and cell phones. “Within the past year or so we’ve seen longer lines, and we’re concerned about the return of the hassle factor,” Lott said. Although the TSA used to track security line wait times and post that data on its web-

site so travelers knew what to expect, the agency stopped publishing that information in 2008. It is now searching for a way to automate the process of collecting wait-time data, said Lauren Gaches, an agency spokeswoman, but does not know when it will resume sharing that information with the public. Historical data posted on tsa .gov indicates that average peak wait times were about 12 minutes in 2006 and crept up to 15 minutes in early 2008. Since then, the TSA has shifted to a system that tracks the percentage of passengers who wait 20 minutes or less to go through security, and says that 99 percent of travelers have waited less than 20 minutes in security lines in 2010.

Long wait times But anecdotal feedback about security wait times varies widely depending on whom you ask. Christopher Bidwell, a vice president at the Airports Council International North America, said the trade association had not heard complaints about long security lines from its airport members. Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, which tracks its own security line wait times and posts that information on its website, has reported lines of less than 10 minutes when randomly checked during the last two weeks. But passengers are finding wait times can stretch well past half an hour at some airports, especially during peak departure times. Lost business is the main fear motivating the U.S. Travel Association to speak out about frustrations with airport security, but lately others have also chimed in. Speaking two weeks ago, Martin Broughton, the chairman of British Airways, bluntly criticized U.S. aviation security policies, particularly for making demands on foreign carriers that are inconsistently enforced within the United States. And the president of the Allied Pilots Association, Dave Bates, sent a letter to members suggesting that they refuse to submit to the body imaging scanners based on privacy objections and the potential health risks of repeated exposure to radiation. Last week, the Electronic Privacy Information Center filed the opening brief in its case against the Department of Homeland Security, challenging the legality of using body scanners as a primary screening tool for all passengers. The government is expected to file its response by December.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .80f .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

10 14 19 25 15 ... ... 25 22 60 19 12 ... 11 ... ... 12 ... 16 ... 7

55.10 -.78 +59.4 21.90 -.17 +1.4 12.60 +.24 -16.3 15.79 -.11 +28.5 70.21 -1.06 +29.7 .47 -.02 -30.9 39.07 +1.16 +42.1 53.66 -.30 +37.4 64.81 -.59 +9.5 7.24 -.14 +201.7 28.64 +.03 -12.5 44.25 +.53 -14.1 12.27 -.01 -7.8 21.23 -.01 +4.1 8.33 -.07 +50.1 22.71 -.40 +10.6 4.86 -.08 +80.0 8.81 +.77 +26.2 20.50 +.12 -13.1 10.94 +.01 +23.9 26.81 -.04 -12.0

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1408.00 $1402.80 $27.428

Pvs Day $1394.00 $1397.30 $26.744

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 18 18 25 59 ... 37 21 ... 22 17 10 25 10 ... 17 76 11 ... ...

83.61 -.50 +26.5 42.77 +.27 +13.8 49.40 -.22 +9.7 18.15 -.12 +43.0 54.73 -.52 +50.9 2.35 ... -16.4 39.06 +.18 +3.4 141.03 -3.97 +27.8 23.34 -.40 +9.6 52.83 -.31 +10.8 73.15 -.12 +18.7 43.90 -.64 +9.7 30.63 -.24 +32.8 10.64 -.01 +77.3 11.65 -.05 -13.1 25.70 -.40 +14.2 15.96 -.26 -17.5 29.04 -.18 +7.6 2.77 +.08 +31.9 17.80 +.30 +12.4

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF FordM SPDR Fncl

4006088 2397440 1344407 1257175 863505

Last Chg 4.44 12.60 122.49 16.41 15.46

-.05 +.24 -.24 +.20 -.12

Gainers ($2 or more) Name IDT Cp C ChNBorun n ChinaGreen HeclaM IDT Corp

Last 17.38 16.91 8.58 8.96 17.50

Chg %Chg +5.02 +2.14 +1.00 +1.03 +2.00

+40.6 +14.5 +13.2 +13.0 +12.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name RadianGrp Furmanite ProUSSlv rs Envestnt n IntraLks n

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

8.82 -1.13 -11.4 6.00 -.46 -7.1 13.18 -1.00 -7.1 12.01 -.87 -6.8 19.59 -1.44 -6.8

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

NovaGld g Taseko DenisnM g GoldStr g NthgtM g

Last Chg

83476 14.60 +1.24 76551 4.57 -.10 57450 2.80 +.29 54011 5.96 +.18 41886 2.96 +.13

Gainers ($2 or more) Last

UraniumEn TravelCtrs MinesMgt NewEnSys BovieMed

6.15 +1.54 +33.4 3.92 +.67 +20.6 3.50 +.56 +19.0 9.00 +1.36 +17.8 2.64 +.37 +16.3

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name HMG EstnLtCap ComndSec Ballanty DeltaAprl

Last 4.74 4.51 2.00 7.07 13.05

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Microsoft Intel MicronT PwShs QQQ

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

557007 1.55 +.03 539189 26.81 -.04 478128 21.23 -.01 430032 8.24 -.42 366226 53.74 +.07

Name

Last

CarverBcp SRISurg CobraEl Vermillion Andatee n

5.49 +2.22 +67.8 4.00 +.90 +29.0 2.85 +.61 +27.2 6.18 +1.28 +26.0 6.08 +.87 +16.7

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

-.44 -.38 -.14 -.48 -.81

-8.5 -7.8 -6.5 -6.4 -5.8

InfoSvcs un ColonyBk RepubAir WarnerCh s Arbinet rs

Last

267 224 29 520 46 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,381 1,627 119 3,127 285 12

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

6.28 -2.45 -28.1 4.04 -.83 -17.0 7.81 -1.26 -13.9 20.15 -3.19 -13.7 6.21 -.77 -11.0

Diary 1,284 1,369 132 2,785 202 16

11,451.53 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,957.21 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,817.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,160.34 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,582.18 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,227.08 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,962.48 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,406.84 4,924.46 406.76 7,782.20 2,163.60 2,580.05 1,223.25 12,928.27 736.77

-37.24 +1.06 -2.84 -18.46 +10.24 +1.07 -2.60 -19.44 +.18

YTD %Chg %Chg -.33 +.02 -.69 -.24 +.48 +.04 -.21 -.15 +.02

52-wk %Chg

+9.39 +20.12 +2.20 +8.31 +18.56 +13.70 +9.70 +11.95 +17.81

+11.54 +25.60 +8.10 +9.07 +18.63 +19.78 +11.91 +14.94 +24.39

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

346.69 2,683.42 3,913.70 5,849.96 6,750.50 24,964.37 36,543.39 21,228.98 3,316.40 9,732.92 1,942.41 3,300.40 4,855.30 5,868.25

-.06 t -.10 t -.08 t -.43 t -.05 t +.35 s +.62 s +.16 s -.08 t +1.11 s +.18 s +1.85 s -.36 t +.18 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0139 1.6132 .9974 .002081 .1496 1.3923 .1290 .012315 .081633 .0325 .000898 .1492 1.0357 .0331

1.0143 1.6189 .9996 .002094 .1501 1.4045 .1290 .012298 .081967 .0328 .000907 .1516 1.0404 .0331

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.21 -0.04 +11.4 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.22 -0.05 +11.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.07 -0.02 +10.1 GrowthI 24.92 -0.01 +13.1 Ultra 22.06 -0.01 +13.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.18 -0.03 +10.0 AMutlA p 24.86 -0.05 +9.4 BalA p 17.76 -0.04 +11.4 BondA p 12.52 -0.01 +9.6 CapWA p 21.34 -0.08 +9.2 CapIBA p 50.84 -0.18 +9.2 CapWGA p 36.17 -0.12 +8.5 EupacA p 42.14 -0.12 +9.9 FdInvA p 35.85 -0.06 +10.8 GovtA p 14.71 -0.01 +7.5 GwthA p 30.01 +0.01 +9.8 HI TrA p 11.44 +14.8 IncoA p 16.68 -0.06 +11.1 IntBdA p 13.70 -0.02 +6.5 ICAA p 27.69 -0.06 +8.4 NEcoA p 25.25 -0.03 +12.3 N PerA p 28.48 -0.02 +11.1 NwWrldA 56.04 -0.22 +18.7 SmCpA p 38.38 -0.03 +21.7 TxExA p 12.38 -0.01 +6.3 WshA p 26.69 -0.09 +10.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.82 -0.05 +9.1 IntlEqA 30.02 -0.05 +8.9 IntEqII I r 12.78 -0.02 +8.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.42 -0.06 +8.5 MidCap 31.60 +0.02 +23.6 MidCapVal 20.01 -0.08 +11.3 Baron Funds: Growth 47.19 +0.16 +14.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.22 -0.01 +11.0 DivMu 14.70 +4.8

TxMgdIntl 16.16 -0.08 +5.8 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.12 -0.04 +9.8 GlAlA r 19.46 -0.02 +9.1 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.15 -0.01 +8.4 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.15 -0.05 +10.1 GlbAlloc r 19.56 -0.02 +9.4 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.24 +0.16 +15.2 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.71 -0.01 +11.4 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.10 +0.02 +18.1 AcornIntZ 40.18 -0.13 +19.5 ValRestr 48.07 -0.05 +13.5 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.13 -0.03 +11.8 USCorEq2 10.47 -0.01 +15.6 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.55 -0.05 +8.3 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.97 -0.04 +8.6 NYVen C 32.26 -0.05 +7.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.82 -0.01 +9.8 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.23 -0.08 +23.4 EmMktV 37.96 -0.09 +21.9 IntSmVa 16.69 -0.01 +11.8 LargeCo 9.66 -0.02 +11.5 USLgVa 19.22 -0.01 +14.2 US Small 20.01 +0.02 +21.9 US SmVa 23.83 -0.01 +21.6 IntlSmCo 16.63 -0.02 +18.4 Fixd 10.38 +1.3 IntVa 18.42 -0.07 +10.2 Glb5FxInc 11.72 -0.01 +8.0 2YGlFxd 10.24 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 68.94 -0.15 +9.6 Income 13.48 +7.8 IntlStk 36.10 -0.17 +13.3 Stock 104.58 -0.31 +9.9

Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.66 NatlMunInc 9.82 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.34 LgCapVal 17.72 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.10 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.98 FPACres 26.87 Fairholme 35.35 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.39 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.67 StrInA 13.05 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.89 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.73 FF2015 11.45 FF2020 13.87 FF2020K 13.24 FF2025 11.54 FF2030 13.76 FF2035 11.41 FF2040 7.97 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.80 AMgr50 15.27 Balanc 17.98 BlueChGr 43.88 Canada 56.29 CapAp 24.80 CpInc r 9.54 Contra 66.96 ContraK 67.01 DisEq 22.40 DivIntl 30.51 DivrsIntK r 30.54 DivGth 27.11 EmrMk 26.90 Eq Inc 42.81 EQII 17.61

-0.07 +6.4 -0.03 +7.9 -0.01 +4.7 -0.06 +6.7 -0.09 +7.6 +3.2 -0.01 +9.9 -0.07 +17.5 -0.04 +15.7 -0.01 +14.3 -0.02 +11.5 -0.01 +14.6 -0.02 +10.5 -0.01 +10.6 -0.02 +11.3 -0.02 +11.4 -0.01 +11.8 -0.02 +11.8 -0.01 +11.9 -0.01 +12.0 -0.03 +11.9 -0.02 +11.8 -0.04 +11.7 +0.01 +15.6 +0.32 +16.1 +0.01 +15.7 +16.3 -0.03 +15.1 -0.03 +15.2 -0.01 +6.6 -0.14 +9.0 -0.13 +9.1 -0.02 +15.2 -0.12 +19.0 -0.11 +10.7 -0.04 +9.0

Fidel 30.78 FltRateHi r 9.82 GNMA 11.75 GovtInc 10.79 GroCo 79.69 GroInc 17.66 GrowthCoK 79.76 HighInc r 9.11 Indepn 23.64 IntBd 10.83 IntmMu 10.38 IntlDisc 33.43 InvGrBd 11.75 InvGB 7.54 LgCapVal 12.09 LatAm 59.73 LevCoStk 26.39 LowP r 37.09 LowPriK r 37.08 Magelln 69.76 MidCap 27.01 MuniInc 12.84 NwMkt r 16.55 OTC 52.20 100Index 8.66 Ovrsea 32.41 Puritn 17.60 SCmdtyStrt 11.98 SrsIntGrw 11.31 SrsIntVal 10.22 StIntMu 10.77 STBF 8.52 SmllCpS r 18.66 StratInc 11.64 StrReRt r 9.57 TotalBd 11.05 USBI 11.62 Value 66.70 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 57.73 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 36.47 500IdxInv 43.38 IntlInxInv 36.12

-0.03 +9.2 +7.1 -0.03 +8.3 +7.4 -0.04 +15.5 -0.02 +10.4 -0.03 +15.7 +14.0 +18.7 +10.0 +5.2 -0.14 +10.1 -0.01 +9.3 +10.2 -0.04 +7.5 -0.10 +16.9 +0.04 +15.3 +0.03 +16.4 +0.03 +16.5 +8.6 -0.01 +15.6 -0.01 +6.7 -0.06 +15.3 -0.02 +14.2 -0.02 +9.2 -0.13 +4.8 -0.02 +11.5 +0.04 +9.9 -0.04 +16.0 -0.05 +5.3 +3.2 -0.01 +4.2 -0.02 +17.1 -0.02 +11.8 +13.0 -0.01 +10.1 -0.02 +8.4 -0.16 +17.1 +1.18 +36.0 +0.03 +21.2 -0.08 +11.5 -0.17 +8.1

TotMktInv 35.60 -0.05 +13.2 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 43.38 -0.08 +11.5 TotMktAd r 35.61 -0.05 +13.2 First Eagle: GlblA 46.09 +0.06 +15.3 OverseasA 22.67 +0.06 +16.5 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.98 -0.01 +5.9 FoundAl p 10.55 -0.02 +9.2 HYTFA p 10.28 -0.01 +8.8 IncomA p 2.17 +11.8 USGovA p 6.86 -0.01 +7.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.6 IncmeAd 2.16 +12.0 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.19 +11.1 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.57 -0.04 +9.0 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.11 -0.05 +8.5 GlBd A p 13.78 -0.07 +12.3 GrwthA p 17.96 -0.06 +6.8 WorldA p 14.92 -0.05 +6.8 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.80 -0.08 +11.9 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.75 -0.10 +7.8 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.11 -0.06 +5.0 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 22.11 -0.08 +7.8 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.75 -0.10 +20.4 IntlCorEq 29.34 -0.09 +9.8 Quality 20.12 -0.06 +5.1 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.38 +0.01 +13.6 HYMuni 8.79 -0.01 +12.3 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.22 -0.02 +10.6 CapApInst 35.94 -0.02 +9.0 IntlInv t 60.72 -0.30 +11.6 Intl r 61.44 -0.30 +12.0

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.71 +0.04 +9.9 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.70 +0.04 +10.1 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.22 +0.03 +12.7 Div&Gr 19.21 -0.06 +9.6 Advisers 19.27 -0.04 +10.4 TotRetBd 11.51 -0.01 +9.3 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.69 -0.01 -0.7 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.74 -0.04 +4.8 CmstkA 15.28 -0.03 +11.9 EqIncA 8.43 -0.02 +9.8 GrIncA p 18.56 -0.07 +8.5 HYMuA 9.57 -0.01 +10.2 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.73 +0.09 +9.0 AssetStA p 24.43 +0.09 +9.6 AssetStrI r 24.64 +0.09 +9.9 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.73 -0.01 +8.8 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.73 +9.1 HighYld 8.29 +14.6 IntmTFBd 11.08 +4.4 ShtDurBd 11.06 -0.01 +3.5 USLCCrPls 20.07 -0.03 +10.4 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.87 -0.14 +19.7 PrkMCVal T 21.99 -0.02 +11.1 Twenty T 66.25 -0.02 +7.6 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.05 -0.01 +12.4 LSGrwth 12.93 -0.02 +12.9 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.92 -0.10 +22.1 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.26 -0.11 +21.8 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.98 -0.01 +5.2 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.71 +15.0 Loomis Sayles:

LSBondI 14.58 -0.03 +14.7 StrInc C 15.18 -0.03 +13.9 LSBondR 14.53 -0.03 +14.5 StrIncA 15.10 -0.04 +14.6 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.73 -0.02 +13.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.05 -0.02 +8.8 BdDebA p 7.88 +12.9 ShDurIncA p 4.68 +7.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.01 -0.04 +8.9 ValueA 22.32 -0.07 +8.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.42 -0.07 +8.8 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.97 +0.01 +12.3 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.73 -0.02 +8.2 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.61 NA PacTgrInv 24.15 -0.04 +25.6 MergerFd 15.98 -0.01 +2.8 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.77 -0.01 +13.1 TotRtBdI 10.77 -0.01 +13.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.61 -0.03 +10.8 GlbDiscZ 30.02 -0.03 +11.1 QuestZ 18.76 -0.04 +8.9 SharesZ 20.77 -0.04 +9.3 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 43.00 +0.05 +13.9 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 44.59 +0.06 +13.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.45 +0.01 +14.7 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.22 -0.04 +6.6 Intl I r 19.17 -0.04 +13.8 Oakmark r 40.97 -0.11 +10.6 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.12 -0.01 +14.9 GlbSMdCap 15.28 -0.01 +19.7 Oppenheimer A:

CapApA p 42.54 -0.01 +6.5 DvMktA p 35.76 -0.22 +24.3 GlobA p 60.31 -0.22 +13.8 GblStrIncA 4.40 -0.02 +17.8 IntBdA p 6.94 -0.05 +12.3 MnStFdA 31.88 -0.09 +13.3 RisingDivA 15.11 -0.04 +9.7 S&MdCpVl 30.56 -0.03 +15.0 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.71 -0.04 +8.9 S&MdCpVl 26.25 -0.02 +14.2 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.66 -0.04 +9.0 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.33 -0.01 +10.6 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.45 -0.22 +24.7 IntlBdY 6.94 -0.05 +12.6 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.72 -0.01 +11.2 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.30 -0.01 +13.3 AllAsset 12.82 -0.02 +15.4 ComodRR 9.22 +0.03 +20.6 HiYld 9.45 +14.8 InvGrCp 12.01 -0.01 +15.1 LowDu 10.74 -0.02 +6.1 RealRtnI 11.87 +12.2 ShortT 9.95 +2.2 TotRt 11.72 -0.01 +11.4 TR II 11.28 -0.01 +10.1 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.74 -0.02 +5.8 RealRtA p 11.87 +11.7 TotRtA 11.72 -0.01 +11.0 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.72 -0.01 +10.3 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.72 -0.01 +11.1 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.72 -0.01 +11.3 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.37 +0.06 +17.3 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.37 -0.11 +11.0

Price Funds: BlChip 37.45 CapApp 20.03 EmMktS 36.05 EqInc 22.81 EqIndex 33.00 Growth 31.57 HlthSci 28.72 HiYield 6.89 IntlBond 10.51 IntlStk 14.44 MidCap 57.13 MCapVal 23.01 N Asia 20.11 New Era 48.90 N Horiz 31.48 N Inc 9.78 R2010 15.55 R2015 11.97 R2020 16.45 R2025 11.99 R2030 17.13 R2040 17.19 ShtBd 4.90 SmCpStk 33.20 SmCapVal 34.72 SpecIn 12.59 Value 22.67 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.06 VoyA p 23.34 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.07 PremierI r 19.34 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.03 S&P Sel 19.33 Scout Funds: Intl 32.34 Selected Funds: AmShD 40.61 AmShS p 40.53 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.75 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.09 +14.3 -0.03 +10.3 -0.09 +19.8 -0.08 +10.4 -0.07 +11.3 -0.06 +14.8 -0.07 +9.7 +14.5 -0.06 +8.8 -0.07 +14.6 +0.10 +20.3 -0.03 +11.1 -0.02 +24.6 +0.27 +12.1 -0.01 +23.1 -0.01 +9.0 -0.03 +11.5 -0.02 +12.2 -0.03 +12.7 -0.02 +13.0 -0.03 +13.3 -0.03 +13.5 +3.8 -0.03 +23.2 -0.03 +17.8 -0.02 +10.6 -0.04 +10.7 -0.03 +9.7 +0.01 +18.3 +0.02 +17.1 +0.03 +18.6 -0.06 +12.3 -0.04 +11.5 -0.07 +12.0 -0.05 +9.0 -0.05 +8.7 -0.12 +7.8

ValueInst 53.38 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.04 IntValue I 28.67 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.68 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.18 CpOpAdl 73.96 EMAdmr r 40.61 Energy 118.36 500Adml 112.80 GNMA Ad 11.12 HlthCr 52.77 HiYldCp 5.83 InfProAd 26.76 ITsryAdml 12.03 IntGrAdm 62.47 ITAdml 13.80 ITGrAdm 10.48 LtdTrAd 11.15 LTGrAdml 9.57 LT Adml 11.22 MuHYAdm 10.64 PrmCap r 67.33 STsyAdml 10.93 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.90 TtlBAdml 10.90 TStkAdm 30.60 WellslAdm 53.30 WelltnAdm 53.38 Windsor 43.94 WdsrIIAd 44.75 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.30 CapOpp 32.01 DivdGro 14.09 Energy 63.01 EqInc 19.83 Explr 68.64 GNMA 11.12 GlobEq 18.03 HYCorp 5.83

+0.11 +15.2 -0.01 +13.7 +14.1 -0.02 +11.7 +6.6 +0.08 +6.6 -0.18 +19.2 +0.25 +5.6 -0.23 +11.5 -0.03 +8.0 -0.12 +5.1 +13.8 +0.01 +9.9 -0.01 +11.6 -0.20 +15.6 +5.7 -0.01 +13.9 -0.01 +3.1 +0.03 +12.6 -0.02 +6.0 -0.01 +7.3 -0.09 +9.2 +3.6 +1.4 +6.0 -0.01 +8.5 -0.04 +13.0 -0.05 +11.1 -0.13 +9.6 -0.15 +10.1 -0.12 +7.7 -0.04 +13.9 +0.04 +6.6 -0.06 +8.1 +0.14 +5.6 -0.06 +11.0 +0.05 +19.8 -0.03 +7.9 -0.05 +15.1 +13.7

HlthCre 125.01 InflaPro 13.62 IntlGr 19.62 IntlVal 33.00 ITIGrade 10.48 LifeCon 16.46 LifeGro 21.91 LifeMod 19.66 LTIGrade 9.57 Morg 17.51 MuInt 13.80 MuLtd 11.15 PrecMtls r 26.92 PrmcpCor 13.45 Prmcp r 64.86 SelValu r 18.39 STAR 19.17 STIGrade 10.90 StratEq 17.73 TgtRetInc 11.46 TgRe2010 22.78 TgtRe2015 12.59 TgRe2020 22.27 TgtRe2025 12.66 TgRe2030 21.64 TgtRe2035 13.05 TgtRe2040 21.40 TgtRe2045 13.51 USGro 17.77 Wellsly 22.00 Welltn 30.91 Wndsr 13.02 WndsII 25.21 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 112.78 Balanced 21.18 EMkt 30.84 Europe 27.77 Extend 39.18 Growth 30.77 ITBnd 11.82 MidCap 19.48 Pacific 10.85 REIT r 18.91

-0.28 +5.0 +9.8 -0.06 +15.5 -0.14 +7.8 -0.01 +13.8 -0.01 +10.7 -0.04 +12.7 -0.03 +12.0 +0.03 +12.5 +0.01 +14.7 +5.6 -0.01 +3.0 +0.10 +31.8 -0.01 +11.1 -0.09 +9.1 -0.03 +15.3 -0.03 +10.4 +5.9 -0.02 +16.0 -0.02 +9.9 -0.03 +11.0 -0.02 +11.3 -0.04 +11.6 -0.02 +11.8 -0.04 +12.1 -0.03 +12.3 -0.04 +12.3 -0.02 +12.4 -0.02 +8.0 -0.02 +11.0 -0.07 +9.5 -0.04 +10.0 -0.07 +7.6

SmCap

33.03

SmlCpGth

20.50 +0.07 +21.8

+20.2

SmlCpVl

15.48 -0.04 +18.6

-0.23 +11.4 -0.02 +11.4 -0.14 +19.1 -0.25 +7.1 +0.03 +19.9 +13.6 -0.01 +14.1 +19.1 +0.02 +12.1 -0.12 +30.6

500Sgl

93.18 -0.19 +11.5

STBdIdx

10.74 -0.01 +5.2

TotBdSgl

10.90 -0.01 +8.5

TotStkSgl

29.53 -0.04 +13.0

STBnd

10.74 -0.01 +5.1

TotBnd

10.90 -0.01 +8.4

TotlIntl

16.00 -0.09 +11.0

TotStk

30.59 -0.04 +12.9

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.28 -0.06

EmMkInst

30.91 -0.14 +19.3

NS

ExtIn

39.24 +0.03 +20.1

FTAllWldI r

95.68 -0.43 +11.6

GrwthIst

30.78

InfProInst

10.90 +0.01 +9.9

+13.7

InstIdx

112.06 -0.23 +11.5

InsPl

112.07 -0.22 +11.6

InsTStPlus

27.65 -0.04 +13.0

MidCpIst

19.55 -0.01 +19.2

SCInst

33.10 +0.01 +20.4

TBIst

10.90 -0.01 +8.6

TSInst

30.60 -0.04 +13.0

Vanguard Signal:

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.03

+13.5


B6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

ENTER AS MANY TIMES AS YOU LIKE!

Enter And win The Bulletin’s

2010 VACAT ION GETAWAY SWEEPSTA KE S! WIN A 7-NIGHT MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

PROVIDED BY

AND Enjoy a spectacular vacation, courtesy of Carnival Cruise Lines, Getaways Travel, and The Bulletin. Trip for two includes 7 days onboard the Carnival Splendor® roundtrip from Los Angeles. Visit the ports of Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. Room, dining and ship entertainment included.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE CALL THE BULLETIN AT

541-385-5800 FOR COMPLETE RULES AND REGULATIONS: Visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Winner will be drawn January 28, 2011.

OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fourth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and can not be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

NAME: __________________________________________________________________________ PHONE: ____________________________ ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ E-MAIL: __________________________________________________________________________ BULLETIN SUBSCRIBER: ___YES ___ NO Official entry forms must be received by 3 p.m. on January 27, 2011 Entry forms may be mailed to: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, or dropped off at:

GETAWAYS TRAVEL located at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

563 SW 13th St., Bend OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


L

Inside

OREGON Faith groups help restore old theater in Malin, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Jule Sugarman, Head Start architect, dies, see Page C5. WASHINGTON Inmates nurture endangered frogs, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010

CROOK COUNTY

Hensley ready to ‘do more with less’ Sheriff-elect is not planning to cut staff

C

Attention, photographers! Submit your own photography at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Picture-taking advice from The Bulletin’s professional photographers

Well, sh ot!

Installment 31: The desert

By Lauren Dake

DMV uproar sparks shift in zoning

The Bulletin

For the first time since 1987, the Crook County Sheriff’s Office will be occupied by someone other than Rodd Clark. Sheriff-elect Jim Hensley said the reality is starting to sink in. “I would like to recognize Sheriff Clark for his many years of service to Crook County and the rest of the state,” Hensley said. “He was there for 24 years, and that’s many years of service to this community and to the state of Oregon. I want to say that first and foremost.” Clark and Hensley worked together for about 20 years. For eight of those years, Hensley was Clark’s second-in-command. Two years ago, Clark demoted Hensley. Clark said he and his staff lost confidence Hensley could do his job. But Clark offered Hensley a position in parole and probations. Currently, Hensley is a parole and probations officer. Hensley said when he takes over as sheriff, he will put a priority on working with all the county’s department heads. His position as a parole officer inspired one of his ideas, to help people on parole to pay off their debts to the courts and make restitution to victims by participating in work crews. And he said he plans to meet individually with every member of the sheriff’s office staff and “do more with less.” He said that doesn’t mean he is planning on laying off any staff members. See Sheriff / C5

Planning commission backs change in code, but move is unaffected By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park in Utah. You never really see this view of the arch. I wanted to do a picture of just stone, shadow and sky during a trip a few years ago and was alone in the bowl next to the arch. Fuji Velvia, underexposed slightly, really makes the colors of the desert pop.

By Pete Erickson The Bulletin

The first time I saw Mono Lake in California was during a field trip while studying aquatic biology during my last year in college. We were there in the middle of the day studying the hordes of flies crawling on the mud, and I was entirely unimpressed. Many years later, after picking up a camera and learning some basics, I returned at sunset and the stunning beauty of the place took my breath away. The lake transformed itself into an opera of color. Landscape pictures, especially of the desert,

look better when shot early in the morning or late in the day. Light passes through hundreds of miles of air when the sun is close to the horizon, resulting in a reddish hue and creating sideways shadows. The rocks, sand and trees of a desert are perfect for using this effect. If you slightly underexpose the photograph, you can make the colors even more amazing. The brilliant red Navajo sandstone of southern Utah and northern Arizona becomes a spectacular kaleidoscope during sunrise and sunset. When you see this happen, with or without a camera, the 20-hour slog to the

Snowstorm may whiten High Desert

I experimented with five stops of graduation by stacking two Singh-Ray graduated neutral-density filters with this presunrise photo of the Hoodoos at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah. It was shot on film and I didn’t think it would turn out, so I only shot two frames, but this was my favorite of the morning.

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A storm moving across the state could bring snow to Central Oregon. “Snow levels are definitely coming down,” said Meteorologist Robert Camp, with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. Today and tomorrow snow levels could drop as low as 3,500 feet, which could come close to hitting ground level in parts of Bend, Camp said. “The forecast for (today) is rain and snow starting in the afternoon,” he said. “And the majority of the rain and snow starts Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning.” Camp said the forecast shows the mountains getting anywhere from 3 to 6 inches of snow. If snow does hit downtown, it’s not expected to stick around long. Temperatures should be in the upper 40s to mid-50s by Thursday. Todd McGee, owner of the Powder House store in Bend, which rents and sells ski gear, said early snow is a good sign. “We can be in an outstanding economy and have poor snow and not do well,” he said of his business. “Or, we could be in the economy we’re in now and have good snow and do well. The ski business is mostly in the hands of snow.” McGee said it would be great news if the ski season started earlier in the year. “It definitely gets people excited, for sure,” he said. “When the (season) comes late, they think the season is partly over and aren’t as excited or enthusiastic.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

nearest amazing location, Zion National Park, is forgotten. Six world-class national parks and a national monument deserving of the title can be found in the region. I go as often as money allows and never get bored. The desert provides the perfect setting for really practicing light, shadow and shape in your photos. You can make a great picture 10 feet from your car, or you can throw on a waterproof backpack and a dry suit to slosh through a slot canyon with cold water up to your neck. The most important rule with desert photography is to go and explore for yourself.

Moon set behind Checkerboard Mesa in Zion National Park in Utah. I was shooting pictures of the mesa at sunrise, and all of a sudden the moon popped out from behind the stone. I shot the photo with a 400mm lens. You can see shadows on the moon’s craters on the Velvia film. Winter sunrise at Smith Rock State Park in Central Oregon a couple of years ago. Underexposing the picture will turn the rocks red just as the sun hits. You can’t really see this with your eyes, but it will turn out in a picture.

Equipment corner FOR BEGINNERS

FOR INTERMEDIATES

FOR ADVANCED

Learn to see what light does during the twilight hours. Take a point-and-shoot to Smith Rock State Park at sunrise and play around with the light on the stone. Shoot normally and then underexpose a few shots to see the difference. The rock will turn red on underexposed pictures.

Get any Jack Dykinga book and study his photos. Don’t spend 10 grand on a 4x5 camera yet; just study the possibilities of photography in the desert.

Invest in Singh-Ray graduated neutral-density filters and learn how and when to use them. Don’t buy any more camera gear. Use the money for a road trip to the Colorado Plateau and go!

Here’s the lineup

Aug. 17 Cars

Aug. 31 Going rustic

Each installment will feature tips from The Bulletin’s photographers, followed the next week by the best of readers’ submitted photos.

Oct. 12 Oct. 26 Sept. 14 Sept. 28 Today Nov. 23 Dec. 7 Dec. 21 Halloween The desert Cycling Flame Winter Horses Nature’s Fall abstracts color

In response to the recent furor over the DMV’s plan to move in the Brookswood Meadow Plaza, the city of Bend is looking to change some rules to ensure a similar situation doesn’t happen in the future. On Monday, the Bend Planning Commission approved a proposed change to the development code that would regulate the placement of government offices in particular commercial zones inside the city. While this won’t have any impact on the DMV’s contentious decision to move into the Brookswood shopping center, city officials say it would fill a loophole in the development code that was exposed by the situation. “I think this is an anomaly, but it’s an anomaly that we want to prevent in the future,” Bend Current Planning Manager Colin Stephens said before the meeting. At issue is Bend’s classification for convenience commercial districts. The city’s general plan states these areas are meant to provide for the needs of the surrounding neighborhood, such as with a grocery store. See Zoning / C5

Grant boosts spay, neuter programs By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Deschutes County officials are boosting a program to prevent unwanted kittens and puppies, with an additional $10,000 in grants for spay and neuter organizations this year. The County Commission’s decision to add money last week brings the total amount available to $12,400, and nonprofit groups must apply for it by Dec. 3. Deschutes County also helps support local shelters with money from dog license fees. However, officials suspect most dogs are unlicensed, which means the county collects less money for animal services and they have no way of ensuring most dogs have their rabies vaccinations. State law requires counties to provide animal shelters to impound dangerous dogs and dogs found to be off their owners’ property and not under any person’s control, among other circumstances. County Administrator Dave Kanner said there is no way of knowing how many unregistered dogs there are in Deschutes County. Kanner cited a statistic from the American Pet Products Association that there is, on average, one dog per 3.94 people in the United States. If the same number were applied locally, there would be 42,778 dogs in Deschutes County, Kanner wrote in an email. Between July 2009 and June 2010, the county issued 13,773 dog licenses, county Revenue Supervisor Cheryl Circle wrote in an e-mail. The difference between the likely number of dogs and the number of licensed dogs is a problem, Kanner said. See Grant / C5


C2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:48 a.m. Nov. 5, in the 1100 block of Southeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and tools stolen at 8:47 a.m. Nov. 5, in the 1100 block of Southeast Division Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:44 a.m. Nov. 5, in the area of Northeast Sixth Street and Northeast Burnside Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at noon Nov. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Roanoke Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:11 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 1100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:37 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 1400 block of Northeast Eighth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3:31 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 61600 block of Daly Estates Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:31 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 100 block of Southwest Westpine Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 11:46 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Andrew Quint Thompson, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:57 a.m. Nov. 6, in the 61100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Stephen Turpin, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:42 a.m. Nov. 6, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Olney Avenue. Theft — Jewelry was reported stolen at 9:16 a.m. Nov. 6, in the 20500 block of Brightenwood Lane. Theft — Propane tanks were reported stolen at 9:47 a.m. Nov. 6, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:32

p.m. Nov. 6, in the 1200 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 2:38 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 400 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and stereo and computer stolen at 8:10 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:57 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 700 block of Northwest Bond Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:23 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 200 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and office printer stolen at 7:37 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 100 block of Southwest Columbia Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:04 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 100 block of Northwest Flagline Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:27 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 2300 block of Northwest Quinn Creek Loop. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and wallet stolen at 9:30 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 800 block of Northeast Hidden Valley Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and CD player and iPod stolen at 10:04 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 61100 block of Chuckanut Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:22 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 100 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and iPod stolen at 11:39 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 900 block of Northeast Hidden Valley Drive. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 11:42 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 400 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 4:25 p.m. Nov. 7, in the 900 block of Southeast Second Street. DUII — Timothy Paul Hand, 48, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:28 p.m. Nov. 7, in the area of Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Stephen John March, 60, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:32 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 900 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:56 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 2400

block of Southwest Yew Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:26 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 400 block of Southwest Glacier Avenue. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 1:29 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — Bicycle parts were reported stolen at 1:28 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:59 a.m. Nov. 5, in the 1100 block of Southwest 15th Street. DUII — Allyson L. Gosson, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:56 a.m. Nov. 5, in the 300 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:03 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 100 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 4:24 p.m. Nov. 7, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:11 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 100 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:52 a.m. Nov. 5, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:58 a.m. Nov. 6, in the area of Southeast Garner Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:39 p.m. Nov. 6, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Barbara Reynolds, 63, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:25 p.m. Nov. 5, in the area of Northeast Fifth Street and Northeast Revere Avenue in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:21 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 3100 block of Northeast Sedgewick Avenue in Terrebonne. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 1:33 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 51600 block of Coach Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:29 p.m. Nov. 5, in the 51300 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Theft — Mail was reported stolen at 8:42 a.m. Nov. 5, in the 60400 block of Arnold Market Road in Bend. DUII — Irma Ezmeralda Arguellas Carbajal, 25, was arrested on

Smart tells jury of abduction By Jennifer Dobner Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Elizabeth Smart remembers not being able to make out the threat, only the feel of cold knife at her neck. As the then-14-year-old lay in bed alongside her baby sister, the man repeated: “Don’t make a sound. Get out of bed and come with me, or I will kill you and your family.” She was his hostage, he told her. “I was shocked. I thought I was having a nightmare. It was just indescribable fear,” Smart, now 23, told jurors Monday on the first day of testimony in the federal trial of Brian David Mitchell, the man accused of kidnapping her in June 2002. That night, they fled up the hills above her home, with Smart in her red pajamas and tennis shoes, and the knife to her back. Her younger sister — a baby blanket wrapped around her head and neck — rushed to their mother, telling of the kidnapping.

“It was utter terror,” their mother, Lois Smart, testified earlier Monday. “It was the worst feeling, knowing that I didn’t know where my child was. I was helpless.” Nine months later, motorists spotted Elizabeth Smart walking in a Salt Lake City suburb with Mitchell. His attorneys did not dispute the facts of the abduction. But during opening statements, they said the prosecution’s allegation that he was a calculating person who planned the kidnapping was wrong. Known as a homeless street preacher named “Immanuel,” Mitchell was influenced by a worsening mental illness and religious beliefs that made him think he was doing what God wanted, his attorneys said. Mitchell, who has a long graying beard to the middle of his chest and hair to the middle of his back, was again removed from the courtroom Monday for singing hymns, so he’s watching

and listening from a holding cell. After leaving the house, Smart said, they hiked three to five hours up a dry streambed and over a mountain to a campsite. There, Mitchell’s now-estranged wife, Wanda Eileen Barzee, embraced Smart, took her into a tent, sat her down on a bucket and washed her feet. Barzee also told her to take off her pajamas and underwear and put on a robe or “she would have the defendant come in and rip them off,” she said. Smart said Mitchell entered the tent wearing a similar robe and married them by twisting lines from a Mormon religious rites into a marriage ceremony, known a sealing. “He proceeded to fight me to the ground and force the robes up,” Smart said quietly, pausing, “where he raped me.” “I begged him not to. I did everything I could to stop him. I pleaded with him not to touch me, but it didn’t work.”

E. Germany opens borders in ’89 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Nov. 9, the 313th day of 2010. There are 52 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On Nov. 9, 1965, the great Northeast blackout occurred as a series of power failures lasting up to 13½ hours left 30 million people in seven states and part of Canada without electricity. ON THIS DATE: In 1872, fire destroyed nearly 800 buildings in Boston. In 1918, it was announced that Germany’s Kaiser Wilhelm II would abdicate. He then fled to the Netherlands. In 1935, United Mine Workers president John L. Lewis and other labor leaders formed the Committee for Industrial Organization (later renamed the Congress of Industrial Organizations). In 1938, Nazis looted and burned synagogues and Jewish-owned stores and houses in Germany and Austria in a pogrom that became known as “Kristallnacht.” In 1953, poet Dylan Thomas died in New York at age 39.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1963, twin disasters struck Japan as some 450 miners were killed in a coal-dust explosion, and about 160 people died in a train crash. In 1967, a Saturn V rocket carrying an unmanned Apollo spacecraft blasted off from Cape Kennedy on a successful test flight. In 1970, former French President Charles de Gaulle died at 79. In 1976, the U.N. General Assembly approved resolutions condemning apartheid in South Africa, including one characterizing the white-ruled government as “illegitimate.” In 1989, communist East Germany threw open its borders, allowing citizens to travel freely to the West; joyous Germans danced atop the Berlin Wall. TEN YEARS AGO George W. Bush’s lead over Al Gore in all-or-nothing Florida slipped beneath 300 votes in a suspenseful recount, as Democrats threw the presidential election to the courts, claiming “an injustice unparalleled in our history.”

FIVE YEARS AGO Three suicide bombers carried out nearly simultaneous attacks on three U.S.-based hotels in Amman, Jordan, killing 60 victims and wounding hundreds. Oil executives testified before Congress that their huge profits were justified. ONE YEAR AGO The Dow Jones industrial average rose 203.52, or 2 percent, to 10,226.94, its highest finish since Oct. 3, 2008, as a falling dollar boosted prices for gold, oil and other commodities. Germany celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Baseball Hall of Famer Whitey Herzog is 79. Baseball Hall of Famer Bob Gibson is 75. Rapper Scarface (Geto Boys) is 40. Singer Nick Lachey (98 Degrees) is 37. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can’t, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.” — Robert Frost American poet (1874-1963)

suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:52 p.m. Nov. 6, in the area of South Heights Avenue and Southwest Canal Boulevard in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:12 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 53400 block of Big Timber Drive in La Pine. DUII — Bradley Austin Montgomery, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:19 p.m. Nov. 6, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Yew Avenue in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:58 p.m. Nov. 6, in the 17200 block of Indio Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:27 p.m. Nov. 6 in the 7700 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Burglary — A wallet was reported stolen at 9:33 a.m. Nov. 6, in the 15900 block of Camino De Oro in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:20 p.m. Nov. 7, in the area of Baker Road near the railroad tracks in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:40 p.m. Nov. 7, in the 18800 block of Choctaw Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:25 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 18900 block of Baker Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — Mailboxes were reported vandalized at 8:18 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 17500 block of Jordan Road in Cloverdale. DUII — Daphne Dee Kremer, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:22 a.m. Nov. 7, in the area of Camp Polk Road and State Highway 126 in Sisters. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:41 a.m. Nov. 7, in the area of Lake and Pine drives in Cloverdale. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:19 a.m. Nov. 7, in the area of Johnson and Tyler roads in Bend. DUII — Santiago Medina Rodriguez, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:43 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 65600 block of 61st Street in Redmond. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:31 a.m. Nov. 7, in the 1000 block of East Desperado Trail in Sisters.

Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:18 p.m. Nov. 2, in the area of Mustang and Haddock roads in Crooked River Ranch. Unauthorized use — A John Deere Gator was reported stolen Nov. 4, in the 2300 block of Southwest U.S. Highway 97 in Madras. Oregon State Police

DUII — Daniel James Lee Cook, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:15 p.m. Nov. 5, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue in Redmond. DUII — Brittnie Nicole Liggett, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:18 a.m. Nov. 6, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Revere Avenue in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:30 p.m. Nov. 5, in the area of State Highway 126 and 59th Street in Redmond. DUII — Carmen Nicole Mallen, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:06 a.m. Nov. 6, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 3:44 a.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, adjacent to 2600 N.E. Forum Drive. 4:20 p.m. — Gas leak, 1945 S.W. Knoll Ave. 6:29 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, adjacent to Baker Road. 17 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 4:36 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, adjacent to 59999 Cheyenne Road. 7:19 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 60845 Ruby Place. 20 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 1:56 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, on Northwest Awbrey Glen and Northwest Mt. Washington drives. 4:15 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 105 N.E. Fifth St. 5:52 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 63930 U.S. Highway 97, Number 41. 15 — Medical aid calls.

Republican closes in on Senate seat By Tim Fought Associated Press

PORTLAND — With most votes counted, the Republican in one of two unresolved Oregon state Senate races has a lead the county clerk says can’t be overcome. Clerk Sherry Hall said the votes tallied Monday in Clackamas County give Republican Alan Olsen a 225-vote edge over Democratic incumbent Martha Schrader with only 130 challenged votes yet to count. “This is not going to change,” Hall said. Schrader said Monday evening she was waiting for all the votes to be counted and to see if the numbers trigger a recount. “I’m just going to hang tight,” she said. Olsen did not immediately return calls. An Olsen victory would give Republicans 14 seats in the Senate, while Democrats have 15. That would keep alive the possibility the chamber might be divided between the parties, as the Oregon House will be, 30-30. A Senate race in Southern Oregon remains to be resolved, and it was unclear Monday when that might happen. The Democratic candidate leads there. The National Conference of State Legislatures says records back to the mid-1960s show that some states have seen ties in one chamber or the other of their legislatures, but not in both simultaneously.

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters License #78462

Brighten The Holidays With The Bulletin’s 50 Day Holiday Package. Receive 50 days of Holiday inserts, local shopping and sales guides, Holiday events, activities and Special Holiday Deals Of The Day offers for only $18.50. Plus, your Holiday subscription includes full web access to bendbulletin.com perfect for checking on weather conditions, local events or staying in touch with local news while you travel.

Get The Bulletin’s Holiday Package for just $18.50 and receive a $15 Fred Meyer Gift Card FREE! Sent when payment has been processed.

To sign up call 541-385-5800 and ask for The Bulletin’s Holiday Package Offer is valid for new subscribers only. Must not have been active within the last 30 days.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 C3 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

TThinking hinking ooff SSpinal pinal Surgery? Surgery? R ead tthis his ffiirst rst before before Read you youdo doanything! anthing!

O O  B Pedestrian deaths up by 80 percent this year PORTLAND — The number of pedestrians killed in Oregon this year has nearly doubled from last year. State highway officials say 52 people have been killed while walking on roads or streets across the state so far this year, compared with 29 during the same period in 2009. The Oregonian reports that just last week, three people died after being struck by cars — one in Eugene, one in Milton-Freewater and another in Welches. The manager for Oregon’s pedestrian safety program, Julie Yip, said the common factor in many of those deaths is visibility — people wearing dark clothing on unlit roads. The state is running a campaign with public transportation posters telling pedestrians to “be visible” and “dress to be seen.”

Ex-spy pleads guilty to plotting from prison PORTLAND — The highestranking CIA officer ever convicted of espionage will spend an additional eight years in prison after becoming the first U.S. intelligence official convicted twice of betraying his country. Harold “Jim” Nicholson entered a guilty plea Monday on charges that he tried to collect a “pension” from old contacts in Russia while serving time in prison. Prosecutors say Nicholson used his son to carry messages to Russian officials on three continents. The government says Nathaniel Nicholson met with the Russians in Mexico, Peru and Cyprus and collected more than $47,000 as compensation for his father’s past spy work. Nicholson is serving a 24-year prison term after he was convicted of selling classified U.S. documents to Russia between 1994 and 1996.

Conservationists could sue over rare butterfly MCMINNVILLE — Conservation groups are warning Yamhill County they will sue if the county doesn’t take steps to protect an endangered butterfly. The Xerces Society and Center for Biological Diversity sent a letter Monday giving the county 60 days to make it clear they will start protecting the Fender’s blue butterfly. Once thought to be extinct, it was rediscovered in 1989. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has expressed concerns that county road maintenance kills off a species of lupine that the butterfly depends on to live. County commissioners applied for a $391,000 grant to develop a habitat conservation plan, but then turned it down on a 2-1 vote over fears it would obligate them to future costs.

FBI rescues 3 girls in sex trafficking sting PORTLAND — The FBI says it recovered three girls in a child sex trafficking sting operation that resulted in prostitution charges against 19 adults in the Portland area. FBI agents said they worked with more than a dozen other local and federal agencies in the Portland and Vancouver, Wash., metro area to run the sting last Thursday through Saturday. The Portland metro operation was part of Operation Cross Country 5, marking the fifth national law enforcement action against child sex trafficking. The FBI says the operation has recovered 69 children nationally.

Coast visitors urged to avoid dead sea lions TILLAMOOK — Marine mammal experts are warning people to stay away from sea lions they may find dead on a beach. KGW-TV reports at least two more dead sea lions were found over the weekend on Oregon beaches. The animals may carry a bacterial disease called leptospirosis that can be spread to dogs and people. In people it causes flulike symptoms. The disease can be spread on contact with a sick or dead California sea lion or its waste. — From wire reports

Faith groups restoring historic Malin theater By Ryan Pfeil Herald and News

MALIN — The Broadway Theater didn’t always have dry rot, water damage and decay to deal with. The building, built by Vaclav Kalina in 1930 to the tune of $30,000, used to be a fully functioning concert hall, complete with stage, movie screen, auditorium and concession stand. A dance and roller rink hall was next door. Big band orchestras, including Glenn Miller’s, played there. Basin Youth for Christ director Pat Hagerty and a group of about 20 other men from Ashland’s First Baptist Church hope to return the now-abandoned building to its former glory. They devoted their weekend to repairing and preserving it and are confident in their success. “I want the building to just be a blessing to the communities around here,” Hagerty said. It used to be a blessing to Malin in a big way. The building’s large stage was used for traveling Vaudeville performers, movie nights, boxing matches, school plays, church services and high school graduation ceremonies. It closed in 1958, shortly after the introduction of TV to the small community. For more than 30 years, Kalina used the building as a storage space until he sold it in 1991. The building remained in fair condition to that point. After it sold, the real damage started, something Hagerty witnessed for the first time nine years later when

“It was completely destroyed. The water damage was extreme. It was bad. Not sort of bad. Downright nasty.” — Pat Hagerty, Basin Youth for Christ director he purchased the theater and the Broadway Hall next door. After the Broadway Hall was renovated, it was renamed the Way Station. It is now used for church youth group gatherings. The theater was another story. The damage was much more severe. Water from hundreds of storms and dew-filled mornings had seeped through, leaving sagging ceiling tiles and rotting wood in its wake. “It was completely destroyed,” Hagerty said. “The water damage was extreme. It was bad. Not sort of bad. Downright nasty.” But the abandoned building also had its charms. It was a treasure trove of memorabilia. Thieves and squatters left untouched the vintage projection and sound equipment. Film reel splicing tools and canisters were there, too. Hagerty had no trouble selling the Western Electric sound equipment he’d found for $15,000. Signatures from days gone by also remained, scrawled in pencil and pen across the back dressing room walls. “We keep finding some inter-

esting things,” said volunteer Eugene Schultzke. But treasure trove or not, there was still major damage. Enter Hagerty’s father-in-law, Lee Fox, and family friend Greg Case from Ashland. Both men had gone on a series of trips to an orphanage in Mexico to do repairs over the past several years, part of an effort by Ashland’s First Baptist Church. “This is an alternative to those longer, expensive trips,” Fox said. “It’s phenomenal. We’ve got 22 guys. That’s amazing when you consider conflicts.” Through coordination with Hagerty, they made a plan of attack to repair the center, complete with needed tools, supplies and manpower. It took about three months to get a volunteer force together. “The guys jumped right in,” Case said. “I’m actually pleased at how much we’ve gotten done.” The biggest planned repairs and expansions are to the front bathrooms, but most of the building will be restored. The small second-story projection room will be used as a museum for center patrons. Stackable chairs will replace the old seats. In the end, Hagerty just hopes the same facility so many enjoyed 60 years ago is coming back. He hopes to host movies, plays and concerts there, mostly on a donation basis for patrons. “We may use it for funerals, too,” Hagerty said. It’s a lot of work, but the show must go on, even if the intermission goes on for years.

Methodists sue congregation over finances PORTLAND — An Eastern Oregon congregation that left the United Methodist Church has been sued over its finances. The Oregon-Idaho Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church lawsuit alleges that members of the independent Ontario Community Church took property, funds and documents held in trust for the Methodist mission and ministry. Leaders of the independent church, formerly the Ontario Community United Methodist Church, said their attorney advised them not to comment on the complaint filed last week in Malheur County Circuit Court, The Oregonian newspaper reported. Congregations in California

and Alabama have left the Methodist denomination in recent years, sparking legal battles over the United Methodist Church’s trust clause, which holds that local congregations own property in trust for the denomination. “It’s unfortunate when a church dispute must be resolved in court,” Greg Tollefson, chairman of the conference board of trustees, said in a statement. “We have an important responsibility to protect property which has been part of the United Methodist Church for 65 years. We understand that certain current members wish to leave the denomination, but this departure does not entitle them to occupy property of the

United Methodist Church or appropriate church funds for other purposes.” Greg Nelson, a spokesman for the Oregon-Idaho conference, said the national church does not keep track of how many churches have left the denomination. But, he added, in most legal disputes, the trust clause has been upheld. Similar issues are at stake in the Episcopal Church of the United States as congregations leave the national denomination. Disagreements over biblical interpretation, same-sex marriage and ordination of gay clergy are reasons congregations often cite for leaving their denominations.

I am Dr. David Herrin, DC. I run the only Non-Surgical Decompression Center of its kind in Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back -- every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica. Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain -- Without Surgery If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self -- Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife. If you have fallen for that trap and are in desperate need of relief of back pain, you should read on. Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion About Surgery -- I Hated

To See My Grandma Suffer How many surgeries does it take to get it right? Two, three, four ... my sweet Grandma had seven before it was a success. Talk about suffering. Maybe you see why I believe surgery should be a last resort. Do you have that kind of time? I have a better solution. People in my office get out of pain fast, and can be back doing the things they love while they are being treated. And you don’t have to feel like you are a drug addict to feel good. The New Solution -- Fast And Long-Lasting Relief We have a non-surgical, non-drug solution. And it’s fast and effective. It’s called non-surgical spinal decompression. Let me give you the low down on this groundbreaking technology. This is a computerized decompression machine that stretches the spine in a unique way. It creates negative pressure deep in the diseased disc. The negative pressure acts like a vacuum that pulls the disc material away from the spinal cord and spinal nerves. Eliminating pain and symptoms. And at the same time the negative pressure pulls nutrients, water and oxygen into the disc. You see with disc diseases, the disc is actually sick! It’s dehydrated. And shrinking. That is how many of our patients regain their life.

Do Any Of These Case Studies Sound Familiar To You? Case #125. Darlene D. After her surgery she was left in some serious pain. This pain lasted 32 years. She came in to us and in three weeks she was out of pain. In five weeks she was on her roof working with her husband. Do you see what we can do for you? We are offering a solution to your pain. To get your life back, FAST! Case #89. Bruce F. After a traumatic car accident, Bruce was left in pain. He went here and there but didn’t find relief. So he came to see us. The treatments were painless. He got out of pain. He now runs, walks the beach, and plays with his kid. All without pain. Does your current therapy offer you this kind of relief? What are you waiting for? Case #320. John M.’s MRI said, “Annular Tear,” Ouch! His episodes of pain put him on his back for two weeks every couple months. He began treatment and his pain decreased almost immediately. Over the course of treatment his back felt stronger and more flexible. No episodes to this day. Do you want to improve the quality of your life? Are your current therapies doing that for you? Case #25. Kevin. Headaches every day of his life since an accident. Headaches gone after first treatment. Peace could be defined as finding a solution to a problem that has you feeling completely crazy. Imagine how Kevin must have felt, and how he feels now! You don’t need a referral to see me. In fact, I want all to come and see me. You are invited to be evaluated by me. I will cover the cost. There is a catch -- you have to qualify. You see, I will not take anyone. I will only treat those I can help.

Don’t Delay Your Pain Relief Come And See If You’re A Good Candidate To Eliminate Your Pain This examination typically costs $245. Right now you can get it for free. That is -- if you qualify. Call now to see if you qualify for this exclusive evaluation. It is a great opportunity to be evaluated by a spinal expert.

It’s A Free Consultation This is what you will discover during your free consultation... ? Why you’re in so much pain? ... You’ll actually get a diagnosis that makes sense. ? How long it will take to get you better? ... It’s less time than you think.

Before you stop reading this, call our number to schedule your free appointment now!

(541) 923-2019 Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic 1655 SW Highland Ave., Suite 6 Redmond, OR 97756


C4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

What Washington voters told pols

W

ashington voters refused to adopt an income tax last week. And then, to their credit, they kept right on going, killing a number of tax-related proposals and, in

the process, expressing very clearly how they’d like lawmakers to handle a shortfall expected to top $4 billion in the coming biennium. Start cutting. Pronto. Consider the following ballot measures: • Initiative Measure 1053 requires tax proposals to receive two-thirds support in each legislative chamber. That hurdle already exists in the state’s law books, but the Legislature suspended it last year. By supporting I-1053, 65 percent of voters told their elected representatives to knock it off. • Initiative Measure 1098 would have created an income tax for individuals making more than $200,000 per year and couples making more than $400,000. Washington state currently has no income tax, and voters like it that way. I-1098 failed by an overwhelming margin, 65 percent to 35 percent. • Initiative Measure 1107 eliminated legislatively imposed taxes on candy, soda and bottled water. It passed with more than 60 percent of the vote. • Finally, voters rejected Referendum Bill 52, which should be familiar to Oregonians. It’s Gov.-elect Kitzhaber’s short-term job creation plan in slightly different clothing. Washington lawmakers had asked voters for permission to borrow more than $500 million. The money would have paid for energyefficiency projects in public schools and higher-education buildings, thereby allegedly saving millions of dollars in heating costs and, as the arguments in favor gushed, “bring(ing) new employment opportunities to every community across Washington State.” But voters in Washington were in no mood for additional debt, well-intentioned though the

proposal may have been. They turned it down by a 10-point margin. Washingtonians, like Oregonians, are wrestling with significant economic and budgetary problems, but last week they refused to fight them with tax hikes and borrowing schemes. Instead, as Gov. Chris Gregoire said on Friday, “they sent a message, which is, they want an all-cuts budget.” The Spartan approach will be difficult for the constituencies affected, not to mention the lawmakers who’ll have to say “no” to them. But it’s preferable to the menu of alternatives that voters rejected, particularly the creation of an income tax. Washingtonians are playing for the long term. When economic conditions improve, as they will, Tuesday’s results will be a selling point for those with the ability to invest in the state and create jobs. Such people want an economic climate that is both favorable and stable, and it won’t go unnoticed that Washington residents didn’t panic when times got tough. Rather than grabbing reflexively for the biggest available wallets, they told their lawmakers to start cutting. That decision has implications for lawmakers in Oregon, who will wrestle with a multibillion-dollar shortfall of their own. Taxpayers — including businesses — are free to move from one state to another, and the hop from Oregon to Washington is a short one. Lawmakers here should do everything they can not to push the very people we need over the border.

Union leaders balk at cuts

I

f an article in Monday’s StatesmanJournal proves correct, John Kitzhaber may find Oregon even more ungovernable in his third term than he did at the end of his second. State employee union leaders told the Salem newspaper they expect Kitzhaber to be a sympathetic leader who asks only small and temporary sacrifices of them. Ken Allen, executive director of Council 51 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), told the paper that Kitzhaber never before has asked unionized public workers for permanent changes to their wages and benefits, and that he doesn’t expect that to change. If he’s right, Kitzhaber will, virtually all experts say, be unable to make any lasting impact on what economists expect to be a decade of deficits. Two areas offer the most room for change. Currently, most government agencies, from cities on up, pay employees’ 6 percent contribution to the state retirement fund. At the same time, state employees pay nothing toward their health insurance costs, un-

like school district and most private sector workers. Government workers are right when they note that the retirement pickup was put in place when the state could not afford raises and that removing it would amount to a compensation cut. That’s unfortunate, but reductions are far from uncommon in Oregon these days, and state workers, in particular, gave up very little in the recession’s early days. They agreed to six unpaid days this year, two in 2009 and one next year. Meanwhile, they received a 5 percent pay raise in August. As for contributing to their health insurance, that should be a given, and Kitzhaber of all people should know that. Beyond the money their contributions would save the state, there’s the practical notion that having some skin in the health insurance game is likely to make state employees more disciplined consumers of health care. Kitzhaber faces a difficult task even if state employees prove to be more reasonable than their leaders are sounding. If they don’t prove reasonable, he faces an impossible one.

Proud to live in Awbrey Glen By Jerry Johnson Bulletin guest columnist

I

read the recent article in The Bulletin regarding the Awbrey Glen Homeowners Association (HOA) with great interest. Since we have lived in Awbrey Glen since 2002, are members of the golf club, and have personally had a somewhat difficult exchange with the HOA, I feel qualified to shed some light on the article. First, let me say that overall I think the people who represent the homeowners in Awbrey Glen through the HOA are well-informed and intelligent people who donate their time and talents to uphold the values of all property owners. Since the development was largely designed around a golf course by Brooks Resources, it presents some unique challenges to the people who represent the best interest of the course and its members and those who represent the best interest of the owners who do not play golf. I personally disagree with those who feel there is a conflict of interest between the two groups. Because the golf course has such a major impact on home values, in my way of thinking, having some of the same people represent both entities is a plus. Before anyone purchases a property in Awbrey Glen, they should make sure they can live under these conditions. One final comment: Dogs do not belong on golf courses for obvious rea-

IN MY VIEW sons, and if the owner doesn’t understand this they must have other problems which need attention. On the other side of the coin, I can understand some of the frustration with those who have had issues with the HOA. Having designed and built several houses over the course of many years and having to deal with numerous planning commissions, review boards, HOAs, etc., I can truthfully say anyone who has experienced this process has to have lots of patience and perseverance. There are always a few members in these groups who have what I call the “Little Caesar Syndrome.” Somehow when they get a little authority it seems to go to their head and short-circuits the part of the brain that controls logic and common sense. Enough said. As a member of the Awbrey Glen Golf Club, I would like to make a few comments regarding the recent election, which was mentioned in the article. To anyone who lives in Bend, it’s pretty obvious that the golf courses in this area are really having a tough time making it financially. Because the maintenance of the Awbrey Glen course is a major expense and benefits all property owners through increased property values, the HOA decided to hold an election which,

if passed, would permit a small portion ($5 per month) of the homeowner dues to be passed on to the course to defray the maintenance cost of the course. If ever there was an election designed to fail, this one would fall at the top of the list. To pass, there needed to be 75 percent yes votes, and a nonresponse was counted as a no vote. Needless to say, the issue failed. I would like to point out that all the people in Awbrey Glen really step up to the plate in the support of the community. Through the “Glen Gives” program, which is a nonprofit organization, more than $300,000 has been raised since 2004 and donated to local families with a onetime assistance to allow them to get their lives back on track. This year, somewhere around $80,000 will be raised through various events within the golf club and the community to be donated through this effort. Personally, we are very proud to be members of the club and the community and hope that the folks who seem to have difficulty living within the community framework try a little harder to work things out. Lastly, did I mention the club house has a great restaurant open to the public, which received an A- when recently reviewed by The Bulletin? Bring your friends ... we need the business. Jerry Johnson lives in Bend.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Sooner or later, Islamic terrorists will manage to hit U.S. again

O

ne of the most striking things about our recent midterm elections is that foreign policy played absolutely no part in the voting — and for that we have Lady Luck, and some good intelligence work, to thank. In fact, in the past year we’ve won the lottery five times in row. How often does that happen? Let’s review: We got incredibly lucky that the al-Qaida-inspired Nigerian, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, was unable to detonate the explosives sewn into his underpants, as his Delta airliner, with 278 passengers, was approaching the Detroit airport on Christmas Day. Ditto for Faisal Shahzad, whose homemade bomb packed into a 1993 Nissan Pathfinder failed to go off after he detonated it in a crowded Times Square on May 1. In February, thanks to good intelligence work, Najibullah Zazi, an Afghan immigrant, pleaded guilty in a New York courtroom to plotting with al-Qaida to kill himself — and as many other people as possible — by setting off a bomb in a New York City subway near the anniversary of 9/11. Then, last week, security teams removed packages from cargo planes in Britain and the United Arab Emirates

bound for Chicago. Inside, they found bombs wired to cell phones and hidden in the toner cartridges of computer printers. The bombs, timed to go off when the planes were over America, were believed to have been built by the same Saudi jihadist, Ibrahim Hassan alAsiri, who designed the Christmas Day underwear bomb. An intelligence tip from the Saudis upset that plan. Imagine if all five had gone off. We would be checking the underwear of every airline passenger, you would have to pass through metal detectors to walk into Times Square or take the subway, and the global air cargo industry would be in turmoil, as every package would have to be sniffed by a bomb-detecting dog. So, yes, we won the lottery five times in a row — and that’s just the attempts we know about. But one of these days, our luck is going to run out because the savage madness emanating from al-Qaida, from single individuals it inspires over the Web and from its different franchisees — like the branches in Yemen and Iraq — is only increasing. A week ago, a Baghdad church was attacked. Here’s how The Associated

THOMAS FRIEDMAN Press described it: Seven or eight alQaida-linked Muslim militants “charged through the front doors of the church, interrupting the evening Mass service. They rushed down the aisle, brandishing their machine guns and spraying the room with bullets. They ordered the priest to call the Vatican to demand the release of Muslim women who they claimed were being held captive by the Coptic Church in Egypt. When the priest said he could not do that, the gunmen shot him and turned their guns on the congregation, killing most of those in the front pew.” When the Iraqi police moved in to rescue the worshippers, scores more were killed in the shootout. On Friday, pro-Taliban bombers blew up two moderate mosques during Friday prayer in northwestern Pakistan, killing

more than 60 worshippers. When Muslim jihadists are ready to just gun down or blow up unarmed men, women and children in the midst of prayer — Muslim or Christian — it means there are no moral, cultural or religious restraints left on the Islamic fringe. It’s anything goes. And it’s becoming routine. What to do? So many, but not all, of the suicide bombers come from failing, humiliated societies that generate huge numbers of “sitting-around people,” who are easy prey for recruiters offering martyrdom and significance in the next life. We need to do what we can to eliminate their sources of energy. That means finishing our business in Afghanistan and Iraq, and settling the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and getting our military out of that region. But these will never be sufficient. There is a civil war in Islam today between the forces of decency and modernism and the suicidal jihadists. This stuff only stops when the Muslim forces of decency triumph — and delegitimize and crush the barbarism of al-Qaida. It takes a village, and it’s going to take a while. Meanwhile, we need to focus on the

things we can control. For starters, we’re going to have to learn to live with more insecurity. Terrorism is awful, but it is not yet an existential threat. And we can’t let our response to it be to shut down our open society or tear ourselves apart with recriminations. Like the Israelis and Brits, we need to keep up our guard, learn from our mistakes, but also learn to bury our dead and move on. Finally, we need to dry up the funding for terrorist groups, and the mosques, schools and charities that support them. And that means working to end our addiction to oil. It is disgusting to listen to Republican politicians lecturing President Barack Obama about how he has to stay the course in Afghanistan while they don’t have an ounce of courage to vote to increase the gasoline tax or renewable energy standards that would reduce the money we’re sending to the people our soldiers are fighting. I know. None of this seems very relevant right now. But it will — the day our luck runs out. Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 C5

O D Jule Sugarman, architect of Head Start, dies N   By Dennis Hevesi

New York Times News Service

Anne Van Voorhees Mitchell MacDonald, of Prineville July 30, 1915 - Nov. 5, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A private family burial took place on Monday, November 8 at the Pioneer Memorial Cemetery in Prineville. Contributions may be made to:

Charity of one’s choice.

Carol Jean Sutton, of La Pine Sept. 13, 1937 - Nov. 5, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Road, La Pine, Oregon. Memorial Service: Friday, November 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM at Grace Fellowship Church of the Nazarene, 15971 Mountain View Lane, La Pine, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Donald Farrar Jones II, of Prineville Feb. 13, 1918 - Nov. 2, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A graveside service will be held at Willamette National Cemetery at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

PMH - Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Harold L. York, of Bend June 19, 1922 - Nov. 7, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend 541-283-0903 www.bairdmortuarires.com Services: Full Military Honors on Wednesday, November 10th at 2:00 pm will be held at 69228 Yellow Daisy Lane, Sisters, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NW Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Leba L. Dorsay, of Bend Dec. 9, 1961 - Nov. 3, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private gathering of family and friends will take place in the future. Contributions may be made to:

Charity of one’s choice in Leba’s memory.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Jule Sugarman, a primary architect of Head Start, the federal support program for millions of poor preschoolers, died Tuesday at his home in Seattle. He was 83. The cause was cancer, his wife, Candace Sullivan, said. Sugarman, who also ran the program for most of its first five years, was executive secretary of the 13-member commission that planned Head Start in 1964 after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared his War on Poverty. Five-year-olds “are inheritors of poverty’s curse and not its creators,” the president said when he introduced Head Start. “Unless we act,” he added, “these children will pass it on to the next generation like a family birthmark.” In the planning phase, consultants suggested a small demonstration project. But Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, argued for a full-scale effort. “We want to write Head Start across this land so that no Congress or president will ever destroy it,” Shriver said. As a result, after only seven months of planning, more than half a million children were enrolled in an eight-week summer program budgeted at $96.4 million. In August 1965, Johnson announced that it would become a full-year program. “Jule Sugarman was absolutely central

Zoning Continued from C1 These establishments are intended to prevent those people from having to travel far to reach parts of Bend to go shopping. The Brookswood Meadow Plaza is an example of a convenience commercial district, as is the section of Newport Avenue on Bend’s northwest side, from 9th Street to 12th Street, that includes the Newport Market and other shops. City councilors and other officials have been critical of the DMV’s decision to relocate to the Brookswood Meadow Plaza in southwest Bend’s RiverRim neighborhood because they said it was not an intended use of the shopping center. And they have said it was in a place that would inconvenience the majority of city residents. But so far, officials have been powerless to do anything about it because convenience commercial zones allow for government “point of service” offices, such as city halls and libraries, that serve entire communities. The DMV, according to city interpretations, fell under this same classification and therefore could move into the plaza without requiring special approval before signing its lease. Planning commissioners decided to tighten the code Monday by narrowing the examples of what could be placed in convenience commercial zones to things like branches or outposts of large government offices. Some examples that would be allowed in these zones would include branches of the local library or post office. The decision wasn’t made without some debate, however, as two of the five commissioners who were present voted against the change because they thought

Grant Continued from C1 “That means there are A LOT of dogs running around who do not have rabies vaccinations and that’s a serious health concern,” Kanner wrote in an e-mail. Under Deschutes County code, dog owners must purchase a dog license within 30 days of obtaining the animal, by the time it is 6 months old or grows permanent canine teeth, whichever comes first. After that, the dog’s owner is required to purchase a license on an annual basis. Licenses cost $12 for spayed or neutered dogs and $27 for unaltered canines, Circle said.

Spay and neuter is crucial Mike Daly, the president of the board of directors of Redmond Humane Society and a former county commissioner, said if the society receives a quarter of the total grant money available, it would probably only cover one month of spay and neuter servic-

in mounting the program and was an administrative genius,” said Edward Zigler, a Yale psychology professor who was on the planning committee and succeeded Sugarman as Head Start director in 1970. “The rest of us were scholars and experts on children; his bureaucratic brilliance is what the rest of us did not have.” The original director, Julius Richmond, became ill during the first year, and Sugarman took charge. With a small staff and thousands of grant applications coming in, Zigler said, “we were supposed to enroll 250,000 kids that first summer, and instead we put in 560,000.” Under Sugarman, enrollment climbed to 733,000 in 1966 and for the next three years settled at slightly below 700,000. “It’s the execution that counts, and the execution that makes it enduring,” Yasmina Vinci, executive director of the National Head Start Association, a nonprofit organization that supports the program, said Friday. “The proof that Jule did a great job is the fact that it has lasted for 45 years and 27 million children and families have had their lives transformed.” With a budget of $8 billion, the program now serves more than 900,000 children a year. Born in Cincinnati on Sept. 23, 1927, Jule M. Sugarman was the only child of Melville Sugarman, a jeweler, and the former Rachel Meyer, a nursery school teacher. He spent two years at Western

it was a knee-jerk reaction to a politically charged issue. “I don’t think this solves, ultimately, our problem in the (convenience commercial) zone,” Commissioner Rockland Dunn said. “I see this kind of like a Band-Aid for appearance and I don’t see this as getting to the root of the problem.” Dunn and Cliff Walkey were the only two planning commissions to vote against the proposed change, while Nathan Hovekamp, Patrick Oliver and Daniel Reesor voted for it. Commissioners Doug Knight and Kevin Keillor were not present at the meeting. Dunn said he felt the DMV issue was related more to traffic and safety issues rather than trying to solve flaws in the development code. He noted that by restricting governments from having “main” offices in convenience commercial zones, it prevents a shopping center like the Brookswood Meadow Plaza from bringing in a tenant. For instance, a shopping center could not bring in the U.S. Forest Service or Bend Park & Recreation Department which might not have a lot of heavy traffic and wouldn’t draw the ire of neighbors. But the other commissioners felt the fix to the development code was needed right away, even if it was unlikely that another DMV-like issue would come up before a complete reworking of the code. “I think this is in response to a hot topic, obviously,” Reesor said. “I do think overall that maybe it’s a Band-Aid ... but maybe it’s a Band-Aid that needs to be in place.” A number of local developers also opposed the city’s proposal to change its development code regarding convenience commercial zones, and wrote letters to the city’s planning division out-

New York Times ile photo

Jule Sugarman, shown here at a press conference in 1972, died Tuesday at his home in Seattle at age 83. Reserve University in Cleveland and another two years as an Army supply sergeant in Japan after World War II, and then finished college at American Uni-

lining their concerns. These developers included Don Bauhofer, president of The Pennbrook Co.; Dale Van Valkenburg, of the Brooks Resources Corp.; and Travis Lovejoy, of Brookswood Meadow LLC, which owns the plaza. One of the most prevalent arguments against the city’s proposed change was that it would further alienate convenience commercial zones. Because convenience commercial zones are already outside of an urban core, the customer base tends to be smaller, therefore making it hard to attract tenants. With more restrictions, such as for government offices, the developers said there could be “unintended consequences” that could further hinder the prospect of bringing in businesses. In particular, Lovejoy’s letter states government offices, like the DMV, can actually spur the success of commercial developments, and that the negative impacts have been “grossly overstated.” “Whatever one may think of the DMV, I can assure you that a derelict shopping center will be much worse for the neighborhood and the city,” Lovejoy wrote. “The point is, many of the (convenience commercial) zones in the city face serious challenges based on their more remote locations. The local residents don’t always shop enough at the businesses within those zones to overcome those challenges.” The Bend City Council still must approve the changes to the development code. This could happen as soon as December, with the changes taking effect January 2011. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

By the numbers WHERE DESCHUTES COUNTY’S SPAY AND NEUTER GRANT PROGRAM GETS MONEY July ’08-June ’09 July ’09-June ’10 July ’10-June ’11 Donations $2,000 $2,500 $2,398 Video lottery $2,000 $2,500 $0 Dog Control Fund* $0 $0 $10,002 Total $4,000 $5,000 $12,400

WHERE THE MONEY WENT IN THE PAST Bend Spay and Neuter Project Humane Society of Redmond Total

July ’08-June ’09 $2,600 $1,400 $4,000

July ’09-June ’10 $5,000 $0 $5,000

*The dog control fund includes money raised from dog licenses, as well as money from the county general fund, which contains local tax and fee revenue.

es. The services are important, he added. “It’s cutting down on the overpopulation of the feral animals we have out there,” Daly said. “It’s so important to spay and neuter the cats, especially, because of their reproductive rates, and we do the same with dogs.” Last week, the County Com-

Magician Charles Reynolds dies By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

Charles Reynolds, who described his business as providing “chaste, charming, weird, wonderful and supernatural illusions” — and who proved it by coming up with two entirely different ways to make an elephant disappear — died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 78. The cause was liver cancer, said his wife, Regina, who is his only survivor. Reynolds belonged to the circumspect, virtually invisible world of “backroom boys” who help magicians refine their acts. In “Merlin,” a 1983 Broadway musical starring Doug Henning, he figured out how to make a live white horse and

Sheriff Continued from C1 “Right now, I have no intentions of laying off people,” he said. “But fine-tune what we’re doing, that’s what I’m saying.” He said he could not specifically say what “fine-tuning” the office meant until he had a chance to see how the office is running. He also said that his understanding is the office has more staffers than ever before. “I haven’t been there in two years,” he said. “I don’t know what people are doing.That office has grown tremendously in several years.” Hensley has picked a second-in-command, he said. John Gautney, currently a lieutenant with the Bend Police Department, will be Hensley’s undersheriff. “I’m hands-on,” Hensley said. “I’ll go on out and help work shifts if I have to. Every one of my supervisors will work shifts if they have to. ... I’ll work the road if I have to — and I will. I plan on it.” Cmdr. Russ Wright, who is currently Clark’s secondin-command, said his office would work to making the transition as smooth and uncomplicated as possible. “It’s all about the Crook County Sheriff’s Office and not self-agendas,” Wright said. “It’s

rider vanish into thin air. In “Blackstone!,” a 1980 Broadway show, he helped Harry Blackstone Jr. bifurcate his wife with a buzz saw. He was producer, director, magic creator and magic consultant for television, stage and film productions from Hollywood and Broadway to London, Paris and Hong Kong. He was chief magic consultant to Henning for all eight of his annual one-hour network magic specials. The first, in 1975, attracted 50 million viewers. He shared magic with Jim Henson, Woody Allen, “Saturday Night Live,” the Metropolitan Opera and the organizers of a birthday party for Mickey Mouse.

“I’m hands-on. I’ll go on out and help work shifts if I have to. ... I’ll work the road if I have to — and I will. I plan on it.” — Jim Hensley, Crook County Sheriff-elect important to keep the level of service that the citizens enjoy today.” Wright said Clark told him to make sure the transition is “informative and productive.” The office is currently seeking several grants, and must continue ongoing investigations and maintenance work. Clark could not be reached for comment Monday afternoon. Wright said his boss plans to retire when his term is up. Hensley said public safety is his top priority. “I know that’s an issue for people. They say if we lose people, it’s going to cut our services and our deputies,” Hensley said. “What I’m saying is public safety and deputy safety is first and foremost the number one thing.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home “Caring People, Caring For You”

Serving Central Oregon Families Since 1911 Greenwood Cemetery Mausoleum Monuments Columbarium

mission decided to contribute $10,002 to the spay and neuter grants from its “Dog Control Fund” — a combination of money from dog licenses and the county’s general fund. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

versity in 1950 with a degree in public administration. Sugarman began his federal service in 1951 as a budget examiner for the Civil Service Commission. Over the next 15 years, he rose through the ranks at the Bureau of the Budget, the Bureau of Prisons and the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs at the State Department. After leading Head Start, Sugarman became New York City’s human resources administrator during the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay. He later returned to Washington under President Jimmy Carter to serve as vice chairman of the Civil Service Commission and deputy director of the Office of Personnel Management. Sugarman’s first wife, Sheila Shanley Sugarman, died in 1983; their son Christopher died in 2002. Besides Sullivan, whom he married in 1989, he is survived by three children from his first marriage, a daughter, Maryanne Costa, and two sons, Jason and James; and eight grandchildren. A lifelong question for him, Sugarman told The New York Post in 1979, “is, Do we make any difference to people? Do more children learn things? Do more families stay together? Do more older people lead happier lives? Are more children taken off the streets and sent into productive employment?” His wife said, “He sure tried, never gave up.”

On-Site Crematorium Pre-Arranged Services Locally Family Owned & Operated

541-382-2471 Jerome Daniel Managing Director

105 NW Irving Ave, Bend Locally Owned & Operated by the Daniel Family

View obits at our website: www.niswonger-reynolds.com


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 9

HIGH Ben Burkel

45

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE



Western 45/36

 Warm Springs

Marion Forks

48/36

41/26

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

43/31

46/34

45/29

Oakridge Elk Lake 33/17

Showers likely along the coast today under mostly cloudy skies. Central

47/35

Camp Sherman 40/26 Redmond Prineville 45/29 Cascadia 42/30 44/30 Sisters 42/28 Bend Post 42/28

48/37

44/33

31/29



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

42/25

42/27

41/25

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

39/24

40/26

Fort Rock

Chemult 39/23



Yesterday’s regional extremes • 55° The Dalles • 24° Redmond

Vancouver 45/39

Seattle Missoula

Portland

43/24

Helena



Bend

38/23

Boise

45/29



46/32

Idaho Falls Elko

57/44

43/28

38/22

41/26

Reno

Chance of showers today throughout the region.



Crater Lake

City

48/38

33/28

50/34

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

62/50





40/32

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

LOW

Full

Last

New

Nov. 13 Nov. 21 Nov. 28 Dec. 5

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 51/37/0.11 . . . . . 51/42/sh. . . . . . 53/43/pc Baker City . . . . . . 44/25/0.01 . . . . . 42/30/sh. . . . . . . 43/23/c Brookings . . . . . . 53/42/0.21 . . . . . 49/47/sh. . . . . . 54/46/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 43/28/0.01 . . . . . .43/31/rs. . . . . . . 42/24/c Eugene . . . . . . . . 50/40/0.18 . . . . . 50/42/sh. . . . . . 54/41/sh Klamath Falls . . . 41/24/0.00 . . . . . 47/31/sh. . . . . . . 42/26/c Lakeview. . . . . . . .NA/25/NA . . . . . .41/31/rs. . . . . . . 41/24/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 44/26/0.00 . . . . . .41/25/rs. . . . . . 42/20/rs Medford . . . . . . . 53/38/0.07 . . . . . 50/42/sh. . . . . . 50/39/sh Newport . . . . . . . 52/41/0.63 . . . . . 52/48/sh. . . . . . 54/46/pc North Bend . . . . . 54/43/0.20 . . . . . 55/45/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 51/34/0.01 . . . . . 48/34/sh. . . . . . . 50/28/c Pendleton . . . . . . 48/36/0.00 . . . . . 51/35/sh. . . . . . . 48/29/c Portland . . . . . . . 51/42/0.01 . . . . . 48/42/sh. . . . . . 53/43/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 43/26/0.00 . . . . . 42/30/sh. . . . . . 46/27/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 47/24/0.00 . . . . . 45/27/sn. . . . . . 46/22/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 51/42/0.19 . . . . . 49/42/sh. . . . . . 49/39/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 51/41/0.08 . . . . . 50/41/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 43/26/0.00 . . . . . .42/28/rs. . . . . . 44/24/sh The Dalles . . . . . .55/39/trace . . . . . 45/33/sh. . . . . . . 48/31/c

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45/25 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 in 1941 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 in 1977 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.31” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.49” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.80” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.06 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.93 in 1963 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:17 a.m. . . . . . .5:17 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:23 a.m. . . . . . .3:37 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:49 a.m. . . . . . .5:47 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:36 p.m. . . . . . .2:14 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:45 a.m. . . . . . .3:27 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:40 p.m. . . . . . .2:33 a.m.

0

LOW

49 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy and cool. HIGH

49 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 39/20

Eugene Showers likely today with 50/42 a chance for snow at Grants Pass higher elevations. 45/41 Eastern

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:53 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:45 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:54 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:44 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:42 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:45 p.m.

Partly cloudy and cool.

48 27

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

44/28

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

LOW

NORTHWEST

44/27

36/19

HIGH

SATURDAY

Partly cloudy and cool.

45 21

48/42

Burns

La Pine

29

FRIDAY

Moslty cloudy, scattered mixed showers.

Tonight: Cloudy, cool, snow showers, couple inches of snow accumulations.

LOW

THURSDAY

Showers will be likely today across the Northwest. Snow will be likely in the Cascades.

37/26

Brothers

41/26

Today: Cloudy, mixed rain-snow showers, light snow accumulations.

Paulina

41/27

Sunriver

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . no report . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . no report . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mammoth Mtn., Californiano report. . no report Park City, Utah . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Squaw Valley, California no report . . . no report Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . no report . . . no report Taos, New Mexico . . . . . no report . . . no report Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 45/39

S

S

Calgary 39/20

S

Saskatoon 35/23

Seattle 48/38

S

S

S

Thunder Bay 56/36 Winnipeg 63/38

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 47/31

Halifax 55/42 Portland Billings (in the 48 To ronto Portland 53/41 43/26 contiguous states): 53/36 48/42 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 65/47 60/41 Boise 52/42 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 46/32 51/36 • 87° New York 45/29 59/43 56/42 Des Moines Gila Bend, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 68/46 Chicago 40/26 64/40 56/42 • 18° 67/50 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. 72/49 Alamosa, Colo. 60/52 City 60/42 Denver Louisville Las 40/32 • 2.07” Kansas City 49/27 73/45 Vegas 75/54 St. Louis Otis, Mass. Charlotte 59/41 75/50 73/40 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 56/27 68/52 75/51 72/40 72/50 Atlanta Honolulu 74/47 Birmingham Phoenix 86/71 Dallas Tijuana 75/42 73/48 76/60 67/52 New Orleans 75/55 Orlando Houston 76/50 Chihuahua 78/63 79/44 Miami 81/65 Monterrey La Paz 83/57 86/60 Mazatlan Anchorage 84/68 32/21 Juneau 40/34 Bismarck 60/33

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . .77/49/s . . . 75/54/s Akron . . . . . . . . .59/29/0.00 . . .58/34/s . . . 59/36/s Albany. . . . . . . . .38/32/0.60 . . .47/35/c . . 50/30/pc Albuquerque. . . .70/42/0.00 . 56/27/pc . . . 55/28/s Anchorage . . . . .28/26/0.18 . .32/21/sn . . 30/24/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .69/39/0.00 . . .74/47/s . . . 74/51/s Atlantic City . . . .55/38/0.08 . 59/43/pc . . 56/46/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .78/39/0.00 . 78/60/pc . . 81/62/pc Baltimore . . . . . .63/35/0.00 . 59/40/pc . . 59/40/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .56/37/0.01 . .43/26/sh . . 42/22/pc Birmingham . . . .70/34/0.00 . . .75/42/s . . . 76/44/s Bismarck . . . . . . .64/31/0.00 . 60/33/pc . . .39/24/rs Boise . . . . . . . . . .48/35/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . 47/28/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .49/36/0.36 . .52/42/sh . . . 52/40/c Bridgeport, CT. . .47/37/0.36 . . .51/42/c . . 53/40/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . 51/36/pc . . . 54/35/s Burlington, VT. . .35/30/0.56 . .43/32/sh . . . 45/28/s Caribou, ME . . . .47/35/0.48 . .47/28/sh . . 43/25/pc Charleston, SC . .70/35/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 74/51/s Charlotte. . . . . . .71/29/0.00 . . .73/40/s . . . 71/41/s Chattanooga. . . .70/32/0.00 . . .72/41/s . . . 74/41/s Cheyenne . . . . . .66/32/0.00 . .40/26/sh . . 43/20/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . . .67/50/s . . . 68/51/s Cincinnati . . . . . .71/28/0.00 . . .68/39/s . . . 69/41/s Cleveland . . . . . .58/32/0.00 . . .58/39/s . . . 60/41/s Colorado Springs 70/34/0.00 . . 50/21/rs . . 44/20/pc Columbia, MO . .74/41/0.00 . . .74/52/s . . 68/50/pc Columbia, SC . . .72/32/0.00 . . .74/44/s . . . 74/41/s Columbus, GA. . .73/35/0.00 . . .75/44/s . . . 77/48/s Columbus, OH. . .64/33/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 66/43/s Concord, NH . . . .50/35/0.54 . . .49/34/c . . 49/28/pc Corpus Christi. . .79/49/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . 84/67/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .75/49/0.00 . 76/60/pc . . 79/62/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .69/35/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . . 66/42/s Denver. . . . . . . . .75/32/0.00 . . 49/27/rs . . 47/26/pc Des Moines. . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 61/36/c Detroit. . . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . . .59/43/s . . . 59/43/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . .49/42/s . . 53/36/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . .78/41/0.00 . . .69/40/s . . . 69/41/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .18/2/0.00 . . . 12/-5/c . . .14/-3/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .61/42/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . 46/31/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .53/32/0.01 . . .46/24/s . . . 47/25/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .64/32/0.00 . . .64/38/s . . 62/42/pc Green Bay. . . . . .64/31/0.00 . . .60/41/s . . 58/44/pc Greensboro. . . . .70/35/0.00 . . .71/41/s . . . 69/40/s Harrisburg. . . . . .56/35/0.00 . 56/40/pc . . . 58/37/s Hartford, CT . . . .46/35/0.40 . . .49/38/c . . . 52/34/c Helena. . . . . . . . .50/36/0.31 . 38/23/pc . . 41/18/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/75/0.00 . . .86/71/s . . . 85/71/s Houston . . . . . . .76/45/0.00 . 78/63/pc . . 82/65/pc Huntsville . . . . . .69/34/0.00 . . .73/37/s . . . 75/40/s Indianapolis . . . .70/39/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . . 70/47/s Jackson, MS . . . .73/35/0.00 . . .76/48/s . . . 80/46/s Madison, WI . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .64/42/s . . 62/44/pc Jacksonville. . . . .70/33/0.00 . . .75/45/s . . . 77/50/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .41/37/0.03 . .40/34/sh . . 41/36/pc Kansas City. . . . .70/49/0.00 . 75/54/pc . . 63/48/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .62/29/0.00 . . .63/37/s . . 61/41/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .67/57/0.00 . . .59/41/s . . 63/45/pc Lexington . . . . . .69/37/0.00 . . .68/41/s . . . 71/42/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/46/0.00 . 72/47/pc . . 59/35/pc Little Rock. . . . . .73/35/0.00 . . .72/50/s . . 76/56/pc Los Angeles. . . . .69/57/0.31 . . .68/52/s . . . 67/52/s Louisville . . . . . . .73/39/0.00 . . .73/45/s . . . 75/50/s Memphis. . . . . . .72/41/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 78/52/s Miami . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . . .81/65/s . . . 82/67/s Milwaukee . . . . .66/34/0.00 . . .60/46/s . . . 62/47/s Minneapolis . . . .63/43/0.00 . . .65/47/s . . . 58/37/c Nashville . . . . . . .71/32/0.00 . . .72/40/s . . . 75/44/s New Orleans. . . .69/43/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . . 80/57/s New York . . . . . .45/40/0.04 . 56/42/pc . . 57/44/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .47/41/0.01 . 57/43/pc . . . 57/42/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .61/44/s . . . 61/46/s Oklahoma City . .75/46/0.00 . 75/51/pc . . 70/51/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . 72/49/pc . . 56/37/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . . 78/56/s Palm Springs. . . .77/60/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . . 72/50/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .69/39/0.00 . . .70/47/s . . 70/52/pc Philadelphia . . . .54/42/0.00 . 56/42/pc . . 57/43/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .73/48/s . . . 73/51/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .58/26/0.00 . . .56/35/s . . . 60/39/s Portland, ME. . . .49/39/0.38 . . .53/41/c . . . 47/39/c Providence . . . . .47/35/0.46 . .51/41/sh . . . 50/37/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .67/31/0.00 . . .70/41/s . . . 68/40/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .76/38/0.00 . .45/29/sh . . 45/23/sh Savannah . . . . . .72/33/0.00 . . .75/46/s . . . 75/49/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . . .50/34/s . . 48/27/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . .51/41/0.04 . .48/38/sh . . 49/40/pc Richmond . . . . . .65/31/0.00 . . .63/41/s . . . 61/43/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .71/35/0.00 . 67/44/pc . . 50/34/pc Rochester, NY . . .46/27/0.00 . 51/36/pc . . . 55/34/s Spokane . . . . . . .44/34/0.00 . . .43/29/c . . . 43/29/c Sacramento. . . . 62/39/trace . 60/46/pc . . 63/47/sh Springfield, MO. .72/43/0.00 . . .72/50/s . . 66/50/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . 76/52/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . . 80/60/s Salt Lake City . . .60/34/0.88 . 40/32/pc . . 41/28/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . . 73/45/s San Antonio . . . .76/46/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . 81/65/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . 75/56/pc . . 73/57/pc San Diego . . . . . .67/60/0.07 . . .67/51/s . . . 66/52/s Washington, DC .64/41/0.00 . . .60/42/s . . 61/43/pc San Francisco . . .60/51/0.00 . 62/50/pc . . 59/51/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . 75/50/pc . . 64/44/pc San Jose . . . . . . .62/49/0.00 . 64/51/pc . . 65/46/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .56/23/0.00 . .45/29/sh . . 46/26/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .66/33/0.00 . 47/21/pc . . 53/20/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .78/60/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 77/52/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .46/36/0.00 . .47/42/sh . . 46/39/sh Athens. . . . . . . . 71/53/trace . . .71/59/r . . 73/55/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .66/53/s . . . 67/54/s Baghdad . . . . . . .84/50/0.00 . . .84/53/s . . . 85/54/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .86/76/c . . . 86/75/c Beijing. . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . 54/31/pc . . 59/32/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . . .79/66/s . . . 81/66/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .37/36/0.00 . . .47/39/c . . 46/38/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . . .65/53/r . . 63/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .58/45/sh . . 58/42/sh Buenos Aires. . . .79/54/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . . 68/46/s Cabo San Lucas .88/63/0.00 . . .85/65/s . . . 84/65/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . . 85/64/s Calgary . . . . . . . .41/36/0.03 . . .39/20/s . . . 39/18/s Cancun . . . . . . . 79/NA/0.00 . 83/63/pc . . 82/65/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .46/39/0.22 . .46/35/sh . . . 45/30/s Edinburgh . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . .41/32/sh . . 41/30/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .46/39/0.12 . .51/42/sh . . 51/41/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . . .85/65/t Hong Kong . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .81/68/s . . . 80/66/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . .69/55/sh . . 69/54/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .74/53/0.00 . . .82/59/s . . . 83/59/s Johannesburg . . .79/55/0.00 . . .78/59/t . . . .78/57/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 68/60/pc . . . 67/58/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .61/54/sh . . 59/52/sh London . . . . . . . .48/41/0.22 . . .50/43/r . . 47/35/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 55/38/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .88/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .102/75/0.00 . .100/76/s . . . 99/75/s Mexico City. . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .74/41/s . . . 76/43/s Montreal. . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . . .47/32/c . . . 53/34/s Moscow . . . . . . .43/28/0.16 . .51/46/sh . . 56/47/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/59/0.30 . .77/60/sh . . 75/59/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .77/72/0.00 . . .82/71/s . . . 83/72/s New Delhi. . . . . .70/66/0.00 . . .87/64/s . . . 88/64/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . . 59/44/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .30/12/0.00 . 33/15/pc . . .31/19/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . 49/31/pc . . . 55/35/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .46/37/0.64 . .50/42/sh . . 51/36/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .88/75/0.00 . . .85/73/t . . . .85/71/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.92 . . .62/55/r . . 61/53/sh Santiago . . . . . . .61/43/0.19 . . .77/46/s . . . 82/48/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .85/64/t . . 73/63/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .45/43/0.00 . . .54/48/r . . 48/40/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . . .46/31/s . . . 49/31/s Shanghai. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .61/46/s . . . 68/51/s Singapore . . . . . .86/75/1.85 . . .90/77/t . . . .91/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .34/14/0.00 . . 35/25/rs . . .38/29/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .72/59/t . . . .77/62/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .77/66/s . . . 78/65/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . . 85/65/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . 62/50/pc . . . 62/48/s Toronto . . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . 53/36/pc . . . 55/37/s Vancouver. . . . . .50/43/0.00 . . .45/39/r . . 47/37/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/45/0.34 . . .53/44/c . . 52/44/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .50/41/0.35 . .51/43/sh . . 45/37/sh

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Endangered frogs thrive in inmates’ gentle hands By Stacia Glenn The News Tribune

James Goodall cradled a frog in his hand and stroked its belly, trying to soothe its racing heart before slipping it back into a cattle tub filled with water. He smiled proudly as he watched the little black and green Oregon spotted frog dart away to join the other 28 that he and fellow inmate Harry Greer are responsible for fattening up before spring. In a fenced-off area behind Cedar Creek Correctional Center called “Frogga Walla,” the two men spend nine hours a day feeding and tending to the endangered species. “We baby them like little kids,” said Goodall, who is serving time at the prison near Littlerock for possession of drugs with the intent to deliver. “They’ve got personalities, too, it seems like.” Much to the surprise of research scientists and zookeepers also participating in a “head start” program to bolster the dwindling population of the frogs, Goodall, 45, and Greer, a 46-year-old convicted robber, have raised the biggest, healthiest amphibians. “People may not think prisons are the right place for this type of environmental work, but it’s the ideal place,” said Chad Lewis, spokesman for the state Department of Corrections. “We have folks with plenty of time in a controlled environment. That’s what you need.”

‘A warning to us’ The Oregon spotted frog was listed as an endangered species in Washington in 1997 and currently awaits the same status on the federal list. “When they begin to disappear, it’s a sign that something is wrong with the environment,” said Dave Ellis, deputy director at Northwest Trek near Eatonville. “It’s a warning to us and by helping species like the spotted frog recover, we’re helping save the environment that is key to keeping the bigger environment we live in.” The program to boost the 2ounce frogs’ dwindling population was spearheaded in 2008 by

Steve Bloom / The Olympian

Cedar Creek inmate James Goodall holds one of 29 Oregon spotted frogs he and fellow Cedar Creek inmate Harry Greer are nurturing in a holding tank as part of an ongoing experiment. the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. Eggs are gathered each winter and distributed to Cedar Creek, Northwest Trek, the Oregon Zoo in Portland and Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. The amphibians then are coddled and cared for over a nine-month span before being released in the wetlands at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. “It gives them a head start so once they’re put back into the wild, they have a better chance of surviving, reproducing and protecting themselves,” Ellis said. After years of raising the frogs, their keepers have learned little tricks to help the endangered amphibians survive and strengthen. They now know to monitor the water constantly, to reduce the number of tadpoles kept in each tank and to be on the lookout for aggressive frogs that might snap up all the food before their meek brethren get a bite. At Cedar Creek, Greer, who has been looking after the frogs since April, said around-the-clock care enabled their success. The frogs he and Goodall raised are larger (57 grams) and have a higher survival rate (83 percent) than those from the other agencies. “It’s a big operation,” said Marko Anderson, a classification counselor at Cedar Creek who supervises the project and obtained a $5,000 grant to help pay for equipment and assistance

from interns at The Evergreen State College. “It’s become the heart of Cedar Creek,” he said.

‘A learning process’ When the eggs are distributed to the institutions, they are hardly bigger than the tip of a pencil. At Woodland Park Zoo, about 200 are grouped together in a plastic container with a few inches of water. The Rubbermaid bin floats in a 300-gallon tank so caretakers can control the water’s temperature and keep track of the tiny eggs. Deciding to experiment this year, Northwest Trek’s keepers used mesh nets instead of plastic containers and kept their tadpole numbers to under 100 per tank. “Any project of this nature is a learning process,” said Keith Neitman, primary frog keeper at Woodland Park Zoo. “It gets better every year.” In late September, a group of people dedicated to helping the spotted frogs flourish gathered at Dailman Lake on JBLM and let loose 1,346 frogs into the water. About half were inserted with a tiny transmitter tag the size of a rice grain. The PIT tags — which stands for Passive Inductive Transponder — will be useful for the volunteers who go out weekly to conduct surveys on the frogs. “Now we have a lot more frogs that are trackable,” Hayes said.


S

D

NFL Inside Steelers hang on to beat Bengals on Monday night, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010

CYCLING

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Central Oregon resident wins Canadian title

Members of the Renegade Roller Derby league speed around a corner together while practicing at the Midtown Ballroom in Bend Sunday evening.

TORONTO — Chris Sheppard, of Bend, won his first national title of any kind in 19 years on Saturday with a victory in the Canadian national cyclocross championships. Sheppard (Rocky Mountain Bicycles P/B Shimano) finished the 25.3-kilometer course, held at Cedarvale Park, in 1 hour, 52 seconds, which was 27.9 seconds faster than second-place finisher Mike Garrigan. Sheppard’s last national title came in 1991, when he won the Canadian junior mountain bike championship. — Bulletin staff report

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Washington AD apologizes for Oregon comments SEATTLE — Washington athletic director Scott Woodward has issued an apology and clarification for comments he made about Oregon over the weekend. During Washington’s pregame radio show on Saturday, Woodward said Oregon as an academic institution has became “an embarrassment.” He told KJR-AM that the growth of the Ducks athletically has come at the expense of their academic standing. Woodward attempted to clarify his comments Monday, apologizing if his comments were found as “critical or insulting” to Oregon. He says he has great respect for Oregon as an institution and athletic program, but that Oregon is “a great example of the struggles which can accompany a university when state funding decreases.” He says Oregon is not the only college suffering from a decrease in state funding. — The Associated Press

Rolling dervishes Two amateur roller derby leagues get a strong foothold in Bend By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

INSIDE Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

NBA Magic...........93 Hawks ..........89

Bulls.............94 Nuggets .......92

Warriors.....109 Raptors ......102

Grizzlies .....109 Suns ............99

Spurs ...........95 Bobcats .......91

Mavericks ....89 Celtics .........87

Smokin’ Ashes jammer Nicole Judge “Speedo Bandito”, left, fights to stay in bounds after being hit by a defender during the first period against The Trampires at Cascade Indoor Sports in early October.

For anyone above a certain age, what may come to mind upon mention of the words “roller derby” are the kitschy, colorful (and often staged) shows that were popular half a century ago but had largely died out by the 1980s. Make no mistake: Roller derby has revived in recent years, and it is alive and well in Central Oregon. So much so, in fact, that the area is home to not one, but two Bend-based amateur roller derby clubs (or leagues, as the individual organizations are called): Lava City Roller Dolls and Renegade Roller Derby. Of course, some aspects of the sport have not changed over the decades, including the flashy outfits and the clever, chuckle-inducing noms de derby — roller derby names for the players’ alter-ego personas — such as Dame Deviant, Skelekim, Vola Tyle, Petty Rage and Dee Moralizer, to list a few. The Bend leagues provide distinct differences in style of play, but one thing a number of the women from both leagues agree upon is the legitimacy of roller derby as a sport. See Rolling / D6

C O L L E G E BA S K E T BA L L : O R E G O N S TAT E P R E V I E W

Vince Carter, above, scored two late baskets in the win, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Baseball .....................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .................... D4 Skiing ....................................... D4 Golf ............................................D5 Community Sports ................... D6

Next home bout: Saturday, Nov. 13, against the Maidens of Mayhem from Lilac City Roller Girls in Spokane, Wash. Where: Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend When: 6 p.m.; doors open one hour earlier Tickets: $10 in advance, $12 at the door; $8 students; $5 children 5-12; children under 5 free Information: http://lavacityrollerdolls.com

RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY Next home bout: Friday, Nov. 19; Metal Mavens vs. Glamour Goddesses Where: Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend When: 8 p.m.; doors open one hour earlier Tickets: $10; children under 10 free Information: http://renegadesor.com Note: Both teams are always looking for “fresh meat” (new skaters). Cost for both leagues is $40 per month or pay the drop-in fee to practice (the Renegades have an additional once-yearly fee of $50). See the league websites for more information.

AUTO RACING: NASCAR SPRINT CUP

in Johnson’s team

The Associated Press

Orlando continues to roll over Atlanta

LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS

OSU’s Robinson embarks on Crew shake-up third year with young roster shows weakness By Anne M. Peterson

Orlando Magic shooting guard Vince Carter, left, takes a shot during Monday’s game in Orlando. Orlando won 93-89.

If you go

CORVALLIS — Shortly after Oregon State men’s basketball coach Craig Robinson spoke at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, delivering a loving introduction of his sister Michelle Obama, highly touted guard Roberto Nelson committed to the Beavers. It was a coup for the coach, who Next up joined Oregon • Western State in the midst Oregon at of his brother-inOregon State law’s successful (exhibition) campaign for the White House. • When: Nelson, a 6-footToday, 7 p.m. 4 shooting guard, was wooed by several big-name programs, including UCLA and Ohio State, but settled on Oregon State after Robinson’s televised speech — during which the charismatic coach sneaked in an enthusiastic “Go Beavers!” Last season Nelson had to redshirt because of academic issues. Robinson said the Beavers will finally have him this season, but he may have to sit out until the fall term ends in mid-December. “You can expect big things from Roberto,” Robinson said. “I would be surprised if he didn’t have an impact

By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

Reed Saxon / The Associated Press

Oregon State head coach Craig Robinson, left, speaks as guard Calvin Haynes, right, looks on during the Pac-10 conference men’s NCAA college basketball media day in Los Angeles in late October. on this team right away. And I am putting pressure on him now.” Nelson, when he does play, will join the Pac-10’s youngest roster — it includes three sophomores and seven freshmen. Taking over a team that had won just six games and went winless in Pac-10 play, Robinson in his first sea-

son led the Beavers to a surprising 18-18 record and the championship of the inaugural College Basketball Invitational tournament. Last season Oregon State underachieved at 14-18 and again went to the CBI tournament but was bounced out after losing the opening game. See OSU / D4

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The dust was still settling Monday on a dramatic race at Texas Motor Speedway, where Jimmie Johnson lost the championship lead for the first time in five years. Hendrick Motorsports moved swiftly to help Johnson, who suffered through shoddy pit stops Sunday until a surprising mid-race benching of the four-time defending champion’s crew. After an accident knocked Jeff Gordon out of the race, Gordon’s crew replaced Johnson’s on pit road Jimmie for the remainder of the day. Johnson On Monday, the swap was made official for the final two races in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. It’s a jarring shake-up for the four-time defending champion, who along with his team had previously been Teflon at this time of year. But uncharacteristic mistakes on pit road led to a ninth-place finish, and Johnson was passed by winner Denny Hamlin in the points standings. He trails Hamlin by 33 points heading into Phoenix, the first time since 2005 he’s not been the points leader this late in the season. The swap Sunday showed just how far Hendrick Motorsports will go to get Johnson that fifth straight championship, and how cutthroat the game has become. See Crew / D4


D2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Boys soccer: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Mountain View at Ashland, 2:30 p.m. Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Newport at Madras, 2:30 p.m. Class 3A/2A/1A state playoffs, first round: Culver at Catlin Gabel in Portland, 7 p.m. Girls soccer: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Ashland at Summit, 5 p.m.; Wilsonville at Bend, 1 p.m.; Sandy at Mountain View, 2:30 p.m. Class 4A state playoffs, La Salle at Sisters, 2 p.m.

2:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, AC Milan vs. Real Madrid (taped), FSNW.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — College, Toledo at Northern Illinois, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Detroit Pistons at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

WEDNESDAY SOCCER 11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Manchester City at Manchester United, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Utah Jazz at Orlando Magic, ESPN. 5:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Clippers at San Antonio Spurs, ESPN.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Miami at Bowling Green, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Detroit Pistons at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Iverson arrives in Istanbul for Turkish stint: Former NBA star Allen Iverson arrived in Istanbul on Monday to begin a stint with Turkish club Besiktas. Dozens of fans greeted the 11-time All-Star at Ataturk Airport. Iverson, who agreed to a $4 million, two-year contract with Besiktas, is the Turkish league’s biggest signing. He has called his move to the Istanbul club “a chance to get back on track with my basketball career” after no NBA team was willing to offer him a contract this season. Iverson is expected to make his debut with Besiktas on Nov. 13 when the team plays Oyak Renault at its home arena.

Football • Dolphins want NFL to check out spitting complaint: Miami Dolphins coach Tony Sparano says he’ll ask the NFL to look into the team’s complaint that Baltimore Ravens running back Le’Ron McClain spit in the face of linebacker Channing Crowder. Sparano said he has sufficient evidence to pursue the matter with the league. McClain denied spitting in Crowder’s face. A video replay from WFOR-TV in Miami appeared to confirm the incident happened when Crowder and McClain were facemask to facemask arguing after a play. • Goodell says players won’t decide fines: Commissioner Roger Goodell says active NFL players won’t be deciding punishment for flagrant hits that merit fines. The commissioner said Monday the league has been opposed to allowing active players or team officials to get involved in deciding punishments. Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu suggested last week that current players and team officials should be involved in deciding punishments. Goodell indicated that’s not going to happen and emphasized that he’s not part of the fines process, which was set up with the players’ association. • Shoulder injury ends Panthers QB Moore’s season: The Panthers have lost starting quarterback Matt Moore for the season with a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder, further complicating Carolina’s miserable season. Moore was driven to the turf on a sack by New Orleans defensive tackle Sedrick Ellis in the second quarter of Sunday’s 34-3 loss. Coach John Fox on Monday wouldn’t say if Jimmy Clausen or fellow rookie Tony Pike would start Sunday at Tampa Bay.

Baseball • Miller, Morgan out at ‘Sunday Night Baseball’: Jon Miller and Joe Morgan are out as announcers on ESPN’s “Sunday Night Baseball” after 21 seasons. The network did not announce replacements. Miller, the play-by-play voice, received the Baseball Hall of Fame’s 2010 Ford C. Frick Award. Morgan, the color commentator, was a twotime National League MVP with the Cincinnati Reds. The second baseman was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1990.

Cycling • Tour champion Alberto Contador faces doping probe: Tour de France winner Alberto Contador will be investigated for doping during this year’s race. Contador tested positive for banned anabolic agent clenbuterol in the final week of his third Tour victory in July. The decision Monday comes after six weeks of deliberation between the International Cycling Union and the World Anti-Doping Agency. The cycling body provisionally suspended the Spaniard in September. Contador denies doping and says the clenbuterol, which can be used to burn fat and build muscle, came from contaminated meat he ate.

Soccer • FIFA gives $100K to Togo goalie shot by terrorists: FIFA says it is giving $100,000 to Kodjovi Obilale, the Togo goalkeeper shot when terrorists attacked the team bus at the Africa Cup of Nations at Angola in January. The donation announced Monday follows FIFA president Sepp Blatter’s promise of $25,000 in September. A Togo team coach, its press official and an Angolan bus driver were killed in the attack by separatists in Angola.

Tennis • Clement, Nieminen reach 2nd round at Paris Masters: French wild card Arnaud Clement rallied past Feliciano Lopez of Spain 6-7 (8), 7-6 (7), 6-3 Monday in a firstround match filled with aces at the Paris Masters. Jarkko Nieminen, of Finland, advanced with a 6-4, 6-3 victory over Xavier Malisse, of Belgium, and will next play eighth-seeded Andy Roddick. Rafael Nadal is assured a spot in the season-ending event. The top-ranked Spaniard said the shoulder injury that forced him out of the Paris tournament won’t prevent him from playing in London from Nov. 21-28. — From wire reports

Favorite

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Football: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Franklin at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Bend at Corvallis, 7 p.m. Class 2A state playoffs, first round: Culver at Oakridge, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Class 5A state tournament in Hillsboro, quarterfinal round: Summit vs. Churchill, 8 a.m.; Mountain View vs. West Albany, 10 a.m.; Class 4A state tournament in Eugene, quarterfinal round: Sisters vs. Crook County, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Volleyball: Class 5A state volleyball final in Hillsboro, 6 p.m.; Class 4A state final in Eugene, 8:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Jets 6 2 0 .750 182 130 New England 6 2 0 .750 219 188 Miami 4 4 0 .500 143 175 Buffalo 0 8 0 .000 150 233 South W L T Pct PF PA Tennessee 5 3 0 .625 224 150 Indianapolis 5 3 0 .625 217 168 Jacksonville 4 4 0 .500 165 226 Houston 4 4 0 .500 193 226 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 6 2 0 .750 175 139 Pittsburgh 6 2 0 .750 174 123 Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 152 156 Cincinnati 2 6 0 .250 167 190 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 5 3 0 .625 183 145 Oakland 5 4 0 .556 235 188 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 239 197 Denver 2 6 0 .250 154 223 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 216 160 Philadelphia 5 3 0 .625 198 181 Washington 4 4 0 .500 155 170 Dallas 1 7 0 .125 161 232 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 6 2 0 .750 196 154 New Orleans 6 3 0 .667 201 151 Tampa Bay 5 3 0 .625 157 190 Carolina 1 7 0 .125 88 184 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 221 143 Chicago 5 3 0 .625 148 133 Minnesota 3 5 0 .375 156 168 Detroit 2 6 0 .250 203 188 West W L T Pct PF PA St. Louis 4 4 0 .500 140 141 Seattle 4 4 0 .500 130 181 Arizona 3 5 0 .375 157 225 San Francisco 2 6 0 .250 137 178 ——— Monday’s Game Pittsburgh 27, Cincinnati 21 Thursday’s Game Baltimore at Atlanta, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14 Minnesota at Chicago, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Miami, 10 a.m. Detroit at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay, New Orleans Monday, Nov. 15 Philadelphia at Washington, 5:30 p.m. Monday’s summary

Steelers 27, Bengals 21 Pittsburgh Cincinnati

10 10 0 7 — 27 0 7 0 14 — 21 First Quarter Pit—Mendenhall 1 run (Reed kick), 12:57. Pit—FG Reed 25, 7:46. Second Quarter Cin—Owens 19 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent kick), 8:46. Pit—Ward 8 pass from Roethlisberger (Reed kick), 2:07. Pit—FG Reed 53, :05. Fourth Quarter Pit—Wallace 39 pass from Randle El (Reed kick), 14:50. Cin—Owens 27 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent kick), 13:12. Cin—Benson 1 run (Nugent kick), 9:05. A—65,626. ——— Pit Cin First downs 14 18 Total Net Yards 314 272

Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

32-121 18-54 193 218 1-0 3-9 4-88 6-132 1-0 1-0 18-28-1 22-36-1 1-9 4-30 5-40.6 5-33.2 2-1 2-1 7-73 3-30 32:19 27:41 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 22-99, Roethlisberger 5-13, Moore 2-5, Redman 2-2, Randle El 1-2. Cincinnati: Benson 18-54. PASSING—Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 17-271-163, Randle El 1-1-0-39. Cincinnati: C.Palmer 22-36-1-248. RECEIVING—Pittsburgh: Wallace 5-110, Mendenhall 3-31, Miller 3-21, Ward 3-10, Moore 2-8, Spaeth 1-12, Randle El 1-10. Cincinnati: Owens 10-141, Shipley 4-47, Leonard 3-14, Benson 2-20, Gresham 2-11, Ochocinco 1-15. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Pittsburgh: Reed 46 (WL). Cincinnati: Nugent 51 (WL), 45 (WL).

College SCHEDULE All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Today MIDWEST Toledo (6-3) at N. Illinois (7-2), 4 p.m. ——— Wednesday MIDWEST Miami (Ohio) (5-4) at Bowling Green (2-7), 5 p.m. ——— Thursday EAST Pittsburgh (5-3) at Connecticut (4-4), 4:30 p.m. SOUTH S. Carolina St. (7-2) at Morgan St. (4-5), 4:30 p.m. East Carolina (5-4) at UAB (3-6), 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Grambling St. (8-1) at Texas Southern (6-3), 4:30 p.m. ——— Friday EAST Ball St. (3-7) at Buffalo (2-7), 3 p.m. FAR WEST Boise St. (8-0) at Idaho (4-5), 6 p.m. ——— Saturday EAST Robert Morris (8-1) at Bryant (6-3), 9 a.m. Brown (4-4) at Dartmouth (5-3), 9 a.m. Holy Cross (4-5) at Lafayette (2-7), 9 a.m. Dayton (9-1) at Marist (3-6), 9 a.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (6-3) at Monmouth, N.J. (3-6), 9 a.m. New Hampshire (5-4) at Villanova (6-3), 9 a.m. Cincinnati (3-5) at West Virginia (5-3), 9 a.m. Princeton (1-7) at Yale (6-2), 9 a.m. Cornell (2-6) at Columbia (3-5), 9:30 a.m. Wagner (5-4) at Albany, N.Y. (4-5), 10 a.m. Colgate (5-4) at Bucknell (1-8), 10 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. (1-8) at Duquesne (5-4), 10 a.m. Lehigh (7-2) at Georgetown, D.C. (3-6), 10 a.m. Delaware (8-1) at Massachusetts (6-3), 10 a.m. Gardner-Webb (2-6) at Stony Brook (5-4), 10 a.m. Harvard (6-2) at Penn (7-1), 10:30 a.m. Maine (3-6) at Towson (1-8), 11 a.m. Cent. Michigan (3-7) at Navy (6-3), 12:30 p.m. Syracuse (6-3) at Rutgers (4-4), 12:30 p.m. SOUTH Boston College (4-5) at Duke (3-6), 9 a.m. Miami (6-3) at Georgia Tech (5-4), 9 a.m. Campbell (3-6) at Jacksonville (9-1), 9 a.m. South Florida (5-3) at Louisville (5-4), 9 a.m. Mississippi (4-5) at Tennessee (3-6), 9 a.m. Southern Miss. (6-3) at UCF (7-2), 9 a.m. Vanderbilt (2-7) at Kentucky (5-5), 9:21 a.m. Howard (1-8) at Bethune-Cookman (9-0), 10 a.m. Liberty (7-2) at Coastal Carolina (4-5), 10 a.m.

Opening Current Underdog Thursday 1.5 1.5 Ravens Sunday COLTS NL NL Bengals JAGUARS 1 1 Texans DOLPHINS 2.5 PK Titans Vikings 1.5 1 BEARS BILLS 3 3 Lions Jets 3 3 BROWNS BUCS NL NL Panthers Chiefs PK 1 BRONCOS 49ERS 5.5 5.5 Rams CARDS 3 3 Seahawks GIANTS 14 14 Cowboys STEELERS NL NL Patriots Monday Eagles 3 3 REDSKINS Bye week: Packers, Saints, Raiders, Chargers. College Football Today NO ILLINOIS 11 11.5 Toledo Wednesday Miami-Ohio 2.5 3.5 BOWLING GREEN Thursday Pittsburgh 5.5 6.5 CONNECTICUT UAB 2 2 E Carolina Friday BUFFALO 3 3 Ball St Boise St 34.5 34.5 IDAHO Saturday Maryland 1 1.5 VIRGINIA W VIRGINIA 6.5 6 Cincinnati C FLORIDA 9 10 Southern Miss Syracuse 2.5 3 RUTGERS Boston Coll 3.5 3.5 DUKE Miami-Florida 3 3 GEORGIA TECH Iowa 12 10.5 NORTHWESTERN Michigan 13 13 PURDUE WISCONSIN 21.5 21 Indiana ILLINOIS 20.5 21 Minnesota NC STATE 19 19 Wake Forest FLORIDA ST 7.5 NL Clemson OKLAHOMA 15.5 15 Texas Tech Texas A&M 3 3 BAYLOR NEBRASKA 34 35 Kansas FLORIDA 6.5 6.5 S Carolina KENTUCKY 15 14.5 Vanderbilt ALABAMA 14 13.5 Miss St Iowa St 2 2.5 COLORADO W MICHIGAN 16 17 E Michigan Army 3 [1] KENT ST Byu 5.5 6 COLORADO ST ARKANSAS 30 29.5 Utep Utah 5.5 5.5 NOTRE DAME MARSHALL 16.5 17 Memphis AUBURN 8.5 8.5 Georgia Oregon 20 19.5 CALIFORNIA Stanford 6.5 5.5 ARIZONA ST NAVY 16 15.5 C Michigan TULANE 6 4.5 Rice Oklahoma St 6.5 6 TEXAS MISSOURI 12.5 13 Kansas St OHIO ST 17.5 17.5 Penn St Virginia Tech 5 4.5 N CAROLINA LOUISVILLE 2 [2] S Florida TCU 27 26.5 San Diego St AIR FORCE 31.5 32 New Mexico La Tech 13.5 15.5 NEW MEXICO ST OREGON ST 23 22.5 Washington St TENNESSEE PK 1 Mississippi ARIZONA 5.5 4.5 Usc Utah St 3.5 3.5 SAN JOSE ST HOUSTON 2 2.5 Tulsa Nevada 9.5 8.5 FRESNO ST Wyoming 7 6 UNLV ARKANSAS ST 11.5 12 W Kentucky TROY 8.5 8.5 Florida Int’l MID TENN ST 9 10 North Texas FLA ATLANTIC 6 7 UL-Lafayette LSU 31 32 UL-Monroe []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. FALCONS

San Diego (4-6) at Davidson (3-6), 10 a.m. Valparaiso (0-10) at Morehead St. (3-6), 10 a.m. Delaware St. (2-7) at Norfolk St. (4-5), 10 a.m. Presbyterian (1-8) at Charleston Southern (2-7), 10:30 a.m. Furman (5-4) at Elon (4-5), 10:30 a.m. William & Mary (7-2) at James Madison (4-5), 10:30 a.m. Murray St. (4-5) at Austin Peay (2-7), 11 a.m. Samford (4-5) at Chattanooga (5-4), 11 a.m. Alabama A&M (2-7) at MVSU (0-9), 11 a.m. Wake Forest (2-7) at N.C. State (6-3), 11 a.m. Rhode Island (4-5) at Richmond (5-4), 11 a.m. N.C. Central (3-6) at Savannah St. (0-9), 11 a.m. E. Kentucky (4-5) at Tennessee Tech (4-5), 11:30 a.m. Wofford (8-1) at Appalachian St. (8-1), noon Hampton (5-4) at Florida A&M (6-3), noon Memphis (1-8) at Marshall (3-6), noon Nicholls St. (2-7) at Northwestern St. (5-4), noon Georgia Southern (5-4) at W. Carolina (2-7), noon Georgia (5-5) at Auburn (10-0), noon North Texas (2-7) at Middle Tennessee (3-5), noon Virginia Tech (7-2) at North Carolina (6-3), noon VMI (3-6) at Old Dominion (6-3), noon Fla. International (3-5) at Troy (5-3), 12:30 a.m. Rice (2-7) at Tulane (3-6), 12:30 a.m. Maryland (6-3) at Virginia (4-5), 12:30 a.m. SE Missouri (9-1) at Jacksonville St. (8-1), 1 p.m. Alabama St. (6-3) at Southern U. (2-7), 3:30 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette (2-7) at Florida Atlantic (3-5), 4 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (4-5) at LSU (8-1), 4 p.m. Tennessee St. (3-6) at Tenn.-Martin (5-5), 4 p.m. Mississippi St. (7-2) at Alabama (7-2), 4:15 p.m. South Carolina (6-3) at Florida (6-3), 4:15 p.m. Clemson (5-4) at Florida St. (6-3), 5 p.m. Texas St. (4-5) at McNeese St. (5-4), 5 p.m. MIDWEST Minnesota (1-9) at Illinois (5-4), 9 a.m. Iowa (7-2) at Northwestern (6-3), 9 a.m. Michigan (6-3) at Purdue (4-5), 9 a.m. Indiana (4-5) at Wisconsin (8-1), 9 a.m. Kansas St. (6-3) at Missouri (7-2), 9:30 a.m. Indiana St. (5-4) at Youngstown St. (3-7), 10 a.m. Butler (4-6) at Drake (6-4), 11 a.m. E. Illinois (2-8) at Illinois St. (5-5), 11 a.m. Army (5-4) at Kent St. (4-5), 11 a.m. W. Illinois (6-3) at S. Illinois (3-6), 11 a.m. E. Michigan (1-8) at W. Michigan (3-6), 11 a.m. Utah (8-1) at Notre Dame (4-5), 11:30 a.m. Penn St. (6-3) at Ohio St. (8-1), 12:30 a.m. S. Dakota St. (4-5) at N. Dakota St. (6-3), 1 p.m. Kansas (3-6) at Nebraska (8-1), 4 p.m. Missouri St. (4-5) at N. Iowa (6-3), 4 p.m. SOUTHWEST W. Kentucky (1-8) at Arkansas St. (4-5), noon Alcorn St. (5-4) at Prairie View (5-4), noon SE Louisiana (2-7) at Stephen F.Austin (7-2), noon Jackson St. (6-3) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (5-4), 12:30 a.m. Texas Tech (5-4) at Oklahoma (7-2), 12:30 a.m. Sam Houston St. (4-5) at Cent. Arkansas (6-3), 1 p.m. San Diego St. (7-2) at TCU (10-0), 1 p.m. UTEP (6-4) at Arkansas (7-2), 4 p.m. Texas A&M (6-3) at Baylor (7-3), 4 p.m. South Dakota (4-6) at Lamar (3-6), 4 p.m. Tulsa (6-3) at Houston (5-4), 5 p.m. Oklahoma St. (8-1) at Texas (4-5), 5 p.m. FAR WEST Iowa St. (5-5) at Colorado (3-6), 10:30 a.m. BYU (4-5) at Colorado St. (3-7), 11 a.m. North Dakota (3-6) at Montana (6-3), 11 a.m. Washington St. (1-9) at Oregon St. (4-4), 1 p.m. S. Utah (6-4) at E. Washington (7-2), 1:05 p.m. N. Colorado (2-8) at Portland St. (2-7), 1:05 p.m. Weber St. (5-4) at N. Arizona (5-4), 2:05 p.m. Sacramento St. (5-4) at Idaho St. (1-8), 2:35 p.m. New Mexico (1-8) at Air Force (6-4), 3 p.m. Louisiana Tech (3-6) at New Mexico St. (2-7), 3 p.m. Stanford (8-1) at Arizona St. (4-5), 4:30 p.m. Oregon (9-0) at California (5-4), 4:30 p.m. Southern Cal (6-3) at Arizona (7-2), 5 p.m. Utah St. (3-6) at San Jose St. (1-8), 5 p.m. UC Davis (4-5) at Cal Poly (7-3), 6:05 p.m. Wyoming (2-8) at UNLV (1-8), 7 p.m. Nevada (8-1) at Fresno St. (6-2), 7:30 p.m.

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps)

BASKETBALL College Men Monday’s Games ——— SOUTHWEST Texas 83, Navy 52 MIDWEST Illinois 79, UC Irvine 65 SOUTH Maryland 105, Seattle 76 EAST Pittsburgh 83, Rhode Island 75

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— BNP Paribas Masters Monday Paris Singles First Round Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-4, 6-3. Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-4, 6-4. Arnaud Clement, France, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (7), 6-3. Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 7-5, 3-6, 6-4. Michael Llodra, France, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-4, 6-1. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-2, 6-0. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 7-5. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (7). Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, def. Josselin Ouanna, France, 6-3, 7-5.

HOCKEY NHL

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times Pacific ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 15 9 4 2 20 45 34 N.Y. Rangers 14 7 6 1 15 38 38 Pittsburgh 15 7 7 1 15 43 39 N.Y. Islanders 14 4 8 2 10 35 50 New Jersey 15 4 10 1 9 25 48 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 14 8 5 1 17 34 33 Boston 11 7 3 1 15 33 20 Ottawa 14 7 6 1 15 36 40 Toronto 13 5 5 3 13 31 34 Buffalo 15 4 9 2 10 37 48 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 14 10 4 0 20 47 34 Tampa Bay 13 7 4 2 16 39 39 Atlanta 14 6 5 3 15 44 51 Carolina 14 7 7 0 14 41 44 Florida 12 5 7 0 10 36 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 12 9 1 2 20 32 18 Detroit 13 9 3 1 19 42 34 Chicago 17 8 8 1 17 50 51 Columbus 13 8 5 0 16 32 32 Nashville 13 5 5 3 13 31 38 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 13 8 3 2 18 40 32 Minnesota 13 7 4 2 16 32 30 Colorado 13 7 5 1 15 45 42 Calgary 13 6 7 0 12 35 38 Edmonton 12 4 6 2 10 34 41 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 13 10 3 0 20 39 26 Dallas 13 8 5 0 16 43 37 Anaheim 15 7 7 1 15 40 50 San Jose 12 6 5 1 13 34 30 Phoenix 14 4 5 5 13 35 45 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games Detroit 3, Phoenix 2, OT Today’s Games Edmonton at Carolina, 4 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Colorado, 5:30 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times Pacific ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Eastern Conference Championship Saturday, Nov. 13: San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Western Conference Championship Sunday, Nov. 14: FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Announced Tohoku Rakuten (Japan Pacific League) has accepted Oakland’s bid for the negotiating rights to RHP Hisashi Iwakuma. American League DETROIT TIGERS—Agreed to terms with SS Jhonny Peralta on a two-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Named Don Wakamatsu bench coach, Dwayne Murphy hitting coach, Torey Lovullo first-base coach and Pat Hentgen bullpen coach. National League NEW YORK METS—Named Paul DePodesta vice president, player development and amateur scouting. PITSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with LHP Justin Thomas on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Green Bay S Nick Collins $50,000 for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Dallas WR Roy Williams in Sunday’s game. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed DT Clinton McDonald from the practice squad. Waived CB Rico Murray. DALLAS COWBOYS—Fired coach Wade Phillips. Promoted offensive coordinator Jason Garrett to head coach. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Released CB Al Harris. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed LB Derrick Johnson to a five-year contract extension. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Placed S Chris Horton on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Jeremy Morin to Rockford (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS—Waived F Dustin Boyd. NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Placed LW Zach Parise on injured reserve. Activated D Matt Corrente from injured reserve. Recalled RW Mattias Tedenby from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Assigned F Evgeny Grachev to Hartford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Reassigned F Zack Smith to Binghamton (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Agreed to terms with F Claude Giroux on a multiyear contract extension. Fired Adirondack (AHL) coach Greg Gilbert. Named assistant general manager John Paddock interim coach. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F Nick Drazenovic to Peoria (AHL). COLLEGE ILLINOIS STATE—Announced sophomore G Candace Sykes has been granted an SLR waiver by the NCAA and will be able to compete for the women’s basketball team at the start of the 2010-11 season. IOWA STATE—Announced the NCAA has denied its waiver for men’s basketball F Royce White to play this year.

MLB

Lee takes free agency slow Texas Rangers’ Cliff Lee pitches to the San Francisco Giants during of Game 5 of the World Series. Lee is now a free agent.

By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Cliff Lee will be taking a slow approach to free agency. “We’re just gathering information. That’s always the early stages of this process,” agent Darek Braunecker said Monday, a day after the former AL Cy Young Award winner became a free agent. Lee is being pursued by the New York Yankees and also is wanted back by the Texas Rangers, who acquired him from Seattle in July. The 32-year-old left-hander was a combined 12-9 with a 3.18 ERA for the Mariners and Rangers, striking out 185 and walking 18 in 2121⁄3 innings. He was 7-0 with a 1.26 ERA in eight career postseason starts before losing to San Francisco in Games 1 and 5 of the World Series. “This one certainly is a little bit unique in that he’s clearly the best player on the free-agent market and not a lot of other things are going to impact our position on Cliff,” Braunecker said. Lee was with Cleveland from

The Associated Press

2002 until he was traded to Philadelphia in 2009, and is friends with Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia. Because he’s familiar with most if not all major league cities, Lee has little need to tour his suitors. “We’re going to take it on as kind of a team-by-team, case-bycase basis. I don’t expect Cliff to be flying all over the country,” Braunecker said. “We’re really in just the infancy stages of it all. We don’t really ever handicap the timing of any of this stuff. We believe that when the right deal presents itself, we’ll be prepared to act. And when that might be, that’s anybody’s guess at this point.” Next week’s general manag-

ers’ meetings in Orlando, Fla., will be used for many clubs and agents to feel each other out. A focal point of the offseason is the winter meetings from Dec. 6-9 in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Lee tops a free-agent class that includes outfielders Carl Crawford, Jayson Werth and Magglio Ordonez; first basemen Carlos Pena and Paul Konerko; catcher Victor Martinez; designated hitter Hideki Matsui and closer Rafael Soriano. Shortstop Jhonny Peralta became the first player to reach a deal, staying with the Detroit Tigers for an $11.25 million, twoyear contract.

Yankees Martin, Steinbrenner on Hall of Fame ballot The Associated Press NEW YORK — Yankees owner George Steinbrenner will be on the Hall of Fame veterans committee ballot next month with former New York manager Billy Martin. Steinbrenner owned the Yankees from 1973 until his death in July, and the team won seven World Series championships, 11 AL pennants and 16 AL East titles during his turbulent and blustery reign. Martin had five stints as Yankees manager under Steinbrenner, who fired him four times and let him resign once. Former union head Marvin Miller also will be on the ballot with players Vida Blue, Dave Concepcion, Steve Garvey, Ron Guidry, Tommy John, Al Oliver, Ted Simmons and Rusty Staub. Retired Toronto, Baltimore, Seattle and Philadelphia general manager Pat Gillick also is on the 12-man ballot, the Hall said Monday. To be elected, a candidate must appear on at least 75 percent of the 16 ballots. Results will be announced Dec. 6 at the winter meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 D3

NFL

NHL

1-7 Cowboys fire coach Wade Phillips

Red Wings top Coyotes in overtime, on the road The Associated Press

By Jaime Aron The Associated Press

IRVING, Texas — Jerry Jones never wanted to change coaches this season. As the blowout losses mounted, and Wade Phillips’ defense was mostly to blame, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys had no choice. Jones fired Phillips on Monday and promoted offensive coordinator Jason Garrett to take his place on an interim basis. Defensive line coach Paul Pasqualoni was promoted to replace Phillips’ other role as defensive coordinator. “I recognized that after the game we just weren’t playing winning football and our best chance was to make a change,” Jones said. “We are grateful to Wade and his contribution to the Cowboys, leading us. We also clearly understand we are not where we want to be at this time, and that’s Wade Phillips an understatement. We share the responsibility — all of us.” It’s the first time Dallas has made an in-season coaching change. Garrett becomes the first former Cowboys player to take over the job previously held by the likes of Tom Landry, Jimmy Johnson and Bill Parcells. Jones decided enough was enough following a 45-7 loss to the Green Bay Packers on Sunday night. It was the Cowboys’ fifth straight loss, dropping them to 1-7. The defense has allowed at least 35 points in three straight games, something that hadn’t happened to this team since going 0-11-1 in its inaugural season, 1960. Stranger still, the unit features nearly all the same players who closed last season with the first back-to-back shutouts in club history. Jones said his deciding factor was the defense’s erosion the last three games — bad against the Giants, worse against Jacksonville and trampled by the Packers, who actually backed off from scoring more than 45. Jones said he’d been “in denial” that the club was in such bad shape. “It really was paramount in my thinking that we would make adjustments and have our defense more productive and demonstrate a correction,” he said. “But I really might not be sitting here today if we had gone and played well against Jacksonville … and then we’d gone to Green Bay and played lights out defensively.” This is the Cowboys’ worst season since 1989 and among the worst in franchise history by record alone. It could go down as the worst-ever considering Dallas was coming off a division title and a playoff win, and was expected to contend for the Super Bowl that’ll be held at Cowboys Stadium. “I told (players) they should not think this an admission of defeat or finality in this season,” Jones said. “We have eight games left and we have one goal — to win.” He called Phillips “somebody we thought so much of” and “a good friend, as well.” He wouldn’t provide details of his conversation with Phillips, and became emotional as he described breaking the news to the team. He said the focus of that speech was accountability.

David Kohl / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Mike Wallace (17) scores against Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Leon Hall (29) on a 39-yard pass from Antwaan Randle El in the second half of an NFL football game Monday in Cincinnati.

Steelers defense holds on in win over Bengals By Joe Kay The Associated Press

CINCINNATI — At the end of a night full of foibles, tricks and missed chances, the Pittsburgh Steelers turned to their one constant to finish it off. That unyielding defense came through again. James Harrison and Ryan Clark stripped the ball away from Jordan Shipley near the 5-yard line on Cincinnati’s final play, preserving a 27-21 victory over the Bengals on Monday night that left the AFC North with an old, familiar look. The Steelers (6-2) are again at the top, sharing the spot with Baltimore. The defending-champion Bengals (26) are in last place alone after their fifth straight loss, coming up one completion short. Credit that last rib-jolting hit — legal all-around — by the Steelers’ onthe-spot defenders. “The defense held strong,” said Ben Roethlisberger, who was 17 of 27 for 163 yards with a touchdown and an interception that helped the Bengals rally at the end. “This is how the Steelers play ball,” Steelers defensive back Ike Taylor said. “We might get a blowout here and there. But we’re always in tough, close ballgames. As a defense we just want to close them out. That’s what

we did tonight.” Pittsburgh seemed to be in control when Antwaan Randle El threw a 39yard touchdown pass off a trick play to open the fourth quarter, building a 277 lead made possible by the Bengals’ many mistakes. Pittsburgh also had points set up by a fumbled kickoff, a blocked punt and a missed field goal. Then, the Steelers turned sloppy as well. Roethlisberger threw an interception that set up Terrell Owens’ second touchdown catch of the game, and Jeff Reed missed a 46-yard field goal try that would have clinched it with 3:59 to go. The drama had just begun. Carson Palmer led the Bengals downfield with the help of a wacky play. His pass to Cedric Benson was tipped, but the running back made a juggling catch for a 16-yard gain on third-and-long. Chad Ochocinco’s only catch of the game moved it to the 12-yard line. On fourth-and-5, Palmer found Shipley open over the middle in firstdown range, but the two Steelers converged and squeezed the ball out to end it. Eight seconds into the game, the Bengals already were in trouble. The Steelers won the coin toss and deferred to the second half. Bernard Scott got the kickoff and fumbled at the Cincinnati 25. Pittsburgh needed

only four plays to score, with Rashard Mendenhall pushing the final yard for a 7-0 lead. When Scott held onto the ball as he was tackled during the ensuing kickoff, some Bengals fans gave a derisive cheer. They were incredulous moments later when William Gay burst through the middle of the line untouched and blocked Kevin Huber’s punt at the Cincinnati 30-yard line — Pittsburgh’s first blocked punt in two years. Reed’s 25-yard field goal made it 10-0, just like that. “Initially, we created some opportunities for ourselves,” Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said. “You knew it was going to be a 60-minute game.” The Steelers lost two offensive linemen on a second-quarter drive. Left guard Chris Kemoeatu hobbled off with an injured right ankle. Center Maurkice Pouncey limped off with an injured right leg two plays later, but returned in the second half. Then, left tackle Max Starks went out in the third quarter with a neck injury. With the backups in place, the Steelers managed to stay ahead. Roethlisberger threw an 8-yard touchdown pass to Hines Ward, his 15th TD catch against the Bengals — Ward’s highest total against any team. And Randle El’s first pass of the season went for a touchdown that seemed to put it out of reach.

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Howard and the Magic still too much for Hawks The Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. — New season. New coach. New venue. Same old result: The Atlanta Hawks still can’t beat the Orlando Magic. Dwight Howard had 27 points and 11 rebounds, and the Magic extended their recent reign over the Hawks with a 93-89 victory Monday night in a rematch of last season’s lopsided Eastern Conference semifinal. “Nothing’s changed,” Howard said. “It’s not just about showing them who we are. We know who we are. It’s for us to come out every night and play championship basketball.” Vince Carter finished with 19 points and made two huge layups in the final minute-plus to seal the Magic’s victory, the 11th in the last 12 meetings over their Southeast Division rival. Jason Williams also had eight points and eight rebounds to fill in for an injured Jameer Nelson. Joe Johnson had 23 points and Al Horford scored 16 for the Hawks, who have lost two games in two days after winning their first six this season. And even on a night they held Orlando to 43 percent shooting, the Hawks still ended up losers. “We have to be more disciplined on both ends, especially coming down the stretch,” Johnson said. “We made crucial mistakes down the stretch in both losses that pretty much hurt us.” Orlando won last season’s

Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard, right, takes a shot over Atlanta Hawks forward Josh Smith (5) on Monday. John Raoux The Associated Press

four playoff games by an average of 25.3 points in a total blowout between teams that finished second and third in the conference. It was the most lopsided four-game sweep in NBA playoff history. “As I told our guys, ‘Let’s not look at this loss as a moral victory,’ ” new Hawks coach Larry Drew said. “We’ve always felt in our hearts all along that we were capable of playing against any team.” Also on Monday: Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 TORONTO — Stephen Curry scored a season-high 34 points, Monta Ellis added 28 points and Golden State beat Toronto. Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Manu Ginobili scored 26 points, including a driving layup with 4.9 seconds left to end Charlotte’s late

DETROIT — After a tiring trip to the West Coast, Henrik Zetterberg and the Detroit Red Wings were happy to sneak away with a win. Zetterberg scored 1:23 into overtime, lifting Detroit to a 3-2 win over the Phoenix Coyotes on Monday night. It was the Red Wings’ first game at home after a threegame road trip. They traveled all day Sunday after dropping a 6-4 decision in Vancouver on Saturday night. “We know this game is a tough one, both in the legs and mentally,” Zetterberg said. “We knew it was not going to be a beautiful win if we were going to get the W. It was a pretty ugly one. We’re taking it and happy to get the day off tomorrow.” Dan Cleary and Nicklas Lidstrom also scored for Detroit. Jimmy Howard made 29 saves. Martin Hanzal and Keith Yandle got the goals for Phoenix, which lost its third straight. Ilya Bryzgalov stopped 37 shots. “We worked hard, had our chances. Both goalies played well,” Phoenix defenseman Ed Jovanovski said. “Sometimes those are the toughest.” Zetterberg tipped in Ruslan Salei’s shot from the top of the left circle as a penalty was being called on the Coyotes. Howard raced to the bench as Detroit maintained possession of the puck and Todd Bertuzzi jumped off the bench to replace Howard to give the Red Wings a 5-on-4 advantage. Bertuzzi took a pass from Zetterberg just after Bertuzzi raced over the blue line along the right wing boards. Bertuzzi then made a cross-ice pass to Salei. He moved in to the top of the left circle and aimed a shot at Zetterberg’s stick. The puck hit the target and trickled through Bryzgalov’s pads and into the net. “Bert made a good pass to Rusty and he really held onto the puck, so I had a chance to get to the side of the net,” Zetterberg said. “He made a good shot pass, I just put the stick there and it went in.”

comeback bid, and the Spurs held on for a win to continue the Bobcats’ early season misery. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored 25 points, including the go-ahead jumper with less than 20 seconds to play, and the Mavericks snapped Boston’s fivegame winning streak. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Zach Randolph had 23 points and 20 rebounds, while Rudy Gay added 22 points to help the Grizzlies defeat the Suns. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 18 points, including eight during a furious fourth quarter rally, to help the Bulls beat the Nuggets. Luol Deng added 17 points and Taj Gibson had 16 points for the Bulls.

SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Monday’s games

Warriors 109, Raptors 102 GOLDEN STATE (109) D.Wright 1-5 4-4 7, Lee 6-11 2-2 14, Biedrins 4-5 0-2 8, Curry 12-21 8-8 34, Ellis 10-17 7-9 28, B.Wright 4-8 0-1 8, Lin 0-2 3-4 3, Carney 2-3 0-0 5, Williams 0-1 2-2 2, Radmanovic 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-74 26-32 109. TORONTO (102) Kleiza 8-16 2-4 20, Evans 0-2 0-0 0, Bargnani 5-10 0-0 11, Jack 7-13 9-10 24, DeRozan 4-8 0-0 8, Andersen 3-6 2-2 8, Barbosa 3-8 1-2 7, Calderon 0-4 0-0 0, Johnson 3-7 6-7 12, Weems 5-9 2-2 12. Totals 38-83 22-27 102. Golden State 26 29 29 25 — 109 Toronto 19 22 31 30 — 102 3-Point Goals—Golden State 5-16 (Curry 24, Carney 1-2, Ellis 1-3, D.Wright 1-4, Lin 0-1, Radmanovic 0-1, Williams 0-1), Toronto 4-14 (Kleiza 2-7, Bargnani 1-1, Jack 1-3, Andersen 01, Barbosa 0-2). Fouled Out—Lee. Rebounds— Golden State 50 (Lee 12), Toronto 41 (Kleiza 7). Assists—Golden State 19 (Curry 4), Toronto 19 (Jack 8). Total Fouls—Golden State 26, Toronto 23. Technicals—Toronto defensive three second. A—14,127 (19,800).

Atlantic Division Boston New York New Jersey Philadelphia Toronto

W 6 3 2 2 1

Orlando Atlanta Miami Washington Charlotte

W 5 6 5 1 1

L 1 2 2 4 6

Chicago Cleveland Indiana Detroit Milwaukee

W 3 3 2 2 2

L 3 3 3 5 5

Mavericks 89, Celtics 87 BOSTON (87) Pierce 10-19 2-2 24, Garnett 9-20 0-0 18, J.O’Neal 1-6 0-0 2, Rondo 5-15 1-1 11, Allen 4-11 2-2 11, Davis 4-7 0-0 8, Daniels 2-5 0-0 4, Erden 2-4 2-2 6, Robinson 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 38-91 7-7 87. DALLAS (89) Butler 5-13 0-2 11, Nowitzki 9-16 7-7 25, Chandler 5-5 2-2 12, Kidd 0-5 0-0 0, Stevenson 2-5 0-0 6, Marion 1-2 0-0 2, Terry 5-11 5-5 17, Haywood 2-2 1-2 5, Barea 4-7 2-2 11. Totals 33-66 17-20 89. Boston 19 21 29 18 — 87 Dallas 23 27 20 19 — 89 3-Point Goals—Boston 4-8 (Pierce 2-3, Rob-

Pct .750 .500 .333 .286 .143

GB — 2 3 3½ 4½

L10 6-2 3-3 2-4 2-5 1-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-4 W-1 L-5

Home 4-0 1-2 2-2 1-3 1-2

Away 2-2 2-1 0-2 1-2 0-4

Conf 5-1 3-2 1-4 2-5 1-1

Away 1-1 4-1 2-2 0-3 1-3

Conf 4-1 4-1 4-1 1-4 1-4

Away 0-2 2-1 1-2 0-3 1-3

Conf 1-2 3-2 2-2 1-4 2-1

Southeast Division Pct .833 .750 .714 .200 .143

GB — — ½ 3½ 4½

L10 5-1 6-2 5-2 1-4 1-6

Str W-4 L-2 W-1 L-2 L-3

Home 4-0 2-1 3-0 1-1 0-3

Central Division Pct .500 .500 .400 .286 .286

GB — — ½ 1½ 1½

L10 3-3 3-3 2-3 2-5 2-5

Str W-1 W-2 L-2 W-2 L-1

Home 3-1 1-2 1-1 2-2 1-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Bulls 94, Nuggets 92 DENVER (92) Anthony 11-22 9-9 32, Williams 1-5 0-0 2, Nene 3-4 2-4 8, Billups 5-10 2-2 14, Afflalo 7-13 0-0 15, Harrington 4-13 1-2 10, Smith 3-7 2-5 10, Lawson 0-2 1-2 1, Ely 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 3478 17-24 92. CHICAGO (94) Deng 6-18 4-7 17, Gibson 7-12 2-4 16, Noah 4-11 5-8 13, Rose 7-21 3-5 18, Bogans 4-7 0-0 10, Brewer 2-3 3-4 7, Asik 1-2 1-2 3, Korver 1-5 3-3 6, Watson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 34-82 21-33 94. Denver 28 15 27 22 — 92 Chicago 23 27 18 26 — 94 3-Point Goals—Denver 7-18 (Smith 2-3, Billups 2-5, Anthony 1-1, Harrington 1-4, Afflalo 14, Lawson 0-1), Chicago 5-13 (Bogans 2-4, Rose 1-2, Korver 1-2, Deng 1-5). Fouled Out—Harrington. Rebounds—Denver 50 (Anthony 8), Chicago 61 (Noah 19). Assists—Denver 15 (Billups 4), Chicago 20 (Rose 6). Total Fouls—Denver 21, Chicago 19. Technicals—Anthony, Denver defensive three second, Chicago defensive three second. A—21,355 (20,917).

L 2 3 4 5 6

New Orleans San Antonio Dallas Memphis Houston

W 6 5 4 4 1

L 0 1 2 4 5

Portland Denver Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota

W 5 4 3 3 1

L 3 3 3 3 6

L.A. Lakers Golden State Sacramento Phoenix L.A. Clippers

W 7 5 3 3 1

L 0 2 3 4 6

Pct 1.000 .833 .667 .500 .167

GB — 1 2 3 5

L10 6-0 5-1 4-2 4-4 1-5

Str W-6 W-4 W-1 W-2 W-1

Home 3-0 2-1 2-2 2-1 1-2

Away 3-0 3-0 2-0 2-3 0-3

Conf 3-0 3-1 2-2 4-3 1-5

Away 3-2 2-2 2-1 1-2 0-4

Conf 2-2 4-2 1-2 2-3 0-3

Away 2-0 1-2 2-1 2-2 0-3

Conf 6-0 4-1 1-2 2-4 1-6

Northwest Division Pct .625 .571 .500 .500 .143

GB — ½ 1 1 3½

L10 5-3 4-3 3-3 3-3 1-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-5

Home 2-1 2-1 1-2 2-1 1-2

Paciic Division Pct 1.000 .714 .500 .429 .143

GB — 2 3½ 4 6

L10 Str 7-0 W-7 5-2 W-1 3-3 L-2 3-4 L-1 1-6 L-2 ——— Monday’s Games

San Antonio 95, Charlotte 91 Golden State 109, Toronto 102 Memphis 109, Phoenix 99

Home 5-0 4-0 1-2 1-2 1-3

Orlando 93, Atlanta 89 Chicago 94, Denver 92 Dallas 89, Boston 87 Today’s Games

Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Utah at Miami, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Cleveland at New Jersey, 4 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Detroit at Portland, 7 p.m. All Times PST

inson 1-2, Allen 1-2, Rondo 0-1), Dallas 6-15 (Terry 2-3, Stevenson 2-5, Barea 1-2, Butler 1-3, Kidd 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 47 (Garnett 15), Dallas 42 (Chandler 13). Assists—Boston 24 (Rondo 15), Dallas 20 (Kidd 10). Total Fouls—Boston 21, Dallas 12. Technicals—Barea, Stevenson. A—20,194 (19,200).

Spurs 95, Bobcats 91 SAN ANTONIO (95) Jefferson 3-9 0-2 6, Duncan 5-12 4-6 14, Blair 2-6 0-0 4, Parker 6-15 0-1 12, Ginobili 9-17 3-3 26, Hill 0-4 0-0 0, McDyess 2-3 3-3 7, Anderson 2-8 0-0 6, Splitter 2-3 1-2 5, Neal 5-8 0-0 15, Gee

0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-85 11-17 95. CHARLOTTE (91) Wallace 2-11 2-2 7, Diaw 5-9 4-6 15, Mohammed 3-6 1-2 7, Augustin 3-15 0-0 7, Jackson 4-13 4-4 15, Diop 2-2 0-0 4, Henderson 3-7 2-2 8, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6, Thomas 5-11 6-8 16, D.Brown 3-3 0-0 6, Collins 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-83 19-24 91. San Antonio 19 25 27 24 — 95 Charlotte 26 22 21 22 — 91 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 12-26 (Neal 5-7, Ginobili 5-11, Anderson 2-4, Hill 0-1, Jefferson 0-3), Charlotte 6-19 (Jackson 3-5, Diaw 1-2, Wallace 1-3, Augustin 1-7, Collins 0-1, Henderson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 58 (Duncan 10), Charlotte 52 (Thomas 8). Assists—San Antonio 22 (Parker 8), Charlotte 19 (Augustin 6). Total Fouls—San Antonio 20, Charlotte 18. A—14,152 (19,077).

Magic 93, Hawks 89 ATLANTA (89) Smith 6-15 0-1 13, Horford 8-13 0-0 16, Collins 3-6 0-0 6, Bibby 3-6 0-0 7, Johnson 9-15 3-3 23, Pachulia 0-0 2-2 2, Ja.Crawford 4-11 6-8 14, Powell 2-4 2-2 6, Teague 0-3 0-0 0, Thomas 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 36-76 13-16 89. ORLANDO (93) Lewis 2-7 0-0 4, Anderson 1-5 2-2 4, Howard 10-20 7-11 27, Duhon 1-3 1-2 4, Carter 8-12 2-5 19, Gortat 4-8 0-0 8, Bass 3-8 0-0 6, Redick 4-12 3-4 11, J.Williams 3-5 0-0 8, Richardson 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 37-86 15-24 93. Atlanta 23 24 23 19 — 89 Orlando 21 30 21 21 — 93 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 4-13 (Johnson 2-4, Bibby 1-2, Smith 1-3, Teague 0-1, Ja.Crawford 0-3), Orlando 4-22 (J.Williams 2-2, Carter 1-1, Duhon 1-2, Howard 0-1, Anderson 0-3, Lewis 0-4, Richardson 0-4, Redick 0-5). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Atlanta 47 (Smith 13), Orlando 54 (Howard 11). Assists—Atlanta 18 (Smith 6), Orlando 16 (Duhon 4). Total Fouls—Atlanta 24, Orlando 18. Technicals—Howard, Lewis. A—18,846 (18,500).

Grizzlies 109, Suns 99 PHOENIX (99) Hill 8-10 3-4 19, Turkoglu 2-5 2-3 8, Lopez 14 0-0 2, Nash 6-11 2-2 16, Richardson 7-18 1-2 17, Warrick 5-6 6-10 16, Frye 1-7 0-0 3, Dudley 3-8 0-0 7, Childress 2-5 0-0 4, Dragic 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 38-80 14-21 99. MEMPHIS (109) Gay 8-18 4-4 22, Randolph 9-16 5-6 23, Gasol 5-6 0-0 10, Conley 6-16 3-4 16, Mayo 714 1-1 16, Arthur 0-0 2-2 2, Henry 4-9 6-7 14, Law 0-3 3-4 3, Young 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 40-84 24-28 109. Phoenix 26 26 23 24 — 99 Memphis 28 27 33 21 — 109 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 9-31 (Turkoglu 2-5, Nash 2-6, Richardson 2-8, Dragic 1-3, Dudley 1-4, Frye 1-5), Memphis 5-15 (Gay 2-5, Young 1-2, Mayo 1-2, Conley 1-4, Henry 0-1, Law 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 48 (Hill 12), Memphis 49 (Randolph 20). Assists—Phoenix 23 (Nash 11), Memphis 19 (Conley 6). Total Fouls—Phoenix 19, Memphis 22. Technicals—Phoenix defensive three second, Memphis defensive three second 3. Flagrant Fouls—Gasol. A—10,786 (18,119).


D4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

OSU Continued from D1 While the Beavers won more games in a two-year span since the 1989-90 and 1990-91 seasons, the pressure is on Robinson to improve this season. He is optimistic, saying the players have come along much faster than expected. “I underestimated how well these (four) seniors would be, who were sophomores when I got here, by the time they were seniors,” Robinson said. The Beavers will be led on court by senior guard Calvin Haynes, who averaged 12.5 points last season and is the only returnee who scored in double figures. He will be joined in the backcourt by sophomore Jared Cunningham, who is charged with replacing graduated defensive specialist Seth Tarver. Cunningham caused a bit of a stir when he recently predicted on a local radio show that the Beavers would make the NCAA Tournament. At center, Joe Burton will take over for departed big man Roeland Schaftenaar. Burton averaged 4.5 rebounds in just 16 minutes a game last season. He will be joined in the frontcourt by junior Omari Johnson. “I think we are real athletic — way more than last year,” Hayes said. “We play a little bit harder. … I think we have a good corps of guys.” Robinson agreed that the Beavers are more athletic. That means he will likely lighten up the slowed-down offense that marked his first two seasons as the OSU coach. “What that means is that we can probably play teams a little bit more man-to-man than we did last year. We sort of played man-to-man last year as a defensive last resort, because we couldn’t match up from a talent standpoint,” Robinson said. “On the offensive end, we have more people who can put the ball in the basket so that just gives you more options on offense. Hope-

Oregon State Beavers 2010-11 MEN’S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Nov. 9 Western Oregon (exhibition) Nov. 14 UT-Arlington Nov. 17 at Seattle University Nov. 21 Texas Southern Nov. 24 UNC Charlotte Nov. 27 at Howard Dec. 1 Utah Valley Dec. 4 at Colorado Dec. 12 Texas-Pan American Dec. 15 at Montana Dec. 18 George Washington Dec. 22 Illinois-Chicago Dec. 30 Arizona State Jan. 2 Arizona Jan. 6 at Washington State Jan. 8 at Washington Jan. 13 UCLA Jan. 15 USC Jan. 22 Oregon Jan. 27 at California Jan. 29 at Stanford Feb. 3 Washington Feb. 5 Washington State Feb. 10 at USC Feb. 12 at UCLA Feb. 19 at Oregon Feb. 24 Stanford Feb. 26 California March 3 at Arizona March 5 at Arizona State March 9-12 Pac-10 Tournament (at Staples Center, Los Angeles) fully, we won’t have to kind of work the ball around until we get an optimum shot. We can just play basketball again.” The Beavers were picked to finish eighth in the Pac-10, in front of only Stanford and Oregon. They open the season tonight with a home exhibition game against Western Oregon University. Oregon State opens its regular season at home Sunday against Texas-Arlington.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL: MEN’S TOP 25 ROUNDUP

It’s Mancuso’s own story, but always in the context of Vonn By Bill Pennington New York Times News Service

In the eight months since the Vancouver Winter Olympics, Julia Mancuso has surfed on the islands of Maui and Hawaii, vaulted off a Swiss Alps cliff in an extreme ski competition, vacationed on Easter Island, served in her sister’s wedding and put in weeks of training on snowy slopes in New Zealand and Chile. Her ski-racing career rejuvenated by two Olympic silver medals, Mancuso soon begins the heart of another race season with a newly focused goal: winning the World Cup overall title. That is the title held for the last three years by her American teammate Lindsey Vonn. Uh-oh. So here we go again. The noted drama and rivalry between Julia and Lindsey, the very topic raised in every televised post-Olympics interview Mancuso sat for, from Larry King to George Lopez. During the Vancouver Games, Mancuso wondered if the intense focus on Vonn, the favorite in multiple events, had become a distraction to the U.S. team. Vonn later called those comments hurtful, and Mancuso thereafter tried to play down a meaningful rift. Speaking by telephone recently from Norway, where she was visiting her boyfriend, the skier Aksel Lund Svindal, Mancuso tried her best to explain her multilayered relationship with Vonn, against whom she has raced since she was 12. “We are just so different and we come across as different, and maybe that’s what this is all about,” said Mancuso, who, like Vonn, is 26. “The differences make it easy to compare. But I respect Lindsey as an athlete, and we’ve never had any real conflict, so to speak.” But Mancuso is aware that their head-to-head battle at the Vancouver Olympics — Vonn won gold and bronze medals — had many American sports fans taking sides. “If people were taking sides, I think that happens when people ask themselves how they would approach something,” Mancuso said. “The general public wants to relate to the people they follow. The best way to describe Lindsey is that she is an athlete who would die for her sport. Everything for her revolves around ski racing. “With me, I feel like I’m lucky to ski, but I love it not just for the competition but for the thrills, the outdoors and the whole vibe. Everything I do is part of the

Armondo Trovati / The Associated Press

Julia Mancuso passes a gate during the first run of an alpine ski women’s World Cup giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, in October.

SKIING: WORLD CUP adventure. Of course, the other way to look at it is that you don’t have to choose sides. You can root for everyone. When I’m in the start gate, I am not thinking about beating Lindsey; I’m trying to beat 60 girls. And at the bottom of the race course, I’m hoping Lindsey and all my teammates ski fast.” Mancuso said she and Vonn had not discussed any of the rivalry issues that surfaced at the Vancouver Olympics. “We don’t spend a lot of time together, although there are meals and things, and we just talk about normal things, like our travel,” Mancuso said. “We don’t really have that much in common.” When they were young teenagers and among the top-ranked junior skiers in the world, they slept at each other’s houses and took vacations together. Of the time since then, Vonn has said, “We just went separate ways.” Mancuso said, “She has a lot of people around her now, including her husband.” If there is a rift, it apparently does not extend to significant others. Svindal last week posted pictures of a feast of ribs he was eating at Vonn’s birthday dinner party in Austria. Given the choice, Mancuso prefers to discuss more recent developments in her life. She switched ski companies, a big

deal for a ski racer. Sponsored by the French manufacturer Rossignol for the last decade, Mancuso this year signed on with Volkl Skis, based in Germany. She finished 12th in the opening race of the season, a giant slalom on Oct. 23 in Solden, Austria. Vonn was 18th. “My new skis have been comfortable from the beginning,” Mancuso said. In Solden, she had something new to autograph for the hordes of European fans who treat double Olympic medalists as if they were rock stars. It was a picture from the most recent ESPN the Magazine, in which Mancuso posed nude, as did other professional athletes. Mancuso said she had seen the picture but did not know the magazine was going to make it into a two-page spread. “I was like, ‘What?’” she said. “It was a bit shocking, but I like the way they presented the athletes. It’s all of us at our most vulnerable, but I feel like my picture has a mental and physical strength.” Still, Mancuso wrote on her blog that the actual shoot made her feel as if she had gotten off a mountaintop ski lift with no clothes and was forced to ski down. (Interestingly, last winter, Vonn posed for the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition on a

mountaintop.) In the off-season, Mancuso has found time to spend alone with Svindal, a two-time World Cup overall champion. Their relationship works, she said, because as pro ski racers, they each understand how hectic the other’s life can be. “Our days off are our best days,” Mancuso said. “But it helps that he knows and appreciates how few of those there will be.” Though Mancuso won an Olympic gold medal in giant slalom at the 2006 Olympics, she had not been on a medal podium for nearly two years before her success at the Vancouver Olympics. She said the experience had given her a feeling of being reborn as a skier. “It was hard when you’re fighting through injuries and disappointment and it feels like maybe you’re not getting anywhere,” she said. “But when you put in the work and achieve a new dream, you feel re-energized. I’ve set some more goals. I want another Olympic gold medal and I want to win an overall World Cup title.” Mancuso says she accepts that Vonn may be in the way of that ambition. “It’s exciting skiing at the same time as Lindsey,” Mancuso said. “She’s brought a lot of attention to ski racing in America. Having her win so often is very inspiring. I watch her, and I know that’s where I want to get to.”

Attack in Brazil sends alert ahead of World Cup, Olympics By Tales Azzoni The Associated Press Keith Srakocic / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh’s Brad Wanamaker (22) tries to force a shot between Rhode Island’s Ryan Brooks, left, and Delroy James, right, in the second half of the NCAA college basketball game on Monday in Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh won 83-75.

No. 5 Pitt survives upset scare by R.I. The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — All summer, his fellow coaches asked Pitt’s Jamie Dixon why he agreed to play an opponent like Rhode Island in the season opener. For most of Monday night’s game, Dixon was asking himself the same question. Brad Wanamaker scored 24 points, Ashton Gibbs had 22 and No. 5 Pittsburgh survived an upset scare in the nation’s first Division I game of the season, rallying from eight points down to beat the Rams 83-75. Pitt ended a sluggish first half in the 2K Sports Classic opener by scoring nine consecutive points over the final 1:21 after Rhode Island went ahead 36-28. The Panthers then wore down Rhode Island with their size, defense and the experienced play of the backcourt of Gibbs and Wanamaker to offset the Rams’ 14 three-pointers. Delroy James scored 17 of his 20 points in the second half for Rhode Island, which trailed 7674 with 1:41 to play before Pitt finished it off by making seven of eight free throws. “There’s a reason why teams don’t want to play them, especially on Nov. 8,” Dixon said. “You don’t

want your first game to be against a team that presses and shoots threes. They made some tough threes and kept the game close, but we made free throws and got baskets when we needed to get them.” Pitt won its 14th consecutive season opener, eight under Dixon, and its 48th straight at home against a non-conference opponent. Gilbert Brown added 10 points and redshirt freshman Talib Zanna, starting for the injured Nasir Robinson, had nine points and 11 rebounds in his first college game. The Panthers play Illinois-Chicago in their second home game of the event Wednesday. Also on Monday: No. 13 Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 UC-Irvine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Reserve Brandon Paul scored all of his 18 points on three-pointers to lead Illinois to a 79-65 seasonopening win over UC-Irvine in the opening round of the 2K Sports Classic. Paul, a sophomore guard, hit his first five three-point attempts as the Illini opened a 42-18 halftime lead. Demetri McCamey added 13 points and eight assists for the Illini. Darren Moore scored 18 points for the Anteaters.

SAO PAULO — Heavily armed gunmen targeting high-profile sports stars on the streets of Brazil — it’s the ultimate nightmare scenario for Olympic and World Cup organizers. And now the attempted attack on Formula One champion Jenson Button has raised alarm bells about security in Brazil for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. “It’s not a very nice feeling having to come to work in a bulletproof car with a policeman as the driver and two police cars, one

Crew Continued from D1 It’s not unusual though — Richard Childress Racing gave Kevin Harvick teammate Clint Bowyer’s crew last month — although the mid-race timing raised eyebrows. “I think it was kind of a desperation move,” said Hamlin crew chief Mike Ford on Sunday, before the swap became permanent. “But it’s something that ... Jimmie, Chad and Rick (Hendrick) needed to do if they wanted to win a championship because they just took their team out of it. They removed their team. Their team got them to this point and they pulled them out, so this is more about trying to win a championship for the company and not the team.” Johnson crew chief Chad Knaus was scheduled to discuss the swap Tuesday, but did not apologize after the race for benching his guys. And it shouldn’t have been a surprise that the move became permanent on Monday. Their confidence likely shak-

in front and one in back,” Button said. “But that’s the way it is.” The Brazilian government said it is confident visitors will be safe during the World Cup and Olympics, but an official with the Justice Ministry acknowledged that “without a doubt there is still a lot to improve.” Button was the victim of an attempted robbery while leaving the Interlagos track Saturday evening, escaping thanks to the skills of an undercover driver who had been hired to drive McLaren team members in armored cars. The driver rammed through several vehicles as the assailants ran toward them with

en by getting pulled, it was going to be hard to recover in time to have the execution necessary to reclaim the points lead. With Gordon out of contention to win the title, the swap was really the only thing Hendrick Motorsports could do to rectify what had quickly developed into a major weakness. Although Johnson’s over-thewall team hasn’t been the best on pit road this season — many in the industry consider the No. 48 crew to be the weakest of the three title contenders — the struggles were not scrutinized until Sunday, when Johnson routinely lost position under caution. Knaus said Sunday he was optimistic he could get the issues ironed out once the team got back to its North Carolina shop. That obviously didn’t happen. Johnson wasn’t surprised by the mid-race timing of the swap, and didn’t seem to have any issues with the potential hurt feelings from such a move. “You watch pro sports and if people aren’t getting the job done, you’ve got to pull them out and put someone else in,” he said. “I really do care for these

machine guns in hand, swiftly driving to safety through traffic. At about the same time Button’s car was attacked, three Sauber team engineers had to go through a similar ordeal while leaving the track. Five armed men forced them to stop their vehicle and hand over their belongings. “Authorities have four years to try to improve security here, to do the decent thing,” said Guaracy Mingardi, a former national public safety subsecretary and former U.N. adviser on crime. “Although this is the type of crime that exists everywhere, it shouldn’t be happening during major events like this.”

guys to the bottom of my heart, they’re my guys, but we have to perform. We can’t come down pit road and lose 10 spots every stop. It’s just killing us. “I knew the possibility (of a change) existed. At this point in the game, you can’t have feelings, you have to go out and try to win the championship and if somebody’s feelings got hurt, it’s too bad, we’re here to win a championship and we’ve got to do everything we can.” The master of staying calm and playing it cool the past four years, Johnson also indicated that his slumping team members may not have been able to rebound the next two weeks. “I know they have it in them, but every once in a while, an athlete gets something in their head that slows them down or makes them overthink things,” he said. It will be interesting to see how the competition responds. Hamlin and Ford have shown time and time again they won’t back down to Johnson, and their confidence is soaring as they prepare to dethrone the champion. Sensing turmoil within the Hendrick organization could

lead the Joe Gibbs Racing team to get too cocky, but Ford was taking credit for some of the 48 team’s issues Sunday. Because Knaus chose to pit in front of Hamlin at Kansas — violating the unwritten code of Chase drivers not pitting next to each other — Ford returned the favor Sunday by selecting the stall in front of Johnson. By forcing the two crews to work side-by-side, Ford thinks Johnson’s team stumbled. “Normally you would show some courtesy, but that courtesy was thrown out the window at Kansas,” Ford said. “You put the two pit crews toe-to-toe and those guys are going to make mistakes. We’ve seen it this year, and we went beside them, and those guys faltered, and it made them panic and push to the point where they made changes.” And the No. 11 team couldn’t help but gloat about the turn of events. “I think our race team is better than their race team, and I’m not going to tiptoe around them,” Ford said. “I’m going to do what it’s going to require for us to win a championship — beat them.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 D5

Calendar

GOLF

Europe’s biggest year keeps on growing By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

SHANGHAI — The PGA Tour continues to shortchange the one World Golf Championship held outside the United States by only offering a threeyear exemption to the winner if he is a member of the American-based tour. One person who didn’t seem the least bit bothered was Francesco Molinari, who won the HSBC Champions. “I’m a European Tour member,” Molinari said with a shrug. “I’m proud to be a European Tour golfer, and it’s a great moment for European golf, and I’m really happy to give my contribution to that. Honestly, going to the States, it’s not really part of my plans at the moment. I’m happy to consider it a European Tour win.” At the trophy presentation in near darkness on the 18th green at Sheshan International, with Chinese drummers adding a unique touch to the ceremony, Molinari was announced as the winner of a $1.2 million check. That translates to just over 850,000 euros, enough to move him to No. 4 in the Race to Dubai, giving him an outside chance depending on how he fares this week in Singapore. It used to be that beating the best field in golf, whether it was a major or a World Golf Championship, was essentially a free pass to the PGA Tour. Now it’s a matter of whether Europeans want to go, much less need to. Lee Westwood, the new No. 1 in the world ranking, tried a full PGA Tour schedule about five years ago and it didn’t work for him. He added tournaments just to meet the minimum requirement of 15 events, and found himself going through the motions at times. Westwood played Las Vegas in 2005 to meet his number. “That’s why I don’t join anymore,” Westwood said. PGA champion Martin Kaymer, eligible for a five-year exemption by winning a major, is said to be leaning against PGA Tour membership, even though his girlfriend is from Arizona and the German spent much of his time there before he became a veritable star. The way this year has gone for Europe, its players can find plenty of competition at home. Europeans did so well on the PGA Tour this year, with seven players winning eight times, that British agent Chubby Chandler quipped midway through the season that the Tournament of Champions in Kapalua “is going to be like a European Tour event.” One benefit for Europe when it began its “Race to Dubai” bonus program was attracting international stars, and it got the interest of Geoff Ogilvy, Anthony Kim, Camilo Villegas, Rory Sabbatini and several others. It was easy to meet the minimum of 12 tournaments because seven could be knocked through majors and WGCs before the Dubai World Championship. Last month, however, the European Tour tournament committee decided to increase the minimum to 13 events. In a separate matter, it denied Kim a medical exemption despite the American missing three

months after surgery on his thumb. To some, the increase was seen as Europe closing its door to outsiders. For others, it was good business. Europe needs its members to play more at home to accommodate sponsors in a tough economy. David Howell, who is on the committee but made it clear he was not speaking on behalf of it, wondered whether Europe needed U.S. tour members to make its circuit stronger. For every rising star on the PGA Tour — Dustin Johnson, Hunter Mahan, Jason Day, Rickie Fowler or Kim — Europe has just as many in Kaymer, Rory McIlroy, Alvaro Quiros, the Molinari brothers (Francesco and Edoardo) and Matteo Manassero, the 17-year-old Italian who two weeks ago became Europe’s youngest winner. Molinari is eligible for Kapalua, but not PGA Tour membership. He cannot even apply the money toward a tour card through nonmember earnings if they were equal to No. 125 on the money list. A big reason for the PGA Tour not treating the HSBC Champions equal to the other WGCs is that less than half of the 78-man field has tour membership. At the other strokeplay WGCs in America, PGA Tour members accounted for at least two-thirds of the field. “I can understand if we weren’t playing a strong field,” Ben Crane said. “But I think if you can win a tournament like this — whoever you are — it doesn’t matter. You’ve done something pretty special. I think this should count for everything.” Molinari turned in one of the best performances of the year. Playing in the final group the last two days, he matched the low round Saturday and Sunday with a 5-under 67. Molinari beat Westwood by one shot, and he beat everyone else by at least 10. Europe swept the top five spots at Sheshan International, and 11 of the top 12 on the leaderboard were European Tour members. The exception was Tiger Woods. PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem did not sound interested in counting this WGC like the others, from a threeyear exemption to the winner to the money being official. He cited the HSBC Champions being too late in the PGA Tour season, and there’s merit to that. Europe still has three events remaining, ending with its version of a Tour Championship. “To add an event that late in the year at the end of the season is just not something we’re prepared to do on the money list,” Finchem said after the ceremony. “On the other side of the coin, I’m not sure it makes any difference. Our theory was players would come and support the event because it has a great purse, a lot of world ranking points. And that’s been the case. “I don’t think changing it will change the field.” It makes no difference to Molinari. He won a World Golf Championship against a strong field. He did something special in what has become an extraordinary year for European golf.

Andy Wong / The Associated Press

Francesco Molinari, left, walks past Lee Westwood, right, as they play the final round of the Shanghai HSBC Champions golf tournament on Sunday.

Continued from D6 REDMOND GIRLS YOUTH BASKETBALL TRYOUTS: For girls in grades five through eight in the Redmond School District: today; grades five and six from 6-7 p.m.; grades seven and eight from 7-8 p.m.; all sessions at Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; will participate in the Central Oregon Basketball Organization; Nathan Covill; 541-923-4800, ext. 2122; nathan.covill@redmond.k12.or.us. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION GIRLS TRYOUTS: Today and Nov. 11 from 7-9 p.m.; both sessions at High Desert Middle School, 61111 27th St., Bend; athletes are requested to attend both sessions; for girls in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades in the Bend High School attendance area; Jerry Cunningham; 503-706-4277; jerry@sunrivervacations.com. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION GIRLS TRYOUTS: Today from 6:30-8:30 p.m.; at Mountain View High School gyms, Bend; for girls in the fifth through eighth grades in the Mountain View High School attendance area; Steve Riper; 541-322-5069; steve.riper@bend.k12.or.us. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION BOYS TRYOUTS: Wednesday; all sessions at Bend High School; for boys in grades five through eight in the Bend High School attendance area; grades five and six from 5:30-7 p.m.; grades seven and eight from 7-8:30 p.m.; Don Hayes, 541-322-5034. HAPPY FEET BASKETBALL CLASS: For children ages 3-4; built around learning new skills and participation; Wednesday, Dec. 8 from 11-11:30 a.m.; parent participation required; RAPRD Activity Center; $5; 541548-7275 or www.raprd.org. BEND PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT WINTER BASKETBALL: 5-on-5 leagues for men 18 and older, men 35 and older, and women 18 and older; 12 regular season games with year-end single elimination tournament; Sunday afternoons Nov. 7-March 13; walk-in registration only at district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; cost is $595 per team; space limited; Rich at 541-706-6126. SISTERS PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT WINTER BASKETBALL: men’s adult league for players 16 and older (cannot also be playing for high school team); began Nov. 7; games at Sisters Middle School, 15200 McKenzie Highway, Sisters; includes eight regular season games and two or three playoff games; cost is $700 per team; Ryan at 541-549-2091 or ryan@sistersrecreation.com.

BIKING CROSSAFLIXION CUP CYCLOCROSS SERIES: For youths through masters, and beginners through experienced riders, Nov. 27 at Seventh Mountain Resort; races start at 9 a.m.; registration on race day or at http://signmeup.com; $10-$25 except for kiddie cross race (12-and-under), which is free; contact Gina Miller at 541-318-7388 or gina@FreshAirSports.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Cyclocross programs for 2010 include three- or fiveday options for ages 10-23; riders will be grouped based on age and

Briefs Continued from D6 The preview begins at Breedlove Guitar Co., which is located just off Skyliners Road at 2843 N.W. Lolo Drive in west Bend. The Dirty Half is scheduled for June 12, 2011. For more information, contact Dave Thomason at 541-317-3568 or at superdave@footzonebend. com. • “I Like Pie” fun run/walk and pie contest: The “I Like Pie” fun run/walk and pie contest is set to take place on Thanksgiving morning, Thursday, Nov. 25. The run/walk, which will not be timed, begins at 9 a.m., and participants may cover two kilometers, five kilometers, 10K or 10 miles. Pies may be brought to be judged or just shared; pies must be checked in between 8:15 and 8:45 a.m. on race day. The event begins at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St. in downtown Bend. Day-of-race registration is available, but advanced registration is preferred. No entry fee is being charged for the race, but participants are asked to contribute $5 and five pounds of food to go to Neighbor Impact, a private nonprofit that assists the economically disadvantaged in Central Oregon. Cotton race Tshirts are available for purchase for $10 through Sunday, Nov. 14, or for $15 after that day. Registration can be completed online, in person at FootZone, or by downloading a registration form via the FootZone website. See www.footzonebend.com for more information, or contact Dave Thomason at 541-314-3568 or at superdave@footzonebend.com.

Volleyball • Oregon Volleyball Academy travel team tryouts: The Oregon

ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain biking, road biking, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays, times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE DEVELOPMENT CYCLING: Professional coaching in cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

MISCELLANEOUS “BIG GAME” PARTY: Party for alumni, parents of alumni and fans of Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley on Nov. 20; CalStanford football game via satellite feed on high-definition televisions at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend; minors welcome; no cover charge; to RSVP, e-mail katyelliottmft@q.com. ICE SKATING: Outdoor ice skating rink at Seventh Mountain Resort opens at 10 a.m. on Nov. 25; open to resort guests and members of the public; $7 for admission and $5 for skate rental; lessons available; 4:30-6:30 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays; 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays; 2 p.m.-4 p.m. and 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to noon, 12:30-2:30 p.m., 3-5 p.m., 5:307:30 p.m. and 8-10 p.m. on weekends and holidays; Vanessa; 541-693-9107; vanessab@seventhmountain.com. TURKEY TROT CONDITIONING CLASS: A 90-minute aerobic workout on Thanksgiving morning, Thursday, Nov. 25, from 9 a.m.-noon; includes kickboxing, step, cardio, Zumba, PiYo; ages 14 and older; 9:15-10:45 a.m.; free; RAPRD Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275. INCLIMB ROCK N’ TIME: Rock climbing in a controlled indoor environment in the afternoon on a no-school day; Nov. 12 from 1:15-4:15 p.m.; $22; all necessary equipment and belaying provided by InClimb staff, transportation provided from RAPRD Activity Center; liability waiver must be signed by legal guardian prior to activity; www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ROLLER DERBY: Saturday, 6 p.m.; Cinder Kittens vs. the Maidens of Mayhem, of Spokane, Wash.; at Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend, $10-12; www.lavacityrollerdolls.com.

PADDLING GRAND CANYON SLIDE SHOW: Nov. 18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; an evening of slide show photographs and stories about Tumalo Creek Canoe & Kayak owner Geoff Frank’s recent trip rafting through the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River; Frank will also discuss hikes and rapids along the river and some Grand Canyon geological history; snacks and beverages will be provided; 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6; 541604-0246; www.tumalocreek.com. WHITE WATER RAFTING: Ages 6 and up; Wednesday, Nov. 24; raft the McKenzie River rapids; guides, gear, transportation and lunch provided; $75; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

RUNNING VETERANS DAY/MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN: Five kilometer run and one-mile run/walk; Saturday

Volleyball Academy is set to hold tryouts later this month for its travel teams for girls in the 12and-under through 18-and-under age groups. The tryouts will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 29, and from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 30, all at Cascade Indoor Sports in northeast Bend, 20775 High Desert Lane. Cost is $15. See http://oregonvolleyballacademy. com for a list of items that need to be brought to the tryouts. Teams will be posted at the end of the second day. A meeting for parents regarding all of the Oregon Volleyball Academy’s teams — which include local, travel and nationals squads — will be held at 6 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 15, at Pappy’s Pizzeria, 20265 Meyer Drive in southwest Bend. For more information, contact Turner Wascom, Oregon Volleyball Academy director, at 541390-2330 or at turner@oregonvolleyballacademy.com.

Winter Sports • COCC beginners classes for skate skiing and snowshoeing: Central Oregon Community College in Bend is accepting registration for noncredit courses for beginners in skate skiing and snowshoeing. The skate skiing class is focused on fun and fitness and will meet on Sundays from Nov. 28 through Dec. 19 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Experienced instructors will teach the course on Mt. Bachelor’s groomed nordic ski trails. Cost is $109, which includes a ski pass, or $89 for students with their own passes. Students must provide their own equipment. The snowshoeing class will focus on trail selection, technique, gear, clothing, safety and etiquette. A classroom session will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 1, from 3 to 5 p.m., and field

at 9 a.m.; race starts next to City Hall in downtown Bend, 710 N.W. Wall St.; fundraiser for Disabled American Veterans; $22 with long-sleeved T-shirt, $16 without; registration and check-in begin at 8 a.m.; Eric Chandler 541-3838061; chandler@bendcable.com. PLANTAR FASCIITIS CLINIC: Today; 7 p.m.; Steve Leary, a physical therapist at Hands On Physical Therapy, will detail how to beat this common runner’s problem; FootZone, 645 N.W. Wall St., Bend; free; 541-3173568; teague@footzonebend.com. “I LIKE PIE” FUN RUN/WALK AND PIE CONTEST: Thanksgiving morning, Nov. 25 at 9 a.m.; untimed run walk; can choose from distances of two kilometers, 5K, 10K or 10 miles; pies may be brought to be judged or just shared; begins at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; no entry fee, but participants are asked to contribute $5 and five pounds of food to Neighbor Impact, a local nonprofit; T-shirts $10 by Nov. 14, $15 after; Dave Thomason, 541-3173568; superdave@footzonebend. com; www.footzonebend.com. DIRTY HALF COURSE PREVIEW: Nov. 21 at 9 a.m., weather permitting; runners and mountain bikers welcome to get sneak peak at new course for 2011 Dirty Half; free; bring own liquids/ nutrition, no aid stations; begins at Breedlove Guitar Co., 2843 N.W. Lolo Drive; Dave Thomason; 541-317-3568; superdave@footzonebend.com. COCC TURKEY TROT: Saturday, Nov. 20; 3-mile run/walk; starts at 10 a.m. at COCC track; fundraiser for the COCC Foundation; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students; $8 for all others; day of race registration available at the Mazama Gym from 9-9:45 a.m.; Bill Douglass; 541383-7794; bdouglass@cocc.edu. HEALTHY KNEES WORKSHOP: Thursday, Nov. 11, at 6 p.m.; “Healthy Knees for Runners: A Mindful Approach,” a presentation by Scott Forrester of La Pine Physical Therapy; will explain basic knee anatomy and the knee’s role in running; Fleet Feet Sports Bend; 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-3891601; marci@fleetfeetbend.com. BEND TURKEY TROT: Thursday, Nov. 25; includes a 10K run and 5K run/walk; starts at 9 a.m. at the Les Schwab Amphitheater; benefit for Girls on the Run of Deschutes County; $20 for adults and $10 for children under 12; $20 for long-sleeved technical T-shirt; sign up online or at Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston; www. fleetfeetbend.com; 541-389-1601. UN-CIVIL WAR HASH RUN: Nov. 28 at 2 p.m., Skyline Sport Complex in Bend; $10; hashers must be at least 21 years old; www.bendhash. com and www.coh3.org.

SNOW SPORTS

7270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SKI CONDITIONING CLASS: For adults ages 55 and older; Nov. 9-Dec. 21 on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:30 a.m.; Therapeutic Associates Bend Physical Therapy; 2200 N.E. Neff Road, Suite 202; 541-388-7738; therapeuticassociates.com/Bend. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options from Dec. 6-Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL LADIES PROGRAM: Designed for women of all skill levels who wish to improve their skate and classic skiing; 10 dryland training sessions; registration limited to 13 participants; Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m.; Nov. 9, 16; $125, includes transportation; at Bend Endurance Academy, 500 S.W. Bond; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive west of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18 begins Nov. 17; Youth Club for ages 7-11 starts Dec. 4; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

SWIMMING SPRINGBOARD DIVING: For all ages; must be able to swim one length of the pool; Nov. 1-24; Mondays, Wednesdays, 7:30-8:15 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. WATERBABIES: Learning to swim or improve ability for little ones; games and challenges; Nov. 2-30; times vary; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

COCC BEGINNING SKATE SKI CLASS: Beginners class focused on fun and fitness; taught by experienced instructors at Mt. Bachelor on groomed nordic trails; students provide own equipment; class meets Sundays Nov. 28-Dec. 19 from 8:30-10 a.m.; $109 or $89 with own pass; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. COCC BEGINNING SNOWSHOEING CLASS: Snowshoeing basics for beginners, including trail selection, safety, technique, etiquette, clothing and gear; classroom session Dec. 1 from 3-5 p.m.; field sessions Dec. 2, 9 and 16 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. though return times vary; $85; held rain or shine; 541-383-

VOLLEYBALL

sessions will be held on three consecutive Thursdays: Dec. 2, 9 and 16. Field sessions will be held rain or shine from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., though return times vary. Cost is $85. Register for either class online at http://noncredit.cocc.edu or by calling the COCC Community Learning Center at 541-3837270.

For more information, contact Beth Wickham at bwickham@ cocc.edu. —Bulletin staff reports

OREGON VOLLEYBALL ACADEMY TRYOUTS: Nov. 29 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. and Nov. 30 from 5-7 p.m.; for OVA’s travel teams for girls 10-18; at Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; Turner Wascom; 541-390-2330; turner@oregonvolleyball academy. com; oregonvolleyballacademy.com. OREGON VOLLEYBALL ACADEMY MEETING: Nov. 15 at 6 p.m.; parent information meeting about OVA’s local, travel and national teams for girls ages 10-18; Pappy’s Pizzeria; 20265 Meyer Drive, Bend; Turner Wascom; 541-390-2330; turner@ oregonvolleyballacademy.com.

Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

541-388-4418

sson er Lege t n i W acka $ 30 P r 1 ns fo o s s e 6L

END OF SEASON SALE!! 30 – 60% OFF EVERYTHING IN THE STORE!!!*

Proud to be Central Oregon’s only golf specialty store! Locally owned. Full Service Repair Shop. Trade-Ins.

N Hwy 97 • Next to ShopKo 541-593-GOLF (4653) Mon–Fri 10–6 Sat 9–5, Sun 10–4 *Certain manufacturer restrictions apply. Golf balls and 2011 Models excluded. Reduction on full retail only.


D6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL BEND PARKS & RECREATION DISTRICT Adult Basketball League Week 1 Standings and Game Results (Wins-Losses) Men’s A Division 1. COCC Bobcats, 1-0. 1. Hustlaz, 0-1. 1. Riverside Market, 0-1. 4. Furnish, 0-0. 5. Country Catering, 0-1. 5. Olson Heating, 0-1. 5. Team Sizzle, 0-1. Hustlaz 77, Team Sizzle 49 COCC Bobcats 82, Olson Heating 63 Riverside Market 78, Country Catering 64 Men’s B Division 1. Bend Basketball Club, 1-0. 1. Cojs Knightryderz, 1-0. 1. Court Vision, 1-0. 1. The Ballers, 1-0. 1. Uniballers, 1-0. 6. Smokin Aces, 0-0. 7. Antioch, 0-1. 7. Bri, 0-1. 7. Eye on the Chicken, 0-1. 7. John Holpuch Dentistry, 0-1. 7. Tailblazers, 0-1. The Ballers 56, John Holpuch Dentistry 51 Bend Basketball Club 76, Bri 49 Court Vision 60, Tailblazers 32 Uniballers 65, Eye of the Chicken 55 Cojs Knightryderz 91, Antioch 54 Men’s Over 35 Division 1. Athletic Club of Bend, 1-0. 1. N the Zone, 1-0. 1. Southwest Hoodies, 1-0. 1. Swish, 1-0. 5. Cabinet Cures, 0-1. 5. Newman Brothers, 0-1. 5. Widgi Creek, 0-1. 5. You Know My Name, 0-1. Swish 96, Widgi Creek 78 Athletic Club of Bend 96, Newman Brothers 89 Southwest Hoodies 62, You Know My Name 60 N The Zone 81, Cabinet Cure 69 Women’s Division 1. Cedar Creek Landscape, 1-0. 1. Kozak Company Realtors, 1-0. 3. Redmond, 0-1. 3. Warm Springs, 0-1. Kozak Company Realtors 54, Redmond 42 Cedar Creek Landscape 72, Warm Springs 39

BOWLING LEAGUE STANDINGS AND HIGH SCORES Lava Lanes, Bend Oct. 18-24 Casino Fun — All in the Family; Josiah Ohlde, 258/686; Edie Roebuck, 181/534. Win, Lose or Draw — The Mispins; Tim Wilson, 199/520; JoAnne Morris, 166/430. His and Hers — Sunriver Realty; Allyn Hayes, 245/697, Carolyn Wirth, 215/599. Greased Lightning — Double Trouble; Dave Grimes, 270/776; Barb Weybright, 179/520. Jack and Jill — Boo Yah!; John Cleveland, 256/662; Shari Hamel, 177/521. Guys and Gals — 4 Locked Films; Josiah Ohlde, 234/649; Michelle Smith, 225/602. Early Risers — Golden Girls; Edith Roebuck, 182/517. Rejects — Kee-Tee; Kenneth Fleming, 215/600; Sue Snedden, 161/451. Lava Lanes Classic — Spare Us; Travis Holmes, 235/650; Marg Kemper, 193/493. Wednesday Inc. — Auntie Em’s Deli; Monte Marler, 278/756; Mike Roberts, 289/703. Tea Timers — MAA Construction; Barb Weybright, 203/558. Afternoon Delight — 2 Dawgs & a Hot Bun; Brian Leach, 222/600; Amanda Stevens, 193/555. Latecomers — High Desert Disposal; Pam Sloan, 183/505. Progressive — Full House; Matt Ayres, 279/722. Free Breathers — Do’s and Don’ts; Gary Davis, 248/647; Ellen Tucker, 195/508. T.G.I.F. — The Young and the Old; Derek Kelley, 274/681; Patti Sundita, 202/538. Adult/Junior Bowlopolis — S.D.G.’s; Kolin Bicart, 169/441; Miranda Baglien, 135/394. Oct. 25-31 Casino Fun — All in the Family; Brandon Zitek, 258/633; Krystal Highsmith, 200/535. Win, Lose or Draw — The Mispins; Tim Wilson, 181/508; Connie Preiss, 163/453. His and Hers — Sunriver Realty; Jerry Collier Jr., 300/725; Carolyn Wirth, 236/637. Greased Lightning — Just A Little Guy; Paul Hilliard, 258/713; Barb Weybright, 197/521. Jack and Jill — Estinguishers!; TM Pete, 236/678; Pennie Olson, 212/603. Guys and Gals — 4 Locked Films; David Moyer, 215/620; Michelle Smith, 234/640. Early Risers — Golden Girls; Edith Roebuck, 191/501. Rejects — Split and Miss; Gary Grittman, 223/600; Sue Snedden, 201/485. Lava Lanes Classic — Leprechans; Travis Holmes, 258/644; Pennie Olson, 192/550. Wednesday Inc. — Auntie Em’s Deli; TM Pete, 250/719; Travis Holmes, 258/707. Tea Timers — MAA Construction; Chris Gray, 225/566. Afternoon Delight — 2 Dawgs & a Hot Bun; Tom Waltosz, 211/577; Amanda Stevens, 191/496. Latecomers — High Desert Disposal; Tami Smith, 183/514. Progressive — Pro Golf; TM Pete, 289/667. Free Breathers — Survivors; Dave Swander, 234/639; Sue Snedden, 189/538. T.G.I.F. — Suck Em Up; Derek Kelley, 257/686; Monique McCleary, 192/549. Adult/Junior Bowlopolis — Grandma’s Girls; Tucker Hess, 159/389; Miranda Baglien, 159/389.

RUNNING LORD’S ACRE RUN At Powell Butte Nov. 6 Five Kilometers 1. Andrew Jensen, 17:56. 2. Curt Rosen, 18:29. 3. Bill Cooley, 19:30. 4. Scott Abrams, 20:13. 5. Kevin Cornettm 20:25. 6. Jessica Cornett, 21:03. 7. Carissa Thomason, 21:58. 8. Dave Thomason, 22:05. 9. Mike Burleigh, 23:26. 10. Cayden Quinn, 23:38. 11. Stephen Dalton, 23:55. 12. Tom Holt, 24:01. 13. Tracy Quinn, 24:55. 14. Dillon Russell, 25:51. 15. Gary Deaver, 25:52. 16. Jacob Hehn, 26:45. 17. Monique Davis, 26:47. 18. Russell Mahaney, 26:50. 19. Joshua Rosen, 26:58. 20. Barb Dalton, 27:31. 21. April Senner, 28:05. 22. Andrea Broyles, 28:16. 23. Steve Greening, 28:35. 24. Eric Engelgau, 28:54. 25. Sadie Wells, 29:17. 26. Galeb Rosen, 29:18. 27. Abby Nyman, 29:27. 28. Linda Hehn, 29:42. 29. Kari Bennett, 30:16. 30. Deborah Dewitz, 30:35. 31. Melinda Bentley, 30:35. 32. Melissa Durham, 30:40. 33. Melissa Pearson, 30:54. 34. Scott Dewitz, 31:10. 35. Michaeline Mallott, 31:28. 36. Suzie Cox, 31:40. 37. Amanda Mahaney, 31:44. 38. Miles Chaney, 31:46. 39. Wendy Mahaney, 31:55. 40. Kim Williamson, 32:05. 41. Analee Dunn, 32:10. 42. Julie Crandall, 32:12. 43. Donna Senner, 32:14. 44. Shelbi Vansise, 32:42. 45. Victoria Brown, 33:19. 46. Frances Dunn, 33:52. 47. Sandy Bell, 35:25. 48. Susanne Chalker, 35:35. 49. Charlie Chalker, 36:26. 50. Kristen Polich, 36:51. 51. Katie Bullock, 37:15. 52. Sara Polich, 37:24. 53. Jon Bolick, 37:25. 54. Stacy Burgett, 37:30. 55. Blake Waldo, 37:59. 56. Suzie Decker, 38:02. 57. Mary Carlson, 38:03. 58. Erika Frickey, 39:48. 59. Thomas Burleigh, 40:24. 60. Cal Pickhardt, 40:27. 61. Jeremy Waldo, 40:55. 62. Clara Butler, 41:28. 63. David Richardson, 41:29. 64. Ellen Gibson, 41:31. 65. Karen Spradling, 41:31. 66. Terry Pickhardt, 42:00. 67. Tatyana Roop, 42:32. 68. Jessica Burnett, 42:50. 69. Emma Hoke, 43:02. 70. Nina Dunn, 43:02. 71. Luke Brewer, 43:34. 72. Rachel Chaney, 43:38. 73. Julie Cavanagh, 45:36. 74. Carlye Seitz, 45:36. 75. Jim Pickhardt, 46:08. 76. Debra Peterson, 46:10. 77. Sheryl Crawford, 46:14. 78. Kerri Vansise, 48:50. 79. Linda Swindle, 48:52. 80. Gail Vaughan, 48:54. 81. Jim Swindle, 48:54. 82. Lalyna Wentzel, 48:56. 83. Dena Marshall, 49:07. 84. Kara Becker, 49:15. 85. Malea Sundby, 49:17. 86. George McCart, 49:50. 87. Lynn Thurston, 49:50. 88. Rita Hodge, 49:53. 89. Rebecca Davis, 49:53. 90. Dana Runge, 49:53. 91. Janene Wilds, 51:00. 92. Caren Staver, 51:02. 93. Julie Hanes, 51:03. 94. McKinley Sloper, 51:09. 95. Niki Sloper, 51:10. 96. Ron Sloper, 51:17. 97. Kurt Sloper, 51:19. 98. Kaitlyn Nixon, 51:19. 99. Tom Evans, 51:21. 100. Amber Humphreys, 51:25. 101. Kathleen Burleigh, 51:26. 102. D.C. Lundy, 52:47. 103. Pam Lundy, 52:49. 104. Betty Evans, 52:50. 105. Dallen Nixon, 53:04. 106. Valerie Nixon, 53:10. 107. Amy Kuper, 53:38. 108. Sandra Fox, 53:38. 109. Lori Kadlec, 54:31. 110. Carol Guy, 54:31. 111. Valerie Russell, 55:32. 112. Sandy Gililand, 55:32. 113. Clarice Schwert, 59:02. 114. Nola Slavey, 59:39. 115. Tina Katzenberger, 1:05:50. 116. Judy Dunaway, 1:05:50. 10 Kilometers 1. Tim Badley, 32:46. 2. Nate Robinson, 37:28. 3. Samuel Schwarz, 37:42. 4. J.J. Howard, 37:45. 5. Jerry Zhu, 42:24. 6. Jim Perry, 43:19. 7. Dan Broyles, 43:44. 8. Quintin McCoy, 45:06. 9. Ron Wortman, 45:56. 10. Jeanette Groesz, 46:21. 11. Jenni Mishler, 46:22. 12. Jane Cleavenger, 47:24. 13. Deb Badger, 48:09. 14. Krista Cooley, 48:12. 15. James Manley, 48:39. 16. Liam Pickhardt, 49:23. 17. Kevin Luckini, 49:51. 18. Andre McNary, 50:04. 19. Dale Nixon, 50:21. 20. Dwayne Timmons, 51:37. 21. Jill Schwartz, 51:55. 22. John Unruh, 52:06. 23. Maureen Anderson, 52:58. 24. Mayson Tibbs, 53:52. 25. Heath Pickhardt, 53:53. 26. Bill Groesz, 55:29. 27. Gordan Gillespie, 55:45. 28. Charsie Brewer, 56:52. 29. Cody Jessee, 57:48. 30. Blake Bartels, 58:22. 31. Connor Chaney, 58:23. 32. Tammy Shelton, 58:45. 33. Rachel Krahn, 59:16. 34. Paul Leatherwood, 1:00:00 35. Lynn Vigil, 1:00:27. 36. Cindy Humble, 1:01:24. 37. Anita Rhoden, 1:01:30. 38. Jeff Frickey, 1:02:03. 39. Sarah Teskey, 1:03:09. 40. Norm Smith, 1:04:53. 41. Gary Bell, 1:07:00. 42. Erin Barnholdt, 1:11:20. 43. Lew Hollander, 1:11:55. 44. Brooke Gray, 1:12:32. 45. Jill Carpenter, 1:13:20. 46. Julie McFarlane, 1:15:47. 47. Deb Robinson , 1:25:26. 48. Cain Robinson, 1:25:26. 49. Charla Meyer, 1:31:07. 50. Christine Barnes, 1:53:00. 51. Jerry Barnes, 1:53:00.

VOLLEYBALL REDMOND VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION Standings as of Nov. 5 (Wins-Losses-Ties) Women’s 1. Hit List, 26-4-0. 2. S.W.A.T., 23-7-0. 3. Lady Slammers, 23-8-1. 4. Volley Girls, 21-10-1. 5. Just Lucky, 19-11-0. 6. Dinkin & Divin, 17-12-1. 7. Pink Panthers, 9-20-1. 8. G N O, 7-24-1. 9. Orphans, 3-28-1. 10. Victorious Secret, 3-27-0. Tuesday Coed 1. Trybz, 30-3-3. 2. Benz Electric, 29-5-0. 3. Penguins, 20-151. 3. Marks Auto Body, 20-15-1. 5. Super Awesomes, 19-15-0. 6. Storm Water Services, 14-21-1. 7. Dysfunctionals, 13-23-0. 8. All Stars, 6-29-1. 9. Go Easy, 5-30-1. Thursday Coed 1. @lst we Tryd, 29-3-0. 2. Net Results, 25-6-1. 3. Peak Performance, 24-8-0. 4. Number One, 14-17-1. 5. All Stars, 12-18-2. 6. LMFAO, 10-22-0. 7. C O Sound & Security, 9-23-0. 8. Ducks, 3-29-0.

C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

Rolling

I B

Continued from D1 “I think it’s becoming more and more a controlled athletic endeavor and less of a show,� says Lynda Beauchamp, a 42year-old middle school math teacher who goes by the moniker Humble Pi and skates for the Roller Dolls. Here is a closer look at Central Oregon’s two roller derby leagues:

Basketball

Lava City Roller Dolls The Roller Dolls league, which was started roughly five years ago, consists of an “A� team (the Smokin’ Ashes) and a “B� team (the Cinder Kittens). The league became a member of the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association in February 2009. WFTDA boasts nearly 100 fullfledged member leagues divided into geographic regions. And dozens more apprentice leagues are seeking full association membership status. Most of the leagues are concentrated in the United States, but others are located in Canada and even in European cities such as Paris, London and Edinburgh. As the international governing body, WFTDA has a board of directors and provides an organized set of rules that member leagues must follow in bouts. “That’s kind of what they are all about is bringing some legitimacy to the sport of roller derby and wanting it to be treated like a sport,� Beauchamp says. The premise of the game is relatively simple: Each of the two teams squaring off in a bout puts five women on the track — four act as “blockers� while the other is the “jammer.� The pack of blockers starts 30 feet ahead of the jammers, who try to catch the blockers and make their way to the front of the pack. The first jammer to do so is called the “lead jammer,� and she is the only player on the track who can stop the jam. Once a jammer breaks through all the blockers, she tries to lap them, scoring one point every time she gets her hips in front of a blocker’s. When a jammer also laps the other team’s jammer, it is referred to as a “grand slam� and is good for five points (one for each opponent). The blockers try to help their jammer move up through the pack and prevent the other jammer from wending her way through, which means both teams are playing offense and defense at the same time. The team that scores the most points by the end of the bout wins. “It’s complete insanity, and I think that’s what makes it so incredibly addicting and challenging,� says Terese Thompson, 30, a psychology student at Oregon State UniversityCascades whose derby name is Mean Satine. A lot of the more violent crowdpleasing tactics of yesteryear’s roller derby — such as throwing, tackling and tripping — will earn a player a trip to the penalty box in WFTDA-style play. And just as a basketball player can foul out with too many personal fouls, a skater can disqualify herself from a bout with seven infractions. The focus is on the players’ safety, but Beauchamp pointed out that “plenty of hitting� still takes place.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Smokin’ Ashes jammer Raemi Poitras “Screamin’ Meanie�, left, fights to score during the first period against The Trampires at Cascade Indoor Sports in early October. If flying around on eight wheels while slamming into other women sounds intimidating, do not fear, as the Roller Dolls will not allow a player to skate in a bout without first undergoing three months of training. Thompson is one of the coaches for new recruits (who are called “fresh meat�). First, the newbies learn basic skating skills and work on their endurance, Thompson says. Next comes blocking, and then, finally, team strategies and rules. Fresh meat players even learn how to keep statistics, what referee hand signals mean, and how to keep score, so they are ready to go from their first moment in a real bout. The Lava City Roller Dolls practice on Sunday afternoons at Cascade Indoor Sports in northeast Bend and on Tuesday evenings at the Midtown Ballroom in downtown Bend. Bouts are held an average of once per month, and home bouts are held at Cascade Indoor Sports.

Renegades On the other hand, maybe that style of roller derby sounds a little tame. If so, check out Renegade Roller Derby, which could be considered a wilder and crazier cousin to WFTDA-style roller derby. Nikki Monroe (nickname: Nafreaki), 23, the Renegades’ president and the mother of a 2-year-old son, said the Renegades split off from the Roller Dolls organization around 2006. She calls her league’s style “no holds barred� roller derby. And what, exactly, does that entail? “The only rule is to pretty much don’t dish out what you can’t take back,� explains Monroe, who travels from Burns for the Renegades’ weekly Sunday evening practices at the Midtown Ballroom. “And so if you do something to somebody, it’s probably gonna come back twice as hard on you.� Before Renegades home bouts (which also take place at the Midtown Ballroom) players from both teams are gathered together and reminded to play fair and to not employ outlawed moves (called “dirt bag� moves) — such as slide tackling or bringing an opposing player down either from behind or by grabbing around the neck — which can cause serious injury. Renegades bouts are played with no referees — only two “brawl breakers,� whose job is to prevent the fights that frequently break out from carrying on too long. Though the fighting is real

and not staged, usually it is done more for fun than to injure another player, says Christina Lyon (Lightning Lyon), 23, who sings for the local band Yenn and works at Corey’s Bar & Grill in downtown Bend. That, explains Lyon, the league vice president, is because the player a Renegade is duking it out with often belongs to her own league. Because their numbers are small and other Renegade sister leagues are few and out of state — such as in Southern California and Arizona — the Renegades often split themselves into two teams for home bouts and bring in players from out of the area to fill out the teams. They usually try to schedule home-and-away bouts with other Renegade sister leagues during a season. Another difference between the Renegades and the WFTDA leagues is that men are allowed to play for Renegades teams. In fact, Monroe says, a man played for the league last year, and when women wanted to fight him, he would hold them down and tickle them instead before getting up and skating away. The scoring system is also slightly different in Renegades bouts, as only the lead jammer can score points rather than both jammers. And fresh meant training is usually more informal, though Renegades newbies must be able to pass a skills test before entering a bout. Something women on both teams agree upon is that there is no rivalry or friction between the two leagues. Rather, they say, they are supportive of one another. Monroe says the Renegades schedule their bouts carefully so that they do not conflict with those of the Roller Dolls, which would hurt both teams’ ticket sales (the primary method of payment for the contests; remaining profits are often donated to nonprofit organizations). At home bouts, both leagues can draw up to several hundred spectators, including families, eager to get up close to the intense roller derby action. Skaters are welcome to practice and play for both leagues if they want, as they all love the same sport. And differences aside, a word frequently used among skaters from both leagues is “empowering,� in regards to the sport’s impact on the women who play it. “It’s empowering,� Lyons says. “It doesn’t matter what league or what rule set you play, roller derby is empowering.� Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

• Athletic Club of Bend youth camp: The Athletic Club of Bend will play host this week to a basketball camp for children in grades two through eight. The camp runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. both Thursday and Friday. Many area schools are not in session on one or both days. Former Pepperdine University player Byron Jenson will be a featured instructor at the camp. Cost is $53 per day for club members, $63 otherwise. Halfday rates are also available. Registration is available online at www.athleticclubofbend.com or at the club, 61615 Athletic Club Drive in southwest Bend. For more information, contact Susan Brown, club youth director, at 541-322-5820 or at susan@athleticclubofbend.com.

Paddling • Grand Canyon slide show: Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe is playing host next week to a slide show and story session about paddling through the Grand Canyon. The event will be held on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the shop, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, in Bend. The owner of Tumalo Creek, Geoff Frank, will share his experiences on a recent trip paddling down the Colorado River. He will also discuss various hikes and rapids along the river, as well as some of the Grand Canyon’s geological history. Those in attendance will also have the opportunity to share photographs of their own Grand Canyon experiences. The event is free, and snacks and beverages will be provided. For more information, contact the shop at 541-604-0246 or go to www.tumalocreek.com.

Rugby • Roughriders drop final fall match: The Bend Rugby Club could not overcome tough field

conditions or its opponent on Saturday, when the Roughriders dropped a road match 5-0 to the Tacoma (Wash.) Rugby Club. Club administrator John Chunn said the sides squared off in ankle-deep mud, and neither team made any headway until the host Nomads scored the only try of the match with two minutes remaining. Bend is now 4-6 overall for the season, 0-6 in the men’s DII South standings of the Pacific Northwest Rugby Football Union. The club will take a hiatus before resuming practices for the second half of the season in January, and league matches will resume in late February.

Running • COCC Turkey Trot: Central Oregon Community College in Bend is set to host its 12th annual Turkey Trot on Saturday, Nov. 20. The three-mile run/walk begins at 10 a.m. at the COCC track. Day-of-race registration will be available from 9 to 9:45 a.m. at the college’s Mazama Gym. COCC and Oregon State University-Cascades Campus students race for free, and the entry fee is $8 for all others. Money raised through entry fees and donations will go to the COCC Foundation, which provides financial assistance for students and fiscal support to college programs. For more information, contact Matt Greenleaf at 541-383-7794 or at mgreenleaf@cocc.edu. • Dirty Half course preview: Runners interested in the new course for the 2011 Dirty Half, a popular annual half-marathon trail race in Bend, can get a free preview at 9 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 21, weather permitting. Mountain bikers are also welcome. Participants will be able to cover the full course, which will be marked, but should bring their own beverages and nutrition, as no aid stations will be available. See Brief / D5

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL BEND ELKS HOLIDAY CAMP: Dec. 16-20; work on pitching, catching, hitting and defensive skills with a number of Pacific Northwest college and high school coaches; cost varies based on components chosen; for players 8-18; Bend Fieldhouse at Vince Genna Stadium; www.bendelks.com. WINTER WORKOUTS WITH DEAN STILES: Work in defense, pitching, catching, hitting, and speed and agility with Dean Stiles, former Bend Elks coach; Nov. 27-28, Dec. 3-4, Dec. 11-12, Jan. 8-9 and Jan. 22-23; $179; www.bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL ATHLETIC CLUB OF BEND YOUTH CAMP: For children in grades two

through eight; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 11-12; camp will feature instruction by Byron Jenson, a former player at Pepperdine University with assistant coaching experience at the NCAA Division I level; $53 per day members, $63 per day nonmembers; half-day rates available; register at www.athleticclubofbend.com or at the club, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; Susan Brown, 541-322-5820; susan@athleticclubofbend.com. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION BOYS TRYOUTS: For boys in grades five through eight who live in the attendance area of Summit High School; Today, Wednesday; grades five and six from 5:30-7 p.m. each day; grades seven and eight from 7-8:30 p.m.; registration deadline Nov. 5; Mike and Lisa Hurley at 541-4808063; www.summithoops.com.

See Calendar / D5


CL

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT

COMMUNITY LIFE

E-mail signoffs Quirkier signoffs can be every bit as much a personality signifier as clothing, Page E6

Inside

E

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010

Indulge I

By Alandra Johnson

SPOTLIGHT

The Bulletin

your mind

Osher program offers classes for 50-plus

t’s college without the tests or homework. That’s how members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute refer to this program in Bend. OLLI, as it is called, allows those ages 50plus to learn about all sorts of subjects, such as the history of China, the art of film, climate change, transcontinental railroads and on and on. There are book discussion groups and field trips in the summer — even classes about quantum physics. Basically, it’s the fun part of school without the paper-writing or exam-taking. More than 100 Central Oregon residents are members of this program, which is run by the University of Oregon. “The more you learn, the more you find there is to learn,” said Russel Hopper, president of the group’s governing council.

What it is Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Cost: Annual cost per person is $120 or $100 if more than one person per household joins; $65 per six months Upcoming topics include: Civil Liberties and the Bill of Rights; The Trans-Siberian Railroad; Water — Our Thirsty World; Forensics Lab Tour; Earth’s Changing Climate; Science in the 20th Century; and Chinese History. Contact: http://osher.uoregon.edu or 541-617-4663

Bend resident Hopper, 62, first heard about OLLI at a dinner party a little more than two years ago. Right away he knew it was something he was interested in. “I’ve always enjoyed learning for the sake of learning.” See Osher / E6

Veterans Day parade routes in Bend, Redmond announced The 11th annual Veterans Day Parade in Bend will kick off at 11 a.m. Thursday on Northwest Newport Avenue. The parade will move through downtown, past Drake Park and conclude at the intersection of Northwest Galveston and Harmon avenues. This year’s parade will be led by Madelon Burcham Hill, 91, who flew military aircraft under the Women Airforce Service Pilots program during World War II and received a Congressional Gold Medal this year. An F-17 fighter jet from Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls is scheduled to fly over Wall Street at 11 a.m. In Redmond, the Veterans Day Parade starts at 11 a.m. downtown on Sixth Street between Dogwood and Forest avenues. Contacts: In Bend, 541-480-4516; in Redmond, 541-548-4108.

Scouting for Food campaign to help out hungry families Local Boy Scouts and their families will be collecting food for needy families this month as part of their annual Scouting for Food campaign. Any household interested in participating is asked to place a bag of nonperishable goods by the front door by 10 a.m. in Bend on Saturday, and in Redmond, Prineville and La Pine on Nov. 20. The Scouts will come by to pick up donations, rain or shine. They will deliver the food to a local food agency. Donations can also be dropped off at local food banks, including the Salvation Army, 755 N.E. Second St. in Bend; the Community Kitchen, 16480 Finley Butte Road in La Pine; FISH, 536 S.W. Ninth St. in Redmond; and St. Vincent DePaul, 240 E. 1st St. in Prineville. Contact: 541-388-3807.

Aligned exchanges services to support NeighborImpact Aligned, a chiropractic office in Redmond formerly known as Holtby Chiropractic Center, is holding its second annual food drive this week. The drive will support NeighborImpact. The first day of care for new patients will be exchanged for a donation of nonperishable items. NeighborImpact seeks to change the course of families’ futures by giving them the tools they need, including home repair, financial skills building, savings programs, tutoring, emergency housing, feeding the hungry and more. To schedule an appointment, call 541-923-0444.

Spoken word artists to put on free show in Bend Spoken word artists Derrick Brown, Anis Mojgani and Buddy Wakefield will perform at 7 p.m. Friday at Greenwood Playhouse in Bend. The three have been collaborating for three years, adopting a new “Revival”related name each tour. This time out, they’re performing under the name Night Kite Revival. Mojgani and Wakefield are both two-time Individual National Poetry Slam champions. Brown, a former paratrooper, has opened for The Decemberists and The Flaming Lips. The event, presented by Cascades Theatrical Company and Deschutes Public Library, is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. Greenwood Playhouse is at 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-312-1032.

Teen Challenge hosting turkey dinner drawing

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Central Oregon Teen Challenge is hosting a Thanksgiving drawing Nov. 18 in Bend. Each of 10 winners will receive a Thanksgiving dinner including a turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, a holiday yam bake, green beans in mushroom sauce, a cherry supreme salad, a layered salad, cranberry sauce, a relish tray, pumpkin cheesecake, a pumpkin roll, and rolls and butter. To participate, donate at least $1 for each ticket. Proceeds benefit the programs at Teen Challenge. Tickets are available by phone or at the Central Oregon Teen Challenge Center at 435 N.E. Burnside Ave. in Bend. The deadline to purchase tickets is 10 a.m. Nov. 18. The winners will be notified by phone. Contact: 541-678-5272. — From staff reports


T EL EV IS IO N

E2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Texting teens do dumb things on smart phones Dear Abby: I read your advice to “Getting Grief in Grants Pass, Ore.,” (Sept. 11), whose father was reading her cell phone messages. You called his supervision “heavy-handed” and suggested she discuss it with him. While I applaud your suggestion to have a talk with her father, please reconsider the characterization that he was heavy-handed. As a parent and high school assistant principal, I have seen too often the dangers of “sexting” and other illicit communications. Today’s smart phone tells us all sorts of things that we as parents need to know. It also has connections to social networking and applications that allow teenagers to blindly send their phone numbers to anonymous users and have conversations. The world has changed with this technology, and the attention we pay as parents must change with it. I strongly urge the parents at my school to check their children’s phones and computers regularly. I suggest to parents to start doing it when their children are young and explain that it is part of their job as a parent. — Dave Miller, New York Dear Dave: Thank you for writing and reminding me that kids today face many challenges that had never been an issue for them in past generations. Read on: Dear Abby: The number of teens and children who engage in inappropriate sexting and texting is shocking. These behaviors can be evidence of sexual exploitation, harassment, bullying and teen dating violence. The results of this teenage behavior can be devastating and have lifetime consequences. Kids sometimes are afraid to go to parents or other responsible adults to seek help when they need it; often kids may not even know they are in trouble or exposing themselves to danger by

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

DEAR ABBY their behavior. How long do you think it takes a “sext” between a girl and her boyfriend to make it to a child porn website? A cell phone is a computer, and parents are responsible for ensuring the safety of their children and protecting them from predators and others who might harm them. If “Grief” is not engaging in inappropriate behavior, she shouldn’t be embarrassed if her parents read the text messages. Abby, please use your column to help educate children, teens and their parents that a text/sext lasts a lifetime. — Patricia Dailey Lewis, deputy attorney general, Delaware Department Of Justice Dear Abby: As a crime prevention officer, I regularly encourage parents to check a child’s cell phone for bullying and sexting, most of which a child won’t share with a parent. Especially if the child is the one who is using the phone to bully others, she certainly won’t share her pictures with her parents. Most children are unaware that state laws have not changed, and children who send pornographic pictures of themselves to others can be charged with distributing child pornography and may have to register as a sexual predator for the rest of their lives. Kudos to “Grief’s” father for protecting his child not only from herself, but ensuring she is not hurting others! — Child Advocate In North Carolina Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Ex-athlete Jones scores role as a coach in ‘Glee’ By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FRESNO, Calif. — Years of throwing the shot put and professional arm wrestling left California State University, Fresno grad Dot-Marie Jones with a bum right shoulder. It got so bad, Jones was scheduled to have surgery in January to place a metal cap on her humerus. She canceled the hospital visit when her hand started to itch. “Every time my palm itches I book a job,” Jones says. “It was driving me nuts, so I knew I needed to postpone the surgery.” Two days later, she was cast in an episode of the cable series “Hawthorne,” which turned into a five-episode arch. While shooting the series, Jones got a call from her agent: Ryan Murphy, the man behind “Glee,” wanted to know if she would be available in mid-July. Murphy, who previously cast Jones in “Nip/Tuck” and the TV pilot “Pretty Handsome,” wanted Jones for a recurring role on his Fox series “Glee.” She was cast Coach Shannon Beiste, who takes over McKinley High’s football team when Coach Ken Tanaka (Patrick Gallagher) has a nervous breakdown. “They guaranteed me I would be in five of the first 13 episodes and I’ve already been in six of the nine shows shot for this year. This week, she has a big storyline with Clovis East High School grad Chris Colfer. “I had heard Chris was from Clovis,” Jones says. “When I told him I went to Fresno State, he was excited.” Jones transferred to Fresno State in 1984 after spending two years at Modesto Jr. College. She’d only been out of high school a year when she entered — and won — her

Fox via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Coach Shannon Beiste (guest star Dorothy-Marie Jones, center) and the football team watch from the sidelines in the “Grilled Cheesus” episode of “Glee.”

‘G lee’ When: 8 tonight Where: Fox

first arm-wrestling competition. The 6-feet-4 Jones went on to be a 15-time World and six-time National arm-wrestling champion. Jones went to work at the Fresno County Juvenile Hall after graduating from college. She got involved in acting after meeting Shirley Eson, who played Sky on “American Gladiators,” and auditioned for the 1992 competition series “Knights and Warriors.”

Soon, Jones was facing down competitors as Lady Battleaxe. That lead to roles on “Married With Children,” “Roseanne,” “Birds of Prey,” “Lizzie McGuire” and other TV shows. As for “Glee,” there was never a question of whether Jones could handle the acting part. The big question was her musical skills. “I can sing,” Jones says with a laugh. “I’m no Mariah Carey, but I can carry a tune.” She’s been told Coach Beiste will have to belt out a number sometime this season. If given the choice, Jones would sing something by Heart, her favor-

ite band — even though she’d be nervous about doing the tunes justice. Singing or not, Jones considers the “Glee” role one of the best she’s ever had. “I was so happy to get a character with so much depth. She’s tough on the outside but has this huge emotional heart. It’s really a fantastic role,” Jones says. “I think what happens with this character is going to surprise a lot of people. I know I’m the luckiest person in this town because there are 5,000 behind me waiting to get a role like this and behind them are 5,000 more.”

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet Featured Business of the Week:

1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Self Referrals Welcome

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

541-706-6900

2736 NW Crossing Dr, #140 Bend, OR 97701

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

www.educate.com

541-312-2887

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 11/9/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Wolf: Travels This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Workshop PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

No Ordinary Family (N) ‘PG’ Å Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å The Biggest Loser The contestants compete in pairs. ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Broken Arrow (N) ‘PG’ Å NCIS: Los Angeles Bounty (N) ‘14’ No Ordinary Family (N) ‘PG’ Å Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å Glee Never Been Kissed (N) ’ ‘14’ Raising Hope (N) Running Wilde News on PDX-TV Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? NOVA The origin of dogs. (N) ’ ‘G’ Through a Dog’s Eyes ’ ‘G’ The Biggest Loser The contestants compete in pairs. ’ ‘PG’ Å One Tree Hill (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Life Unexpected (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Art Workshop Joy/Painting NOVA The origin of dogs. (N) ’ ‘G’ Through a Dog’s Eyes ’ ‘G’

10:00

10:30

11:00

(10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 (N) ‘14’ Å KATU News at 11 Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News The Good Wife Poisoned Pill (N) ‘14’ News (10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 (N) ‘14’ Å News (N) News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget South Park ‘14’ Frontline Sailors convicted of rape and murder. (N) ‘PG’ Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News Married... With Married... With King of Queens Family Kitchen Jacques Pepin Sara’s Meals Frontline Sailors convicted of rape and murder. (N) ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ South Park ‘14’ Bonaparte’s Ret. Jay Leno King of Queens Primal Grill Bonaparte’s Ret.

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Lured In; Disaster ‘14’ Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Parking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) Parking Wars Parking Wars 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Bad Seed ’ ‘14’ Å (3:00) › “Wild Wild ›››› “The Untouchables” (1987, Crime Drama) Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro. Incorrupt- › “Death Wish 3” (1985, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Deborah Raffin, Ed Lauter. › “Death Wish 4: The Crackdown” (1987, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Kay Lenz. 102 40 39 West” Å ible government agents move against Al Capone. Å Paul Kersey goes after a murderous New York street gang. Å Vigilante targets L.A. drug rings on girlfriend’s behalf. Å Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å Weird, True Weird, True Lost Tapes ‘14’ Freak Encounters The Haunted ’ ‘PG’ Å The Haunted ’ ‘PG’ Å The Haunted ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker (N) ‘14’ The Fashion Show (N) ‘14’ (11:15) The Fashion Show ‘14’ 137 44 Home Videos Home Videos The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Chr Chr Chr Cribs ’ 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ BP: In Deep Mad Money Coca-Cola: The Real Story Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s Success Zumba Dance 51 36 40 52 ››› “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room” (2005, Documentary) Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Nick Swardson’s South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (3:30) Grilled Å Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Get Outdoors Redmond City Council Epic Conditions Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “Wizards of Waverly Place The Movie” (2009) ‘G’ (9:45) Fish Hooks Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Dirty Jobs Floating Fish Factory ‘14’ Dirty Jobs ’ ‘PG’ Å Dirty Jobs Animal Relocator (N) ‘PG’ Auction Kings (N) Auction Kings (N) Dirty Jobs: The Nitty Gritty ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ 2010 World Series of Poker Final Table, from Las Vegas. SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 (N) NBA Coast to Coast Highlights, analysis and NBA news and information. NFL Live (N) NASCAR Now NBA Tonight 2010 World Series of Poker 22 24 21 24 (4:00) College Football Toledo at Northern Illinois (Live) Who’s Number 1? Å Can’t Blame Can’t Blame AWA Wrestling Å NBA From March 21, 1994. (N) 23 25 123 25 MLB Baseball From Oct. 28, 1981. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Melissa & Joey › “What a Girl Wants” (2003, Comedy-Drama) Amanda Bynes, Colin Firth. Å America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor Å Down Home Paula’s Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Best Thing Ate Challenge Cakes at least six feet tall. Private Chefs of Beverly Hills (N) Chopped Fired Up! Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Bensinger Mark Few Show Seahawks Beavers Football UEFA Champions League Soccer AC Milan vs. Real Madrid The Final Score Pac-10 Hoops The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Equestrian Spruce Meadows (3:00) ›› “Man on Fire” (2004) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Jumper” (2008, Science Fiction) Hayden Christensen, Jamie Bell. Sons of Anarchy Firinne (N) ‘MA’ (11:05) Sons of Anarchy Firinne ‘MA’ 131 Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place House Hunters Real Estate House Hunters Hunters Int’l For Rent ’ ‘G’ For Rent ’ ‘G’ 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Holmes/Homes The Universe The outer planets. ‘PG’ The Universe Alien Galaxies ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å IRT Deadliest Roads Thin Air ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Marked Biker tattoos. ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 The Universe ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Wife Swap Flannagin/Logan ’ ‘PG’ Wife Swap Cedarquist/Oeth ’ ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 16 and Pregnant Maci ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Brooke ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly iKiss ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Stargate SG-1 Thor’s Chariot ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Stargate Universe The Greater Good Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr (11:01) Stargate Universe ’ Å 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Praise-A-Thon Biannual fundraising event. 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “Local Hero” (1983, Comedy) Burt Lancaster, Peter Riegert, Denis Lawson. A ››› “The Parallax View” (1974, Suspense) Warren Beatty, Paula Prentiss. A reporter ›››› “Kind Hearts and Coronets” (1949) ›››› “Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” 101 44 101 29 (1964, Comedy) Peter Sellers, George C. Scott. Å would-be mogul tries to secure a Scottish village’s land. uncovers a nationwide network of assassins. Å Alec Guinness. Wedding Day Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å William & Kate: A Royal Love Story Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count The Little Couple The Little Couple Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Narcosis ’ ‘14’ Bones Woman at the Airport ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Law & Order Brilliant Disguise ‘14’ Law & Order Innocence ’ ‘14’ CSI: NY Enough ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order School Daze ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Would Happen Adventure Time › “Small Soldiers” (1998, Action) Kirsten Dunst, Gregory Smith. Tower Prep Buffer Buffer rules. (N) King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘G’ Å Mysteries at the Museum (N) ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures Stanley Hotel ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Psych Mr. Yin Presents... ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Bret Michaels Mario Lopez Football Wives Football Wives Dance Cam Slam My Big Friggin’ Wedding ’ ‘14’ Dance Cam Slam 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:30) ›› “Seven Years in Tibet” (5:50) ››› “A River Runs Through It” 1992 Craig Sheffer. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Spy Game” 2001, Suspense Robert Redford, Brad Pitt. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:10) ›› “Legends of the Fall” 1994, Drama Brad Pitt. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Class Action” 1991, Drama Gene Hackman, Colin Friels. ‘R’ Å ›› “Luna” 1979 Jill Clayburgh. Widowed opera singer gets unusually close to teenage son. When-Whales ››› “Nell” 1994, Drama Jodie Foster, Liam Neeson. ‘PG-13’ Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ Insane Cinema: Slammed ‘14’ The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Tracking Eero Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Tracking Eero Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Big Break Dominican Republic Big Break Dominican Republic (N) Haney Project Haney Project Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Big Break Dominican Republic Haney Project Haney Project Playing Lessons Inside PGA Tour Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Jane Doe: The Harder They Fall” (2005) Lea Thompson. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:15) ››› “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” 2009 Daniel Radcliffe. New dan- REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ In Treatment ’ In Treatment ’ In Treatment (N) ’ In Treatment (N) ’ Eastbound & Down Eastbound & Down Bored to Death ’ Boardwalk Empire HBO 425 501 425 10 gers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. ‘PG’ Å ‘PG’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ›› “Love and a .45” 1994 Gil Bellows. ‘R’ 360 Sessions Arrested Dev. Kids in-Hall Todd Margaret Todd Margaret ›› “Love and a .45” 1994, Action Gil Bellows. ‘R’ 360 Sessions (11:15) The Grid Arrested Dev. IFC 105 105 ›› “Pirate Radio” 2009, Comedy Philip Seymour Hoffman, Bill Nighy, Rhys Ifans. › “Stephen King’s Thinner” 1996, Horror Robert John Burke, (4:45) ›› “O” 2001 Mekhi Phifer. A jealous teen tries to ruin his (6:20) ››› “Solaris” 2002 George Clooney. A psychologist (11:35) Lingerie ’ MAX 400 508 7 basketball teammate’s life. ’ ‘R’ Å encounters his late wife on a space station. ’ Pirate DJs play rock music for ’60s-era British fans. ’ ‘R’ Å Joe Mantegna, Michael Constantine. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å Journey to the Edge of the Universe ‘G’ Great Migrations (N) ‘PG’ Journey to the Edge of the Universe ‘G’ Great Migrations ‘PG’ King Tut’s Final Secrets ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Ted Nugent Hunting Count. Truth-Hunting Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Elk Chronicles Truth-Hunting Wildlife Bow Madness Steve Outdoor Wild Outdoors Trophy Quest OUTD 37 307 43 (3:30) ›› “My One › “The Life Before Her Eyes” 2007 Uma Thurman. A woman’s ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. iTV. A teen is caught Weeds Fran Tarken- The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å Dexter Circle Us ’ ‘MA’ Å Weeds Fran Tarken- The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å SHO 500 500 ton ’ ‘MA’ and Only” childhood memories ruin her life as an adult. up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ ton ’ ‘MA’ Monster Jam Monster Jam Race in 60 (N) Monster Jam Monster Jam Race in 60 NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (6:50) ››› “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus” 2009 Heath Ledger. ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009, Comedy ‘G’ (10:40) ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” 2009 ››› “Cadillac Records” 2008, Drama Adrien Brody, Jeffrey Wright. ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:40) “The Neighbor” 2007 Matthew Modine. A man falls for his (6:20) ›› “Street Smart” 1987 Christopher Reeve. A journalist “The Vicious Kind” 2009 Adam Scott. A man becomes infatuated (9:35) ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy. Col. Claus von (11:40) “The Hurt TMC 525 525 new neighbor, but trouble soon arrives. ’ fabricates a story about a Times Square pimp. with his brother’s girlfriend. ‘R’ Å Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Locker” 2008 ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at New York Rangers (Live) Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show World Extreme Cagefighting Joseph Benavidez vs. Dominick Cruz Inside XDL The T.Ocho Show WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å VS. 27 58 30 Downsized Down But Not Out ‘PG’ Bridezillas Molly, Tasanna & Angel Molly has an epic meltdown. ‘14’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘G’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ‘PG’ Å I Want to Save I Want to Save WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “EAT, DRINK & BE DEADLY”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.bendticket.com. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Ashland-based indie-folk trio Kites and Crows perform; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; 541-306-0048. BODY VOX-2: The Portland-based dance ensemble performs; $20 or $25; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. KELLI SCARR: The New York-based indie-folk musician performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; with a discussion with the director; free; 3-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7412. “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; with a discussion with the director; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, BORIS GODUNOV”: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in an encore presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. “BUTTE BAGGIN’ II”: A screening of the ski film featuring descents on local mountains; free; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 919-389-1088. 18 SWITCHBACKS: The Coloradobased Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. BUILT TO SPILL: The Boise, Idahobased indie band performs, with Fauxbois; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. ROGER CLYNE AND THE PEACEMAKERS: The Phoenix-based Americana-rock act performs; ages 21 and older; $15; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

THURSDAY BEND VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade includes marching bands, floats, military vehicles, a flyover and more; free for spectators; 11 a.m.; downtown Bend; 541-480-4516. VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade honoring veterans; free; Downtown Redmond, Sixth Street between Dogwood and Forest avenues; downtown Redmond. VFW OPEN HOUSE: Meet military service members and veterans in honor of Veterans Day; free; noon6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. A SIMON & GARFUNKEL RETROSPECTIVE: AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle perform both classic and obscure songs from the

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

band; $23-$37; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

FRIDAY GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Jurassic Park” by Michael Crichton; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. POETRY REVIVAL : Poets Buddy Wakefield, Anis Mojgani and Derrick Brown join together for an evening of visceral spoken word performances; presented by the Deschutes Public Library and the Cascades Theatrical Company; free admission; 6 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-312-1032. CENTRAL OREGON HOMEGROWN MUSIC REVIEW: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta, Shireen Amini, Tim Coffey, Dennis McGregor, Brent Alan and Erin Cole-Baker; proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon; $12; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “A FISH CALLED WANDA”: A screening of the 1988 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an electric rock ‘n’ roll set, with Tuck and Roll; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

SATURDAY INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN/ WALK: Run 5K or walk one mile in honor of the Marine Corps; race begins outside city hall; registration required; proceeds benefit Disabled American Veterans’ Portland shuttle van; $22 with a shirt, $16 without; $21 with shirt or $14 without before Nov. 1; 9 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-383-8061, chandler@bendcable.com or www .vetsdayrun.homestead.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in a presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. VETERANS CHILI COOK-OFF CHALLENGE: Featuring chili, drinks, music and more; proceeds benefit local veterans organizations; free admission; noon-5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. NATIONAL GAMING DAY: Play a variety of board and video games; free; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7079 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

AUDUBON FUNDRAISER: Featuring a membership drive, silent auction, book sale, presentations, live music and more; proceeds benefit the East Cascades Audubon Society birding projects; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-317-3086 or www.ecaudubon.org. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC BENEFIT GALA: Includes live music, dinner, a silent auction and a raffle; proceeds benefit High Desert Chamber Music programs; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-306-3988, info@highdesert chambermusic .com or www.High DesertChamber Music.com. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Cinder Kittens play the Maidens of Mayhem; a portion of proceeds benefits junior roller derby; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-330-1183 or www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. “FROM CHEYENNE TO PENDLETON”: A screening of the documentary about the rise and fall of the rodeo cowgirl, with filmmaker Steve Wursta; $5, free museum members; 7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241 or kgarton@highdesertmuseum.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs with warm-up band The Fondue Party; $5 donation; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 27: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Bill Beach and Brasil Beat; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541977-5637, joe@justjoesmusic.com or www.justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an acoustic rock ‘n’ roll set; $13 plus fees in advance, $16 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com. HEAD FOR THE HILLS: The Fort Collins, Colo.-based bluegrass band performs; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY CRUSADER CHOIR: The Idaho-based choir performs a concert of sacred music; free; 10:15 a.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496. EMPTY BOWLS: Ninth annual event features gourmet soup and a selection of artisan bowls, with live music; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $18 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-548-2380, ext. 144 or www.neighborimpact.org. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Guy Few performs on the trumpet, piano and other instruments, with Stephanie Mara; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org.

MONDAY Nov. 15 No calendar events.

TUESDAY Nov. 16 “NATIVE AMERICAN RESEARCH — THE WARM SPRINGS TRIBE”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Jane Kirkpatrick; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/ bend-gs.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 17 THANKSGIVING POTLUCK: Bring a vegan dish to share, along with its recipe; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017 or http:// vegnetbend.org. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. POWDER HOUND SLIDE SHOW: The 11th annual Pine Mountain Sports fundraiser party will feature local photographers and filmmakers, along with an outdoor gear raffle; proceeds to benefit Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Deschutes County Search & Rescue; $12 in advance, $14 at the door; Doors open at 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-385-8080 or www .pinemountainsports.com.

THURSDAY Nov. 18 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Festive open house featuring seasonal beer and wine tastings, tasty food, and music by a local band; free; 5:30 p.m.; Great Earth Natural Foods, 46 S.W. D St., Madras; 541-475-1813. STEELHEAD FILM NIGHT: A screening of fishing films and photos from around the world; proceeds benefit the Deschutes River Conservancy; $10; 6 and 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “What Does It All Mean?” with Kathleen Dean Moore; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360.

FRIDAY Nov. 19 A CASCADES CLASSICAL EVENING: Concert pianist Dr. William Chapman Nyaho performs pieces by Chopin, BachRachmaninoff, Beethoven and Gershwin; proceeds benefit the Cascades Classical Music Foundation; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-383-0868. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper will discuss her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

M T For Tuesday, Nov. 9

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CONVICTION (R) 4, 6:45 FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) 4:05, 6:50 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) 4:15, 6:55 NEVER LET ME GO (R) 4:20, 7:05 NOWHERE BOY (R) 4:40, 7:05 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 4:10, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DUE DATE (R) 12:25, 2, 2:40, 4:25, 5:10, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:05 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 12:50, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:05, 4:40, 7:55 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:10 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) Noon, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13)

12:30, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 12:15, 1:45, 2:30, 4, 5:05, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 9:50 MEGAMIND (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:50, 10:10 RACE ACROSS THE SKY 2010 (no MPAA rating) 7:30 RED (PG-13) 1, 4:45, 9:55, SAW 3-D (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8, 10:20 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 12:40, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.)

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

INCEPTION (PG-13) 8:30 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 6:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DUE DATE (R) 5, 7:15, 9:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 SAW VII (R) 5, 7, 9 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3:45, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DUE DATE (R) 7 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 6:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 6:30 WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” (PG) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SECRETARIAT (PG) 4, 7

Michael Nagle / New York Times News Service

Steve-O, born Stephen Glover, of “Jackass” fame, will star alongside Johnny Knoxville and rest of the “Jackass” cast in the third installment of the prank series, “Jackass 3D,” out in theaters.

Steve-O’s next trick: sobriety By Melena Ryzik New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Regrets, Steve-O’s had a few. Not among them: holding a lit firework in his derriere, attaching a leech to his eyeball, inserting a hook through his cheek and swimming with sharks, or any of the other stunts he performed as part of the “Jackass” cast. But the way he conducted himself when he was off-camera — the drug and alcohol binges; arrests (for drug possession, disorderly conduct and assault); the time he urinated on the red carpet at the premiere of “Jackass Number Two” in front of his entire family — those were not his proudest moments. Yet they weren’t quite regrets, either. If he hadn’t done all that, “then I wouldn’t have the real motivation” to act differently, he said recently, over dinner at Angelica Kitchen, a vegetarian restaurant in the East Village. Steve-O, 36, born Stephen Glover, has been a vegan for more than a year. He says he has been sober for two and a half years, including during filming of “Jackass 3D,” the third installment of the prank series, which opened Oct. 15. For much of his professional life, he said, he was high. “Just about every scene in that first movie, except the ones we filmed in Japan, I was visibly on cocaine,” he said. After promising his co-stars, he stayed off drugs for the second film, “but I was more out of control in other ways.” He was hearing voices, one in each ear. “I can only describe them as demons and angels,” he said. In 2008, his cast mate Johnny Knoxville, with the help of Dr. Drew, the TV therapist, staged an intervention that resulted in Steve-O being committed. “I was locked up in the psych ward with two weeks on my hands,” Steve-O said. “Some people came in and talked about how they stayed sober and it stuck. They gave me the idea that getting sober was something that could be done and that I had

to do it.” He spent six months in treatment, then moved into a halfway house. Now he lives alone in suburban Glendale, Calif. “I keep it simple,” he said. He has a dog, “a diversion named Walter.” In a backward baseball cap, loose jeans and flip-flops, he is unassuming enough to sit on the sidewalk outside the restaurant, after having walked there from Times Square, and famous enough to be spotted by a table full of teenage girls, who squealingly asked for photos. (He obliged.) For a while, being Steve-O had been his full-time identity, and his downfall. At the premiere of the second “Jackass” film, “I felt like I was at my own funeral,” he said. “I was convinced there would be no more movies, nothing was ever going to be that big of a deal. I was so afraid of the rest of my life. I just didn’t have any identity aside from my persona. Peeing on the red carpet had a lot to do with that.” Now he’s trying to be someone off-screen as well. He is a mentor to a boy in juvenile detention and he’s working on his autobiography. “My main focus in sobriety has been to replace fear with faith or love,” he said. But fans of “Jackass” need not worry that Steve-O has gone soft. “If I don’t perceive a risk of paralysis or death, then I’m in,” he said of his stunts. He still has a BB embedded in his nipple from the new movie. “It’s a pretty gnarly nipple wound,” he said, lifting his shirt and pressing a finger on it to show it off. After dinner, he met a few friends at 675 Bar, a sleek pool hall in the meatpacking district. They shot a few games, and Steve-O goofed off, trying to juggle (he’s a graduate of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College), but by 10 p.m. he was dutifully heading to a 12-step gathering. “I don’t care if people think I’m boring,” he said. A few weeks later, at a promotional event for “Jackass 3D,” he set his head on fire.


E4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010: This year, you change what is no longer working in your daily life. This transformation could be anything, from a car or a computer to taking a course in better communication. You become proactive, perhaps making radical changes. If you are single, late spring starts drawing forth very interesting people. Make sure you want to be with the person you choose before you commit. If you are attached, your partner might become more demanding in 2011. You will like the results should you choose to make this effort. CAPRICORN can be too serious, especially when you are trying to have fun. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Keep reaching out for a key person, who could be a relative, friend or someone who is a source of information. Though you might not be able to plan a trip just yet, start considering where and when. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH News, though surprising, could force you to get past selfimposed mental filters. Break free and learn to better understand those in your immediate environment. You might be surprised by what happens when you gain some perspective. Tonight: Let your mind wander. Surf the Net. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Someone you counted

on might back out at the last minute. Your creativity mixed with a partner’s perspective stabilizes what could be a difficult situation otherwise. Tonight: Flex with the moment and a friend. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Others want to dominate, which should not be a new scenario for you. Although how you handle it might be quite different. People are changing, as are their reactions. You, too, will be making an adjustment. Tonight: The only requirement is not to be alone. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Rarely can you focus to the current extent. You might want to revisit an issue with a fresh mind and some detachment. The insight you gain could help mend bridges. Listen to what is being shared among your associates. Tonight: Slow down and take time to visit with individuals you generally only say “hi” to. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Don’t hesitate to scrap a bad idea, because you will come up with another idea and yet another, until you find the one you like. If you’re in the arts, your muse has arrived. Just tap into it. Tonight: Let your hair down. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Accept the limitations of a situation, and you will be one step closer to processing them. You would like to make profound changes. Make sure you really want this type of transformation. You can create nearly anything you want. Tonight: At home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Count on your ability to profoundly turn a situation around through communication.

Remember, there are many ways to say something. Think about the most effective way for each situation. Tonight: Take time to chat with a neighbor or sibling. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Do you need to add to the current financial pressure? A decision made right now could do exactly that. Be very careful, as you are in a process of reorganizing and rethinking your money/life structure. The fewer commitments made now the better. Tonight: Treat yourself to a special item for the fall. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH To many, you seem reasonable and staid. Little do they know about the many changes that are bubbling up within. Use your ability to discern the frivolous and toss it out of your life. Tonight: Whatever puts a smile on your face. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH The fewer decisions you make and the less you act on your personal situation, or even a business deal, the better. You might feel a bit overwhelmed by information. What you realize is that either your facts or your perspective was off. Tonight: Just do for you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH You might be surprised to see your perspective change radically, and to see yourself acting on new views. You do need to check in with yourself about a goal or a project you might be fostering today. It might not feel appropriate any longer. Tonight: Where the crowds are. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

When ‘best’ isn’t good enough By Judith Newman New York Times News Service

A few years ago I got this note from a mother in my son’s class. “Hey, we both end our e-mails with ‘Carpe Diem’! Hope the parents in class won’t confuse us, ha-ha!” Naturally I thought she was kidding, and wrote back saying our different names might be a tip-off we were not the same person. “Oh, sure,” she said, “but I’ve used ‘Carpe Diem’ forever. People know me by that one. It would be great if you used something else from now on. Thanks!” After briefly considering the alternative “Carpe Diem, You Control Freak,” I continued ending my notes as I had, and the mother dropped the issue. But it was the first time I realized how fraught that little epistolary goodbye can be. In a medium where it is often oddly difficult to interpret tone, where the lines of friendship, love and business are easily muddied, and where people are sometimes a little too eager to shine brightly in the drab sludge of daily missives, something as seemingly trivial as an e-mail signoff can loom large. It can be a clue to both the personality of the sender and the standing that the recipient has in his or her social universe. It can enlighten, amuse and enrage — sometimes all at once. Quirkier signoffs can be every bit as much a personality signifier as clothing — the equivalent of a leather jacket or Jimmy Choos. Katrina Markoff, who owns Vosges Haut-Chocolat, closes her e-mails with the words “Peace, love and chocolate.” (“She believes she can bring peace to the

Osher Continued from E1 Hopper, a retired high school science teacher, loves to read and often peruses books about interesting topics. He saw this program as an even better way to learn than just by reading because it involved discussion with other people. Redmond resident Jeanne Freeman also heard about OLLI from a friend and decided to sign up for a class about French Impressionists. “I was absolutely hooked from the beginning,” she said. That was two years ago and now she is very involved with the program. OLLI offers courses and discussion groups nearly every day, Monday through Friday. Local members help determine the subject matter covered. Some people attend one or two events a month; others, like Hopper, attend two or three each week. Members can take as many classes as they like for one annual membership fee. Many of the courses are lectures by professors that are shown on DVD, followed by facilitated discussions. A few lectures have been streamed live from the Eugene campus. The group tries to get as many speakers as possible, but the DVDs offer flexibility and breadth, says Hopper. He estimates about 25 people on average attend each class. Most classes are held at the Chandler Lab on Awbrey Butte in Bend or at the Bend Senior Center. The program started at the

world through chocolate,” her spokesman says.) I used to think my friend Bishop Savas of Troas, the director of the Office of Society and Culture of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, signed his e-mails with a “(PLUS)” instead of an “X” for kiss because it was his unique form of proper, churchly affection toward me. Um, no. “This is actually a common signoff among those in the church, but please, don’t let that disturb your theory,” he generously explained. On the other side of the theological aisle, David Hirshey, executive vice president at HarperCollins, tends to close his e-mails with the words “Stay Jewish” — “though mostly with friends who are Gentiles,” he added. “I find it works best when the person’s last name is something like O’Hara or Soprano.” People go through periods where they try on different closes like hairstyles. “Norman used to use ‘Cheers,’ and I tried to appropriate it when he died,” the writer and artist Norris Church Mailer said of her husband, Norman Mailer. “It just wasn’t me.” For now, Mailer is sticking with the lowercase xx — “which are not really kisses but a placeholder, as if I don’t really know how I feel about this person, and they can apply whatever meaning they choose.” But she did approve of the signoff I was currently trying on, “Be Fabulous.” “I love that!” she said. “Of course, I’ve lived in Provincetown for the past 35 years.” Confusing for many of us, particularly in business relationships, is the question of familiarity. People will start with “Sin-

cerely” and work their way up — “Regards,” “Best,” “Warmly,” “Fondly.” But then there’s inevitably a point where a decision needs to be made.

University of Oregon in 1993 and came to Bend in 2003. At the time, it was known as the Silver Sage Society, said Ruth Heller, program director. The group switched its name after receiving an endowment from the Bernard Osher Foundation in 2004. The goal is to “urge people to keep exploring and to nurture that,” said Heller. She says older individuals also bring a lot to the table. She thinks the program helps connect retirees, who want to have conversations about “topics that go beyond pleasantries.” The Eugene program has more than 400 members, and Heller says she would love to see more members in the Bend program.

the program reached more contemporary history, Hopper says many people began offering personal or family insights, which made it even more interesting. Sometimes when politics or religion comes up, members can engage in some debate, but Hopper says it never becomes heated. When science comes up, the discussion usually revolves around understanding it; with history, people tend to want to share their own experiences; and with art, people want to offer their own impressions or interpretations. “I enjoy discussion as much as anything,” said Hopper. He says the group has led him to form good friendships. Most of the members are retired and this group offers a good outlet for conversation. The members range in age from 50 to 90-plus. Freeman, 62, loves meeting people she probably wouldn’t have come into contact with otherwise. Not all classes are successful. Hopper recalls one lecture about the art of Japan that only one person attended. But that is a rarity. Hopper is looking forward to an upcoming series on the history of China, particularly because of how important China is becoming in the world. He is also excited about a series a retired art history professor is going to offer about movies. Hopper says he will likely get together and watch the movies — including “The Red Violin,” “High Noon” and “Citizen Kane” — with some

Subjects Freeman greatly enjoyed a series about the Middle East as well as one about comparative religion. She also likes the field trips, which typically take place during the summer. In September, the group went on a trip to learn about geology around the region, led by an author on the subject. Currently Freeman is enjoying a series about climate change which has provoked good discussion. Hopper likes art, history and music. Due to his background, science is of particular interest. Several other members of the Bend OLLI group also have science backgrounds. One of Hopper’s favorite programs was a nearly yearlong course about U.S. history. When

Too much love “I’ll be having a back-andforth e-mail — I’ll get ‘Best’ and ‘Regards’ and ‘Cheers’ — and all of a sudden I get ‘Love,’” said Will Schwalbe, a co-author, with David Shipley, the editor of The New York Times’ Op-Ed page, of the book “Send: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better.” “And then I’m tortured. Is it just a dumb slip? Or is it a Freudian slip? And if you return the ‘Love,’ it’s like an arms race — how do you step back without insulting someone?” Thomas Mallon, a novelist and the author of “Yours Ever,” a book about some of the world’s best letter-writing, said: “I’ve learned over time that X-ing and O-ing in a business relationship, no matter how much you may like the person, is probably buying yourself trouble. Because there will come a time when you have contentious business — and then what?” And as mortifying as the runaway train of escalating intimacy can be, the complete misplacement of it can be worse — so easy to do when one of the most reflexive signoffs is XOXO. (Startlingly, even William F. Buckley Jr. used it.) Eric Poole, a Fox executive and the author of “Where’s My Wand?” — a memoir about growing up gay and Baptist — still shudders a little remembering the day when he “accidentally signed XOXOXO to

my straight male boss. To which he replied, ‘I’m flattered, but let’s take it slow.’” And Karen Karbo, a journalist and novelist, admits she has bestowed many accidental XOXOs over the years. “But the worst was when I was in the middle of the hairiest divorce imaginable and I shot off an accidental XOXO and the ex was on my doorstep within a half hour, sure this meant we were reconciling.” Then again, in established relationships, it’s always better to err on the side of warmth. The writer Marjorie Ingall recently found a press release that her husband, Jonathan Steuer, had forwarded to her with the note, “Thought you’d be interested,” and it was signed, “Best, J” — to which she replied, “What am I, your accountant?” It is, in fact, the reflexive nature of closes that frequently trips us up. “I recently changed my standard ‘Cheers’ signoff after noting that it had been automatically appended to e-mails breaking up with a longtime girlfriend, discussing the plans for my mother’s cremation and threatening my insurance company with a lawsuit,” my friend Spencer noted. “I’ve also learned that ‘Cheers’ doesn’t work well in any e-mail that includes the words ‘stage four.’” What makes Ingall a little nuts are the wise quotes that turn out to be entirely fictitious. “When people use ‘Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle — Plato,’ I want to be all, ‘You know Plato never said that, right?? There’s this thing called fact-checking, look into it.’” She is also not a fan of the politically correct signoff. “If

the bottom of your e-mail says, ‘Please consider the environment before printing out this e-mail,’ you should know that makes me want to print out the e-mail — which I was not going to do because who prints out e-mail? Don’t flatter yourself!” I find myself thinking, “Sing it, sister,” as Ingall rants; not surprisingly, we both spend perhaps a little too much time on e-mail. And that’s the problem, Schwalbe said. This virtual world of communication has become our real world, and we read all sorts of meaning into it because — here’s a shocker for you — many of us are not superclear communicators. “We need to cut the world more slack — and ourselves

less,” Schwalbe said. “There’s a very practical reason. On the one hand, we need to pay attention to how we sign off. Are we being pleasant? Sometimes an exclamation point makes the world a better place. But when we see e-mails coming to us, we don’t need to be the Style Police. People are not e-mailing in an atmosphere of monastic concentration. We’re all doing a million things. So no finger-wagging. It’s a recipe for unhappiness.” No one wants to create angst over a signoff, which, after all, is usually just a way to ease the transition to SEND. So, Cheers, Yours Truly, Carpe Vino, Be Fabulous, XXOOXXOOXXOO and, if you’re reading this online, don’t print it.

class members before attending class to learn interesting aspects of the films. Freeman loves the freedom of taking the classes and “not having to worry about the exam that comes after.” And if someone doesn’t understand something in the class, it might be frustrating,

but it’s not a big deal. The best part of the program is having a “way to stay engaged with other people,” said Hopper. He also believes the learning aspects keep up his mental health. “Staying interested in learning just keeps you more vital,” said Hopper.

Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Mary Ann Smith / New York Times News Service

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

Sewing & Vacuum Center

As L ow As $149

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

Light Up A Life 2010 December 2, 2010 ~ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Partners In Care ~ Bend in keeping with the spirit of hospice, we welcome all traditions and beliefs Music provided by: Youth Choir of Central Oregon Keepsake ornament is available for $20. Proceeds go to support Partners In Care programs not covered by Medicare (Transitions, Children’s Grief Camp, Bereavement Services). For more info. call Partners In Care 541.382.5882.

HOSPICE HOME HEALTH

SERVING CENTRAL OREGON 24 HOURS EVERYDAY

HOSPICE HOUSE

2075 NE WYATT CT. | BEND | 541.382.5882

TRANSITIONS

www.partnersbend.org


AH

HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON

F

3 tips from Martha Mending a fitted sheet; using apples for savory side dishes; selecting canned tomatoes, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010

HOME

Wine widgets and whatsits Local experts’ favorite gift ideas

FOOD

Ways to slash the fat, boost the flavor and keep snacking By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

W

e’re a nation of dippers. No party or televised football game or potluck would be complete without a bowl or two of dip and salsa to nosh on. We’ve been devoted to dip for decades. “The Joy of Cooking,” by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker, first printed in the 1930s, says, “ ... dipped dainties are still the most popular types of hors d’oeuvre, and the easiest to prepare.” The only problem with dip is that it tends to be loaded with calories and fat, heavy on the mayonnaise, sour cream and cheese. Diane Morgan has changed all that with her new cookbook, “Skinny Dips: 60 Recipes for Dips, Spreads, Chips, and Salsas on the Lighter Side of Delicious.” Her artichoke dip, for example (see recipe, Page F2), is a lighter, less greasy but still cheesy version of the beloved classic that usually includes one cup of mayonnaise in the recipe. “What you’re getting from my Skinny Artichoke Dip is a lot of flavor, and what you’re losing is all the goopy fat that masks the artichoke and lemony bite,” Morgan said in a phone interview from her home office in Portland. “Parmesan is like a ‘free cheese’ because you grate it, and you really haven’t used very much. You get a whole cupful in that recipe, and it’s still only 46 calories per tablespoonful. “If you think about it, when you’re scooping something up, maybe you’re taking a teaspoonful. You could have four dips into that dip and you’re under a hundred calories. That’s pretty nice.” Morgan is a recipe developer and cookbook author who always aims for maximum health and flavor. In “Skinny Dips” she suggests when and how to cut fat. See Dips / F2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A Vinturi Wine Aerator and Tower, at Cork Cellars in Sisters, runs about $20-$40.

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

Photo by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Go o d sk in n ydippers: More veggies, fewer chips “The appeal of dippers comes from the contrast in texture — the big-chip crunch of baked bagel chips coated with a creamy hummus ... the snap of garden-fresh crudites slicked with a Svelte Green Goddess Dip.”— Diane Morgan • In the book: “Skinny Dips” has a chapter on how to prepare raw, blanched and roasted vegetables to be dippers, including:

Belgian endive Bell peppers Carrots Celery Cherry tomatoes

Cucumbers Fennel bulbs Jicama Lettuce Green/spring onions

Radishes Asparagus Broccoli Cauliflower Summer squash

Potatoes Green beans Snow peas/ sugar snap peas

For more recipes, tips and videos from Diane Morgan, visit www.dianemorgancooks.com.

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • LIGHT ROMESCO SPREAD, F2 • EDAMAME TOFU DIP, F2 • SKINNY ARTICHOKE DIP, F2 • SLOW-ROASTED PORK SHOULDER WITH ROASTED BEETS, F2 • FALL SALAD WITH BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE, F2 • APPLE BROWN BETTY, F2 • SNICKERS BAR CHEESECAKE, F6 LASAGNA LOAF, F6 • BAKED STUFFED ZUCCHINI, F6

1. Bend Wine Cellar

GARDEN

Don’t tuck away those tools just yet With gardening winding down, end-of-year chores remain By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

November means shovels and trowels are being put away, with ski and snow equipment becoming the center of attention. I think we are all ready for some sort of change of pace from the digging and pulling. But we aren’t finished until the last chores are done. With luck, you have time to pull out any summer-blooming dahlia and gladiolus bulbs and put them into storage for the winter. A wooden trellis that has been used

to grow annual flowers and vegetables should come out of the ground. Keeping it in through the winter will encourage wood rot. As long as it is out of the ground, check to see if it needs to be freshened up with a new coat of stain. Maybe you should be brave and paint it a funky, fun color. See Chores / F5

Remove dirt and rust from your shovels with a wire brush. More tool-cleaning tips on Page F5.

The world of wine isn’t just bottles of red, white and pink. It’s glassware, corkscrews, aerators, decanters, bottle stoppers, racks, funnels, buckets, chillers, charms and coasters — and that’s just a sampling of the myriad accessories and gadgets available for wine drinkers. Since the holiday season is fast approaching, we checked with five Central Oregon wine experts to find out what their favorite wine must-haves are (besides a good bottle). We talked to Dennis Sienko, owner (with wife Diane) of the Bend Wine Cellar shop, Nadean Murray, owner of Cork Cellars Wine Bar & Bottle Shop in Sisters, Mike Millette, operations manager of 900 Wall Restaurant and Bar, Liz Ratcliff, owner (with her husband Scott) of Volcano Vineyards, and Debbie Dory, kitchen department manager of Newport Avenue Market on Bend’s west side. We talked to everyone separately, so no one knew what anyone else said. There are some shared favorite items. You may be inspired to try a couple of the wine tools that these experts use at home. Maybe you have a wine lover on your holiday gift list. After you read the ideas from our local wine lovers, you’ll have the perfect present. Cheers!

The Bulletin ile photo

Dennis and Diane Sienko call their store “the funkiest wine shop in Bend.” It’s not easy to find, but if you want to learn about wine or have a fun conversation about it, the Bend Wine Cellar is a great destination. Dennis Sienko’s favorite: Eisch wine glasses. “I call them magic glasses. Eisch calls it ‘breathable glass.’ After they make the glasses, they put them through a proprietary treatment that’s a trade secret. It allows wine to aerate more. It gets the oxygen into the wine quicker, and there’s absolutely no question that our everyday wine tastes better out of these glasses,” he said. “You aren’t going to turn TwoBuck Chuck into Lafite Rothschild, but you’re accelerating the evolution of the wine in the glass. Wine flavor changes as it warms up and gets exposed to air. What you get when you pour it is different from the last sip,” he said. See Wine / F4


F2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Beef stew A classic fall dish.

Ways to treasure the family meal

COVER STORY

Dips Continued from F1 She advises against using fat-free cream cheese, and instead recommends the one-thirdless-fat variety also known as neufchatel. Morgan writes that reduced-fat mayonnaise is the best choice for healthier dips, “with less than half of the calories and about a third of the fat of regular mayonnaise.” She tested all of the recipes in her book using the Best Foods brand of light mayo, also known as Hellmann’s. Morgan uses low-fat plain yogurt in her recipes and recommends avoiding fat-free yogurt “as it tends to be watery and won’t contribute the smooth mouth feel that low-fat varieties do.” All you really need to produce dip is a food processor. It creates the creaminess that makes dips appealing, and hides some of the ingredients, like the tofu in Morgan’s edamame tofu dip. The dip looks appealing, like a green goddess dressing, but its name can sound a little unappetizing. “That’s a great dip. You really do not taste the tofu at all because the food processor makes it so creamy. Tofu is a low-fat way to make something really creamy. I’d be shocked if anyone said they can taste the tofu,” Morgan said. In the introduction to “Skinny Dips,” Bend registered dietician Garrett Berdan writes, “Fundamental to healthful eating is learning how to prepare delicious food that is good for you. When food that tastes great is healthful — and you don’t even know it — we call it ‘stealth health.’” That’s what these dips are all about — big taste and low calories in festive hors d’oeuvres that are secretly, stealthily good for you. So don’t just reach for a celery stick — it’s OK to have another scoop of dip if it’s a skinny one.

By Greg Morago Houston Chronicle

Mention “family meal” to Tyler Florence and he’s likely to think of the shared meal that is served to a restaurant staff before service each day (that’s called family meal). He also might think of meals he’s shared with chefs, restaurateurs and purveyors who are like family to him. Or meals taken with his Food Network family. Or repasts with partners from his restaurants, kitchen stores, baby food company, cookware line or his new wine venture with the Michael Mondavi family. And it certainly would include meals together with his wife and children.

SLOW-ROASTED PORK SHOULDER WITH ROASTED BEETS 6-8 servings. 1 ⁄4 C fennel seeds 4- to 5-lb boneless pork shoulder, skin on 12 garlic cloves, minced 1 TBS chopped fresh thyme 1 TBS chopped fresh oregano Extra-virgin olive oil

Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

LIGHT ROMESCO SPREAD Makes 3 cups. It may seem a bit brazen to take a classic Catalan sauce, remove most of the olive oil to lighten it up, and declare it addictively delicious. But that’s what my dinner-party guests called this romesco sauce when I served it with poached shrimp and roasted cauliflower. — Diane Morgan Photos courtesy “Skinny Dips” by Diane Morgan, Chronicle Books 2010

2 med ancho chilies 4 lg cloves garlic 1 lg roasted red bell pepper, coarsely chopped 1 C blanched almonds, toasted (see note below) 1 can (14.5-oz) diced tomatoes, drained

2 TBS red wine vinegar 1¼ tsp kosher or sea salt 1 tsp pimenton (Spanish smoked paprika) ¼ tsp sugar 1 ⁄8 tsp cayenne 3 TBS extra-virgin olive oil

Skinny dippers: roasted cauliflower, poached shrimp, roasted fingerling potatoes, crostini, herbed cheddar cheese straws To prepare the ancho chiles, remove the stems and seeds, then soak the chiles in hot water to cover until softened, about 45 minutes. Drain well and tear into small pieces. In the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, process the garlic until finely minced. Add the chiles, roasted pepper, almonds, tomatoes, vinegar, salt, pimenton, sugar and cayenne. Pulse until uniformly minced, scraping down the sides of the bowl once or twice. With the machine running, slowly add the olive oil and process just until combined. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover, and set aside for at least 1 hour to allow the flavors to meld. Note: To toast almonds, place them in a single layer on a rimmed baking tray and bake in a preheated 350-degree oven until lightly browned, 5 to 10 minutes. Alternatively, nuts and seeds can be browned in a microwave. Place in a single layer on a microwave-safe plate, and microwave on high power for 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned, stirring once or twice while they are toasting. Watch carefully that they don’t burn. This sauce keeps, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 months. Remove from the refrigerator 45 minutes before serving. Serve at room temperature. Serving size: 2 TBS: Calories 62, fat 4.9 g, saturated fat 0.5 g, protein 2 g, carbohydrate 4 g, fiber 1 g, cholesterol 0 mg, iron 0.7 mg, sodium 97 mg, calcium 21 mg.

Edamame Tofu Dip is healthy and protein-packed when served with crudites or crostini.

EDAMAME TOFU DIP Makes 3 cups. I almost always have a bag of frozen shelled edamame in my freezer. Here I puree them for a creamy, fresh, protein-packed dip speckled with cilantro. — Diane Morgan 1 C (225 g) silken tofu 2 C frozen shelled edamame 2 tsp kosher or sea salt

3 TBS fresh lemon juice 2 TBS Asian sesame oil 1 tsp finely minced garlic 1 tsp sugar

1 tsp freshly ground pepper ¼ C minced cilantro leaves, plus sprigs for garnish

Skinny dippers: baked pita chips, crudites, crostini Drain the tofu and blot completely dry with paper towels. Set the tofu on several thicknesses of paper while you cook the edamame. Fill a medium saucepan two-thirds full of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the edamame and ½ tsp of the salt and boil for 3 minutes. Drain in a colander and rinse under cold water. Drain again and blot to remove excess moisture. In the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, process the tofu, edamame, the remaining 1½ tsp salt, the lemon juice, sesame oil, garlic, sugar and pepper until very smooth. Scatter the minced cilantro/fresh coriander leaves over the top and pulse to incorporate. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour to allow the flavors to meld. Garnish with cilantro. This dip can be prepared up to 2 days in advance. Cover and refrigerate. Remove from the refrigerator just before serving. Serving size: 2 TBS: Calories 34, fat 2.2 g, saturated fat 0.3 g, protein 2 g, carbohydrate 2 g, fiber 1 g, cholesterol 0 mg, iron 0.4 mg, sodium 99 mg, calcium 21 mg.

SKINNY ARTICHOKE DIP Makes about 4 cups. When it comes to calories, artichokes are almost “free” — a half-cup has only 35 calories. As cheeses go, Parmesan is on the light side. — Diane Morgan 1 lg shallot, halved 2 cans (13.75-oz each) artichoke hearts packed in water, well drained ½ C reduced-fat mayonnaise

½ C reduced-fat sour cream 1 TBS fresh lemon juice 1 C freshly grated Parmesan, preferably Parmigiano-Reggiano ½ tsp kosher or sea salt

Freshly ground pepper 1⁄3 C unseasoned dry bread crumbs 1½ tsp finely minced fresh oregano 2 tsp extra-virgin olive oil

Skinny dippers: Crostini, baked pita chips, Parmesan-crusted pita chips, baked bagel chips, baked wonton crisps In the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, pulse the shallot and artichoke hearts until coarsely chopped. In a medium bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, Parmesan and salt. Add the chopped shallots and artichokes. Season with pepper. Transfer to a buttered 1½-quart baking dish. In a small bowl, combine the bread crumbs, oregano and olive oil, mixing until the oil evenly coats the bread crumbs. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Just before baking, sprinkle the bread crumb mixture on top of the artichoke dip. Bake until the dip bubbles at the edges, 20 to 25 minutes. Serve hot. Serving size: 2 TBS: Calories 46, fat 3 g, saturated fat 1.1 g, protein 2 g, carbohydrate 3 g, fiber 1 g, cholesterol 6 mg, iron 0.2 mg, sodium 140 mg, calcium 49 mg. — Recipes from “Skinny Dips, 60 Recipes for Dips, Spreads, Chips, and Salsas on the Lighter Side of Delicious,” by Diane Morgan, Chronicle Books 2010

“Fundamental to healthful eating is learning how to prepare delicious food that is good for you. When food that tastes great is healthful — and you don’t even know it — we call it ‘stealth health.’” Cut the fat but not the flavor with Light Romesco Spread from Diane Morgan.

A new cookbook, “Tyler Florence Family Meal,” is more than a collection of recipes; it’s a document that suggests we need to treasure the family meal. And that starts with actually having a family meal (more than one cultural critic has opined that reclaiming this neglected ritual would make us better people). “It’s not the crispness of my fried chicken that makes cooking my calling, or the creaminess of my potato puree that makes me feel good about myself. It’s my ability to express my emotions and communicate my feelings through these dishes that is truly rewarding to me,” he writes in his book.

— Garrett Berdan, a registered dietitian in Bend, in the introduction to “Skinny Dips”

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 bunch red baby beets (about 11⁄2 lbs) 1 bunch yellow beets (about 11⁄2 lbs) 1 TBS Dijon mustard 2 TBS whole-grain mustard Toasted bread crumbs

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a small dry skillet, toast the fennel seeds over medium heat until fragrant and golden, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a spice grinder or use a mortar and pestle to grind to a powder. Place the pork shoulder on a cutting board and butterfly it, opening it up like a book to make one large flat piece. Generously rub the inside with the toasted fennel seeds, garlic, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Roll up the meat like a jelly roll and use kitchen string to tie the roll every 2 inches. Rub the exterior of the roll liberally with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Place a large roasting pan on the stovetop and get it good and hot over high heat. Add a 2-count of olive oil and sear the entire outside of the rolled shoulder until it’s golden brown, about 10 minutes. Slide the pan into the oven and roast the pork until the internal temperature reaches 145 degrees, about 2 hours. Place the beets on large squares of aluminum foil in groups of 2 or 3 and season them with oil, salt and pepper. Wrap the beets tightly in the foil and roast along with the pork until they are tender when pierced with a fork, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. When the pork is done, transfer it to a cutting board for at least 30 minutes. Pour the drippings from the roasting pan into a small skillet. Whisk in the mustards and heat gently, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Peel the beets and cut into quarters. To serve, slice the pork about ½ inch thick. Arrange on a platter and drizzle with the mustard drippings. Add the beets to the platter and sprinkle bread crumbs all over.

FALL SALAD WITH BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE 4 servings. CANDIED PECANS 2 TBS unsalted butter 2 TBS light brown sugar

Pinch of kosher salt 1 ⁄2 C pecans

Line a baking sheet with wax paper. Combine the butter, brown sugar and salt in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. When the butter has melted, toss in the pecans and cook, tossing occasionally, for about 3 minutes. Transfer to the baking sheet and use two forks to separate the pecans. Set aside and cool. BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE 1 sm shallot, finely diced 1 tsp Dijon mustard 2 tsp balsamic vinegar 1 ⁄4 C extra-virgin olive oil

2 tsp honey 1 ⁄4 C shredded Parmesan Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Combine shallot, mustard and balsamic vinegar in a large mixing bowl. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil, whisking constantly until well combined. Add the honey and Parmesan, and season to taste with salt and pepper. SALAD 1 Belgian endive, leaves separated 1 bunch tender purple kale 1 large head radicchio, torn

1 head treviso (radicchio) 1 handful arugula 1 red pear, cored and sliced 1 ⁄4 C shaved Parmesan

Add the salad greens and pear slices to the bowl with vinaigrette and toss gently to coat with the dressing. Top with Parmesan shavings and candied pecans and serve.

APPLE BROWN BETTY Unsalted butter and granulated sugar (for the ramekins) 4 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and cut into thin wedges Juice of 1 lemon 1 ⁄2 C packed brown sugar

1 ⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon Pinch of grated nutmeg 2 TBS Calvados 4 slices brioche loaf, cut into small cubes 4 TBS (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease four 6-ounce ramekins with butter and sprinkle with granulated sugar. In a large mixing bowl, combine the apple wedges, lemon juice, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and Calvados, and toss to combine. Place the bread cubes in a separate mixing bowl and pour the melted butter over them. Toss to coat the bread with the butter. Place some of the bread cubes in the bottom of each ramekin followed by some of the apple mixture. Repeat to make a second layer, pressing down gently on the filling to compact them slightly. Pour any remaining liquid from the apple bowl over the ramekins. Arrange the ramekins on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until golden and crusty, 40 to 45 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature. Top with a scoop of ice cream if you wish. — Recipes courtesy “Tyler Florence Family Meal”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 F3


F4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With ... The High Desert Museum’s Janeanne Upp.

COVER STORY

Wine Continued from F1 Sienko likes the Eisch 14-ounce glass. “The reason you want a bigger glass is you want to keep the aromatics in the glass. You never want to fill a wine glass more than one-third full,” Sienko said. Eisch wine glasses are sold at the Bend Wine Cellar. A holiday two-pack of the Bordeaux glasses (25 ounces each) is $32.50.

2. Cork Cellars (Sisters) Nadean Murray is the new owner (since July) of Cork Cellars in Sisters, but she’s a longtime wine enthusiast and self-professed “gadget person.” Murray’s favorite: Vinturi wine aerator and tower (a holder for the aerator). “I think it’s the coolest thing. You pour the wine through the aerator and you get the same effect as if you decanted it or poured it in your glass to let it breathe. The aerator allows you to drink the wine right away,” Murray said. Murray said the Vinturi works well on both white and red wines, improving the flavor of both. “Especially the really tannic red wines — they benefit from the air, it smooths them out,” she said. The Vinturi tower is an elegant, curved acrylic holder for the aerator. It allows you to put a glass under the aerator spout and pour wine without holding the aerator over the glass. “If you’re having a dinner party, it’s a nice presentation to pour wine that way. It’s an interesting thing to do,” Murray said. Vinturi wine aerators come in various styles, and are available in many stores, including Cork Cellars. The basic styles range from $20-$40, and the tower (without aerator) is about $25-$30.

3. 900 Wall (Bend) Mike Millette knows wine. He serves a lot to his customers at 900 Wall Restaurant and Bar in Bend, and he enjoys drinking it at home. Millette’s favorite No. 1: Vinturi wine aerator. “It’s a great way to enjoy the true flavors and bouquet of a wine. People buy wines at the grocery store and want to drink them right away. The aerator brings the wine out. It’s not as ideal as aging, but it’s like decanting a wine,” Millette said. Favorite No. 2: Proper glassware. “If you’re going to enjoy wine at home, or have a party, the proper glassware is essential, and handwashing the glasses is important. Glassware is an accessory that creates a nice ambience. Get the good stuff, and take care of it,” Millette said. Favorite No. 3: Wine preservation spray. “I like the inert gas you spray into a half-used bottle so you don’t get so much oxygen in there,” he said. Private Preserve Wine Preservation Spray is a brand Millette mentioned that removes the oxygen from an opened bottle of wine and helps retain its flavor and aroma. (The website www.wine

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Debbie Dory of Newport Avenue Market holds a wine glass with a cut rim and a waiter’s corkscrew, both favorite wine accessories. enthusiast.com is one source; wine preservation sprays are widely available in wine shops and wine departments of various stores.)

“Invest in one good glass and try it. Determine if it has the right feel in your hand, then buy a few more.”

4. Volcano Vineyards (Bend)

— Debbie Dory, Newport Avenue Market

Volcano Vineyards is a microwinery that produces about 1,000 cases of wine annually in Eagle Point. The company closed its tasting room in downtown Bend in September to move to a new building on Century Drive where they’ll focus on local wine and sangria production. Liz Ratcliff’s favorite No. 1: Vinturi wine aerator. Favorite No. 2: Wine preservation spray. Favorite No. 3: $20 Riedel winter decanter. “It’s a really nice, thin crystal decanter that’s at Target, Kitchen Complements in Bend and Allyson’s Kitchen in the Old Mill District,” Ratcliff said. Decanting aerates wine and removes sediments. “Any wine that hasn’t been fined or filtered (processes to remove sediments) benefits from decanting. Pour the bottle slowly into the decanter so most of the sediments collect in the wine bottle,” Ratcliff said.

5. Newport Avenue Market (Bend) Debbie Dory keeps Newport Avenue Market’s kitchen department stocked with a wide variety of cooking tools and gadgets that would please any serious home cook. She enjoys wine, and a current favorite is their wine department’s Mark West Pinot Noir ($9.99). “I love it a lot. I love the price, and it tastes great when it’s aerated,” she said. Debbie’s favorite No. 1: Vinturi wine aerator. “We’ve easily got six or eight wonderful wines under $15 that drink like a $50 or $75 bottle of wine because, with the Vinturi, the wine opens up like you’ve let it aerate for a couple of hours,” she said. Favorite No. 2: Waiter’s corkscrew ($9.99). “I’ve got a couple of different corkscrews at home, but a good

$ave

money with Nature’s Fuel Pellets In our third season of production and producing pellets better than ever. Nature’s Fuel Pellets are made in Prineville with the bits and pieces left over at the Woodgrain Millwork’s Prineville facility. Nature’s Fuel is a Central Oregon product for Central Oregonians.

HOT – Highest BTU’s on the market CLEAN – Clear lumber means no ‘clinkers’ EASY – Ash is light and easy to clean

a division of

Listen to what others are saying about Nature’s Fuel: I have been using pellets for 25+ yrs and yours are by far the cleanest, nicest I’ve come across! –Kathy, Boise We burn your pellets in our store and it makes it smell like Christmas. –Dan

Hi, I was told by a friend that she loves your guys wood pellets I am getting a new pellet stove . . . where I can get your pellets? thanks. –Ben, Portland

Available at these local retailers: BEND Country Feed and Pet Round Butte Seed

PRINEVILLE Fair Feed Round Butte Seed

CULVER Round Butte Seed

REDMOND Oregon Feed & Irrigation Quarry Ave Hay & Feed

LA PINE High Lakes Feed

SISTERS Lutton’s Ace Hardware TERREBONNE Terrebonne True Value Hardware

waiter’s corkscrew is basic and very doable. You’ve got that, you can rule the world,” she said. Favorite No. 3: A really nice glass in which to drink your wine. “You want a glass with a cut rim, like Riedel glass. If there’s a lip on the glass, you don’t get the nose, you don’t get to experience the whole wine,” Dory said. “Invest in one good glass and try it. Determine if it has the right feel in your hand, then buy a few more,” she said.

Dennis Sienko of Bend Wine Cellar pours wine into an Eisch “breathable” wine glass. “I call them magic glasses. ... Everyday wine tastes better out of them.”

Liz Ratcliff of Volcano Vineyards pours wine into a Riedel decanter in the tasting room at the Century Center in Bend. Decanting aerates wine and removes sediments.

Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

Resources • BEND WINE CELLAR 1444 N.W. College Way, #8, Bend 541-385-9258, www.bendwinecellar.com

• CORK CELLARS WINE BAR & BOTTLE SHOP 161A N. Elm St., Sisters 541-549-2675, www.corkcellars.com

• 900 WALL RESTAURANT AND BAR 900 N.W. Wall St., Bend 541-323-6295, www.900wall.com

• VOLCANO VINEYARDS Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, #175, Bend 541-617-1102, www.volcanovineyards.com

• NEWPORT AVENUE MARKET 1121 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend 541-382-3940, www.newportavemarket.com

Mike Millette, operations manager at 900 Wall, uses the Private Preserve Wine Preservation Spray on a bottle of wine. It’s one of Millette’s favorite gadgets.

Websites for wine lovers • www.wineenthusiast.com • www.winestuff.com • www.winejazz.com • www.wine.com • www.vinturi.com

The Bulletin ile photo

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

Nadean Murray, owner of Cork Cellars in Sisters, uses a Vinturi Wine Aerator to pour a glass of wine. The device is a favorite of many local wine experts.

Every Friday

Attention:

Oriental Rug Owners Don’t send your valuable rugs out of town!

Shop Local The Cleaning Clinic is Central Oregon’s only IICRC Certified MASTER Cleaners! 3rd Generation carpet and rug cleaners. The Dunbar Family has been cleaning in Central Oregon for over 40 Years!

541-382-9498 FREE Pickup & Delivery www.cleaningclinicinc.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured • CCB# 72129

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Repair your wicker now. Shown is a unique, 100 year old wicker dining room table with a broad base, 7 chairs, and 5 extensions to reach 8’ in length. It is versatile enought for the entire family reunion or intimate coffee for two on the sun porch. Keep your family stories going with help from Karen at ...

Wicker Restoration Since 1974

541-923-6603 | Redmond


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 F5

G

Next week: Backyard centerpiece Creating a tablescape with elements from the outdoors.

COVER STORY

Cleaning tools In a perfect world with a perfect organized schedule, we would have cleaned our garden tools at the end of each gardening day. Instead, we probably looked at our watch and raced to the house to start dinner or jumped in the car to pick up kids. Now it’s fess-up time, so gather together a wire brush, some fine steel wool, a can of 3-IN-ONE oil, linseed oil or furniture wax and rags for cleanup. After you have spent the hours cleaning and refurbishing your tools, you may decide to make it a quick, ongoing end-of-day ritual next year. Life would have been good if we had taken the time to rinse the dirt off the shovel after each use, but most of us probably didn’t. Using the wire brush, remove the dirt from the front and the back. Some of the rust will be removed in the process. If you dented the shovel tip on one of our infamous rocks, use

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Use a bleach solution or isopropyl alcohol to clean garden tools at the end of the season. This will help stop the spread of disease. a hammer and gently tap out the area. It is helpful to place the shovel on a hard metal surface. I am lucky to have a vise mounted on a workbench. Laying the shovel head over the closed vise will make the repair easier. Squirt a quarter-sized or smaller amount of 3-IN-ONE oil onto the shovel head and scour with steel wool. This is when you will really see a difference. Wipe with a clean rag, apply more oil and repeat as needed. Leave a sheen of oil on the shovel for storage. I am mindful of always spraying my clippers with isopropyl alcohol (a bleach solution or hydrogen peroxide can be used, too)

each time I go from one garden chore to another. This helps to eliminate the spreading of any disease or bug problem. I am not very mindful of keeping the clippers in as good a working order as they should be, so I have some catching up to do. While holding the clippers open, squirt some 3-IN-ONE oil in the hinge, and all the nooks and crannies. Open and close them several times to distribute the oil, and apply more if necessary to lubricate. Keep working them until the action is smooth. If possible, lock the clipper in the open position and scour the blades with steel wool. Add more oil as in the cleaning process for the shovel if needed. Continue with the steel wool and oil process until the blades are cleaned of dirt and rust. All of your equipment with wooden handles will benefit with a coating of linseed oil or furniture wax. It will help keep the wood from drying out and splitting. Having tools that are in good condition and that you enjoy using makes your next gardening season even more rewarding. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Gardening in the great indoors By Nancy O’Donnell

Houseplant season is a great way to continue your love of gardening indoors. Walk a mall and check out the plants, then visit a greenhouse and bring one home for that cozy corner that needs a little greening.

Albany (N.Y.) Times Union

Thinkstock

By Norman Winter McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Thanks to dozens of colorful trailing flowers, designing mixed containers for this season is an absolute delight. Flowers that hang downward are just as important a part of the design equation during the cool season as the warm days of summer. A great place to start is with pansies and violas. You may not have even realized that mounding trailing varieties even existed. The first that captured the imagination of gardeners across the country was Purple Rain pansy. There is almost nothing you cannot do with this versatile flower. It is terrific in the garden, reaching 12-plus inches tall and cascading. But in a container all you can say is wow. Trailing violas have also jumped in popularity, thanks in large part to Sakata Seed’s Rebelina series. There are four colors available, Red and Yellow, Purple and Yellow, the new Blue and Yellow, and a clear Yellow with whiskers. While I am touting their use in mixed containers, know that they offer enough pizzazz to be stand-alone plants in baskets or window boxes. The Rebelina violas reach 8 to 10 inches in height with an equal spread. You could not ask for a more striking partnership than yellow snapdragons. Trailing varieties of snapdragons have really caught on with gardeners for use in landscape, baskets and mixed containers. The big three series in trailing snapdragons are Lampion, Chandelier and Luminaire. If you have grown these or looked closely, it becomes apparent they not only have a different habit and feel but also offer additional heat tolerance by virtue of hybridization of Antirrhinum majus with A. hispanicum and A. molle species from Spain. As is typical



FERTILIZERS



of the large varieties, the trailing types come in several colors, including several richly hued bicolored selections. But there is a snapdragon relative prized for fragrance that is still relatively unknown to the everyday gardener. It is the diascia and deserves to be put high on your list. The Flying Colors series that I have seen in trials has been very surprising, quick to flower in the fall, cold-hardy through zone 7 and flushing dramatically after winter. I’ve even had them stay green through hot summers to flower again in the fall. When using any of these trailing flowers in mixed containers, remember drainage is absolute, sunlight is essential and feeding with a liquid fertilizer pays big dividends. During cold weather, liquid fertilizer is more readily available as compared to temperature-released granules. Try combining these plants with flowering kale or cabbage, or medium-height snapdragons like Sonnet or Liberty Classic. Try partnering them with dianthus like the Bouquet Purple, an 18-inch-tall cut-and-come-again vivid flower producer. Use greenery like ivy or asparagus fern to create added texture and interest. Going to the garden center in the fall is just as exciting as in the spring, and there are opportunities galore to create dazzling cool season mixed containers. Norman Winter is vice president for college advancement, Brewton Parker College, Mount Vernon, Ga., and author of the highly acclaimed “Tough-asNails Flowers for the South” and his release “Captivating Combinations: Color and Style in the Garden.”

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

POTTING SOIL

 BARK  SOD 

SPRINKLER WINTERIZATION

FALL CLEAN-UPS

NURSERY



CLEARANCE SALES FREE LANDSCAPE ESTIMATE

61780 SE 27th Street • Bend 541-383-3722 GIFT ITEMS



GARDEN SUPPLY

TES  SOD

tenance, hence their popularity in indoor planters at shopping malls. Though not as tolerant of low light, other options are Aspidistra elatior, or cast-iron plant; Aglaonema commutatum, or Chinese evergreen; the family of Dracaenas; Caryota mitis, or fishtail palm; Raphis excelsa, or lady palm; Sansevieria trifasciata, or the snake plant, aka mother-inlaw’s tongue; Spathiphyllum wallisii, or peace lily; and many members of the Peperomia family. I highly recommend you cruise the aisles of your neighborhood greenhouse and see what plants are available. Don’t be quick to choose just any plant. The family of Philodendrons, for example, can offer some pretty spectacularly textured and shaped leaves, from heart-shaped to deeply cut to some that look to be so thick you’d think they were artificial. If a deeply wrinkled and crinkled leaf appeals to you, the family of Peperomia is for you; it’s just a cool-looking plant. Unfortunately, most low-light plants won’t offer a flower, so you’ll need to rely on leaf color to add pizzazz to the room. Pothos come in variegations of green and white, green and yellow, and a pure, almost chartreuse yellow; it’s stunning, I might add. The cast-iron plant has a green leaf mottled with silver streaks,

and the infamous snake plant can be found in variations of solid green, green and yellow, or green and white. You can always pot a few different plants together, as long as they observe the same moisture and light conditions. I have a dark green snake plant potted with a yellow-and-green pothos. I’ve hung the pot in a jute hanger; the pothos cascades, while the swordlike leaves of the snake plant point upward. Like any plant, if it’s not happy, it’ll let you know. Some telltale signs include fading leaf color, leaf drop, bending or stretching toward a light source, smaller new leaves, or no new growth during the growing season. Should any of these occur, just move your plant and watch. Houseplant season is a great way to continue your love of gardening indoors. Walk a mall and check out the plants, then visit a greenhouse and bring one home for that cozy corner that needs a little greening.

Trailing flowers make cold-season containers sizzle

SEEDS  TREES & SHRUBS

Houseplants have been indoor guests for thousands of years; hieroglyphics show their popularity in ancient Egypt, while history records the use of atrium rooms, similar to our sunrooms of today, by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Fast-forward to the 1400s, when explorers sailed the oceans blue and returned with new species of tropical plants. The whole idea of growing plants indoors “took root.” The challenge, however, was that darn ocean voyage. The survival rate of these tropical plants being tossed around and subject to dark, dank, below-deck quarters and constantly changing environmental conditions was poor, to say the least. By the mid-1800s, an enclosed glass box that allowed the plants to be safely transported was conceived and became the precursor to today’s terrarium. A new challenge arose: With all of these exotic plants being raised indoors with minimal light, heat and humidity, a better way to tend them was needed. The predecessors to today’s greenhouses and conservatories, “orangeries,” were invented. It wasn’t until the late 1950s that houseplants caught on in the states, mainly because many folks did not have consistent heat during the winter months. If the stove went cold, the plants froze. It’s estimated that the houseplant craze took serious hold here in the early ’70s, really not all that long ago, if you think about it. Take a trip to the southern coast of the United States or visit a Caribbean island, and you’re sure to see a houseplant you’re familiar with growing alongside the road or in a manicured landscape. Take notice of where they are growing, because the trick to growing them indoors is to mirror those environmental conditions. Some love humidity, others full sun, and still others the tranquility of a shady location under the canopy of a big tree. Shade-loving, tropical plants do best in most homes and offices. Shopping malls are great places to get ideas for low-light plants. There, all they receive is either artificial lighting or muted natural light from skylights high above. In our homes and offices, low light is typically considered a north- or east-facing window, or a location across the room from a south- or west-facing window. Ah, but who are these tropical shade-worshippers? The vast families of Philodendron and Epipremnum aureum, also known as Pothos or Devil’s Ivy, top the list. Philodendrons can be grown as hanging baskets, floor or desk plants, or trained to climb slabs of bark or other decorative trellises, depending on the variety chosen. Pothos and Devil’s Ivy are typically hanging plants. All are not only outstanding for low-light conditions, but also low-main-

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Rebelina Purple and Yellow is a trailing viola perfect for mixed containers or even as a stand-alone in a cool-season basket.

FREE ESTIMATES TES

Continued from F1 If taking the trellis out of the garden presents a storage problem, suspend it under the eaves of the garage. I don’t have an in-ground irrigation system, so consequently I have sprinklers of all sizes and shapes to fit here and there. Each spring it is a puzzle as to which one went where. This year, I decided to write the location on each sprinkler with a good old Sharpie pen. It took less than half an hour to do the labeling and will save me hours of frustration in the spring. My mother used to say, “Too late we get so smart.” Do you have a frustrating chore that somehow could be simplified? Which comes first, cleaning up the garden tools or catching up the garden journal? The garden journal should be the priority. While production activity is still fresh in your mind, record what worked and what didn’t. Keeping track of the flowers that held up through the frosts and the production rate of vegetable varieties all help to make next year’s garden more successful. Take time to chart the location

of your vegetable plantings so the crops will be rotated next year. Crop rotation helps build healthy soil by reducing soil fungi and in some cases acting as a weed control.

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

Chores

 PLANTERS 


F6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Torn fitted sheets, just like new Selecting canned tomatoes

MARTHA STEWART

Q:

Q: A:

How can I fix a hole in the corner of my fitted sheet? Start by taking an inch off the non-fitted sheet and rehemming it. Then use that inch of matching fabric to repair the tear. It’s similar to appliqueing a patch onto a piece of fabric. Use a satin stitch on the sewing machine, a quarter of an inch around the hole, nice and flat. Trim the edge very closely. Nobody will ever know that the sheet had a hole. If you don’t sew, then take the bedding to a tailor. It should be a pretty inexpensive job, and she’ll trim it really well.

Savory apple side dishes

Q:

I’d like to use the apples I have in cold storage, but I’ve already made quite a few desserts this year. Do you have ideas for side dishes? You could mix the apples with cranberry relish. Or

A:

Recipes often call for whole canned tomatoes, only to have me puree or crush them. Wouldn’t precrushed ones work just as well? Despite the variety of tomato products available at the grocery store, most chefs (including the food editors at Martha Stewart Living) prefer to start with whole, peeled tomatoes. This choice ensures you’re getting top quality. Manufacturers will take the unblemished fruits and pack them whole, leaving the rest to be pureed, crushed, chopped or diced. Also, more-processed products often contain tomato paste, which can alter the flavor of your dish. Starting with whole tomatoes allows you to control the texture of your preparation: One brand’s “crushed” might be thick, while another’s could be soupy. To create a chunky consistency, you can use your hands to break up the tomatoes (be sure to wear an apron, since the fruits are likely to spurt when squeezed). For a neater appearance, drain and chop them. To make a smooth puree, whirl them in a blender. Another option is one of our favorite “Good

A:

New York Times News Service photos

Lengthen the life of your sheets by mending small holes yourself or taking them to a tailor. bake a gratin of potatoes, sweet potatoes and apples. You could also make a nice, spicy applesauce. I’d use nutmeg, allspice and cinnamon, and a tiny bit of sugar to soften the spices. Incorporate a little butter to lend it a subtle richness. For these and other great savory apple recipes, go to www.marthastewart.com/savory -apple-recipes.

Autumn is the perfect time of year to cook with apples. An extremely versatile ingredient, apples work just as well in savory dishes as in sweet ones.

Things”: Using a pair of kitchen scissors, cut the tomatoes right in the can. Among whole canned tomatoes, San Marzano varieties grown in Italy’s Agro SarneseNocerino region are considered the gold standard, thanks to the rich, volcanic soil that comes from nearby Mount Vesuvius. Like sparkling wine from the Champagne region of France, the San Marzano fruits from this part of Italy are protected because they have distinct qualities (look for “D.O.P.” on the can’s label, which stands for Denominazione di Origine Protetta, or “protected designation of origin”). Beware: As with Champagne, certified San Marzano tomatoes come at a premium price: They can cost up to three times as much as other canned varieties. E-mail Ask Martha at mslletters@marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

Lasagna loaf’s a winner — even at half the size Mike Cardew / Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal

Eat all of your leftover Snickers bars at once by putting them into this decadent cheesecake.

Halloween snacks find new uses By Lisa Abraham Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal

If you had treats for 200 and only 40 kids showed up at your door on Halloween, you can find a way to use up those extra snacks. Pretzels and chips are the ultimate coating material. Try a pretzel-crusted chicken breast. Add a honey mustard sauce, and you’ve found the perfect complement for chicken, pork and pretzels. Home cooks have been topping casseroles with crushed potato chips for years. But try using them to bread fish for an extra crunchy topping that packs more flavor than plain bread crumbs. Looking for something sweet? Check out this cheesecake recipe.

SNICKERS BAR CHEESECAKE Serves 12. 1 (9 oz) pkg chocolate wafer cookies ½ stick unsalted butter, melted 3 (8-oz) pkgs cream cheese, room temperature 1 C sugar 3 eggs 1 C heavy cream 2 tsp vanilla 1½-2 C Snickers candy bars chopped into pieces, plus more for garnish (see note) Crushed peanuts, for garnish Prepared caramel sauce and prepared chocolate fudge sauce, for garnish Preheat oven to 325. Crush cookies to crumbs, and mix with melted butter. Press into bottom of a 9-inch springform pan. Beat cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Add eggs and beat until combined. Add heavy cream and vanilla, and continue beating on medium-high speed for 3 to 4 minutes until batter is light. Fold in candy bar pieces. Pour batter over prepared crust. Bake for 1½ hours, or until center is set. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack. When cake is completely cooled, run a knife around edge of pan, then open ring to release cake. Drizzle caramel and fudge sauce over top of cake. Top with additional chopped candy bars, and sprinkle with peanuts. Note: A bag of snack-sized candy bars contains 19 bars, or about 2 cups of chopped candy. We used one bag inside the cake and another for garnishing.

By Susan M. Selasky Detroit Free Press

Downsizing recipes is not always an easy task, especially for classics like lasagna. How do you take a 9-inchby-13-inch baking dish of lasagna that would serve six or more and scale it down to two or maybe three servings? You could cut the ingredients by half and boil just a few noodles. But you’d need a small baking dish. Or you could make one large pan of lasagna, cut it into portions and freeze them. But you’d need room in the freezer for them — and you’d need to remember they’re in there. Or you can make today’s Lasagna Loaf recipe. What I found with those noboil lasagna noodles is that they fit just right in a standard, 8-inch-by-4-inch loaf pan and bake up nicely. A key to using no-boil noodles, which are precooked and dried, is to cover them with enough sauce so that they cook properly and there are no crunchy parts. Many recipes say you can use any lasagna noodles without boiling them first; they just need adequate moisture to cook them. I used Hot Lean Turkey Italian sausage for this recipe. It has about half the fat grams compared with other store brands of hot Italian pork-style sausage. Just remove the sausage meat from the casing and brown in a skillet before using. You can also use mild turkey Italian sausage or your favorite sausage or beef filling. Be sure to let the lasagna rest for at least 15 minutes once it’s baked. It will be easier to cut and hold its shape better. You can assemble lasagna, today’s included, a day ahead. Cover it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Then be sure to bake it from its chilled state. Do not bring it to room temperature beforehand. To freeze an unbaked lasagna, tightly wrap with plastic wrap and then with foil. It will keep for about two months. To bake a frozen pan of lasagna, remove it from the freezer the night before and refrigerate to thaw. Remove the foil and plastic wrap, and then replace the foil. Bake as directed.

Regina H. Boone / Detroit Free Press

This Lasagna Loaf, which doesn’t quite fill the pan, has all the makings: Italian sausage, ricotta cheese, pasta sauce and even some spinach.

LASAGNA LOAF Serves: 2-3. Preparation time: 15 minutes. Total time: 1 hour. You can substitute any variety of Italian sausage in this recipe. 2 links hot, lean, turkey Italian sausage, casings removed 1 C low-fat ricotta cheese 2 TBS pesto, optional

1 C shredded Italian-blend cheese, divided 1 egg, lightly beaten 1¾ C favorite pasta sauce, divided

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

1 TBS dried Italian seasoning 6 no-boil lasagna noodles 10 oz frozen chopped spinach, thawed, squeezed dry

2 TBS Parmesan cheese Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet, brown the sausage, breaking it up as you cook. Remove the sausage from the skillet to a paper towel-lined plate. In a medium bowl, mix the ricotta cheese, pesto if using, ¼ cup Italian-blend cheese, egg and Italian seasoning. In an 8-inch-by-4-inch loaf pan, spread ¼ to 1/3 cup of the pasta sauce on the bottom. Spread ¼ cup of the ricotta mixture on one noodle and place it in the bottom of the pan. Sprinkle some of the spinach and cooked sausage on top, then spoon on a few tablespoons of the pasta sauce. Top with a few tablespoons of the Italian-blend cheese. Repeat the layering, reserving a good ¼ cup pasta sauce and cheese for the final top layer. Press down slightly. Spread the remaining pasta sauce on top of the last noodle, sprinkle with remaining cheese and the Parmesan. Cover with foil and bake the loaf about 35 minutes. Uncover and bake another 10 minutes making sure the noodles are fully cooked. Remove from the oven and let rest 10 minutes before slicing. Nutrition information: 544 calories (44% from fat), 27 grams fat (13 grams sat. fat), 36 grams

Q:

After using the same brownie recipe for 20 years, my brownies now turn out gooey in the middle. What would cause that? Small changes can cause a difference in how your brownies turn out,

A:

including switching to a different kind of flour or using margarine instead of butter. However, the first thing I’d check is your oven. Home ovens routinely run 25 to 50 degrees off, either higher or lower. If the oven has started running a little lower, you may be baking at a lower temperature

without realizing it. It’s easy to check it yourself. Oven thermometers are available at most hardware and kitchen-supply stores. Ovens also can have hot spots, so it’s a good idea to try the thermometer in a couple of places. If the oven is running a little

Don’t give away your zucchinis yet! Stuff ’em first By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Hiltrud Tuinstra, of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe she lost years ago for making stuffed zucchini. She recalled that it had frozen spinach and bread crumbs added to the zucchini flesh, but she could not remember any other details. Joann Langdale, also from Santa Rosa, sent in her favorite recipe for making stuffed zucchini, which sounded fairly similar to what Tuinstra was seeking. Stuffed zucchini is one of those dishes that has as many variations as your garden or farmers market has zucchinis. Langdale’s recipe is simple and straightforward, nothing overly fancy added, just good, quality ingredients, and the right balance of flavor and texture. So, before you give away or compost those last zucchinis from your garden, you might want to give this recipe a try. RECIPE REQUEST: Leda Hoffman, of Sonoma, Calif., is looking for a recipe for making a hearty apricot nut bread. She thought the recipe came from James Beard’s book on bread, but she says she looked it up and it was not there. She remembers that, in addition to apricots, the bread had almonds and sour cream.

RECIPE FINDER

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. If you send more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper with your name, address and daytime phone number. Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

BAKED STUFFED ZUCCHINI

Knowing when to blame oven temperature By Kathleen Purvis

Thinkstock

Too many zucchinis in the garden? Stuffing them makes for a simple and straightforward dish.

high or low, you can make a note of it and adjust the setting when you heat it. If it’s more than 50 degrees off, though, it would be a good idea to call a repair service and have it checked out. Kathleen Purvis answers your food questions at www .charlotteobserver.com/food.

6-8 servings. 6 to 8 med zucchini 2 med onions, diced 1 clove garlic, minced 12 sprigs parsley, minced 3 TBS olive oil 1 C frozen spinach, cooked and drained 1 tsp dried oregano 1½ tsp salt 1 ⁄8 tsp pepper ½ C grated Parmesan cheese 3 eggs beaten 2 ⁄3 C dry bread crumbs Cook whole zucchinis in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain. Cut in half lengthwise and scoop out center, leaving ¼-inch of shell all around. Combine the zucchini pulp with the cooked and drained spinach in a bowl and set aside. Sauté onions, garlic and parsley in olive oil until onion is tender. Add to spinach and pulp mixture, and combine well. In a separate bowl, combine bread crumbs, eggs, cheese and seasonings. Lightly grease or spray a cooking dish large enough to hold the zucchini shells. Lightly salt shells and fill with pulp mixture, then sprinkle bread crumb mixture on top. Cover dish with foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Uncover and bake for 10 minutes more.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted:Jewelry buffer/polisher, silver smithing tools, equip & supplies. 541-350-7004 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

203

Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Beagle Mix, 8 weeks old, rescued, male, $75, 541-576-3701, 541-536-4440 Beautiful Purebred Yellow Lab. Call for info. $400 OBO. 541-508-6387 Bernese/Newfoundland pups, 3 wks old, 5 females, 2 males, $600-$675, $250 deposit. Wormed, dewclaws. Ready mid-Dec. 541-279-7914 Boxer Puppies $450 females $400 males. Ready Nov 27, tails and dew claws done. Great family dogs, Mom and dad on site. To loving homes. Culver, OR 541-728-8428

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chihuahuas, Applehead, 2 males, 5 weeks old, $250 each. 541-593-0223.

BeeCrafty Holiday Show November 12: Noon - 7 PM November 13: 10 AM - 5 PM Middle Sister Conference Hall, Deschutes County Fairgrounds, Redmond. 80+ local artisans & crafters will be selling their handcrafted items. Admission: $1.00 donation to be given to The Kid's Center & CASA of Central Oregon Information: 541-536-5655

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

2 Baby Bearded Dragons, $50 each. 2 Baby Chameleons, $50 each. 541-350-8949 Australian Shepherd male, red merle, 12 weeks old, perfect markings, has had two sets of vaccines and dewormings. 774-487-7933 Bend

1 7 7 7

Cockapoo pups AKC parents. Low shed, great family dogs. $300. 541-504-9958 English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 7 mo. old, all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

English Setter Purebred pups ready for homes. $500 female (5), $400/ male (1), dam & sire on site. Great bird hunting/family dogs. 541-280-2597 English Springer Spaniels, AKC Reg., black/white ready to go! $750. 541-408-6322 www.kennykennels.com German Shepherd Puppies, 7 weeks, black, parents on site, $350. 541-536-5538 Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready now. Females $850, males $800. 541-852-2991.

C h a n d l e r

Japanese Chin / Westie-Cairn mix, 8 wks, 5 Females, Shots/wormed. 541-848-3525

Lab/German Short-Hair pups. 2 Black, 2 yellow. $50. 8 weeks. Shots, wormed, and ready. Call 541-281-8297

Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250 to $450. 541-954-1727

Maltese AKC, 1 female, 1 male; Malti-poos 2 females. Vet checked, 1st shots & dewormed. No AM calls or shipping; cash only. 541-350-5106 Maltese female puppy AKC, shots, dewclaws, 3 mos old, a little powder puff! $400. 541-536-2181; 541-728-8067

9 7 7 0 2

210

243

246

258

264

Ski Equipment

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Travel/Tickets

Snow Removal Equipment

HUNTER RETIRING! Rifles & shotguns for sale. Call 541-382-7995, evenings.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Papillons (3), 6 mo. female, FRIDGE: Amana 22 cu.ft. Mdl black/white, $300, 4.5 yr. feABB2223DEW with icemaker, male, red/white, $250, 5 yr. bottom freezer, beautiful old male, can be papered,$350, condition, $400 OBO. alvinoshields@yahoo.com 541-419-0882 or 923-5657 Pitbull Puppy, chocolate Male, family raised, guaranteed, $150 OBO. 541-325-1391 POODLES AKC Toy, tiny toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised! 541-475-3889

Purebred, very small, rare, chocolate brown female Pomeranian puppies ready Dec. 1. Great for Christmas gift. AKC registered. (mother weighs pound and a half) Call to reserve your little angel. 541-728-8323 or 541-382-7786 Shawna.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

You Can Bid On: K2 LOTTA LUV SKIS w/ Marker ERS 11.0 TC Bindings, $1,185 Value at P o w d er H o u s e (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & cute, 8 weeks old, $240 cash. 541-678-7599 Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $550, 541-536-3108

210

Furniture & Appliances

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Loveseat Hide-a-bed, light tan, $100 OBO, please call 541-480-5203. Loveseat & Sofa, tan microfiber. Paid $800 3 mos ago; sell for $400. 541-728-0601

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

215

Coins & Stamps

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

WANTED TO BUY Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: $500 Home Furnishings Gift Certificate at La Z Boy Furniture Gallerie (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

244

Snowboards

248

Bid Now!

Health and Beauty Items

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

ROLLTOP DESK: Old but not antique, very good shape. I paid $500, will sell $300. 541-420-3344, 541-508-8522

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website. You Can Bid On: Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set, $2,098 Value at Lance and Sandy's Maytag

You Can Bid On: Hoodoo Ski Area 2010-2011 Season Pass, $585 Value at Hoodoo Ski Area

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

541-598-4643. Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

You Can Bid On: 8 Weeks Snowboard, 1 Hour Class, 1 Day Per Week, $110 Value at Acrovision Sports Center (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

245

Mini-Schnauzer, male, “Merlin”, Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne young, very cute, $175 reStyle, wing back, burgundy homeing fee, 541-389-2412. plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323.

You Can Bid On: Smile Makeover: Seen on Extreme Makeover, $7,600 Value at Steve Schwam, DDS (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now!

Art, Jewelry and Furs Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Ping G10 Irons set with Graphite Shafts, 3-PW, Reg. Flex, $900 Value at Pro Golf (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

246

You Can Bid On: $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Painting by Marty Stewart at Tumalo Art Company

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

357 Stainless Steel Revolver, $300; 38 S&W police revolver, $200, 541-480-1337.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

Browning, made in Belgium, Grade II Auto.5, 12 ga, 3” Mag., 90-95% cond. MUST SELL, 541-447-7272.

240

Crafts and Hobbies

You Can Bid On: Snowmobile Pre-Season Tune-Up, $100 Value at JD Powersports (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Thomas Kinkade litho-canvas, 1998 “Stairway to Paradise,” 24.5x34”, framed, VOP I, #101 of 3950, smokeless home. $500. 541-598-7219

253

18” Rock Saw, $975. Rock sander & polisher, $300. All great cond! 541-350-7004

TV, Stereo and Video

242

52” Samsung 2006 big screen, works great, exc cond. Must sell, $500. 541-480-2652.

Exercise Equipment

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

SHOW

Nov. 13th & 14th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables $8 Admission OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120

Snow Plow, Meyers 6 ft. blade, angles both right, left & straight, all hydraulic controls $1450. 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800, leave msg.

265 260

Misc. Items 25¢ candy vending machines, not placed, exc cond, extra parts, $150 ea 541-536-4359 3 Plots at Redmond Memorial Cemetery, $600 each or best offer. Call 360-254-3186 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves Certified Woodstove, used, but in good shape, $250. Phone 541-389-9138

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

541-322-7253

You Can Bid On: Mountain Hardwear Sub Zero SL Hooded Jacket, $275 Value at Mountain Supply

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 TURN THE PAGE For More Ads BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

Ad must include price of item

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

• Receipts should include,

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263

Tools Drill Press, Delta 12”; Craftsman 10” Table Saw, Ryobi 9” band Saw; Ryobi 16” Jig Saw; 541-388-6729.

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Leave message, 541-923-6987

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006

55” Mitsubishi projection TV, great condition, great picture, $350. 541-548-9861

GUN You Can Bid On: 12 Month Membership to Anytime Fitness, $468 Value at Anytime Fitness

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

The Bulletin 249

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Two Nights Lodging in Inglenook Room, $390 Value at O v e rl e a f L o d g e

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Golf Equipment

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & CASH!! Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex FEG M1937M 380 ACP, exc. finish cond., w/orig. holster. & vintage watches. No col$375. 541-447-6061 lve msg. lection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: Adaire Iron Bed, $900 Value at Edman Fine Furniture

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

Find It in

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 Siberian Husky, AKC 13 weeks, both parents on site. $450 OBO. Josh, 541-633-9160

Bid Now!

Ruger .22 Single 6, 3 Screw revolver, as new with box, $400 Cash, 541-504-9210.

Furniture

Miniature Schnauzer, purebred Male, 8 weeks, first shots, $250. 541-536-6262 Mini Australian Shepherds, Blue Merle Males, superior looks/disposition,from NSDR reg. parents, avail. 11/6, 541-504-4624,541-548-0852

O r e g o n

Furniture & Appliances

KITTENS & cats avail. thru res- Appliances, new & recondicue group. Altered, shots, ID tioned, guaranteed. Overchip, more. Visit at sanctustock sale. Lance & Sandy’s ary Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other Maytag, 541-385-5418 days by appt, 65480 78th, Bend. Map/photos/more at www.craftcats.org. 541 389 Bed Frames,2 Antique, twin, ca. 1900,carved headboard/foot- Wanted washers and dryers, 8420 or 598 5488 for info. board, $200, 541-815-5000 working or not, cash paid, We still have many to place, 541-280-7959. so adoption fees are tempoBid Now! rarily reduced this weekend. 212 www.BulletinBidnBuy.com KITTENS in Foster Home, $40 Antiques & Buy New...Buy Local ea. incl. spay, neuter, shots Collectibles and wormed. 541-548-5516. KITTENS, social, playful, handraised in rescue group foster homes, ready to adopt! Altered, ID chip, vaccinated. Small adoption fee/donation to offset some vet costs. Avail. only Sat/Sun 11-5, Tom Tom Motel, see mgr, 3600 N 3rd, Bend, near Sonic drive-in. Info: 541-815-7278

B e n d

208

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call Jack is a family friendly, 5 year old Am/Staff who is looking for a place where he can lounge inside and be spoiled. He is very gentle and friendly. Neutered. FREE!! Please call John at 541-390-9004

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, The Bulletin Classiieds OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on English Bulldog Male, Intact, site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. AKC Great with kids and aniwww.kinnamanranch.com mals. $500 541-588-6490. English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

264

Snow Removal Equipment Ariens 2006 . Big job capable 11.5 hp 28". Electric start. $800. 541-330-8285 SNOWBLOWER 5 HP 22” MTD $200. 541-389-7472.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663


G2 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: 1 Week Rental S150 Loader with Bucket, $810 Value at Bobcat of Central Oregon (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found jacket/coat, 11/2, name brand, NE 3rd/Franklin area. email: hikealot@q.com

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training Oregon Medical Training PCS

2006 Challenger 16x18 inline Baler, low bale count, excellent cond, $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713.

Phlebotomy classes begin in Jan. Registration now open, www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100

Bid Now!

SECURITY DPSST UNARMED SECURITY CERTIFICATION CLASS TO BE HELD ON 11-13-2010 IN BEND. AFTER COMPLETING CLASS YOU WILL BE READY TO GO TO WORK IN THE SECURITY FIELD. 541-550-9260

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: General Implement New 72" Landscape Rake, $700 Value at Superior Tractor (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Kioti CK-20 2005, 4x4, hyrdostatic trans, only 85 hours, full service at 50 hrs., $8000 or make offer, 541-788-7140.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

FOUND Ring, solid silver from Israel, at Les Schwab Amphitheater. 541-788-7244 FOUND: Sunglasses, in Drake Park. Please call 541-385-0482 to identify. Found Young Blue Heeler near Costco. Email info to: mocachocolate68@yahoo.com

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

325

Hay, Grain and Feed IF FOUND, please call (541) 419-6575. It very important to my family. A reward will be given if found & returned. LOST 3 month old orange & white striped tabby cat, SE Tempest area. 541-382-9768 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Small bale orchard/alfalfa mix, $160/ton. Volume discounts, delivery avail. 541-480-8648.

Sales Northeast Bend

CLEAN GRASS HAY, small bales, $4/bale, $100/ton. Other quality hay available. Madras area, 541-490-5440 or 541-475-3697.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

286

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Paint, 14 yr old, 14H, breeding stock, $800. 4 year old 15+H, Grulla gellding, $800. 541-771-9042 Powder Creek Manger Horse Feeders (2), w/hooks to hang in barn, stall or pen, ea. $40, 541-923-0442 Shetland Pony weanling colt, Black, $200. 541-383-4552 PLEASE leave message

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

358

Farmers Column 12x24 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1743 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

375

Meat & Animal Processing Meat Goats, (3), $100 each, please call 541-923-8370 for more info.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Supported Employment (SE) Trainer performs fidelity reviews and provides training to statewide programs serving people with serious mental illness. Extensive travel within Oregon. BA in a behavioral science required; Master’s degree preferred. Experience with program evaluation and SE preferred. Hiring range $18.84 $23.00/hour DOQ. Excellent benefits. Visit www.optionsonline.org and click on Jobs or call 541-476-2373. EOE. Fax application to 541-479-3514.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dental Receptionist/Office Manager, Attractive benefit package. Must be detailed in computer work & have exc. people skills, Refs. required. Fax resume to 541-475-6159. Drivers – COIC is recruiting for on-call drivers to operate the Cascades East Transit buses based in Redmond. Individuals will operate an 8-28 passenger bus transporting passengers from their homes to a variety of locations within Central Oregon. Starting salary $11.84 per hour. Application, complete job description and hiring requirements are available on the COIC website www.coic.org, at local COIC offices or at Administration – 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. In order to be considered for this position, a completed application must be received by 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, November 17, 2010 in the Redmond Administration office. Faxed applications will be accepted (541) 923-3416. COIC is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request for individuals with disabilities.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Caregivers Visiting Angels seeks compassionate, reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. Experience req’d. Must pass background check & drug test. Apply at our office located within Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend. No phone calls, please.

Medical billing Primary care clinic needs biller familiar with Medicare and commercial insurances. Please send resume to cketron1948@gmail.com

Nurse - LPN Part-time nights. Please contact Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667.

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com Plant Manager

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Human Resources Manager

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Maintenance Technician Position: 96-unit Apartment Beautiful Community, has an immediate opening for a highly motivated and professional individual with strong background in apartment/building maintenance. The ideal candidate will have maintenance experience with a strong desire for a career in residential property management. Position requires employee to provide their own tools and On-Call Responsibilities. Hourly plus a free apt., required to live on-site. Exc. benefit package including: paid holidays, vacation, full medical, dental and 401k package avail. after 6 months of employment. Preemployment drug & physical screening required. Send resume to: 1-541-548-1384 Equal Opportunity Employer

This position is responsible for the development and implementation of Ranch-wide HR strategies, plans and programs, which facilitate growth and maximize customer service levels. Serves as a resource for the senior management team in the areas of, hiring, training, succession planning, performance evaluation, compensation, benefits, productivity analysis, employee morale, employment litigation, legal/regulatory compliance, and safety/risk management. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid vacation and holidays, discounts on food and merchandise, 401k. 5-10 years experience in HR management. Position will close Nov 30. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

ED STAUB & SONS PETROLEUM is looking for a Bulk Plant Manager to over see its' fuel and propane operation in Redmond, Oregon.

The successful candidate will possess management and supervisory experience, as well as being a motivated, self-starter. Responsibilities include, maintaining operations, add to, as well as maintain current customer base, review and be accountable for financial statements, expenses, overhead, credit /collections, reconcile and update inventory, keeping the plant profitable, and managing a staff of up to 10. Must possess a CDL with hazmat endorsements. Fax Resume to 530-667-2971, or email to ginger.rayl@edstaub.com.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Trucking John Davis Trucking in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: CDL Class A Drivers & Maintenance Mechanics. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or www.jdt3d.net

500

Sales

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH All Ages Welcome. No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $500/wk. Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-306-6346

Social Services Second Nature Cascades is a dynamic and growing wilderness therapy program seeking an experienced doctoral (preferred) or master’s level therapist to join our clinical team based in Bend, Oregon. Qualifications: Candidate must be eligible for licensure in Oregon and experienced working with adolescents in a therapeutic wilderness setting and with IECA consultants. Contact: J Huffine, Ph. D. j@2ncascades.com The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

541-385-5809 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

630

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

636

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

#1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Bend's Finest $200 off 1st month with 1 yr. lease on select apts.

2Bdrm 1 Bath $ 700 2Bdrm 2 Bath $ 750 W/D in each apt. Paid W/S/G Covered Parking, Billiards, Free DVD Rentals 2 Recreation Centers 24 hr. fitness, computer labs with internet & more! Call STONEBRIAR APTS.

The Bulletin

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $600 +dep. no pets,541-480-4824 1 Mo. Free Option.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

642

650

658

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

NOTICE:

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $850/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

700

1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hkups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable 541-480-7806

A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. References. $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Autumn Specials Are Here! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced yard, central heat, fully landscaped, $675+dep. 541-545-1825. Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood floors, granite counters, back deck, garage, W/D hookup, quiet st., 2025 NW Elm, $625. 541-815-0688. TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $600 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

648

Houses for Rent General Powell Butte, country living, 2/1.5, large rooms, beautiful view, fenced yard, all appl, no smoking,$750, $400 dep, $150 off 1st mo. 541-447-6068

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautifully furnished (or unfurnished) 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2695, incl. cable, internet, garbage, lawn care; min 6 mo lease. 541-944-3063 CLEAN, small 2 bedroom. Large yard, wood heat. $675 + last + dep., Local ref., no pets. 1015 NW Ogden. FABULOUS 3500 sq. ft. 5 bdrm, 3 bath home in great neighborhood, fenced yard. $1850 +$500 security deposit. Avail. 11/10. 541-749-0724. Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. 541-389-5408 Great NW Location! Exquisite, Studio cottage, short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $575 Avail. 12/1, 503-729-3424 .

61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 The Bulletin is now offering a duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE views. No pets or smoking 541-330-5020 Rental rate! If you have a Older 1 Bdrm cottage, garage, $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), 631 Stone.briar.apts@gmail.com home to rent, call a Bulletin large yard, no pets, washer & W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500 Managed by Norris & Stevens Classified Rep. to get the Condo / Townhomes dryer incl, refs & credit new rates and get your ad check, $525, 1st/last/dep. For Rent For Rent By Owner: 3 bdrm., Happy holidays! Enjoy living at started ASAP! 541-385-5809 541-382-3672 leave msg. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2.5 bath, w/garage, hardAvail. now,unfurnished 1 bdrm. 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 650 wood downstairs, new carNeed help ixing stuff condo at Mt. Bachelor Vilbaths, W/D hookups, fenced pets, $795/mo., please call around the house? Houses for Rent lage, W/S/G/elec, amenities, yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. 541-480-8080. Call A Service Professional lower level, no smoking/pets NE Bend Rent starts at $545 mo. and ind the help you need. $650+dep, 541-389-1741 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 www.bendbulletin.com ** Pick your Special ** 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1092 sq.ft., A Westside Condo @ Fireside wood stove, newer carpet, 2 bdrm, 1 bath 642 654 Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, vinyl, fenced yard, as low as $495 Apt./Multiplex Redmond $595/mo. Wood stove, Houses for Rent single garage, $825/mo. Carports & Heat Pumps. W/S/G pd. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 SE Bend Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 1104 NW 7th St., #22, 1 Fox Hollow Apts. Bdrm., 1 bath, $425, no Cozy 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car ga- 61166 Larkspur Loop - Cute 3 rage, close to hospital, shop(541) 383-3152 Long term townhomes/homes credit checks, 1st & last only, Bdrm 2 bath, fenced yd, dbl Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. ping, Mtn View HS. Available for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. avail. 10/1, please call garage, 1100 sq ft, 1 yr lease, now, no smkg or pets. $850/ included, Spacious 2 & 3 541-788-3480. $850/mo + $800 dep; $200 mo, 1yr lease. 541-923-7453 bdrm., with garages, $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! off 1st month. 541-389-9303 541-504-7755. Limited numbers available COMPUTERIZED 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. 656 632 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT W/D hookups, patios or decks, Houses for Rent Mountain Glen, Apt./Multiplex General 541-382-0053 541-383-9313 SW Bend •Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 bdrm/1 bath with private Professionally managed by The Bulletin is now offering a fenced back yard & patio. No pets. $425 incl. w/s/g 3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1.15 ac. 800 sq Norris & Stevens, Inc. MORE AFFORDABLE Rental •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath ft shop/4-car garage, utilirate! If you have a home or Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. Newly painted 2 Bdrm 1 bath in ties furnished except elec. apt. to rent, call a Bulletin $495/mo. Includes w/s/g triplex, gas stove, private $995/mo + $750 sec dep. Classified Rep. to get the yard, plenty of parking space, •1/2 Off Move-in Rent! Spacious Hillside Apt. Floor-level 541-228-5131; 541 517-4345 new rates and get your ad with balcony & fireplace. 2 bdrm/1 bath. Laundry facilities on no smoking; cat OK. $520/ started ASAP! 541-385-5809 $925: 2 bdrm, 1 bath log site. Central Location. $495 includes w/s/g & Basic Cable. mo + deposit. 541-419-4520 home, 19427 Kemple Dr., •Spacious 2 bdrm/1 bath apts. Off-street parking. Nice shade 634 west side location, $250 trees. On site laundry. Near hospital. $525 includes w/s/g 636 cleaning dep., call Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Near Old Mill Dist. - Spacious 2 bdrm/1bath upstairs unit Apt./Multiplex NW Bend • w/balcony. 503-860-2824. On-site laundry. $525 mo. incl.CABLE + w/s/g Alpine Meadows • Great Older Duplex in NW - 2 bdrm/1 bath on Large lot. 1 Month Rent Free Private back yard. New carpets & paint plus. Single garage & 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D hookups. Pets? $550 w/ s included. $675, 2 bdrm, 1½ bath W/D included! ½ off 1st Mo. Rent • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, bed. $550 includes WST/wireless 1 Bath, Gas heat. 541-330-0719 • Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 bdrm/2 bath. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Professionally managed by W/D included. No Pets. $550 w/s Included. Call us at 382-3678 or Norris & Stevens, Inc. Charming, cozy 2 bdrm/1bath cottage in central location. Visit us at www.sonberg.biz • Fenced backyard. Country kitchen. $625 per month. 1/2 OFF 1ST MO! 2 bdrm., 1 • Adorable 2 brdm/1 bath at end of Wells Acres. Huge fenced bath in 4-plex near hospital. Comfy furnished studio., all yard, single garage. Laundry area. $725 mo. util. included, indoor pool, no Laundry, storage, yard, deck, pets, ref. and credit check, • Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 master suites + ½ bath W/S/G paid. $600+dep. No downstairs. W/D included. Huge kitchen and dbl. garage. Wood $495, 1st, last and $300 dep. Whether you’re dogs. 541-318-1973. burning fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. 541-382-3672 leave msg. looking for a home • LOVELY 1408 sq. ft. Home in Nottingham Square . 2 1/2 Off First Full Month bdrm/2 bath + office. Lrg. kitchen. Wood stove. End of road in or need a service, 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 park-like setting. Dbl. garage. Laundry room. $775 mo. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., your future is in • Cheerful, bright 3 bdrm/2 bath, 1500 sq. ft.+ SW Home. gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car these pages. Large living room with gas fireplace, GFA. Double garage. Small garage, no pets. $775+dep. fenced backyard. $875 mo. With lease. • Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. With media room downViking Property Management stairs and extra space upstairs. Garage and access to commu541-416-0191 nity pool. $1025 mo. •Unique Combination - Nice NE home off Boyd Acres on corner lot. 3 bdrm, 2 bath home PLUS 2 bdrm, 1 bath apt. above Thousands of ads daily in garage. 2775 sq. ft. Total. Whole Pkg is $1800. Various opprint and online. tions available. Prefer no pets. Professional Golfer looking to To place your ad, visit ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** drive your car to Palm www.bendbulletin.com CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website Springs before Thanksgiving, or call 385-5809 www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com Brandon, 541-693-4119.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

834 NE Modoc Ct. Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $850 mo.+ dep. Call (503) 803-4718

personals

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Snow Removal

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

Holiday Lighting

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Clear those rain gutters now, before winter sets in. Call Mindin’ The Gutter at 541-848-2457 for free estimate now!

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

SPRINKLER BLOW-OUT & Repair • Fall Clean up

• Weekly Mowing & Edging Check out the •Flower bed clean up classiieds online • Snow Removal •Senior Discounts www.bendbulletin.com Bonded & Insured Updated daily 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling Harris Custom Crating: We provide custom crating, palletizing, strap & wrap and arrange shipping if required. 541-390-0704,541-390-0799

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

800 850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, super clean, move-in ready, mfd home, new wall to wall carpet, incl. range, fridge, W/D, dbl. garage, no pets/smoking, $695 mo, 1st & last, $750 security, $250 cleaning dep., $25/applicant screening fee for credit check, rental history & criminal background check. Please call 503-637-5054 or 503-351-1516

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe. piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1450. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295, 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

745

Homes for Sale

NEW HOME at

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

PUBLISHER'S 20114 Carson Creek, Bend. NOTICE 3 bdrms, 2.5 bath, 1488 All real estate advertising in sq. ft., corner lot. Will conthis newspaper is subject to sider trades. Call the Fair Housing Act which 541-480-7752. Price makes it illegal to advertise $159,900 "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, 748 color, religion, sex, handicap, Baja Vision 250 2007, familial status, marital status Northeast Bend Homes new, rode once, exc. cond., or national origin, or an in$1700. 541-647-4641 or tention to make any such A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 541-923-6283. preference, limitation or dissq.ft., all new carpet, pad & crimination." Familial status inside paint,fenced yard, heat includes children under the pump., dbl. garage, quiet HARLEY Davidson age of 18 living with parents cul-de-sac, only $112,900, Fat Boy - LO 2010, or legal custodians, pregnant Randy Schoning, Broker, Health forces sale, 1900 women, and people securing John L Scott, 541-480-3393 mi., 1K mi. service done, custody of children under 18. black on black, detachable This newspaper will not 749 windshield, back rest & lugknowingly accept any adverSoutheast Bend Homes gage rack, $13,900, Mario, tising for real estate which is 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, that all dwellings advertised family room w/ pellet stove, in this newspaper are availdbl. garage, on a big, fenced able on an equal opportunity .50 acre lot, $159,900. Randy basis. To complain of disSchoning, Broker, Owner, crimination call HUD toll-free John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Harley Davidson Heritage Soft free telephone number for 750 Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras the hearing impaired is incl. pipes, lowering kit, Redmond Homes 1-800-927-9275. chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753 Looking for your next Bid Now! employee? www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Place a Bulletin help Buy New...Buy Local wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will Harley Davidson Heritage also appear on Softail 1988, 1452 original bendbulletin.com which mi., garaged over last 10 currently receives over You Can Bid On: yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022 1.5 million page views $1000 Gift Certificate every month at Toward Lennox System at no extra cost. Mountain View Heating Bulletin Classifieds (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) Get Results! Harley Davidson Police Bike Call 385-5809 or place 2001, low mi., custom bike your ad on-line at very nice.Stage 1, new tires Bid Now! bendbulletin.com & brakes, too much to list! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com A Must See Bike $10,500 Buy New...Buy Local 755 OBO. 541-383-1782

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

You Can Bid On: Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material, $1000 Value at Carpetco Flooring

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

773

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

You Can Bid On: Premium Storage Building 10'x10' with Peaked Roof, $5,375 Value at HiLine Homes (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 14x50 2 bdrm, 2 bath sgl. wide in park. Super Good Cents package, drywall, vaulted ceiling, good condition, $15,000. 541-306-7951.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: $150 Cooking Class for Two People at Allyson's Kitchen (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Pet Services Serious On-site Horse Care Full service sitting w/options for more in-depth care. Call EquiCare, 541-706-1820 (leave message if no answer)

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling: Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 Tenant Improvement Structural remodel - 28 yrs exp Quality • Dependable • Honest Armstrong Gen’l Contractor CCB#152609 • 541-280-5677

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

FARM FOR SALE! Vale, OR. 151 acres irrigated land w/150 acres dry hillside pasture. 4 Bdrm home, outbuildings & corrals. Irrigation well & 1884 water rights from creek. Near Bullycreek Reservoir w/fishing, boating & camping. Area known for pheasant, quail & chukkar hunting; deer & elk hunting nearby. Shown by appt only! $1,250,000. 1-208-466-8510.

775

693

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Exceptional Investment 1+ acre in Bend: $65,000 Property Zoned RM. **Bids Due Nov 10th!** Call Steve: 503.986.3638

Acreages

You Can Bid On: Oreck Little Hero Canister Vacuum and Car Vac Combo Pack, $189.99 Value at Oreck

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

771

Lots

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

STICK-BUILT 1 bedroom house on an acre for sale in La Pine. Only $72,5000. 541-536-9221.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Boats & RV’s

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

***

Motorcycles And Accessories

Where buyers meet sellers.

Your Future Is Here.

705

Real Estate Services

745

Homes for Sale

Call 541-385-5809

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024


G4 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 880

880

882

882

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

900

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

“WANTED” RV Consignments AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 865

870

875

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Yamaha YFZ450 2006 , low hrs hard

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

times $3500 OBO Call 541-306-8321 like new

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

880

870

Motorhomes

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

17’

Seaswirl

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

31’

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Queen

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 Dolphin 35’ 1998, large tip-out, 45K mi., part trade for trailer or camper, $19,500, 541-536-2792.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Watercraft

19’ Duckworth Jet 2002, 285 HP inboard Jet Pump, 8 HP kicker,all accessories, 1 owner, low hrs, $24,500,541-410-8617

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121 Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

881

Travel Trailers

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Find It in

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

925

Utility Trailers

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 970-812-6821

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

The Bulletin Classiieds

875

541-923-1655

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

1989,

basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Travel 1987,

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Allegro

Ford Falcon Camper Van, 1989 Class B, fully equipped, like new, only 35K miles. $10,000. 541-588-6084

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

916

Autos & Transportation

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Airplane Hangars now available for lease at Redmond Municipal Airport. $270/mo. Please contact airport administration, 541-504-3499 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

You Can Bid On: 3 Oil Changes for Car or Light Truck, $120 Value at Bryan's Automotive (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Studded snow tires 245-75-R16 Wildcat Touring AT, 4 for $500. Call 541-312-2972

Canopies and Campers

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

4 Studded tires, Wintercat SST 245-65-R17, used 2 seasons, $180. 541-504-1209

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

916

Tires (4) Michelin Primacy Studless Snows, 215/55HR16, hardly used, $250, 541-480-5205.

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $300, 541-447-1668 Tires, (4) Snow/traction, LT245/75R-16/10, 6K mi., $300/set, 541-408-0531. Tires, Used less than 2 weeks, 4 studded, 185/60R 15, Winter Trax, on wheels. Fits Scion models. $300 OBO. Call 541-382-5333

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

541-322-7253 International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, November 9, 2010 G5

932

933

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Automobiles

Automobiles

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, asking 12,500. Please call 541-419-2181

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) Services for Surface Water Improvement Project – WA0902 Proposals due 3:00pm December 9, 2010

fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com / AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3773994 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031161607 T.S. No.: 10-10809-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DOUG J. HEADRICK, BETH E. HATTENBERGER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on May 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-33466 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 241466 LOT 209, FOXBOROUGH - PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON Commonly known as: 61208 BROOKHOLLOW DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $974.82 Monthly Late Charge $38.68 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $ 238,115.45 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Chrysler New Yorker 1990, 3.3 V6, new tags, tires, battery, etc. excellent condition, $1600. 541-549-6523 Ford Escort 2002, black, 5 speed, runs great, $1600. 541-633-0555

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160. Mercedes-Benz 450GL 2007, exc. cond., all options incl. navigation & TV/DVD players, 80K all road miles, $32,000, 541-350-5373.

Mercedes-Benz SL 550 2007 Only 38,750 miles. Excellent, pristine condition. No body damage, chips, etc. Loaded with extras. Comes with 4 studded snow tires with less than 2000 miles wear. $46,000. 541-388-7944

package, Good condition, $1495, 541-815-9939.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567 Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $17,500. 541-788-8626

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edition, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 spd, sunroof, gold color, good running cond, reduced, now $1500. 541-923-0134.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

933

Pickups C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 Cyl. eng. w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500, please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

940

Vans

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

GRAND AM 2002 with V-6. great shape! $3600, 541-536-9221

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 541-706-1568

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, $16,999 OBO, Call 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Chrysler Town & Country SX, 155K: 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975 Acura Integra 1993, clean title, 165K mi, lowered, runs good, body rough, needs TLC. 1st $1800 takes it. 541-728-1036

Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221 FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Outback Special Edition Wagon 2007, 37K, exc. cond,$18,750, 541-312-8829

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Honda CRV EX 2002, 4WD, only 63K, auto, many orig. extras+deer alarm, Demco front base plate for towing, exc. cond., $12,250, 541-549-7587.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Automobiles

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 194K highway miles. $7500, 541-410-7586

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The City of Bend requests proposals for Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) services for construction of surface water supply improvements that may include any or all of the following: (1) a new or modified raw water intake, (2) replacement of existing raw water supply conduits, (3) forest highway reconstruction, (4) a hydroelectric power facility, (5) a water treatment facility. Sealed proposals must be submitted by December 9, 2010, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, PO Box 431, Bend, Oregon, 97709, Attn: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project: “CMGC Proposal for Surface Water Improvement Project-WA0902” and the name and address of proposer. A mandatory pre-submittal meeting will be held at City Hall Council Chambers, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend OR on: November 23, 2010, 10:30 PM. Proposals will only be accepted from attendees of this meeting. Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder’s Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right 1) to reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) to reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) to cancel the solicitation if the City finds it is the public interest to do so, 4) to seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Dated: November 9, 2010 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030207674 T.S. No.: 10-10612-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMES T. PREHODA, DARLENE D. PREHODA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE ESCROW AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as Beneficiary, recorded on April 28, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-24278 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 155707 LOT 10, BLOCK 1, RIVER BLUFF SECTION OF SUNRISE VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 60075 RIVER BLUFF TRAIL, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,974.16 Monthly Late Charge $120.75 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 488,894.58 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.12500 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031338916 T.S. No.: 10-10817-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAYNE I. HEYNE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-60824 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 248357 LOT TWENTY-THREE (23), ASPEN WINDS, PHASE 2. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 145 & 147 SW 25TH ST., REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $946.81 Monthly Late Charge $47.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 310,520.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.66200 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3793085 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010

any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Michael Busby ASAP# 3793557 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-393412-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TRENT A TAYLOR & BARBARA A TAYLOR as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WILMINGTON FINANCE, INC. CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 12/1/2004, recorded 12/10/2004, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number - at page number - fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2004-73839, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241794 LOT 5, CASCADE GARDENS, PHASE LAND II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20367 ROCCA WAY BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,611.55 Monthly Late Charge $64.46 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $213,479.21 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.7500 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 3/2/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 3/2/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 1/31/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 10/27/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3795617 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010


G6 Tuesday, November 9, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031458201 T.S. No.: 10-10596-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RILEY CRANSTON, DEANNA E CRANSTON as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.,, as Beneficiary, recorded on November 8, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-74303 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 180488 LOT 6 IN BLOCK 13 OF AWBREY BUTTE HOMESITES, PHASE SEVENTEEN, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 3033 NW WINSLOW DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,397.43 Monthly Late Charge $119.87 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 641,120.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.37100 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 31, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3774174 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-68042-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHAWN HOLM AND MICHELLE HOLM, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 01-22-2008, recorded 01-30-2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-04450 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251596 LOT 174 OF PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 5, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61387 CULTUS LAKE COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes; the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's; INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 05/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,432.07 Monthly

Late Charge $171.60 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $522,817.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from 04-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 02-10-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: October 01, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3782472 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031266703 T.S. No.: 10-10813-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVID J. STEIGLEDER, MARTHA M. STEIGLEDER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on August 3, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-53281 and re-recorded on October4, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-66954 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 245218 LOT TWENTY-NINE (29), DIAMOND BAR RANCH PHASE 1, RECORDED JULY 29, 2004 IN CABINET G, PAGE 388, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2455 NE 7TH LN., REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $930.61 Monthly Late Charge $35.84 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 235,106.82 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.51200 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR- County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure

proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Michael Busby ASAP# 3793553 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031058530 T-S. No.: 10-10806-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVID W. GARDNER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on March 27, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-20641 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 201599 LOT FIVE (5), HIGH DESERT VILLAGE, RECORDED OCTOBER 19, 2000, IN CABINET E, PAGE 518, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20030 BADGER RD., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,082.72 Monthly Late Charge $36.15 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $240,793.27 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.26200 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any

successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3793551 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031328669 T.S. No-: 10-10816-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVE STEIGLEDER, MARTHA STEIGLEDER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on August 28, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-58759 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 247729 LOT THIRTY-THREE (33), CENTENNIAL GLEN, RECORDED FEBRUARY 15, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 612, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 689 SE GLENGARRY PL., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,116.58 Monthly Late Charge $45.31 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $299,084.02 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.66200 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT

www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3793138 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0017302662 Title Order No: 100236B18-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR08000049-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMOTHY A. KASTEL AND CANDIDA J. KASTEL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of BENEFICIAL OREGON INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 6, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-37534 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 125837 LOT FORTY-FOUR (44), BLOCK THIRTEEN (13), OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17365 SCAUP DR., BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $1539.16 Monthly Late Charge $76.95 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 182,769.29 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.35000 % per annum from November 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on December 20, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of

the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 10, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon G. Sheppard, Authorized Signor C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, and (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3697562 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713909265 T.S. No.: OR-174341-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, THOMAS J. SMITH and TERESA L. GRAVES, NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT WITH RIGHTS OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/21/2005, recorded 7/22/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-47412 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 243366 LOT TWO HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT (248), FOXBOROUGH PHASE 5, RECORDED APRIL 8, 2004 IN CABINET G PAGE 232 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20674 CHERRY TREE LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $154,617.67; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $676.45 Monthly Late Charge $33.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,617.67 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 8/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Des-

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26140-5 Loan No.: 0144845476 Title No.: 4480649 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Joseph A. Devine and Nancy A. Devine, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/03/2006, recorded 04/06/2006 as Document No. 2006-23604, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot fifty-six (56), Caldera Springs, Phase One, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 252107 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56766 Dancing Rock Loop, Bend, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,730.51 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $267,950.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.750% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/14/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 7-30-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 202424, 10/19/10, 10/26/10, 11/02/10, 11/09/10)

chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/17/2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3698638 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0201594447 T.S. No.: 10-10487-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JUDITH A. SHAW as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on May 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006Â33369 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 18 12 18DB 06000 LOT SIX (6), IN BLOCK NINE (9), OF ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 5, RECORDED AUGUST 31, 1973, IN CABINET B, PAGE 361, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 60946 LODGEPOLE DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $1,164.48 Monthly Late Charge $46.58 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 140,147.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 14, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W, Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said

trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trusiee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 26, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY . Michael Busby ASAP# 3793563 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010, 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patricia A. Lynch, Maia L. Thornton and Shad M. Thornton, as grantor, to Hamey County Title Company, as trustee, to secure certain obligations in favor of Pacific Rim Funding, Inc., as beneficiary, dated May 22, 2008, recorded May 30, 2008 in Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2008-23513, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (W' 1/2 S 1/2 S 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4) OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Together with all tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances and all other rights .thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, and the rents, issues and profits thereof and all fixtures now or hereafter attached to or used in connection with the property. Said real property is also identified as Tax Lot Number 16 12 19 00 00401, Tax Account ID No. 149961. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 65519 Cline Falls Road Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee .have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due all principal and interest owing on the note secured by the trust deed which amounts were to be paid in full on or before September 30, 2009. The balance thereof is the sum of $403,209.69 principal, plus unpaid interest accrued thereon through July 16, 2010 in the amount of $37,654.95, plus interest on the unpaid balance at the rate of 18% per annum from July 17, 2010, until paid; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $440,864.64, which includes principal and accrued interest through July 16, 2010, plus additional interest accruing thereafter on the unpaid principal balance at the rate of 18 % per annum beginning July 17, 201.0; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and an}, further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, NOTICE HEREBY IS GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on December 21, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 o'clock A.M., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public .auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with Federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.-753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, -to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753.. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other-person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" .and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest. NOTICE TO TENANTS: IT IS UNLAWFUL FOP ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU, FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224; PO Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935; (503) 620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800) 452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. information about whom to contact for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources maybe found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-teen lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 20, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under Federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. DATED July 28, 2010 at Bend, Oregon. Stephen D. Dixon, OSB #730789 Successor Trustee For further information, please contact: Stephen D. Dixon, Merrill O'Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702; Phone: (541) 389-1770 Fax: (541) 389-1777


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

20

1552 NE Third Street (At Highway 97)

%

541-389-2963

Chem-Dry of Bend

OFF

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF

ANY LARGE PIZZA

Residential Upholstery Cleaning when combined with a regular Residential Carpet Cleaning. Original Crust Only

Minimum Service Call Applies Offer not valid with any other promotion.

www.cleaningclinicinc.com

541-382-9498

Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB# 72129

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

BEND

“Service You Can Depend On!”

$

10

00

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location.

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: Nov. 30, 2010

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments

Wild Bird Seed “WHAT A GREAT STORE!”

25% OFF

541-788-8444 Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

1/2 OFF PITA

® ™

® ™

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

Expires December 31,

2010

Buy One – Get One Half Off

Buy any pita and get the second pita of equal or lesser value half off.

Facing Drake Park

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

Expires 12/13/10. Not good with any other offer. Limited to stock on hand.

Open Late & We Deliver!

(See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

$89!

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 12/31/10.

10

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

$

Take your lunch and stuff it.

$20 Off

PLUS Order 10 Window Coverings or More & Get An Additional 10% Off

50# Bag

BEND 63353 Nels Anderson, Bend, OR (541) 385-7001 PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd., Prineville, OR (541) 447-5609 CULVER 603 1st St., Culver, OR (541) 546-6603

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Coupon required. Exp. 11-30-10. Offers cannot be combined.

$5 off any 25” pizza $3 off any 18” pizza CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

541-549-9090 ANTI-ALLERGENS & GREEN PRODUCTS

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

541-389-6714

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

Only Buy one entree $ 00 get one entree Chicken Pad Thai

1/2 price

(fred meyer shopping center)

One per customer

Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

OF 12

$ CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

BRAKE SERVICE

15995

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

Blue Tooth Hands Free Car Kit • Keep both hands on the wheel for safety • Uses your car’s audio system • Connects you to the world with a touch of a button

$

10

80 WITH COUPON

Reg. $1200 Expires 12-13-10. Not good with any other offer.

FEAST 5#

$ 50

5

Reg. $695 Expires 12-13-10. Not good with any other offer.

Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

$ See reverse for details

All DayDine In or Take Out

NorthWest Crossing • Bend

FINCHES SUET BOX

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

• Replace front or rear brake pads • Add brake fluid (as needed) • Inspect front & rear discs & calipers (or rear drums & wheel cylinders), brake likes, hoses, & master cylinder • Rotor turning or replacement extra *Price per axle. *Some models may be higher

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

or Thai Fried Rice

LONGER LIFE THROUGH REGULAR MAINTENANCE

WE PAY YOU!

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner 2009 Semifinalists - World Pizza Championships 2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349

“When Taste Matters”

5

541.548.4883

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

SAVE $4,000!

$109 95

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

RESTAURANT Lunch Special

Gluten Free Available Now Serving Gelato

ANY 3 AREAS INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

THAI O By Osathanon’s Family

SEE MORE OFFERS ON BACK

(UP TO 350 SQ. FT.)

• Most advanced truck mount extraction system • Recommended by carpet manufacturers • FAST Drying

Tel. 541.548.4883

Expires November 30, 2010

Family owned and operated since 1986

FALL SERVICE SPECIAL Oil & Filter: Drain and refill with up to 6 quarts of synthetic blend motor oil, install oil filter. Cooling System: Drain and refill with up to 1 gallon of coolant* *Long life coolant extra Brake Inspection & Tire Rotation: Inspect brake linings, set tire pressure

$

35900

9995

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20 House Whole ial! Spec

5 Rooms and Hallway Cleaned

$

144

With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer. A room is considered 250 sq. ft. or less. No hidden fees.

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799 IICRC Certified Technician

Expires 12/31/10

BW1010

2 Rooms Cleaned

SUPER C.E. LOVEJOY’S COUPON

$

*6225

$

50 PURCHASE

$

74

With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer. A room is considered 250 sq. ft. or less. No hidden fees. Expires 12/31/10

BW1010

Upholstery Cleaning

At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597 Expires 12/13/10. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

Chair $35 Love Seat $60 Sofa $75 All Three $149 With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer. Expires 12/31/10

BW1010

Excludes purchases of Alcohol, Tobacco, Postage, Lottery, Money Orders, Western Union and Gift Cards. Effective November 10 – November 16, 2010. Coupon valid at CE Lovejoy’s only. One coupon per family please. Value 1/20¢


Tuesday, November 9, 2010

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! LONGER LIFE THROUGH REGULAR MAINTENANCE Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

BRAKE SERVICE

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: Nov. 30, 2010

$20 Off

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning (See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

$89!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Expires December 31,

2010

• Replace front or rear brake pads • Add brake fluid (as needed) • Inspect front & rear discs & calipers (or rear drums & wheel cylinders), brake likes, hoses, & master cylinder • Rotor turning or replacement extra *Price per axle. *Some models may be higher

$

Blue Tooth Hands Free Car Kit

$

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

$

35900

9995

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 11/30/10.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

THAI O RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

Lunch Special FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

Only Buy one entree $ 00 get one entree Chicken Pad Thai

50# Bag

“WHAT A GREAT STORE!” BEND 63353 Nels Anderson, Bend, OR (541) 385-7001 PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd., Prineville, OR (541) 447-5609 CULVER 603 1st St., Culver, OR (541) 546-6603

1/2 price Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Expires 12/13/10. Not good with any other offer. Limited to stock on hand.

%

OFF

Residential Upholstery Cleaning when combined with a regular Residential Carpet Cleaning. Minimum Service Call Applies Offer not valid with any other promotion.

All DayDine In or Take Out Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

10

20

or Thai Fried Rice

One per customer

$

“Service You Can Depend On!”

5

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

(fred meyer shopping center)

Wild Bird Seed

FALL SERVICE SPECIAL Oil & Filter: Drain and refill with up to 6 quarts of synthetic blend motor oil, install oil filter. Cooling System: Drain and refill with up to 1 gallon of coolant* *Long life coolant extra Brake Inspection & Tire Rotation: Inspect brake linings, set tire pressure

• Keep both hands on the wheel for safety • Uses your car’s audio system • Connects you to the world with a touch of a button

15995

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

www.cleaningclinicinc.com

541-382-9498

Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB# 72129

SUPER C.E. LOVEJOY’S COUPON

BEND

$

1552 NE Third Street (At Highway 97)

541-389-2963

*6225

$

50 PURCHASE

ANY LARGE PIZZA Original Crust Only

$

10 00

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location.

Excludes purchases of Alcohol, Tobacco, Postage, Lottery, Money Orders, Western Union and Gift Cards. Effective November 10 – November 16, 2010. Coupon valid at CE Lovejoy’s only. One coupon per family please. Value 1/20¢

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

$5 off any 25” pizza $3 off any 18” pizza CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

541-549-9090

SEE MORE OFFERS ON BACK

Gluten Free Available Now Serving Gelato

ANY 3 AREAS

ANTI-ALLERGENS & GREEN PRODUCTS

541-389-6714

Expires November 30, 2010

Family owned and operated since 1986

$109 95

(UP TO 350 SQ. FT.)

• Most advanced truck mount extraction system • Recommended by carpet manufacturers • FAST Drying

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

“When Taste Matters”

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner 2009 Semifinalists - World Pizza Championships 2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments

FINCHES SUET BOX CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597

10

80 WITH COUPON

Reg. $1200

1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

5 Rooms and Hallway Cleaned

$

144

With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer. A room is considered 250 sq. ft. or less. No hidden fees.

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799 IICRC Certified Technician

Expires 12/31/10

BW1010

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer. A room is considered 250 sq. ft. or less. No hidden fees. Expires 12/31/10

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 12/31/10.

$ 50

5

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

Reg. $695

Expires 12-13-10. Not good with any other offer.

Take your lunch and stuff it. Open Late & We Deliver!

Expires 12/31/10

BW1010

Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com

Buy One – Get One Half Off

1/2 OFF PITA

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

WE PAY YOU!

SAVE $4,000!

Buy any pita and get the second pita of equal or lesser value half off.

Facing Drake Park

Upholstery Cleaning

With Coupon. One Coupon per Customer.

541-788-8444

Expires 12-13-10. Not good with any other offer.

At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

BW1010

Chair $35 Love Seat $60 Sofa $75 All Three $149

Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

5#

Expires 12/13/10. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

House Whole ial! Spec

25% OFF

FEAST

OF 12

$

PLUS Order 10 Window Coverings or More & Get An Additional 10% Off

® ™

®

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

Coupon required. Exp. 11-30-10. Offers cannot be combined.

See reverse for details


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! FREE TWISTS

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists

$

Any X-Large Pizza

With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price

any Reg. Price Large Pizza

Original Crust Only

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

BREATHe Better AIR!

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $45.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

25% OFF

a style for every point of view® We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

® by Budget Blinds ®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 12/31/10

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

$149

“When Taste Matters”

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

EXCLUSIVE LAMB & RICE, OR CHICKEN & RICE

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

AS

Hw

Buy one entree get one entree

Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service! If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

RINE V

ILLE

N

SW

N

Cu

lve rH

wy

(541) 546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com

95

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

Only

$ 00

5

Chicken Pad Thai or Thai Fried Rice All DayDine In or Take Out Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly. • Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

FREE

TO P

BUTTE SEED

(541) 447-5609

20% OFF

Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

SW Iris Ln.

(541) 385-7001

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $179 95 PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

Rd.

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

rk Rd

nta

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

amo

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 12/31/10

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

WITH COUPON Expires 12/13/10

Take your lunch and stuff it. Open Late & We Deliver!

Chicken Caesar Combo with 22oz. fountain drink and chips

6.

$

Facing Drake Park

99

® ™

® ™

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

Coupon required. Exp. 11-30-10. Offers cannot be combined.

THAI O RESTAURANT By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

Lunch Special

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 Recommended Regular Maintenance Service 30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash

541-389-6714

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

*Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

10% Off Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153 Your newest

A DR

NW L ial Pa

CULVER

(fred meyer shopping center)

C.E.

TO M

NW In dustr

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

1/2 price

3

Nels Anderson Pl.

3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

PRINEVILLE

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

$ 00 OFF PER BAG

35#

N

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

$99

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

(UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

BEND

SOFA CLEANING

95

www.cleaningclinicinc.com

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

a style for every point of view®

M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

ANY 5 AREAS

OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CLEANING AND RESTORATION

CCB#72129

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

541-382-9498

7th Ave.

SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY & A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Culver Hwy

– AND –

EXPIRES December 31, 2010

Save $20 On

DRYER VENT CLEANING

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

CALL NOW!

SW Larch Dr.

Save UP TO $50 on Air Duct (541) 389-8715 Cleaning!

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

✓ Uniformed Professional Technicians ✓ Cleaning performed to Industry Standards ✓ Competitive Rates ✓ No “hidden” costs ✓ FREE estimates ✓ Senior Discounts ✓ Satisfaction Guaranteed

✓ Carpet Cleaning ✓ Upholstery Cleaning ✓ Safe, Non-Toxic Chemicals ✓ We move furniture! ✓ Pet Odor Control ✓ IICRC Master Cleaning Technician on staff ✓ On-time Service

Hw y . 97

Trust Chem-Dry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

Nels Anderson Rd.

Original Crust Only

Any Medium Pizza

U-Haul

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Any Large Pizza

Hwy 97

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

Side of Wings 3off $2off $1off FREE with Purchase of

Cascade Village

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

FAVORITE TOPPING

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

Artist conceptual drawings. Builder reserves the right to change plans, specifications & prices without notice. Plan number is approx. living square feet. © Copyright 1997 HiLine Homes : Modification or “derivative works” to Floor Plans /Blueprints without permission constitutes copyright infringement.

®

Store in Oregon

LOVEJOY’S IS OPEN AND READY

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician

TO SERVE YOU. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

• 541-388-1580


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! Side of Wings 3off $2off $1off FREE with Purchase of

Original Crust Only

Any Large Pizza

Any Medium Pizza

any Reg. Price Large Pizza

Original Crust Only

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service! If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 11/30/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

• Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

CALL NOW!

541-382-9498 OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CLEANING AND RESTORATION

www.cleaningclinicinc.com

CCB#72129

Your newest

C.E.

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

*Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

FREE

10% Off

Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

Trust Chem-Dry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

THAI O

Only

Buy one entree get one entree

✓ Uniformed Professional ✓ Carpet Cleaning Technicians ✓ Upholstery Cleaning ✓ Cleaning performed to ✓ Safe, Non-Toxic Chemicals Industry Standards ✓ We move furniture! ✓ Competitive Rates ✓ Pet Odor Control ✓ No “hidden” costs ✓ IICRC Master Cleaning ✓ FREE estimates Technician on staff ✓ Senior Discounts ✓ On-time Service ✓ Satisfaction Guaranteed

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash

• Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders

Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/10

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service

Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly.

$ 00

5

1/2 price One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

RESTAURANT By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

Lunch Special

Chicken Pad Thai or Thai Fried Rice

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open til 3:00 pm daily

BREATHe Better AIR!

Save UP TO $50 on Air Duct (541) 389-8715 Cleaning!

Save $20 On

DRYER VENT CLEANING – AND –

SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY & A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $45.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin

All DayDine In or Take Out

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

Coupon Required | Expires 12-13-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

(fred meyer shopping center)

Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

®

Store in Oregon

LOVEJOY’S

Cascade Village

YOU. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

TO M

A DR

AS

NW In dustr

Hw

NW L ial Pa

rk Rd

.

nta

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

Rd. SW Iris Ln.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

TO P

RINE V

ILLE

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

amo

N

BUTTE SEED

SW

7th Ave.

TO SERVE

Nels Anderson Pl.

3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

SW Larch Dr.

AND READY

N

Culver Hwy

IS OPEN

N

Hw y . 97

Any X-Large Pizza

Bonus Discount Special

Nels Anderson Rd.

With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price

$

FAVORITE TOPPING

U-Haul

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

Hwy 97

FREE TWISTS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

EXPIRES December 31, 2010

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

Cu

lve rH

wy

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

ANY 5 AREAS 2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

SOFA CLEANING

$99 95

$149 95

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $179 95 (UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

“When Taste Matters”

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

a style for every point of view

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

35#

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 12/31/10

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 12/31/10

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

3

$ 00 OFF PER BAG • 541-388-1580

WITH COUPON Expires 12/13/10

Take your lunch and stuff it. Open Late & We Deliver!

Chicken Caesar Combo with 22oz. fountain drink and chips

6.

$

Facing Drake Park

99

®

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

541-389-6714

LAMB & RICE, OR CHICKEN & RICE

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 1/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

EXCLUSIVE

25% OFF

®

20% OFF

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

Artist conceptual drawings. Builder reserves the right to change plans, specifications & prices without notice. Plan number is approx. living square feet. © Copyright 1997 HiLine Homes : Modification or “derivative works” to Floor Plans /Blueprints without permission constitutes copyright infringement.

® ™

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

Coupon required. Exp. 11-30-10. Offers cannot be combined.

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician


Bulletin Daily Paper 11/09/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday November 9, 2010

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you