Issuu on Google+

Charging into the playoffs

Pinpointing the

wetlands

Cougs and Lava Bears win their play-in games to advance • SPORTS, D1

LOCAL, C1

WEATHER TODAY

SATURDAY

Mainly cloudy, unseasonably warm High 67, Low 40 Page C8

• November 6, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Buckaroo book

A limited-edition look at a vibrant culture • PAGE B1

DAVID BLACK HEADS HOME

Out of prison, with plans and a promise

Lawsuit vs. DMV stirs additional friction Fighting the much-protested development isn’t worth what it may cost, a few neighbors say By Nick Grube The Bulletin

A recent lawsuit filed by the RiverRim Community Association to stop the DMV from moving into the Brookswood Meadow Plaza in southwest Bend has a few residents in that neighborhood upset. They say the association board entered into the lawsuit without gaining prior approval from its members — something they say is required under association rules — and they’re now worried that the ensuing legal battle could cost homeowners tens of thousands of dollars in membership dues. “You can tell they’re going to fight this to the death, and they’re going to take our homeowners association dues with them,” RiverRim resident Terri McClain said. The lawsuit alleges the state, and in particular, the Department of Administrative Services, didn’t follow protocol when choosing a new location for the DMV. Among other things, the lawsuit, which was filed in Deschutes County Circuit Court on Oct. 25, claims the DAS should have consulted with the local community when picking a DMV site. It also claims the DAS should have notified local officials, business associations and homeowners associations before entering into a lease. McClain doesn’t agree with the lawsuit, and said that before it was filed there needed to be a vote among the RiverRim Community Association membership, something which she says is outlined in the covenants, codes and restrictions. A section of the RiverRim CC&Rs states that for the association to enter litigation, 75 percent of the membership would have to approve. See DMV / A7

DOCUMENTING HISTORY

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

David Black, 26, takes a last look back at the Deer Ridge Correctional Institution on Friday in Madras. When he was 20, Black was convicted of second-degree manslaughter in a death stemming from illegal street racing.

He maintains his sentence was unfair, and he still loves cars, but he’s sworn off illegal street racing By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

MADRAS — Outside the prison’s gates, David Black’s friends waited for him. Two of them had been in the car with Black on that summer night, seven years ago, when two teenage girls died. Inside, many of the inmates know Black. They know the 26-year-old’s story and where he was headed. He was free. He was going home. “Later, Black,” one said. “Don’t come back,” another said. His three friends sat outside Deer

C3-5

Crossword B5, E2

Obituaries

Classified

E1-4

Editorial

C6

Sports

D1-6

Comics

B4-5

Local

C1-8

Stocks

C4-5

Movies

B3

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

The Washington Post

TOP NEWS

Business

Community B1-6

By Jacqueline Trescott

Ridge Correctional Institution, in a parked 2001 Acura Integra Type-R, a limited-production car. Black was impressed. He hugged his friends. He couldn’t believe this day had come. There would be no more head counts. No more isolation cell. It wasn’t sinking in yet. The young men hit the straight stretch of highway south of Madras, and their talk turned to their passion: cars. When Black was 20 years old, he was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, along with other charges, for the death of 15-year-old Stephanie Beeksma. See Black / A6

INDEX C7

Weather

C8

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 310, 64 pages, 6 sections

The photographer who went to war

ECONOMY: U.S. added jobs in October, Page C3

James Vrem, 29, hugs Black. Three friends came to pick him up in a 2001 Acura Integra Type-R. “That’s fierce,” Black said.

Financial crisis spices up a staid museum By Nathaniel Popper Los Angeles Times

5JNFUPGBMMCBDL Turn clocks back one hour at 2 a.m. Sunday. "1

In 1860, Mathew Brady was one of the world’s best-known photographers. His book, “The Gallery of Illustrious Americans,” published 10 years earlier, had made him famous. Those who had sat in his studio and faced the large box on the wooden tripod included Daniel Webster, Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Clay. So when Republican operatives wanted the perfect picture of presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln, they took him to Brady’s studio on Broadway in Mathew New York City. Brady looked Brady at the tall, gangly man with the rugged, clean-shaven face. He pulled up his shirt collar so his neck wouldn’t look so long. He brushed down his hair and placed his hand on a book. Later, as Brady developed the photo, he retouched it so Lincoln’s facial lines wouldn’t be so harsh. See Brady / A7

NEW YORK — The little museum did not know what it was in for when it decided to tackle the financial crisis. It began in a neglected corner of the institution’s marbled grand hallway. Once home to the historic Bank of New York, the space was converted to hold exhibitions about Alexander

Hamilton, futures trading and the history of the Dow Jones industrial average. After Wall Street was shaken to within an inch of its life in 2008, the curators of the Museum of American Finance decided to add a section explaining what happened. The modest display featured panels depicting the greed and blunders leading up to the

government’s $700 billion bailout. That was in March 2009, just after the government took a controlling stake in Citigroup. But the controversies kept coming — General Motors and Chrysler went bankrupt, the leaders of the Galleon Group hedge fund were arrested, Greece almost went broke — and so more panels were added. See Museum / A6


A2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

T S

How to reach us

Pelosi aims to keep leading Democrats

STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-633-2157 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804

By Paul Kane and Perry Bacon Jr.

ONLINE

The Washington Post

www.bendbulletin.com E-MAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com E-MAIL THE NEWSROOM Business. . business@bendbulletin.com City Desk . . . . news@bendbulletin.com Community Life . . . . . communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports . . . . . . sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Mailing address: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Street address:

The Associated Press

Coral several miles from the site of the blown-out BP well in the Gulf of Mexico appears to be covered with a dark substance. For the first time, federal scientists say they have found damage to coral and other deep-sea marine life from the Deepwater Horizon rig, but tests are needed to verify that the coral died from oil released in the disaster.

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool 541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black 541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa 541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Director Jay Brandt. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson. . 541-383-0324 Human Resources Sharlene Crabtree . . . . . . 541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even . . . 541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR At Home, GO! Julie Johnson . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0308 Business Editor John Stearns . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7822 City Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0348 Community Life Editor Denise Costa . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0356 Editorials Erik Lukens. . . 541-617-7816 News Editor Jan Jordan. . 541-383-0315 Photo Editor Dean Guernsey . . . . . . . . 541-383-0366 Sports Editor Bill Bigelow . 541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address: 226 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond, OR 97756. Mailing address: P.O. Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Phone 541-504-2336 Fax 541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS

Scientists find dead coral near blown-out BP well By Cain Burdeau The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — For the first time, federal scientists have found damage to deep-sea coral and other marine life on the ocean floor several miles from the blown-out BP well — a strong indication that damage from the spill could be significantly greater than officials had previously acknowledged. Tests are needed to verify that the coral died from oil that spewed into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion, but the chief scientist who led the government-funded expedition said Friday he was convinced it was related. “What we have at this point is the smoking gun,” said Charles Fisher, a biologist with Penn State Univer-

sity who led the expedition aboard the Ronald Brown, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. “There is an abundance of circumstantial data that suggests that what happened is related to the recent oil spill,” Fisher said. For the government, the findings were a departure from earlier statements. Until now, federal teams have painted relatively rosy pictures about the spill’s effect on the sea and its ecosystem, saying they had not found any damage on the ocean floor. In early August, a federal report said that nearly 70 percent of the 170 million gallons of oil that gushed from the well into the sea had dissolved naturally, or was burned, skimmed, dispersed or

captured, with almost nothing left to see — at least on top of the water. The report was blasted by scientists. Most of the Gulf’s bottom is muddy, but coral colonies that pop up every once in a while are vital oases for marine life in the chilly ocean depths. Coral is essential to the Gulf because it provides a habitat for fish and other organisms such as snails and crabs, making any large-scale death of coral a problem for many species. It might need years, or even decades, to grow back. “It’s cold on the bottom, and things don’t grow as quickly,” said Paul Montagna, a marine scientist at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi. He was not on the expedition.

WASHINGTON — Rejecting demands that she relinquish power after her party’s losses in the midterm elections, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Friday that she will run for minority leader, potentially setting up an ideological battle inside the Democratic caucus. “I am running for Dem leader,” the California congresswoman said in a post on her Twitter account. She said her decision was in part “driven by the urgency of creating jobs” and protecting this year’s health-care and Wall Street overhauls. Many Democrats had hoped Pelosi — a central figure in campaigns that allowed Republicans to capture at least 60 new seats and retake control of the House — would step aside. This would have cleared a path for Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., who has support from the party’s diminished moderate-toconservative ranks. Nancy Pelosi But Pelosi’s allies have been quietly approaching fellow Democrats, seeking support for her to continue as the party’s leader. After her announcement Friday, Hoyer and Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., each signaled his interest in running for the No. 2 post. Pelosi has no challenger at the moment, making her the clear favorite to win in a caucus that is more liberal after Tuesday’s losses. She needs only a bare majority to become minority leader. But frustration with her tough leadership style cuts across all ideological ranks of the caucus, and most insiders expect that she will face some opposition in the secret ballot, which is likely to be held the week of Nov. 15. On Friday, Republicans were practically giddy at Pelosi’s announcement. “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting a different result,” said Ken Spain, spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee. “Of course, if House Democrats are willing to sacrifice more of their members in 2012 for the glory of Nancy Pelosi, we are happy to oblige them.” Told of Pelosi’s decision during a roundtable with reporters, Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele broke into applause. “My breath is taken away by that announcement,” he said. “Nancy is one of the best at what she does from a political standpoint. She marshaled through one of the worst pieces of legislation in the history of this country. The voters soundly rejected that Tuesday night.”

The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month, $11 Print only: $10.50

By mail in Deschutes County: One month, $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month, $18 E-Edition only: One month, $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5809 Advertising fax . . . . . . . . 541-385-5802 Other information. . . . . . 541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints. . . . . . . . . 541-383-0358 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7825 Back issues . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

19 25 34 46 53 15 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $25 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

MSNBC suspends Olbermann over political donations

China assails Nobel prize as a scheme to subvert it

By Brian Stelter and Bill Carter New York Times News Service

By Michael Wines New York Times News Service

BEIJING — Accelerating its assault on the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, China denounced the prize on Friday as a political tool of the West, and an official warned that countries acknowledging the honor would “bear the consequences.” A commentary in the principal party newspaper People’s Daily suggested that Liu’s award was a plot by the United States and other Western democracies that “fear the rise of China” and seek to subvert its political system. Vice Foreign Minister Cui Tiankai reinforced that critique, calling the prize a “highly politicized event” and telling foreign countries they had a stark choice between challenging China’s judicial system and developing friendly relations with Beijing, The Associated Press reported. China’s Communist hierarchy has bitterly criticized the award since its announcement nearly a month ago, calling Liu a criminal and asserting that giving him the award demeans the prize. Liu, an author and intellectual who issued a call for democratic reforms in China in late 2008, received an 11-year prison sentence this year for seeking to subvert Communist rule. His wife, Liu Xia, under house arrest in Beijing, has invited scores of supporters to attend next month’s Nobel ceremony, but few believe the government will allow them or her to attend.

The Associated Press

Indian Shiite Muslims burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest following Friday prayers outside a mosque in Lucknow, India. Obama is scheduled to begin his visit to India today.

In India, Obama unlikely to push hard on Pakistan By Lydia Polgreen and Mark Landler New York Times News Service

NEW DELHI — Senior American military commanders have sought to press India to formally disavow an obscure military doctrine that they contend is fueling tensions between India and Pakistan and hindering the American war effort in Afghanistan. But with President Barack Obama arriving in India today for a closely watched three-day visit, administration officials said they did not expect him to broach the subject of the doctrine, known informally as Cold Start. At the most, these officials predicted, Obama will quietly encourage India’s leaders to do what they can to cool tensions between these nuclear-armed neighbors. That would be a victory for India, which denies the very existence of Cold Start, a plan to deploy new ground forces that could strike inside Pakistan quickly in the event of a conflict. India

has argued strenuously that the U.S., if it wants a wide-ranging partnership of leading democracies, has to stop viewing it through the lens of Pakistan and the war in Afghanistan. It is also a victory for those in the administration who agree that the U.S. and India should focus on broader concerns, including commercial ties, military sales, climate change and regional security. However vital the Afghan war effort, officials said, it has lost out in the internal debate to priorities like American jobs and the rising role of China. “There are people in the administration who want us to engage India positively,” said an administration official, speaking on the condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal deliberations. “They don’t care about Afghanistan. Then there are people, like (Gen. David) Petraeus (the top commander in Afghanistan), who have wars to fight.”

Keith Olbermann, the leading liberal voice on American television in the age of Obama, was suspended Friday after his employer, MSNBC, discovered he made campaign contributions to three Democrats last month. The indefinite suspension was a stark display of the clash between objectivity and opinion in television journalism. While Olbermann is anchorman of what is essentially the “Democratic Nightly News,” the decision affirmed that he was being held to the same standards as other employees of MSNBC and its parent, NBC News, Keith both of which answer to NBC Olbermann Universal. Most journalistic outlets discourage or directly prohibit campaign contributions by employees. Olbermann’s contributions came to light in an article by Politico on Friday morning. He said he had donated $2,400 to the campaigns of Reps. Raul Grijalva and Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona and Attorney General Jack Conway of Kentucky, who lost his Senate race to Rand Paul. On Friday evening, no one at NBC suggested that Olbermann would be fired. Campaign contributions are a form of activism, said Bob Steele, director of the Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. “When a journalist becomes an activist, the principle of independence is not just eroding, it’s corroding from within,” he said. Others said that thinking was outdated, and many prominent liberals and conservatives immediately called on MSNBC to reinstate Olbermann, who is normally outspoken but who had no comment on his suspension on Friday. In suspending Olbermann, MSNBC, a favorite of liberals, appeared to be trying to differentiate itself from the Fox News Channel, a favorite of conservatives, which does not discourage employees from making personal donations to candidates or political causes.


N AT ION / WOR L D

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 A3

Volcanic eruption scorches villages as death toll hits 122 in Indonesia By Sarah DiLorenzo The Associated Press

MOUNT MERAPI, Indonesia — A surge of searing gas raced down the sides of Mount Merapi on Friday, smothering houses, cattle and villagers in its path. The death toll after the volcano’s largest eruption in a century soared to 122. The worst-hit village of Bronggang lay nine miles from the fiery crater, just on the perimeter of the government-delineated “danger zone.” Crumpled roofs, charred carcasses of cattle and broken

Mosque bomb kills at least 64 in Pakistan

chairs — all layered in white ash and soot — dotted the smoldering landscape. The zone has since been expanded to a ring 12 miles from the peak, bringing it to the edge of the ancient royal capital of Yogyakarta, which has been put on its highest alert. Sri Sucirathasri said her family had stayed in their Bronggang home Thursday night because they hadn’t been told to leave. They awoke in the dark as the mountain let out thunderous claps and tried desperately to outrun

the flows, which reached speeds of 60 mph, on a motorbike. Her mother, father and 12-year-old sister, Prisca, left first, but with gray ash blocking out any light, they mistakenly drove into — rather than away from — the volcano’s dangerous discharge. The 18-year-old Sri went looking for them when she heard her mother’s screams, leaving at home an older sister, who died when the house became engulfed in flames. “It was a safe place. There were no signs to evacuate,” said Sri, a vacant gaze fixed on Prisca,

whose neck and face are burned a shiny ebony, her features nearly melted away. Their mother is still missing. Their father, whose feet and ankles are burned, is being treated in another ward. “I don’t know what to say,” she whispers when asked if she blames officials for not warning the family. “Angry at who? I’m just sad. And very sick.” Merapi’s latest round of eruptions began Oct. 26, followed by more than a dozen other powerful blasts and thousands of tremors.

MASSIVE JESUS STATUE RISES IN POLAND

The Associated Press

The Washington Post

Photos by Czarek Sokolowski / The Associated Press

Workers struggled Friday to assemble a crane that will be used to lift the 32-ton head and shoulders of a concrete and metal statue of Jesus in Swiebodzin, western Poland. The statue is to be the world’s tallest of Jesus and is supposed to attract pilgrims and boost business in the town. It will rise 167 feet, including the mound it sits on and the golden crown on its head. Polish media say the project cost $1.45 million. Work on the statue began in 2008. — The Associated Press

4 dead in floods as Tomas compounds Haiti’s woes By Jonathan M. Katz The Associated Press

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Hurricane Tomas flooded camps of earthquake refugees, turning some into squalid islands Friday as it battered Haiti’s rural western tip, while largely sparing the vast homeless encampments in the shattered capital. Aid workers rushed to guard against the spread of disease as the storm moved into the region where thousands are infected with cholera. Driving 85-mph winds and a lashing storm surge battered Leogane, a seaside town west of Port-au-Prince that was 90 percent destroyed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. In one refugee camp, dozens of families carried their belongings through thigh-high floodwaters to a taxi stand on higher ground, huddling under blankets and a sign that read “Welcome to Leogane.” “We got flooded out and we’re just waiting for the storm to pass. There’s nothing we can do,” said Johnny Joseph, a 20-year-old resident. Four deaths were confirmed by Haitian officials, all people attempting to cross rivers by car or on foot in the mountainous

Ramon Espinosa / The Associated Press

People wade through a flooded street Friday during the passing of Hurricane Tomas in Leogane, Haiti. region to the west of Leogane, on Haiti’s far southwestern tip. Two more people were missing in Leogane. Tomas had earlier killed at least 14 people in the eastern Caribbean. On Friday it came ashore as a Category 1 hurricane, pummeling Haiti’s southern peninsula, before moving on to the rest of the country, eastern Cuba and the Bahamas. It could be days before the storm’s impact is known as re-

ports filter in from isolated mountain towns cut off by the flooding. But as officials took stock and aid workers rushed to contain flood damage and the widening cholera epidemic, the storm left harsh reminders of poverty’s toll on the Caribbean nation. “We have two catastrophes that we are managing. The first is the hurricane and the second is cholera,” President Rene Preval told the nation in a television and radio address.

Judge must revisit his order to release Guantánamo captive By Carol Rosenberg McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A U.S. appeals court Friday ruled that a federal judge was too quick to order the Pentagon to free a Mauritanian captive who joined and then quit alQaida, and was subsequently

1 year later, Hood victims remembered By Angela K. Brown

By Haq Nawaz Khan and Karin Brulliard PESHAWAR, Pakistan — At least 64 people were killed in blasts at two Sunni mosques in Pakistan’s restive northwest Friday, in the latest in a string of attacks on shrines and other places of worship around the country. In the first attack, in a mosque outside the city of Peshawar, a teenage suicide bomber detonated his explosives during Friday afternoon prayers, causing the roof to collapse on hundreds of worshipers and killing at least 60 people, government and police officials said. It was the largest bombing in Pakistan since September, when a blast killed more than 60 people in the southwestern city of Quetta. The second attack occurred a few miles away during evening prayers at a second mosque, where militants hurled three grenades and set off a bomb, police said. Authorities said both attacks appeared to be aimed at villagers and tribal elders who had stood up to the Pakistani Taliban, a loose coalition of militants based in the rugged tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. The Pakistani television network GEO reported that the Taliban asserted responsibility for the first bombing, which occurred in the town of Darra Adam Khel. A tribal elder who had organized residents against the Taliban lived in a guesthouse adjacent to the mosque and might have been the target, authorities said. Residents said he had recently moved to Dubai for security reasons. In Badabher, where the second bombing took place, residents had organized a so-called peace committee to patrol against militants, who have targeted the area several times before. The sites of both attacks border the tribal areas where the Pakistani military has waged various offensives in recent years against homegrown militants. Although the operations appear to have helped slow attacks, militants have continued to display their ability to strike across the country. Several recent attacks have been aimed at Sufi shrines and institutions, the religious gatherings of minority sects and mosques affiliated with Taliban opponents, whose views hard-line Sunni groups consider abhorrent. Officials said Friday that the Taliban was lashing out at the Pakistani military offensives. “The militants are on the run and weakened by the security forces, and therefore they are hitting such weak targets,” Mian Iftikhar Hussain, information minister in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, told reporters.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Mourners visit a memorial stone Friday in Fort Hood, Texas, after it was unveiled during a ceremony commemorating the one-year anniversary of the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military base.

abused by military interrogators at Guantánamo. U.S. District Judge James Robertson on March 22 ordered the release of Mohamedou Ould Salahi, 39, who lived in Germany and Canada as a computer technician.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Washington, D.C., circuit ordered Robertson to undertake more review and possibly take more testimony to consider how many past ties to the terror group is enough to confine a captive indefinitely

at Guantánamo. At issue in part is the federal court’s evolving definition of who among the 170 or so captives at Guantánamo can be held indefinitely without charge for some association with al-Qaida.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Parents, spouses and children reverently approached the 6foot-tall granite memorial Friday, some kneeling and wiping away tears as they gently touched a name etched on the stone — each belonging to one of the 13 people killed in the Fort Hood shooting rampage a year ago. Many families of the 12 soldiers and one civilian who died Nov. 5, 2009, met for the first time at the anniversary memorial, hugging and weeping together. “I wanted to come down here and see the place where she died and get a better understanding of what happened, and I think that’s helped,” said Philip Warman, of Havre De Grace, Md., who had never before been to the Texas Army post where his wife, Lt. Col. Juanita Warman, was killed as she prepared for deployment to Iraq. “It’s been very difficult, and has taken the better part of the last year to get back to functioning,” he said. Leila Hunt Willingham of McKinney called the memorial a good way to honor her brother and others who lost their lives that day. On Friday, she gently placed a 1987 penny — from the year her brother, Spc. Jason Dean “J.D.” Hunt, was born — on the memorial. “He was incredibly selfless from the moment he was born. He was always giving gifts, and obviously he gave the ultimate gift last year,” Hunt Willingham said, her eyes welling with tears.

Later Friday, more than 1,000 soldiers, victims’ families and others gathered for a memorial ceremony that included a moment of silence and the playing of taps. Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey told the crowd that during the past year, he visited two units that each had lost several soldiers in the shootings before they deployed. He said the units were an inspiration — as were soldiers such as Staff Sgt. Patrick Zeigler, who nearly died after being shot four times but learned to walk again and continues physical therapy. Casey said those who died were bound by a spirit of service. “We will never forget,” he said. Earlier Friday, Casey and Army Secretary John McHugh presented awards to more than 50 soldiers and civilians whose actions “went above and beyond the call of duty.” Capt. John Gaffaney, who was fatally shot after he threw a chair at the gunman, received an award posthumously. The crowd rose to its feet and applauded when medals were presented to Officer Kim Munley and Sgt. Mark Todd, the two civilian Fort Hood police officers who engaged in a gunbattle with the shooter, eventually wounding him. Munley was wounded by the gunman. “It’s not about us. It’s about the families,” Todd said after the ceremony, adding that he thinks about the shooting every day.

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters License #78462


A4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R  Traditional, tech-savvy nuns thrive despite hard times

I B Matthew Soerens, immigration expert and author, will speak at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the 11:15 Redux service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “Seeing the Big Picture” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “My Invitation Can Change the World” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Grace Provides a Place to Belong,” based on 1 Corinthians 1:26-2:5, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Lessons from the Sea,” based on Acts 27:13-20, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will lead a “Hope Celebration Service,” based on Romans 15:13, in a combined service at 10 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part two of the message “Unshakable: The Wild Kingdom” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “What Kind of Dirt Are We” as part of the series “Storytime” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Pastor Syd Brestel will lead a focused time of prayer and Bible teaching followed by communion at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “A Time to Be Generous and Grateful!” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “All Saints/Communion Sunday,” based on Luke 6:20-31 and Ephesians 1:11-23, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Joel LiaBraaten will share the messages “This Little Light of Mine” and “Can You Be a Saint?” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. • Pastor Dan Dillard will share the message “The Restoration of Peter” at 10:30 a.m. and “The New Jerusalem” at 6 p.m. Sunday at Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church, 62162 Hamby Road, Bend. • This Sunday will be dedicated to serving Bend High School at Journey Church, held at Regal Old Mill 16 Cinemas, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend. • Pastor Randy Myers will share the message “How to Bring REAL Life Back into Your Life (the church of Sardis)” as part of the series “Morph” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Mark Zechin will share the message “Living from the Heart” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Rapha Center Ministries, 2330 N.E. Division St., Suite 1, Bend. • Anakha Coman will share the message “The Love of Now” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor David Carnahan will share the message “Saints: Us and Ours” based on Revelation 7:9-17, at the 8 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • The Rev. Heather Starr will speak on the topic “Not Like the Other” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor Ken Johnson will share the message “How to Gain From Your Loss” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Dr. John Nastari will share the message “I Dare You!,” based on Daniel 6:19-28, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Katherine Hellier will share the message “Now and Not Yet,” at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and the 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 Black Butte Blvd., Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “The Origin of Choice, Sin and Redemption,” based on Genesis 2:16-17; 3:1-24, as part of the series “Back to the Beginnings” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “On the Festival of All Saints Christians Remember The Saints Down Through the Ages Who Preserved the Gospel for Christ’s Sake and the Sake of All of Us Who Have Come After Them,” based on Matthew 5:10, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

By Patricia Montemurri Detroit Free Press

Photos by Lourdes Segade / New York Times News Service

Visitors walk inside the patio of the Cathedral of Cordoba, built as a mosque in the eight century, in Cordoba, Spain. The bishop of the cathedral objects to signs that reflect its origin as a mosque, in the latest chapter in the struggle over the region’s contested religious legacy.

Spanish ‘mosque-cathedral’ a monument to discordance By Rachel Donadio

“There’s no problem saying that the Muslim caliphs built this temple to God,” Bishop Demetrio Fernandez wrote in an opinion article in ABC, a Spanish centerright daily newspaper. “But it is completely inappropriate to call it a mosque today because it has not been one for centuries, and to call it a mosque confuses visitors.”

New York Times News Service

CORDOBA, Spain — The great mosque of Cordoba was begun by the Muslim caliphs in the eighth century, its forest of pillars and red-and-white striped arches meant to convey a powerful sense of the infinite. With the Christian reconquest of Spain in the 13th century, it was consecrated as a cathedral. Today, signs throughout this whitewashed Andalusian city refer to the monument, a UNESCO World Heritage site, as the “mosque-cathedral” of Cordoba. But that terminology is now in question. Last month, the bishop of Cordoba began a provocative appeal for the city to stop referring to the monument as a mosque so as not to “confuse” visitors. For now, the matter is largely semantic because the mayor says the city will not change its signs. But the debate goes far beyond signs. It is the latest chapter in the rich history of the most emblematic monument in Christian-Muslim relations in Europe — and a tussle over the legacy of “Al Andalus,” when part of Spain, under the Muslim caliphs, was a place of complex coexistence among Muslims, Christians and Jews. The debate takes on greater weight ahead of Pope Benedict XVI’s planned visit this weekend to Spain, which he has identified as an important battlefield in his struggle to shore up Christian belief in an increasingly secular — and implicitly Muslim — Europe. The polemic in Cordoba began in mid-October, when Bishop Demetrio Fernandez published an opinion article in ABC, a Spanish center-right daily newspaper. “There’s no problem saying that the Muslim caliphs built this temple to God,” the bishop wrote. “But it is completely inappropriate to call it a mosque today because it has not been one for centuries, and to call it a mosque confuses visitors. “In the same way, it would be inappropriate to call the current mosque of Damascus the Basilica of St. John or to expect that it could be both a place of Muslim and Christian worship,” Fernandez added, referring to the Syrian site where an Umayyad mosque was built in the eighth century above a fourth-century church said to contain the remains of John the Baptist.

Many visitors The Cordoba monument — one of the true architectural wonders of the world, with its rows of pillars that both disorient and overpower — drew 1.1 million visitors in 2009, most of them tourists, not worshipers. But diocesan officials are upset that some Muslims have tried to pray there, even though it is a consecrated cathedral. “Every time some Islamic fundamentalist, in a video on Al Jazeera or other channels, calls for the reconquest of Al Andalus, the old Muslim dominion, people show up here calling for the use of the cathedral as a place of Islamic worship,” said the Rev. Manuel Montilla Caballero, who oversees the diocese’s nighttime tours of the monument, which use dramatic lighting to showcase the splendid architecture. Today, the legacy of Al Andalus is

highly contested. While Osama bin Laden and other radicals have called repeatedly for the return of Al Andalus to Muslim hands — that is, for the Islamic reconquest of Spain and implicitly Europe — others look to Al Andalus as an almost utopian era of peaceful coexistence among Christians, Muslims and Jews. The city also has a rich Jewish history. Maimonides, the 12th-century Jewish polymath philosopher, was born in Cordoba, in a modest white house in the Juderia, now a tourist area where the local Jewish population lived before Ferdinand and Isabella expelled the Jews from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492. “The Cordoba monument is a lesson in universalism, in how cultures and religions can meet and coexist,” said Isabel Romero, the spokeswoman for Cordoba’s local Islamic association. Much to the diocese’s displeasure, the group wants the diocese to create a space in the cathedral for Muslim worship. “It would be an exemplary gesture,” Romero said. In another complex twist, indicative of the historical ironies at work in today’s Spain, Romero is a Catholic convert to Islam — as are 300,000 out of Spain’s 2.2 million Muslims.

Local Muslims This week, a judge in Cordoba charged eight Austrian Muslims with disturbing the peace when they entered the monument in small groups on Good Friday this year, began to pray loudly and scuffled with security guards and local police officers who tried to stop them. Meanwhile, a group called the Association of Muslims of Cordoba, which represents others among the 2,500 Muslims in this city of more than 300,000 people, says it

has no intention of seeking the right for its members to pray in the mosque-cathedral. “No, no, no,” said Kamel Mekhelef, the secretary of the association, whose members pray in a mosque in Cordoba built in the 1940s by North African soldiers who fought for Franco. “To ask for shared worship is to fan the flames, to force the question and raise tensions,” Mekhelef added. But he said that he and his group were vehemently opposed to the bishop’s suggestion of removing the word “mosque” from local signs. “It’s a tendency that I feel across Spain, a certain inclination to want to cancel anything related to Islamic Spanish history,” he said. Local officials say they have no intention of changing the signs. A spokesman for the diocese, Juan Jose Jimenez Gueto, said the bishop declined to elaborate beyond his published remarks. On a recent afternoon, visitors to the monument, standing beneath the rows of orange trees and clever irrigation canals in its courtyard, appeared split. “It’s a cathedral and should be called a cathedral,” said Daniel Ramirez, who was visiting from Seville. “It’s not a question of terms; it’s a question of our culture.” His friend Celestino Gonzalez from Malaga disagreed. “It’s a mosque,” Gonzalez said, pointing to the Islamic architecture. “I’m not practicing and I don’t see any problem in combining the two names. For me it’s the same thing.” As Conchi Bello stood in the doorway to her house nearby, she said the debate was purely academic. “For us, for everyone in Cordoba, it’s normal to give tourists directions to the mosque,” Bello said. “We’re not offended. On the contrary, it’s a nice example of the history of our land.”

DETROIT — The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist — which has exploded in size from four sisters when it was founded in 1997 to 113 today and was featured on a segment of “Oprah” this year — is burnishing its national profile with a tentative purchase of the John Paul II Cultural Center in Washington, D.C. The Ann Arbor, Mich., congregation is made up mostly of young women who adhere to old-fashioned dress, wearing floor-length habits and taking new names upon entering the convent. At a time when the number of Catholic sisters is declining, the traditional methods of the Dominican order attracted 22 new members this year alone. The average age of women who enter is 21, and the average age of the sisters is 26, which is a sharp contrast to many other long-established Catholic congregations. The sisters are aggressive, technology-savvy recruiters. They host three discernment retreat weekends yearly to orient potential members. They also film a children’s education program aired daily on EWTN, the Catholic cable channel. Among the women who entered in August was Mary Anne Mark, who hails from Queens, N.Y., and was a classics major who gave the salutatorian address at Harvard’s commencement last spring — in Latin.

Building opportunity “The opportunity to purchase the building came up unexpectedly, but it’s part of our long-standing need to provide for evangelization,” said Sister Maria Gemma Martek, a prioress for the order. “We saw it as potential to house some sisters to live there and to study, and to have close proximity to Catholic University.” The motherhouse will remain in Ann Arbor, though Martek couldn’t say whether the cultural center would remain open to the public after the sale. No purchase price was disclosed. The Ann Arbor Dominicans were established with the aid of former Domino’s Pizza owner Tom Monaghan, who has bankrolled several conservative Catholic efforts. Monaghan brought the sisters to Ann Arbor to operate Spiritus Sanctus schools, which now enroll about 220 students on two campuses near Plymouth and Ann Arbor. Through a spokesman Tuesday, Monaghan said he is not involved in the sisters’ purchase of the John Paul II Cultural Center. Susan Gibbs, a spokeswoman for the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C., said the Ann Arbor congregation is in an inspection phase of the property and that the sale could close in December. Gibbs said the center’s Pope John Paul II Heritage Room, which contains memorabilia, will remain in the building after the sale. The center was a pet project of Cardinal Adam Maida, who led the Archdiocese of Detroit from 1990 to 2009. He spent more than a decade fundraising to create the center, securing major donations from prominent Detroitarea Catholics. Donors pledged $100,000 to become trustees, and Maida often arranged for the donors to meet with Pope John Paul II at the Vatican, as a way to thank them. When the center opened in 2001, Maida had raised about $50 million, even as the cost of the building soared past $70 million. The archdiocese loaned $17 million directly to the center to cover shortfalls and guaranteed its $23 million mortgage. In 2006, Maida pledged he’d recover “every penny” of local money loaned to establish the center. But the center and its museum never developed into a major tourist attraction. It hosts a variety of interfaith and religious programs, art shows and other exhibitions. Archdiocese spokesman Ned McGrath confirmed Tuesday that “we have a secured interest in the building and when the time comes, we’ll be involved in a financial transaction.”


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike Johnson will share his message titled, “Unshakable: The Wild Kingdom” Part II in the morning worship service beginning at 10:30 AM. On Wednesday “Fuel” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com RADIANT LIFE FELLOWSHIP Loving God & Truth + People & Life 60670 Brookswood Blvd. • (541) 389-4749 www.rlfbend.org Pastor George Bender SUNDAY “GLOW” Sunday School @ 9:30 am “IGNITE” Worship @ 10:30 am “SPARKLERS” Kids’ Care & Kids’ Church WEDNESDAY “VISION” Bible Study @ 7 pm “ILLUMINATE” Youth Worship @ 7 pm REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service This Sunday at First Baptist, Pastor Syd leads a focus time of prayer and Bible teaching before we take communion. This special prayer event is a response to our current series on integrating prayer into daily life. For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00AM Sunday Mass — 10:00AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00PM HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30PM Sunday Mass — 8:00AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00–12:15PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Fr. Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 8:00 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian

Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor

CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818

PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M.

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, November 7 Sermon Title: “Stupid” Comes Natural Proverbs 2:1-22 Speaker: Associate Pastor, Greg Strubhar POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you!

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Junior Church is at 9:15 AM for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service Pastor David C Nagler.

Rev. Dr. Steven H Koski Senior Pastor “A Time to Be Generous and Grateful!” Sunday Worship 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are

Christian Schools

Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman.

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM

7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH How To Gain From Your Loss Pastor Ken Johnson Extracting Gains From Your Losses By Grieving God’s Way WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm

5th Grade Meets: Wednesday at 6:45pm Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:45pm Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Tuesdays at 6:45pm and Sunday at 10:45am SOUTH CAMPUS How To Gain From Your Loss Pastor Ken Johnson Extracting Gains From Your Losses By Grieving God’s Way Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am www.westsidechurch.org Follow us on Facebook 541-382-7504

Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education 10:00am Holy Eucharist Presider The Rev. Richard Brown Tuesday- 3pm Bible Study Wednesday- 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim Pastor www.zionrdm.com

Nazarene

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years.

BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday

Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack

Episcopal

Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am

Jewish Synagogues

541-728-6476 www.eckankar-oregon.org www.eckankar.org

ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org

Nursery provided on Sundays

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond

Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com

For more contact info: 541-728-6476 (message) www.eckankar.org

Fall schedule Contemporary Worship at 8:00 AM Traditional Worship at 11:00 AM Sunday School & Bible Study at 9:30 AM

4th Grade Meets: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am

ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God

Sunday, November 14, 2–3pm Dudley’s Bookstore, Downtown Bend 135 NW Minnesota Bend, Oregon

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm

We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome!

“Spiritual Wisdom on Conquering Fear” Where does fear come from? Are you afraid of losing love, of death, of change? Learn a spiritual exercise to help conquer fear.

(Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org

Eckankar

Free introductory discussion for people of all faiths:

Come worship with us.

Religious Education, Hebrew program & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Active Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Oct. 31 - Nov. 7 - The Scholastic Jewish Book Fair @ Shalom Bayit Co-Sponsored by Shalom Bayit and TBT Sundays: 9:00 am to 3:00 pm Monday - Thursday: 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm Sat. evening - Nov. 13 - Home Havdallah! Fri. Nov. 19 - 7 pm - Shabbat Service TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. We offer a wide range of monthly activities including social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Glenn Ettman Friday, November 12 at 6:00 pm Erev Shabbat Services Saturday, November 13 at 9:00 am Torah Study Saturday, November 13 at 10:30 am Torah Service All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street For the complete schedule of services go to: www.bethtikvahbend.org Join us at the JCCO, 21555 Modoc Lane, for the Scholastic Book Fair, Sundays 10/31 and 11/7, 9:00 am–3:00 pm Mon.–Thurs. 11/1–11/4, 5:00 pm–7:00 pm Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000 For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Women’s Bible Study Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org

WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241 Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM

Youth Groups Senior Highs Mondays Middle School Wednesdays Details: gbolt@bendfp.org Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always! www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, November 7, 11:00 am Rev. Heather Starr: “Not Like the Other” We are brought up as children learning to discern what “doesn’t fit,” what is “not like the other.” We come into community as adults grateful to find others who are “like-minded.” What does it mean to respect, welcome, even yearn for diversity in our midst, while also being grateful for common views and values? Childcare and religious education are provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569United Church of God

United Church of Christ ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. United by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with us at 10 a.m. Sunday, November 7th at the Summer Creek Clubhouse 3660 SW 29th St. in Redmond. The next meeting will be Sunday, November 21st. For details, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call the church at: 541-388-2230 or, email: prisbill@earthlink.net

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson 8:30 am Contemporary Service 9:30 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Service Sermon title “All Saints/Communion Sunday” Scripture: Luke 6:20-31 & Ephesians 1:11-23 *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105

Nursery Care provided for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

5 Saturdays and TMC:

Presbyterian

$126

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Temples


A6 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Museum Continued from A1 Soon enough, a display on entrepreneurs had to be moved so that the crisis panels could snake their way along the entire front wall of the museum. “I’ve got a few friends who think it may be going around the entire room,” said David Cowen, the hedge fund manager who now runs the museum. That might be good for business, since the financial crisis has added some sizzle to the once-sleepy museum. Attendance is expected to double this year, to 35,000, and the best-selling item in the gift shop is a poster set of the financial crisis exhibit, supplanting the silver bear and bull statues that were longtime favorites.

Scent of scandal

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Newly released David Black, 26, gets a hug from his grandmother Loretta Del Rio at her home and his new home in Bend. Black plans to attend Central Oregon Community College this winter.

Black Continued from A1 The charges stem from a night on Aug. 9, 2003, when a crowd gathered east of Bend for some illegal street racing. A Crook County Sheriff’s deputy showed up. The cars scattered. As they fled, Danielle O’Neil Gates, 16, lost control of her 1999 Mitsubishi Eclipse as she rounded a corner on Alfalfa Market Road. She was killed, along with Beeksma, her passenger. Prosecutors made the case that Black and Randy Clifford, his codefendant who was in a separate car from Black, raced Gates on the two-lane highway, making them culpable for her death. Clifford negotiated a plea settlement and got six months in jail. Black didn’t think a judge would find him guilty. He maintained he was miles behind Gates’ car when she crashed. He wasn’t racing her, he said. Sometimes he wished that he was the one who had died. And not because he got in trouble. But because he would have died driving his car, doing something he loved. The girls could have lived. But Black said he doesn’t feel responsible for the death of the two girls. It’s as if, he described, a person passed a car crash on the highway. “They were two young girls,” he said. “I didn’t want to see anyone get hurt. I feel bad. But I didn’t know them, and I didn’t see them crash.” That’s why he didn’t take the plea deal, he said. With seconddegree manslaughter, a Measure 11 crime, comes a mandatory 75month sentence. On Friday morning, Black finished that sentence. He won’t forget that night. He is now a convicted felon. It’s time, though, to start his life. He started serving jail time before he was convicted when he was 19 years old, a teenager. He left prison Friday morning, a young man.

David Black, 26, celebrates his freedom with a chocolate milk shake with friends Friday morning at Jake’s Diner in Bend. Beeksma’s mother declined to comment. Gates’ family could not be reached for comment.

Life in prison Black’s family asked Deschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan to reduce his charges so he wasn’t subject to Measure 11 sentencing guidelines. Dugan didn’t. His family worried about his safety in a medium-security prison, though he was later moved to Deer Ridge, a minimum-security prison. Black was scared, too. In his first week in prison, he watched a guard get stabbed in the face. Everyone was doing drugs, he said. An inmate was stabbed. Black made friends with the people who could help protect him. He became known, he said, as “the guy who shouldn’t be here.” “In prison you hear a lot of ‘I’m

innocent, I’m innocent,’ ” Black said. “I didn’t say that. I shouldn’t have been there (in prison). But I accepted it.” Black said if he’s mad at anyone, it’s Dugan. His family feels the district attorney used him to make an example. His happiest day in prison was the day Dugan lost his bid for re-election as district attorney, he said. In an earlier interview with The Bulletin, Dugan said Black didn’t tell the whole story. Investigators taped interviews with Black, Dugan said, who admitted to being angry when Gates passed him that night. Dugan could not be reached for comment. Black said there should have been a better solution. “There needs to be a fix for Measure 11,” he said. “They shouldn’t send a first-time offender, unless you’re a murderer or rapist, there. There had to have been an alternative for them. They send me there with murderers and rapists and gang members. That’s your best option to help correct my way of thinking?” While Black was serving time, his friends grew up. They told him when they met a new girl. They told him about their weddings. And then some of them started bringing their newborn children with them on visits. Black’s sister had a baby. And Black’s uncle died from a heart attack. His parents started living apart after nearly 30 years of marriage.

Inside, his 21st birthday was unremarkable. As were the rest. Every day for him was nearly the same. The only days that really stood out were those when there was something out of the norm, a stabbing or remarkable fight. “Yeah, I missed life,” he said. “I wanted what my friends had. I wanted my career started. The college experience, the Christmases with my family. I had plans to be married, have a kid by now.” Black said he hesitated talking to the media about his release from prison. He’s ready to move on. To no longer be “that guy.” But he’s still hoping that he can overturn his felony conviction. He wants to be able to drive cars and leave the state without written permission. He wants to attend college in California and apply for jobs without having to explain that he’s a felon. Earlier Friday morning at the prison, after one final head count, Black took off his denim jeans and shirt with the word “inmate” stamped in orange. He put on a black jacket, a white T-shirt with a car on it, black jeans and red Puma sneakers. Correctional Officer Ron Schleis handed Black an Oregon voters’ guide. “Here’s your voter guide,” Schleis said. “In case you want to change the laws.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Admission is $8, and passers-by are lured in by a poster board that screams “SCANDAL!” and a flag advertising the “Mu$eum” inside. The institution also offers a “Scandals and Scoundrels” walking tour that takes in scenes of Wall Street notoriety. “I’ve never found another place like this — and I’m interested in this stuff,” said Lisa Ellerton, who works in insurance and made her first visit to attend the walking tour along with her parents. The crisis is also responsible for giving the museum its director, Cowen, who worked for 14 years as a currency trader at Deutsche Bank and Bankers Trust before he started his own hedge fund. It was only when investors pulled money out of his hedge fund in 2008 that he began discussions with the museum. “If it hadn’t been for the credit crisis, it’s not an opportunity I would have looked at,” said Cowen. “I would have been managing my fund.” The museum was founded in 1989 by John Herzog, who ran a firm that was a market maker for Nasdaq stocks. An avid collector of financial memorabilia, Herzog launched the enterprise in a cramped room in the Standard Oil building on Broadway, where there was space for only a single temporary exhibit. After the New York Stock Exchange closed its own visitor center in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the museum sought a bigger home so that it could take on the role of the unofficial visitors center for the Street — and one of the only museums about finance in the world. It eventually settled in on the second floor of the Bank of New York building, built in 1929 on the site where Hamilton originally founded the bank. Much of the collection is less

than remarkable: vintage stock certificates, yellowed copies of the Wall Street Journal and video screens showing scenes from the stock exchange floor.

A critical look The exhibits dedicated to financial misdeeds have more edge, but also pose something of a risk for an institution that relies on Wall Street donations to make its $3.3 million annual operating budget. “It’s got to be very tough for a museum on Wall Street to look at these problems,” said Gretchen Sullivan Sorin, director of the museum studies program at the State University of New York in Oneonta. The financial industry, Sorin notes, is not known for taking a critical look at itself. She recalled attending a meeting with the historian of the New York Stock Exchange. “She said, ‘I’m allowed to say anything about the history of the exchange as long as I don’t mention 1929,’” Sorin remembered with a laugh. Among the museum’s biggest donors are Wells Fargo, the New York Stock Exchange and Goldman Sachs. The latter is a featured stop on the “Scandals and Scoundrels” tour. Annaline Dinkelmann, a South African native, chooses her words carefully as she leads a group of about 20 people past Goldman’s 30-story headquarters on Broad Street. “I want to make it clear: Goldman Sachs is not guilty of any crime,” she said while standing under the brown stone archway in front of the building. “We all have our personal opinions, but Goldman had their court case against them, and they settled out of court.” Goldman Sachs declined to comment on its relationship with the museum. But a spokesman for another big donor — the NYSE — said it was happy to support public understanding of capitalism, warts and all. “The museum is an independent educational institution that examines historical themes, both positive and negative, and develops its own exhibition programs that we are proud to support,” NYSE spokesman Ray Pellechia said. Cowen, who also serves as a fundraiser for the museum, says the decision to highlight scandal has not hurt efforts to raise money. Still, he said he has received some “interesting feedback” about the exhibits from key donors. “They’re happy that we recognize the difficult times and are objective about it,” he said. “Most of them walk out with a poster set. It’s like a badge of honor: ‘I survived this thing.’”

Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

Call 541.330.6160 www.aesthetics-md.com

‘Learned my lesson’ Black said none of his friends will illegally street race again. And neither will he. “I learned my lesson,” he said. “I would have learned my lesson with 30 days in jail.” But he’s still passionate about cars. He plans to enroll at Central Oregon Community College this winter and will take automotive classes along with computer and photography. It’s what makes him want to live, he said. For him, life is: family, friends, cars. He said he knows people expect him to say he doesn’t want to race on a track again, or that he doesn’t want to drive again. But that’s not the truth. He still loves the sound of the Integra’s engine on the straightaway. “Man, that’s fierce,” he said when the engine kicked. “That’s sexy.” “I will modify cars. I will never street race again,” he said later. Black’s grandmother, Loretta Del Rio, said she thinks it’s in her grandson’s blood. Since he was little, he was obsessed with cars. She has a long line of professional car drivers in her family. And she realizes too that it could sound insensitive after what’s happened to Beeksma and Gates. She said she thinks of the two young girls and knows she’s lucky that Black can come home. “They were both young girls and had their lives ahead of them,” she said.

1865 NE Highway 20, Bend M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6

541-389-1177 Expires Sunday, November 7 , 2010.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 A7

Brady Continued from A1 Brady produced a remarkable image. At that time most Americans hadn’t seen Lincoln, and his opponents had caricatured him as a wild frontiersman. Yet here he was — extremely tall, standing erect, an imposing gentleman in a long frock coat. The Brady photo was used for engravings and reprinted in the major weeklies of the day, Harper’s Weekly and Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. It also appeared on a campaign button. The same day he sat for Brady — Feb. 27, 1860 — Lincoln gave one of his most important speeches, the Cooper Union address. He spoke 7,000 words to an audience of influential businessmen, ministers, scholars and journalists. The speech was front-page news the next day. In an interview years later, very aware of his role in history, the photographer repeated what Lincoln reportedly said about the confluence: “Brady and the Cooper Institute made me president.” Brady was born in Warren County, N.Y., in 1823. As a young man in New York City, he studied photography with Samuel Morse (in addition to inventing the electric telegraph and Morse code, Morse is credited with bringing the daguerreotype process from France to the United States). When Brady was introduced to daguerreotypes in the 1840s, photography was still a new art form and — at a time when most newspapers still relied on sketches — an extremely uncertain business venture. Nonetheless, Brady opened his first photography studio in 1844; by the following year he had won a national competition for the best colored and best plain daguerreotypes.

Photos by Mathew B. Brady / National Portrait Gallery

When the Civil War began in 1861, Mathew Brady decided to step outside the formal setting of his studio. Because he was the first photographer to actually go to a battlefield and document what he found there, he is widely considered the father of modern photojournalism. Mathew Brady’s photograph of Sojourner Truth, taken in 1864. In addition to his work during the Civil War, Brady specialized in portrait photography of famous Americans. “From the first I regarded myself as under obligation to my country to preserve the faces of the historic men and mothers,” Brady said in a 1891 perhapsembellished interview in the New York World.

Portraits, personality He operated his studio like a painter’s workshop, assigning colleagues and apprentices to various tasks. Studio personnel operated the cameras after Brady set up the shot, a practice he may have adopted because of the poor eyesight that had plagued him since childhood. The photographer and his assistants posed their subjects. They became skilled at injecting personality into the images, much like formal portrait painters. Brady’s artistry was leavened with promotional acumen. As was the custom of the times, the studio’s photographs were reprinted on tiny cards called “cartes de visite,” making his work greatly accessible. “Brady developed a reputation because of his quality and his marketing skills,” said Ann M. Shumard, curator of photographs at the National Portrait Gallery. “He was a good promoter and supplied images that could be reproduced. He adapted to the times.” Edward McCarter, supervisory archivist for still pictures at the National Archives, concurred. “Brady was the best-known entrepreneur of the day,” McCarter

DMV Continued from A1 She also considers the protests over the DMV moving into the Brookswood Meadow Plaza to be a little hyperbolic and a classic case of “not in my backyard” opposition to new development. “They say it’s not a ‘not in my backyard issue,’ but it’s exactly a ‘not in my backyard issue,’ ” McClain said. “I agree the Brookswood Meadow Plaza might not be the best centralized location for all the citizens of Bend, but I feel that the impact on our community might be overblown. I think a good Mexican restaurant might generate just as much traffic as the DMV.” Ever since the DMV announced it was moving to the Brookswood Meadow Plaza from its current location on the north side of Bend, it has caused many in the RiverRim neighborhood to speak out. Many of their concerns have been related to increased traffic and how it would wear on the privately maintained streets, create parking problems and endanger the children who go to a nearby elementary school. The lawsuit reiterates these concerns, and expands upon them through a second plaintiff, Robert Tyler, who is the treasurer for the RiverRim Community Association. According to the lawsuit, Tyler would be adversely impacted in a number of ways by the DMV moving into his neighborhood. In addition to seeing a “deterioration in the convenience and safety of vehicular travel” in RiverRim and southwest Bend, the DMV would lead to a

the historic men and mothers,” Brady said in a 1891 article in the New York World. (Historians think the interview, one of the few given by Brady, is greatly embellished. It also includes a rare physical description of the aging photographer: “Mr. Brady is a person of trim, wiry, square-shouldered figure, with the light of an Irish shower-sun in his smile.”) When the Civil War began in 1861, Brady decided to step outside the formal setting of his studio. Because he was the first photographer to actually go to a battlefield and document what he found there, he is widely considered the father of modern photojournalism. He later attributed his decision to destiny. After he returned from the first Battle of Bull Run, Brady recalled, “My wife and my most conservative friends had looked unfavorably upon this departure from commercial business to pictorial war correspondence, and I can only describe the destiny that overruled me by saying that, like Euphorion, I felt that I had to go.”

Legacy-minded said. “You might get an argument on whether he was the best photographer.” In 1858, Brady set up a second studio on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, across the street from the present location of the National Archives. He did his printing on the roof. He came to the city seeking greater proximity to the power brokers of the day, and his subjects included John Quincy Adams, Dolley Madison, Washington Irving, James

Fenimore Cooper, Jenny Lind, Sojourner Truth, Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, William Cullen Bryant, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee. He even photographed the actor Edwin Booth and his brother John Wilkes Booth. His interest in documenting the era’s notables foreshadowed the art of celebrity portraiture. “From the first I regarded myself as under obligation to my country to preserve the faces of

sense of “strangers in the neighborhood” that would leave him with a feeling of “insecurity and anxiety.” This would be further exacerbated, the lawsuit alleges, because Tyler has a 10-year-old daughter who walks or rides her bike to the Elk Meadow Elementary School that is in the vicinity of the Brookswood Meadow Plaza. Bruce White, the attorney representing Tyler and the RiverRim Community Association, did not return phone calls seeking comment Friday. Tyler and Bill Binion, the vice president of the RiverRim Community Association, refused comment and directed questions to their attorney. Officials from the DMV and DAS also refused to comment, saying they couldn’t answer questions about pending litigation. The lawsuit is just one more attempt in tactics used by opponents of the DMV to get the state to reverse its decision. Over the past several months, individuals have staged protests, organized boycotts, gathered signatures on petitions and even sent a letter to Gov. Ted Kulongoski to get the DMV to reconsider its move. So far all those maneuvers have filed. The DMV is still scheduled to open in the Brookswood Meadow Plaza in January, and there hasn’t been any indication from the state that it will try to get out of its 10-year lease for the property. RiverRim resident John Poe said he thinks the opposition to the DMV is “much ado about nothing,” and he said he’s not alone. In fact, he thinks the DMV will actually benefit the neighborhood by attracting business

to the Brookswood Meadow Plaza, which today sits mostly vacant aside from a grocery store, a fitness center and a preschool. With the lawsuit, he said he now feels like the homeowners association board has overstepped its bounds. Like McClain, Poe said there should have been vote to approve legal action, especially since it could result in having additional assessments on his quarterly dues of $176.50. Since there wasn’t a vote, he

Brady seemed intent on establishing his legacy from the outset, in some cases even inserting himself into the studio’s wartime photographs. “He’s in one taken at Gettysburg,” said Carol Johnson, a photography curator for the Library of Congress’s Civil War collections. Johnson said her staff still occasionally finds the photographer in the images, particularly as they are digitized. Brady realized early on that the pictures were not mere memo-

said he thinks the RiverRim Community Association’s name should be removed from the lawsuit, and that dues from the membership should not be used to pursue what he believes is a misguided quest by a select few. “We think this is a losing matter,” Poe said. “It’s all emotion, and it’s not based at all on facts.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

rabilia but were footnotes to history. In 1862, he displayed gruesome battlefield scenes taken by his studio colleagues Alexander Gardner and James Gibson in his New York gallery. The images of decaying corpses after the Battle of Antietam appalled viewers and galvanized the anti-war movement. After the war, the demand for Brady’s work waned. Photography was changing rapidly, incorporating new equipment and techniques, and the public no longer wanted the Civil War images for which Brady was best known. A skilled promoter but an inept businessman, Brady had invested much of his capital in the studio’s war coverage. Ultimately it proved his financial ruin.

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950

In late 1864, Brady began selling off his assets, including a half share in his Washington gallery. He sued his business partner when it fell into bankruptcy in 1868, then bought it back at public auction. But his affairs continued to spiral downward. The courts declared him bankrupt in 1873, and by 1875 his New York studios were closed. Brady petitioned Congress to buy his collection, which it did, for $25,000, in 1875. Despite his political associations, he failed to get a hall of prominent Americans — with his work as a critical source — started. His last known Washington address was 484 Maryland Ave. SW. Brady died an indigent in New York on Jan. 15, 1896. His funeral was paid for by friends and a veterans association. He is buried in Congressional Cemetery in Washington. Today, Washington is the epicenter of Brady scholarship. The National Archives and Records Administration, the Library of Congress and the National Portrait Gallery — where two walls of his work are on permanent display — house thousands of photographs and glass plates that have survived for more than 150 years. Taken together, they provide a haunting glimpse of the city and its nearby battlefields during the Civil War and an illuminating history of early photography. That fateful sitting with Lincoln remains a pivotal departure point for the study of Brady and the Civil War. Even then, copies of the photo were scarce and quickly became collector’s items. In a letter written on April 7, 1860, to a person requesting the Brady photo, Lincoln wrote: “I have not a single one now at my control; but I think you can easily get one at New York. While I was there I was taken to one of the places where they get up such things, and I suppose they got my shadow. ... Yours truly, A. Lincoln.”

Sewing & Vacuum Center

As L ow As $149

New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend


A8 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

1-800-275-7214

1-800-275-6221


CL

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

COMMUNITY LIFE

B

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010

JULIE JOHNSON

When poverty has a face A

ll of us probably know someone who lost a job in this economy. Or a home. Or both. Central Oregon, after all, has been hard-hit by the recession. Any many of us have had to scramble to get the bills paid over the past few years. New shoes have been rare. Spare change has been spent before it has a chance to accumulate in the couch cushions. With luck, our children will come out of this decade with the knowledge of the value of a dollar, but without having experienced the pain of deprivation themselves. My family, like others, is trying to walk that tricky line between teaching the kids to value what they have (even if it’s less than what we want to give them) and making sure they don’t go without what they need. We try to be honest with our sons about not being able to afford a new bicycle. But with that honesty, I hope, we offer what assurances we can that our life and home and dinner plans are stable. It’s a tough balancing act, but one I am grateful for, because our family is not among those facing real poverty. But what do you tell your kids when poverty becomes real? When the destitute aren’t strangers, but people they have met? My 8-year-old son has always been interested in panhandlers, beggars and homeless people. Before he could read, he would ask us to read their signs as we passed in our car: Family hungry, anything helps. Veteran out of job. Will work for help. He’d ask who they were, what they were doing. We’d explain as best we could in terms appropriate to a 5-, 6- or 7-yearold. Some people don’t have houses to live in. That man doesn’t have very much money. He doesn’t have a job, so he’s asking for help. Occasionally I’d pass a buck or two out of the car window. Once I bought a sack of Egg McMuffins for a pair of homeless men camped out with a sign near a McDonald’s. I was impressed by my son’s apparent empathy. He seemed to understand that the people we saw begging on street corners were suffering. He suggested we should give them money. He was sad they didn’t have homes. He was glad one had a dog with him, for company. Then one day, while riding in the car with a relative on Bend’s east side, my son saw a man on the sidewalk he recognized. His name was Chris. He had done some yardwork for a friend for a small wage, and my son had met him. But now, the man was sitting outside of the Forum Center parking lot with a cardboard sign asking for work. He had a family to feed. He needed help. Suddenly, poverty had a face. And it was the face of someone my son knew. And just as suddenly, being poor was no longer something that happened only to other people. After all, if Chris could be reduced to panhandling, my son’s logic said, could his mom or dad? Over the next few days, my son asked a lot of questions about the poor: Where do they get food? Do they live in tents? Where do they park their cars? Can we keep our house? He read with even more attention the signs held by panhandlers at street corners. “That man doesn’t have a house or any money,” he’d say. “Does Chris have a house?” I would do my best to answer his questions and reassure him of our relatively stable position in life. Chris, in fact, did have a house, or an apartment at least. But he’d sold his car to pay his bills, and he rode a bike to odd jobs and errands. This I learned from my friend. I could see the gears turn in my son’s mind, fitting this new face of poverty into his view of the world, which had, to date, not included an out-of-work acquaintance who had resorted to begging to feed his family. As sad as the circumstances of this lesson are, I am glad my son has experienced this level of empathy for those who have less than he does. My hope is that it will feed his sense of gratitude for how rich his own life is. Julie Johnson can be reached at 541383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

The making of a

buckaroo book By David Jasper • The Bulletin

T

ake a fourth-generation buckaroo, several artists, a wordsmith and a printmaking studio, and what do you get?

“Vaquero/Buckaroo,” a limited-

edition, leather-bound book being made by hand with soy inks and archival paper. The project, says Pat Clark of printmaking studio Atelier 6000, is limited to just 75 copies, and should be complete by Dec. 15, just in time for

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Ron Miller rides Wasabi at Miller’s Tumalo ranch Wednesday. Miller is a fourth-generation buckaroo and inspiration for the forthcoming book “Vaquero/Buckaroo,” a collaborative effort from artists and printmakers at Atelier 6000 in Bend.

Christmas. Clark, the owner of Atelier 6000 (also known as A6), says that when she arrived in Central Oregon a few years

LEFT: Items going into the making of “Vaquero/Buckaroo,” including the leather-bound cover and the wooden box it will be sold in.

ago from Southern California, she was intrigued by an article about the buckaroo tradition written by Sandy Anderson for High Desert Journal, a

Photo courtesy Atelier 6000

literary publication based in Bend. “I was kind of enthralled by the whole history and idea of (buckaroos),” Clark says. “At that time, I thought, ‘Well, it’s such a nice vignette of culture, it would make a wonderful original book.’ ”

Get the book To pre-order a limited-edition copy of “Vaquero/Buckaroo,” visit Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, in Bend, or contact 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.com.

Bachelor’s school benefit tickets are now on sale

SPOTLIGHT

Tickets are on sale for the sixth annual Mt. Bachelor Ski for Schools fundraiser, which will run from Nov. 29 to Dec. 3. Single-day lift tickets can be purchased while supplies last through Nov. 26 for $25 from a number of local retailers, including in Sunriver, 4 Seasons Recreational Outfitters; in

BELOW: Wasabi, a thoroughbredwarmblood cross, in the barn at Ron and Nye Miller’s Tumalo ranch. The hat is a staple of buckaroo attire.

When Clark talked to Anderson about it, she learned the author had plenty of material she hadn’t included in that article. “Pages and pages,” a laughing Anderson recalled Monday at A6, located in the Old Mill District in Bend. The book would be based on Anderson’s interviews of Ron Miller, of Tumalo. Anderson is well-acquainted with Miller, whose wife, Nye, is an artist affiliated with A6. Additionally, Miller helped Anderson learn to train her 6-month-old wild mustang, which came to her from his brother’s ranch, and has taken her along while moving cattle. Working with Miller’s vignettes about the buckaroo lifestyle and philosophy, the project “got bigger as we went along,” she says. Among those stories are gems such as how his mother used to take “a jar of cream and tie it to (his father’s) saddle, and he’d come back with butter.” “She asked me,” Miller explained Wednesday by phone, “if I could share with her my views on what I felt buckaroos were and did, and my history with it.” See Buckaroo / B6

Bend, La-Z-Boy Furniture Gallery, Mid Oregon Credit Union, Mountain Supply, Pine Mountain Sports, Powder House, REI, Side Effect, Skjersaa’s, Vanilla, Zydeco; and in Redmond, McDonald’s, Jody’s Drive-In and Dr. Scott Burgess’ office. Mt. Bachelor donates the revenue to the education foundations for Bend-La Pine Schools and the Redmond School District.

More information can be found at www.mtbachelor.com or www. bendlapineschoolsfoundation.org.

Watch the Civil War game, raise money for chimps If you don’t have tickets to this year’s Civil War football game between the Ducks and Beavers, you can watch it instead on three giant screens at the Hooker Creek Ranch

as a fundraiser for Chimps Inc., a local nonprofit wildlife sanctuary in Bend. Single-admission tickets for the Dec. 4 game are $65, and advance reservations are required. The event includes an all-you-can-eat buffet as well as a silent auction. Doors open one hour before kickoff. Contact: 541-389-5853 or www. chimps-inc.org. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Serious student seeks time out from chitchat

Jim Belushi keeps heart in Chicago By William Lee

‘The Defenders’

Chicago Tribune

Dear Abby: I’m a junior in high school and taking multiple AP classes. With all the homework we’re assigned, I sometimes need to use lunchtime to finish assignments. My problem is my friends follow me into the school library and talk to me while I’m working. Their constant chatter is distracting and prevents me from concentrating on my assignments. I don’t neglect my friends. I spend hours outside of school with them every week. But they don’t understand that I’m more focused on academics and long-term goals than my short-term social life. How can I get them to leave me alone when I’m working? — Focused on My Goals in Los Angeles Dear Focused on Your Goals: If you haven’t told your friends plainly how you feel and clearly drawn a line, you shouldn’t blame them for being clueless when they cross it. Tell them you need to concentrate when you’re in the library and that they are creating a problem for you. Not only will you be helping yourself, you’ll be doing a favor for other students who are trying to study and who are also being distracted. Dear Abby: I am a 34-year-old woman and still single. Many people like me enjoy their lives, but I don’t. I long to be married and to have a family. But because of my failures in the dating world, I’m not optimistic about my chances. The thought of marriage and family late in life frightens me, and I don’t want to raise a child as a single parent. So, at my age, is it likely I may never be married?I would appreciate it if your readers could share how they were able to change circumstances like mine. — Single Still in Little Rock Dear Single Still: Please do not resign yourself to singlehood quite yet. People are settling down and marrying later today for many reasons. Because you mentioned that the thought of marriage and family “later in life” frightens you,

DEAR ABBY my inclination is to suggest that you discuss it with a therapist to see whether your fear may have been instrumental in causing your relationships to fail. However, because you’re requesting reader input regarding late marriage, I’m sure we’ll hear from them, generously sharing their experiences. I know couples who married later in life, and they are compatible and happy. Readers, what do you have to say? Dear Abby: I was recently promoted to a new position at work, doing something I have always wanted to do. My supervisor and I are very different — almost polar opposites, in fact. But we get along great and work well together. Because we have started working more closely, she is beginning to consider me her friend, asking me to “hang out” and occasionally offering me recreational drugs. I love working with her, but I don’t want to “hang out” because of our differences. If something were to go wrong, it would affect our work relationship. How do I keep things strictly professional without offending her? — Wary Assistant in Arizona Dear Wary Assistant: By telling her (with a smile) that your time to socialize is extremely limited and, as much as you enjoy working with her, you prefer to keep your work relationships strictly professional. And should the woman offer you a controlled substance, simply say, “No, thank you.” Dear Readers: Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday. Don’t forget to turn your clocks back one hour before going to bed. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

CHICAGO — Leave it to hometown boy Jim Belushi to find a way to work the Chicago Bears fight song into a legal dramedy set in Las Vegas. In a recent episode of “The Defenders,” local viewers got a chance to see Belushi’s Chicago-raised character, Nick Morelli, belt out “Bear Down, Chicago Bears.” The storyline revolved around the planned theft of a Super Bowl ring that belonged to Bears Hall of Famer Mike Singletary. In another episode, after punching a villainous character from Detroit, Morelli derides the downed man for the Red Wings’ “stealing (Chris) Chelios from the Blackhawks.” The Second City alum and kid brother to John “Joliet Jake” Belushi wasn’t coy about injecting his love of all things Chicago into the story. “You know, I have an influence,” Belushi joked during a recent break from filming of the show he called a “courtroom drama on steroids.” Chicago, Belushi said, is “where I’m connected, and it’s where my sense of humor is rooted. When you draw back on experiences and things, you go back to what you’re connected to.” The Wheaton, Ill., native’s extended return to network television after his eight-year run playing lovable lout Jim Orenthal on ABC’s “According to Jim” was uncertain until CBS executives ordered additional episodes of the popular yet critically maligned series. “The Defenders” is averaging about 11 million viewers each week in its 10 p.m. time slot, besting NBC’s “Law and Order: Los Angeles,” according to the latest Nielsen ratings. While the show has received some bad press, criticizing it as contrived or uninteresting,

When: 10 p.m. Wednesdays Where: CBS

McClatchy Tribune News Service

Jim Belushi, left, stars as Nick Morelli, and Jerry O’Connell stars as Pete Kaczmarek in the CBS drama “The Defenders.” Belushi is upfront that he’d much rather be popular than critically acclaimed. “In TV, when you get great reviews, it’s a ... death knell,” Belushi said, quickly pointing to Fox’s critical darling “Lone Star,” canceled after only two airings. “To have 11 million people watch your show when there’s 85 critics writing about you. It’s like, ‘Guys, sorry. I love you, I love how hard you work, but it doesn’t matter,’ ” he said. “I’m not looking for you guys’ approval; I’m looking for 11 million (viewers’) approval.” Belushi’s Morelli co-heads a

flashy, if slightly bottom-feeding, Vegas law firm with brash, young partner Pete Kaczmarek, played by Jerry O’Connell. Belushi’s character is a shark with a velvet touch; a wry-smiling, smooth-operating defense attorney who wears his blue-collar background and simple values as well as he wears his fine Italian suits. Belushi said he spent time with the Vegas legal team the show is based on, as well as in real courtrooms. Attorney Michael Cristalli, half of the real-life Las Vegas defense team the show is based on, and

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

www.educate.com

541-706-6900

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

Featured Business of the Week: lunch dinner tasty

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Self Referrals Welcome

541-389-9252

the model for Belushi’s character, said he was excited with Belushi’s portrayal. He and law partner Marc Saggese are frequently on the show set, giving advice to producers and actors. “He’s done such an incredible job and I’m thrilled,” Cristalli said of Belushi. “He is the leading force behind the success of the show.” “The guy I’m playing has got great bedside manners and is very charming,” Belushi said. “From his point of view, your whole job is to win the jury. So everything is a performance.” This incarnation of “The Defenders” changes course from the high-minded, yet controversial 1960s series of the same name, starring E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed as a crusading fatherson legal team fighting to right legal wrongs. Morelli and Kaczmarek, aided by their associate (Jurnee Smollett, “Friday Night Lights”), also fight the good fight for their clients, but the lighthearted tone of the show is much more “Boston Legal” than “Perry Mason.” Belushi said the transition from a family sitcom to a drama wasn’t difficult, considering his work in Michael Mann’s “Thief” and, more recently, his role in Roman Polanski’s “The Ghost Writer.” “I’ve always considered myself an actor, and as an actor, I look at it as a plumber,” he said. “I can go in a small house and fix the sink, or I can go in a massive commercial site and lay all kinds of pipes. To me, it’s just a different venue, that’s all.”

541-322-CARE

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

2754 northwest crossing drive 541 385 1777 • portellowinecafe.com

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

SATURDAY PRIME TIME 11/6/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

6:00

6:30

College Football Arizona at Stanford Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å News Nightly News The Unit Dedication ’ ‘PG’ Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News College Football Arizona at Stanford NUMB3RS Card counters. ‘PG’ Å Bones Serial killer strikes. ‘14’ Å Old Christine Old Christine PDXposed ‘G’ Green Econ. This Old House The Lawrence Welk Show ‘G’ Last of the Wine News News Nightly News Straight Talk ›› “The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi. Å Am. Woodshop Yankee Shop Woodsmith Shop Amer. Woodshop This Old House The Lawrence Welk Show ‘G’ Last of the Wine

7:00 Jeopardy! ‘G’ Old Christine

7:30 Wheel of Fortune Old Christine

Criminal Minds Ashes and Dust ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Travels-Edge Steves Europe Inside Edition Grants Getaways That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Yankee Shop Am. Woodshop Travels-Edge Steves Europe

8:00

8:30

Paid Program Outlaw In Re: Kelvin Jones (N) ‘14’ NCIS Jack Knife ’ ‘PG’ Å College Football Cops (N) ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Å Da Vinci’s Inquest ‘14’ Å Globe Trekker The Balkans ’ ‘G’ Outlaw In Re: Kelvin Jones (N) ‘14’ House The Jerk ’ ‘14’ Å Yankee Shop Yankee Shop Globe Trekker The Balkans ’ ‘G’

9:00

9:30

Comedy.TV ’ ‘14’ Å Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ The Defenders ’ ‘14’ Å Entourage ‘MA’ Curb Enthusiasm America’s Most Wanted NUMB3RS Card counters. ‘PG’ Å As Time Goes By Ladies of Letters Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ House Human Error ’ ‘14’ Å Am. Woodshop Woodsmith Shop As Time Goes By Ladies of Letters

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 48 Hours Mystery (N) ’ Å The Closer Mom Duty ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 Two/Half Men NUMB3RS In Plain Sight ‘PG’ Å New Tricks Riverboat disaster. Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit House of Payne House of Payne Woodturning Yankee Shop New Tricks Riverboat disaster. Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 Comedy.TV ‘14’ News Sat. Night Live News (11:35) Cold Case College Football Ugly Betty ‘PG’ Fringe The Plateau ‘14’ Å South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ Å News Sat. Night Live Stargate Universe Time ‘PG’ Å Am. Woodshop Yankee Shop Song of the Mountains ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter 130 28 8 32 Bounty Hunter (4:30) ››› “Superman Returns” (2006, Adventure) Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth, James Marsden. The Man of Steel faces an ›› “Jeepers Creepers” (2001, Horror) Gina Philips, Justin Long, Jonathan Breck. A ›› “Jeepers Creepers 2” (2003, Horror) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck, Garikayi Mutam102 40 39 old enemy. Å flesh-eating entity pursues sibling college students. Å birwa. A winged creature terrorizes stranded high schoolers. Shark Feeding Frenzy ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 Meet the Komondor. ‘PG’ Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) ’ ‘PG’ Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Crocodile Feeding Frenzy ‘14’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Kathy Griffin:... on Crutches ‘14’ ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell. Three co-workers unite to help their buddy get a sex life. ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” 137 44 ››› “Rocky II” (1979) Sylvester Stallone. Underdog Philly fighter gets another shot at heavyweight champ. ››› “Rocky III” (1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T. Premiere. ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›››› “Unforgiven” (1992) Clint Eastwood, Gene Hackman. ’ The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part American Greed The Suze Orman Show Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part NO DIETS! Zumba Body 51 36 40 52 American Greed Larry King Live ‘PG’ Charlie Sheen Newsroom Easy Prey Larry King Live ‘PG’ Newsroom Easy Prey 52 38 35 48 Easy Prey (N) ›› “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle” (2004) John Cho. Å ›› “Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” (2008) Kal Penn. (11:15) › “Strange Wilderness” 135 53 135 47 ››› “Napoleon Dynamite” (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries. Å High Desert Paid Program Get Outdoors Visions of NW Joy of Fishing Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Bend on the Run Ride Guide ‘14’ City Edition 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 98 11 American Perspectives Wizards-Place Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Suite/Deck “Camp Rock 2: The Final Jam” (2010) Demi Lovato, Kevin Jonas. ‘G’ Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Meth Nation ’ ‘14’ Å Cocaine Nation ’ ‘14’ Å Unusual Suspects Cold-Blooded ‘14’ Double Life ’ ‘PG’ Å I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ Unusual Suspects Cold-Blooded ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 American Loggers ’ ‘PG’ Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å College Football Final (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) College Football Arkansas at South Carolina (Live) College Football Scoreboard Å NBA Tonight NASCAR Racing College Football 22 24 21 24 College Football Texas at Kansas State (Live) Boxing: 2007 Peter vs. Toney Boxing: 2007 Rivera vs. Simms 2004 World Series of Poker Å 2004 World Series of Poker Å 2004 World Series of Poker Seven-card stud, from Las Vegas. Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 2002 Diaz vs. Margarito ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “Back to the Future Part II” (1989, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. Å ››› “Back to the Future Part III” (1990, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. Å ››› “Dirty Dancing” (1987) Å 67 29 19 41 (3:30) ››› “Back to the Future” Campaign ’08: Fight to the Finish Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Red Eye Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Campaign 2010: Fight to the Finish 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Bobby Flay Food Feuds Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America 177 62 46 44 Iron Chef America College Football Arizona State at USC (Live) Seahawks Pac-10 Hoops 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) College Football Oklahoma at Texas A&M (Live) ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Always Sunny Always Sunny ›› “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. 131 Color Splash: Mi Designed to Sell Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Divine Design ‘G’ Color Splash: Mi Dear Genevieve Curb/Block House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Marijuana: A Chronic History ‘PG’ Å The True Story of Killing Pablo ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 ’70s Fever ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” (2005) Amber Tamblyn. ›› “Never Been Kissed” (1999) Drew Barrymore, David Arquette. Å The Fairy Jobmother ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 ››› “Akeelah and the Bee” (2006, Drama) Laurence Fishburne. Å Lockup Inside San Quentin Lockup: Raw Doomed Decisions (N) Lockup Folsom State Prison. Lockup Return to Valley State Lockup Utah State Prison Lockup Inside Anamosa 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Pendleton 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Freedom Writers” (2007, Drama) Hilary Swank, Patrick Dempsey, Scott Glenn. ’ World of Jenks Pranked ’ ‘14’ Megadrive ’ 192 22 38 57 Teen Mom Check Up With Dr. Drew Dr. Drew checks in. ’ ‘PG’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly iCook ‘G’ iCarly iPie ’ ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å True Jackson, VP George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob (7:06) ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985) Sylvester Stallone. ’ (9:08) ›› “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. ’ (11:10) ››› “First Blood” (1982) 132 31 34 46 (5:04) ››› “First Blood” (1982) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ’ › “The Reaping” (2007, Horror) Hilary Swank, David Morrissey. Å “Messengers 2: The Scarecrow” (2009) Norman Reedus. Premiere. Å “Hallowed Ground” (2007, Horror) 133 35 133 45 “Children of the Corn” (2009) Kandyse McClure, David Anders. ‘MA’ Å (2:00) Praise-A-Thon Biannual fundraising event. Praise-A-Thon Biannual fundraising event. 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels. Å ›› “Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels. 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Mutiny on the Bounty” (1962, Adventure) Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard, Richard Harris. Fletcher Christian and the crew (8:15) ›› “Pagan Love Song” (1950, Musical) Esther Williams, (9:45) ›› “The Tuttles of Tahiti” (1942, Comedy) Charles Laughton, Jon Hall, Peggy ››› “The Hur101 44 101 29 dump Captain Bligh. Å Howard Keel, Rita Moreno. Å Drake. A fun-loving family lives a charmed life on a small island. ricane” (1937) LA Ink Kat in Wonderland ‘PG’ Å Strange Sex ‘14’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘14’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ’ ‘MA’ Å Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘14’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ 178 34 32 34 LA Ink Kat Minus Sixx ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Kill Bill: Vol. 1” (2003, Action) Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu. Å (9:15) ››› “Kill Bill: Vol. 2” (2004) Uma Thurman. An assassin confronts her former boss and his gang. Å 17 26 15 27 (4:30) ›› “Shooter” (2007) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Peña. Å Codename: Kid Codename: Kids Adventure Time Total Drama Total Drama Scooby-Doo ›› “Flubber” (1997, Comedy) Robin Williams, Marcia Gay Harden. King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ 84 Extreme Pools ‘G’ Å Extreme Resorts ‘G’ Å Most Terrifying Places in America 3 Most Terrifying Places in America 4 Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Å Ghost Stories Ghost Stories 179 51 45 42 Extreme Terror Rides ‘G’ Å Andy Griffith (6:13) The Andy Griffith Show ‘G’ Andy Griffith Andy Griffith (7:56) M*A*S*H (8:27) M*A*S*H Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith ›› “Bad Boys II” (2003) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. Å ›› “Street Kings” (2008, Crime Drama) Keanu Reeves, Forest Whitaker. Premiere. Å House Help Me ’ ‘14’ Å 15 30 23 30 (3:00) Bad Boys Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Entourage ‘MA’ (7:35) Entourage (8:10) Entourage (8:45) Entourage (9:15) Entourage (9:45) Entourage ’ ‘MA’ Å (10:20) Entourage (10:55) Entourage Dickie Roberts 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:10) ››› “G.I. Jane” 1997 Demi Moore. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ›› “Bedtime Stories” 2008 Adam Sandler. ‘PG’ ››› “Casino” 1995 Robert De Niro. A mob employee makes a play for power in 1970s Las Vegas. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “The Rookie” 2002 ‘G’ Å ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Vanishing” 1993, Suspense Jeff Bridges, Nancy Travis. ‘R’ Å ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Vanishing” 1993 ‘R’ Å Bowl B Q Vert Challenge Insane Cinema: The Arena Insane Cinema Cubed ‘14’ Bowl B Q Vert Challenge Insane Cinema: The Arena Insane Cinema Cubed ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf European PGA Tour Golf HSBC Champions, Final Round (Live) European PGA Tour Golf HSBC Champions, Final Round (Live) “Class” (2010, Drama) Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Justin Bruening. ‘PG’ Å “An Old Fashioned Thanksgiving” (2008) Jacqueline Bisset. ‘PG’ Å ›› “A Family Thanksgiving” (2010) Daphne Zuniga. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å ›› “A Family Thanksgiving” ‘PG’ Boardwalk Empire Margaret and Van (10:45) 24/7 Pac- (11:15) Boxing Zab Judah vs. Lucas Mat›› “The Box” 2009, Horror Cameron Diaz, James Marsden. A mysterious gift bestows ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington, Voice of Zoe Saldana. Premiere. A former Marine HBO 425 501 425 10 Alden undermine Nucky. ‘MA’ Å riches and death at the same time. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å quiao/Margarito thysse, Junior Welterweights ’ ››› “Grindhouse Presents: Planet Terror” 2007 ‘R’ (8:45) ››› “Grindhouse Presents: Death Proof” 2007 Kurt Russell. ‘NR’ (10:45) ›› “City of Ghosts” 2002 Another Day ›› “City of Ghosts” 2002, Crime Drama Matt Dillon, James Caan. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ›› “A Perfect Getaway” 2009, Suspense Steve Zahn. Honey- (6:40) ››› “Beverly Hills Cop” 1984, Comedy-Drama Eddie Murphy. A Detroit cop ›› “The Time Traveler’s Wife” 2009 Rachel McAdams. A time-traveler keeps moving › “Bride Wars” 2009 Kate Hudson. Weddings scheduled the MAX 400 508 7 mooning hikers find terror in paradise. ’ ‘R’ Å goes west to avenge his friend’s death. ’ ‘R’ Å same day turn best friends into enemies. ‘PG’ in and out of the life of his true love. ‘PG-13’ Å Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Border Wars A raid in Puerto Rico. Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Border Wars A raid in Puerto Rico. Explorer DEA sting operation. ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard Back, Barnyard Planet Sheen ‘Y7’ T.U.F.F. Puppy SpongeBob SpongeBob Tigre: Rivera Tigre: Rivera Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Glenn Martin Jimmy Neutron The Secret Show The Secret Show NTOON 89 115 189 Tracks, Africa The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Lethal Wild and Raw Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Best of West OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Transporter 3” 2008, Action Jason Statham, Natalya Rudakova. iTV. Frank Martin Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Big C An un- Weeds Viking Pride Jamie Kennedy: Uncomfortable (iTV) Boxing Juan Manuel Lopez vs. Rafael Marquez (iTV) Lopez battles Marquez for the SHO 500 500 becomes involved with a Ukrainian woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ usual lunch. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å WBO featherweight title. From Las Vegas. World of Outlaws Charlotte From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (Live) World of Outlaws Charlotte From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. SPEED 35 303 125 (2:50) ›› 2012 (5:35) ›› “The Crazies” 2010, Horror Timothy Olyphant. ‘R’ (7:20) ››› “Up” 2009 Voices of Ed Asner. ‘PG’ ››› “The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus” 2009 Heath Ledger. (11:05) ›› “2012” 2009 ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 (3:55) › “Gigantic” (5:35) Battle of the High School Musicals: Guys ’n’ Divas (7:10) › “The Spirit” 2008, Action Gabriel Macht, Samuel L. Jackson. A rookie cop, “Maneater” 2009 Sarah Chalke. A 32-year-old Hollywood social- (10:35) “Dismal” 2009 Bill Oberst Jr. A deranged cannibal terrorTMC 525 525 2008 ’ ‘R’ believed to be dead, fights crime in Central City. ’ ‘PG-13’ ’ ‘PG’ Å ite hatches a plan to snare a filmmaker. ‘NR’ izes students trekking through a swamp. ‘R’ (4:00) College Football Oregon State at UCLA (Live) The T.Ocho Show UFL Football Sacarmento Mountain Lions at Las Vegas Locomotives (Live) Whacked Out Whacked Out VS. 27 58 30 (3:30) ›› “Where the Heart Is” Downsized Down But Not Out ‘PG’ (7:02) The Locator (N) ‘14’ Å Downsized Down But Not Out ‘PG’ The Locator Desperate Mothers ‘14’ ››› “The First Wives Club” 1996, Comedy Goldie Hawn. ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with biscuits and gravy, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 810 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. LORD’S ACRE DAY: The 64th annual event features a sale of crafts, baked goods and novelties, live music, a barbecue dinner, an auction, 10K run, 5K walk and more; proceeds benefit Powell Butte Christian Church projects; free admission, $7 barbecue, $15-$27 to race; 7:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. events; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541-548-3066 or www.powellbuttechurch.com. INFORMED FAMILY FAIR: Learn about resources and products for family welfare and child safety and development; proceeds benefit local nonprofits; $3, $6 for family; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Kiddoz Inc. Indoor Play Center, 222 S.E. Reed Market Road, #100, Bend; 541-312-4742 or kiddoz@bendbroadband.com. WILDFIRE POTTERY SHOWCASE: The Clay Guild of the Cascades hosts an event of continuous ceramic demonstrations, potter booths with pieces for sale and more; donations benefit Arts Central and food collections benefit NeighborImpact; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-3403 or www.clayguildofthecascades.com. THE NATURE OF WORDS: Featuring a lecture by David Whyte; $35; 11:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541647-2233, info@thenatureofwords. org or www.thenatureofwords.org. HOEDOWN FOR HUNGER: Featuring live Americana, folk and bluegrass music, a chili feed and more; donations of survival gear requested; proceeds benefit the center’s Feed the Hungry program; $10, $5 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; noon10 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. MOM AND KID ITEM SWAP: Pick out used clothing, toys and household items; free; 1-3 p.m.; The Jireh Project, 2330 N.E. Division St., Suite 1, Bend; 541-678-5669. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Saralee Lawrence talks about her book “River House”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. THE NATURE OF WORDS: Featuring a wine reception, author dinner and author readings on “The Sacred and the Profane”; with keynote speaker Sam Waterston; $70 or $100; 5:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-6472233, info@thenatureofwords.org or www.thenatureofwords.org. BETHLEHEM INN BEER DINNER: A five-course gourmet dinner prepared by local chefs; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; $80; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-385-8606. GREEN AND GOLD GALA: Fourth annual event features dinner, dancing and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit Sisters Elementary School; $25; 6 p.m.; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-948-9722. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Robin Cody talks about “Another Way the River Has”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS COMEDY BENEFIT: Comedy event featuring Darren Capozzi and Jodi Miller; with food and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon; $100; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. BRYON FRIEDMAN: The soulful singer-songwriter performs, with Franchot Tone and Justin Lavik; free;

7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins. com. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Redmond High School drama department presents four student-directed comedies; $4; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY FALL CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a fall concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring piano soloist Robert Thies; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com. GREAT AMERICAN TAXI: The Boulder, Colo.-based Americana musicians perform; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. THE NEW UP: The San Franciscobased psych indie rock band play; free admission; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

SUNDAY WILDFIRE POTTERY SHOWCASE: The Clay Guild of the Cascades hosts an event of continuous ceramic demonstrations, potter booths with pieces for sale and more; donations benefit Arts Central and food collections benefit NeighborImpact; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-3403 or www.clayguildofthecascades.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Paulann Petersen reads from her works; followed by an open mic; free; 11 a.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. THE NATURE OF WORDS: Featuring a reading by Paulann Petersen, followed by an open mic; free; 11 a.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-647-2233, info@thenatureofwords. org or www. thenatureofwords.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-4475451. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY FALL CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a fall concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring piano soloist Robert Thies; free but a ticket is required; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941 or www. cosymphony.com. STAR TREK LIVE: Help Capt. Kirk and Mr. Spock fend off aliens and discover how science, technology and imagination can save the world; $20, $14 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. THE BELLS OF SUNRIVER IN CONCERT: Concert featuring The Bells of Sunriver play songs from the movies; free; 3 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-1635.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

5677. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY FALL CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a fall concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring piano soloist Robert Thies; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com.

TUESDAY “EAT, DRINK & BE DEADLY”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.bendticket.com. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Ashland-based indie-folk trio Kites and Crows perform; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; 541-306-0048. BODY VOX-2: The Portland-based dance ensemble performs; $20 or $25; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. KELLI SCARR: The New York-based indie-folk musician performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; with a discussion with the director; free; 3-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541383-7412. “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; with a discussion with the director; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, BORIS GODUNOV”: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in an encore presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. “BUTTE BAGGIN’ II”: A screening of the ski film featuring descents on local mountains; free; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 919-389-1088. 18 SWITCHBACKS: The Coloradobased Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. BUILT TO SPILL: The Boise, Idahobased indie band performs, with Fauxbois; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. ROGER CLYNE AND THE PEACEMAKERS: The Phoenix-based Americana-rock act performs; ages 21 and older; $15; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

MONDAY THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; November’s theme is “Dinnertime!: Stories About Thanksgiving”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-

THURSDAY BEND VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade includes marching bands, floats, military vehicles, a flyover and more; free for spectators; 11 a.m.; downtown Bend; 541-480-4516.

VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade honoring veterans; free; Downtown Redmond, Sixth Street between Dogwood and Forest avenues; downtown Redmond. VFW OPEN HOUSE: Meet military service members and veterans in honor of Veterans Day; free; noon-6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. A SIMON & GARFUNKEL RETROSPECTIVE: AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle perform both classic and obscure songs from the band; $23-$37; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

FRIDAY GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-3094088. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Jurassic Park” by Michael Crichton; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. POETRY REVIVAL : Poets Buddy Wakefield, Anis Mojgani and Derrick Brown join together for an evening of visceral spoken word performances; presented by the Deschutes Public Library and the Cascades Theatrical Company; free admission; 6 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3121032. CENTRAL OREGON HOMEGROWN MUSIC REVIEW: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta, Shireen Amini, Tim Coffey, Dennis McGregor, Brent Alan and Erin Cole-Baker; proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon; $12; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “A FISH CALLED WANDA”: A screening of the 1988 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an electric rock ’n’ roll set, with Tuck and Roll; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.randompresents. com. BEAD AND GEMSTONE SHOW: Thousands of beads and gemstones will be on display and available for purchase; free; 10-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600.

SATURDAY Nov. 13 INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN/ WALK: Run 5K or walk one mile in honor of the Marine Corps; race begins outside city hall; registration required; proceeds benefit Disabled American Veterans’ Portland shuttle van; $22 with a shirt, $16 without; $21 with shirt or $14 without before Nov. 1; 9 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-383-8061, chandler@bendcable.com or www. vetsdayrun.homestead.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in a presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347.

M T REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CONVICTION (R) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:20, 6:20, 9:15 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 4:40, 6:55, 9:05 NEVER LET ME GO (R) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:35, 9:10 NOWHERE BOY (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 6:50, 9:20 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) Noon, 2:40, 6:25, 9

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DUE DATE (R) 11:40 a.m., 12:25, 2, 2:40, 4:25, 5:15, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:05 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 12:50,

4:15, 7:15, 10:15 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:05, 4:40, 7:55 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:10 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) Noon, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 12:30, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 12:15, 1:45, 2:30, 4, 5:05, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 9:50 MEGAMIND (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:50, 10:10 RED (PG-13) 1, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 SAW 3-D (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8, 10:20 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 12:40, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DESPICABLE ME (PG) 1 INCEPTION (PG-13) 9 EDITOR’S NOTE: The Oregon State University football game will screen at 4 p.m. today (doors open at 3 p.m.).

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? G o to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

DUE DATE (R) 10:15 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 SAW VII (R) 11 a.m., 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 SECRETARIAT (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:45

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DUE DATE (R) 3, 5:30, 8 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 2:15, 5 MEGAMIND (PG) 3, 5:15, 7:30 RED (PG-13) 7:45 WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” (PG) 2:45, 5:15, 7:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SECRETARIAT (PG) 1, 4, 7

Weird Al inspires nerds of a feather By Deborah Sengupta Stith Cox Newspapers

AUSTIN, Texas — Like most members of the early-MTV generation, I took in Weird Al Yankovic’s seminal hits with prepubescent glee. Though “Video Killed the Radio Star,” pop parodies like “Eat It” and “Like a Surgeon” skillfully skewered the masters of the newly visual music industry with a combination of clever wordplay and goofy sight gags. As an 11year-old, I thought it was great. But as I grew up, Yankovic fell off my radar completely even as he continued to churn out a steady string of successful albums. Then one day in 2006, my husband e-mailed me a YouTube clip of “White and Nerdy,” Yankovic’s hysterical take on Houston rapper Chamillionaire’s hit “Ridin’.” The video, which features an eager plaid-clad, Segway-riding Al shunned by thugs even as he copiously cops “Star Wars” bootlegs, was a spot-on sendup of the suburbanization of a gangsta aesthetic. When I went home for the holidays that year, my 12-yearold nieces (who happen to be black) were walking around singing “Can’t you see I’m White and Nerdy.” Twenty years later, Weird Al was still in the mix. I caught up with Yankovic via telephone from LA for a very nerdy conversation about the life of a new-millennium parodist. As someone who was around before the computer revolution, did you anticipate the revenge of the nerds? I knew that some day we would have our say. All those times at recess getting beat up I knew that someday I would have my revenge. (laughs) I think that I’m very pleasantly surprised by how much cred the whole nerd culture has gotten in the last decade or so. It definitely feels like being called a nerd is not an insult anymore, it’s a badge of honor. I think there’s been a lot of nerd empowerment, and people have kind of woken up to the fact

Q: A:

that nerds rule the world now. It’s nice to be a bit of a spokesperson for that culture. Are you the unsung godfather of nerdcore rap? People have said that. I’ve been doing what you’d consider nerdcore for many years. I think “It’s All About the Pentiums” came out in ’99 and that was, if not the first, certainly one of the earliest nerdcore songs. I guess I would be an early adopter of the nerdcore genre. It seems like if ever there were an artist made for YouTube, it would be you. Has that medium helped you reach new fans? It has. I try to embrace whatever technology comes around, and certainly YouTube has been great in getting exposure for my material. I mean, “White and Nerdy,” it’s hard to quantify how many hits that’s gotten on the Internet, but conservatively we figure it’s been seen 100 million times. YouTube has also, in some ways, been the bane of my existence because now there are tens of thousands of people doing funny song parodies and I’m certainly never again gonna be the only person doing a parody of any particular song. So it’s a challenge for me to step up my game and figure, if I can’t be the first or the only person doing a parody of a song I can still strive to be the best. Popeater.com named you as one of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s most egregious snubs this year. Have you been feeling snubbed? I’m extremely flattered that the fans care enough to put the effort into that movement. I don’t know that I can say I feel snubbed, but let me tell you, if some other accordion playing, rock ’n’ roll parody artist gets into the Hall of Fame before I do, I will feel snubbed. But I kind of feel that the Hall probably doesn’t have enough of a sense of humor to put somebody like me in their pantheon, but certainly, if they ever do I would be incredibly honored.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

Lil Wayne emerges from NYC jail after 8 months The Associated Press

Miami, where they’re planning a NEW YORK — Lil Wayne was welcome-home party Sunday. freed from jail Thursday after Lil Wayne, who had the bestserving eight months in a gun selling album of 2008 and won a case, emerging with a best rap album Gramhot new album, wellmy with “Tha Carter wishes from a former III,” kept his career in president and a deephigh gear while locked ened appreciation for up for having a loaded his fans. gun on his tour bus in “Welcome home, 2007. Weezy!” the rap star’s He started a yearlong Facebook page prosentence in March but claimed, using one of Lil Wayne got time off for good behis nicknames, after his havior, despite a discimorning release from plinary knock that sent the Rikers Island jail complex. him to solitary for the last month He was freed at a location jail of- of his term. A charger and headficials and his lawyer wouldn’t phones for a digital music player disclose. were found in his cell in May, jail His managers have said he officials said. The items are conplanned to head for his home in sidered contraband.


B4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010: This year, you often project someone very different from the authentic you. This disparity can cause a problem sometimes. Allow a merger of image and personality. Your strong intuition will point you in the right direction. Verbalize your thoughts and feelings more often. If you are single, you could have one stunning love affair or a series of whirlwind relationships — enjoy. If you are attached, there could be a new addition to your family, if you are at the right point in your life. The two of you will enjoy yourselves more and more together. SAGITTARIUS sees financial issues far differently. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You demand greater giveand-take within a relationship. Your ability to understand and integrate your feelings helps you express your needs within a relationship. Listen well, and you could be shocked by what you hear. Tonight: Let plans revolve around your sweetie. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You can be a stubborn Bull. Nevertheless, it is appropriate to back off some and allow others to make the decisions. Friends provide an endless source of fun and happiness. If you are single, a friendship could be developing into more. Tonight: Go along with another’s plans.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You might not be able to postpone a project or decision any longer. Just take the big plunge. You might feel a bit overwhelmed. Trust yourself to finish what must be done. Invite a friend or relative over. Tonight: Easy does it. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH If you are single, you could find yourself suddenly entangled in a new relationship. Others find a new beginning. Your creativity surges, encouraging solutions with an innate easiness. A child might need extra time. Tonight: A good old-fashioned date. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Recognize the importance of staying close to home. You might not feel comfortable with a present situation. Indulging a difficult friend or loved one might not be the answer. Tonight: Dinner at your pad. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Express yourself without too much reserve. Others are more receptive than they have been in a long time. You could be surprised by what a partner or several friends reveal. Resolve to keep communication open. Tonight: Visit with a friend, flirt with a new acquaintance or just chat with a loved one. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Be careful — in your effort to make someone feel comfortable and cared about, you could go overboard. The problem lies in the cost of this behavior. Try less-expensive indulgences. Offer a back massage or help this person with a project.

Tonight: Stick to your budget. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH If you act like you feel, you could be unstoppable. You might be confused by a domestic matter. Don’t linger on this issue for too long. Let go, and choose to join a loved one at a movie or do some other favored pastime. Tonight: Just wish upon a star. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Make it OK to be by yourself, whether it is by choice or not. You might need to review a recent event or exchange. The unexpected occurs with family or your home. Communication soars. Tonight: Make it easy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH A friendship remains a high priority. Make plans to meet this person today or as soon as you can. You hear news that might surprise you. Adapt and work with it. A positive attitude goes far. Tonight: Use care when handling money. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might have tight plans, but an older relative’s or respected friend’s or associate’s request could toss them in the air. You like structure and sometimes might have difficulty with scenarios like this. Relax. You can do it. Tonight: Out and about. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Take off for a day trip or another form of escape. You need to recharge your batteries, and the more different the setting, the better off you will be. Give up worrying and overthinking. Tonight: Try a new spot with music. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

B6 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Buckaroo Continued from B1 Miller’s family ties to buckarooing date back to his great-grandfather, who settled in Harney County and had seven kids. “My grandparents homesteaded in Catlow Valley” in Harney County, around the same time “cattle king” Peter French, a 19th-century rancher, moved into Eastern Oregon. His grandparents, who in turn had seven kids themselves, ran the Rock Creek Ranch. His father bought a ranch of his own and eventually took over the family ranch at Rock Creek, combining the two, says Miller, who eventually moved to Sisters and then Tumalo, where he lives on 10 acres with his wife and their 11year-old son. About five years ago, the Millers and some friends started a business, Vaquero Ranch and Cattle Co., situated on a ranch south of Prineville Reservoir that now has about 60 cows. “It’s much smaller than where I was raised. … We’re trying to raise organic beef,” he says. “We’ve been selling some, but we haven’t really marketed it formally yet.” The word “buckaroo” is derived from “vaquero,” the Spanish word for “cowboy.” “Vaqueros came from California when Pete French and all these big ranches came up from California, and they brought this style that a lot of ranchers in Eastern Oregon, Nevada, Idaho and Utah have adopted. It’s a style. They have their own look. But more than that, it’s a much calmer way of handling livestock. I think that’s the value my family saw in what the vaqueros brought from California: how they handled their stock. “Not only that, but they weren’t afraid to do other work. Some guys that hire onto ranches, they’re pretty job-specific. We ask them to go out of their job description and do something (else), they don’t want to do it.” Whatever they did with cows was called “buckarooing,” he added. “He worked on a ranch. He had his own ranch, and he did everything that the ranch asked him to do.” On any given day, a buckaroo might mend a fence, make reins and rope from braided horsehair, or herd cows. “We grew up, we had to do everything. We had to hay. We had to build fence.” And they had to move cows, he says, only “we didn’t call it ‘moving cows.’ “Dad said, ‘Well, we’re gonna buckaroo today.’ ”

Making the book: an ambitious project Buckarooing has seen something of a resurgence, with roping competitions and more helping to bring back some of the traditions in California, Miller says. “It’s good, because the way they handle their stock and their horses is calmer, more gentle.” At the same time, that style, when it comes to the kind of ranching that he grew up with, “is going by the wayside.” Which makes “Vaquero/Buckaroo” all the more poignant as both book and piece of art. If a vaquero needed a saddle, he had one custom-made instead of buying one, instead of buying a one-size-fits-all saddle.

What is a vaquero/buckaroo? “Vaqueros came from California when ... all these big ranches came up from California, and they brought this style that a lot of ranchers in Eastern Oregon, Nevada, Idaho and Utah have adopted. It’s a style. They have their own look. But more than that, it’s a much calmer way of handling livestock. I think that’s the value my family saw in what the vaqueros brought from California: how they handled their stock Not only that, but they weren’t afraid to do other work.” — Ron Miller Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ron Miller tends to Wasabi, his wife’s horse, at their Tumalo home. Miller’s family and its ties date back several generations to Harney County, where they embraced buckaroo traditions.

Submitted photo

In front of his barn, Ron Miller stands behind, from left, Pat Clark, his wife, Nye Miller, and Sandy Anderson as they play with the Millers’ dog Buzz.

Submitted photo

Sandy Anderson, who wrote an article about “buckarooing” for High Desert Journal, watches as Atelier 6000’s Pat Clark inks a plate for “Vaquero/Buckaroo” at the Bend printmaking studio.

“I was kind of enthralled by the whole history and idea of (buckaroos). ... I thought, ‘Well, it’s such a nice vignette of culture, it would make a wonderful original book.’” — Pat Clark, owner of Atelier 6000 The philosophy of the buckaroo allows for a slower, more methodical way of doing things, not altogether unlike the way “Vaquero/Buckaroo” is being made. The book is the most ambitious project Atelier 6000 has yet tackled since opening. It will include 32 original print illustrations ranging in size from 3-by-3 inches to 10-by-16. Handmaking the book is a loving, time-consuming process somewhat akin to buckarooing. The collaborative effort also includes illustrations by A6’s Clark and Danae Bennett-Miller, archi-

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

tectural drawings and maps by David Anderson, typography by Thomas Osborne. Ezma Hanschka of Night Owl Press is handling letterpress printing. The book, once complete, will sell for $350. The price will go up to $475 after Jan. 15. Each of the 75 copies will be hand-signed and numbered. It’s been more than six months in the making, says Clark. “Vaquero/Buckaroo” will reflect the buckaroo lifestyle in look and feel; the pace at which it is being made certainly suits buckaroo Miller. “They are right in there with

the old-fashioned way, that’s for sure,” he says. “They’re doing it by hand, and they’re putting in tons and tons of hours. I just hope people will see the value in all the hard work they’ve done.” “(Buckaroos) did things slower,” Miller adds. “There’s an old saying, ‘If you go slow, you get there faster.’ We live in an impatient world, and that philosophy doesn’t seem to work very much for any kind of businesses anymore.”

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ron Miller rides horseback on his 10-acre ranch in Tumalo. Miller also co-owns a ranch near Prineville Reservoir that will raise organic beef.

David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com. Treating all Foot Conditions

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

www.optimafootandankle.com

s Turf, Inc.

SERY ” R U ro w n N c a ll y g

M

Every Friday

541.383.3668

cPh

o

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

541-546-9081 2019 SW Park Lane • Culver

Bend | Redmond | Prineville

Light Up A Life 2010 December 2, 2010 ~ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Partners In Care ~ Bend in keeping with the spirit of hospice, we welcome all traditions and beliefs Music provided by: Youth Choir of Central Oregon Keepsake ornament is available for $20. Proceeds go to support Partners In Care programs not covered by Medicare (Transitions, Children’s Grief Camp, Bereavement Services). For more info. call Partners In Care 541.382.5882.

HOSPICE HOME HEALTH

SERVING CENTRAL OREGON 24 HOURS EVERYDAY

HOSPICE HOUSE

2075 NE WYATT CT. | BEND | 541.382.5882

TRANSITIONS

www.partnersbend.org


L

C

Inside

OREGON Historic Timberline carving gets replacement, see Page C2. BUSINESS U.S. mulls subsidies for developing antibiotics, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010

Parties may seek recounts in 2 races With Senate’s balance of power at stake, ballot-counting scrutinized in Districts 3, 20 By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — Three days after the election, two state Senate races remained unresolved Friday. Recounts are considered likely, and an election complaint by Senate Republicans is possible. Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, who is leading the Senate Republicans’ factfinding efforts, said he had received a variety of conflicting numbers from election officials, particularly in the Senate District 3 race between Sen. Alan Bates,

D-Ashland, and Republican challenger Dave Dotterer, in which the Democrat held a narrow lead Friday. “I think we’re going to go to court, and I think there’s going to be a recount,” Boquist said, citing a number of alleged discrepancies. The lack of clarity regarding the state Senate’s balance of power is especially significant in light of the outcome in the state House of Representatives, which appears to have split 30-30 between parties. A majority in the Senate would give

Democrats more power over what bills survive the Legislature and go to the governor to be signed into law. Questions also exist in Senate District 20, where Sen. Martha Schrader, D-Canby, appeared to be narrowly trailing Republican challenger Alan Olsen in a race that Democrats did not expect to lose. Molly Woon, a spokeswoman for the Senate Democrats, said her party was likely to request a recount in that race. Ross Day, a lawyer for the Oregon Republican Party, said that while a recount was possible, he hadn’t seen any evi-

ELECTION

dence of election fraud. “It seems to me that a lot of people are wondering why it takes so long to count ballots, and I think that’s when people’s imaginations start to run wild,” he said. “I think it just takes a while to count ballots.” Steve Trout, elections director for the Secretary of State’s Office, said he did not share the concerns that some Senate Republicans had voiced. He said “numbers are moving” in many races because it’s normal that ballots trickle in late — either because they were mailed too late, in which case they won’t be counted, or because a voter dropped a ballot off in another county on Election Day and the ballot is en route to the voter’s home county for signature verification. See Senate / C7

S. Century Dr.

Des chu tes

S. Century Dr.

rt Rd. Vanderve

97

42

Littl eD esc hu tes Riv er

Delineation of marshy areas in south Deschutes County clears picture on development, impact

Riv er

Putting wetlands on the map La Pine State Park

Study area Wetlands found

By Hillary Borrud

Map source: Deschutes County

A consultant working for Deschutes County recently completed a survey of wetlands in the southern portion of the county. A draft report and maps were posted on the county website earlier this week.

r ive Deschutes R

DESCHUTES NATION AL FOREST

McK ay Bu tte

Rd.

Huntin gton R d.

A new inventory of wetlands in south Deschutes County gives property owners a better picture of where they can develop without impacting the marshy areas, and could help protect and restore wildlife habitat. The wetland locations will help people who want to buy property in the area determine whether they can realistically build their dream house on a specific parcel, and it could help county planning staff make decisions such as where to locate a road, said Ryan Houston, executive director of the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council. Federal law also requires property owners with wetlands to work with government agencies to minimize harm to wetlands, regardless of whether the area is listed on an official wetland list. Deschutes County released a draft report and maps of the wetlands on its website earlier this week. County planners have called the existing National Wetlands Inventory inaccurate, and the local survey found wetlands cover a smaller number of properties and less total acreage than earlier believed. The national inventory was based on aerial im-

Wetland survey

INVENTORY STATISTICS

Day Rd.

The Bulletin

SUNRIVER

• The inventory identified approximately 180 wetlands • The study area covered 18,937 acres For more detailed information on your neighborhood, visit www.deschutes.org/cdd, click on South County Wetland Inventory, and use the index under “Draft Local Wetland Inventory Maps” to find the detailed map of your area.

Burgess Rd.

LA PINE ages, while the local survey included on-the-ground work. “The National Wetland Inventory is widely known to be very inaccurate,” Houston said. For instance, a warehouse in Bend was identified as a wetland because in aerial photographs used in the national survey, the building’s shiny roof resembled water, Houston added. See Wetlands / C7

DESCHUTES NATION AL FOREST

Finley Butte Rd.

6th St.

Masten Rd. #FOE 4VOSJWFS

97 -B1JOF

"3&" 0'%&5"*-

“It seems to me that a lot of people are wondering why it takes so long to count ballots, and I think that’s when people’s imaginations start to run wild. I think it just takes a while to count ballots.” — Ross Day, Oregon Republican Party lawyer

Man gets 15 years for police shootout By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A man who shot at police officers and led officials on a two-month manhunt was sentenced to 15 years in prison Friday morning after he pleaded guilty to two counts of attempted aggravated murder and one count of attempted murder. Aldo Inez Antunez, 32, was shot and wounded on the Warm Springs Reservation in July during a shootout with police officers. Antunez called the Warm Springs Police Department dispatch and surrendered after being on the run for about two months. “He pled to three counts — one count for each person involved,” said Jefferson County District Attorney Steven Leriche. One of the police officers was a reserve officer, which is not covered under the aggravated murder statute. Aggravated murder is a specific type of murder, such as murder of a police officer, according to Leriche. The search for Antunez and Waylon Weaselhead started May 20 after a Madras police officer stopped a vehicle. The driver sped away, and someone inside the vehicle fired shots at the officer. Later that day, a Warm Springs Police officer attempted to stop a white Ford Explorer on state Highway 3. The vehicle sped away, and someone inside the car fired shots. One shot hit the windshield of an officer’s car. Police believe it was the same vehicle they had stopped earlier. The two people in the car fled on foot while shooting at officers. Weaselhead, a Warm Springs tribal member, was arrested on suspicion of being involved with the shootings. No police officers were injured. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

31

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Three sentenced to prison for years of tax fraud, evasion Redmond man, former Bend couple set up trusts to avoid paying the IRS By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A Redmond man and two former Bend residents convicted of defrauding the Internal Revenue Service over a 10-year period were sentenced to prison this week by a federal judge. Jerry Miller, 61, of Redmond,

was sentenced to two years, nine months in prison and ordered to pay $200,000 in restitution to the IRS after a jury found him guilty of five counts of income tax evasion and one count of conspiracy. Former Bend residents William Cardwell, 62, and his wife, Jennifer Cardwell, 58, took a plea

deal and did not stand trial. William Cardwell pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion and one count of structuring currency transactions to avoid reporting requirements. He was sentenced to one year and one day in prison and three years of post-prison supervision and must pay $197,594 in restitution. Jennifer Cardwell pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion and was sentenced to five months in prison and five months of home detention and ordered to

pay $114,379 to the IRS. The three were indicted in October 2007 after IRS investigators turned up evidence of tax fraud. According to court documents, the Cardwells owned a company called Business Administrative Services, which handled payroll taxes, among other functions. Miller was an employee of the company. In the mid-1990s, the Cardwells and Miller began setting up trusts to avoid paying taxes and depositing money into the trusts for their

personal use. In addition, they set up a “professional services agreement” between the company and William Cardwell and Miller. The two men were listed as volunteers for the company and in return, the company was required to pay for their expenses, ranging from home repairs to vacations to college tuition for their family members. The three also used the company to get preloaded ATM cards, which they then used to pay personal expenses.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Bradford said the case was opened after an audit of the trusts. “Based on what happened at trial, the evidence was that a civil audit occurred on these trust returns, and that was the beginning,” he said. “They looked at these returns and what was going on and then it snowballed from there.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.


C2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O

B 

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

UO president has prostate cancer EUGENE — University of Oregon President Richard Lariviere has been diagnosed with prostate cancer but is expected to make a full recovery following surgery scheduled later this month. University officials said Friday the cancer was detected last month during a routine medical exam and tests show it was caught in the early stages. Lariviere was expected to be back at work about two weeks after surgery scheduled for Nov. 15. University Provost and Senior Vice President Jim Bean will handle the president’s duties and consult with Lariviere as needed during his leave.

Kulongoski plans trip to Bangladesh SALEM — Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski plans to begin a three-day trip to the South Asian country of Bangladesh this weekend. The governor’s office says the adjutant general of the Oregon National Guard will accompany him. In a statement, Kulongoski’s office says the trip is part of a continuing effort to discuss mutual best practices for natural disaster response and mass casualty training exercises. Natural disasters such as floods and cyclones are common in Bangladesh. KPTV says the visit due to begin Sunday is also intended to highlight mutually beneficial economic ties between Oregon and Bangladesh.

Starlings in power station cause outage PORTLAND — Starlings that flew into equipment at a Pacific Power and Light substation caused an outage that affected about 19,500 Portland customers. Utility spokeswoman Jan Mitchell says three neighborhoods were affected by the Thursday morning outage. Most of the power was restored by late morning.

Columbia marina fire burns 5 boats PORTLAND — A fastmoving fire at a Columbia River marina in Portland has burned five boats and displaced two families who live aboard boats. No injuries were immediately reported in the Thursday night fire. Firefighters managed to control the blaze within about a half hour. There was no immediate word on damage or a cause. The Oregonian says a boat moored at Bill Babeckos Yacht Broker caught fire about 8 p.m. The fire sent up heavy smoke, and flames soon spread to four nearby boats. At least three boats were cut loose, drifting aflame downriver. — From wire reports

Randy L. Rasmussen / The Oregonian

Woodcarver John Zipprich replicates Timberline Lodge’s historic carved wooden panel in Pine Grove on Oct. 24.

Timberline bird carving gets assist from stimulus By KATY MULDOON The Oregonian

PINE GROVE — John Zipprich had to crank. The season’s first big blast of snow barreled toward Mount Hood that fourth weekend in October, and if Zip, as friends call him, didn’t finish his enormous woodcarving fast, he’d never get it installed before full-bore winter delayed that tricky operation. His elegant, angular bird, carved into a massive slab of Douglas fir and paid for with $4,500 in federal stimulus money, was bound for a place built more than 70 years ago by another government-driven economic impetus. And it’s one that feels its weather: Timberline Lodge. Destined for a prominent spot above a lodge front door, Zipprich’s piece would be among the last and most visible projects accomplished since 2009, when Mt. Hood National Forest garnered $4.25 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for Timberline. The money is a drop in the bucket compared with the $787 billion in stimulus money distributed nationwide, including more than $2.7 billion in Oregon. But it gave lodge caretakers the chance to catch up on a hefty maintenance backlog. Among other jobs, workers restored the National Historic Landmark’s stone chimneys, upgraded plumbing, installed energy-efficient windows, improved the fire-alarm system and painted the exterior stem to stern. As they scraped off coats of pale gray, painters found trouble: a disintegrating lintel, or header, over the Roosevelt Terrace door. The nearly 15-foot long, 3-foot high slab is carved with what’s commonly dubbed Thunderbird — the spirit of thunder and lightning that in Native American lore takes the shape of a great bird, probably a California condor. Some Warm Springs elders once indicated the lintel carving might instead be a butterfly. Wings outstretched over a zigzag pattern, the figure appears to protect Timberline and the entire Cascade Range, as it has since the lodge was built between 1936 and 1938. But this fall, it looked like it wouldn’t survive another paint job, much less another winter.

The lintel was crumbling. In the mountain’s harsh elements, long slivers of rotten fir had fallen away. Crusty paint held together what was left of the carving. Linny Adamson, Timberline’s curator, had worried about its condition; workers repaired the lintel over the years, but time took its toll. Change comes slowly to Timberline, planted in the scree and snow at 5,960 feet. Decisions often are made by committee, with input from the U.S. Forest Service, longtime lodge operator R.L.K. & Co., the nonprofit Friends of Timberline and the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. Sometimes, opinions differ. Adamson called Zipprich, who works out of his home studio now but for 15 years did all manner of repairs as part of the lodge’s maintenance staff. His work includes carvings of Oregon-bred Olympic skiers hanging on the wall at Charlie’s Mountain View, the classic Government Camp watering hole, to the primitive-style signs in that unincorporated burg, the gateway to western Oregon’s ski country. Zipprich, 58, told Adamson long ago that if the Thunderbird lintel ever needed replacing, he’d be happy to handle the job. The time had come and he had to make it snappy. Winter loomed. At the lodge, Zipprich unfurled brown butcher paper over the lintel. Using a cranberry colored lumber crayon, he made a rubbing. Back in his garage studio, just steps off Oregon 216, where the mountain’s deep green gives way to the golden expanse of high desert, it took four guys including the broad-shouldered, barrelchested Zipprich, to manhandle the hunk of fir onto sawhorses. He’s not sure what it weighs, but estimates 600 to 800 pounds — the biggest and most important carving of his career. From the rubbing, he traced the double-groove design onto the fir and lined up wood-handled skews, bench knives, firmers and other tools. He crafted a guide so his skill saw would cut each long groove to a consistent depth. Under a bright shop light hanging from the rafters, with the air smelling deliciously of fresh-cut wood, he got to work. “I feel honored,� he says, “to be chosen to do this.�

Three men arrested in Highway 97 drug bust

facturing and delivering cocaine and marijuana.

Police arrested three men on Thursday afternoon after a traffic stop turned up cocaine and marijuana in their truck. According to a news release from the Oregon State Police, a trooper stopped the cargo-style truck at about 3 p.m. Thursday after seeing it drift into another lane of traffic and nearly hit another vehicle. With the help of a Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office deputy and drug-detection dog, the trooper found more than a pound of cocaine — with a value of about $15,000 — and nearly three ounces of marijuana in the truck. The driver, Juan Pablo Bucio Perez, 20, of Yakima, Wash., was arrested along with his passengers, Jose Cervantes-Cuevas, 20, of Yakima, and Antonio Castaneda Patino, 33, of Santana, Calif. The three men were lodged in the Deschutes County jail on suspicion of possession, manu-

Two pile burns south of Bend start Sunday

Today is Saturday, Nov. 6, the 310th day of 2010. There are 55 days left in the year. A reminder: Daylight-Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday. Clocks go back one hour. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Nov. 6, 1860, former Illinois congressman Abraham Lincoln defeated three other candidates for the presidency: John Breckinridge, John Bell and Stephen Douglas. ON THIS DATE In 1861, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was elected to a six-year term of office. In 1888, Benjamin Harrison won the presidential election, defeating incumbent Grover Cleveland with enough electoral votes, even though Cleveland led in the popular vote. In 1893, composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky died in St. Petersburg, Russia, at age 53. In 1900, President William McKinley was re-elected, beating Democrat William Jennings Bryan. In 1928, in a first, the results of Republican Herbert Hoover’s

T O D AY IN HISTORY election victory over Democrat Alfred E. Smith were flashed onto an electric wraparound sign on the New York Times building. In 1934, Nebraska voters approved dissolving their twochamber legislature in favor of a nonpartisan, single legislative body, implemented in 1937. In 1944, British official Lord Moyne was assassinated in Cairo, Egypt, by members of the Zionist Stern gang. In 1956, President Dwight Eisenhower won re-election, defeating Democrat Adlai Stevenson. In 1977, 39 people were killed when the Kelly Barnes Dam burst, sending a wall of water through Toccoa Falls College in Georgia. In 1990, about one-fifth of the Universal Studios backlot in southern California was destroyed in an arson fire. TEN YEARS AGO On Election Eve, George W. Bush and Al Gore campaigned through the final hours of their run for the White House, seeking last-minute momentum in a costly and exhausting race to become

the nation’s 43rd president. Surgeons in Manchester, England, separated conjoined twin girls, a procedure that involved allowing one of the girls to die, while giving the survivor a chance at life. FIVE YEARS AGO In a clear jab at Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, President George W. Bush, in Brazil, called on Latin Americans to boldly defend strong democratic institutions. French President Jacques Chirac promised arrests, trials and punishment in the wake of urban unrest that had spread to central Paris. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama signed a $24 billion economic stimulus bill, hours after the government reported that the unemployment rate had hit 10.2 percent in Oct. 2009 for the second time since World War II. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Director Mike Nichols is 79. Country singer Stonewall Jackson is 78. Singer Eugene Pitt (The Jive Five) is 73. Singer P.J. Proby is 72. Country singer Guy Clark is 69. Actress Sally Field is 64. Pop singer-musician Glenn

Search and Rescue team saves hurt biker An injured mountain biker who crashed while riding west of Bend was rescued Friday evening by Deschutes County Search and Rescue volunteers. A member of the Search and Rescue Mountain Bike Team who was headed east on Ben’s Trail came across the injured rider about 5:45 p.m. Shoshana Foxwell, 45, of Bend, had been riding east on Ben’s Trail when she lost control on a corner and flipped over the handlebars. The volunteer who had been in the area treated Foxwell for serious but non-life-threatening injuries and called in additional Search and Rescue personnel. Foxwell was placed on a backboard and transported to St. Charles Bend for further treatment of her injuries.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:47 a.m. Nov. 3, in the 1400 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — An irrigation pump was reported stolen at 11:48 a.m. Nov. 3, in the 20200 block of Reed Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:06 p.m. Nov. 3, in the 700 block of Northwest Georgia Avenue. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 5:07 p.m. Nov. 3, in the 600 block of Northwest Wall Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and a backpack stolen at 8:48 p.m. Nov. 3, in the area of Northeast Fourth Street and Northeast Hawthorne Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported at 11 p.m. Nov. 3, in the 2200 block of Northeast Daggett Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:26 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 2700 block of Northeast Jill Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:48 a.m. Nov. 4, in the area of Clairaway Avenue and Southeast 27th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:37 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 3100 block of Northeast Coho Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:41 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 20100 block of Lora Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:37 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 100 block of Southwest McKinley Avenue.

Harrison elected despite losing popular vote in 1888 The Associated Press

Pile burns in the Sunriver and Deschutes River Woods areas will start Sunday and last for two weeks, according to a news release. The first burn will happen north of Cottonwood Road in Sunriver, with specialists planning to burn piles spread over 105 acres. No road closures are planned for the area. However, signs will be posted along Cottonwood Road to alert motorists to the burns. The second burn will take place between Lava Butte and the south end of the Deschutes River Woods area. Specialists will burn about 400 piles spread out over 56 acres. Smoke will be visible from Bend, U.S. Highway 97, and the Deschutes River Woods and Sunriver areas, but no road closures are expected.

The purpose of the burns is to remove materials left over from forest-thinning projects from earlier in the year.

Frey (The Eagles) is 62. Singer Rory Block is 61. Jazz musician Arturo Sandoval is 61. TV host Catherine Crier is 56. California’s first lady, Maria Shriver, is 55. Actress Lori Singer is 53. Actor Lance Kerwin is 50. Rock musician Paul Brindley (The Sundays) is 47. Education Secretary Arne Duncan is 46. Rock singer Corey Glover is 46. Actor Brad Grunberg is 46. Actor Peter DeLuise is 44. Actress Kelly Rutherford is 42. Actor Ethan Hawke is 40. Actress Thandie Newton is 38. Model-actress Rebecca Romijn (roh-MAYN’) is 38. Actress Zoe McLellan is 36. Actress Nicole Dubuc is 32. Actress Taryn Manning 32. Actress Emma Stone is 22. Actress Mercedes Kastner is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Don’t try for wit. Settle for humor. You’ll last longer.� — Elsa Maxwell American socialite (1883-1963)

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Theft — A theft was reported at 11:25 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. DUII — Sarol A. Keller, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:50 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and vandalized at 12:17 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 3100 block of Northeast Delmas Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:41 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 500 block of Southwest Power House Drive. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 6:16 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 61400 block of U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 8:11 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 1000 block Southeast Cleveland Square Loop. DUII — Rhiannon Marie Robison, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:35 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 1900 block of Northeast Curtis Drive. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:03 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 1600 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:18 a.m. Nov. 4, in the area of Northwest Canal Boulevard and Northwest Dogwood Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:06 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 700 block of Northwest Jackpine Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:47 a.m. Nov. 4, in the area of Northwest Madras Highway. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:50 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 19200 block of Shoshone Road in Bend. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:21 a.m. Nov. 4, in the 56800 block of Enterprise Drive in Bend.

DUII — Jesus Pedro Hernandez Hernandez, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:29 a.m. Nov. 4, in the area of Northeast Paula Drive and Northeast Purcell Boulevard in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 8:13 a.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 21660 Paloma Drive. 9:46 a.m. — Smoke scare, odor of smoke, 1537 N.W. 11th St. 9 — Medical aid calls. Thursday 11:35 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 64861 Old Bend Redmond Highway. 15 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador Retriever — Adult male, yellow; found at the Redmond airport.

HOLIDAY DINING SET SALE Huge Selection! UP TO 50% OFF

Amish Crafted Dining Sets Solid Lumber ~ Heirloom Quality

Questions About Meth?

AMISH HOUSE

www.methaction.org

Next to Costco • 541-388-4651 www.amishhouse.net

2620 NE Hwy 20 • Bend


C3

B

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,578.98 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +1.64 +.06%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

s

11,444.08 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +9.24 +.08%

New York Times News Service

Nampa, Idaho-based Home Federal Bancorp Inc., which took over Prineville-based Community First Bank in August 2009 and Eugene-based LibertyBank in July, on Friday reported lower fourth-quarter and fiscal year-end results for the period ended Sept. 30. In the quarter, it reported a net loss of $0.2 million, or 1 cent per diluted share, compared with net income of $9.7 million, or 62 cents per diluted share, in the fiscal fourth quarter of 2009. For the year ended Sept. 30, Home Federal reported a loss of $4.1 million, or 26 cents per diluted share, compared with net income of $8.1 million, or 51 cents per share, for the year ended Sept. 30, 2009.

PV Powered, parent end merger provision

1,225.85 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +4.79 +.39%

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.53 treasury CHANGE +2.02%

s

$1397.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$14.60

U.S. added jobs in October — the first gain since May By Catherine Rampell

Home Federal reports loss for quarter, year

s

The U.S. economy added 151,000 jobs in October, a welcome change after four months of job losses but still not enough to make a dent in unemployment. Private companies have been expanding their payrolls throughout 2010, according to a Labor Department report released Friday. Private job growth had been overwhelmed by the elimination of temporary

“The notion that the economy might be double-dipping can now be safely tossed out.” — John Ryding, chief economist at RDQ Economics decennial Census jobs and layoffs by state and local government during the summer and early fall — until October. Companies added 159,000 jobs last month, after a gain of 107,000 jobs in September. Governments cut 8,000 jobs

following losses of 148,000 positions in September. October was much stronger than expected — most forecasts were for a gain of 60,000 jobs. The report also revised the numbers for August and September. The August data was

revised to reflect a loss of 1,000 jobs instead of 57,000, and September was revised to 41,000 losses instead of 95,000. “The big picture from this report and some of the others recently all points to a pickup in growth in the beginning of the fourth quarter,” said John Ryding, chief economist at RDQ Economics. “The notion that the economy might be double-dipping can now be safely tossed out.” See Jobs / C5

Weakened antibiotics need their own cure

Bend-based PV Powered and its parent company, Advanced Energy Industries Inc., have agreed to an early settlement of an earnings provision left over from their merger. As part of its March agreement to buy PV Powered, Advanced Energy agreed to pay PV Powered shareholders up to $40 million, in addition to $35 million in cash and $15 million in Advanced Energy stock paid at closing, if the Bend company met certain financial targets between the closing date and Dec. 31. The provision also allowed PV Powered to operate on a stand-alone basis during the period. However, Fort Collins, Colo.based Advanced Energy wants to integrate PV Powered and so has agreed to pay PV Powered shareholders $39.6 million on or before Nov. 15 to end the provision early, according to an Oct. 30 agreement filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

s

$26.744 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.705

U.S. profits from aid to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac By Binyamin Appelbaum New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The federal government made a profit of $1.1 billion in the third quarter on its huge bailout of the mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, even as the two companies continued to lose money on bad loans. Fannie Mae reported Friday that it lost $3.5 billion in the third quarter and that it would require an additional $2.5 billion from the Treasury Department to balance its books. Freddie Mac, the smaller of the two, said this week that it lost $4.07 billion in the third quarter and that it would need an additional $100 million in aid from taxpayers. But the government collected $3.7 billion in dividend payments from the two companies, more than the $2.6 billion in new aid. It is the first quarter in which the company’s payments to the government exceeded their draws on Treasury. Still, it was the 13th consecutive quarter in which Fannie Mae has lost money. See Fannie / C5

Bernanke defends Fed move in face of criticism from abroad By Sewell Chan New York Times News Service

Pending home sales drop 1.8 percent

9.8 2009

2010

Source: Department of Commerce AP

WHAT’S GOING UP?

Chan’s Chinese Restaurant

BUS 97

Wilson Ave.

Cleveland Ave.

BEND

Reed Market Rd. St. rd

damage to the building and contents, according to estimates made at the time. No one was injured. Chan said the blaze destroyed most of the kitchen in the nearly 25-year-old restaurant, which can seat about 160 diners. While he plans to rebuild to the same size, Chan said the restaurant will be upgraded in many areas to comply with current building codes. Insurance will cover rebuilding, business losses and employee wages. The restaurant employs 16 full- and part-time employees. Chan receives many phone calls daily, he said, from customers asking about the business, its employees and when he plans to reopen. Hearing from so many people in the community, Chan said, has made him want to provide

97

ay

What: Chan’s Chinese Restaurant Where: 1005 S.E. Third St. Owner: Lap Chan General contractor: Kirby Nagelhout Construction Co., Bend Architect: Thomas Deatherage, Bend Contact: 541-389-1725 Details: The owner of Chan’s Chinese Restaurant in Bend has started rebuilding after an attic fire in August heavily damaged the restaurant on Southeast Third Street between Southeast Wilson Avenue and Southeast Reed Market Road. Lap Chan said he expects to reopen around the beginning of February. A damaged wire in the attic started the fire early on Aug. 20 that caused between $600,000 and $700,000 in

The world’s weakening arsenal against “superbugs” has prompted scientists to warn that everyday infections could again become a major cause of death just as they were before the advent of penicillin. See Antibiotics / C5

97

BUS 97

d.

10.0

this field in search of more lucrative medicines. The number of new antibiotics in development is “distressingly low,” Dr. Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, said at a news conference last month.

R us rho

10.2

— Dr. Brad Spellberg, an infectious disease specialist at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif.

ste

$10.41

$10.4 trillion

“For these infections, we’re back to dancing around a bubbling cauldron while rubbing two chicken bones together.”

Bro

Aug. 0.5% Sept. 0.2%

Worried about an impending public health crisis, government officials are considering offering financial incentives to the pharmaceutical industry, like tax breaks and patent extensions, to spur the development of vitally needed antibiotics. While the proposals are still nascent, they have taken on more urgency as bacteria steadily become resistant to virtually all existing drugs at the same time that a considerable number of pharmaceutical giants have abandoned

Thi

Change from previous month

New York Times News Service

rkw

Seasonally adjusted

By Andrew Pollack

Pa

Americans’ personal spending:

Amid a looming health crisis, U.S. considers development subsidies

nd

Personal spending

Matthew Cavanaugh / New York Times News Service

A researcher with Cubist Pharmaceuticals works in the company’s lab in Lexington, Mass. Things like tax breaks and patent extensions are being considered to entice creation of antibiotics as bacteria become resistant to more drugs and many pharmaceutical giants abandon the field.

Be

WASHINGTON — The number of people who signed contracts to buy homes fell in September after two months of gains, a possible fallout from foreclosure moratoriums which have disrupted activity in the housing market. The National Association of Realtors said Friday that its index of sales agreements for previously occupied homes dropped 1.8 percent in September to a reading of 80.9. Contract signings fell in every region of the country except the West. The setback highlighted the continued problems facing the housing industry as it struggles to mount a sustained recovery from a deep recession. Analysts said some of the weakness in September probably reflected disruptions in the housing market caused by moratoriums imposed by banks on mortgage foreclosures. Banks halted tens of thousands of foreclosures as they investigated allegations that some foreclosures had involved flawed legal documents. — From staff and wire reports

JEKYLL ISLAND, Ga. — The Federal Reserve chairman, Ben Bernanke, on Friday defended the central bank’s decision to inject $600 billion into the U.S. economy, in the face of objections from European and Asian officials about the weakening of the dollar that is likely to result from the action. “The best fundamentals for the dollar will come when the economy is growing strongly,” Bernanke told students at Jacksonville University in Florida. “That is where the fundamentals come from. We are aware the dollar plays a special role in the global economy.” In commenting on the dollar, Bernanke was making an unusual departure from custom. By tradition, the dollar is the purview of the Treasury secretary and monetary policy is the domain of the Fed chairman, and neither official steps on the other’s turf. See Fed / C5

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

food and service that equals or is better than before. “I am so lucky I have so many loyal customers,” he said. — Tim Doran, The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Rebuilding is under way at Chan’s Chinese Restaurant on Southeast Third Street in Bend. A fire in the attic on Aug. 20 heavily damaged the restaurant. Owner Lap Chan expects to reopen the restaurant by early February.


B USI N ESS

C4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 21.67 ACE Ltd u61.88 AES Corp 11.76 AFLAC u57.76 AGCO 44.45 AK Steel 13.87 AMB Pr u30.15 AMR 8.87 AOL n 24.92 AT&T Inc u29.27 AU Optron 10.39 Aarons s 20.38 AbtLab 50.92 AberFitc 47.03 Accenture 45.67 Actuant u23.97 AMD 8.04 AecomTch 27.83 Aeropostl s 24.70 Aetna 31.03 Agilent 36.38 Agnico g u79.94 Agrium g u85.15 AirProd u86.65 Aircastle 9.76 Airgas u68.56 AirTran 7.47 Albemarle u53.10 AlbertoC n 37.32 AlcatelLuc 3.28 Alcoa 14.00 Alcon 167.20 Alere 28.84 AllgEngy 23.55 AllegTch 55.92 Allergan u70.87 AlliData 62.95 AlliancOne 4.47 AlliBern 25.27 AldIrish d.83 AllisChE u5.53 Allstate 31.27 AlphaNRs 44.45 AlpTotDiv 5.91 Altria u26.11 AmbacF h d.50 Amdocs 26.97 Ameren u29.83 Amerigrp 43.76 AMovilL u59.48 AmAxle 10.11 AmCampus u33.39 AEagleOut 16.48 AEP u37.70 AEqInvLf 11.41 AmExp 44.07 AmIntlGrp u45.61 AmTower u51.92 AmWtrWks u24.81 Ameriprise u55.02 AmeriBrgn 31.68 Amphenol u52.88 Anadarko 67.61 AnalogDev u35.53 AnglogldA u49.31 ABInBev 61.56 AnnTaylr 24.35 Annaly 17.91 Anworth 7.07 Aon Corp 41.78 Apache 108.69 AptInv u25.44 AquaAm u21.93 ArcelorMit 36.12 ArchCoal u28.30 ArchDan 31.35 ArmstrWld u49.83 ArrowEl 31.28 ArtioGInv 14.75 ArvMerit u18.52 Ashland 50.94 AspenIns 29.08 Assurant 41.39 AssuredG 20.01 AstoriaF 13.17 AstraZen 50.10 AtwoodOcn 35.50 AutoNatn u26.38 Autoliv u76.03 AvalonBay u113.33 AveryD 37.99 AvisBudg 13.79 Avnet 31.44 Avon 29.78 AXIS Cap u35.93 BB&T Cp 25.58 BCE g 33.40 BHP BillLt u92.14 BHPBil plc u79.94 BJs Whls 42.97 BP PLC 43.79 BPZ Res 4.12 BRE u45.91 BRFBrasil s 15.08 BakrHu 49.94 BallCp u66.06 BallyTech 37.76 BcBilVArg 12.27 BcoBrades u22.50 BcoSantand 11.94 BcoSBrasil u15.30 BcpSouth 14.00 BkofAm 12.36 BkAm wtA 7.05 BkAm wtB 2.58 BkIrelnd d2.58 BkNYMel 28.17 Barclay 18.87 BarVixShT d11.14 BarrickG u49.21 Baxter 51.52 BeazerHm 4.51 BeckCoult 55.15 BectDck 77.54 Belo 6.26 Bemis 31.74 Berkley u28.54 BerkH B s 83.72 BestBuy 44.75 BigLots 30.12 BBarrett 37.17 BioMedR 19.27 BlackRock 173.15 Blackstone 14.15 BlockHR 12.22 Boeing 71.27 Boise Inc u7.98 Boise wt .78 Borders 1.22 BorgWarn u59.26 BostProp 90.15 BostonSci 6.92 BoydGm 9.76 Brandyw 12.20 BrasilTele 23.26 BridgptEd 15.09 Brinker 18.89 BrMySq 26.69

-.08 +.98 -.38 +2.46 -.19 -.18 -.09 +1.87 +.14 +1.98 +.32 +1.28 +.30 +1.96 +.53 +.98 -.68 -1.76 -.17 +.75 -.03 +.36 +.31 +1.52 +.04 -.40 +1.29 +4.17 ... +.96 +.48 +1.50 +.04 +.71 +.38 +1.32 +.35 +.30 +.15 +1.17 +.39 +1.58 -.36 +2.35 +.01 -3.36 -.21 +1.68 +.34 +.55 -.04 -2.33 ... +.07 +.32 +2.97 -.01 +.03 +.03 -.20 +.40 +.89 -.80 -.52 +.06 -.71 ... +.35 +.27 +3.23 -2.67 -1.54 -.13 +2.23 -.36 +.05 +.75 +.99 -.08 -.19 +.20 +.39 +.09 +.78 -1.26 -.72 +.09 +.28 -.04 +.69 -.02 -.33 -.41 -3.71 +.11 +.85 -.09 +2.03 +.54 +2.22 +.12 +.89 +.47 +1.76 +.22 +.46 +.11 +.26 +.13 +.56 +.34 +2.61 +.87 +3.60 -.49 +.31 +.27 +.93 +1.29 +3.51 -.28 -1.15 -.07 +2.75 +1.65 +6.04 -.10 +1.86 +.14 +2.20 -1.06 -1.34 +.94 +1.05 -.01 +.23 +.03 +.06 +.69 +2.03 +.90 +7.67 +.61 +2.13 +.38 +.40 +.61 +3.74 +.56 +3.71 -.21 -1.97 +4.18 +8.08 +.23 +1.67 +.39 -.82 +.04 +1.94 +.15 -.69 +.04 +.71 +.59 +1.85 -.36 +.96 +.17 +.75 +.05 -.36 +.79 +2.99 +.69 +3.16 +.03 +5.08 +.24 +7.02 +.20 +1.64 +.66 +2.18 +.43 +1.66 +.76 -.67 +.31 +1.88 +1.38 +2.17 -.34 -.11 +.94 +9.56 +.92 +9.14 +.06 +1.24 -.12 +2.99 +.12 +.40 +.57 +2.98 -.01 +.45 -.80 +3.52 +.33 +1.70 -.27 +1.68 -.47 -.88 +.03 +1.71 -.56 -.87 -.25 +.91 -.08 +.81 +.23 +.91 +.45 +1.15 +.22 +.53 -.28 -.50 +1.67 +3.11 -.07 +1.22 -.12 -1.96 -.10 +1.12 +.05 +.59 +.18 +.45 +.73 +2.09 -.71 +2.02 -.04 +.49 +.23 -.02 -.01 +1.02 +.76 +4.16 +1.07 +1.77 +.86 -1.25 -.43 -.58 +.11 +.92 +4.14 +2.16 ... +.67 +.46 +.44 +.42 +1.05 +.11 +.73 +.06 +.13 +.01 ... +.74 +3.15 +1.51 +3.96 +.43 +.53 +.19 +1.45 +.17 +.23 -.03 +1.21 +.05 +.88 -.02 +.35 -.14 -.21

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

BroadrdgF 21.51 Brookdale 20.52 BrkfldAs g u31.56 BrkfldPrp u18.57 Brunswick 17.44 Buckle 33.86 Buenavent u54.20 BungeLt 60.25 CB REllis 19.85 CBL Asc u18.47 CBS B 17.01 CF Inds u122.47 CIGNA 37.36 CIT Grp n 43.46 CMS Eng 18.38 CNA Sure u23.36 CNO Fincl 6.05 CSX u61.80 CVR Engy u11.72 CVS Care 30.94 Cabelas u23.11 CablvsnNY u28.70 CabotO&G 32.21 CalDive 5.35 Calpine 12.40 CamdnP u52.67 Cameco g 33.26 Cameron 46.13 CampSp 36.61 CdnNRy g 64.50 CdnNRs gs 39.46 CapOne 40.36 CapitlSrce u6.48 CapsteadM 11.68 CardnlHlth 35.21 CareFusion 24.11 CarMax u32.35 Carnival u44.70 Carters 28.05 Caterpillar u83.54 Celanese u39.07 Celestic g 9.16 Cemex 9.66 Cemig pf 17.90 CenovusE n 29.40 CenterPnt u16.68 CnElBrasil 14.36 CntryLink u42.57 ChRvLab 31.46 ChesEng 22.27 Chevron 84.98 ChicB&I u27.96 Chicos 10.51 Chimera 4.05 ChCBlood n d3.97 ChiMYWd n 12.40 ChinaMble 53.04 ChNBorun n 14.77 ChinaSecur 5.85 ChinaUni 14.29 Chipotle u230.56 Chiquita 12.45 Chubb u59.47 Cimarex 79.88 CinciBell 2.62 Cinemark 18.35 Citigp pfN 26.80 Citigrp 4.49 CliffsNRs 71.10 Clorox 62.58 Coach u52.92 CocaCE 24.61 CocaCl u62.58 Coeur 23.48 ColgPal 77.57 CollctvBrd 16.67 ColonPT u19.47 Comerica 38.64 CmclMtls 14.56 ComScop 31.45 CmtyHlt 32.25 Compellent 23.66 CompPrdS u26.59 CompSci 49.74 ComstkRs 24.23 Con-Way 35.32 ConAgra 22.14 ConchoRes u76.92 ConocPhil 61.81 ConsolEngy 39.30 ConEd u51.00 ConstellA u20.07 ConstellEn 30.72 ContlRes 49.93 Cooper Ind u54.22 CooperTire 21.58 CoreLogic 18.23 CornPdts u43.81 Corning 18.88 CorpOffP 36.33 CorrectnCp u26.25 Cosan Ltd u13.90 Costamre nud11.75 Cott Cp 8.35 Cntwd pfB 23.60 Covance 44.38 CovantaH 15.65 CoventryH 24.87 Covidien 41.73 CredSuiss 43.80 CrwnCstle 42.95 CrownHold u32.50 Cummins u96.39 CurEuro 139.83 Cytec 52.52

-.95 -.49 +.65 +1.74 +.72 +1.84 +.33 +1.18 +.94 +1.63 +.88 +4.77 +.74 +1.31 -.37 +.18 +.16 +1.50 +.35 +2.79 -.65 +.08 +1.28 -.06 -.01 +2.20 +.23 +.13 -.25 +.21 -.14 +4.11 +.06 +.61 -.72 +.35 -.03 +2.20 -.57 +.81 +.07 +4.57 +.34 +1.96 +.35 +3.23 +.20 +.29 -.06 -.10 +.61 +3.08 +.43 +2.30 +.54 +2.38 -.05 +.36 -.84 -.28 +.22 +2.99 +1.06 +3.09 +.05 +.37 +.12 +.28 -.48 +.52 -.03 -.03 +.34 +1.36 +.14 +1.53 +.65 +3.16 +.36 +4.94 +.74 +3.42 +.08 +.74 +.01 +.89 -.53 +.06 -.36 +1.58 -.24 +.12 -.30 +.39 -.48 +1.19 -.45 -1.31 -.02 +.59 -.16 +2.38 +.97 +2.75 +.06 +.79 +.01 -.05 -1.69 -1.58 +.14 +.65 +.02 +1.67 -.24 +.14 +.09 +.45 -.06 +.29 +7.70+20.35 ... -.82 -.54 +1.45 -.60 +3.13 -.05 +.17 +.43 +.80 +.03 +.30 +.16 +.32 +1.10 +5.90 +.44 -3.97 +.52 +2.92 +.21 +.60 +.13 +1.26 +1.26 +2.87 -.87 +.45 +.56 +1.34 +.37 +1.69 +.63 +2.86 -.03 +.68 -.02 -.21 +.77 +2.17 -.44 -1.61 +.26 +3.16 +.08 +.69 -.07 +1.88 +.32 +2.31 -.05 -.35 -.05 +8.25 +.56 +2.42 +.85 +2.54 +.12 +1.28 +.12 +.34 -.05 +.48 -.06 +2.40 +.16 +1.80 -.17 +1.97 +.13 +.66 +1.24 +1.26 -.04 +.60 +.60 +.84 -.03 +.58 -.18 +.76 -.10 ... -.06 +.15 +.27 +.40 -.77 -2.61 -.17 -.13 +1.39 +1.45 +1.39 +1.86 +.03 +2.30 -.41 -.17 -.41 +.32 +.75 +8.29 -1.67 +1.15 +.65 +3.06

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

DirEMBr rs d20.62 DirFnBear d10.42 DrxFBull s 26.48 Dir30TrBear 40.51 DrxREBll s u62.31 DirxSCBull 60.69 DirxLCBear d9.84 DirxLCBull 65.32 DirxEnBull 44.56 Discover u18.91 Disney 37.20 DolbyLab 69.51 DollarGn n 28.00 DollarTh 48.13 DomRescs 43.50 Dominos 15.15 Domtar grs u81.94 DoralFncl 1.82 DEmmett 18.24 Dover u55.08 DowChm u32.50 DrPepSnap 37.15 DresserR 38.38 DuPont u48.18 DuPFabros 24.75 DukeEngy u18.49 DukeRlty 12.93 Dynegy rs 4.44 EMC Cp 21.57 ENI 46.34 EOG Res 88.61 EQT Corp 38.36 EastChm 79.72 EKodak 4.83 Eaton u93.88 EatnVan 31.75 EVTxMGlo 11.54

+.06 -3.51 -.63 -2.17 +1.40 +4.30 +1.81 +2.11 +1.77 +8.38 +1.08 +8.06 -.14 -1.12 +.91 +6.36 +.60 +6.28 +.17 +1.26 +.17 +1.08 +3.66 +7.83 -.35 -.19 +.25 +1.73 -.03 +.04 +.09 +.31 +1.12 +2.58 +.29 +.32 +.29 +.30 -.13 +1.98 -.27 +1.66 -.07 +.56 +1.32 +4.16 -.18 +.90 +.43 -.35 -.04 +.28 +.22 +.48 -.05 -.20 -.09 +.55 -.61 +1.41 +.32 -7.11 -.46 +1.14 -.98 +1.15 -.02 +.13 +.63 +5.63 +.65 +2.98 +.14 +.51

Last

Chg Wkly

ForestCA 15.70 +.14 +1.11 ForestLab u33.24 -.73 +.19 ForestOil u34.14 +.60 +3.40 Fortress 5.03 +.30 +.63 FortuneBr 54.39 +.02 +.34 FranceTel 24.13 -.34 +.24 FrankRes u124.59 +2.43 +9.89 FMCG u104.84 +.95+10.05 FrontierCm u9.00 -.02 +.22 FrontierOil 14.60 -.08 +1.35 Frontline 27.87 -.61 -.88

G-H-I GMX Rs 4.39 Gafisa s 17.91 GameStop 19.99 GamGld g 7.11 Gannett 12.46 Gap 20.81 GaylrdEnt u34.45 GencoShip 17.18 GnCable 31.60 GenDynam 69.66 GenElec 16.73 vjGnGrthP 17.75 GenMarit 4.22 GenMills s 36.53 GenesisEn 24.28 Genpact 15.37 GenuPrt u48.24 Genworth 12.43 Gerdau 13.39 GlaxoSKln 40.85 GlimchRt u8.33 GlobalCash d2.98 GlobPay 40.33 GlbShipLs u4.97

-.17 -.09 +.13 +1.12 +.04 +.34 +.07 +.28 -.22 +.61 +.38 +1.80 +.03 +1.11 +.77 +.63 -.45 +3.66 +.49 +1.54 +.22 +.71 +.27 +.95 -.18 +.38 +.05 -1.03 +.33 -1.11 -.21 -.53 +.64 +.38 +.18 +1.10 -.49 +.35 +.80 +1.81 +.16 +.82 +.08 -.66 +.09 +1.37 +.21 +.37

Last

Chg Wkly

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

MonstrWw u19.80 Moodys 28.78 MorgStan 27.28 Mosaic 70.78 Motorola 8.20 MuellerWat 3.34 MurphO u67.84 NCR Corp 14.83 NRG Egy 20.10 NV Energy u14.08 NYSE Eur 30.79 Nabors 21.70 NalcoHld u30.07 NBkGreece 2.13 NatFnPrt 13.66 NOilVarco u58.77 NatSemi 13.97 NatwHP 40.66 NavigCons 8.93 Navios 6.24 Navistar 54.76 Netezza 26.99 NY CmtyB 17.16 NY Times 8.92 NewAlliBc 13.39 NewellRub 17.47 NewfldExp u64.59 NewmtM 61.62 NewpkRes 5.73 Nexen g 21.73 NextEraEn 54.73 NiSource 17.63 NikeB u84.11 99 Cents 14.69 NobleCorp 36.34 NobleEn u85.63 NokiaCp 10.77

+.69 +1.74 +.74 +1.72 +.91 +2.41 -.26 -2.33 +.10 +.04 -.06 +.32 +.58 +2.68 +.11 +1.11 +.17 +.19 +.07 +.41 +.50 +.15 +.02 +.80 +.44 +1.89 -.05 -.13 +.35 -.14 +.51 +5.01 +.01 +.28 +.26 -.17 -.02 -.22 +.15 +.25 +.51 +6.58 ... +.03 -.17 +.48 +.29 +1.25 +.15 +.57 -.43 -.18 +.83 +4.97 +.10 +.76 +.25 -.15 +.14 +.44 -.28 -.31 +.11 +.32 +.70 +2.67 -.11 -.73 -.01 +1.95 +.47 +4.33 +.03 +.07

PetrbrsA 32.99 Petrobras 36.13 PtroqstE 6.74 Pfizer 17.18 PhmHTr 65.82 PhilipMor u60.44 PhilipsEl 31.95 PhlVH 64.32 PhnxCos 2.52 Pier 1 u9.66 PilgrmsP n 6.64 PinnclEnt 13.72 PinWst 42.14 PioNtrl u76.32 PitnyBw 23.38 PlainsEx 29.02 Plantron u36.28 PlumCrk 38.88 Polo RL u99.62 PolyOne u13.37 Polypore u34.85 PortGE u21.52 PostPrp u33.06 Potash 141.06 PwshDB u26.41 PS Agri u30.33 PS USDBull d22.18 PSFinPf 18.22 PwShPfd 14.39 Praxair 92.94 PrecCastpt u145.00 PrecDrill 7.82 PrideIntl 33.29 PrinFncl 29.80 ProShtS&P d45.32 PrUShS&P d25.43 ProUltDow u52.89

-.26 +1.97 -.20 +2.18 +.10 +1.16 -.20 -.06 -.55 +.47 -.38 +1.93 -.11 +1.50 +1.22 +2.98 +.10 +.42 +.22 +.98 -.14 +.54 -.24 +.92 -.12 +.98 +1.08 +6.52 +.34 +1.44 -.53 +1.15 -1.55 +.40 +.16 +2.04 +.29 +2.74 -.23 +.45 +2.11 +1.58 +.05 +.62 +.11 +2.62 -.91 -4.03 +.11 +1.23 -.07 +.63 +.21 -.19 ... +.13 +.01 +.08 +.65 +1.60 +1.77 +8.42 -.16 +.02 -.11 +2.97 +.21 +2.96 -.19 -1.69 -.21 -1.90 +.07 +2.94

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

We have a solution for all your banking needs: • Business Banking • Personal Banking • Commercial Lending • • Residential Mortgage Lending • Cash Management • • Online Banking and Bill Pay • Remote Deposit • Free ATM access* •

Local Bank. Local Relationships. Visit us today. Meet our local Board of Directors: Gwil T. Evans, Gary Everton, Gary D. Fish, Cynthia L. Kane, Ph.D., John P. Lietz, Dr. Bruce A. McLellan, Romy E. Mortensen, Larry R. Snyder

High Desert Bank 1000 SW Disk Drive Bend, Oregon 97702

541.848.4444 www.highdesertbank.com *Free at all on-premises Instant Cash ATMs. Loans subject to credit approval.

DCT Indl 4.97 DPL 27.06 DR Horton 11.98 DTE 46.83 DanaHldg u15.02 Danaher s u45.00 Darden 48.19 DaVita u71.77 DeVry 47.37 DeanFds 10.55 Deere u79.10 DelMnte 14.67 DeltaAir 14.26 DenburyR 18.60 DeutschBk 58.98 DBGoldDL u41.50 DBGoldDS d8.28 DevelDiv u14.08 DevonE 70.78 Diageo u75.28 DiaOffs 69.80 DiamRk 11.05 DianaShip 13.62 DicksSptg 29.75 DigitalRlt 56.74 DigitalGlb 30.71 Dillards 28.46 DrxTcBll s 44.28 DrxEMBll s u43.23 DrSCBear rsd19.42 DREBear rs d17.52 DrxEBear rsd30.85

-.02 -.04 +.13 +.96 +.21 +1.55 -.27 +.07 +.18 +.85 +.30 +1.64 +.32 +2.48 -.56 +.02 +.79 -.49 -.08 +.15 -.08 +2.30 +.42 +.33 +.08 +.38 -.05 +1.58 -.42 +1.10 +.24 +2.20 -.04 -.49 +.46 +1.16 +1.18 +5.76 -.65 +1.28 +.07 +3.64 +.08 +.47 +.26 -.03 +.05 +.93 +.18 -2.99 -.17 -1.94 +.94 +2.95 +.04 +4.04 -.15 +5.83 -.36 -3.19 -.51 -2.83 -.46 -5.38

Ecolab 49.65 EdisonInt u38.22 ElPasoCp u13.46 Elan 5.57 EldorGld g 18.83 EBrasAero u31.22 EmersonEl u57.28 Emulex 11.28 EnCana g s 29.03 Energizer 67.60 EngyTsfr 51.45 EnergySol 4.63 Enerpls g u29.66 ENSCO 50.14 Entergy 75.40 EntPrPt u44.02 Equifax 34.74 EqtyRsd 50.84 EsteeLdr 72.16 EtfSilver u26.69 ExcelM 6.36 ExcoRes 18.34 Exelon 41.17 ExterranH 22.79 ExtraSpce u17.32 ExxonMbl 70.00 FMC Tech u78.06 FNBCp PA 9.20 FTI Cnslt 33.76 FairchldS 12.57 FamilyDlr u48.43 FedExCp 90.00 FedSignl 6.10 FedInvst 25.46 FelCor 6.60 Ferro u14.85 FibriaCelu 18.71 FidlNFin 14.10 FidNatInfo 27.95 FstBcpPR .31 FstCwlth 6.32 FstHorizon d10.40 FstInRT 7.80 FstMercFn u16.29 FirstEngy 35.89 FlagstB rs d1.27 Flowserve 104.18 Fluor u54.53 FootLockr 16.61 FordM u16.21 FordM wt u7.50 FordC pfS u51.35

ArenaPhm 1.55 AresCap u17.24 AriadP 3.76 Ariba Inc 19.77 ArkBest 25.50 ArmHld 17.26 Arris 10.13 ArtTech u5.97 ArthroCre 28.47 ArubaNet u23.13 AscentSol 4.42 AsiaEntRs u10.19 AsiaInfoL 20.46 AspenTech u12.40 AsscdBanc 13.52 athenahlth 41.05 Atheros 33.00 AtlasAir u61.19 AtlasEngy 30.50 Atmel u10.28 AudCodes u5.10 Autodesk 35.68 AutoData u45.84 Auxilium 21.57 AvagoTch u25.37 AvanirPhm u4.79 AviatNetw 4.38 Axcelis u2.53 BE Aero u38.46 BGC Ptrs u7.61 BJsRest 34.65 BMC Sft 46.17 BMP Sunst 9.82 BSD Med u5.06 BannerCp 1.85 BeacnRfg 15.61 BebeStrs 6.67 BedBath 45.13 BenefMut d7.71 BigBand h 3.28 Biocryst 5.25 Biodel d1.88 BioFuelEn 2.17 BiogenIdc 62.78 BioMarin 25.71 BioSante 1.63 BioScrip d4.54 BlkRKelso 11.86 Blkboard 42.76 BlueCoat 28.00 BlueNile 48.30 BostPrv 5.63 BttmlnT 18.88 BreitBurn u19.42 BrigExp u23.17 Brightpnt u9.03 Broadcom u42.34 Broadwind 1.93 BrcdeCm 6.06 BrklneB 10.20 BrooksAuto 7.48 BrukerCp 15.35 Bucyrus 73.77 BuffaloWW 49.19 CA Inc 23.46 CBOE n 24.65 CH Robins 71.79 CME Grp 295.03 CNinsure 22.84 CTC Media u23.53 CVB Fncl 8.49

... -.10 +.21 +.50 +.01 +.08 +.02 +.99 -.35 +.20 +.60 -.42 +.02 +.82 ... +1.77 +.47 +1.19 -.17 +1.20 +.13 +.05 +2.12 +4.92 -.40 -1.74 +.19 +1.20 +.25 +.88 +.45 +1.08 -.21 +1.96 +1.04 +8.93 -.18 +1.35 +1.35 +1.42 +.09 +.11 -.16 -.52 +.08 +1.35 -.42 -3.18 +.08 +.69 +.04 +2.37 -.34 -.17 -.03 +.39 +1.20 +1.70 +.02 +.65 +.31 +1.50 -.18 +.71 ... -.02 +.27 +.31 +.17 +.20 +.34 +.85 +.59 +.11 +.32 +1.23 ... +.37 +.02 +.31 +.21 +.29 -.05 -1.75 -.05 -.07 +.28 +.07 -.19 -.40 +.06 +.13 ... -1.09 -.19 +.14 -.20 +1.02 +.35 +1.03 +2.80 +5.70 +.13 -.08 +.87 +.86 +.25 +.36 +.21 +2.07 +.15 +1.52 -.12 +1.51 -.06 +.03 -.14 -.29 +.05 +.46 -.03 +.68 +.05 +.36 +1.29 +5.64 +.49 +2.16 -.10 +.26 +.64 +.64 -.46 +1.31 -2.09 +5.38 +.73 -2.86 -.26 -.07 +.19 +.88

CadencePh 7.90 -.10 -.98 Cadence 8.61 +.15 +.14 CaliperLSc u4.93 -.04 +.43 Callidus 4.76 -.04 -.15 CalumetSp 21.11 +.21 -.68 CdnSolar 15.85 -.05 +1.88 CapellaEd 54.61 +1.40 -.28 CapProd 8.70 +.08 +.09 CpstnTrb h .79 +.00 +.04 Cardiom g 4.80 +.08 -.26 CardioNet 5.83 +.19 +.73 Cardtronic u17.86 -.01 +.91 CareerEd 17.49 +.29 -.05 Carrizo 24.49 -.15 +.87 Caseys 39.75 +.10 -1.71 CatalystH 43.44 -.15 +5.59 CathayGen 14.59 +.29 +.99 CaviumNet u35.20 -.14 +3.33 CeleraGrp d5.82 +.16 +.11 Celgene 61.22 -1.10 -.81 CelldexTh 4.70 +.21 +.25 CentEuro 26.19 +.92 +1.22 CEurMed 22.91 -.98 -.10 CentAl 14.81 +.01 +1.29 Cephln 66.11 -.75 -.33 Cepheid u21.93 +.65 +.89 CeragonN 10.95 -.22 -.11 Cerner 87.82 +.42 -.01 ChrmSh 3.53 +.02 +.04 ChkPoint u43.35 +.35 +.60 Cheesecake 29.80 -.07 +.68 ChildPlace 44.94 +.34 +.88 ChinAgri s 14.71 +.72 +1.86 ChinaBAK 2.20 +.31 +.32 ChinaBiot 13.61 -.04 +1.07 ChinaDir 1.33 +.01 -.09 ChinaMda u19.61 +.07 +4.15 ChinaNGas 6.99 +.13 +.82 ChinaSun 4.70 -.04 +.19 ChiValve n 10.50 -.15 +1.78 ChiCache n 25.89 +1.46 +1.77 CienaCorp 14.37 +.17 +.56 CinnFin u30.74 -.16 +1.29 Cintas 28.20 +.03 +.73 Cirrus 13.89 +.93 +1.03 Cisco 24.26 +.05 +1.40 CitrixSys 65.31 -.61 +1.18 CleanEngy 15.35 -.35 +.83 Clearwire 6.93 -.24 -.16 CogentC 11.64 +.04 +.79 Cogent 10.49 -.01 -.03 Cognex u29.59 +.43 +2.89 CognizTech 63.36 -.92 -1.83 Coinstar u61.74 -.04 +4.16 ColdwtrCrk 3.54 +.04 +.17 ColBnkg 19.10 +.39 +.89 Comcast u21.04 -.02 +.41 Comc spcl u19.86 -.02 +.50 CmcBMO 38.80 +.85 +1.96 CmclVehcl u15.53 +.53 +2.10 CommVlt u30.20 -.20 +1.27 Compuwre 10.28 +.05 +.27 ComScore u22.51 +.27 -1.00 Comtech 31.50 +.11 +.68 ConcurTch u54.05 +.36 +2.43 Conexant 1.46 +.01 -.04 ConstantC 24.04 -.21 +1.04 CopanoEn 28.56 +.53 +.60 Copart 34.49 +.11 +.63 CorinthC d4.03 +.06 -1.20 Costco u65.40 -.08 +2.63

D-E-F

Name

+.11 +.33 +.39 +1.32 +.18 +.20 +.06 +.12 -.06 +1.90 -.03 +2.37 +.53 +2.38 +.33 -.12 -.28 +.81 +.30 -7.18 +.26 +1.35 -.03 -.06 +.59 +2.42 +.26 +3.80 ... +.87 +.84 +1.17 -.20 +1.61 +.43 +2.21 +.03 +.99 +.60 +2.06 +.38 +.54 -.64 +3.51 ... +.35 -1.40 -2.38 +.07 +1.12 +.62 +3.51 +.65 +5.96 +.06 +.70 -1.19 -1.70 +.12 +1.30 +.66 +2.26 +1.20 +2.28 -.06 +.45 +.52 +.79 +.14 +.45 +.17 +1.13 -.48 +.75 +.31 +.71 +.14 +.85 +.00 +.01 -.02 +.50 +.19 +.31 -.08 +.47 -.02 -.01 -.06 +.12 -.03 ... +5.34 +4.18 +4.73 +6.34 +.23 +.68 +.35 +2.08 +.29 +1.82 +.28 +1.65

GoldFLtd u16.86 +.09 +1.09 Goldcrp g 46.23 +.03 +1.64 GoldmanS 171.07 +4.68 +9.94 Goodrich u86.36 +.27 +4.29 GoodrPet 13.41 +.44 -.23 Goodyear 10.47 -.02 +.25 GrafTech u19.11 +.16 +2.64 Gramrcy 2.24 -.06 ... GrtAtlPac 3.78 -.09 +.34 GtPlainEn 19.41 +.05 +.38 GpTelevisa u23.17 +.09 +.72 Guess 41.21 +.92 +2.29 GushanEE 1.08 +.11 +.09 HCC Ins 28.20 -.03 +1.72 HCP Inc 36.39 +.09 +.85 HSBC 55.55 -1.37 +3.44 HSBC Cap2 27.77 +.05 +.12 Hallibrtn 31.92 -.93 +.06 Hanesbrds 25.29 +.49 +.49 HarleyD 33.63 +.23 +2.97 Harman 39.88 +.07 +6.33 HarmonyG u12.35 -.01 +.82 HarrisCorp 47.33 +.45 +2.14 Harsco 24.14 -.03 +.96 HartfdFn 26.42 +.17 +2.47 Hasbro 47.26 -.01 +1.01 Headwatrs 3.81 ... +.41 HltCrREIT u50.28 -.76 -.13 HltMgmt 8.63 +.21 +.62 HealthNet u28.68 -.28 +1.79 HlthSouth 18.38 -.35 +.31 HlthSprg 27.82 -.43 -1.37 HeclaM u7.93 +.25 +1.04 Heinz u49.25 -.48 +.14 HelixEn 13.67 +.04 +.98 HelmPayne 43.70 -.29 +.92 Herbalife 65.68 +.16 +1.82 Hersha 6.23 -.01 +.13 Hershey 48.49 -.37 -1.00 Hertz 12.29 +.30 +.97 Hess u69.98 +.73 +6.95 HewlettP 43.72 -.35 +1.68 Hexcel 18.15 +.14 +.38 hhgregg 23.48 +.75 +.44 HighwdPrp 33.92 +.02 +.80 HollyCp u32.25 -.54 -.48 HomeDp 31.92 -.02 +1.02 Honda 35.75 +.99 -.28 HonwllIntl u49.28 +.27 +2.17 Hornbeck 20.61 -.80 -1.63 Hospira u59.54 -.05 +.06 HostHotls u17.12 +.25 +1.23

HovnanE 4.04 +.12 +.48 Humana u59.56 +.30 +1.27 Huntsmn u13.71 -.17 -.14 Hypercom u6.54 -.01 +.58 IAMGld g 18.50 -.94 +.22 ICICI Bk u57.57 +.16 +4.99 ING 11.11 -.17 +.33 ION Geoph 6.06 ... +1.17 iShGold s u13.65 +.04 +.37 iSAstla u26.27 +.03 +1.80 iShBraz u81.16 -.42 +4.12 iSCan u30.01 +.08 +1.09 iShGer u24.57 -.21 +.74 iSh HK u20.18 +.06 +1.45 iShJapn 10.34 +.09 +.32 iSh Kor u57.44 -.35 +3.05 iSMalas u14.34 -.06 +.27 iShMex 59.50 +.31 +1.98 iShSing u14.31 +.02 +.67 iSPacxJpn u48.91 +.06 +3.33 iSSpain 41.68 -1.40 -1.26 iSTaiwn u14.41 -.01 +.51 iSh UK u17.86 -.09 +.81 iShSilver u26.20 +.57 +2.03 iShS&P100 55.37 +.17 +1.93 iShDJDv u49.30 +.06 +1.22 iShBTips 111.50 -.38 +.14 iShChina25 u47.83 -.05 +2.86 iShDJTr u88.92 +.06 +3.15 iSSP500 u123.15 +.52 +4.26 iShBAgB 108.62 -.30 +.35 iShEMkts u48.49 -.09 +2.37 iShiBxB 112.74 -.36 +.82 iShSPLatA u54.53 -.10 +2.41 iSSPVal 57.79 +.38 +2.12 iShB20 T 97.98 -1.71 -2.12 iShB7-10T 99.40 -.42 +.87 iShB1-3T 84.39 -.07 -.03 iS Eafe u59.20 -.26 +2.19 iSRusMCV u43.52 +.26 +1.60 iSRusMCG u53.58 +.26 +1.80 iSSPMid u86.04 +.61 +3.23 iShiBxHYB u91.79 -.10 +1.66 iSR1KV 62.99 +.35 +2.18 iSR1KG u55.78 +.08 +1.89 iSRus1K u67.92 +.25 +2.33 iSR2KV 67.74 +.44 +3.36 iSR2KG u81.61 +.35 +3.40 iShR2K 73.77 +.41 +3.47 iShUSPfd 39.67 +.03 +.27 iSSPMatl u71.33 +.28 +4.17 iShREst u57.62 +.57 +2.66

CowenGp 4.21 Cray Inc 5.89 Cree Inc 54.49 Crocs 14.46 CrosstexE 8.89 Ctrip.com s u47.52 CubistPh 23.44 Curis 1.67 Cyclacel 1.60 CypSemi u15.33 Cytori 4.49

FEI Co 23.24 FLIR Sys 28.61 FSI Intl 3.13 FalconStor d2.53 Fastenal 53.74 FifthThird 13.03 Finisar 19.29 FinLine 16.17 FFnclOH 17.69 FMidBc 11.36 FstNiagara 12.44 FstSolar 138.83 FstMerit 18.73 Fiserv u55.78 Flextrn 7.21 FlowInt 3.29 FocusMda u26.00 FormFac 10.53 Fortinet n u31.29 Fossil Inc u62.22 FosterWhl 27.21 FresKabi rt .04 FreshMkt nud32.11 FuelSysSol 36.47 FuelCell 1.27 FultonFncl 9.41 Fuqi Intl lf 7.65 FushiCopp 10.35

iShDJHm 12.25 iShFnSc 56.36 iShSPSm 64.66 iShBasM u72.04 iStar 5.68 ITT Corp 48.68 ITT Ed 60.00 ITW 48.36 IndoTel 35.67 IngerRd u41.03 IngrmM 18.26 IntcntlEx 117.44 IBM u146.92 Intl Coal u6.16 IntFlav u53.23 IntlGame 16.55 IntPap 26.44 IntlRectif u27.50 InterOil g 78.43 Interpublic 10.64 IntPotash 32.38 Invesco u24.24 InvMtgCap 22.65 IronMtn 22.90 ItauUnibH u26.24 IvanhM g u26.50

“Local Service - Local Knowledge” +.11 +.88 +1.02 +3.35 +.36 +3.06 +.57 +3.40 +.09 +1.11 +.89 +1.49 +1.58 -4.53 +.47 +2.68 -1.33 -4.72 +.43 +1.72 -.01 +.60 +2.72 +2.57 +.13 +3.32 +.03 +.54 -.11 +3.07 +.17 +.96 +.26 +1.16 +2.62 +4.27 +2.64 +7.25 +.26 +.29 -.31 -1.95 +.24 +1.24 -.15 +1.08 +.09 +1.11 -.02 +1.69 ... +2.43

J-K-L JCrew 34.01 JPMorgCh 40.94 JPMAlerian u36.49 Jabil 15.63 JacobsEng 42.48 Jaguar g 7.57 JanusCap 12.24 Jarden 32.42 Jefferies 25.40 JinkoSol n u35.99 JohnJn 64.65 JohnsnCtl u36.80 JonesGrp 14.95 JnprNtwk u34.39 KB Home 12.24 KBR Inc u27.08 KKR n u13.25 KKR Fn 9.14 KT Corp 21.04 KC Southn u46.53 Kellogg 49.32 Kennamtl u35.19 KeyEngy 10.27 Keycorp 8.40

+1.16 +2.02 +1.14 +3.31 +.33 +1.01 +.33 +.29 +1.37 +3.87 +.47 +1.10 +.34 +1.68 +.15 +.36 +.26 +1.47 -1.53 +5.84 -.11 +.91 +.30 +1.68 +.21 +.49 +.55 +2.00 +.38 +1.80 +.96 +1.68 -.14 +.57 +.01 +.35 -.09 +.35 +.68 +2.71 +.01 -.94 +.38 +1.17 -.06 +.42 -.21 +.20

KimbClk 63.03 Kimco u18.08 KindME 70.04 KindredHlt 14.59 KingPhrm 14.15 Kinross g 18.84 KnghtCap 14.03 KnightTr 18.61 Kohls 53.30 Kraft 31.08 KratonPP n 28.97 Kroger 23.11 L-1 Ident 11.78 L-3 Com 73.90 LDK Solar 13.18 LG Display 17.95 LSI Corp 5.61 LabCp u82.99 LaBrnch 3.14 LVSands u51.98 LaSalleH 25.10 Lazard 37.91 LeapFrog 5.63 LeggMasonu35.41 LeggPlat 20.50 LenderPS 30.72 LennarA 15.85 LeucNatl 27.30 LexRltyTr u8.70 Lexmark 39.19 LibtProp 34.82 LillyEli 35.72 Limited u31.81 LincNat 25.43 LiveNatn 9.81 LizClaib 6.80 LloydBkg 4.54 LockhdM 73.27 Loews u40.08 Lorillard u88.92 LaPac 8.04 Lowes 22.29 LumberLiq 21.94 LyonBas A u28.35 LyonBas B u28.34

+.05 -.31 +.47 +.87 +.15 +.57 ... +.87 -.01 +.01 ... +.89 +.40 +1.00 +.11 +.75 +1.38 +2.08 -.71 -1.19 -.53 -3.49 -.10 +1.11 -.01 -.01 +.53 +1.72 +.29 +1.81 -.20 +.74 +.11 +.37 +.18 +1.67 -.04 -.11 -.03 +6.10 +.14 +1.41 +1.19 +1.14 -.26 +.04 +1.03 +4.38 -.08 +.12 -.68 +1.88 +.04 +1.34 +.29 +1.88 +.36 +.92 -.58 +1.16 +.37 +1.36 -.04 +.52 +.38 +2.42 +.53 +.95 ... +.32 +.02 +.68 -.03 +.16 +1.31 +1.98 +.01 +.59 -.02 +3.58 -.25 +.30 -.01 +.95 +.43 -2.14 +.94 +1.49 +.96 +1.45

M-N-O M&T Bk MBIA MDC MDU Res MEMC

82.70 12.34 29.08 20.38 12.73

+.21 +7.95 +.20 +1.13 +.36 +3.58 +.04 +.45 +.20 -.09

MF Global 8.20 MFA Fncl u8.08 MGIC 9.67 MGM Rsts 12.11 MPG OffTr 2.90 Macerich u49.40 MackCali 34.39 Macys u25.57 MagnaI g u99.46 Manitowoc 11.87 ManpwI 57.50 Manulife g 14.76 MarathonO 33.92 MarinerEn u26.28 MktVGold u60.09 MkVStrMet u21.14 MktVRus 36.23 MktVJrGld u40.51 MktV Agri u52.04 MarIntA u39.55 MarshM u25.97 MarshIls 5.54 Masco 11.56 MasseyEn 46.94 Mastec u14.91 MasterCrd 256.29 McClatchy 3.24 McDrmInt s u16.12 McDnlds 79.30 McGrwH u39.31 McKesson 66.30 McMoRn 16.83 McAfee 47.32 MeadJohn u59.44 MeadWvco 26.46 Mechel 25.99 MedcoHlth 59.12 MedProp u11.39 Medicis 28.77 Medtrnic 35.35 Merck 35.70 MetLife 42.10 MetroPCS u11.72 MindrayM 29.78 Mirant 10.93 MitsuUFJ 4.66 MizuhoFn 2.96 MobileTel s 23.28 Mohawk 57.08 MolsCoorB u50.25 Molycorp n 35.51 Monsanto 62.27

+.07 +.37 +.08 +.17 +.45 +.85 -.21 +1.18 +.10 +.19 +.37 +4.82 +.63 +.81 +.01 +1.90 +5.85 +8.92 -.09 +.73 -.01 +2.77 +.63 +2.06 +.09 -1.65 +.10 +1.36 +.10 +2.79 -.05 +.53 -.13 +1.94 +.58 +4.33 -.08 +1.14 +.40 +2.50 -.05 +.99 -.20 -.41 +.22 +.90 +4.73 +4.87 +.58 +2.71 +1.40+16.23 -.03 +.48 -.06 +.69 +.12 +1.53 +.47 +1.66 -.75 +.32 -.25 -.01 ... +.02 -.01 +.62 -.37 +.73 +.72 +2.44 -.68 +6.59 -.06 +.20 -1.62 -.98 -.22 +.12 -.95 -.61 -.06 +2.51 +.35 +1.32 +.11 +.80 +.04 +.32 -.02 ... +.02 +.06 -.05 +1.63 -3.24 -.26 +.42 +3.02 -1.00 +.11 -.55 +2.85

Nomura 5.30 +.10 +.24 Nordstrm 42.50 +.57 +3.99 NorflkSo u62.31 -.41 +1.18 NoestUt u31.75 -.09 +.47 NorthropG 65.34 +.07 +2.12 NStarRlt 4.34 -.01 -.04 Novartis 58.63 -.42 +.68 NuSkin 32.09 -.27 +1.48 Nucor 40.40 +1.00 +2.18 OcciPet 84.23 -.26 +5.60 Oceaneer 68.23 +.23 +6.36 OcwenFn d9.40 +.25 +.77 OfficeDpt 4.69 +.04 +.20 OfficeMax 18.27 +.54 +.57 OilSvHT 126.09 -.36 +6.89 OldNBcp 10.33 +.38 +.87 OldRepub 13.05 -.07 -.15 Olin 19.84 +.15 -.15 Omncre 25.58 +.07 +1.46 Omnicom u46.74 +.32 +2.78 Orbitz 5.81 +.18 -.99 OrientEH 11.73 +.24 -.93 OshkoshCp 30.10 -.13 +.59 OvShip 35.83 -1.53 +2.84 OwensCorn 28.45 +.27 +1.41 OwensIll 28.47 -.03 +.44

P-Q-R PG&E Cp u48.58 +.07 +.76 PHH Corp 20.80 +.19 +1.53 PMI Grp 3.61 +.23 +.27 PNC 58.41 +2.48 +4.51 PNM Res 12.97 +.11 +1.18 PPG u79.67 +.54 +2.97 PPL Corp 27.00 +.20 +.14 PackAmer 25.93 +.32 +1.50 Pactiv 33.19 +.05 +.02 ParkDrl 4.28 -.06 +.05 ParkerHan u81.68 +1.30 +5.13 PatriotCoal 15.32 +.79 +1.83 PeabdyE u57.75 +.96 +4.94 Pengrth g u12.75 -.01 +.76 PennVa 15.81 +.01 +1.05 PennWst g u23.58 -.27 +.78 Penney 32.59 +.27 +1.41 PenRE 15.68 +.34 +1.41 Penske 15.27 +.37 +1.82 Pentair 33.87 -.07 +1.14 PepcoHold 19.27 -.10 +.01 PepsiCo 65.08 -.27 -.22 PerkElm 24.00 -.07 +.55 Petrohawk 16.90 +.06 -.09

PrUlShDow d21.60 -.03 -1.31 ProUltQQQ u79.05 +.02 +4.18 PrUShQQQ d12.16 ... -.72 ProUltSP 45.42 +.36 +3.07 ProUShL20 35.28 +1.11 +1.29 ProUSRE rs d17.83 -.38 -1.86 ProUSOG rsd45.59 -.32 -4.97 ProUSBM rsd22.83 -.33 -2.39 ProUltRE rs u52.82 +1.04 +4.82 ProUShtFn d16.75 -.65 -2.30 ProUFin rs 63.54 +2.35 +7.35 ProUltO&G 38.35 +.24 +3.56 ProUBasM u43.80 +.72 +3.92 ProShtR2K d34.52 -.18 -1.78 ProUSR2K d14.47 -.17 -1.56 ProUltR2K 37.83 +.43 +3.43 ProUSSP500d21.53 -.27 -2.48 ProUltSP500 189.12 +2.46+18.88 ProUltCrude 11.66 +.09 +1.43 ProUSSlv rsd14.18 -.65 -2.62 ProUShCrude11.26 -.10 -1.62 ProSUltSilv u123.64 +5.15+18.05 ProUShEuro 18.56 +.44 -.36 ProctGam u65.00 ... +1.43 ProgrssEn 45.14 +.03 +.14 ProgsvCp u21.94 -.03 +.78 ProLogis 14.57 +.46 +.94 ProtLife 25.12 +.55 +1.15 ProvET g u7.99 +.10 +.31 Prudentl 55.64 +.05 +3.06 PSEG 33.02 -.24 +.68 PubStrg u104.74 -.16 +5.52 PulteGrp d7.86 +.11 +.01 QEP Res n 33.46 -.72 +.43 QuantaSvc 17.85 +.08 -1.81 QntmDSS u3.47 -.02 +.09 QstDiag 52.02 +.47 +2.88 Questar s 17.56 +.04 +.59 QksilvRes 14.99 -.43 +.02 Quiksilvr 4.53 +.18 +.36 QwestCm u6.80 -.12 +.19 RAIT Fin 1.87 +.08 +.19 RPC u25.06 +.50 +3.05 RRI Engy 3.86 -.01 +.10 Rackspace u26.46 +.33 +1.50 RadianGrp 9.95 +.78 +2.36 RadioShk 20.57 +.22 +.45 RangeRs 39.40 +.25 +2.01 RJamesFn 30.71 +.54 +2.49 Raytheon 48.15 +.09 +2.07 RealD n u25.50 -1.55 +4.58 RltyInco 35.22 +.09 +.94

Name RedHat Reddy Ice RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG RelStlAl ReneSola RepubSvc ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT ReynldAm RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl Rowan RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RdxSPEW Ryland

Last

Chg Wkly

u43.10 -.33 +.84 2.85 ... -.64 57.62 +.74 -.09 13.64 +.20 +.14 u44.80 +1.11 +2.62 81.29 +2.87 +6.50 6.45 -.09 +.15 u21.11 -.13 +.66 19.89 -.66 -2.34 46.06 +.07 +4.21 12.96 -.10 +.99 29.04 -.91 -.77 33.40 +.70 +1.53 6.66 +.18 +.33 103.08 +.13 +4.00 u66.80 +.35 +1.87 u70.80 +.28 +5.68 20.98 -.25 -.20 .96 -.00 +.04 28.41 +.07 +1.30 u66.47 +.10 +4.10 60.28 -.32 -.23 32.18 -.09 -.72 u42.88 +.64 +3.34 u66.68 -.66 +3.20 u67.91 -.38 +3.82 u45.48 +.23 +1.59 d16.28 +.15 +1.30

S-T-U SAIC 16.12 +.08 +.58 SAP AG 52.42 -.56 +.69 SK Tlcm 18.81 +.01 +.38 SLGreen 70.27 +.52 +4.57 SLM Cp 12.68 +.43 +.78 SM Energy 47.88 +1.42 +6.20 SpdrDJIA u114.54 +.11 +3.23 SpdrGold u136.38 +.35 +3.76 SP Mid u156.46 +1.07 +5.93 S&P500ETFu122.73 +.47 +4.24 Spdr Div u52.32 +.06 +1.26 SpdrHome 16.66 +.13 +1.16 SpdrKbwBk 24.19 +.57 +1.60 SpdrLehHY u41.12 -.13 +.53 SpdrLe1-3bll 45.85 ... -.01 SpdrKbw RB 23.99 +.39 +1.32 SpdrRetl u45.30 +.37 +1.69 SpdrOGEx u46.64 +.13 +2.79 SpdrMetM u60.70 +1.24 +4.71 SPX Cp 67.64 +.44 +.58 STMicro 9.06 -.15 +.29 Safeway 23.74 -.18 +.84 StJoe d20.46 +.29 +.27 StJude 38.69 +.53 +.39 Saks u12.12 +.34 +.98 Salesforce 113.17 -.86 -2.90 SallyBty n u13.04 +.36 +.87 SandRdge 5.16 -.70 -.31 Sanofi 35.88 -.43 +.77 SaraLee 14.71 -.09 +.38 Schlmbrg u75.66 -.14 +5.77 Schwab 16.10 +.26 +.69 Scotts 51.96 +.08 -1.44 ScrippsNet u52.67 +.20 +1.78 SeadrillLtd u33.09 +.40 +2.66 SealAir 23.59 -.04 +.44 SemiHTr u31.19 +.45 +1.73 SempraEn 54.06 +.28 +.58 SenHous u25.03 -.16 +1.14 ServiceCp 8.28 +.03 ... ShawGrp 32.44 +1.13 +1.88 Sherwin 73.27 +.43 +.30 SiderNac s 17.98 -.23 +1.10 Siemens u118.03 -.60 +3.72 SilvWhtn g u32.95 +.75 +4.20 SilvrcpM g u11.89 +.32 +2.54 SimonPropu105.77 +1.93 +9.75 Skechers 20.78 ... +1.34 SkilldHcre 5.25 -.15 +1.50 SmithfF 16.81 -.41 +.06 SmurfStn n u24.22 -.13 +1.22 SolarWinds 18.69 +.17 +.54 Solutia u19.35 -.06 +1.24 SonicAut 12.19 +.19 +1.27 SonyCp 33.40 +.19 -.44 Sothebys u45.27 +.55 +1.43 SouthnCo 38.47 +.02 +.60 SthnCopper u46.63 +1.50 +3.83 SoUnCo 25.22 -.34 +.09 SwstAirl u14.19 -.05 +.43 SwstnEngy 36.09 -.38 +2.25 Spansion n 19.00 +.66 +1.51 SpectraEn u24.70 +.07 +.93 SpiritAero 19.27 +.34 -2.37 SprintNex 3.99 -.10 -.14 SprottSilv u10.78 +.05 +.74 SprottGld n 12.35 +.02 +.46 SP Matls u36.32 +.13 +1.52 SP HlthC 31.45 -.19 +.28 SP CnSt u29.11 -.15 +.34 SP Consum u36.51 +.18 +1.25 SP Engy u62.31 +.31 +3.07 SPDR Fncl 15.58 +.35 +1.02 SP Inds u33.43 +.20 +1.25 SP Tech u25.10 -.02 +.75 SP Util 32.05 -.01 +.33 StdPac 4.23 +.20 +.60 StanBlkDk 63.02 +.22 +1.05 StarwdHtl u59.29 +1.88 +5.15 StateStr 45.47 +1.52 +3.71 Statoil ASA 21.55 +.08 -.28 Sterlite 16.79 +.07 +1.32 StillwtrM u20.23 +.51 +2.43 StoneEngy 18.58 +.41 +2.95 Stonerdg 12.60 +.17 +1.60 StratHotels 5.00 +.03 +.44 Stryker 52.43 +.67 +2.94 SunLfFn g 29.35 +.16 +1.02 Suncor gs 35.68 +.16 +3.67 Sunoco 38.22 -.21 +.75 SunriseSen 4.15 -.12 +.72 SunstnHtl 10.86 +.26 +.01 Suntech 9.30 +.50 +.81 SunTrst 26.47 +.06 +1.46 SupEnrgy 27.77 -.36 +.15 Supvalu 10.75 -.31 -.04 SwRCmATRu10.11 +.05 +.38 SwftEng 35.45 +1.61 +3.60 Syniverse 30.41 +.01 -.08 Synovus 2.11 -.03 -.05 Sysco 30.03 -.10 +.57 TCF Fncl 14.16 +.20 +1.00 TECO 17.59 -.02 ... TJX 47.09 +.22 +1.20 TRWAuto u49.37 -.98 +3.68 TaiwSemi 11.18 -.08 +.27 Talbots 10.61 +.36 +.83 TalismE g 19.90 +.10 +1.76 Target 55.15 +.39 +3.21 TataMotors u29.78 +.81 +1.66 Taubmn u50.16 +.49 +3.74 TeckRes g u49.72 +1.98 +4.98 TeekayTnk 12.64 +.16 +.76 TelNorL 15.07 -.18 -.27 TelcmNZ 8.36 +.05 +.54 TelefEsp 79.09 -1.76 -1.78 TelMexL 15.86 -.06 +.38 TempleInld 21.56 ... +.84 TempurP u35.55 -.10 +1.05

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

Tenaris 44.45 TenetHlth 4.53 Tenneco u34.23 Teradata u41.03 Teradyn 11.86 Terex 24.70 Tesoro 14.17 TetraTech 10.09 TexInst u31.47 Textron 22.61 ThermoFis 52.38 ThomCrk g 13.12 3M Co 86.34 Tidwtr 49.50 Tiffany u56.95 Timberlnd u25.39 TW Cable u62.05 TimeWarn 31.34 Timken u44.52 Titan Intl u15.97 TitanMet 19.26 TollBros 19.31 TorDBk g 74.90 Total SA 57.15 TotalSys 15.92 Toyota 72.64 Transocn 63.92 Travelers u57.44 TrinaSol s 28.63 Trinity 24.69 Tsakos d10.42 Tuppwre 46.83 TycoElec u33.10 TycoIntl 38.89 Tyson 15.10 U-Store-It 9.15 UBS AG 18.05 UDR u24.05 UIL Hold u30.40 URS 41.54 US Airwy u11.57 US Gold u5.99 USEC 5.06 USG 14.22 UltraPt g 43.80 UndrArmr u50.26 UnilevNV 31.82 Unilever 31.12 UnionPac u91.22 Unisys 24.20 UtdContl 27.86 UtdMicro 3.17 UPS B 69.79 UtdRentals u20.06 US Bancrp 26.10 US NGsFd 5.66 US OilFd 37.65 USSteel 48.55 UtdTech 76.75 UtdhlthGp 36.86 UnvHlth s 41.93 UnivTravel 6.26 UnumGrp 22.88

+.99 +3.02 +.06 +.17 -.37 +1.61 +.62 +1.67 +.19 +.62 ... +2.25 +.58 +1.21 -.08 +.33 +.72 +1.90 +.42 +1.79 -.50 +.96 +.69 +1.09 -.70 +2.12 +.69 +3.37 +1.08 +3.95 -.13 +4.37 -.28 +4.18 -.42 -1.17 +1.01 +3.10 -.26 +.80 +.01 -.40 +.51 +1.37 +.59 +2.70 -.50 +2.67 +.12 +.31 -.09 +1.82 -.29 +.56 +.20 +2.24 +.43 +1.87 +.20 +1.96 +.32 +.08 -.48 +2.02 +.40 +1.42 -.48 +.61 -.31 -.45 +.13 +.54 +.10 +1.03 +.47 +1.57 +.37 +1.44 +.35 +2.61 +.01 -.22 +.22 +.76 -.06 -.31 +.02 +1.54 +.35 +2.65 +1.77 +3.58 -.07 +2.13 -.11 +2.10 -.50 +3.54 +.22 +1.15 ... -1.18 +.01 +.08 +.42 +2.45 +.12 +1.27 +.94 +1.90 +.07 -.16 +.16 +2.48 +1.22 +5.83 +.51 +1.98 +.06 +.81 -.02 +.66 +.14 +.66 -.04 +.46

W-X-Y-Z VF Cp 84.97 Valassis 32.78 Vale SA 33.82 Vale SA pf u29.89 ValeantPh u27.15 ValeroE 19.14 VlyNBcp 13.68 VangTotBd 82.61 VangTSM u62.94 VangREIT u57.29 VangDivAp u51.35 VangAllW u48.92 VangEmg u49.24 VangEur u52.76 VangEurPc u37.31 VarianMed u65.00 Venoco 15.39 Ventas u55.10 VeriFone u35.15 VerizonCm 33.43 ViacomB u38.70 VimpelC n 15.99 Visa 79.80 VishayInt u13.84 VivoPart 29.69 VMware 77.50 Vonage 2.33 Vornado 89.85 VulcanM 42.39 W&T Off u14.16 WMS 44.17 Wabash 9.24 WABCO u49.93 WaddellR 32.31 WalMart 55.20 Walgrn 35.14 WalterEn 95.73 Warnaco 54.91 WREIT 32.48 WsteMInc 35.51 Waters u77.88 WatsnPh u51.24 WeathfIntl 19.04 WeinRlt u25.92 WellPoint 57.35 WellsFargo 29.22 WendyArby 5.01 Wesco Intl u46.63 WestarEn u25.55 WDigital 34.76 WstnRefin u8.15 WstnUnion 18.24 Weyerh 17.50 Whrlpl 80.07 WhitingPetu106.47 WmsCos 22.34 WmsSon u36.06 WillisGp 32.68 WilmTr d4.31 WiscEn u60.49 WT India u28.69 WldFuel s 29.49 Wyndham u30.07 XL Grp 20.80 XcelEngy u24.33 Xerox u11.90 XuedaEd n ud10.82 Yamana g 11.71 YingliGrn 12.82 YumBrnds u51.33 Zimmer 51.81 ZweigTl 3.81

+1.44 +1.73 -.44 -.22 +.02 +1.68 -.21 +1.16 -.03 -.46 +.21 +1.19 +.08 +.34 -.35 +.14 +.28 +2.22 +.61 +2.74 +.09 +1.25 -.25 +1.89 -.08 +2.37 -.66 +1.66 -.16 +1.39 +.59 +1.78 -.25 -.09 -.33 +1.54 -.35 +1.32 -.09 +.95 -.29 +.08 -.26 +.66 -.19 +1.64 +.34 +2.54 -.20 +1.05 +.22 +1.04 +.18 -.22 +.81 +2.46 +1.05 +6.13 ... +3.28 +.03 +.54 -.19 +1.18 +.17 +3.51 +.47 +3.24 -.16 +1.03 -.81 +1.26 +.77 +7.90 +1.26 +1.79 -.23 +.45 -.36 -.21 +.77 +3.75 +.88 +4.59 +.28 +2.23 +.90 +1.79 +.64 +3.01 +1.76 +3.21 +.11 +.41 +1.17 +3.81 +.01 +.25 +1.18 +2.75 +.60 +1.50 +.06 +.65 +.50 +1.33 +.27 +4.24 -.39 +6.03 +.11 +.83 +.18 +3.69 +.16 +.88 +.03 -2.80 +.49 +.95 +.07 +1.50 -.05 +1.26 -.23 +1.32 -.33 -.35 +.21 +.47 -.03 +.20 -1.03 ... +.24 +.72 +.40 +1.16 -.15 +1.77 +1.05 +4.37 +.02 +.13

Nasdaq National Market Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C A-Power 7.58 ADC Tel 12.68 AGA Med 20.78 AMAG Ph 16.49 ARYxTh h .43 ASML Hld 34.20 ATP O&G 15.11 AVI Bio 2.02 AXT Inc u8.70 AcaciaTc 27.18 AcadiaPh h d.74 Accelrys u8.10 Accuray 6.89 AcmePkt h u41.80 AcordaTh 27.04 ActivIden 3.26 ActivePwr u1.85 ActivsBliz 11.30 Actuate 5.19 Acxiom 18.01 AdobeSy 29.14 Adtran 33.70 AdvEnId 12.99 AEterna g 1.22 Affymax 5.51 Affymetrix 4.61 AgFeed 3.17 AirTrnsp u7.52 AirMedia 7.02 Aixtron 33.66 AkamaiT u53.28 Akorn u5.29 AlaskCom u10.65 Alexion u72.72 Alexza d.97 AlignTech 18.50 Alkerm 12.10 AllosThera 4.34 AllscriptH 19.49 AlnylamP 12.90 Alphatec 2.30 AlteraCp lf u33.25 AlterraCap 19.76 Alvarion 2.65 Amazon u170.77 Amedisys 27.22 ACapAgy 29.43 AmCapLtd u7.66 AmerMed 19.46 AmPubEd 26.75 AmSupr 36.99 Amgen 55.42 AmkorT lf 6.79 Amylin 13.05 Anadigc 5.93 AnadysPh d1.29 Ancestry n 26.56 Andrsons 36.47 Angiotc gh d.28 Ansys 46.06 A123 Sys 9.96 ApolloGrp d35.73 ApolloInv 11.41 Apple Inc u317.13 ApldMatl 12.98 AMCC 10.88 Approach u15.69 ArchCap u89.92

+.11 +.44 -.01 -.01 +.09 +.03 +.02 +.59 +.02 -.11 -.56 +1.04 -.15 +.76 -.01 -.10 +.28 +.45 -.02 +.56 -.02 -.02 +.09 +.85 +.05 +.31 -.05 +2.25 +.44 ... ... +.03 +.01 +.05 -.33 -.16 +.10 +.35 -.02 +.46 -.32 +.99 +.66 +1.41 -.21 -1.37 ... -.04 +.27 +.44 -.04 +.11 +.10 +.28 +.23 +.80 +.23 +.12 +.22 +1.14 -.35 +1.61 +.09 +.82 +.14 +.62 -.05 +4.42 -.05 -.07 +.70 +1.48 +.17 +.53 +.60 +.36 +.30 +.39 -.30 -.24 -.01 +.12 +.21 +2.01 ... -.44 -.05 -.11 +1.84 +5.54 +.05 +1.76 +.12 +.79 +.14 +.68 -.42 -.74 -.39 -1.21 +.04 +3.34 -.59 -1.77 -.59 -.44 +.36 +.02 -.11 -.86 ... -.16 +1.25 -.18 -1.62 -2.90 -.01 -.23 +.31 +.81 +.68 +.24 +.35 -1.75 -.05 +.40 -1.14+16.15 +.09 +.63 +.06 +.81 +.16 +.24 -.19 +3.53

+.11 +.71 -.33 -.09 -.30 +3.20 -.34 +.53 +.11 +.78 -.19 -4.54 -.15 +.16 -.03 +.27 +.01 -.04 +.32 +1.23 -.27 -.39

D-E-F DDi Corp u10.74 DG FastCh 27.74 DJSP Ent d.67 DJSP wt d.05 Daktronics u11.81 DealrTrk 18.45 DeerConsu 11.62 Dell Inc 14.46 DeltaPtr h .79 DemandTc 10.53 Dndreon 35.07 Dentsply 31.72 Depomed 5.11 DexCom 10.85 DigRiver 37.46 Diodes 23.30 DirecTV A u42.72 DiscCm A 41.11 DiscCm C 35.63 DishNetwk 20.81 DonlleyRR 18.18 DotHill h 1.97 DrmWksA 35.42 DressBarn 24.30 drugstre 1.68 DryShips 4.69 DyaxCp 2.41 ETrade rs 15.30 eBay u30.87 eResrch 7.56 EV Engy u38.51 EagleBulk 5.38 EaglRkEn u7.34 ErthLink 9.27 EstWstBcp 18.82 EchoGLog 11.90 EducMgmt 13.34 ElectArts 16.33 Emcore 1.27 EndoPhrm 35.89 Endologix u6.02 Ener1 4.60 EngyConv 4.46 EnrgyRec 3.57 Entegris 6.38 EntropCom 9.15 EnzonPhar 10.84 EpicorSft 9.51 Equinix 83.27 EricsnTel 10.89 EvrgrSlr h .93 Exelixis 4.36 ExideTc 7.43 Expedia 27.30 ExpdIntl u51.78 ExtrmNet 3.03 Ezcorp u24.47 F5 Netwks u123.00

+.49 +.46 -.06 +4.19 -.10 -.33 -.02 -.02 -.12 +.89 -.17 -.87 -.16 +.17 -.06 +.07 -.03 +.05 -.05 -.05 -1.52 -1.43 ... +.33 +.06 +.22 -3.06 -2.94 -.16 +.20 +.32 +1.32 +.13 -.73 -.84 -3.56 -.74 -3.27 +.12 +.94 -.32 -.27 +.03 -.06 -.78 +.12 +.50 +1.36 +.04 +.08 +.32 +.58 -.01 ... +.35 +1.00 +.72 +1.01 -.45 -.06 +1.30 +1.82 +.05 +.25 -.08 +.65 +.12 +.28 +.27 +1.19 -.10 -2.30 +.31 +1.34 +.49 +.51 +.01 +.01 +.06 -.85 -.03 +.49 +.59 +.98 -.01 -.06 -.09 +.01 +.13 +.39 +.19 +.78 +.10 -.41 +.01 +.10 -1.11 -.97 -.18 -.09 -.04 +.00 -.09 -.11 +.87 +1.54 +.13 -1.65 +.07 +2.42 -.04 -.16 +2.09 +2.99 +2.11 +5.30

-.74 +1.48 +.15 +.77 +.13 +.44 -.06 -.21 -.01 +2.26 -.37 +.47 +.95 +2.26 +.20 +.84 ... +.85 +.26 +.65 +.16 +.59 +2.35 +1.15 +.31 +1.56 +.04 +1.26 ... +.04 -.08 +.65 -.28 +1.27 -.12 +.80 +.73 +1.29 +.97 +3.23 +2.11 +3.77 -.00 -.01 ... ... -2.05 -4.51 +.01 +.13 +.08 +.07 -.06 +.24 -.13 +1.03

G-H-I GSI Cmmrc 25.73 GSI Tech u7.17 GT Solar 8.84 GTx Inc 2.80 Garmin 31.17 Geeknet u2.11 GenProbe 49.20 Genoptix 18.22 Gentex 22.10 GenVec h .53 Genzyme 71.69 GeronCp 5.60 GigaMed d1.70 GileadSci 38.95 GlacierBc 13.71 Gleacher 2.39 GloblInd 6.18 GlbSpcMet u16.88 Google u625.08 GrCanyEd 18.20 GrLkDrge 7.14 GreenPlns 11.81 GulfportE u17.95 Gymbree u65.23 HSN Inc 26.24 HainCel u26.41 Halozyme 7.49 HanmiFncl 1.20 HansenMed 1.56 HansenNat 51.54 HarbinElec 21.78 Harmonic 6.78 HawHold 7.20 Healthwys 11.32 HrtlndEx 15.47 HSchein 57.39 HercOffsh 2.65 Hibbett 27.68 Hollysys u14.05 Hologic 15.83 Home Inns 45.94

+.28 +1.31 +.05 +.22 +.10 +.61 ... ... -.69 -1.67 -.06 +.03 -.11 +.86 +1.02 +1.20 +.62 +2.12 -.00 -.05 -.01 -.56 -.02 +.02 +.03 -.03 -.69 -.72 +.06 +.71 +.18 +.14 +.09 +.39 +.48 +1.34 +.81+11.38 -.07 -.61 +.27 +.94 -.02 +.71 +.21 +1.27 +.08 +.17 +.07 -3.70 +.93 +1.68 -.17 +.16 +.03 +.03 +.01 -.15 +.42 +.33 +.05 +.22 -.07 -.20 -.09 -.12 +.30 +.84 +.10 +.56 -.43 +1.24 +.03 +.29 -.04 +.73 +.02 +1.41 -.18 -.20 +.17 -5.22

HorizTFn n d14.85 HorsehdH 11.35 HotTopic 5.90 HudsCity 11.98 HumGen 25.31 HuntJB 37.24 HuntBnk 5.94 HutchT 3.17 IAC Inter u28.58 iGateCorp 20.86 IPG Photon u25.20 iShAsiaexJ u65.56 iSh ACWI u46.51 iShNsdqBio 88.61 Icon PLC 20.09 IconixBr 17.14 IdenixPh 4.29 iGo Inc u2.69 Ikanos 1.12 Illumina 56.29 Imax Corp u21.87 Immucor 17.89 ImunoGn 8.00 Imunmd 3.70 ImpaxLabs 18.85 Incyte 16.12 Infinera 8.54 InfoSpace 7.70 Informat u40.85 InfoSvcs wt .02 InfosysT 68.96 Innophos u34.01 InsightEnt 13.07 InsitTc 22.64 InspPhar 7.00 Insulet 14.44 IntgDv 6.32 ISSI 7.68 Intel 21.24 InteractBrk u19.08 IntactInt u27.25 InterDig u34.36 Intrface u15.56 InterMune 13.93 InterNAP 5.29 IntlBcsh 19.15 InternetB 13.31 Intersil 13.64 Intevac 12.67 Intuit u48.45 IntSurg 278.27 IridiumCm 8.69 IronwdP n 10.81 IsilonSys 27.95 Isis 9.90 Itron 60.71 Ixia u16.71

-.16 -.74 +.03 +.42 -.02 +.17 +.04 +.49 -.96 -1.57 -.02 +1.29 +.07 +.28 -.03 -.24 +.57 +.68 -.02 +.42 +.01 +2.70 +.11 +3.27 -.09 +1.68 -.52 -.69 +.03 +.74 -.03 -.36 -.01 -.04 +.61 +.74 -.17 -.02 +.32 +1.98 -.09 +.22 -.11 +.49 -.01 -.22 -.10 -.23 -.88 +.01 -.01 -.54 -.03 +.35 -1.48 -.74 +.26 +.16 +.01 +.00 -.60 +1.52 -.54 -2.71 -.43 -2.05 +.22 +1.04 -.22 ... -1.61 -1.51 +.13 +.42 +.34 +.17 +.27 +1.35 +.21 +.36 +.25 +2.54 -1.00 +.79 +.05 +1.17 -.07 +.77 +.11 +.29 +.07 +2.02 +.01 +.07 +.38 +.67 -.19 +2.57 -.25 +.47 +2.47+15.32 -.01 +.44 +.13 -.38 +1.88 -.52 +.44 +.76 -.90 -.06 +.42 +1.06

J-K-L j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JackHenry JackInBox Jamba JamesRiv JazzPhrm JetBlue JoyGlbl K Swiss

u28.20 +.51 +1.85 9.43 +.20 +1.10 26.19 -.58 +.87 11.40 +.28 +.90 u28.04 -.04 +.88 23.48 -.22 +.32 2.47 +.07 +.10 17.77 +.82 +.49 u14.28 +1.88 +3.65 u7.54 +.25 +.56 u75.33 +1.09 +4.38 12.19 -.06 +.03

KLA Tnc u37.57 -.24 +1.85 Kforce 15.52 +.07 +.51 KnightT u23.55 +.20 +1.88 KopinCp 3.73 +.04 -.08 Kulicke 6.61 ... +.39 L&L Egy n 9.43 +.48 +1.26 LJ Intl u5.64 ... +.54 LKQ Corp u22.59 +.14 +.84 LTXCrd rs 6.59 +.10 +.27 LamResrch u47.63 -.51 +1.84 LamarAdv 33.77 +.27 -.22 Landstar 39.08 -.09 +1.46 Lattice 4.94 -.04 +.08 LawsnSft u9.22 +.03 +.33 LeGaga n 9.60 -.28 -1.66 LeapWirlss 11.78 -.07 +.37 Level3 .91 +.02 -.06 LexiPhrm 1.63 -.07 -.14 LibGlobA u39.43 -.72 +1.67 LibGlobC u37.08 -1.02 +.89 LibtyMIntA 15.28 +.27 +.52 LibMCapA u59.21 +.12 +1.67 LibStrzA n 64.36 -1.02 -1.24 LifeTech 51.55 -.26 +1.37 LifePtH 34.62 +.11 +.70 LigandPhm 1.68 ... +.06 LimelghtN u6.60 -.55 -.19 LincEdSv 15.37 -.56 +2.91 LinearTch u32.94 -.17 +.69 LinnEngy u36.14 +.58 +1.81 Lionbrdg 3.96 +.16 -1.04 LodgeNet 3.02 +.10 +.47 Logitech 19.07 +.07 +.27 LogMeIn 40.05 +.58 +.32 lululemn g 48.09 +3.09 +3.77

M-N-O MB Fncl d16.49 +.55 +1.60 MCG Cap u7.24 +.08 +.91 MIPS Tech u15.04 +.07 +.34 MKS Inst 21.70 ... +1.05 MSG n 22.18 +1.19 +1.37 MagelnHl 48.77 -.73 +.77 MagicSft u3.35 +.05 +.63 Magma u4.24 -.18 -.05 MaidenH 7.89 +.07 +.24 MMTrip n 32.09 -1.28 -4.08 MAKO Srg 11.36 +.52 +.58 MannKd 5.54 +.03 -.84 MarvellT 20.80 +.28 +1.52 Masimo 30.16 -.16 -.01 Mattel 23.94 -.19 +.61 Mattson 2.69 ... +.14 MaximIntg u22.67 -.50 +1.01 MecoxL n d14.69 +.28 -1.64 MedAssets d18.54 +.36 -.05 Mediacom 7.03 -.02 +.13 MediCo 12.28 -.27 -.49 MelcoCrwn u6.57 -.15 +.30 Mellanox 23.99 -.16 +.95 MentorGr 10.93 -.04 +.11 MercadoL 61.24 -.44 -4.90 MercerIntl u6.57 +.18 +1.27 Methanx u29.33 +.07 +1.56 Micrel 12.35 +.05 +.43 Microchp u33.96 +.01 +1.78 Micromet 7.74 -.12 +.25 MicronT 8.65 +.10 +.40 MicrosSys 45.63 -.03 +.24 MicroSemi u21.17 +.46 +1.18 Microsoft 26.85 -.29 +.19

Microtune 2.90 Micrvisn d1.67 MillerPet 4.77 Millicom 95.99 Mindspeed 6.40 Molex 21.69 Momenta 16.35 MonPwSys 15.48 Motricity n u27.90 Move Inc u2.39 Mylan 20.14 MyriadG 20.71 NETgear 31.39 NGAS Rs h .60 NIC Inc 9.00 NII Hldg 42.73 NPS Phm 6.69 NXP Sem n 13.97 Nanomtr 12.74 NasdOMX 22.20 NatCineM 18.77 NatPenn 7.24 NektarTh 14.36 NetServic 13.48 NetLogic s 31.30 NetApp u55.10 Netease 41.09 Netflix 168.10 Netlist 3.20 NetSpend nu15.98 NetwkEng 1.65 Neurcrine 7.67 NeutTand 14.72 Newport 14.78 NewsCpA 14.50 NewsCpB 16.33 NorTrst 51.88 NwstBcsh 11.33 NovaMeas 6.65 NovtlWrls 10.12 Novavax 2.33 Novell 5.78 Novlus u30.63 NuVasive d24.00 NuanceCm 16.38 NutriSyst 20.73 Nvidia 12.61 NxStageMdu22.46 OReillyA h u58.43 OceanFr rs 1.05 Oclaro rs 9.97 OmniVisn u28.03 OnSmcnd 8.21 OnyxPh 29.64 OpenTxt 44.60 OpenTable u67.66 OpnwvSy 2.20 OplinkC 17.38 Opnext 1.43 Oracle u29.25 Orexigen 5.99 OriginAg 9.25 Oritani s 11.04 Oxigene h d.23

... +.01 -.03 -.38 -.01 -.73 -.98 +1.39 -.01 -.98 +.15 +1.39 +.06 -.35 +.08 -.60 +1.96 +5.94 -.06 +.03 -.10 -.18 -.07 +.85 -.04 +.58 +.01 +.03 +.56 +.32 -.75 +.92 -.02 +.46 ... +.78 +.17 -.73 +.31 +1.09 -.40 +.27 +.04 +.76 -.78 -.21 -.01 +.07 -.19 +1.24 +.17 +1.85 +1.09 -.73 +.28 -5.47 +.09 +.09 +.75 +2.26 -.04 -.02 -.11 -.47 +.04 +.10 -.11 +.24 -.25 +.02 -.23 +.24 +.25 +2.25 +.01 +.09 +.06 +.73 -.69 -.38 -.10 -.10 ... -.15 +.06 +1.41 -.29 -2.17 +.01 +.67 -.11 +1.61 +.21 +.58 +.21 +2.30 +.23 -.07 +.04 +.06 +.08 +1.56 +.45 +.90 +.20 +.54 +1.44 +2.81 +.38 +.37 -1.95 +6.19 +.03 +.14 -.15 -.08 -.07 -.08 -.22 -.13 +.19 +.70 -.08 +.55 +.09 +.39 +.01 -.02

P-Q-R PDL Bio 5.62 PF Chng 47.00 PMC Sra 7.97 PSS Wrld 23.09 Paccar u55.25

+.09 +.40 +.62 +1.29 +.11 +.28 +.06 -.56 +.08 +3.99

PacerIntl 5.60 PacBiosci nd14.56 PacCapB h d.42 PacSunwr 6.05 PaetecHld 4.20 PainTher u8.36 PanASlv u34.58 PaneraBrd 93.38 ParamTch u22.70 Parexel 21.66 Patterson 28.29 PattUTI 19.68 Paychex 28.20 Pegasys lf 27.89 PnnNGm 33.14 PennantPk 11.85 PensonWw d4.83 PeopUtdF 12.69 PerfectWld 32.00 Perrigo u63.91 PetroDev u35.95 PetsMart u38.28 PharmPdt 25.56 Pharmasset u40.06 PhnxTc 4.25 PhotrIn u6.82 Polycom u35.03 Pool Corp 21.74 Popular 2.87 PwrInteg 38.13 Power-One 9.41 PwShs QQQu53.67 Powrwav u2.22 PriceTR u60.46 priceline u388.87 PrimoWt n ud12.95 PrivateB 11.98 PrUPShQQQd33.43 ProspctCap 10.52 ProspBcsh 33.75 PsychSol u33.71 QIAGEN 18.68 QiaoXing 1.77 QlikTech n 23.48 Qlogic 18.23 Qualcom 48.33 QualitySys 64.06 QuantFu h .52 QuestSft u26.70 Questcor u12.84 QuickLog 5.57 QuinStrt n 16.01 RF MicD u7.43 RTI Biolog 2.57 RadntSys 19.53 RadOneD h .98 Radware 33.80 RAM Engy 1.56 Rambus 20.68 Randgold 97.01 RealNwk 3.52 RedRobin 18.65 Rdiff.cm 3.51 RegncyEn 26.11 Regenrn 26.53 RentACt 26.37 RepubAir u9.07 ResCare 13.10 RschMotn 55.66 ResConn 16.98 RexEnergy 11.24

+.21 +.03 +1.71 -2.24 -.06 -.22 +.13 +.09 -.14 -.02 -.24 +.68 +.07 +2.66 +.54 +3.87 +.09 +1.23 +.05 +.15 +.09 +.64 -.10 +.27 -.07 +.46 -.63 +.84 -.74 -.05 +.14 +.73 -.06 -.32 +.10 +.39 -.50 -.40 -.39 -1.97 +.23 +4.69 +.06 +.85 -.19 -.25 -.94 +2.56 ... +.15 -.08 +.53 +.38 +1.25 +.29 +1.60 +.04 +.14 +.31 +3.92 -.28 -1.01 ... +1.49 ... +.05 +1.33 +5.19 +8.75+12.06 ... ... -.02 +.19 -.02 -3.02 +.09 +.61 +.39 +2.66 ... +.01 -.16 -.14 ... ... -1.22 -1.49 +.18 +.65 -.01 +3.17 +.37 -.20 +.03 +.06 +.02 +.48 -.14 +.56 -.09 -.36 -.02 +.48 -.15 +.14 +.19 +.10 -.12 +.02 -.07 -.18 -.19 -1.50 +.02 +.13 +.46 +.94 -.30 +3.09 +.39 +.52 -1.61 -1.65 -.24 -.31 +.44 +1.23 -.32 +.42 +.07 +1.29 -.15 -.22 -.13 -.13 -1.45 -1.26 -.14 +.78 -.62 -1.09

RigelPh 8.10 -.13 -.21 RightNow u27.30 +.02 +1.11 RINO Intl 16.60 -.02 -1.74 Riverbed u59.28 +.15 +1.69 RodmanR 3.16 +.16 +.29 RosettaR u29.20 +3.79 +5.29 RossStrs u64.25 +.62 +5.26 Rovi Corp u52.16 +.13 +1.51 RoyGld 51.66 +.15 +2.15 RubiconTc 23.10 -2.21 +.02 Rudolph 8.20 +.03 +.79 RuthsHosp 4.97 +.18 +.41 Ryanair 31.52 -.13 -1.11

S-T-U S1 Corp 5.96 SBA Com 38.43 SEI Inv 23.36 SMTC g 4.03 STEC 17.93 SVB FnGp 47.17 SalixPhm 37.80 SanderFm 42.62 SanDisk 41.31 Sanmina 12.49 Santarus 3.34 Sapient u12.41 SavientPh 11.73 Savvis 23.87 Schnitzer 53.14 Scholastc 30.41 SciGames d7.87 SeacoastBk 1.24 SeagateT 15.32 SeahawkDr 10.31 SearsHldgs 73.34 SeattGen 14.71 SelCmfrt 8.79 Semtech u22.62 Sequenom 7.14 ShandaGm 6.30 Shire u73.08 ShoreTel 6.47 ShufflMstr 9.65 Shutterfly 30.52 SierraWr 11.36 Sify lf 2.00 SigaTech h 13.22 SigmaAld u65.34 SilicGrIn 7.52 SilicnImg u6.66 SilcnLab 41.68 SilicnMotn 4.64 Slcnware 5.54 SilvStd g u25.58 Sina u59.14 SinoTech n ud6.55 Sinovac 4.05 SiriusXM u1.53 SironaDent 38.06 SkywksSol u24.17 SmartBal 3.64 SmartM 7.56 SmartT gn 12.45 SmartHeat 6.89 SmithWes 3.83 SmithMicrou15.13 SodaStrm nud31.88 Sohu.cm 74.05 SolarCap n 23.11 Solarfun 11.03

-.03 +.14 -.71 -.83 +.19 +1.21 ... +.21 +.64 +2.33 +1.31 +3.83 -.21 -.03 -1.29 +.64 +.96 +3.68 -.04 -.70 +.04 +.21 -.83 -.75 -.63 -.70 -.24 -.14 -.01 +1.45 +.05 +.97 -.27 -.05 +.03 -.01 +.40 +.61 +.12 +.21 -.98 +1.36 -.12 -1.70 -.12 +.48 +.27 +1.21 +.50 +.78 -.18 -.38 +.03 +2.98 +.12 +.21 -.14 +.24 +.01 +.37 -.78 -.71 -.05 -.09 -.26 -.03 -.66 +1.85 -.17 -.05 -.01 +.51 ... +1.78 +.07 -.77 -.06 -.04 -.37 +1.30 +.69 +2.84 +.28 ... ... +.01 +.06 +.03 -.16 +.41 +.49 +1.25 +.08 +.08 -.17 +.16 +.37 -.54 +.13 +.41 +.04 +.08 +.26 +2.97 +1.88 ... -.29 -.45 -.10 +.79 +.39 +.82

SonicCorp 9.42 SonicSolu 12.72 Sonus 2.79 Sourcefire 25.02 SpectPh 4.41 Spreadtrm u16.09 Stamps.cm 15.10 Staples 20.79 StarBulk 3.16 StarScient 1.78 Starbucks u30.87 StlDynam 15.93 StemCell h .88 Stericycle 72.39 SterlBcsh 5.88 StewEnt 5.77 Strayer 135.57 SuccessF u28.27 SunHlthGp 9.37 SunOpta u7.19 SunPowerA 14.32 SunPwr B 13.89 SuperGen 2.74 support.cm u6.36 SusqBnc 8.25 SykesEnt 18.14 Symantec 17.21 Synaptics 29.16 Synchron u27.00 Synopsys u25.84 TD Ameritr 17.72 TFS Fncl 8.98 THQ 4.16 TICC Cap u11.20 TTM Tch u13.63 tw telecom 17.30 TakeTwo 11.13 TalecrisBio 23.48 Taleo A u32.24 TASER 4.11 TechData 46.20 TechTeam 8.29 Tekelec 13.60 TlCmSys 5.09 Tellabs 6.89 Telular u5.69 Terremk u11.62 TeslaMot n 24.44 TesseraT 21.20 TetraTc 21.68 TevaPhrm 50.77 TexRdhse u16.06 Theravnce 20.66 Thoratec 33.18 TianliAg n u7.73 TibcoSft u20.02 TiVo Inc 11.16 Toreador u15.96 TowerGrp u25.61 TowerSemi 1.66 TradeStatn 6.09 TransGlb u14.63 TridentM h 1.90 TriMas h 16.29 TrimbleN u37.91 TriQuint 10.65 TrueRelig 19.00 Trustmk 23.54 TuesMrn 5.21 USEcology 16.89 UTiWrldwd u19.67

+.06 +.53 +.74 +.75 -.02 -.33 +.27 +1.43 -.07 +.16 +.39 +1.82 -.02 -.84 +.05 +.26 +.22 +.24 -.03 -.22 +1.12 +2.31 +.20 +1.39 -.01 -.01 -.29 +.65 +.44 +.52 +.03 +.22 +2.66 -4.39 -.16 +1.15 -.16 -.14 +.10 +.73 +.21 +.72 +.19 +.67 -.01 -.04 +.23 +.68 -.05 +.34 +.06 +1.51 +.64 +1.02 -.09 +2.23 -.89 +5.69 +.13 +.26 +.20 +.63 -.14 +.25 +.18 +.16 +.29 +.86 +2.23 +3.15 -.32 -1.10 -.11 +.46 -.15 -1.04 -.17 +3.55 -.01 +.14 +1.03 +3.24 ... +1.03 -.20 +.56 -.70 -.33 -.01 +.07 +1.64 +2.08 +.19 +1.63 -.46 +2.60 +.43 +1.49 -.08 +.62 -.04 -1.11 -.11 +.67 -.19 +.28 +.25 +.52 +.70 +2.04 -.11 +.80 -.34 +.01 -.24 +2.20 +.17 +1.33 +.04 +.30 +.40 +.60 +1.81 +4.13 -.02 +.04 +.06 +.46 -.19 +2.07 +.10 +.35 +.27 -1.45 +.44 +1.45 +.08 +.42 -.02 +.67 -.42 +.45

UTStrcm 2.11 -.06 +.09 UltaSalon 32.30 +.44 +1.61 Umpqua 11.70 +.14 +.70 UtdCBksGa d1.81 -.03 -.15 UtdNtrlF u36.74 -.46 +.98 UtdOnln 7.11 -.03 +.93 UtdTherap 59.23 -.23 -.77 UtdWstrn h .46 -.03 +.06 UnivDisp 23.87 -2.26 -1.17 UrbanOut 32.44 +.72 +1.65

V-W-X-Y-Z VCA Ant 21.78 +.83 +1.11 ValueClick u15.45 +.01 +1.69 VarianSemi 33.91 -.30 +1.19 VeecoInst 44.00 -.09 +2.50 Verigy 9.53 +.38 +.36 Verisign 35.15 -.12 +.40 Verisk 30.27 -.24 +.46 VertxPh 35.06 +.29 -3.24 Vical d2.20 ... +.04 VirgnMda h u26.62 +.55 +1.19 ViroPhrm u16.78 -.22 +.42 VisnChina 3.97 +.02 -.20 VistaPrt 38.70 -.32 -3.37 Vivus 7.12 +.03 -.63 Vodafone u28.46 -.05 +.95 Volcano u26.60 +.35 +2.18 Volcom 16.34 +.39 +.17 Volterra 21.11 +.17 +.65 WarnerCh s 23.34 -.35 -.64 WarrenRs 4.18 ... ... WashFed 16.22 +.59 +1.17 Web.com u6.67 -.02 +.47 WebMD 52.10 -.14 -.18 Websense 21.90 +.16 +1.78 WernerEnt 21.89 +.21 +.56 WstCstB 2.69 +.05 +.06 WestellT u2.86 +.05 -.06 WstptInn g 18.37 -1.17 +.25 WetSeal 3.49 +.10 -.01 WhitneyH 9.07 +.14 +.79 WholeFd u45.49 -1.78 +5.74 Windstrm u13.23 -.03 +.57 Winn-Dixie 7.26 +.21 +.56 Wintrust 31.90 +.60 +1.96 WonderAuto 10.49 +.09 +.85 WrightM d13.72 +.64 +.37 Wynn u113.07 +.55 +5.91 XOMA rs 2.63 +.24 +.32 Xilinx 27.73 -.12 +.93 XinhuaSp h .27 +.01 +.04 Xyratex 16.59 +.33 +1.11 YRC Ww rs 4.16 -.60 -.25 Yahoo 16.27 +.07 -.23 Yongye 8.88 -.19 +.86 ZST Digtl 7.77 +.38 +.29 Zagg n 8.24 +.30 -.06 Zalicus 1.34 -.01 +.04 ZebraT u38.20 -.40 +2.42 Zhongpin u22.91 -.01 +2.69 ZionBcp 22.03 +.66 +1.28 Zix Corp u3.77 -.29 -.12 Zoltek 10.48 +.09 +.86 Zoran 7.20 ... +.12 Zumiez u28.07 -.69 +1.85


B USI N ESS

Jobs Continued from C3 Still, the economy has a long way to go before the world brightens for many Americans. Nearly 15 million people are out of work and actively looking, and the unemployment rate, which remained steady at 9.6 percent, has been relatively flat since May. A broader measure of unemployment, which includes people who are working part-time be-

Antibiotics Continued from C3 “For these infections, we’re back to dancing around a bubbling cauldron while rubbing two chicken bones together,” said Dr. Brad Spellberg, an infectious disease specialist at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif. For example, scientists have become alarmed by the spread from India of a newly discovered mutation called NDM-1, which renders certain germs like E. coli invulnerable to nearly all modern antibiotics. About 100,000 Americans a year are killed by infections acquired in hospitals, many resistant to multiple antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, the best known superbug, now kills more Americans each year than AIDS.

A necessity? While the notion of directly subsidizing drug companies may be politically unpopular in many quarters, proponents say it is necessary to bridge the gap between the high value that new antibiotics have for society and the low returns they provide to drug companies. “There is a market failure,” said Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., and chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, who said he was considering introducing legislation. “We need to look at ways to spur development of this market.” With the Republicans having won control of the House this week, Waxman will lose his committee chairmanship. But the idea of spurring antibiotic development appears to have some bipartisan support. Rep. Phil Gingrey, a Georgia Republican and a physician, recently introduced the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now bill, which would provide certain antibiotics with five extra years of protection from generic competition and speed the reviews of new antibiotics by the Food and Drug Administration. Besides tax breaks and extra protection from competition, other ideas policymakers are considering include additional federal funding of research and guaranteed purchases by the government of new antibiotics. Measures like these are already used to encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases, through the Orphan Drug Act, and for illnesses like malaria that primarily afflict poor countries. The Obama administration is also taking some steps. The federal agency that oversees de-

Fannie Continued from C3 Borrowers who took loans from 2005 to 2008 continue to default on their obligations, and the homes that they leave behind can be sold only at sharp discounts. The average sale of a foreclosed home in the third quarter recouped only 57 percent of the money left unpaid by the original borrower, Fannie Mae said. The company sought to underscore Friday that it now conducted business with greater sobriety,

cause they cannot find full-time jobs and people who have given up looking for work, ticked down slightly to 17 percent from 17.1 percent in September. The economy last added jobs in May, when more than 400,000 workers were hired by the federal government to help with the Census. In the absence of congressional action, the last tier of unemployment benefits is also set to expire soon. With little prospect of employment in the near future,

“There’s not a recognition yet that we should think about antibiotics as a natural resource and we should conserve them like we do fish.” — Ramanan Laxminarayan, director of the Extending the Cure project on antibiotic resistance at Resources for the Future velopment of treatments for bioterrorism agents like anthrax is broadening its scope to encompass more common infections. In August, the agency, known as the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, awarded its first such “multi-use” contract, giving an initial $27 million to a company called Achaogen to develop an antibiotic that could be used for plague and tularemia as well as antibiotic-resistant infections. The Department of Health and Human Services is considering creating an independent fund that would invest in small biodefense companies. Antibiotic-resistant germs would be one priority, according to a report that the department issued in August. The European Union is also working on a plan, based on proposals for possible incentives from the London School of Economics. A year ago, the United States and the European Union formed a task force on antibiotic resistance.

many of the nation’s long-term unemployed, whose numbers hover around record highs, have become increasingly desperate. “I hope that Congress can become human and forget about being Democrats or Republicans and just be human beings to see what it’s like for us,” said Annette Tornberg, 50, of Sacramento. Tornberg was laid off from her job at a printing company in 2009 and has been unable to find work. “We’re human beings, and all we want is for you to help us out.”

directs the Extending the Cure project on antibiotic resistance at Resources for the Future, a policy organization, said the government should focus on conserving the effectiveness of existing antibiotics. That could be done by preventing unnecessary use in people and farm animals and requiring better infection control measures in hospitals. “There’s not a recognition yet that we should think about antibiotics as a natural resource and we should conserve them like we do fish,” Laxminarayan, an economist, said. Kevin Outterson, an associate professor of law at Boston University, said one way to encourage both new development and conservation would be to pay drug companies to develop new antibiotics but not to aggressively market them. Incentives, he said, “must be conditioned on the companies’ changing their behavior.”

Disincentives

Despite the activity, there is no consensus on what would work best and little discussion yet of how much such measures would cost. A paper issued last month by the Office of Health Economics, a consulting firm owned by the British pharmaceutical industry’s trade group, suggested that incentives exceeding $1 billion per drug would be required. Some critics say the case for incentives is not yet persuasive. There are signs that the drug industry is picking up its efforts on its own, in response to perceived need. The number of antibiotics in clinical trials has climbed sharply in the last three years, reversing a steady decline that began in the 1980s, according to figures from the FDA. The efforts are being led by small companies, which can be satisfied with smaller sales. Ramanan Laxminarayan, who

Only five new antibiotics were approved by the FDA from 2003 through 2007, down from 16 in the period from 1983 to 1987. A survey last year by European health authorities found only 15 antibiotics in clinical trials that offered some promise of going beyond what is available today. Only five of the 13 biggest pharmaceutical companies still try to discover new antibiotics, said Dr. David M. Shlaes, a consultant to the industry and the author of a new book “Antibiotics: The Perfect Storm.” One reason is that antibiotics are typically taken for a week or two and usually cure the patient. While that makes them cost-effective for the health system, it also makes them less lucrative to drug companies than medicines for diseases like cancer or diabetes, which might be taken for months, or even for life, because they do not cure the patient. “There’s this perverse disincentive against antibiotics because they work so well,” said J. Kevin Judice, chief executive of Achaogen. Another factor is that new antibiotics are likely to be used only sparingly at first, to stave off the emergence of resistance. While that might be medically appropriate, it reduces the ability of a drug company to recoup its investment, said Dr. Barry Eisenstein, a senior vice president at the antibiotic maker Cubist Pharmaceuticals. Another factor discouraging investment, some experts say, is that the FDA has made it harder recently for new antibacterial drugs to win approval.

even though losses on old loans would persist for years. “The loans we have acquired since the beginning of 2009 reflect our commitment to realistic, common-sense lending standards and sustainable homeownership,” Michael Williams, Fannie Mae’s chief executive, said in a statement. The government seized Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2008 to ensure the availability of mortgage loans. The companies provide money to lenders by buying new loans; those loans then are bundled into securities for resale to investors.

The Obama administration has said the two companies should be replaced by a new system of government support for the mortgage market. The administration said it planned to present recommendations to Congress early next year. In the meantime, to keep the companies in business, the government provides enough money each quarter to balance their books. In exchange, the companies must pay the government a quarterly dividend. The companies have now absorbed $152.8 billion in taxpayer aid and returned $16.5 billion in dividend payments.

Arguments against

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 C5

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Patty Moore has joined Journeys Peak Travel. With 13 years of travel experience, Moore is a cruise specialist for Princess and Cunard cruise lines and a destination expert for Mexico and Hawaii. Charles Schirm has joined Oregon Valley Business Brokers. Based in Bend, he will represent sellers and buyers in the sale or acquisition of businesses in Central Oregon. With more than 30 years of business experience and training, Schirm is skilled in business sales, business valuation and finance. Jerry Upham has joined News Press & Gazette of Oregon as local sales manager for Bend Fox affiliate KFXO and CW affiliate NTVZ. Upham has more than 25 years of television sales and management experience, most recently as general manager of KOHD in Bend, and prior to that as general manager of KFXO when the station was owned by Meredith Broadcasting. Jean Morgan has been

Fed Continued from C3 But the Fed’s announcement Wednesday that it would resume a strategy of buying Treasury securities to lower long-term interest rates has generated unease around the world. As Bernanke spoke, the Treasury secretary, Timothy Geithner, arrived in Kyoto, Japan, for a meeting of finance ministers of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, where American complaints about the undervaluation of the Chinese currency will probably be countered with accusations that the Fed is engaging in an exchange-rate move of its own. “What the U.S. accuses China of doing, the USA is doing by different means,” the German finance minister, Wolfgang Schauble, said of the Fed’s new decision. Earlier, the Brazilian finance minister, Guido Mantega, who has warned of a global currency war, predicted that the Fed’s move would be ineffective, saying, “Throwing money out of a helicopter

Charles Schirm

Jean Morgan

named traffic manager of Horizon Broadcasting Group’s six radio stations in Bend. She is responsible for the production of all daily programming logs, including commercial advertising and scheduling. Morgan comes to HBG from Journal Broadcast Group in Boise, Idaho. She was HBG’s traffic manager from 2001 to 2009, working remotely from Boise, and prior to that served in the same capacity for Citadel Broadcasting in Boise and Pacific Northwest Broadcasting Corp. Chris Holzshu has been elected by the Lithia Motors Inc. board of directors to be senior vice president/chief financial officer, moving up from vice president of op-

doesn’t do any good.” Bernanke has defended the Fed’s decision to pump $600 billion into the banking system as a modest but necessary step to support the American recovery, and he told the students: “A strong U.S. economy is critical not just for Americans but for a global recovery.” The chairman also addressed critics who were worried that the Fed’s move could touch off uncontrollable inflation, even though the current rate is well below the Fed’s unofficial goal of about 2 percent. “We are absolutely committed to keeping inflation low and stable,” Bernanke said. “We have the tools to unwind and tighten policy at the appropriate time, when that time comes.” The chairman spoke in Jacksonville before traveling here for a conference on Fed history, attended by many presidents of Fed regional banks, along with a legion of Fed veterans and top economists. Bernanke and his predecessor, Alan Greenspan, whose 18-year tenure coincided with a period of economic calm that ended soon after Bernanke

erational planning and analysis for the Medford-based company. In July, Lithia took over Bendbased Bob Thomas Car Co.’s General Motors lines and bought his Honda franchise. Holzshu is directly involved in operations and continues to oversee the performance-monitoring functions within the company, including setting operational targets for store performance and improvements, tracking and managing companywide budgets and leading capital deployment decision making. Amy Tykeson, president and CEO of BendBroadband, was recently honored at the 2010 Oregon Connections Conference in Hood River. Tykeson received the Edwin B. Parker Enduring Achievement Award for her contributions to the telecommunications industry in Oregon. At the conference, presenters and attendees examined the importance of broadband telecommunications for business, government, education, health care, public safety, communities and individuals.

succeeded him, are scheduled to speak Saturday at the conference, organized by the Atlanta Fed and Rutgers University. Leading scholars of the Fed voiced skepticism about the latest step, which even Fed officials acknowledge will have only modest effects on employment and growth. “Learning is slow when you need it most,” said Charles Calomiris, an economist at Columbia Business School who presented research on the Fed’s policy mistakes from its founding until 1951, most notably during the Depression. “Volatile times make learning and accountability much harder, because views that might be false are harder to discredit.” Calomiris said he would “make a strong case” against additional purchases of government debt, and added: “When we need central banks to act the wisest, they often act the least wise.”

The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac u7.10 AbdAustEq u13.30 AbdnChile u24.84 AbdnEMTel 19.37 AbdnIndo 14.47 AdcareHlt 4.01 AdeonaPh .75 AdvPhot 1.10 Advntrx rs 2.07 AlexcoR g u6.78 AlldNevG 27.47 AlmadnM g 3.06 AlphaPro 1.89 AmApparel 1.13 AmDefense .14 AmLorain 2.77 AmO&G u9.57 Anooraq g 1.36 AntaresP 1.48 ArcadiaRs .32 ArmourRsd 7.28 Augusta g 4.10 Aurizon g u7.60 BMB Munai .77 Baldw 1.25 Ballanty u7.55 Banks.com .32 Banro g 3.01 BarcUBS36 u46.37 BarcGSOil 24.70

+.07 +.20 -.03 +.60 +.67 +2.29 +.09 +.29 -.09 -.32 -.15 +.09 +.03 -.06 +.14 +.10 -.05 -.03 +.01 +.58 +.45 +2.83 +.02 +.18 -.07 +.23 -.04 +.16 -.01 -.03 -.13 -.29 +.08 +.96 ... +.08 +.06 +.02 -.00 -.05 ... -.06 -.02 +.19 +.19 +.92 +.03 -.02 +.07 +.17 -.85 -.87 ... -.04 -.07 +.06 +.24 +1.90 +.10 +1.68

BrcIndiaTR u83.64 BioTime 6.05 BlkMuIT2 14.73 BlkMunvst 10.30 BlonderT u2.09 BovieMed 2.27 Brigus grs 1.75 BritATob u79.25 CPI Aero u12.60 CAMAC n 2.82 CanoPet .36 CapGold n 4.53 CaracoP 4.61 Cardero g 1.34 CardiumTh .49 CelSci .66 CFCda g u18.78 CentGold g u53.16 CheniereEn 3.70 CheniereE 18.69 ChiArmM 3.76 ChiGengM 1.77 ChIntLtg n 3.10 ChiMarFd 6.66 ChinNEPet 7.20 ChinaPhH 3.12 ChinaShen 2.81 ClarkH wt .00 ClaudeR g u1.69 CloughGA 15.76 CloughGEq u15.47 ClghGlbOp u13.73

+.84 +6.75 -.18 +.05 +.08 +.13 ... -.08 -.21 -.24 +.40 +.41 ... +.16 -.02 +3.02 -.02 +1.48 +.03 +.18 -.00 -.04 -.06 +.14 -.38 -.55 -.05 +.12 +.02 +.03 +.00 -.02 +.26 +1.08 +.28 +1.46 -.09 +.42 -.17 -.49 +.10 +.03 +.03 -.15 +.03 +.20 -.01 +.84 +.07 +.48 -.02 +.01 +.40 +.56 ... -.01 ... +.13 +.13 +.64 +.28 +.81 +.17 +.84

Comforce ConmedH CnsTom Contango CornstProg CornerstStr CrSuisInco CrSuiHiY Crossh glf Crystallx g CubicEngy Cytomed DejourE g DenisnM g DigitalPwr DocuSec Dreams EV CAMu EV LtdDur EVMuniBd eMagin EmersnR h EndvrInt EndvSilv g EngyInco EnovaSys EntGaming EntreeGold EvolPetrol ExeterR gs Express-1 FiveStar

u2.47 3.37 28.90 55.01 7.10 11.01 u3.73 3.00 .22 .36 d.61 .49 .36 u2.51 u1.95 4.07 2.09 12.76 16.73 13.59 4.13 2.00 1.27 u5.87 27.72 1.11 .40 2.73 6.12 6.13 u2.71 u6.34

+.01 +.82 -.02 -.01 -.11 +2.63 +.01 +2.42 +.06 +.13 +.05 +.09 +.02 -.00 +.01 +.08 +.00 -.01 -.00 +.01 ... -.02 +.01 +.03 ... +.05 -.05 +.41 -.14 +.85 +.14 +.44 +.04 +.02 +.02 -.34 +.07 +.05 +.03 -.06 +.25 +.24 +.03 -.05 +.01 -.11 +.62 +.98 +.14 +.85 +.06 +.15 +.03 -.01 -.02 +.15 -.03 +.18 +.12 +.32 +.02 +.26 +.19 +.91

FortuneI .29 FrkStPrp 12.91 FrTmpLtd 13.56 Fronteer g u8.60 FullHseR 3.63 GSE Sy 3.62 GabGldNR 18.37 GascoEngy .36 Gastar grs 3.78 GenMoly u5.40 GeoGloblR .75 Geokinetics 6.72 GoldRsv g 1.44 GoldResrc 23.17 GoldenMin u26.06 GoldStr g u5.78 GldFld d.30 GrahamCp 17.98 GranTrra g 7.46 GrtBasG g u2.94 GreenHntr .93 GpoSimec 7.42 GugFront u24.98 Gulfstream d.16 HQ SustM 3.30 HSBC CTI 8.14 HawkCorp 49.83 HearUSA 1.08 Hemisphrx .50 HooperH .74 HstnAEn 14.12 Hyperdyn 3.23

... +.01 -.24 -.45 +.08 +.08 +.04 +.66 -.02 +.13 -.09 +.04 +.43 +.76 +.01 +.02 -.09 +.10 +.33 +.18 -.01 -.05 +.12 -.10 -.05 +.06 -.22 +2.07 -.09 -.19 +.10 +.56 ... ... -.05 +1.01 -.28 ... -.04 +.13 +.04 +.07 -.05 +.18 +.23 +1.09 ... -.41 -.05 -.01 +.05 +.23 -.16 ... +.07 +.08 -.01 -.02 ... +.04 -.30 +.07 +.21 +.77

iMergent ImpOil gs IndiaGC InovioPhm Intellichk IntTower g Inuvo InvVKAdv2 Iteris KeeganR g Kemet KimberR g KodiakO g LGL Grp LaBarg LadThalFn Lannett Libbey LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LongweiPI LucasEngy MAG Slv g MadCatz g MagHRes Metalico Metalline MetroHlth MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt

4.39 38.70 .83 1.21 1.30 u8.42 .34 12.78 1.46 u8.32 u4.30 1.01 4.13 25.60 13.04 1.35 5.87 14.15 10.59 u1.70 u3.50 2.06 u9.47 .50 4.92 4.54 .64 u4.36 .61 u1.46 9.09 2.94

+.11 -.15 -.16 -.08 -.02 +.05 +.05 +.08 +.02 +.07 -.07 +.98 -.01 +.01 ... +.12 +.05 +.04 +.02 +.52 +.20 +.56 +.01 +.06 -.03 ... -.68 -.77 -.30 +.35 +.08 +.19 +.69 +.75 +.11 +.86 ... +.09 +.01 +.06 +.31 +.72 +.02 +.07 -.20 +1.15 +.04 +.06 +.15 +.14 ... +.20 ... +.01 -.05 +.12 +.01 ... -.07 +.28 -.23 +.28 +.10 +.46

MtnPDia g 5.15 -.10 +.19 NIVS IntT 2.62 -.31 -.23 NeoStem 1.85 -.14 -.03 NBRESec u4.00 +.01 +.12 Neuralstem 2.30 -.02 +.07 Nevsun g u6.17 ... +.46 NDragon .04 -.00 ... NewEnSys 7.64 +.20 +1.27 NwGold g u8.23 -.08 +.83 NA Pall g u5.48 +.31 +.83 NDynMn g 9.45 -.05 +.43 NthnO&G u20.65 +.44 +.97 NthgtM g 2.83 -.11 +.02 NovaGld g u13.36 +.48 +2.14 NvDCmdty 26.26 +1.06 +1.22 NuvDiv2 14.76 +.06 +.09 NuvDiv3 14.66 +.02 +.08 NvInsDv 14.77 -.01 -.03 NMuHiOp 13.05 -.13 +.10 NuvREst u10.60 +.18 +.50 NvTxAdFlt 2.55 +.01 -.06 Oilsands g d.41 -.01 -.03 OpkoHlth u2.99 -.04 +.23 OrienPap n 6.90 +.33 +1.45 OrionEngy 3.43 -.02 +.08 OrsusXel .17 -.01 -.01 Palatin rs d1.30 -.04 -.07 ParaG&S 1.74 +.01 +.05 ParkNatl 68.11 +.15 +2.76 PhrmAth 3.36 -.07 -.15 PionDvrsHi u21.48 +.26 +.74 PionDrill 6.40 +.04 +.24

Biggest mutual funds PlatGpMet 2.31 -.02 +.34 PolyMet g 1.96 +.03 +.11 ProceraNt .49 -.01 -.10 ProlorBio 6.34 -.01 +.30 Protalix 9.77 +.08 +.11 PudaCoal u11.99 +1.54 +3.18 Quaterra g 1.70 +.13 +.25 RadientPh .46 +.00 -.05 RaeSyst 1.60 ... +.01 RareEle g 10.69 +.07 -.67 ReavesUtl 22.16 -.02 -.03 RegeneRx .28 +.01 +.03 RELM 2.08 +.02 +.04 RenhngPh 2.46 +.03 +.22 Rentech 1.25 ... +.06 RexahnPh 1.11 +.05 ... Richmnt g 5.28 ... +.55 Rubicon g 4.13 -.07 +.45 SamsO&G 1.24 +.03 +.05 SeabGld g 30.02 -.12 +2.69 SearchMed 3.03 -.16 +.45 Senesco .27 +.00 +.04 SinoHub 2.42 ... +.17 Solitario 2.26 ... +.04 SondeR grs 3.19 +.02 -.01 SprottRL g 1.86 +.09 +.06 SulphCo .22 -.01 -.03 TanzRy g 7.03 -.04 +.05 Taseko 4.67 -.05 -1.64 Tengsco .53 +.04 +.11 TianyinPh 3.49 +.02 +.17 TimberlnR 1.15 ... -.03

TrnsatlPt n 3.24 +.02 +.19 TravelCtrs 3.25 +.09 +.30 TriValley .66 -.01 -.08 TrioTch 4.70 +.19 -1.19 Tucows g .70 +.03 -.02 TwoHrbInv 9.27 ... +.05 UQM Tech d2.15 +.07 -.21 US Geoth 1.10 +.01 +.23 Uluru .09 +.00 -.01 Univ Insur 4.69 -.02 +.14 Ur-Energy u1.57 -.06 +.22 Uranerz u3.21 +.22 +.97 UraniumEn u4.61 +.09 +.74 VangTotW u48.26 -.01 +1.77 VantageDrl 1.78 ... +.06 VantDrl wt d.01 ... ... Versar 3.14 +.03 -.03 VirnetX 18.12 -.08 -.43 VistaGold 3.03 +.21 +.28 WalterInv 18.27 +.02 +.01 WFAdvInco 10.38 +.04 +.08 WFAdMSec 16.35 +.03 +.17 Wesco 371.67 +2.72 +8.68 WhitestR n u13.60 -.04 +.27 WidePoint u1.39 +.03 +.09 Wilber u9.47 +.16 +.21 WT DrfChn 25.59 -.07 +.05 WT Drf Bz 29.21 -.19 +.43 WizzardSft .27 ... +.04 Xfone 1.43 -.02 +.09 YM Bio g 2.08 -.04 +.05 ZBB Engy .71 -.06 -.03

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: GwthFdA p American Funds A: CapInBldA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapWGrA p American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Stock Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk American Funds A: EupacA p American Funds A: WshMutA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA px American Funds A: NewPerA p American Funds A: FundInvA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n American Funds A: BalA p

IB XC LG BL LG GL BL SP SP LC LV IL IL LC IB BL GL LC XC BL

144,752 67,000 64,096 58,470 58,191 54,945 51,266 48,658 47,989 47,546 40,078 40,051 39,464 37,596 35,095 33,023 32,555 31,383 31,061 30,718

+0.4 +5.5 +5.5 +2.6 +6.4 +3.7 +2.7 +5.3 +5.3 +4.4 +5.6 +4.5 +3.6 +4.0 +0.4 +2.5 +4.8 +4.8 +5.5 +3.6

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

+12.0/B +19.1/B +15.2/D +12.4/D +21.1/B +11.9/E +16.1/A +17.3/A +17.1/A +13.8/D +15.1/B +16.3/B +13.0/C +16.4/B +11.7/B +17.6/A +16.1/C +16.7/B +19.3/B +15.3/B

+54.1/A +14.8/C +16.0/B +28.8/A +29.3/A +35.4/A +26.4/B +11.8/A +11.2/A +14.4/B +1.2/D +36.0/B +43.5/A +10.9/C +52.2/A +33.0/A +39.6/A +26.5/A +15.3/C +22.0/C

1,000,000 3,000 250 250 2,500 250 250 5,000,000 3,000 250 2,500 2,500 250 250 1,000,000 1,000 250 250 100,000 250

Percent Load

NAV

NL 11.73 NL 30.63 5.75 30.00 5.75 51.02 NL 66.99 5.75 36.29 5.75 16.74 NL 112.29 NL 113.01 5.75 27.75 NL 104.89 NL 36.27 5.75 42.26 5.75 26.78 NL 11.73 4.25 2.17 5.75 28.50 5.75 35.91 NL 30.64 5.75 17.80

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Minor parties flexed muscle

A

n interesting thing happened on the way to John Kitzhaber’s victory this week. Two minor parties flexed their muscles, and Chris Dudley toppled. When the con-

ditions are right, you don’t need to win an election, or even come close, to have a profound effect on the outcome. The candidates for the Constitution and Libertarian parties received roughly 38,000 votes, according to Friday’s largely complete tally. This number represents less than 3 percent of all votes cast for governor, but it’s more than twice as large as the gap separating Kitzhaber and Dudley, which was roughly 17,000 votes on Friday. Though each party is unique, the Constitution and Libertarian parties are ideologically closer to the Republican Party than the Democratic Party, at least when it comes to fiscal and regulatory issues. For that reason, their two candidates pulled a lot more votes from Dudley than from Kitzhaber, perhaps even enough to cost Dudley the election. Meanwhile, according to The Oregonian, minor parties that share many values with the Democratic Party were pressured not to field gubernatorial candidates. So, while Dudley leaked tens of thousands of votes on his right, Kitzhaber leaked none on his left. Here’s another way to look at the results. As of Friday, about 690,000 people voted for Kitzhaber, and 711,000 voted for candidates to his

“As of Friday, about 690,000 people voted for Kitzhaber, and 711,000 voted for candidates to his right. ... We hope the numbers push him to the political center.” right. Smaller-government, free-market voters outnumbered Kitzhaber voters, but a Democrat running on the strength of public-sector union money prevailed. Kitzhaber and his supporters, who ran a smart and effective campaign, deserve a great deal of credit for the results. But there are lessons here for all involved. For Kitzhaber, we hope the numbers push him to the political center. Voters gave him an office — and a decidedly mixed message to go with it. And for those who supported minor-party candidates, we hope they consider this year’s outcome when voting in the future. They’ve just demonstrated how much even small bunches of votes can matter, but how many of them are happy with the result?

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s note: The following editorial, which appeared on July 21, 1922, does not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

Boosters Did you ever stop and think, friends, what a grand thing the Bend spirit is? How contagious it is and how proud we are of our city? Do you realize if we would back up this Pride by our Loyalty that we could be just twice as proud when we got through. And that is what we should all do. If Jack, the little scamp, has worn out those shoes you bought him we are going to suggest that you buy your next pair in Bend. If you are contemplating building or improving, secure your materials in Bend and contract Bend labor. If you are not confining all of your purchases to this city, start today. Try this awhile and see how good it feels to look yourself in the glass each morning and be able to say, “Howdy, Old Booster!” To tell the truth, friends, if you could buy merchandise at 50 cents on the dollar away from Bend you still cannot afford — either as a property owner or as a working person — to remove that 50 cents from the community. When you do, you are knocking the props from under your own property values, undermining the financial structure that forms our indus-

trial existence and thus remove from the working homes of our community just that much sustenance, comfort and happiness. We want to burn this in deep. You cannot measure so-called money saving against the tearing down process that involves the community from whence it comes. There fore keep your money at home by spending it at home. And to make times good, property values high and employment for all — let normal business transaction prevail without doubts or misgivings. Buy what you need freely. Money put in circulation comes back in wages, crop receipts, investments and in prosperity. Hoarding dollars is a game we should all discourage. Spending them foolishly is another matter. But purchasing the requirements of living, indulging in reasonable amusement and sane investments spells progress and financial success for all. “Setting Tight” is a pastime of the Doubter who contributes nothing to the prosperous conditions which can be made to always prevail. Hard times exist most in the minds of pessimists. Take yourself from this class. Wear the smile of optimism, show commercial courage and faith and keep boosting for Bend. By so doing we will have Civic Success, Personal Success and a City to be proud of.

My Nickel’s Worth Awbrey Glen

Buy locally

Conger and schools

A recent article in The Bulletin made it sound like Awbrey Glen was a terrible place to live. I will say what a pleasure it is to live in Awbrey Glen and belong to Awbrey Glen Golf Club. There is a spirit of cooperation between the two entities that is not always found in gated communities. Examples: The Glen Gives, our own nonprofit organization, started in 2004, has raised close to $400,000 to help hundreds of local families with a onetime assistance to allow them to get their lives back on track. One hundred percent of monies raised assist local families. All overhead is contributed by our committee members. New this year was a yard sale that required huge cooperation between the golf club and the residents of Awbrey Glen. Over $11,000 was raised that day. For more than four years, the Awbrey Glen community, including the golf club, has been working on fire issues with the fire department and the Oregon Department of Forestry. Home and lot owners were encouraged to remove combustible vegetation from their properties. Tons were removed this spring. This year, we applied for and received a “firewise community” designation from Firewise Communities/USA. Because of this, we received a two-year grant from Deschutes County so we could thin our evergrowing pines and clean up the north and northwest parts of Awbrey Glen community, including the golf course. I am proud to live in this caring community. Sonya McLaughlin Bend

What is up with the “Market magic” piece in a recent issue? We see pictures from local stores in Bend, but does the article say anything at all about these markets? No. It’s all about some market in Corvallis that has already closed its doors. Truly a little could have been said about our local stores here in Bend. In this economy we (the local store owners) need all help we can get. Instead of just posting pictures about our stores, why not say a little about each and why these stores are such treasures to the community (as the article points out). The article did get it right that a lot of the local stores are a very reliable route for regional growers and also food vendors to get their products to the consumer. Consumers don’t understand that a lot of the local stores are a great resource for farmers who don’t have time to do farmers markets. Most of the produce during the growing season can be found at these stores. The plus side of shopping these stores is that it is helping the local economy. We, the owners of these businesses, employ locally; we live here and spend our money here. The local retailer/owner can spend more time with customers, give them more information about the products they sell and actually have knowledge about the products they sell. Best of all, if you shop the local stores you are helping our local economy. Connie Lowe Bend

On Oct. 27, letter writer Josh Gatling depicted future House Rep. Jason Conger as having “right wing social values.” He depicts Conger as promoting “fringe education theories” — like home-schooling and voucher programs. Perhaps Gatling hasn’t been informed of some very interesting facts. For instance, home-schooled kids perform head-and-shoulders above public school students on national tests. And it is well documented that there is an inverse relationship between massive infusions of taxes into public schools and their academic results. More money, less performance. Informed citizens opt out of public education if they can, and Conger appears to be no exception. Vouchers put money back into citizens’ pockets to best educate their kids — after they have already paid high taxes for public schools. Sadly, vouchers, home-schooling and charter schools have become “the” tools to attack troubled public education only after the desperate requests for local, state and federal reforms have been met with union and teacher stiffarming. Indeed, Conger seems to have an excellent grasp of the public education intransigence, and he is just what is needed in Salem. Our president has made the reform of public schools one of his highest priorities. Let’s watch the Jason Congers help get that job done. Our nation is still at risk due to our troubled public schools. Ron Deady Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

How schoolkids and adults can deal with bullying By Wendy Ely Bulletin guest columnist

N

ational Bullying Prevention Awareness month is everyone’s opportunity to share constructive ideas. My own past experiences of parenting and teaching helped me recognize the bully is always being bullied himself by negative feelings and thoughts he can’t control. When the bully learns how to manage the inner conflict and grows into a better self-concept, the bullying often stops. This can happen through positive responses instead of negative reactions. I don’t think it’s naive to accept that gaining an understanding of one’s own goodness enables anyone to take the next important step of seeing a bully in a new light. When “a victim” learns how to see the situation more positively, he finds strength to look at “the villain” with a new caring, which changes the

whole scene. Children who learn to find and focus on positive qualities in the bully discover a transformation in their own thinking that often breaks the victim/bully cycle effectively. Reporting bullying instead of remaining silent helps both victim and bully. It can lead to counseling for the bully. At times, school counselors uncover abuse from a parent at home, and when the family is given needed support to find better ways to manage conflict, the bullying at school stops. By speaking up, victims, in turn, can receive the comfort and advice they need to overcome fear, and to find positive ways, such as humor and empathy, to counter bullying. In my experience, the conflict managersprogram at Kenwood Elementary School consistently thwarted bullying. Older students were trained as “conflict managers.” Instead of finding a

IN MY VIEW teacher, a child concerned about unfair treatment sought out a student conflict manager, who wore a special T-shirt. The mistreated student was asked to speak first about what happened and how he felt. The “wrongdoer” had to listen, and then paraphrase what the other student said. Often the first speaker had to repeat himself more than once. After the second child successfully conveyed the other’s viewpoint, he was allowed to share his own perspective. Next, the role of paraphrasing was reversed. Finally, after both students felt understood, the conflict manager asked how they could resolve the problem. Ninety percent of the time, they followed “their plan,” which ended the problem! What if positive communication or

counseling isn’t possible? One is never too young or too old to learn how the power of choosing to improve his own thinking can transform a bullying situation into something better. Willingness to replace negative, fearful thoughts with inspired, loving thoughts can stop meanness in its tracks. This is not to say “victims” are responsible for bullies, but to suggest we can all accept responsibility for our own thoughts and actions; this has a huge impact on our experience. A dear friend was badly abused by her roommate for some years until she realized she could take action — she could move away. This positive action in itself did not immediately solve the problem, because memories of abuse continued to enslave her. Finally, tired of being so intimidated by fear, she began to slowly replace feelings of negativity, hate, anger, self-condemnation, self-

pity and the expectation of continued struggle with good images and happy expectations. The conviction that her brighter outlook could indeed wipe the slate clean gave her the confidence to slowly regain her complete freedom. In her own consciousness, she was mentally freed from the ugly label the bully represented. In time, she found herself feeling the compassion that allowed her to separate the wrongdoing from the person. So what can we do about bullying? We can ask for help when it’s needed! We can take responsibility for our own thinking and actions and try to find the good that is so hard to see in hurtful circumstances. Not always easy, for sure, but we can choose to gain good from our trials, which is always worth the effort and can bring life-changing results! Wendy Ely lives in Crooked River Ranch.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 C7

O D

N   Vernon K. Siedelman, of Redmond Jan. 2, 1937 - Oct. 30, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 2:30 PM, Nov. 6, 2010, Redmond Christian Church, 9th and Evergreen, Redmond, OR.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Wetlands Continued from C1 The local study found about 180 wetlands, which was three times what a consultant working for Deschutes County had anticipated, county Principal Planner Peter Gutowsky said. The county was awarded about $124,000 in grants from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and the Deschutes River Mitigation and Enhancement Program, to cover the cost of the survey.

Survey key to planning

Actress Jill Clayburgh dies at 66 By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Jill Clayburgh, an Oscar-nominated actress known for portraying strong, independent women, died on Friday at her home in Lakeville, Conn. She was 66. The cause was chronic leukemia, with which she had lived for 21 years, her husband, the playwright David Rabe, said. Clayburgh, who began her career in films and on Broadway in the late 1960s, was among the first generation of young actresses — including Ellen Burstyn, Carrie Snodgress and Marsha Mason — who regularly portrayed characters sprung from the new femi-

(The best-actress Oscar went to Jane Fonda in “Coming Home.”) Reviewing “An Unmarried Woman” in The Times, Vincent Canby wrote: “Miss Clayburgh is nothing less than extraordinary in what is the performance of the year to date. In her we see intelligence battling feeling — reason backed against the wall by pushy needs.” Clayburgh also received an Oscar nomination for “Starting Over” (1979), directed by Alan Pakula. She played a teacher who embarks on a relationship with a newly divorced man played by Burt Reynolds. Reviewing that film in The

Times, Janet Maslin wrote, “Miss Clayburgh delivers a particularly sharp characterization that’s letter-perfect during the first part of the story.” She added, “Her Marilyn is all wrong for Phil — that’s what makes their affair so unexpectedly touching and gives the story so much life.” Jill Clayburgh was born in Manhattan on April 30, 1944, the daughter of Albert, an industrial textile salesman, and Julie Clayburgh. She earned a bachelor’s degree in theater from Sarah Lawrence College in 1966. She made her Broadway debut in 1968 in “The Sudden & Accidental ReEducation of Horse Johnson.”

Seth Wenig / Associated Press ile photo

Jill Clayburgh, shown here in New York in May 2007, died Friday. She was 66.

Former Washington Post Jerry Bock, composer of ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ president Ferguson dies By Matt Schudel

The Washington Post

By T. Rees Shapiro The Washington Post

Thomas Ferguson, 74, who served as president and general manager of The Washington Post from 1979 to 1995, a period marked by large gains in circulation and profitability, died Nov. 3 at a hospital in Southampton, N.Y. He had leukemia. Early in his career, Ferguson proved he was a skilled salesman no matter the product — cigars, ballpoint pens or shampoo. He came to The Post after serving as president of Parade, a magazine supplement that appears in many newspapers. As president and general manager of The Post, Ferguson was responsible for the business side of the newspaper, including oversight of the advertising, circulation and finance departments. When Ferguson announced he would retire in 1995, then-pub-

If you go Local Wetlands Inventory workshop When: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 16 Where: Three Rivers Elementary School cafeteria, 56900 Enterprise Drive, Sunriver habitat, among other things. This could help the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council to prioritize protection or restoration of the highest-quality wetlands, and work with the property owners to do that, Houston said.

The new wetland survey does not create new regulations for development on wetlands, Gutowsky said. It does provide a more accurate map of wetlands, for property owners and conservationists to use when developing properties and protecting the marshy areas. The Federal Clean Water Act regulates the filling or removal of material from wetlands, and property owners have to work with state or federal agencies to obtain a permit for either of those actions. Not all wetlands provide equal benefits, and the draft report quantifies how well each area stores water, traps or removes pollutants and provides wildlife

Wetlands filter water

Senate

Not only are there issues with signatures that don’t match, there are also late ballots as well as “overvotes,” in which voters select multiple candidates in the same race, and “undervotes,” in which voters select no candidates in a particular race. Any of those reasons could explain why the number of votes tallied in a given race can be lower than the number of ballots submitted, Blankenship said. “Things have been going smoothly, at least here in Deschutes County,” she said. It’s unclear whether even the Senate Republicans believe there are enough votes to sway the governor’s race, and Republican nominee Chris Dudley said Friday afternoon that he had not been paying close attention to the issue. “I think, as in any election, you want to make sure that ev-

Continued from C1 He said he would soon know more about how many signatures were awaiting verification by the voters who submitted them. In the meantime, much of the suspicion he’s seen out there, such as in chatter on blogs, appears based on misunderstandings, Trout said, adding that “this is probably the smoothest election I’ve ever been associated with.” Boquist said he found a discrepancy in ballot-counting in the Senate District 3 race. He said Jackson County and the state had given him different totals of the number of votes cast in that race. But Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship, like Trout, said the shifting numbers are a normal part of vote-counting.

nist ethos: smart, capable and gritty, sometimes neurotic, but no less glamorous for all that. “I guess people look at me and they think I’m a ladylike character,” Clayburgh told The New York Times in 1982. “But it’s not what I do best. I do best with characters who are coming apart at the seams.” She was known in particular for her starring role in “An Unmarried Woman” (1978), directed by Paul Mazursky. For her performance as Erica, a New Yorker who must right herself after her husband leaves her for another woman, Clayburgh was nominated for an Academy Award.

Wetlands are natural filtration systems that catch a variety of substances such as herbicides, pesticides, sediment from erosion and nitrates before they get into waterways, Houston said. Some of the marshy areas also intercept phosphorous and sequester carbon, according to the draft report. “Whatever it may be, the wetlands are really important for filtration in that area,” Houston said. Nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous compounds, encourage excessive growth of algae and other water plants, which deplete the oxygen that

lisher Donald Graham said that Post circulation had grown by hundreds of thousands of copies and that operating income had tripled during Ferguson’s career at the newspaper. “Tom’s most important legacy to the paper is 15 years of good decisions on the day-in, day-out business of the paper,” Graham told The Post in 1994. Ferguson, whose role at the paper had no effect on news coverage or editorial content, said the business side had a symbiotic relationship with The Post’s overall health. “There are some people in the industry that believe the First Amendment has no connection with producing a profit,” Ferguson said in 1994. “Managing that in proportion is difficult, and I think over the span of time that we’ve successfully maintained that balance.”

fish and other aquatic species need to survive, according to Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality. Nitrates in the south county’s shallow aquifer have been an issue since at least 1982, when high nitrate levels were first detected in La Pine. Since then, county, state and federal officials have tried to find solutions to prevent widespread pollution from septic systems, but they have encountered opposition from some residents who were concerned about the cost and did not trust studies on the issue. Another benefit of wetlands is the habitat they provide for birds and other wildlife, Houston said. Insects, salamanders and other food sources are plentiful in these areas, and there are good nesting spots for birds. “From a wildlife standpoint, they’re really important for birds and game,” Houston said. Deschutes County must obtain approval of the wetland survey from Oregon’s Department of State Lands before it can adopt the new wetland survey into its blueprint for future development, known as the comprehensive plan. That process will likely be completed in January, Gutowsky said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

ery vote is counted, every ballot is counted,” he said. “Until I have more details, there’s not a whole lot more to say than that.” Even if recounts don’t change the makeup of the Senate from what now appears to be headed toward a 16-14 Democratic edge, Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said that Republicans’ pickup of two seats in the election will help “tremendously” in terms of giving her caucus additional clout. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Jerry Bock, a Broadway composer who wrote the memorable and emotionally resonant music for “Fiddler on the Roof” and other acclaimed theatrical productions, died Nov. 3 at a hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y., of complications from a stroke. He was 81.

Charles McDowell, PBS commentator and columnist, dies By Ashley Southall New York Times News Service

Charles McDowell, a retired columnist for The Richmond Times-Dispatch who brought a folksy manner to a regular stint on the PBS program “Washington Week in Review” and to a prominent role in Ken Burns’ PBS series “The Civil War,” died Friday. He was 84. The cause was complications of a stroke, said his wife, Ann Webb McDowell. McDowell worked for the paper in Richmond, Va., for almost half a century, covering local news and state politics from 1949 until 1965, when he became the paper’s Washington correspondent. His syndicated column ran from 1954 until his retirement in 1998. Television viewers knew him from frequent appearances on a variety of PBS programs, including “Summer of Judgment: The Watergate Hearings,” for which he was the writer, narrator and host.

Bock and lyricist Sheldon Harnick produced the music for seven Broadway musicals between 1958 and 1970, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “Fiorello!” (1959) and the Tony-nominated “She Loves Me” (1963). But with “Fiddler,” they touched a musical and mystical chord that remains undiminished.

Based on writings by the Yiddish-language author Sholom Aleichem, “Fiddler on the Roof” seemed to be an unlikely candidate for Broadway success when it premiered in 1964. The play — with a book by Joseph Stein, who died Oct. 24 — depicts Jewish life in a fictional Russian village at the turn of the 20th century.

Dolores “Dee” Marie Hasse August 30, 1942 - November 1, 2010 Dolores “Dee” Marie Hasse, age 68, died in Klamath Falls, OR on Monday, November 1, 2010. At 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 7, 2010, a memorial service will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Bend, OR. Graveside services will be Monday, November 8 at 10:00 a.m. at Deschutes Memorial Park in Bend. Please consider memorial contributions to Little Lambs Preschool and Daycare c/o Zion Lutheran Church, 1025 High Street, Klamath Falls, OR 97601. The oldest of seven daughters, Dee was born August 30, 1942, in Klamath Falls to Ted and Dorothy Sandberg. She grew up in the Klamath area and married Fred Hasse in 1965. The couple later made their home in Redmond, OR. In 1998, they returned to Klamath Falls, and she worked at JELD-WEN Corporation. Dee was active in many church activities. At Trinity Lutheran School she served as the school secretary. She was instrumental in the development of Little Lambs Preschool and Daycare at Zion Lutheran Church. Survivors include her husband; children and their spouses, Ted and Judi Hasse, Fred and Lynette Hasse, and Kim and Brad Henshaw; 14 grandchildren; 4 great grandchildren; her sisters and brothers-in-law Rose Olson, Judy and Dan Manchester, Dorothy and Mike Hudson, Karen Nielsen and Gene McBee, Barb and Rick Ogden; and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles. Dolores was preceded in death by her parents and a sister Elizabeth Harwood. More at www.ohairandriggs.com/obituaries.html

Ralph ”Neale” Callison October 24,1936 - October 28, 2010

R

alph Neale Callison was born to Alford and Leora Callison on October 24, 1936 in Eugene, OR. Surrounded by his family, he passed away on October 28, 2010 in Springfield, OR at 74. Neale graduated from Redmond High School in 1955 where he was a dedicated and talented member of the football and wrestling teams. He was accepted to Oregon State on a wrestling scholarship, but due to a knee injury he had to forego his dreams for a wrestling career. His kids and grandkids enjoyed hearing stories of his football games and taking down a number of fellow wrestlers back in the day. He married Betty Mullins in Powell Butte, OR on October 2, 1958. They moved around the state quite a bit due to his job with the Oregon Department of Transportation, going from Bend to Klamath Falls and Prineville and then back to Bend before settling in Sisters in 1974. Neale loved his job with the State and retired after 39 years, many of those years as a foreman in Sisters. After his retirement from ODOT, he worked during the summers with Valentine Construction and at Mt. Bachelor during the winter season doing snow removal. For years, Neale enjoyed hunting and fishing and thought nothing was better than having someone go with him. Many of those trips were first times for his kids and grandkids and he thought there was nothing better than sharing his joy with his family. As time rolled on and took a toll on his body, he found a new love in gardening. Anyone who knew him looked forward to his famous tomatoes at the end of summer. He was always overjoyed to share his crop with anyone and everyone. Neale and Betty celebrated 50 years of marriage in October, 2008. From the beginning of her illness to her death in 2009, he stood by her side. He took her death very hard, and grieved with the rest of the family for many months. Then, in the form of a Christmas card, his joy returned. He reconnected with a family friend, Judith Stone, who was just checking in on him. Little did they know, in just a few short months, they would be smitten. He found a joy he didn’t think he would find. In the summer, he moved to Springfield to be with his sweetheart. Neale and Judi were married October 23, 2010 in Springfield, Oregon, surrounded by family and friends. He was so proud to see his beautiful bride walk down the aisle. He showed everyone to love with all your heart and not let anything get in the way of that. Neale is survived by his wife Judi (Springfield, OR), two sisters: Bethene Grimes (Prineville, OR) and Tess Hartzell (Bend, OR); three children: Kenneth (Redmond, OR), Kathryn (Modesto, CA) and Karold Toney (Sisters, OR); two step-daughters: Teresa Lilles (Springfield, OR) and Patty Cook (Redmond, OR); 10 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, who affectionately nicknamed him “Papa Boots.” He was preceded in death by his parents and his first wife, Betty. A Memorial Mass will be held at St. Edward the Martyr Catholic Church in Sisters at 8 a.m. on Monday, November 8, with a graveside service held at 11 a.m. at Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend. A Celebration of Life will be held in the spring or summer for all friends and family to remember and celebrate his life. Neale was a great man with a huge heart who touched the lives of everyone he met. He will be greatly missed by all. “I have a long road ahead of me, and not that long to get there in.” Neale “Papa Boots” Callison. Please sign the online guestbook at www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com


W E AT H ER

C8 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 6 Today: Mainly cloudy, unseasonably mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

56/43

52/40

59/39

39/31



Warm Springs

Marion Forks

59/47

63/37

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

65/42

57/45

Camp Sherman 65/37 Redmond Prineville 67/40 Cascadia 64/41 66/41 Sisters 67/39 Bend Post 67/40

Oakridge Elk Lake 64/39

55/28

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain far north today. Rain tonight. Central

69/46

64/37

64/36

64/38

64/36

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

60/35

62/37

Fort Rock

Vancouver 52/45

63/36

Seattle

59/40

Helena

55/46

Bend

69/43

59/43



65/39

Crater Lake 40/32

67/37

68/35



Partly to mostly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy skies tonight.

Idaho Falls Elko

71/50



52/32

67/37

Boise

67/40

Grants Pass

Redding

Silver Lake

60/34

Missoula

Eugene

Christmas Valley

Chemult



Reno

69/43

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

67/54

70/45

Moon phases First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Full

Last

New

Nov. 13 Nov. 21 Nov. 28 Dec. 5

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

WEDNESDAY

Mostly cloudy, isolated mixed showers, LOW chilly.

Astoria . . . . . . . . 54/51/0.01 . . . . . . 55/50/r. . . . . . 54/43/sh Baker City . . . . . . 61/33/0.00 . . . . . . 64/40/c. . . . . . 51/33/sh Brookings . . . . . .56/49/trace . . . . . 53/49/sh. . . . . . 55/41/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 62/32/0.00 . . . . . 64/41/sh. . . . . . 50/32/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 57/46/0.00 . . . . . . 55/46/c. . . . . . 54/42/sh Klamath Falls . . . 65/36/0.00 . . . . . 59/36/pc. . . . . . 46/31/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 63/34/0.00 . . . . . 55/37/sh. . . . . . 48/33/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 64/32/0.00 . . . . . 64/36/sh. . . . . . 42/28/rs Medford . . . . . . . 62/43/0.00 . . . . . 64/45/pc. . . . . . 53/40/sh Newport . . . . . . . 55/52/0.00 . . . . . . 54/53/c. . . . . . 55/45/sh North Bend . . . . . 55/52/0.00 . . . . . . 57/49/c. . . . . . 52/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 57/33/0.01 . . . . . 68/45/pc. . . . . . 56/38/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 50/35/0.00 . . . . . . 63/44/c. . . . . . 57/37/sh Portland . . . . . . . 60/46/0.00 . . . . . . 60/47/c. . . . . . . 55/43/r Prineville . . . . . . . 61/37/0.00 . . . . . 64/41/sh. . . . . . 49/30/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 67/31/0.00 . . . . . . 65/37/c. . . . . . 50/26/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 58/52/0.00 . . . . . 59/45/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 55/43/0.00 . . . . . . 56/46/c. . . . . . 55/42/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 67/34/0.00 . . . . . 67/39/sh. . . . . . 50/26/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 54/39/0.00 . . . . . . 61/45/c. . . . . . 56/36/sh

HIGH

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 in 1980 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 in 1971 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.19” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.46” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.68” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.86 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.04 in 1973 *Melted liquid equivalent

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

LOW

44 22

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:04 a.m. . . . . . .5:16 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:43 a.m. . . . . . .3:47 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:50 a.m. . . . . . .5:51 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:48 p.m. . . . . . .2:27 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:55 a.m. . . . . . .3:38 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:52 p.m. . . . . . .2:45 a.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, unseasonably cold.

45 24

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

56/50

66/38

58/30

Calgary

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:49 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:49 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:50 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 8:38 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:56 p.m.

LOW

44 23

BEND ALMANAC

60/47

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 67° Redmond • 31° Redmond

TUESDAY Mostly cloudy, unseasonably chilly.

53 27

Portland

Partly to mostly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy tonight. Eastern

Mainly cloudy, light rain showers, significantLOW ly cooler.

NORTHWEST

59/37

Brothers

MONDAY

Rain will move into the northwest part of the region today, spreading east tonight and Sunday.

Paulina

63/38

Sunriver

HIGH

40

STATE

Maupin

Tonight: Mainly cloudy, light rain showers developing.

LOW

67

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

SUNDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . no report . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . no report . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . no report Mammoth Mtn., Calif.. . no report Park City, Utah . . . . . . . no report Squaw Valley, Calif. . . . . no report Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . no report Taos, New Mexico . . . . . no report Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . no report

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 52/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 63/36

Portland 60/47 Boise 69/43

Cheyenne 71/40 San Francisco 67/54

• 1.37” Danbury, Conn.

Las Vegas 82/57

Salt Lake City 70/45

Phoenix 88/59

Honolulu 84/73

Rapid City 74/42

St. Louis 55/36 Little Rock 59/42

Dallas 68/42 Chihuahua 73/41

La Paz 86/61 Juneau 43/35

S

S

S

S

Mazatlan 89/71

Houston 69/46 Monterrey 75/46

FRONTS

S S

Quebec 39/26

Green Bay St. Paul 48/33 56/40 Des Moines 58/38 Chicago 49/35

Oklahoma City 69/40

Tijuana 75/55

Anchorage 33/30

S

Omaha 64/37 Kansas City 62/43

Denver 80/44 Albuquerque 70/42

Los Angeles 73/61

S

Bismarck 68/39

Billings 70/42

Santa Ana, Calif. Embarrass, Minn.

S

Saskatoon 59/30 Winnipeg 51/36 Thunder Bay 48/31

Seattle 56/50

• 96° • 1°

S

To ronto 40/29 Detroit 44/32

Buffalo

New York 51/35

40/32

Philadelphia 53/34 Washington, D. C. 52/36

Columbus 43/25 Louisville 47/29

Portland 47/32 Boston 49/36

Charlotte 52/26

Nashville 49/29

Atlanta Birmingham 54/33 54/29 New Orleans 61/45

Orlando 66/44 Miami 70/51

Halifax 61/48

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .66/30/0.00 . . .72/46/s . . . 75/50/s Akron . . . . . . . . .41/36/0.12 . . .38/27/c . . . 48/31/s Albany. . . . . . . . .47/41/0.22 . 46/28/pc . . 46/31/pc Albuquerque. . . .65/41/0.00 . . .70/42/s . . . 69/38/s Anchorage . . . . .32/27/0.00 . .33/30/sn . . 33/26/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .52/38/0.01 . . .54/33/s . . . 59/40/s Atlantic City . . . .54/44/0.06 . 55/34/pc . . 52/40/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .68/36/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . . 75/52/s Baltimore . . . . . .56/45/0.00 . 52/32/pc . . . 52/35/s Billings. . . . . . . . .72/42/0.00 . 70/42/pc . . 64/40/sh Birmingham . . . .52/40/0.00 . 54/29/pc . . . 63/35/s Bismarck . . . . . . .59/23/0.00 . 68/39/pc . . . 66/37/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . 69/43/pc . . . .56/37/r Boston. . . . . . . . .62/50/0.38 . 49/36/pc . . 49/36/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .53/47/0.20 . 52/36/pc . . 49/37/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .41/37/0.23 . . .40/32/c . . . 46/34/s Burlington, VT. . .42/39/0.35 . . .39/29/c . . 40/32/pc Caribou, ME . . . .62/37/0.85 . .43/34/sh . . . 39/31/c Charleston, SC . .61/47/0.00 . . .59/37/s . . . 59/42/s Charlotte. . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . .52/26/s . . . 56/32/s Chattanooga. . . .50/43/0.02 . 49/28/pc . . . 58/32/s Cheyenne . . . . . .70/29/0.00 . . .71/40/s . . . 65/38/s Chicago. . . . . . . 40/30/trace . 49/35/pc . . . 58/43/s Cincinnati . . . . . .49/39/0.03 . 46/27/pc . . 57/34/pc Cleveland . . . . . .44/36/0.06 . .41/31/sn . . 50/36/pc Colorado Springs 69/30/0.00 . . .75/42/s . . . 78/41/s Columbia, MO . .48/28/0.00 . . .57/37/s . . . 67/42/s Columbia, SC . . .59/41/0.00 . . .56/33/s . . . 58/31/s Columbus, GA. . 57/43/trace . . .59/34/s . . . 61/36/s Columbus, OH. . .43/36/0.00 . 43/25/pc . . . 55/35/s Concord, NH . . . .55/43/0.29 . 48/26/pc . . 46/26/pc Corpus Christi. . .72/39/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . 80/59/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .62/43/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 74/53/s Dayton . . . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . . 56/36/s Denver. . . . . . . . .74/35/0.00 . . .80/44/s . . . 79/42/s Des Moines. . . . .49/26/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . . 65/41/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . 44/32/pc . . 51/37/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .43/20/0.00 . 48/34/pc . . 51/33/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .75/40/s . . . 77/44/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .25/8/0.00 . . . .19/3/c . . . . 18/0/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .49/23/0.00 . 56/37/pc . . 57/38/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .69/29/0.00 . . .66/27/s . . . 57/30/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .40/32/0.00 . 45/31/pc . . 54/35/pc Green Bay. . . . . .39/31/0.00 . 48/33/pc . . . 52/37/s Greensboro. . . . .58/37/0.00 . 50/30/pc . . . 56/33/s Harrisburg. . . . . .53/44/0.01 . 48/30/pc . . . 50/31/s Hartford, CT . . . .53/46/0.29 . 52/29/pc . . 49/32/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .60/27/0.00 . 67/37/pc . . . 61/33/c Honolulu . . . . . . .83/74/0.00 . 84/73/pc . . . 84/71/s Houston . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 73/54/s Huntsville . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 51/28/pc . . . 62/34/s Indianapolis . . . .47/34/0.01 . 48/30/pc . . 58/37/pc Jackson, MS . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .59/36/s . . . 65/39/s Madison, WI . . . .41/26/0.00 . . .50/33/s . . . 57/38/s Jacksonville. . . . .63/44/0.00 . . .61/36/s . . . 62/40/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .42/37/0.09 . . .43/35/r . . . .41/33/r Kansas City. . . . .50/27/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . . 72/47/s Lansing . . . . . . . .37/33/0.00 . 43/30/pc . . 53/33/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . 77/57/pc Lexington . . . . . .47/39/0.01 . 46/26/pc . . . 55/35/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .54/20/0.00 . . .66/34/s . . . 71/39/s Little Rock. . . . . .56/40/0.00 . . .59/42/s . . . 68/44/s Los Angeles. . . . .87/65/0.97 . 73/61/pc . . 65/58/pc Louisville . . . . . . .50/43/0.02 . 47/29/pc . . . 60/42/s Memphis. . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . . .55/35/s . . . 64/40/s Miami . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . .70/51/s . . . 73/63/s Milwaukee . . . . .38/31/0.00 . 49/38/pc . . . 56/42/s Minneapolis . . . .45/27/0.00 . 56/40/pc . . . 60/40/s Nashville . . . . . . .49/42/0.00 . 49/29/pc . . . 60/37/s New Orleans. . . .62/48/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 65/45/s New York . . . . . .52/45/0.05 . 51/35/pc . . 50/37/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .54/46/0.04 . 52/34/pc . . 50/35/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .59/46/0.10 . 54/37/pc . . . 53/36/s Oklahoma City . .57/32/0.00 . . .69/40/s . . . 75/43/s Omaha . . . . . . . .52/25/0.00 . . .64/37/s . . . 68/41/s Orlando. . . . . . . .65/54/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 68/51/s Palm Springs. . . .90/63/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . 83/56/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .44/30/0.01 . . .50/32/s . . . 61/40/s Philadelphia . . . .55/46/0.01 . 53/34/pc . . 52/36/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . . .88/59/s . . . 84/58/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .45/36/0.13 . .40/26/sn . . 47/31/pc Portland, ME. . . .58/45/0.42 . .47/32/sh . . . 45/27/c Providence . . . . .62/49/0.42 . 51/33/pc . . 49/33/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .61/40/0.00 . 53/30/pc . . . 56/32/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .68/25/0.00 . . .74/42/s . . . 72/41/s Savannah . . . . . 61/41/trace . . .59/36/s . . . 60/39/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . 69/43/pc . . . .58/36/r Seattle. . . . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .56/50/r . . . .53/44/r Richmond . . . . . .59/46/0.01 . 54/34/pc . . . 54/34/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .49/20/0.00 . . .62/37/s . . . 66/38/s Rochester, NY . . .44/37/0.30 . . .41/30/c . . 46/33/pc Spokane . . . . . . .52/40/0.00 . . .55/44/c . . . .52/37/r Sacramento. . . . .77/53/0.00 . 73/52/pc . . . .61/47/r Springfield, MO. .47/29/0.00 . . .57/37/s . . . 65/42/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .48/35/0.00 . . .55/36/s . . . 64/46/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .69/56/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . . 71/53/s Salt Lake City . . .69/40/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . 64/41/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . . 84/53/s San Antonio . . . .71/39/0.00 . . .71/42/s . . . 75/54/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .57/31/0.00 . . .65/41/s . . . 73/50/s San Diego . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 70/59/pc . . 65/58/pc Washington, DC .58/46/0.00 . 52/36/pc . . . 54/34/s San Francisco . . .66/54/0.00 . . .67/54/c . . . .60/50/r Wichita . . . . . . . .58/30/0.00 . . .67/42/s . . . 75/49/s San Jose . . . . . . .69/55/0.00 . . .75/54/c . . . .63/49/r Yakima . . . . . . . .54/32/0.00 . . .57/40/c . . . 58/31/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .65/34/0.00 . . .66/33/s . . . 65/32/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .89/65/0.00 . . .87/58/s . . . 83/57/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .59/48/0.26 . . .50/41/r . . 45/37/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .74/53/0.00 . . .76/57/s . . . 77/59/s Auckland. . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . 58/46/pc . . 58/45/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .85/54/s . . . 84/53/s Bangkok . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . 85/73/pc . . 86/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .69/39/s . . 60/35/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .83/66/s . . . 78/62/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . .51/40/r . . . 45/35/c Bogota . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .68/51/sh . . 65/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . . 61/45/c Buenos Aires. . . .73/54/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . 88/63/pc Cabo San Lucas .93/72/0.00 . . .85/66/s . . . 84/63/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .85/63/s . . . 81/60/s Calgary . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . 63/36/pc . . . 55/31/c Cancun . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 75/58/pc . . 78/60/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.17 . .45/35/sh . . 43/31/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . .45/35/sh . . 43/28/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . 64/44/pc . . 50/41/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . 90/65/pc . . . .86/64/t Hong Kong . . . . .66/63/0.93 . .76/67/sh . . 82/69/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .57/54/0.00 . . .72/54/s . . . 72/53/s Jerusalem . . . . . .81/53/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 79/51/s Johannesburg . . .81/57/0.62 . 84/59/pc . . . .83/61/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 70/60/pc . . . 69/59/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .73/55/s . . . 62/50/c London . . . . . . . .63/48/0.07 . .51/39/sh . . 47/38/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .70/42/s . . 61/39/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .87/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .100/77/0.00 . .102/79/s . . 103/79/s Mexico City. . . . .64/30/0.00 . . .69/38/s . . . 70/39/s Montreal. . . . . . .41/37/0.48 . 38/26/pc . . 46/32/pc Moscow . . . . . . .41/36/0.02 . . 37/32/rs . . 41/34/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.01 . .72/60/sh . . 75/61/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .90/75/0.02 . . .77/66/s . . 79/67/pc New Delhi. . . . . .64/63/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . 87/62/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . . 68/51/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .45/25/0.00 . 38/23/pc . . 34/22/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .39/34/0.43 . 39/25/pc . . 45/31/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . . .54/42/r . . 45/35/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .99/73/0.00 . . .83/72/t . . 80/70/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .72/51/s . . 67/51/sh Santiago . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .87/53/s . . 58/40/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .80/61/sh . . 81/61/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . .53/45/sh . . 50/41/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . . 63/39/s Shanghai. . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .69/53/s . . . 72/55/s Singapore . . . . . .90/79/0.85 . . .88/78/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .39/30/0.00 . 40/24/pc . . . 36/24/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . .64/56/sh . . 73/57/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/70/0.00 . .78/72/sh . . 81/73/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . . 79/61/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .64/53/s . . . 67/54/s Toronto . . . . . . . .43/36/0.18 . 40/29/pc . . 48/33/pc Vancouver. . . . . .52/50/0.01 . . .52/45/r . . . .50/43/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . 63/44/pc . . 51/39/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .59/52/0.50 . . .51/40/r . . 45/30/pc


S

College Basketball Inside

Kyle Singler looks to lead No. 1 Duke to a national title during the 2010-11 season, see Page D3. www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2010

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Pac-12 releases first football schedule WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Utah will visit Southern California in the first conference game in the newly formed Pac-12 conference next season. The league released its first football schedule Friday, following the addition of Colorado and Utah to the conference. The season will end Dec. 3 with the championship game at the site of the division winner with the best record. Oregon and Oregon State will not make trips to Los Angeles in the first season with the Ducks hosting USC and the Beavers hosting UCLA. Washington State will travel to UCLA and Washington will visit USC. Those trips will flip in 2012. Also, the previously scheduled nonconference game between California and Colorado has been dropped. That forces both schools to fill a game on their schedules. For a complete list of Oregon and Oregon State games in 2011, see Scoreboard, Page D2. — The Associated Press

PREP FOOTBALL

HORSE RACING

Bend wins in double overtime Zenyatta Lava Bears overtake West Albany 34-28 to advance to 5A playoffs By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Bend High’s defense was tired of getting pushed around. After trailing 21-7 to West Albany at halftime Friday night, the Lava Bears did something about it. Bend shut down the visiting Bulldogs in the second half and came back to win 34-28 on a 10-yard Gavin Gerdes run in the second overtime to advance to the Class 5A state football playoffs. “I think at halftime, they were just tired of letting somebody dictate the game, and they decided to take over themselves,” said Bend coach Craig Walker. “There was no special adjust-

ment at all. Honestly, we said, ‘You just have to play harder and tougher.’” Gerdes ran 28 times for 104 yards and two touchdowns for the Bears, and quarterbacks J.C. Grim and Jonah Koski — a sophomore who took over for Grim in the second half — combined to complete 10 of 19 passes for 130 yards and a touchdown. West Albany racked up 221 yards of total offense — led by Ryker Smith’s 171 yards on 25 carries — compared with the Lava Bears’ 156 yards. But it was Bend’s defense that took over. Bend forced three turnovers, including two interceptions, in the first 13 minutes of the second half, leading to 14 Bend points. And after the Bulldogs scored touchdowns on their only three possessions of the first half, the Bears shut them out in the final two quarters. See Bend / D4

NBA Celtics ....... 110 Bulls...........105

Magic.........105 Nets .............90

Hornets ........96 Heat .............93

Cavaliers....123 76ers ......... 116

Warriors.......85 Jazz..............78

Pistons.........97 Bobcats .......90

Lakers ........108 Raptors ......103

Knicks ........ 112 Wizards........91

Nuggets ..... 111 Clippers .....104

Hawks ........ 113 T’wolves ....103

Suns ..........123 Grizzlies ..... 118

looks to cement legacy By Will Graves The Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — John Shirreffs looked up at the majestic replica of Secretariat’s U.S. postage stamp looming behind him and adjusted his cap. Big Red and his trademark checkered blue blinkers stared right back down, a larger than life reminder of the legend Next up Shirreffs and • Breeders’ superstar Cup mare Zenyatta are chasing. • When: The unbeatToday, en 6-year-old 3:15 p.m. has become arguably the • TV: ESPN sport’s most transcendent figure since Secretariat won the Triple Crown in 1973, her 19-0 record giving the industry a much-needed shot of adrenaline. But there is more on the line in Saturday’s $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic than Zenyatta’s pursuit of perfection. Her place in history also could depend on whether she can beat another talented field to the finish line one more time. She’s already one of the greatest females in the sport’s history. Whether she needs to reach the winner’s circle under the lights on Saturday night at Churchill Downs to enter the pantheon reserved for the likes of Secretariat, even Shirreffs doesn’t know. See Zenyatta / D5

INSIDE

Bucks ...........94 Pacers..........90

D

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View running back Austin Sears (20) breaks through the Woodburn defense to score a touchdown during the second quarter Friday at Mountain View.

Cougars heading into playoffs with big win Austin Sears rushes for 266 yards in a 55-12 victory over Woodburn By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

New Orleans Hornets forward Trevor Ariza celebrates hitting a three point shot late in the game in New Orleans on Friday.

Hornets stay perfect New Orleans hangs on to a 96-93 victory over Miami to take its overall record to 5-0, see Page D5

NHL Stars take 6-3 win

For the second straight game, Mountain View running back Austin Sears produced video-game numbers as he led the host Cougars to a 55-12 Class 5A football state play-in victory Friday night over Woodburn at Mountain View’s Jack Har-

Morry Gash / The Associated Press

Zenyatta makes her way to the track Thursday for a practice session for the Breeder’s Cup horse race at Churchill Downs today in Louisville, Ky.

Huskies’ QB makes first Oregon State eager to start against No. 1 Ducks face struggling UCLA By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Next up

Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Golf ............................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 NBA ...........................................D5

all) advance to the 5A state playoffs for the fifth consecutive season. Mountain View, which entered Friday’s game as the Oregon School Activities Association’s No. 1-ranked team in 5A, all but clinched home-field advantage through the first two rounds of the postseason. See Cougars / D4

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Dallas scores four power-play goals en route to beating Phoenix, see Page D3

INDEX

ris Stadium. Sears, who rushed for more than 330 yards two weeks ago in Mountain View’s 45-14 win against Bend High, ran for 266 yards and five touchdowns against Woodburn and caught two passes for 15 yards and another touchdown. With the win, the Cougars (9-0 over-

• Washington at Oregon • When: Today, 12:30 p.m. • TV: ABC • Radio: KBND-AM 1110

EUGENE — Washington redshirt freshman Keith Price says he isn’t nervous about making his first college start at quarterback against Oregon. Sure, kid. The Ducks, after all, are the top-ranked team in the country and Saturday’s game is at Autzen Stadium, where the noise of the fans can be brutal on opponents. See Huskies / D4

By Greg Beacham

Washington QB Keith Price

The Associated Press

Next up • Oregon State at UCLA • When: Today, 4 p.m. • TV: VS. network • Radio: KICEAM 940, KRCO-AM 690

PASADENA, Calif. — After everything that’s happened to Oregon State during two tumultuous months, the Beavers are still in contention to play in the Rose Bowl in January. That’s only if they take care of business during their first trip to that stadium today. The Beavers (4-3, 3-1 Pac-10) will visit spiraling UCLA (3UCLA 5, 1-4). quarterback See UCLA / D4 Richards Brehaut


D2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 4 a.m. — World Golf, HSBC Champions, third round, Golf Channel. 1:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, third round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Illinois at Michigan, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Maryland at Miami, ESPNU. 9 a.m. — College, Air Force at Army, CBS College Sports (Ch. 41). 9:30 p.m. — College, Baylor at Oklahoma State, FSNW. Noon — College, Pennsylvania at Princeton, VS. network. 12:30 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Alabama at LSU, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, Hawaii at Boise State, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, TCU at Utah, CBS College Sports (Ch. 41). 1 p.m. — College, California at Washington State, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Arkansas at South Carolina, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Texas A&M, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Oregon State at UCLA, VS. network. 4 p.m. — College, Louisiana-Lafayette at Mississippi, ESPNU. 5 p.m. — College, Arizona at Stanford, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Texas at Kansas State, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — College, Tennessee at Memphis, CBS College Sports (Ch. 41). 7:30 p.m. — College, Arizona State at USC, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — College, Bethune-Cookman at Hampton, ESPNU. 8 p.m. — UFL, Sacramento Mountain Lions at Las Vegas Locomotives, VS. network.

AUTO RACING 9:55 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, ESPN2.

FIGURE SKATING 1 p.m. — ISU Grand Prix, Skate Canada International (taped), NBC.

HORSE RACING 3:15 p.m. — Breeders’ Cup Classic, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Toronto Raptors at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

SUNDAY GOLF 4 a.m. — World Golf, HSBC Champions, final round, Golf Channel. 1:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, final round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Miami Dolphins at Baltimore Ravens, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Indianapolis Colts at Philadelpia Eagles, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, New York Giants at Seattle Seahawks, Fox. 5:15 p.m. — NFL, Dallas Cowboys at Green Bay Packers, NBC.

SOCCER 10 a.m. — College, Big 12 Tournament, final, teams TBD, FSNW. 6 p.m. — MLS, Conference semifinal, Seattle Sounders at Los Angeles Galaxy, ESPN.

RUNNING 11 a.m. — New York City Marathon (same-day tape), NBC.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA Texas 500, ESPN.

BOWLING Noon — PBA, All-Star Shootout (taped), ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Lakers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 12:30 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 4 p.m. — College, Oregon State at UCLA, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Toronto Raptors at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 1 p.m. — NFL, New York Giants at Seattle Seahawks, KBNW-FM 96.5.

BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Lakers, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Today Cross country: OSAA state championships at Lane Community College in Eugene, 11:15 a.m. Boys soccer: Class 6A state playoffs: Redmond at Beaverton, 6 p.m. Class 5A state play-in games: South Albany at Mountain View, 2 p.m.; Lebanon at Summit, 3 p.m.; Bend at Woodburn, 6 p.m. Class 4A state play-in games: Newport at Sisters, 2 p.m.; Tillamook at Madras, 2 p.m.; Crook County at La Grande, noon. Girls soccer: Class 5A state play-in games: Bend at West Albany, 3 p.m.; Silverton at Mountain View, 11 a.m. Class 4A state play-in games: Central at Sisters, noon; Crook County at La Grande, 2 p.m. Volleyball: Class 5A state playoffs: Wilson at Summit, 6 p.m.; Parkrose at Mountain View, 3:30 p.m. Class 4A state playoffs, Douglas at Crook County, 3 p.m.; Estacada at Sisters, TBA. Class 2A state playoffs, Culver at North Douglas, 6 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 6 1 0 .857 205 154 N.Y. Jets 5 2 0 .714 159 110 Miami 4 3 0 .571 133 149 Buffalo 0 7 0 .000 131 211 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 193 142 Tennessee 5 3 0 .625 224 150 Houston 4 3 0 .571 170 197 Jacksonville 4 4 0 .500 165 226 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 149 129 Pittsburgh 5 2 0 .714 147 102 Cleveland 2 5 0 .286 118 142 Cincinnati 2 5 0 .286 146 163 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 5 2 0 .714 163 122 Oakland 4 4 0 .500 212 168 San Diego 3 5 0 .375 210 174 Denver 2 6 0 .250 154 223 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 5 2 0 .714 175 153 Philadelphia 4 3 0 .571 172 157 Washington 4 4 0 .500 155 170 Dallas 1 6 0 .143 154 187 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 5 2 0 .714 169 133 Tampa Bay 5 2 0 .714 136 163 New Orleans 5 3 0 .625 167 148 Carolina 1 6 0 .143 85 150 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 176 136 Chicago 4 3 0 .571 126 114 Minnesota 2 5 0 .286 129 144 Detroit 2 5 0 .286 183 165 West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 4 3 0 .571 123 140 St. Louis 4 4 0 .500 140 141 Arizona 3 4 0 .429 133 198 San Francisco 2 6 0 .250 137 178 ——— Sunday’s Games Chicago vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Detroit, 10 a.m. Miami at Baltimore, 10 a.m. San Diego at Houston, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m. New England at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Arizona at Minnesota, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 5:30 p.m. Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis, Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee

NFL Injury Report NEW YORK — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT - Definitely will not play; DNP - Did not practice; LIMITED - Limited participation in practice; FULL - Full participation in practice): SUNDAY SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at HOUSTON TEXANS — CHARGERS: DNP: WR Malcom Floyd (hamstring), TE Antonio Gates (toe), WR Richard Goodman (hamstring), K Nate Kaeding (right groin), WR Legedu Naanee (hamstring), LB Brandon Siler (foot). LIMITED: LB Larry English (foot). FULL: LB Kevin Burnett (shoulder), G Kris Dielman (neck). TEXANS: DNP: LB Xavier Adibi (hamstring), TE Owen Daniels (hamstring). LIMITED: WR Andre Johnson (ankle), DT Earl Mitchell (ankle), DE Jesse Nading (ankle), DE Mario Williams (hip). FULL: LB Kevin Bentley (knee), G Mike Brisiel (knee), TE Garrett Graham (shoulder), LB Stanford Keglar (thigh), CB Karl Paymah (wrist), LB Darryl Sharpton (ankle). ARIZONA CARDINALS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS — CARDINALS: DNP: LB Clark Haggans (groin). LIMITED: WR Steve Breaston (knee), WR Early Doucet (groin), RB Beanie Wells (knee). FULL: DT Alan Branch (back), LB Will Davis (knee), DE Kenny Iwebema (shoulder). VIKINGS: DNP: WR Percy Harvin (ankle). LIMITED: CB Chris Cook (quadriceps), G Chris DeGeare (ankle), QB Brett Favre (foot, ankle, chin), LB Ben Leber (knee), CB Lito Sheppard (hand), CB Frank Walker (hamstring), DT Pat Williams (elbow). FULL: CB Asher Allen (back), C John Sullivan (calf). NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at CAROLINA PANTHERS — SAINTS: DNP: CB Patrick Robinson (ankle), T Jon Stinchcomb (knee), RB Pierre Thomas (ankle). LIMITED: RB Reggie Bush (fibula), S Pierson Prioleau (ankle). FULL: WR Marques Colston (hand), C Jonathan Goodwin (groin), CB Jabari Greer (shoulder), K Garrett Hartley (right ankle), RB Christopher Ivory (concussion), CB Tracy Porter (knee), LB Scott Shanle (hamstring). PANTHERS: DNP: T Jeff Otah (knee), RB DeAngelo Williams (foot). FULL: LB Dan Connor (hip). NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at CLEVELAND BROWNS — PATRIOTS: DNP: S Jarrad Page (calf), RB Fred Taylor (toe). LIMITED: WR Deion Branch (hamstring), S Patrick Chung (knee), WR Matthew Slater (ankle). FULL: QB Tom Brady (right shoulder). BROWNS: DNP: DE Kenyon Coleman (knee), QB Jake Delhomme (ankle), T John St. Clair (ankle), QB Seneca Wallace (ankle). LIMITED: DT Shaun Rogers (ankle), LB Matt Roth (hamstring), TE Alex Smith (ankle). TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS at ATLANTA FALCONS — BUCCANEERS: DNP: C Jeff Faine (quadriceps), RB Earnest Graham (hamstring), DT Ryan Sims (knee), WR Sammie Stroughter (foot), T Jeremy Trueblood (knee). LIMITED: DE Kyle Moore (shoulder), TE Kellen Winslow (knee). FULL: DT Gerald McCoy (neck), WR Preston Parker (knee). FALCONS: DNP: RB Ovie Mughelli (hamstring), TE Justin Peelle (groin), LB Sean Weatherspoon (knee). FULL: DE John Abraham (ankle), LB Curtis Lofton (knee), CB Dunta Robinson (head, knee), RB Antone Smith (shoulder). CHICAGO BEARS at BUFFALO BILLS — BEARS: DNP: CB Zackary Bowman (foot). FULL: LB Lance Briggs (ankle), C Edwin Williams (back). BILLS: DNP: LB Andra Davis (shoulder). FULL: T Demetrius Bell (knee), T Cordaro Howard (shoulder), WR Donald Jones (knee), CB Terrence McGee (back), G Eric Wood (knee). MIAMI DOLPHINS at BALTIMORE RAVENS — DOLPHINS: DNP: RB Patrick Cobbs (hamstring). LIMITED: S Yeremiah Bell (toe). FULL: LB Channing Crowder (thumb). RAVENS: DNP: S Tom Zbikowski (foot). LIMITED: TE Dennis Pitta (head). FULL: WR Donte’ Stallworth (foot). NEW YORK JETS at DETROIT LIONS — JETS: LIMITED: S Brodney Pool (head). FULL: LB David Harris (back), LB Calvin Pace (foot), CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring). LIONS: DNP: S C.C. Brown (knee), LB Isaiah Ekejiuba (knee), RB Kevin Smith (knee). LIMITED: S Louis Delmas (ankle), QB Shaun Hill (left forearm), LB Ashlee Palmer (hamstring), TE Brandon Pettigrew (ankle). FULL: RB Jahvid Best (toe), WR Bryant Johnson (foot), WR Calvin Johnson (shoulder), LB DeAndre Levy (ankle), DE Turk McBride (ankle), QB Matthew Stafford (foot). NEW YORK GIANTS at SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — GIANTS: DNP: T William Beatty (foot), RB Madison Hedgecock (hamstring), C Shaun O’Hara (foot), DE Dave Tollefson (illness). LIMITED: DE Osi Umenyiora (knee). FULL: T Kareem McKenzie (illness), LB Gerris Wilkinson (hand). SEAHAWKS: OUT: QB Matt Hasselbeck (head). DNP: DT Colin Cole (ankle), T Russell Okung (ankle), T Tyler Polumbus (knee), RB Michael Robinson (hamstring), WR Golden Tate (ankle), WR Mike Williams (knee). LIMITED: DT Brandon Mebane (calf). INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — COLTS: DNP: RB Joseph Addai (neck), TE Brody Eldridge (rib), WR Anthony Gonzalez (knee), RB Mike Hart (ankle), DT Antonio Johnson (knee), DE Robert Mathis (knee), CB Jerraud Powers (foot), S Bob Sanders (biceps), LB Clint Session (elbow), CB Justin

Tryon (foot). LIMITED: LB Kavell Conner (foot). FULL: WR Austin Collie (hand), T Ryan Diem (quadriceps), DE Dwight Freeney (not injury related), CB Jacob Lacey (foot). EAGLES: DNP: T King Dunlap (knee), CB Ellis Hobbs (hip). FULL: DT Brodrick Bunkley (elbow), G Nick Cole (knee), DE Brandon Graham (ankle), WR DeSean Jackson (concussion), DE Juqua Parker (hip), T Jason Peters (knee), QB Michael Vick (rib). KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at OAKLAND RAIDERS — CHIEFS: LIMITED: S Kendrick Lewis (hamstring), WR Dexter McCluster (ankle). FULL: G Ryan Lilja (hand). RAIDERS: DNP: CB Nnamdi Asomugha (ankle), DT John Henderson (foot), TE Zach Miller (foot), WR Louis Murphy (bruised lung), WR Chaz Schilens (knee). LIMITED: S Hiram Eugene (hamstring), QB Bruce Gradkowski (right shoulder), WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (shoulder), C Samson Satele (knee). FULL: LB Travis Goethel (back), CB Chris Johnson (concussion). DALLAS COWBOYS at GREEN BAY PACKERS — COWBOYS: DNP: DE Jason Hatcher (groin), G Montrae Holland (groin), S Akwasi Owusu-Ansah (ankle), QB Tony Romo (left shoulder). LIMITED: T Marc Colombo (back), LB Bradie James (knee). FULL: RB Felix Jones (ankle), G Kyle Kosier (ankle), CB Terence Newman (ribs). PACKERS: OUT: WR Donald Driver (quadriceps), CB Pat Lee (ankle). DNP: G Daryn Colledge (back). LIMITED: S Nick Collins (knee), DE Cullen Jenkins (calf), LB Clay Matthews (shin), DE Ryan Pickett (ankle), TE Andrew Quarless (shoulder), T Mark Tauscher (shoulder), CB Charles Woodson (toe). FULL: T Chad Clifton (hamstring, knee), RB Dimitri Nance (ankle), QB Aaron Rodgers (ankle). MONDAY PITTSBURGH STEELERS at CINCINNATI BENGALS — STEELERS: DNP: DE Aaron Smith (triceps). BENGALS: OUT: DE Jonathan Fanene (hamstring). DNP: DT Tank Johnson (knee), LB Roddrick Muckelroy (ankle). LIMITED: LB Keith Rivers (foot), DE Frostee Rucker (knee). FULL: CB Johnathan Joseph (ankle), S Chinedum Ndukwe (knee), S Roy Williams (knee).

IN THE BLEACHERS

College SCHEDULE All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Friday’s games MIDWEST C. Michigan 26, W. Michigan 22 SOUTHWEST UCF 40, Houston 33 ——— Today’s games EAST Air Force at Army, 9 a.m. Columbia at Harvard, 9 a.m. Davidson at Marist, 9 a.m. William & Mary at New Hampshire, 9 a.m. Cent. Connecticut St. at Robert Morris, 9 a.m. Louisville at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Yale at Brown, 9:30 a.m. Dartmouth at Cornell, 9:30 a.m. Lehigh at Holy Cross, 9:30 a.m. Fordham at Bucknell, 10 a.m. Lafayette at Colgate, 10 a.m. Villanova at Rhode Island, 10 a.m. Albany, N.Y. at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Bryant at St. Francis, Pa., 10 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. at Wagner, 10 a.m. Penn at Princeton, noon Towson at Delaware, 12:30 p.m. Maine at Massachusetts, 12:30 p.m. Northwestern at Penn St., 12:30 p.m. SOUTH Virginia at Duke, 9 a.m. N.C. State at Clemson, 9 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. Maryland at Miami, 9 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. Florida at Vanderbilt, 9:21 a.m. W. Carolina at Furman, 9:30 a.m. Idaho St. at Georgia, 9:30 a.m. Charleston Southern at Kentucky, 9:30 a.m. Chattanooga at Auburn, 10 a.m. Valparaiso at Campbell, 10 a.m. N.C. Central at Delaware St., 10 a.m. Lamar at Georgia St., 10 a.m. Morgan St. at Norfolk St., 10 a.m. Florida A&M at N. Carolina A&T, 10:30 a.m. Stony Brook at Presbyterian, 10:30 a.m. Howard at S. Carolina St., 10:30 a.m. Coastal Carolina at VMI, 10:30 a.m. Alcorn St. at Alabama A&M, 11 a.m. Tenn.-Martin at Austin Peay, 11 a.m. Appalachian St. at Georgia Southern, 11 a.m. Bethune-Cookman at Hampton, 11 a.m. Tennessee Tech at Murray St., 11 a.m. Savannah St. at Old Dominion, 11 a.m. Elon at The Citadel, 11 a.m. Concordia-Selma at Grambling St., noon Wofford at Samford, noon Navy at East Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Alabama at LSU, 12:30 p.m. Gardner-Webb at Liberty, 12:30 p.m. James Madison at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Southern Miss. at Tulane, 12:30 p.m. Boston College at Wake Forest, 12:30 p.m. North Carolina at Florida St., 12:30 or 5 p.m. Fresno St. at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Marshall at UAB, 1 p.m. Florida Atlantic at W. Kentucky, 1:30 p.m. Stephen F.Austin at Nicholls St., 2 p.m. E. Illinois at Tennessee St., 3 p.m. Jacksonville St. at E. Kentucky, 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Mississippi, 4 p.m. Northwestern St. at SE Louisiana, 4 p.m. Arkansas at South Carolina, 4 p.m. Texas Southern at Southern U., 4 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Fla. International, 4:30 p.m. Jackson St. at Alabama St., 5 p.m. Tennessee at Memphis, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Iowa at Indiana, 9 a.m. Illinois at Michigan, 9 a.m. Minnesota at Michigan St., 9 a.m. Wisconsin at Purdue, 9 a.m. Jacksonville at Butler, 9 a.m. Akron at Ball St., 10 a.m. Drake at Dayton, 10 a.m. UC Davis at North Dakota, 10 a.m. Youngstown St. at Illinois St., 11 a.m. Colorado at Kansas, 11 a.m. Temple at Kent St., 11 a.m. Missouri St. at S. Dakota St., 11 a.m. SW Baptist at SE Missouri, 11 a.m. N. Iowa at Indiana St., 12:05 p.m. Nebraska at Iowa St., 12:30 p.m. S. Illinois at N. Dakota St., 1 p.m. Cal Poly at South Dakota, 2:05 p.m. Texas at Kansas St., 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Baylor at Oklahoma St., 9:30 a.m. Rice at Tulsa, 11 a.m. McNeese St. at Sam Houston St., noon Cent. Arkansas at Texas St., noon MVSU at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 12:30 p.m. Troy at North Texas, 4 p.m. Oklahoma at Texas A&M, 4 p.m. Missouri at Texas Tech, 5 p.m. SMU at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST UNLV at BYU, 11 a.m. Weber St. at Montana St., 11:05 a.m. Dixie St. at S. Utah, noon New Mexico St. at Utah St., noon Washington at Oregon, 12:30 p.m. Hawaii at Boise St., 12:30 p.m. TCU at Utah, 12:30 p.m. N. Arizona at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. Morehead St. at San Diego, 1 p.m. California at Washington St., 1 p.m. Nevada at Idaho, 2 p.m. Portland St. at Sacramento St., 2:05 p.m. Wyoming at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Oregon St. at UCLA, 4 p.m. Arizona at Stanford, 2 p.m. Colorado St. at San Diego St., 7 p.m. Arizona St. at Southern Cal, 7:30 p.m. 2011 SCHEDULES (As of Nov. 5, 2010) ——— OREGON STATE Sept. 3 TBA Sept. 10 at Wisconsin Sept. 17 Bye Sept. 24 UCLA Oct. 1 at Arizona State Oct. 8 Arizona Oct. 15 BYU Oct. 22 at Washington State Oct. 29 at Utah Nov. 5 Stanford Nov. 12 at California Nov. 19 Washington Nov. 26 at Oregon OREGON Sept. 3 LSU (at Cowboys Stadium, Arlington, Texas) Sept. 10 Nevada Sept. 17 TBA Sept. 24 at Arizona Oct. 6 California Oct. 15 Arizona State Oct. 22 at Colorado Oct. 29 Washington State Nov. 5 at Washington Nov. 12 at Stanford

Nov. 19 USC Nov. 26 Oregon State POLLS THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 30, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (49) 8-0 1,487 1 2. Boise St. (7) 7-0 1,403 2 3. Auburn (2) 9-0 1,396 3 4. TCU (2) 9-0 1,350 4 5. Alabama 7-1 1,228 6 6. Utah 8-0 1,147 8 7. Wisconsin 7-1 1,113 9 8. Ohio St. 8-1 1,010 10 9. Nebraska 7-1 974 14 10. Stanford 7-1 950 13 11. Oklahoma 7-1 928 11 12. LSU 7-1 872 12 13. Arizona 7-1 779 15 14. Missouri 7-1 739 7 15. Iowa 6-2 700 18 16. Michigan St. 8-1 644 5 17. Arkansas 6-2 500 19 18. South Carolina 6-2 497 17 19. Oklahoma St. 7-1 457 20 20. Virginia Tech 6-2 332 21 21. Mississippi St. 7-2 302 23 22. Baylor 7-2 247 25 23. N.C. State 6-2 113 — 24. Florida St. 6-2 97 16 25. Nevada 7-1 91 — Others receiving votes: Hawaii 50, Syracuse 22, Oregon St. 16, Maryland 11, Southern Cal 10, San Diego St. 9, Illinois 8, UCF 5, Pittsburgh 4, Miami 3, Northwestern 3, Florida 2, N. Illinois 1. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times Pacific Conf. Ov’ll W L W L Oregon 5 0 8 0 Arizona 4 1 7 1 Stanford 4 1 7 1 Oregon State 3 1 4 3 USC 2 3 5 3 Arizona State 2 3 4 4 California 2 3 4 4 Washington 2 3 3 5 UCLA 1 4 3 5 Washington State 0 6 1 8 Today’s Games Washington at Oregon, 12:30 p.m. California at Washington State, 1 p.m. Oregon State at UCLA, 4 p.m. Arizona at Stanford, 5 p.m. Arizona State at USC, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 13 Washington State at Oregon State, 1 p.m. Stanford at Arizona State, 4:30 p.m. Oregon at California, 4:30 p.m. USC at Arizona, 5 p.m.

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Sunday t-Bears 3 3 BILLS Chargers 2.5 3 TEXANS Saints 7 6.5 PANTHERS VIKINGS 7.5 8 Cards FALCONS 8.5 8.5 Bucs Jets 3.5 4 LIONS RAVENS 5.5 5 Dolphins Patriots 5 4 BROWNS Giants 6.5 7 SEAHAWKS RAIDERS 2.5 1 Chiefs EAGLES 3 3 Colts PACKERS 8.5 7.5 Cowboys Monday Steelers 4 4.5 BENGALS t- Toronto, Canada. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Today Air Force 7 6.5 ARMY MIAMI-FLORIDA 11 8 Maryland CLEMSON 2.5 3.5 NC State Virginia 1(D) 1 DUKE SYRACUSE 5.5 6.5 Louisville Iowa 17 17.5 INDIANA MICHIGAN 3 3 Illinois Boston Coll 3 3 WAKE FOREST PENN ST 6.5 6.5 Northwestern Wisconsin 20 20 PURDUE MICHIGAN ST 24 24 Minnesota FLORIDA ST 10 10.5 N Carolina OKLAHOMA ST 7 8.5 Baylor S CAROLINA 3 4.5 Arkansas Florida 14 14 VANDERBILT Colorado 9 8.5 KANSAS BALL ST 13.5 13.5 Akron BYU 18 18.5 Unlv TULSA 18 17.5 Rice BOISE ST 23 21 Hawaii Temple 3.5 3.5 KENT ST UTAH ST 17 18 New Mexico St E CAROLINA 2.5 3 Navy OREGON 28 35.5 Washington Southern Miss 10 10 TULANE Nebraska 19 18 IOWA ST Oklahoma 4 3 TEXAS A&M Texas 4 3.5 KANSAS ST STANFORD 8 8.5 Arizona Tcu 5 5 UTAH LA TECH 2 (F) 2 Fresno St UAB 10 10.5 Marshall Nevada 12.5 11 IDAHO California 14.5 14.5 WASHINGTON ST Wyoming 11.5 9 NEW MEXICO Oregon St 6.5 5 UCLA Missouri 5.5 4 TEXAS TECH Alabama 6.5 6.5 LSU Tennessee 18.5 20 MEMPHIS Smu 8 6.5 UTEP SAN DIEGO ST 17 17.5 Colorado St USC 6.5 5.5 Arizona St MISSISSIPPI 27.5 28.5 UL-Lafayette Fla Atlantic 2.5 2.5 W KENTUCKY FLORIDA INT’L 9.5 9.5 UL-Monroe Troy 11.5 12 NORTH TEXAS The (D) after the opening line denotes that Duke opened as the favorite. The (F) after the opening line denotes that Fresno State opened as the favorite.

TENNIS WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— COMMONWEALTH BANK

TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS Friday Nusa Dua, Indonesia Singles Quarterfinals Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, def. Aravane Rezai (2), France, 6-1, 6-2. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Yanina Wickmayer (4), Belgium, 6-4, 7-6 (5).

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— DAVIDOFF SWISS INDOORS Friday Basel, Switzerland Singles Quarterfinals Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Richard Gasquet, France, 6-4, 6-2. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-3. Andy Roddick (4), United States, def. David Nalbandian, Argentina, 6-4, 6-4. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. VALENCIA OPEN 500 Friday Valencia, Spain Singles Quarterfinals Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4. Gilles Simon, France, def. Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Robin Soderling (2), Sweden, def. Gael Monfils (8), France, 6-3, 6-2. David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 7-5, 6-4.

GOLF PGA Tour HSBC CHAMPIONS HSBC Champions Friday At Sheshan International Golf Club Shanghai Purse: $7 million Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72 Second Round Francesco Molinari 65-70—135 Lee Westwood 66-70—136 Jaco Van Zyl 71-66—137 Richie Ramsay 69-68—137 Ernie Els 72-65—137 Luke Donald 68-70—138 Seung-yul Noh 67-72—139 Ross Fisher 69-70—139 Fredrik Andersson Hed 69-71—140 Richard Johnson 70-70—140 Robert Allenby 72-68—140 Padraig Harrington 70-70—140 Ian Poulter 70-70—140 Nick Watney 72-68—140 Tiger Woods 68-72—140 Richard Green 72-68—140 Phil Mickelson 69-71—140 Henrik Stenson 67-74—141 Kyung-tae Kim 72-69—141 Andrew Dodt 73-68—141 Pablo Martin 68-73—141 Martin Kaymer 72-69—141 Ryan Palmer 69-72—141 Matteo Manassero 71-70—141 Adam Scott 69-73—142 Peter Hanson 73-69—142 Ben Crane 71-71—142 Tetsuji Hiratsuka 71-71—142 Tim Clark 72-70—142 Miguel Jimenez 72-70—142 Yuta Ikeda 67-75—142 Rory McIlroy 71-71—142 Heath Slocum 71-72—143 Bill Haas 72-71—143 K.J. Choi 72-71—143 Edoardo Molinari 72-71—143 Ryo Ishikawa 72-71—143 Hunter Mahan 70-73—143 Y.E. Yang 69-74—143 Charl Schwartzel 74-70—144 Robert Karlsson 71-73—144 Arjun Atwal 73-71—144 Retief Goosen 70-74—144 Carl Pettersson 71-73—144 Katsumasa Miyamoto 69-75—144 Paul Casey 73-71—144 Rickie Fowler 71-74—145 Anders Hansen 71-74—145 Camilo Villegas 75-70—145 Anthony Kim 73-72—145 David Horsey 71-74—145 Darren Fichardt 73-72—145 Graeme McDowell 74-71—145 Michio Matsumura 71-74—145 Stuart Appleby 72-73—145 Rhys Davies 76-70—146 Danny Willett 77-69—146 Gregory Bourdy 73-74—147 Jason Bohn 72-75—147 Brendan Jones 76-72—148 Marcus Fraser 72-76—148 Alistair Presnell 74-75—149 Shunsuke Sonoda 72-77—149 Louis Oosthuizen 69-80—149 Simon Khan 76-73—149 Hiroyuki Fujita 75-75—150 Bill Lunde 78-72—150 Mardan Mamat 75-76—151 Thaworn Wiratchant 75-76—151 Michael Sim 72-79—151 Alvaro Quiros 74-78—152 Wu Kang-chun 75-77—152 Liang Wen-Chong 79-73—152 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 78-75—153 Pariya Junhasavasdikul 74-80—154 Hao Yuan 79-75—154 Chao Li 79-79—158

LPGA Tour MIZUNO CLASSIC Friday At Kintetsu Kashikojima Golf Club Shima, Japan Purse: $1.2 million Yardage: 6,506; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Yukari Baba 32-33—65 Jiyai Shin 31-34—65 Morgan Pressel 35-31—66 Miki Saiki 33-34—67 Karine Icher 33-34—67 Meena Lee 35-32—67 Chie Arimura 32-35—67 Na Yeon Choi 32-35—67 Young Kim 33-35—68

Mika Miyazato Katherine Hull Jimin Kang Sun-Ju Ahn Akiko Fukushima Stacy Prammanasudh Stacy Lewis Yani Tseng Candie Kung Sakura Yokomine Na-Ri Lee Ritsuko Ryu Yui Kawahara Maiko Wakabayashi Momoko Ueda Seon Hwa Lee M.J. Hur Hee-Won Han Christina Kim Asako Fujimoto Teresa Lu Hyun-Ju Shin Na On Min Vicky Hurst Amy Hung Akane Iijima Song-Hee Kim Karrie Webb Maria Hjorth Bo Bae Song Kyeong Bae Shinobu Moromizato Hiromi Takesue Amanda Blumenherst Yun-Jye Wei Eun-A Lim Azahara Munoz Inbee Park Sun Young Yoo Ai Miyazato Kristy McPherson Sophie Gustafson Rui Kitada Ayako Uehara Saiki Fujita Mi-Jeong Jeon Ji-Hee Lee Hee Young Park Mayu Hattori Kaori Aoyama Eun-Hee Ji Catriona Matthew Brittany Lincicome Angela Stanford Hiromi Mogi Junko Omote Alena Sharp Ah-Reum Hwang Nobuko Kizawa Haeji Kang Na Ri Kim Meaghan Francella Wendy Ward Anna Nordqvist Rikako Morita Mie Nakata Ji-Woo Lee Gwladys Nocera Yoshimi Kohda

36-32—68 34-34—68 32-36—68 35-33—68 31-38—69 33-36—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 35-34—69 34-35—69 36-34—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 36-34—70 35-35—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-35—70 35-36—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 35-37—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 34-38—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 37-36—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 34-39—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 36-38—74 38-36—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 35-39—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 38-37—75 36-39—75 37-39—76 35-41—76 37-40—77

Champions Tour CHARLES SCHWAB CUP CHAMPIONSHIP Friday At Harding Park Golf Course San Francisco Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 7,135; Par 71 Second Round John Cook 64-69—133 Tom Kite 67-67—134 Tom Lehman 66-68—134 Mark O’Meara 70-65—135 Russ Cochran 67-68—135 Fred Funk 65-70—135 Corey Pavin 68-68—136 David Frost 68-68—136 Bernhard Langer 67-69—136 Tom Pernice, Jr. 65-71—136 Jeff Sluman 67-70—137 Olin Browne 67-70—137 Michael Allen 69-69—138 Fred Couples 69-69—138 Peter Senior 67-72—139 Mark Wiebe 71-69—140 Nick Price 70-70—140 Tommy Armour III 71-70—141 David Peoples 70-71—141 Jay Haas 71-71—142 Chien Soon Lu 71-71—142 Loren Roberts 70-72—142 Dan Forsman 72-71—143 Brad Bryant 73-70—143 Joe Ozaki 71-72—143 Tom Watson 72-72—144 Larry Mize 70-74—144 Joey Sindelar 73-72—145 Mike Reid 74-71—145 Mark Calcavecchia 70-78—148

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 13 8 4 1 17 41 30 N.Y. Rangers 13 7 5 1 15 38 36 Pittsburgh 14 6 7 1 13 39 36 N.Y. Islanders 13 4 7 2 10 34 48 New Jersey 15 4 10 1 9 25 48 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 13 8 4 1 17 32 30 Boston 10 7 3 0 14 32 18 Ottawa 13 6 6 1 13 33 38 Toronto 12 5 5 2 12 29 31 Buffalo 14 3 9 2 8 34 46 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 13 9 4 0 18 44 32 Tampa Bay 12 7 3 2 16 37 34 Atlanta 13 6 5 2 14 40 46 Carolina 13 6 7 0 12 38 42 Florida 11 5 6 0 10 34 29 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 11 8 2 1 17 35 26 St. Louis 10 7 1 2 16 28 17 Columbus 12 8 4 0 16 30 29 Chicago 15 7 7 1 15 44 45 Nashville 11 5 3 3 13 26 29 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 12 7 3 2 16 34 28 Minnesota 12 6 4 2 14 29 28 Colorado 12 6 5 1 13 40 42 Calgary 13 6 7 0 12 35 38 Edmonton 11 3 6 2 8 32 40 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 12 9 3 0 18 35 25 Dallas 12 8 4 0 16 43 32 Anaheim 14 6 7 1 13 35 46 San Jose 11 5 5 1 11 29 28 Phoenix 12 4 5 3 11 30 38 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 3, New Jersey 0 Washington 5, Boston 3 Montreal 3, Buffalo 2 Florida 7, Carolina 4 Minnesota 2, Calgary 1 Dallas 6, Phoenix 3 Detroit 3, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 3, Pittsburgh 2 Today’s Games St. Louis at Boston, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Toronto, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 4 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Columbus, 4 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Nashville at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Philadelphia at Washington, 2 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Chicago, 4 p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times Pacific

——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose 1, New York 1, San Jose advanced on aggregate 3-2 Saturday, Oct. 30: New York 1, San Jose 0 Thursday, Nov. 4: San Jose 3, New York 1 Colorado 1, Columbus 0 Thursday, Oct. 28: Colorado 1, Columbus 0 Today, Nov. 6: Colorado at Columbus, 1 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals FC Dallas 1, Real Salt Lake 0 Saturday, Oct. 30: FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake 1 Today, Nov. 6: FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m. Los Angeles 1, Seattle 0 Sunday, Oct. 31: Los Angeles 1, Seattle 0 Sunday, Nov. 7: Seattle at Los Angeles, 6 p.m.

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup AAA TEXAS 500 LINEUP After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 195.397. 2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 193.653. 3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193.646. 4. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 193.479. 5. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 193.424. 6. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 193.375. 7. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 193.32. 8. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.216. 9. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 193.175. 10. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 193.092. 11. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.078. 12. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 192.775. 13. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.603. 14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 192.369. 15. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 191.993. 16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 191.986. 17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 191.939. 18. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 191.891. 19. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 191.884. 20. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 191.768. 21. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 191.748. 22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 191.741. 23. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 191.673. 24. (83) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 191.598. 25. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 191.564. 26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 191.557. 27. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 191.53. 28. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.09. 29. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.056. 30. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 190.968. 31. (10) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 190.846. 32. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 190.833. 33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.201. 34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.121. 35. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 189.72. 36. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 189.633. 37. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford, 189.255. 38. (66) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 189.201. 39. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 188.851. 40. (71) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (37) Dave Blaney, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (09) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 188.996. Failed to Qualify 44. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 188.673. 45. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 188.653. 46. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 187.852. 47. (64) Jeff Green, Toyota, 187.169. 48. (23) Josh Wise, Toyota, 185.944. 49. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 182.076.

HORSE RACING Breeders’ Cup Odds At Churchill Downs Louisville, Ky. Purses do not include supplemental fees CLASSIC 1 1/4 miles (Dirt), 3&Up Purse: $5 million Horse Jockey Odds 1. Quality Road Velazquez 5-1 2. Paddy O’Prado Desormeaux 15-1 3. Haynesfield Dominguez 12-1 4. First Dude Albarado 15-1 5. Blame Gomez 9-2 6. Fly Down Leparoux 15-1 7. Musket Man Maragh 20-1 8. Zenyatta Smith 8-5 9. Pleasant Prince Rosario 30-1 10. Etched A.Garcia 30-1 11. Espoir City (JPN) Sato 20-1 12. Lookin At Lucky M.Garcia 6-1 Trainers 1, Todd Pletcher. 2, Dale Romans. 3, Steven Asmussen. 4, Dale Romans. 5, Albert Stall, Jr. 6, Nick Zito. 7, Derek Ryan. 8, John Shirreffs. 9, Wesley Ward. 10, Kiaran McLaughlin. 11, Akio Adachi. 12, Bob Baffert.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Sent C Donny Lucy and LHP Randy Williams outright to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Sent INF Andy Marte outright to Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Claimed INF Lance Zawadzki off waivers from San Diego. Assigned OF Jai Miller outright to Omaha (PCL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with RHP Willie Eyre on a minor league contract. Re-signed LHP Travis Blackley to a minor league contract. SEATTLE MARINERS—Named Ted Simmons senior adviser to the general manager. TEXAS RANGERS—Sent INF Esteban German, RHP Doug Mathis and RHP Brandon McCarthy, outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). All refused the assignment to become free agents. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Purchased the contracts of RHP Juan Abreu from Mississippi (SL) and RHP Erik Cordier from Gwinnett (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Named Mike Barnett hitting coach. NEW YORK METS—Waived LHP Hisanori Takahashi. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Released RHP Tyler Walker. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Tennessee DE Jason Babin $20,000 for unnecessarily striking San Diego QB Philip Rivers in the knee area in an Oct. 31 game. Fined San Francisco LB Manny Lawson $12,500 for using his helmet to hit Denver QB Kyle Orton in the chest and LB Ahmad Brooks $10,000 for striking Orton in the head and neck area. Fined New England DT Myron Pryor $7,500 for his hit on Minnesota QB Brett Favre and LB Gary Guyton $7,500 for roughing the passer when he unnecessarily struck Favre. Fined Seattle DE Chris Clemons $7,500 for a late hit on Oakland QB Jason Campbell. Fined Oakland G Robert Gallery $7,500 for a late hit on Seattle DE Chris Clemons that cost him amd Oakland LB Rolando McClain $7,500 for grabbing Seattle RB Justin Forsett by the helmet in an attempt to tackle him. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended San Jose F Joe Thornton two games for delivering an illegal check to the head of St. Louis F David Perron in a Nov. 4 game. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Jeremy Morin from Rockford (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Activated D Mike Commodore off injured reserve. Assigned D Nick Holden to Springfield (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Activated D Anton Volchenkov from injured reserve. Placed D Matt Corrente on injured reserve. Recalled D Alexander Urbom and G Jeff Frazee from Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Reassigned F Zack Smith to Binghamton (AHL). ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS—Signed F Samson Mahbod. Announced F Oren Eizenman has been recalled by Syracuse (AHL). UTAH GRIZZLIES—Announced D Jake Gannon was loaned to Peoria (AHL). VICTORIA SALMON KINGS—Traded G Riley Gill to Kalamazoo to complete an earlier trade. COLLEGE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE—Suspended Florida State women’s soccer coach Mark Krikorian for one game and fined the school $25,000 for not bringing several starters to the league tournament. BIG 12 CONFERENCE—Signed commissioner Dan Beebe to a three-year contract extension through 2015. WESTERN COLLEGIATE HOCKEY ASSOCIATION— Suspended North Dakota F Brad Malone for one game after a check last weekend left Denver F Jesse Martin hospitalized with a neck injury. BAYLOR—Announced G Kelli Griffin has quit the women’s basketball team. HAMPDEN-SYDNEY—Named Richard Epperson director of athletics.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 D3

S  B

COLLEGE BASKETBALL PREVIEW Duke’s Kyle Singler (12) and Miles Plumlee (21) look to lead No. 1-ranked Duke to another trip to the Final Four in March, 2011.

Basketball • Ducks beat Northwest Christian in exhibition: Joevan Catron made a splash in his return to the court to help lead the Oregon men’s basketball team to an 80-53 exhibition win over Northwest Christian at McArthur Court on Friday night. Catron finished five-for-seven from the floor and tied teammate E.J. Singler with a game-high 16 points in the victory. The senior also drained five of his six free throws. The Ducks stormed out of the gates by scoring the first seven points, a run that Teondre Williams put the exclamation point on with a thunderous dunk.

Gerry Broome / The Associated Press

Tennis • Federer, Roddick to meet in Swiss Indoors semis: Roger Federer and Andy Roddick cruised to straight-set wins Friday in Basel, Switzerland, to gain a Swiss Indoors semifinal that will be their first rematch since an epic 2009 Wimbledon final. The top-seeded Swiss eased past Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-2 and the No. 4 American rode his big serve to a 6-4, 6-4 victory over David Nalbandian of Argentina. • Soderling eases past Monfils into Valencia semis: Second-seeded Robin Soderling defeated Gael Monfils 6-3, 6-2 in the Valencia Open on Friday in Valencia, Spain, gaining his first semifinal since July. Soderling served out the victory in 53 minutes — clinching it with his fifth ace. Soderling will face the winner between David Ferrer and Potito Starace on the hard indoor surface at the City of Arts and Sciences complex. Earlier, former top-10 player Gilles Simon outlasted Nikolay Davydenko 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3.

Baseball • Seattle hires Ted Simmons to front-office position: The Seattle Mariners have hired San Diego bench coach Ted Simmons as a senior adviser to general manager Jack Zduriencik. The Mariners announced the move Friday. Simmons has spent the past two seasons as the Padres bench coach. Before moving to the Padres bench, he worked in the San Diego front office in various positions from 1999-07 and was the Milwaukee bench coach in 2008. • Catholic nuns sell Honus Wagner card for $262,000: As soon as collector Doug Walton heard about a rare Honus Wagner baseball card that had been bequeathed to an order of Roman Catholic nuns, he told himself he had to have it. So Walton put in a bid that far exceeded the amount offered by other potential buyers. Walton, of Knoxville, Tenn., will pay $262,000 for the card, which was auctioned off this week by the Baltimore-based School Sisters of Notre Dame. Proceeds from the sale will benefit the order’s ministries for the poor in 35 countries.

Auto racing • Sadler takes first pole since ’06: Elliott Sadler has won his first Sprint Cup pole in more than four years with a dominating run in Fort Worth, Texas. Sadler zipped around the high-banked 1½-mile track in 195.397 mph Friday, nearly 2 mph better than front-row partner Greg Biffle. Points leader Jimmie Johnson qualified 17th for the race Sunday. He’s locked in a tight battle for the championship with Denny Hamlin and Kevin Harvick. Harvick is 26th on the starting grid, and Hamlin 30th.

Football • Auburn QB Cam Newton: ‘I didn’t do anything wrong’: Auburn quarterback Cam Newton says he “didn’t do anything wrong” amid allegations that a man tried to secure payment from Mississippi State during the Heisman Trophy hopeful’s recruitment. Newton said Friday just before stepping on the bus to the team’s hotel in Montgomery ahead of today’s game with Chattanooga that he’s “sure the smoke will settle.” He says he’s holding up just fine, that he’s had “worse days.” A person familiar with the situation tells The Associated Press that Auburn has had “no contact whatsoever” with Kenny Rogers. The former Mississippi State player has been identified by ESPN.com, citing unidentified people, as the person soliciting payment from that school. The person tells AP that Newton’s eligibility “has never been in jeopardy.” • Notre Dame president: School responsible in student death: The president of the University of Notre Dame sent an e-mail to students, faculty, staff and alumni Friday saying that the school is responsible for a student videographer’s death because it failed to protect him. “Declan Sullivan was entrusted to our care, and we failed to keep him safe,” the Rev. John Jenkins wrote. “We at Notre Dame and ultimately I, as President are responsible. Words cannot express our sorrow to the Sullivan family and to all involved.” Declan Sullivan, 20, a student videographer was killed Oct. 27 when a hydraulic lift he was on toppled over while he was filming football practice. The National Weather Service reported a gusts of up to 51 mph at the time. The school and state regulators are investigating the accident. • Okung ‘highly doubtful’ for Seahawks vs. Giants: Making his first NFL start, Seattle quarterback Charlie Whitehurst had better be acutely aware of what’s happening behind him come Sunday. The Seahawks will be starting a completely new left side of the offensive line against the sack-happy New York Giants. Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said Friday that rookie left tackle Russell Okung is “as doubtful as you can get” as he continues to recover from a high-ankle sprain sustained two weeks ago against Arizona. Seattle also lost left guard Ben Hamilton for the season to a concussion last week. • Canada’s Rogers committed to Bills, NFL in Toronto: Despite difficulties selling Toronto fans on the Buffalo Bills, a senior Rogers Communications executive tells The Associated Press his company is committed to extending the team’s five-year series in the city beyond 2012. Saying Rogers is in it for “the long haul,” company vice chairman Phil Lind says the possibility has also been raised of expanding the Bills presence by splitting games between Buffalo and Toronto. • Pryor fined $7,500 for Favre hit: The NFL fined two New England Patriots on Friday for hits on Brett Favre. Defensive tackle Myron Pryor was docked $7,500 for his hit that cut the Minnesota quarterback’s chin. Favre left the Vikings’ loss midway through the fourth quarter Sunday and needed 10 stitches in his chin. — From wire reports

The return of another college hoop season By Jim O’Connell The Associated Press

It can’t be seven months ago that Gordon Hayward’s shot from halfcourt came so close to providing one of the greatest endings in sports history. It can’t be eight months ago that a lot of people learned in a hurry to correctly pronounce Ali Farokhmanesh, after the Northern Iowa guard hit the three-pointer that everybody has imitated whenever they get on a court. Time to file away those memories of Butler and Duke’s epic title game, of the Panthers beating top-ranked Kansas on a jaw-dropping three. A new season gets under way Monday and the biggest change will come in March when, for the first time, people fill out NCAA tournament brackets that have three more teams and three more games. But first comes four months of the regular season. It starts with Duke a solid preseason No. 1 in most polls, and Blue Devils coach Mike Krzyzewski’s title collection now includes a gold medal from the World Championships. His roster includes seniors Kyle Singler and Nolan Smith back to defend their national championship. “I’ve been fortunate. I had to close last season right away to coach the U.S. team, so last season seems to me like a lot of years ago,” said Krzyzewski, whose four national titles are tied with Adolph Rupp and behind only John Wooden (10). “I just jumped right into that. It’s probably the easiest for me to put last season behind.” Singler and Smith have a chance to join the Duke elite with a second title. “You’re going to hear this a lot from us: We’re not defending last year and not trying to repeat,” said Singler, a preseason All-American for the second straight season. “We know for the freshmen coming in, they’re hungry to win the national championship. At the same time, we’re trying to win another one. That’s our main focus. We’re just trying to stay motivated and Coach is also helping us in doing that.” This season’s versions of Duke and No. 17 Butler meet Dec. 4 at the Meadowlands, one of two games the Blue Devils

play against last season’s Final Four. They meet No. 2 Michigan State on Dec. 1 and, eight days earlier, will have faced No. 12 Gonzaga or No. 3 Kansas State in the CBE Classic. “Someone asked me if we don’t win a national championship, will it ruin the year?” Singler said. “You just never know what to expect in the year and toward the end of the year, we’re not worried about that right now. There’s so much we can accomplish, especially at the beginning of the year and the middle of the year. There’s so much to learn and experience. “We definitely have the caliber of talent to accomplish what we did last year.” No program has ever lost as much talent as Kentucky did from a team that was ranked in the top five all season. Five underclassmen — including freshmen All-Americans John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins — were taken in the first round of the NBA draft. No problem for coach John Calipari, who brought in a recruiting class considered so good that the Wildcats are No. 11 in the preseason Top 25. Led by Brandon Knight, considered the best prep point guard last season, this class of Wildcats will have to live with the comparisons to Wall and Co., who were beaten by West Virginia one game shy of the Final Four. “Anybody compared to that group of kids, you’re going to be on the short end,” Calipari said. “This is a totally different team.” There are plenty of other quality newcomers, led by Harrison Barnes, the 6foot-8 forward who is the first freshmen to be selected to The Associated Press’ preseason All-America team and the player who is being looked to lead a quick turnaround for North Carolina. The Tar Heels, who missed the NCAA tournament last season, were picked eighth in the preseason Top 25, a ranking based on the freshmen class led by Barnes. “It remains to be seen if Harrison is going to continue to grow, but from this point, I’ve never been around a freshman who has this kind of intensity at this stage of his freshman year,” Tar Heels coach Roy Williams said.

GOLF ROUNDUP

NHL ROUNDUP

Power plays help Dallas beat Phoenix The Associated Press DALLAS — The top line of Brad Richards, James Neal and Loui Eriksson is clicking for Dallas. So is the Stars’ power play. Eriksson scored two of Dallas’ four power-play goals and had two assists, Richards had one of his two goals with the man advantage, and the Stars beat the Phoenix Coyotes 6-3 on Friday night. “The No. 1 line is dangerous right now because of their skill and chemistry,” Stars coach Marc Crawford said. “They’re a confident bunch.” Eriksson, Richards and Neal have combined for eight goals and nine assists in their last three games. Brenden Morrow added his 200th career goal, Jamie Benn also struck on the power play, and Mike Ribeiro had three assists for Dallas. The Stars set a season high for goals and have 15 in their last three games. The Stars failed to capitalize on their first two power-play chances, but they remained persistent. “We’re trying to shoot it more and we’re finding ways to get in front of the net,” said Eriksson, whose four points were a career high. “That’s huge for us. We need the power play to work. We got a little frustrated, but we were able to get the power play working and that’s why we won the game.” Kari Lehtonen stopped 25 shots as the Stars won their third in a row after dropping the first three of a season-high six-game homestand. Sami Lepisto, Shane Doan and Lauri Korpikoski scored for the Coyotes, led by former Stars coach Dave Tippett. Eriksson’s power-play deflection off Ribeiro’s pass at 15:44 was the only goal of the opening period. Richards made it 2-0 at 3:22 of the second period, converting Neal’s cross-ice setup from low in the left circle, and Richards’ second of the game at 5:21 of the second period extended Dallas’ lead. At that point, Tippett replaced starting goalie Ilya Bryzgalov with Jason LeBarbera, making his third appearance of the season. Bryzgalov stopped 15 of 18 shots. The Coyotes were in catchup mode for most of the night. Phoenix also got some bad

bounces on Dallas goals that caromed in off Coyotes. “It’s disappointing,” Tippett said. “We got behind early and they got some breaks on some pucks that bounced off our guys and into the net, and we couldn’t create the breaks ourselves. But when a team gets those breaks, they earn them and their group found a way to get it in the net.” In other games on Friday: Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WASHINGTON — John Carlson scored the tiebreaking goal with 6:35 left, and Washington chased goalie Tim Thomas and beat Boston after blowing a three-goal lead. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 NEWARK, N.J. — Henrik Lundqvist made 33 saves for his second shutout of the season and Brandon Dubinsky scored two goals for New York, keeping New Jersey winless at home. Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sabres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Benoit Pouliot scored twice, Jeff Halpern had a goal and two assists, and Carey Price made 29 saves to help Montreal improve to 84-1 and snap a two-game losing streak. Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SUNRISE, Fla. — Chris Higgins broke a tie late in the second period, and Stephen Weiss added two goals for Florida in the first game of a home-andhome set. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Martin Havlat scored his first goal of the season to break a third-period tie, and Niklas Backstrom made 33 saves for Minnesota. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 EDMONTON, Alberta — Jimmy Howard made 29 saves, Valtteri Filppula broke a tie on a second-period power play and Detroit beat Edmonton for its third straight victory and sixth in seven games. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Bobby Ryan, Ryan Getzlaf and Saku Koivu scored during a 6:51 span of the second period to break open a scoreless game, and Anaheim overcame two goals by Sidney Crosby.

Tim Sharp / The Associated Press

Phoenix Coyotes left wing Wojtek Wolski (86) takes a shot on Dallas Stars goalie Kari Lehtonen (32) during the first period of an NHL hockey game Friday in Dallas. sson er Lege t n i W acka $ 30 P r 1 ns fo o s s e 6L

END OF Westwood one back at HSBC SEASON SALE!! The Associated Press

SHANGHAI — Lee Westwood figured a 5-wood would be enough to carry the water on the par-5 18th and set up an easy birdie for a share of the lead Friday at the HSBC Champions. Only when he got to the green did he realize the hole was closer to the edge of a slope than usual, and that his position some 15 yards left of the pin made it nearly impossible to keep it on the green. He had to settle for par, leaving him one shot behind Francesco Molinari. “That’s why you shouldn’t play golf by memory,” he said after a 2-under 70. That was only one shot on one hole. As for the rest of the game, Westwood has total recall. It does not look as though the Englishman is playing in only his second tournament since the first week of August. He was on a roll this year, and the only difference now is the No. 1 ranking next to his name. In his first tournament since replacing Tiger Woods atop the world ranking, Westwood didn’t know what to expect from his game in the final World Golf Championship of the year.

“Everything is pretty competitive in my game,” Westwood said. “It’s a good performance the first two rounds to come back. I’m pleasantly surprised with how well I’ve played.” Also on Friday: Cook takes lead at Cup championship SAN FRANCISCO — Defending champion John Cook shot a 2-under 69 at Harding Park to take a one-stroke lead over Tom Kite and Tom Lehman in the Champions Tour’s season-ending Charles Schwab Cup Championship. A day after opening with seven birdies in a bogey-free 64, Cook was even par through 15 holes before he eagled the par-4 16th. He followed with pars on the final two holes to get to 9-under 133. Asian golfers tied on top at Mizuno Classic SHIMA, Japan — South Korea’s Jiyai Shin and Japan’s Yukari Baba shot 7-under 65s at Kintetsu Kashikojima to share the first-round lead in the Mizuno Classic. Morgan Pressel opened with a 66, and Na Yeon Choi was two strokes back at 67 along with Miki Saiki, Karine Icher, Meena Lee and Chie Arimura. Japan’s Ai Miyazato, a five-time winner on the LPGA Tour this season, shot a 72.

30 – 60% OFF EVERYTHING IN THE STORE!!!*

Proud to be Central Oregon’s only golf specialty store! Locally owned. Full Service Repair Shop. Trade-Ins.

N Hwy 97 • Next to ShopKo 541-593-GOLF (4653) Mon–Fri 10–6 Sat 9–5, Sun 10–4 *Certain manufacturer restrictions apply. Golf balls and 2011 Models excluded. Reduction on full retail only.


D4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

UCLA

PREP ROUNDUP

Cowboys fall short of playoffs Bulletin staff report PRINEVILLE — Crook County came oh, so close to advancing to the state football playoffs for the first time since 1997. Instead, North Bend dashed the Cowboys’ postseason hopes by edging out Crook County 2221 on Friday night in a Class 4A state play-in contest. After a slow start and trailing 14-6, the Cowboys (7-3 overall), sparked by Alex Greaves’ field goal block before the half, tied the game 14-14 in the third quarter. The home team then surged ahead in the fourth quarter on a 12yard rushing touchdown by Jordan Reeher, only to watch North Bend march down the field and score with less than a minute remaining in the game. With 50 seconds left on the clock, the Bulldogs gambled and converted a two-point conversion to take a 22-21 lead. The Cowboys, who amassed 355 total yards offense compared to North Bend’s 332, were unable to respond as time expired following an incomplete Crook County passing play. Cowboy quarterback Travis Bartels twice connected with Tyler Tooley for touchdowns. Tooley finished with 53 yards receiving and two touchdowns.

The narrow home less marked an end to the Cowboys’ winning season. In other prep action Friday: FOOTBALL Oregon City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 OREGON CITY — Redmond could not have started any better in its Class 6A state play-in game. The visiting Panthers scored twice in the first quarter, including a five-yard touchdown run by Ryan Simmons, and led by 10 points at the end of the opening period. The Pioneers answered early in the second quarter with a touchdown on a 37-yard run by Malcolm Paulston, then Louis Wolf returned a Redmond punt 30 yards for a score to give Oregon City the lead for good. “We were taking care of business and that (the punt return) let ’em right back in the game,” said Panthers coach Dan Elliott. “Big momentum shift right there.” Paulston scored two more touchdowns in the second half and Oregon City (4-6 overall) advanced to the 6A postseason. Simmons ran for 78 yards, and fellow Redmond senior Mitch Dahlen completed 20 of 27 passes for 162 yards and a touchdown. Panther receiver Sawyer Gerdes caught 10 passes for 73 yards and a touchdown.

The Panthers (3-6 overall) won three of their first four games this season but ended with five consecutive defeats. Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MT. ANGEL — Though Culver dropped its final Tri-River Conference game of the season, the Bulldogs had already clenched a berth in the Class 2A state playoffs after besting Central Linn 26-6 on Oct. 29. Kennedy led Friday’s game from the start and built a 28-0 lead by the half. Culver’s Nathan Hamlin put the Bulldogs (2-3 Tri-River Conference, 5-4 overall) on the scoreboard in the third quarter with a safety before scoring on a nineyard run later in the quarter. Culver will kick off playoff action next week, but its opponent and location will not be determined until Sunday. Elkton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 ELKTON — The young and quickly improving Grizzlies were hoping to end their season with three consecutive victories, but host Elkton was too much for Gilchrist in a Class 1A Special District 2 contest. “I’m really proud of the way our boys played,” said Grizzlies coach Steve Hall. “This was a rebuild-

ing season for us and the kids really started to catch on halfway through the year.” Despite the win, Elkton (5-2 SD1, 7-2 overall) will just miss qualifying for the 16-team Class 1A playoffs. Next year the Grizzlies (2-5 SD1, 2-6 overall) are expected to return their top two offensive weapons from this season, Josh Anderson and Tyler Shuey, as well as 11 other starters. GIRLS SOCCER Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 The Storm, who have not lost a game since September, rolled to another convincing win in a second-round Class 5A state play-in game at Summit High. Eve Hess scored the game’s first goal 10 minutes in, and the senior defender went on to add three more goals and two assists. Summit led 5-0 at halftime, and Kristen Parr notched three goals and three assists while Hadlie Plummer tallied two goals in the second half. Rianna Alyward and Annie Hill also scored for Summit. The Storm (11-2-2 overall) will play Tuesday in the first round of the 16-team, 5A state playoffs. Summit’s opponent is to be determined, and the site and time of Tuesday’s match are to be announced.

Bend Continued from D1 After both teams scored touchdowns in the first overtime, Bend’s defense came up big one last time. The Lava Bears stuffed West Albany on two running plays, and on third down, Kody Petersen chased down Bulldog quarterback Nick Orsborn for a sack. That led to a 43-yard field-goal try by Tyler Davis that missed. With Bend back on offense, Koski scrambled for 12 yards on third down, and Gerdes barreled through the heart of the West Albany defense for the game-winning touchdown. “We pulled it together and our (offensive) line just did really good,” Gerdes said of the game’s final play. “Our motto is ‘Just believe,’ and that is exactly what we did.” Bend struggled to sustain drives early in the night until getting a jump-start from the defense. A third-quarter fumble deep in Lava Bear territory led to an 85yard touchdown drive, capped by a three-yard pass from Grim to Kenny Dailey to cut the Bulldogs’ lead to 21-14 with 1:16 left in the third quarter. On West Albany’s next possession Kyle Barker picked off an Orsborn pass at midfield and returned the ball to the Bulldogs’ 2yard line. Two plays later, Gerdes tied with a touchdown. “It was a big deal,” said Walker of his team’s ability force turnovers. “Turnovers are the difference in the ballgame. We didn’t have any and they had three.” Bend will play next week in the first round of the playoffs. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Huskies

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Andrew Hester (55) and other Mountain View defenders stop quarterback Xavier Fernandez (12) in the backfield during the first half against Woodburn on Friday.

Cougars Continued from D1 The OSAA is expected to release the 5A playoff bracket this weekend. The Cougars jumped to a 270 lead in the first half behind the running of Sears and Mountain View’s big-play defense. The Cougars’ first two scores — a pair of four-yard runs by Sears — were set up by tackling the punter on one Woodburn possession and recovering a fumble on the next. Led by linebacker Joel Skotte and his 12 solo tackles — he also recovered the fumble that set up the Cougars’ second touchdown — Mountain View’s defense limited the Bulldogs

(3-6) to fewer than 100 yards of offense in the first half and just 12 points the entire night, their third-lowest total of the season. “Our defense gives us that push,” Cougar coach Steve Turner said. “I was disappointed we didn’t score on our first possession, but (the defense) got us the ball right back (on the muffed punt). Getting us in that short field is so important.” Taking advantage of two big kick returns and three Mountain View personal fouls, Woodburn scored twice in the third quarter, both times starting inside the Cougars’ 35-yard line. Mountain View held the Bulldogs’ doublewing, double-tight-end offense in check the rest of the night, though, stopping Woodburn on

fourth down three times while also forcing two turnovers. On the other side of the ball, Woodburn had no answer for Mountain View’s offense. The Cougars recorded 563 yards of total offense and scored on four of their first five possessions. In addition to Sears’ big night, Mountain View quarterback Jacob Hollister completed nine of 15 pass attempts for 190 yards and two touchdowns against one interception. Skotte added 98 yards and a touchdown on just three carries, highlighted by a 91-yard scoring run in the fourth quarter. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

PREP SCOREBOARD FOOTBALL CLASS 6A PLAY-IN ——— OREGON CITY 28, REDMOND 17 Redmond 10 0 7 0 — 17 Oregon City 0 13 7 8 — 28 R — Ryan Simmons 5 run (Travis Simpson kick) R — Simpson 29 field goal OC — Malcolm Paulston 37 run (kick failed) OC — Louis Wolf 30 punt return (Shawn Hepler kick) R — Sawyer Gerdes 4 pass from Mitch Dahlen (Simpson kick) OC — Paulston 10 run (Hepler kick) OC — Safety OC — Paulston 4 run (kick failed)

Class 5A

Continued from D1 Oregon State has two losses to Top 5 teams and an embarrassing slip-up at Washington in its recent past, but a strong finish will keep the Beavers on track for their sixth bowl berth in seven seasons. “We thought about it after the Washington game and the bye week,” Oregon State linebacker Dwight Roberson said. “Coach (Mark) Banker ... said, ‘You know what? We are not out of this. We win the next six games, we are there.’ We talked about it, and now we just have to do it.” Jacquizz Rodgers has posted two memorable games against UCLA’s defense already in his career, but the Oregon State tailback is more focused on his team’s execution. After a bit of harsh criticism from their junior star, the Beavers returned from their off date last week with a 35-7 thumping of California, which routed UCLA last month. Rodgers still expects more from the Beavers, but the win only proved their potential. “I am hard on us as a team, because I know what we are capable of,” said Rodgers, who was downright pleased with his teammates’ response against Cal. “Our defense almost had a shutout, and we were well-balanced on offense. When our team scores like that, and our defense makes stops like that, it just makes us hard to beat.” While the Beavers attempt to keep building, the Bruins are hoping to stop a three-game slide that has left them facing long odds just to gain bowl eligibility. UCLA lost at home to Arizona last weekend, and the Bruins will need three wins in their

Second-round state play-in contest ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW 55, WOODBURN 12 Woodburn 0 0 12 0 — 12 Mountain View 13 14 14 14 — 55 MV— Austin Sears 4 run (Skyler Laughlin kick) MV— Sears 4 run (run fail) MV— Sears 31 run (Skyler Laughlin kick) MV— Sears 14 run (Skyler Laughlin kick) W— Josh Graff 18 run (run fail) MV— Sears 4 pass from Jacob Hollister (Skyler Laughlin kick) W— Rico Lopez 8 run (run fail) MV— Sears 36 run (Skyler Laughlin kick) MV— Nick Gentry 71 pass from Hollister (Skyler Laughlin kick) MV— Joel Skotte 91 run (Skyler Laughlin kick) ——— BEND 34, WEST ALBANY 28 West Albany 7 14 0 0 7 0 — 28 Bend 0 7 7 7 7 6 — 34

WA— Aaron Potter 3 run (Tyler Davis kick) WA— Jackson Ruckert 5 pass from Nick Orsborn (Davis kick) B— J.C. Grim 3 run (Hayden Crook kick) WA— Ruckert 74 pass from Orsborn (Davis kick) B— Kenny Dailey 3 pass from Grim (Crook kick) B— Dailey 1 run (Crook kick) B— Gavin Gerdes 4 run (Crook kick) WA— Ryker Smith 6 run (Davis kick) B— Gerdes 10 run ———

CLASS 4A Play-In ——— NORTH BEND 22, CROOK COUNTY 21 North Bend 7 7 0 8 — 22 Crook County 0 6 8 7 — 21 NB — Kai Johnson 22 run (Michael Hobson kick) NB — Johnson 9 run (Hobson kick) CC — Tyler Tooley 10 pass from Travis Bartels (kick fail)

CC — Tooley 17 pass from Bartels (Tooley pass from Bartels) CC — Jordan Reeher 12 run (Braden Woodbury kick) NB — Aaron Mateski 10 pass from Logan Lucero (Jackson Stump pass from Lucero)

CLASS 2A TRI-RIVER CONFERENCE ——— KENNEDY 35, CULVER 8 Culver 0 0 8 Kennedy 14 14 7 K — Derek Trager 6 run (Patrick Goerun kick) K — Michael Billenberg 1 run (Goerun kick) K — Daniel Hammer 41 run (Goerun kick) K — Trager 2 run (Goerun kick) C — Nathan Hamlin safety C — Hamlin 9 run (kick fail) K — Trager 13 run (Goerun kick)

0 — 8 0 — 35

Continued from D1 But Price is undaunted. “I’m going to go out there and just have fun and play, just like high school,” he said. Price was thrust into his new role as starter against the Ducks (8-0, 5-0 Pac-10) because senior Jake Locker has a broken rib. The Heisman hopeful at the start of the season was first hurt during a marathon overtime victory over Oregon State on Oct. 16. At first it was a hairline fracture and Locker continued to play, but it got worse in Washington’s 41-0 loss at home to Stanford last weekend. Price played the final quarter against the Cardinal, and threw a touchdown pass on his only play from scrimmage in a 32-31 victory on the road against USC on Oct. 2. Washington Coach Steve Sarkisian said Price has an advantage in that he’s practiced with the first-team offense for the past three weeks while Locker has rested. But Sarkisian was realistic about what Price is up against. “It’s going to be hard, a great challenge. But one of the unique qualities Keith has is he is a very positive young man. He’s always bright eyed and got a great smile on his face. He doesn’t tend to get rattled by things,” the coach said. “I think that type of an approach is one that you really need going into Autzen Stadium.” Price isn’t the only one who is going to be challenged. Oregon has the nation’s top-ranked offense, averaging nearly 573 yards a game. The Ducks are dropping just under 56 points per game on their opponents. The Huskies, meanwhile, are struggling on defense, allowing an average of 429.8 yards and 34.1 points per game. Washington (3-5, 2-3) has lost three of their last four games. In the last two, losses to Arizona and Stanford, the team has been outscored 85-14. “Our confidence has changed

final four games to avoid missing bowl qualification for just the second time in 11 seasons. Richard Brehaut is slated to make his fourth career start, and coach Rick Neuheisel is hoping the sophomore is ready to lead UCLA’s mostly awful passing offense to a breakout game. The Bruins finally showed signs of life through the air in last week’s loss, passing for a season-high 228 yards. “This is not too big for Richard,” Neuheisel said. “Richard has what I like to call moxie. He’s got a little swagger to him. He’s unafraid. There’s zero fear, so that’s not an issue. Sometimes there should be some fear, but there’s not, in terms of him knowing who’s unblocked and those kinds of things. It’s not too big for him that way.” Neuheisel also isn’t comforted by the season-long criticism of Banker’s defense, noting Oregon State held Cal to 23 yards passing last week. “Their defensive coordinator does a nice job there,” Neuheisel said. “Their bendbut-don’t-break thing, they’re going to get up in your mustache and make some plays.” Neuheisel realizes his own defense is unlikely to slow down Rodgers, who also threw a touchdown pass last week in another do-it-all game. Oregon State coach Mike Riley isn’t sure which defense he’ll see at the Rose Bowl: The UCLA squad that shut down Texas in a big road win in September, or the clueless bunch that has yielded 124 points in its last three games. “They’ve had some outstanding moments in their season,” Riley said. “Defensively, UCLA has always been a problem for us with their athleticism and with the schemes that they run. We expect a very tough match.”

some and it’s slumped some and there is some wonder and doubt in some guys’ minds,” Sarkisian said. “But that doesn’t mean you can’t bring that back up. That’s part of the business that we are in.” The Ducks are brimming with confidence after taking over the top spot in the BCS rankings this week. Oregon, which also is No. 1 in the AP Top 25, is off to it’s best start since the 1933 season, when they also opened 8-0. The Ducks have never before been the No. 1 team in the country. And while coach Chip Kelly won’t address what that means for Oregon, the players admit they can’t help but be excited about the prospects for a national championship. “We’re all human out here. We know we control our own destiny and we can do something really special this year. But we understand it’s one week at a time and it’s four weeks for the rest of lives,” said receiver Jeff Maehl. “We have to sacrifice and make sure we come out here everyday and focus.” Maehl was the Pac-10 offensive player of the week after making eight catches for 145 yards and three touchdowns in Oregon’s 53-32 victory at USC last Saturday. And Maehl is only a part of Oregon’s prolific offense. Running back LaMichael James leads the nation with an average of 172.9 yards a game. Through seven games the Heisman candidate has already rushed for 1,210 yards. Quarterback Darron Thomas has thrown for 21 touchdowns and run for two more. The Ducks could see the return of running back and return specialist Kenjon Barner, who suffered a serious concussion in Oregon’s 43-23 victory at Washington State on Oct. 9. Oregon only lists players as day-to-day, but Barner was practicing at full-speed this week. The Huskies lead the alltime series against Oregon 5839-5, but the Ducks have won the last six games, all by 20 or more points.

Former Storm golfer earns Big Sky Conference weekly honor Bulletin staff report OGDEN, Utah — Tiffany Schoning, a Summit High graduate and a junior at Portland State University, has been named the Big Sky Conference’s cowomen’s golfer of the week after winning the Turtle Bay Collegiate Invitational in Kahuku, Hawaii, a three-day tournament which concluded on Thursday. Schoning shot rounds of 74 and 76 before ending the tournament with a 3under-par 69 to claim medalist honors by two strokes. Her three-day total of 218 was a career low and tied her for the third-best 54-hole total in Portland State history.

Schoning shared the Big Sky honor with Northern Arizona’s Alexa Kim.

PREP NOTEBOOK

Ex-Lava Bear shines at Concordia PORTLAND — Kaitlyn Tebbs, a 2007 graduate of Bend High, leads NAIA’s topranked women’s soccer team, Concordia University of Portland, into the Cascade Collegiate Conference playoffs today. Tebbs, who led the Cavaliers in goals (eight) and assists (eight) this regular season, has helped guide Concordia to a 16-02 overall record and an 8-0-1 mark in CCC play. The Cavs host the College of Idaho today in a CCC semifinal match. The winner of today’s game advances to the CCC

title game, which will be played on Nov. 13. The winner of the CCC tournament earns the league’s automatic berth into the NAIA National Championships.

ic-10 Conference loss to No. 4 Stanford. Defoe, who graduated early and played spring ball with OSU, leads the Beavers in digs this season with 295. Oregon State, which were 1-10 in Pac-10 play as of Friday, played Arizona State on Friday night and are at Arizona today.

Former Storm standout leads Beavs in digs CORVALLIS — Oregon State University freshman Becky Defoe, a homeschooled student from Bend who played volleyball for Summit High the last four seasons, led the Beavers in digs last Sunday in their 25-17, 25-21, 25-20 Pacif-

Redmond grad finishes strong season at OIT KLAMATH FALLS — Crystal Foster, a 2009 graduate of Redmond High and a sophomore at Oregon Institute of Technology, just completed a standout season for the Owls in women’s soccer, leading her with team with 14 goals in 17 games. Fos-

ter, who also recorded three assists this year, helped guide OIT to a 10-7 overall record and a 5-4 mark in the NAIA Cascade Collegiate Conference. The Owls’ season came to a close on Saturday with a 6-1 defeat at Concordia University in Portland. Past Madras AD to receive honor SPRINGFIELD — Margret Sturza, a former athletic director at Madras High School, will be inducted into the Oregon Athletic Directors Association’s hall of fame on April 16, 2011. Sturza will be one of five former athletic directors honored by the OADA at its annual conference in Sunriver.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 D5

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Friday’s games

Atlantic Division

Hawks 113, T’wolves 103 ATLANTA (113) Smith 9-13 2-3 20, Horford 7-11 0-0 14, Collins 2-3 2-2 6, Bibby 5-11 2-3 15, J.Johnson 4-13 3-3 11, Ja.Crawford 8-14 5-5 22, Pachulia 1-2 5-8 7, Teague 2-5 2-2 6, Powell 5-6 0-0 10, Jo.Crawford 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 44-81 21-26 113. MINNESOTA (103) Beasley 6-17 4-5 16, Love 6-19 5-5 18, Milicic 2-7 0-0 4, Ridnour 4-6 0-0 9, W.Johnson 711 0-0 18, Brewer 8-16 2-2 18, Pekovic 2-6 0-0 4, Tolliver 2-6 0-0 4, Telfair 3-8 0-0 8, Ellington 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 42-99 11-12 103. Atlanta 26 30 27 30 — 113 Minnesota 25 26 20 32 — 103 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 4-18 (Bibby 3-7, Ja.Crawford 1-4, Jo.Crawford 0-1, Smith 0-1, Teague 0-1, J.Johnson 0-4), Minnesota 8-22 (W.Johnson 4-6, Telfair 2-3, Ridnour 1-2, Love 14, Brewer 0-1, Tolliver 0-3, Beasley 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 51 (Horford 12), Minnesota 49 (Love 12). Assists—Atlanta 27 (Smith 6), Minnesota 24 (Telfair 7). Total Fouls— Atlanta 15, Minnesota 22. Technicals—Beasley. A—17,222 (19,356).

Boston New York New Jersey Toronto Philadelphia

W 5 3 2 1 1

Knicks 112, Wizards 91 WASHINGTON (91) Blatche 9-17 4-4 22, Thornton 4-9 0-0 8, McGee 4-5 0-0 8, Wall 4-11 5-6 13, Hinrich 28 3-4 7, Armstrong 2-4 0-0 4, Arenas 6-13 2-3 18, Hudson 0-0 0-0 0, Booker 0-0 0-0 0, Yi 2-5 4-4 8, Young 1-3 1-1 3, Martin 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-75 19-22 91. NEW YORK (112) Gallinari 6-13 0-1 16, Stoudemire 6-11 6-7 18, Mozgov 3-4 0-2 6, Fields 2-5 0-0 5, Felton 5-10 1-1 13, Douglas 8-19 0-0 19, Chandler 5-8 3-3 14, Turiaf 4-4 2-2 10, Walker 4-6 0-0 9, Randolph 1-7 0-2 2. Totals 44-87 12-18 112. Washington 27 22 24 18 — 91 New York 26 32 23 31 — 112 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-16 (Arenas 4-8, Young 0-1, Blatche 0-1, Wall 0-2, Hinrich 0-4), New York 12-29 (Gallinari 4-9, Douglas 38, Felton 2-5, Walker 1-2, Chandler 1-2, Fields 1-2, Randolph 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 44 (McGee 8), New York 49 (Douglas 10). Assists—Washington 13 (Wall 7), New York 23 (Felton 10). Total Fouls—Washington 18, New York 21. Technicals—Blatche, Washington defensive three second, Turiaf. A—19,763 (19,763).

Cavaliers 123, 76ers 116 CLEVELAND (123) Moon 3-6 0-0 7, Hickson 5-12 6-6 16, Varejao 10-10 3-5 23, M.Williams 6-15 10-12 22, Parker 1-2 3-4 5, Gibson 6-9 8-11 22, Hollins 2-2 1-2 5, Sessions 2-6 5-5 9, J.Williams 2-7 0-0 4, Graham 4-6 2-3 10. Totals 41-75 3848 123. PHILADELPHIA (116) Nocioni 6-10 0-0 15, Brand 8-12 4-5 20, Hawes 1-1 1-2 3, Holiday 10-17 6-8 29, Iguodala 3-7 1-2 7, L.Williams 7-14 2-3 16, Young 2-4 1-2 5, Turner 2-7 1-1 5, Kapono 0-0 0-0 0, Speights 3-4 2-2 8, Songaila 0-1 0-0 0, Battie 4-6 0-0 8. Totals 46-83 18-25 116. Cleveland 34 27 18 44 — 123 Philadelphia 20 33 31 32 — 116 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 3-13 (Gibson 24, Moon 1-2, J.Williams 0-2, M.Williams 0-5), Philadelphia 6-17 (Nocioni 3-5, Holiday 3-5, Iguodala 0-2, Turner 0-2, L.Williams 0-3). Fouled Out—Holiday. Rebounds—Cleveland 53 (Varejao 12), Philadelphia 35 (Battie 7). Assists—Cleveland 22 (M.Williams 7), Philadelphia 26 (Holiday 8). Total Fouls—Cleveland 17, Philadelphia 32. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—10,589 (20,318).

Bucks 94, Pacers 90 MILWAUKEE (94) Delfino 4-15 0-0 9, Gooden 3-7 1-2 7, Mbah a Moute 2-7 6-8 10, Jennings 7-19 3-4 18, Salmons 6-12 8-10 22, Brockman 0-1 0-0 0, Dooling 3-4 0-0 9, Ilyasova 3-7 2-2 9, Maggette

L 1 2 3 4 5

Pct .833 .600 .400 .200 .167

GB — 1½ 2½ 3½ 4

L10 5-1 3-2 2-3 1-4 1-5

Str W-4 W-2 L-3 L-3 L-1

Home 4-0 1-1 2-2 1-1 1-3

Away 1-1 2-1 0-1 0-3 0-2

Conf 5-1 3-1 1-3 1-1 1-5

Away 4-0 0-1 2-2 0-3 1-3

Conf 4-0 2-1 3-1 1-3 1-3

Away 0-2 1-1 1-2 1-3 0-3

Conf 1-2 2-2 2-2 2-1 1-4

Southeast Division Atlanta Orlando Miami Washington Charlotte

W 6 3 4 1 1

L 0 1 2 3 4

Chicago Cleveland Indiana Milwaukee Detroit

W 2 2 2 2 1

L 3 3 3 4 5

Pct 1.000 .750 .667 .250 .200

GB — 2 2 4 4½

L10 6-0 3-1 4-2 1-3 1-4

Str W-6 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 2-0 3-0 2-0 1-0 0-1

Central Division Pct .400 .400 .400 .333 .167

GB — — — ½ 1½

L10 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-4 1-5

Str L-2 W-1 L-2 W-1 W-1

Home 2-1 1-2 1-1 1-1 1-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Pistons 97, Bobcats 90 CHARLOTTE (90) G.Wallace 6-9 1-2 13, Diaw 3-11 0-0 7, Mohammed 3-5 0-0 6, Augustin 4-6 2-2 12, Jackson 12-19 0-0 28, Thomas 4-6 2-2 10, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Livingston 2-2 0-0 4, D.Brown 3-8 1-3 9, Henderson 0-1 0-0 0, Diop 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 37-67 7-11 90. DETROIT (97) Prince 7-17 0-0 14, Daye 3-6 0-0 8, B.Wallace 2-3 0-0 4, Gordon 7-16 5-5 20, McGrady 3-6 4-4 10, Hamilton 2-7 11-11 16, Monroe 3-5 3-3 9, Bynum 2-9 2-2 6, Villanueva 3-6 1-2 10. Totals 32-75 26-27 97. Charlotte 15 24 25 26 — 90 Detroit 32 23 17 25 — 97 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 9-20 (Jackson 4-8, D.Brown 2-3, Augustin 2-4, Diaw 1-5), Detroit 7-13 (Villanueva 3-5, Daye 2-2, Hamilton 1-2, Gordon 1-2, Bynum 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 42 (Diaw, D.Brown 7), Detroit 36 (Monroe, B.Wallace 6). Assists—Charlotte 28 (Augustin 8), Detroit 14 (B.Wallace 4). Total Fouls—Charlotte 18, Detroit 13. Technicals—Charlotte Coach Brown, Jackson, Charlotte defensive three second. A—13,291 (22,076).

NBA ROUNDUP

Southwest Division New Orleans Dallas San Antonio Memphis Houston

W 5 3 3 2 0

L 0 1 1 4 4

Portland Denver Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota

W 4 3 3 2 1

L 2 2 2 3 5

L.A. Lakers Golden State Sacramento Phoenix L.A. Clippers

W 6 4 3 2 1

L 0 1 2 3 5

Pct 1.000 .750 .750 .333 .000

GB — 1½ 1½ 3½ 4½

L10 5-0 3-1 3-1 2-4 0-4

Str W-5 W-2 W-2 L-3 L-4

Home 3-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 0-2

Away 2-0 2-0 2-0 1-3 0-2

Conf 3-0 2-1 2-1 2-3 0-4

Away 3-1 1-1 2-1 1-2 0-3

Conf 2-1 3-2 1-2 1-3 0-2

Away 2-0 0-1 2-1 1-1 0-2

Conf 5-0 4-1 1-1 2-3 1-5

Northwest Division Pct .667 .600 .600 .400 .167

GB — ½ ½ 1½ 3

L10 4-2 3-2 3-2 2-3 1-5

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-4

Home 1-1 2-1 1-1 1-1 1-2

Paciic Division Pct 1.000 .800 .600 .400 .167

GB — 1½ 2½ 3½ 5

L10 Str 6-0 W-6 4-1 W-2 3-2 L-1 2-3 W-1 1-5 L-1 ——— Friday’s Games

Milwaukee 94, Indiana 90 Cleveland 123, Philadelphia 116 New York 112, Washington 91 New Orleans 96, Miami 93 Phoenix 123, Memphis 118, 2OT L.A. Lakers 108, Toronto 103

Home 4-0 4-0 1-1 1-2 1-3

Orlando 105, New Jersey 90 Detroit 97, Charlotte 90 Atlanta 113, Minnesota 103 Boston 110, Chicago 105, OT Golden State 85, Utah 78 Denver 111, L.A. Clippers 104 Today’s Games

Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 6 p.m. Memphis at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Cleveland at Washington, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Utah, 6 p.m. Toronto at Portland, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games

Philadelphia at New York, 9 a.m. Golden State at Detroit, 3 p.m. Boston at Oklahoma City, 4 p.m.

Phoenix at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 4 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m. ——— All Times Pacific

4-11 2-4 10, Sanders 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-83 22-30 94. INDIANA (90) Granger 6-17 7-8 19, McRoberts 0-2 0-0 0, Hibbert 4-11 6-7 14, Collison 5-13 8-9 19, Dunleavy 3-8 5-6 11, Posey 3-7 0-0 9, Ford 1-4 0-0 2, George 4-9 0-0 10, Hansbrough 3-3 0-0 6, S.Jones 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 29-75 26-30 90. Milwaukee 18 34 18 24 — 94 Indiana 20 40 16 14 — 90 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 8-20 (Dooling 3-3, Salmons 2-5, Ilyasova 1-1, Jennings 1-3, Delfino 1-7, Maggette 0-1), Indiana 6-24 (Posey 3-7, George 2-5, Collison 1-3, McRoberts 0-1, Ford 0-2, Dunleavy 0-2, Granger 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee 54 (Mbah a Moute 15), Indiana 55 (Hibbert 12). Assists—Milwaukee 16 (Salmons 5), Indiana 11 (Hibbert 4). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 24, Indiana 24. Technicals—Gooden, Indiana defensive three second. A—14,115 (18,165).

Magic 105, Nets 90 NEW JERSEY (90) Outlaw 7-8 0-0 17, Murphy 2-9 0-0 5, Lopez 3-17 4-4 10, Harris 5-10 3-3 14, Morrow 2-6 0-0 5, T.Williams 6-14 0-0 15, Favors 2-3 0-0 4, Farmar 3-10 0-0 7, Humphries 6-7 1-2 13. Totals 36-84 8-9 90. ORLANDO (105) Lewis 5-15 0-0 12, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 9-13 12-16 30, Nelson 7-12 4-6 20, Carter 6-11 4-4 19, Richardson 0-1 0-0 0, Bass 1-3 4-4 6, Duhon 0-3 0-0 0, Redick 2-5 2-2 7, Gortat 1-1 0-0 2, Pietrus 3-6 0-0 9. Totals 3471 26-32 105. New Jersey 18 33 16 23 — 90 Orlando 20 28 32 25 — 105 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 10-22 (Outlaw 3-4, T.Williams 3-4, Morrow 1-3, Harris 1-3, Farmar 1-4, Murphy 1-4), Orlando 11-28 (Pietrus 3-4, Carter 3-6, Nelson 2-4, Lewis 2-8, Redick 1-3, Anderson 0-1, Duhon 0-1, Richardson

Zenyatta Continued from D1 “Somebody else will have to make that decision,” he said. One more brilliant stretch run by the massive dark bay could erase any lingering doubts. And there are doubts. All but two of her victories have come on the synthetic tracks back home in California. She’s only beaten the boys once, when she roared past Gio Ponti in the final yards to become the first mare to win the Classic a year ago. Her 2010 campaign has been flawless, but her five wins this year have come against fields comprised largely of unimpressive fillies and mares. Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert, who will send out Preakness champion Lookin At Lucky in the Classic, is in awe of Zenyatta and grateful for what she’s done for racing. He also understands the argument against her. “She has to win here on the dirt,” he said. “Last year she was phenomenal, but she did it on a synthetic track. There’s always going to be that question mark.” It’s a question Zenyatta can answer one ground-swallowing stride at a time. Shirreffs believes the dirt won’t be a problem. Her two largest margins of victory came in the Apple Blossom on the real stuff at Oaklawn Park. She’s looked right at home at Churchill since arriving on Tuesday with the type of fanfare normally reserved for visiting heads of state. Her daily trips from the barn to the track for a light jog look like something out of a movie star’s nightmare, with a mass of cameras swimming around her as Shirreffs gently leads the way. Not that it bothers her. Nothing really does. Jockey Mike Smith calls her “the ultimate entertainer,” and she’s determined to give her

0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 38 (Outlaw 6), Orlando 54 (Howard 16). Assists—New Jersey 20 (Farmar 7), Orlando 16 (Nelson 6). Total Fouls—New Jersey 27, Orlando 11. A—18,846 (18,500).

Hornets 96, Heat 93 MIAMI (93) James 6-16 7-8 20, Bosh 7-13 0-0 15, Anthony 1-2 0-0 2, Arroyo 0-2 0-1 0, Wade 7-16 13-13 28, House 2-10 0-0 4, Ilgauskas 5-6 0-0 10, Haslem 3-7 2-2 8, Jones 2-6 0-0 6. Totals 33-78 22-24 93. NEW ORLEANS (96) Ariza 5-13 0-0 13, West 5-12 5-6 15, Okafor 12-13 2-3 26, Paul 5-13 3-3 13, Belinelli 3-7 2-2 8, Smith 5-10 2-3 12, Green 2-4 0-0 4, Bayless 0-2 0-0 0, Mbenga 0-2 0-0 0, Thornton 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 39-79 14-17 96. Miami 17 24 23 29 — 93 New Orleans 29 21 22 24 — 96 3-Point Goals—Miami 5-21 (Jones 2-6, Bosh 1-1, James 1-2, Wade 1-5, House 0-7), New Orleans 4-14 (Ariza 3-7, Thornton 1-1, Paul 0-2, Belinelli 0-2, Green 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 45 (Wade 10), New Orleans 45 (Okafor 13). Assists—Miami 19 (James 10), New Orleans 26 (Paul 19). Total Fouls—Miami 17, New Orleans 22. Technicals—Paul, New Orleans defensive three second. A—17,988 (17,188).

Celtics 110, Bulls 105 CHICAGO (105) Deng 8-19 2-2 20, Gibson 9-14 0-0 18, Noah 8-13 10-10 26, Rose 8-19 2-2 18, Bogans 1-3 2-2 4, Asik 1-2 0-0 2, Watson 2-2 0-0 5, Johnson 0-4 0-0 0, Scalabrine 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 2-5 0-0 5, Brewer 3-4 1-2 7, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-85 17-18 105. BOSTON (110) Pierce 4-14 2-2 10, Garnett 7-17 2-2 16,

J.O’Neal 5-6 2-3 12, Rondo 5-10 0-0 10, Allen 9-12 4-4 25, Davis 4-10 7-8 15, Robinson 3-7 0-0 7, Erden 0-0 2-2 2, Daniels 5-6 3-4 13, Wafer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-82 22-25 110. Chicago 23 15 26 32 9 — 105 Boston 19 30 23 24 14 — 110 3-Point Goals—Chicago 4-10 (Deng 2-4, Watson 1-1, Korver 1-2, Bogans 0-1, Rose 0-2), Boston 4-11 (Allen 3-5, Robinson 1-3, Rondo 0-1, Pierce 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 50 (Noah 12), Boston 37 (Garnett 10). Assists—Chicago 25 (Rose 9), Boston 27 (Rondo 11). Total Fouls—Chicago 23, Boston 20. Technicals—Noah, Chicago defensive three second. A—18,624 (18,624).

Lakers 108, Raptors 103 TORONTO (103) Kleiza 4-8 0-0 8, Evans 1-4 1-2 3, Bargnani 5-13 3-4 14, Jack 4-7 2-2 11, DeRozan 7-18 1-2 15, Weems 2-5 1-1 5, Johnson 4-8 4-4 12, Calderon 7-9 0-0 14, Barbosa 6-13 2-2 17, Andersen 1-2 2-2 4, Wright 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-87 16-19 103. L.A. LAKERS (108) Artest 3-6 0-0 7, Odom 2-10 3-7 7, Gasol 12-22 6-6 30, Fisher 4-7 2-2 11, Bryant 6-12 11-12 23, Blake 4-6 2-2 14, Barnes 1-4 0-0 2, Brown 4-7 3-3 12, Ratliff 1-1 0-0 2, Caracter 0-1 0-0 0, Walton 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-77 27-32 108. Toronto 20 38 20 25 — 103 L.A. Lakers 33 22 27 26 — 108 3-Point Goals—Toronto 5-13 (Barbosa 3-5, Jack 1-2, Bargnani 1-2, Calderon 0-1, Kleiza 0-1, DeRozan 0-2), L.A. Lakers 7-21 (Blake 4-6, Fisher 1-1, Artest 1-2, Brown 1-3, Walton 0-1, Odom 02, Bryant 0-3, Barnes 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 58 (Johnson 15), L.A. Lakers 36 (Odom 9). Assists—Toronto 22 (Calderon 8), L.A. Lakers 22 (Bryant 6). Total Fouls—Toronto 22, L.A. Lakers 20. Technicals—Johnson, Toronto defensive three second. A—18,997 (18,997).

Suns 123, Grizzlies 118 MEMPHIS (118) Gay 11-25 1-2 26, Randolph 3-11 6-7 12, Gasol 12-13 2-3 26, Conley 7-15 2-6 16, Mayo 6-17 8-10 23, Arthur 4-7 2-4 10, Allen 2-6 1-2 5, Law 0-1 0-0 0, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-96 22-34 118. PHOENIX (123) Hill 1-9 0-0 2, Turkoglu 6-11 1-1 18, Lopez 0-2 0-0 0, Nash 8-18 7-8 25, Richardson 1429 4-5 38, Frye 0-6 1-2 1, Warrick 6-9 3-4 15, Dudley 1-5 3-4 5, Dragic 4-6 4-8 13, Siler 0-1 0-0 0, Childress 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 43-101 2332 123. Memphis 35 20 21 23 10 9 — 118 Phoenix 20 25 25 29 10 14 — 123 3-Point Goals—Memphis 6-19 (Gay 3-8, Mayo 3-8, Randolph 0-1, Conley 0-2), Phoenix 14-35 (Richardson 6-8, Turkoglu 5-10, Nash 26, Dragic 1-3, Hill 0-1, Dudley 0-2, Frye 0-5). Fouled Out—Gasol, Gay. Rebounds—Memphis 60 (Randolph 14), Phoenix 70 (Frye 11). Assists—Memphis 21 (Conley 7), Phoenix 23 (Nash 9). Total Fouls—Memphis 30, Phoenix 29. Technicals—Phoenix defensive three second 4. A—16,470 (18,422).

Nuggets 111, Clippers 104 L.A. CLIPPERS (104) Gomes 2-8 1-2 5, Griffin 11-18 4-4 26, Kaman 5-18 0-0 10, Bledsoe 6-9 0-1 12, Gordon 6-12 9-14 21, Butler 5-10 0-1 12, Jordan 0-1 0-0 0, C.Smith 8-9 2-3 18, Aminu 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-86 16-25 104. DENVER (111) Anthony 14-20 2-2 30, Ely 2-4 1-2 5, Williams 4-9 4-4 12, Billups 4-11 3-3 12, Afflalo 4-10 7-7 16, Harrington 7-12 2-2 18, J.Smith 4-9 1-1 10, Lawson 4-8 0-1 8. Totals 43-83 20-22 111. L.A. Clippers 28 26 17 33 — 104 Denver 24 29 29 29 — 111 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 2-15 (Butler 2-6, Jordan 0-1, Gordon 0-4, Gomes 0-4), Denver 5-21 (Harrington 2-6, J.Smith 1-3, Billups 1-4, Afflalo 1-5, Anthony 0-1, Lawson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 53 (Griffin 10), Denver 41 (Harrington, Ely 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 28 (Bledsoe 13), Denver 26 (Billups 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 16, Denver 17. Technicals—Denver defensive three second. A—15,559 (19,155).

Warriors 85, Jazz 78 UTAH (78) Kirilenko 0-3 4-4 4, Millsap 6-11 0-0 12, Jefferson 6-14 4-6 16, D.Williams 9-18 4-7 23, R.Bell 3-10 0-0 7, Elson 1-2 0-0 2, Miles 4-13 34 12, Watson 0-0 0-0 0, Price 1-5 0-0 2, Hayward 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-76 15-21 78. GOLDEN STATE (85) D.Wright 3-13 0-0 7, Lee 6-15 2-4 14, Biedrins 4-11 0-1 8, Curry 7-17 5-5 20, Ellis 9-22 5-9 23, Carney 1-5 0-1 2, Radmanovic 0-1 0-0 0, R.Williams 2-4 1-2 5, Gadzuric 3-4 0-0 6, C.Bell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-93 13-22 85. Utah 16 23 17 22 — 78 Golden State 17 23 20 25 — 85 3-Point Goals—Utah 3-14 (R.Bell 1-4, Miles 1-4, D.Williams 1-4, Price 0-2), Golden State 2-14 (D.Wright 1-3, Curry 1-4, R.Williams 0-1, Carney 0-2, Ellis 0-4). Fouled Out—R.Bell. Rebounds—Utah 54 (Jefferson 15), Golden State 65 (Biedrins 20). Assists—Utah 18 (D.Williams 6), Golden State 16 (Curry 6). Total Fouls—Utah 23, Golden State 23. Technicals—Millsap. A—17,902 (19,596).

“I think she’s brought the sport back and is carrying it on her back right now. She’s big enough to handle it.” — Zenyatta jockey Mike Smith fans a show. She prances. She preens. She poses. “No one tells her to,” Smith said. “She just does it by herself.” Her charisma and dominance have given horse racing a figure to rally behind. She’s become a part of the national conversation during her remarkable run, making headlines with her brilliance in a sport overshadowed by drugs and tragedy in recent years. Shirreffs claims the only thing in her system beside hay, oats and water is the occasional Guinness. “I think she’s brought the sport back and is carrying it on her back right now,” Smith said. “She’s big enough to handle it.” Saturday’s race will almost certainly be her toughest. Zenyatta will start from the No. 8 post in the 1¼-mile Classic and is the solid 8-5 favorite in one of the deepest Classic fields in recent memory. Shirreffs’ competitors respect her. They don’t necessarily fear her. Trainer Al Stall Jr., who will send out 9-2 second choice Blame, calls Zenyatta “beatable.” Todd Pletcher, who will saddle Donn Handicap winner Quality Road, considers Zenyatta one of the greats. That doesn’t mean he thinks she’s been the best horse in the world this year. While Shirreffs argues Zenyatta deserves Horse of the Year no matter what happens in the Classic because of what she’s done for the sport, Pletcher disagrees. “This is Horse of the Year 2010, so any accomplishments you have in 2009 don’t count,” Pletcher said. “This is about 2010 and here it is, all on the line.”

Hornets upset Heat The Associated Press NEW ORLEANS — Emeka Okafor evoked memories of his dominant college days and helped Chris Paul get the best of his buddy, LeBron James. Okafor had a season-high 26 points and 13 rebounds, Paul had 13 points, 19 assists and five steals, and New Orleans remained unbeaten with a 9693 victory over the Miami Heat on Friday night that gave the Hornets (5-0) their best start in franchise history. “Mek was outstanding tonight,” Paul said. “Every time he stepped out on the court, he played with a lot of passion and I think when he gets going, we all feed off of him. He just played a great game.” David West added 15 points, including crucial free throws with 7.2 seconds to go after Chris Bosh’s three had pulled Miami within 94-93. Dwyane Wade gave up a potential tying three-point attempt and passed to Eddie House, whose shot rimmed out in the final seconds. Miami did not take its first lead until James’ free throws made it 90-89 with 59.8 seconds left, but the Hornets responded with Marco Belinelli’s free throws, and then Trevor Ariza’s three. “One thing we have to continue to learn, that every time we step out on the basketball court no matter who we’re going against, we can’t just show up, you know, because we have this uniform on, because we have who we have on the court,” James said. “We have to play and it’s not about Xs and Os, it’s about the energy level.” “We know we can still make a comeback because of the talent that we have but teams are always going to be excited to play us,” James continued. “If we don’t match that effort early, then it’s always an uphill battle throughout the whole game and that’s what it was.” Wade led all scorers with 28 points to go with 10 rebounds. He scored 12 points in the fourth quarter, and went 13 of 13 from the foul line. In other games on Friday: Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 PHILADELPHIA — Anderson Varejao had 23 points and 12 rebounds, Daniel Gibson scored 20 points and Cleveland recovered in the fourth quarter after blowing a 19-point lead. Mo Williams scored 22 points and J.J. Hickson had 16 for the Cavaliers, who won for the first time since beating Boston on opening night. Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 BOSTON — Kevin Garnett chased down Joakim Noah and tipped the ball away from behind with 14 seconds left. Gar-

Though Shirreffs believes Zenyatta’s legacy is secure regardless of the outcome, he’s also aware of the unique opportunity at hand. She is racing’s biggest crossover star and an unlikely success story. Owners Jerry and Ann Moss purchased her for a relatively modest $60,000 five years ago, then allowed her to grow at her own pace. Shirreffs didn’t send his gangly pupil out to the track until she was 3, and she began building her reputation as one of racing’s greatest closers one heart-stopping race at a time. Slowly the wins piled up. Ask Shirreffs if there’s ever been a time over the last three years in which he thought she’d dug herself a hole she couldn’t climb out of and he just laughs. “Plenty of times,” he said. Yet she comes through. Always. Shirreffs doesn’t know where her tenacious drive comes from and is too humble to take the credit. He knows she’s more than a star, she’s a symbol of what is possible. “She represents overcoming obstacles,” he said. There’s one more standing in the way of perfection. Her final act may be her greatest challenge. One last mad dash to the wire would silence what few critics remain and elevate her into something more than a champion. “I think it will stamp her,” Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas said. “If she whips them twice in a row in the Classic, I would have to say you’d have to mention her with the Spectacular Bids and Secretariats.” Secretariat owner Penny Chenery is rooting for her. So is the rest of the industry. Baffert admits he’ll likely have mixed emotions if Lookin At Lucky spoils the fairy tale ending. Not Shirreffs. His big girl has done enough. “It’s not the end of the world (if she loses),” he said. “Giving her the opportunity to achieve something that seems almost unattainable is more important.”

Bill Haber / The Associated Press

New Orleans forward David West (30), right, and Miami shooting guard Dwyane Wade (3) scramble for a ball late in the second half of Friday’s game in New Orleans. The Hornets defeated the Heat 96-93 to remain undefeated. nett scored 16 points with 10 rebounds, and he also drew an offensive foul on Derrick Rose with Boston nursing a threepoint lead in overtime. Ray Allen, who scored 25 points, followed with a layup on an assist from Rajon Rondo to make it a five-point game. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 MINNEAPOLIS — Jamal Crawford came back from a one-game absence due to a toe injury to score a season-high 22 points in his reserve role for undefeated Atlanta. Josh Smith had 20 points, eight rebounds, six assists and five blocked shots, and the Hawks improved to 6-0 despite a low-impact performance by star Joe Johnson for the second straight game. Mike Bibby had 15 points and Al Horford added 14 points and 12 rebounds. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 NEW YORK — Toney Douglas had 19 points and 10 rebounds, Raymond Felton added 13 points and 10 assists, and New York spoiled Gilbert Arenas’ return to NBA action. The Knicks’ guards had help up front, with Amare Stoudemire scoring 18 points and Danilo Gallinari chipping in 16. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 INDIANAPOLIS — John Salmons scored 22 points and Brandon Jennings scored 18 points and Luc Mbah a Moute added 10 points and 15 rebounds for the Bucks (2-4). Danny Granger and Darren Collison both scored 19 points for the Pacers (2-3), who have lost two straight. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 AUBURN HILLS, Mich.

— Ben Gordon scored 20 points and Tayshaun Prince had 14 to lead Detroit to its first win of the season. Detroit (1-5) was off to its worst start since going 0-7 in 1980, but never trailed against the Bobcats. Charlotte fell to 1-4. Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 30 points and 16 rebounds, and Orlando beat New Jersey for the fourth straight time. Howard finished nine for 13 shooting to power the Magic. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 PHOENIX — Jason Richardson scored five of his 38 points in an amazing final 1.1 seconds of regulation and, thanks to a made free throw that Rudy Gay intended to miss, Phoenix went on to a head-shaking double-overtime victory over Memphis. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 LOS ANGELES — Pau Gasol scored 30 points, Kobe Bryant added 23 points and six assists, and the Los Angeles Lakers remained unbeaten. Steve Blake scored 14 points for the Lakers. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 OAKLAND, Calif. — Stephen Curry returned from an ankle injury to score nine points over the final 2:35, helping Golden State stay unbeaten at home. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 DENVER — Carmelo Anthony scored a season-high 30 points and reserve Al Harrington added 18.

541-388-4418


D6 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

REGISTER TO BID NOW!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com INTRODUCING THE BULLETIN’S HOLIDAY BID-N-BUY ONLINE AUCTION EVENT Beg BRINGING QUALITY PRODUCTS AT LOW-AUCTION inni ng 9 e! n PRICES TO CENTRAL OREGON i l n a.m sO . on N

ovembe

r 7, Browse,

Bid And Buy These And Other G

re

Ite n o i t c at Au

m

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Oreck Halo UV-C Vacuum Cleaner

Two Night Stay in Junior Suite

“Mourning Doves” Encaustic Painting

Wedding Accessory Package

Cooking Class for Two

One-Year Family Tennis Membership

RETAIL VALUE: $599 FROM: Oreck

RETAIL VALUE: $390 FROM: Pronghorn

RETAIL VALUE: $400 FROM: Tumalo Art Co.

RETAIL VALUE: $130 FROM: Bend Wedding & Formal

RETAIL VALUE: $150 FROM: Allyson’s Kitchen

RETAIL VALUE: $2388 FROM: Athletic Club of Bend

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Magic Motion Clock

$100 Bead Certificate

$200 Framing Certificate

30-Min. Erchonia Ionic Detoxifying Foot Bath

Adaire Iron Bed

$100 Toward PANDORA Purchase

RETAIL VALUE: $665 FROM: Ice Fine Jewelry

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Azillion Beads

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Sage Custom Framing

RETAIL VALUE: $25 FROM: The Center for Integrated Medicine

RETAIL VALUE: $900 FROM: Edman Fine Furniture

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Saxon’s Fine Jewelry

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

General Implement New Harrows

Four Goodyear Wrangler Radial Tires

1 Week Rental: 331 Mini Excavator

7-Foot Landscape Rake

RV Service Certificate

$250 Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $300 FROM: Superior Tractor

RETAIL VALUE: $459 FROM: Wright Ford

RETAIL VALUE: $1110 FROM: Bobcat of Central Oregon

RETAIL VALUE: $575 FROM: Deschutes Valley Equipment

RETAIL VALUE: $200 FROM: Courtesy RV

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Desperado

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Ping G10 Stainless Steel Irons

3-Night Stay in Waterfront Suite

Maytag Front Load Washer & Dryer Set

Mountain Hardware Light Wedge 3 Tent

$500 Electrical Service Certificate

Remote Car Starter with 3-Channel Alarm

RETAIL VALUE: $900 FROM: Pro Golf

RETAIL VALUE: $800 FROM: The Lodge at Suttle Lake

RETAIL VALUE: $2098 FROM: Lance and Sandy’s Maytag

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Mountain Supply

RETAIL VALUE: $500 FROM: Quality Builders Electric

RETAIL VALUE: $374 FROM: InTune Audio

Central Oregon’s BIGGEST Online Auction Event Is Coming November 7th

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

1 7 7 7

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

208

208

210

212

246

248

260

266

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Health and Beauty Items

Heating and Stoves

Maltese AKC, 1 female, 1 male; Malti-poos 2 females. Vet checked, 1st shots & dewormed. No AM calls or shipping; cash only. 541-350-5106

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Cockatiel, young male (we think) seeks new home. Good whistler. Experienced bird owners to reply. $30. 541-317-8987

Antiques & Collectibles TRUCKLOAD SALE! Out of state dealer quits! All antiques priced below cost. Oak and mahogany furniture, stained glass, etc. Dealers happy hour 4-5 daily. Sat. & Sun. 9-5. 1428 SW Simpson

357 Stainless Steel Revolver, $300; 38 S&W police revolver, $200, 541-480-1337.

25¢ candy vending machines, not placed, exc cond, extra parts, $150 ea 541-536-4359

Certified Woodstove, used, but in good shape, $250. Phone 541-389-9138

3 Plots at Redmond Memorial Cemetery, $600 each or best offer. Call 360-254-3186

Fuel and Wood

Dachshunds puppies, 2 males, $200. Call 541-788-1289 olesonmd@hotmail English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 7 mo. old, all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Maltese female puppy AKC, shots, dewclaws, 3 mos old, a little powder puff! $400. 541-536-2181; 541-728-8067 Miniature Schnauzer, purebred Male, 8 weeks, first shots, $250. 541-536-6262

Browning, made in Belgium, Grade II Auto.5, 12 ga, 3” Mag., 90-95% cond. $1,000 OBO. 541-447-7272

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

215

You Can Bid On: Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set, $2,098 Value at Lance and Sandy's Maytag

Carry concealed in 33 states. Sat. Nov. 20th 8 a.m, Redmond Comfort Suites. Qualify For Your Concealed HandWANTED TO BUY gun Permit. Oregon & Utah US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & permit classes, $50 for OrCurrency collect, accum. Pre egon or Utah, $90 for both. 1964 silver coins, bars, www.PistolCraft.com. Call rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Lanny at 541-281-GUNS coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & (4867) to Pre-Register. dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No colCASH!! lection too large or small. BedFor Guns, Ammo & Reloading rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Coins & Stamps

English Bulldog Male, Intact, AKC Great with kids and aniMini Australian Shepherds, mals. $500 541-588-6490. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, MoBlue Merle Males, superior torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, English Bulldog puppies, AKC, looks/disposition,from NSDR (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Grand sire by Champion reg. parents, avail. 11/6, 541-280-7959. Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 541-504-4624,541-548-0852 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for Bid Now! ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. Mini-Schnauzer, male, “Merlin”, old vintage costume, scrap, young, very cute, $175 rewww.BulletinBidnBuy.com 541-306-0372 silver & gold Jewelry. Top homeing fee, 541-389-2412. Buy New...Buy Local dollar paid, Estate incl. HonPapillons (3), 6 mo. female, English Setter Purebred est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 241 black/white, $300, 4.5 yr. fepups ready for homes. $500 Wanted washers and dryers, male, red/white, $250, 5 yr. female (5), $400/ male (1), Bicycles and working or not, cash paid, old male, can be papered,$350, dam & sire on site. Great Accessories 541- 280-7959. alvinoshields@yahoo.com bird hunting/family dogs. 541-280-2597 Pit Bull puppies, very cute, 1st 203 Girls bike, Schwinn, 24” 7 shots, ready for good homes, You Can Bid On: speed, good condition, $60. Holiday Bazaar 3 @ $75 ea. 541-280-3992 Adaire Iron Bed, 541-383-4231 English Springer Spaniels, AKC & Craft Shows $900 Value at Reg., black/white ready to Pitbull Puppy, chocolate Male, Edman Fine Furniture 242 go! $750. 541-408-6322 family raised, guaranteed, (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) www.kennykennels.com $150 OBO. 541-325-1391 Exercise Equipment BeeCrafty Holiday Show German Shepherd Puppies, 7 POODLES AKC Toy, tiny Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne November 12: Noon - 7 PM Style, wing back, burgundy weeks, black, parents on site, toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home Bid Now! November 13: 10 AM - 5 PM plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323. $350. 541-536-5538 raised! 541-475-3889 www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Middle Sister Buy New...Buy Local Child’s solid wood headboard German Wirehaired Pointer Conference Hall, Purebred, very small, rare, and twin bed frame, $75 Pups, champ bloodlines, Deschutes County chocolate brown female OBO. 541-388-8198. great colors, $400. Fairgrounds, Redmond. Pomeranian puppies ready 541-548-3408 80+ local artisans & craftFrench Provincial Dresser, $65. Dec. 1. Great for Christmas ers will be selling their Nice Rocker, $45. Please call gift. AKC registered. handcrafted items. 541-420-2220. (mother weighs pound and Admission: $1.00 donation a half) Call to reserve your You Can Bid On: Fridge: Whirlpool, beige to be given to The Kid's little angel. 541-728-8323 12 Month Membership to 18 cu.ft., only $125 Center & CASA of Central or 541-382-7786 Shawna. Anytime Fitness, Call 541-388-2159 Oregon $468 Value at Information: 541-536-5655 GENERATE SOME excitement in Golden Doodles pups ready for Anytime Fitness Queensland Heelers your neigborhood. Plan a ga(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) their new home! $500. BeauStandards & mini,$150 & up. rage sale and don't forget to 208 tiful! 541-279-9593. 541-280-1537 advertise in classified! http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com Pets and Supplies TURN THE PAGE 385-5809. Golden Retriever AKC English Siberian Husky, AKC 13 weeks, Cream puppies, beautiful. For More Ads Recliners (2), good condition, both parents on site. $450 Ready now. Females $850, The Bulletin recommends $60 ea., & Brown Swivel OBO. Josh, 541-633-9160 males $800. 541-852-2991. The Bulletin extra caution when rocker, $60, 541-330-8349. purchasing products or Working cats for barn/shop, ROLLTOP DESK: Old but not Treadmill/Ski Machine, good services from out of the companion.Free, fixed/shots. antique, very good shape. cond., $35, please call area. Sending cash, checks, Will deliver! 541-389-8420 I paid $500, will sell $300. 541-317-2890. or credit information may 541-420-3344, 541-508-8522 be subjected to fraud. For more information about an 243 Second Hand advertiser, you may call the Ski Equipment Jack is a family friendly, 5 Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & Mattresses, sets & Oregon State Attorney year old Am/Staff who is cute, 8 weeks old, $240 General’s Office Consumer singles, call looking for a place where cash. 541-678-7599 Protection hotline at Bid Now! 541-598-4643. he can lounge inside and be 1-877-877-9392. www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Yorkie Pups, ready for good spoiled. He is very gentle Buy New...Buy Local homes, parents on-site, 1st and friendly. Neutered. Sofa w/recliners on ends; shots, $550, 541-536-3108 FREE!! Please call John at great for room w/limited 541-390-9004 space. Dark Blue; in great 210 cond. $225, 541-322-6261 2 Baby Bearded Dragons, $50 each. 2 Baby Chameleons, Japanese Chin / Westie-Cairn Furniture & Appliances $50 each. 541-350-8949 mix, 8 wks, 5 Fem., $150 ea. #1 Appliances • Dryers The Bulletin Shots/wormed. 541-848-3525 • Washers Australian Shepherd male, red recommends extra caution You Can Bid On: merle, 12 weeks old, perfect King Shepherd Pups, when purchasing products K2 LOTTA LUV SKIS w/ markings, has had two sets or services from out of the ready now, male & female, Marker ERS 11.0 TC of vaccines and dewormings. area. Sending cash, checks, black & tan or all blacks, exc. Bindings, 774-487-7933 Bend or credit information may temperament, both parents $1,185 Value at be subjected to F R A U D . on site+grandma, sire ChaPowder House Beagle Mix, 8 weeks old, resStart at $99 (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) For more information about teau De Chiefs, AKSC cued, male, $75, FREE DELIVERY! an advertiser, you may call #02BGG872-IM, Dam Sonja 541-576-3701, 541-536-4440 Lifetime Warranty the Oregon State Attorney Vom Holtzberg, AKC 244 Also, Wanted Washers, General’s Office Consumer Beautiful Purebred Yellow Lab. #DN17285408, $800, Dryers, Working or Not Protection hotline at Call for info. $400 OBO. Snowboards 541-815-2888. Call 541-280-7959 1-877-877-9392. 541-508-6387 KITTENS & cats avail. thru resBernese/Newfoundland pups, 3 Bid Now! cue group. Altered, shots, ID AirPedic airbed mattress, CalKing, adjustable firmness wks old, 5 females, 2 males, chip, more. Visit at sanctuwww.BulletinBidnBuy.com each side. $50. 541-389-1913 $600-$675, $250 deposit. Buy New...Buy Local ary Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other Wormed, dewclaws. Ready days by appt, 65480 78th, Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Wanted washers and dryers, mid-Dec. 541-279-7914 Bend. Map/photos/more at A-1 Washers & Dryers working or not, cash paid, www.craftcats.org. 541 389 $125 each. Full Warranty. 541-280-7959. 8420 or 598 5488 for info. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s We still have many to place, 212 dead or alive. 541-280-7355. so adoption fees are tempoAntiques & rarily reduced this weekend. Appliances, new & recondiYou Can Bid On: Collectibles tioned, guaranteed. OverKITTENS in Foster Home, $40 8 Weeks Snowboard, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s CAVALIER KING CHARLES ea. incl. spay, neuter, shots 1 Hour Class, 1 Day Per Antique German Heco beautiMaytag, 541-385-5418 PUREBRED pups, 3 boys @ and wormed. 541-548-5516. Week, $110 Value at ful floral Anniversary Clock, $800 each; 1 girl, $900. RefAcrovision Sports $110. 541-390-6016 erences avail. 541-664-6050 KITTENS, social, playful, handCenter Find It in (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) raised in rescue group foster shellyball1@mac.com Furniture homes, ready to adopt! Al- The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809 tered, ID chip, vaccinated. 245 Small adoption fee/donation to offset some vet costs. Bed Frames,2 Antique, twin, ca. Golf Equipment Avail. only Sat/Sun 11-5, 1900,carved headboard/footTom Tom Motel, see mgr, board, $200, 541-815-5000 Visit our HUGE home decor Bid Now! 3600 N 3rd, Bend, near Sonic consignment store. New Chihuahua- absolutely adorable drive-in. Info: 541-815-7278 www.BulletinBidnBuy.com items arrive daily! 930 SE Bid Now! teacups, wormed, 1st shots, Buy New...Buy Local Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Lab/German Short-Hair pups. 2 $250, 541-977-4686. Bend • 541-318-1501 Buy New...Buy Local Black, 2 yellow. $50. 8 www.redeuxbend.com Chihuahuas, Applehead, 2 weeks. Shots, wormed, and males, 5 weeks old, $250 ready. Call 541-281-8297 each. 541-593-0223. Sat. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 21950 LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & Butler Market Rd. 100’s of blacks, champion filled lines, Antiques & Collectibles. OFA hips, dew claws, 1st You Can Bid On: The Bulletin reserves the right shots, wormed, parents on Ping G10 Irons set with You Can Bid On: to publish all ads from The site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. Graphite Shafts, $500 Home Furnishings Bulletin newspaper onto The www.kinnamanranch.com 3-PW, Reg. Flex, Gift Certificate at Bulletin Internet website. La Z Boy Furniture $900 Value at Cockapoo pups AKC parents. Labrador pups AKC, chocoPro Golf Gallerie late, yellow, hips guaranteed, Low shed, great family dogs. (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm) $250 to $450. 541-954-1727 $300. 541-504-9958

COLT 1911A1 Series 80 45 ACP 2 8-round mags, orig. finish w/wear, exc. mech. cond., $450. 541-447-6061 lve msg. FEG M1937M 380 ACP, exc. finish cond., w/orig. holster. $375. 541-447-6061 lve msg.

You Can Bid On: Smile Makeover: Seen on Extreme Makeover, $7,600 Value at Steve Schwam, DDS

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Bid Now!

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $110/cord rounds, delivered in Bend, Sunriver & LaPine, 1½ cord min., fast service 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

249

Art, Jewelry and Furs Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Mountain Hardwear Sub Zero SL Hooded Jacket, $275 Value at Mountain Supply

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 You Can Bid On: Snowmobile Pre-Season Tune-Up, $100 Value at JD Powersports (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

GUN

SHOW

Nov. 13th & 14th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables $8 Admission OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120

You Can Bid On: $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Painting by Marty Stewart at Tumalo Art Company

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Tue. Nov. 9th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

Thomas Kinkade litho-canvas, 1998 “Stairway to Paradise,” 24.5x34”, framed, VOP I, #101 of 3950, smokeless home. $500. 541-598-7219

HUNTER RETIRING! Rifles & shotguns for sale. Call 541-382-7995, evenings.

TV, Stereo and Video

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

253

42" Hitachi HD/TV works great, Oak entertainment center Inland M1 US Carbine, Springwith lighted bridge and shelf. field 1903 & US M1 Grand, Cabinets have speaker doors WIN 1885 45-70, REM Rolland glass doors on top for ing block 7/57, Savage 264 collectibles. Excellent shape. Win mag left hand, REM 742 $400 takes both, call 243, Marlin 308 MX lever 541-318-1907. gun, Browning Safari 30-6 Belguin, FAKO L61R 300 Win 52” Samsung 2006 big screen, mag, Ruger M77 300 Win left works great, exc cond. Must hand. sell, $500. 541-480-2652. H & H Firearms 541-382-9352 Kenwood amplifier 4 channel with Punch sub, $195. Juniper Rim Game 541-388-4302. Preserve - Brothers, OR Our Chukars are ready to fly! 255 Bring a shotgun, give ‘em a try! They’re on special this fall Computers so just give us a call! 541-419-3923;541-419-8963 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with mulRuger .22 Single 6, 3 Screw retiple ad schedules or those volver, as new with box, selling multiple systems/ $400 Cash, 541-504-9210. software, to disclose the Wanted: Collector seeks high name of the business or the quality fishing items. Call term "dealer" in their ads. 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. ATLAS 833 Snowshoes, used twice, like new. Paid $139; sell for $65. 541-549-6036

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

257

Musical Instruments

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Glock 22, 40 S&W with holster & mags; Ruger SR9, w/same, $525 ea. 541-279-3504

267

Hearthstone propane heater, like new, $1200 OBO. Sears Craftsman lawn mower, $40. Magic Chef kitchen stove $300 OBO. 541-330-2297. Moving Boxes, large, $4 each, 30 available, please call 541-923-8868. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Pandora’s Box Consignment Boutique An eclectic mix of current and vintage jewelry, clothing and accessories. Tues.-Fri. 11-5; Sat. 12-5. 735 NW Columbia on Bend’s westside. 541-383-3377 Shower Enclosure 2 doors, 5’wx6’h, includes all hardware. $25. 541-923-0041. TEXAS T1-83+ in unopened package. cost new $90, sell for $70. 541-549-8421 eves. Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263

Tools

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: 1 Week Rental S150 Loader with Bucket, $810 Value at Bobcat of Central Oregon (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found BICYCLE found on Green Ridge Road nears Sisters, Call to identify, 541-312-6059. Found 16” Kid Bicycle, in Shevlin Park, 10/29, call to identify, 541-388-4164. Found jacket/coat, 11/2, name brand, NE 3rd/Franklin area. email: hikealot@q.com

Found Water Pump, 11/1, on Drill Press, Delta 12”; CraftsAmerican Ln, call to identify, man 10” Table Saw, Ryobi 9” ask for Craig, 541-948-3588. band Saw; Ryobi 16” Jig Found Young Blue Heeler near Saw; 541-388-6729. Costco. Email info to: mocachocolate68@yahoo.com 264

Snow Removal Equipment HELP YOUR AD TO stand out Ariens 2006 . Big job capable 11.5 hp 28". Electric start. $800. 541-330-8285

from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Drums, Beginner’s 5-piece set, exc. cond., $350, call Frank, 541-390-8821.

258

Travel/Tickets Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790. Snow Plow, Meyers 6 ft. blade, angles both right, left & straight, all hydraulic controls $1450. 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800, leave msg.

265 You Can Bid On: Hoodoo Ski Area 2010-2011 Season Pass, $585 Value at Hoodoo Ski Area

You Can Bid On: Two Nights Lodging in Inglenook Room, $390 Value at Overleaf Lodge

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

IF FOUND, please call (541) 419-6575. It very important to my family. A reward will be given if found & returned. LOST 3 month old orange & white striped tabby cat, SE Tempest area. 541-382-9768 Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178


E2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 2006 Challenger 16x18 inline Baler, low bale count, excellent cond, $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

325

358

476

476

476

476

Hay, Grain and Feed

Farmers Column

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831

12x24 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1743 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Human Resources Director

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, Caregiver $25/bale; Orchard grass hay 375 mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Small Prineville senior care home bale orchard/alfalfa mix, Meat & Animal Processing looking for Care Manager for $160/ton. Volume discounts, two 24-hour shifts per week. delivery avail. 541-480-8648. Meat Goats, (3), $100 each, Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal please call 541-923-8370 for CLEAN GRASS HAY, small background check. Ref. remore info. bales, $4/bale, $100/ton & quired. 541-447-5773. up, other quality hay avail, Madras area, 541-490-5440 Caregivers or 651-475-3697. Visiting Angels seeks compassionate, reliable caregivWheat Straw: Certified & Beders for all shifts incl. weekding Straw & Garden Straw; ends. Experience req’d. Must Kentucky Bluegrass; Compass background check & post; 541-546-6171. drug test. Apply at our office located within Whispering 341 Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Horses and Equipment Bend. No phone calls, please.

$42,418 - $59,801 Full Benefits Professional Management, Regular, Full-Time This position is located in Chiloquin. For more information contact: The Klamath Tribes PO Box 436 Chiloquin, OR 97624 jobs@klamathtribes.com 541-783-2219 x 113 Human Resources Manager

Employment

You Can Bid On: General Implement New 72" Landscape Rake, $700 Value at S u p e ri o r T r a c t o r (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

400

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Powder Creek Manger Horse Feeders (2), w/hooks to hang in barn, stall or pen, ea. $40, 541-923-0442 Kioti CK-20 2005, 4x4, hyrdostatic trans, only 85 hours, full service at 50 hrs., $8000 or make offer, 541-788-7140.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Shetland Pony weanling colt, Black, $200. 541-383-4552 PLEASE leave message

421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin in Jan. Registration now open, www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100

282

286

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Huge Estate Sale: Sat. 8-3, 263 NW Outlook Vista Dr. , Furniture, antiques, dishes, tools, W/D, freezer.

Huge Moving to Hawaii Sale, Sat.-Sun. 8-5, 63723 Scenic Dr.,everything must go, great deals, kid/baby items, skis.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com Winter sports gear, boys clothes & shoes, furniture, more! Sat. 8-noon 1015 NW Stannium Rd 382-1710

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Indoor Swap Meet Every Sat., 9-4, 401 NE 2nd St., Bend (old St. Vincent DePaul bldg, next to Bi-Mart) 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847

Sat. Nov 6th 8-4, 21950 Butler Market Rd., Large inside heated farm/garage sale. 100’s antiques & collectibles, glassware, vintage jewelry, Roseville Pottery, antique furniture, dressers, wood cook stove, trunks, chairs, school desks, wood washing machine, quilts, Singer Featherweight, butter churn, bamboo fishing poles & plugs, lamps & lanterns, clocks, telephone, toys, milk shake maker, 1905 & 1910 Barber chairs, 5 cent slot machine, cash registers, candy scale, 1917 saddle, Zither, iron bed, Tokheim gas pump, railroad items, several advert signs, Coco Cola cooler & signs, goat & milk carts, weather vane & lightning rod, pedal grinder, coal sleigh, railroad baggage cart, cider press, corn cutter & drill, 1877 Cutter & silage cutter. Like new solid oak dressers, 5’ display cabinets, armoire, dining tables, w/chairs, desks, pickup canopy w/boat rack, 2x6 lumber, concrete blocks, animal bedding, lots smalls, misc, Much, Much, More!!! Cash only, NO Early Sales!!!

290

Sales Redmond Area Garage Sale: Hardly used dining table, chairs, hutch, Harley Davidson leather coats & boots, leather bomber jacket, lots more, Sat. 8-4, 1675 NW Odem Ave, 541-420-5690.

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

SECURITY DPSST UNARMED SECURITY CERTIFICATION CLASS TO BE HELD ON 11-13-2010 IN BEND. AFTER COMPLETING CLASS YOU WILL BE READY TO GO TO WORK IN THE SECURITY FIELD. 541-550-9260 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Database SpecialistJELD-WEN, inc has two openings for Database Specialists. Ideal candidates will be detail orientated with strong organizational and follow through skills; the ability to handle multiple tasks; the willingness to learn and the ability to work individually or within a group. Must be comfortable performing data entry, programming and problem solving. Associates degree or equivalent along with programming experience is required. Positions are located in either Klamath Falls or Bend, Oregon. View the full job description at www.jeld-wen.com. Send resume to jobs@jeld-wen.com. EOE. DELIVERY/ SPA TECHNICIAN immediate opening for hard worker with CLEAN driving record and valid license. Must be able to do heavy lifting. Spa experience a plus. Fax resume to 541-388-4055. NO PHONE CALLS. Dental Receptionist/Office Manager, Attractive benefit package. Must be detailed in computer work & have exc. people skills, Refs. required. Fax resume to 541-475-6159.

Framer

(Experienced)

Needed. Must have commercial & residential exp. Valid ODL req’d; drug testing. Fax or email resume to: 541-617-4545 or brodyb@baxterbuilders.net

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

This position is responsible for the development and implementation of Ranch-wide HR strategies, plans and programs, which facilitate growth and maximize customer service levels. Serves as a resource for the senior management team in the areas of, hiring, training, succession planning, performance evaluation, compensation, benefits, productivity analysis, employee morale, employment litigation, legal/regulatory compliance, and safety/risk management. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid vacation and holidays, discounts on food and merchandise, 401k. 5-10 years experience in HR management. Position will close Nov 30. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. Maintenance Technician Position: 96-unit Apartment Beautiful Community, has an immediate opening for a highly motivated and professional individual with strong background in apartment/building maintenance. The ideal candidate will have maintenance experience with a strong desire for a career in residential property management. Position requires employee to provide their own tools and On-Call Responsibilities. Hourly plus a free apt., required to live on-site. Exc. benefit package including: paid holidays, vacation, full medical, dental and 401k package avail. after 6 months of employment. Preemployment drug & physical screening required. Send resume to: 1-541-548-1384 Equal Opportunity Employer

Medical billing Primary care clinic needs biller familiar with Medicare and commercial insurances. Please send resume to cketron1948@gmail.com

Microbiologist/Lab Quality Assurance

UMPQUA Research Company is seeking a hard working individual to support our quality assurance program and perVIEW the Classifieds at: form commercial microbiowww.bendbulletin.com logical analyses at our drinking water and environmental laboratory in Bend, Oregon. Minimum requirements include an Associates degree in Chemistry, MicroGeneral biology or a related field. Hoodoo Ski Area This position will oversee the quality control function NO JOB FAIR within the lab in order to THIS SEASON meet stringent State certifiApplications are online cation requirements and will www.hoodoo.com or at the interface with regulatory mountain. authorities as needed. Training and/or experience in miPlease call these depts. to crobiological analysis is also inquire on available required. Candidates must be positions 541-822-3799, comfortable with computer Lift Operators - ext. 6121 based applications and posAutobahn Tube sess high quality clerical, orPark - ext. 7135 ganizational, and communiSki and Ride cation skills. Our small School - ext. 6510 business has been serving public and private clients for over 30 years. We are looking for a team member who The Bulletin Classifieds is your is comfortable working in a Employment Marketplace small group setting. Salary is Call 541-385-5809 today! commensurate with experience. A comprehensive benHairstylist / Nail Tech efit package is provided. We Also needs to be licensed for are an equal opportunity emwaxing. Recent relevant exp ployer. Email résumé to: necessary. Hourly/commislab@urcmail.net sion. Teresa, 541-382-8449. or fax to 541-863-6199.

Plant Manager ED STAUB & SONS PETROLEUM is looking for a Bulk Plant Manager to over see its' fuel and propane operation in Redmond, Oregon.

The successful candidate will possess management and supervisory experience, as well as being a motivated, self-starter. Responsibilities include, maintaining operations, add to, as well as maintain current customer base, review and be accountable for financial statements, expenses, overhead, credit /collections, reconcile and update inventory, keeping the plant profitable, and managing a staff of up to 10. Must possess a CDL with hazmat endorsements. Fax Resume to 530-667-2971, or email to ginger.rayl@edstaub.com.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Sales - ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 People. No Experience Necessary. Transportation & Lodging Furnished. Paid Training. Work & Travel Entire USA. Start Today! www.protekchemical.com 208-590-0365. (PNDC) Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Sales

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH All Ages Welcome. No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $500/wk. Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-306-6346

Social Services Second Nature Cascades is a dynamic and growing wilderness therapy program seeking an experienced doctoral (preferred) or master’s level therapist to join our clinical team based in Bend, Oregon. Qualifications: Candidate must be eligible for licensure in Oregon and experienced working with adolescents in a therapeutic wilderness setting and with IECA consultants. Contact: J Huffine, Ph. D. j@2ncascades.com The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500 800 507

850

Real Estate Contracts

Snowmobiles

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

541-322-7253 Baja Vision 250 2007, BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Trucking JOHN DAVIS TRUCKING in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: CDL Class A Drivers. MUST BE WILL573 ING TO RELOCATE. For application, please call Business Opportunities 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach or website www.jdt3d.net over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad Web Developer in 30 daily newspapers for Well-rounded web pro3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 grammer needed for busy regarding the Pacific Northmedia operation. Expert west Daily Connection or level Perl or PHP, SQL skills email elizabeth@cnpa.com desired. Knowledge of (PNDC) principles of interface design and usability essential; Have an item to basic competence with Creative Suite, including sell quick? If it’s Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used under $500 you open-source apps, especan place it in cially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate The Bulletin is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and Classiieds for problem-solver who thrives $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days in a collaborative environment. Must be able $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days to communicate well with (Private Party ads only) non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's for professional growth. Dishes & Collectibles" PatSend cover letter explaintern matching china & dish ing why this position is a fit business...very fun! Extenfor your skills, resume and sive large inventory all incl. links to work samples or w/storage racks & packing portfolio to material. Work from home even.jan@gmail.com. part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email Looking for your next me at patorre@msn.com for employee? more information if you are Place a Bulletin help interested.I am moving to AZ wanted ad today and to retire again. $20,000 OBO! reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will Looking for your next also appear on employee? bendbulletin.com which Place a Bulletin help currently receives over wanted ad today and 1.5 million page views reach over 60,000 every month at readers each week. no extra cost. Your classified ad will Bulletin Classifieds also appear on Get Results! bendbulletin.com which Call 385-5809 or place currently receives over your ad on-line at 1.5 million page views bendbulletin.com every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Need Seasonal help? Get Results! Need Part-time help? Call 385-5809 or place Need Full-time help? your ad on-line at Advertise your open positions. bendbulletin.com The Bulletin Classifieds

Boats & RV’s

new, rode once, exc. cond., $1700. 541-647-4641 or 541-923-6283. CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail 90, 1979, good condition, but needs engine work, $499. 541-410-4792


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 860

880

882

Motorcycles And Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Allegro Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 E3

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 Dolphin 35’ 1998, large tip-out, 45K mi., part trade for trailer or camper, $19,500, 541-536-2792.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

times $3500 OBO Call 541-306-8321 like new 870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Ford Falcon Camper Van, 1989 Class B, fully equipped, like new, only 35K miles. $10,000. 541-588-6084 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Seaswirl

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. 2 hangars at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 planes. $536 annual lease. Reduced to $125,000 or make offer! 541-815-6085. Airplane Hangars now available for lease at Redmond Municipal Airport. $270/mo. Please contact airport administration, 541-504-3499 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19’ Duckworth Jet 2002, 285 HP inboard Jet Pump, 8 HP kicker,all accessories, 1 owner, low hrs, $24,500,541-410-8617

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

Canopies and Campers Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

“WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

VW Super Beetle 1974 MICHELIN X-ICE studless snow tires, mounted on 4 Lexus GS300 rims plus extra brand new tire. $325 541-317-4945. Studded snow tires 245-75-R16 Wildcat Touring AT, 4 for $500. Call 541-312-2972

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $300, 541-447-1668 Tires, (4) Snow/traction, LT245/75R-16/10, 6K mi., $300/set, 541-408-0531.

C-10

Pickup

TIRES - Studded snows, (4) P215/60Rx16, $95. Phone 541-420-2220

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Ford Escape XLT2008

Smolich Auto Mall

4 wheel drive. Super clean and ready for next weeks winter storm. $17,757

Special Offer

VIN#A74168

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 Cyl. eng. w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500, please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Smolich Auto Mall Jeep Wrangler 2008

Special Offer

Hardtop, Tow, 6 spd, 28K Miles! VIN #530123

Double Cab, 4X4, 63K Miles! Vin #463612

Now Only $19,750

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Explorer 2005 V6, 7 Passenger, Family SUV! Vin #A06585

Now Only $10,735

931

Bid Now!

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Special Offer for Hunters

NISSAN

Special Offer

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

4 WHEEL DRIVE, 49,000 miles. V6-auto. $14,897

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Cadillac Escalade 2007

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Now Only $18,888

Now Only $37,911

package, Good condition, $1495, 541-815-9939.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

VIN#812162

personals Professional Golfer looking to drive your car to Palm Springs before Thanksgiving, Brandon, 541-693-4119.

Special Offer for Hunters

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Jeep Wrangler 2009 Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

31K Miles! VIN #767844

Now Only $19,877

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer for Hunters

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Smolich Auto Mall

Infiniti g35x 2007 all wheel drive, Navigation, Moonroof. $24,889

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, $16,999 OBO, Call 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

30K Miles! VIN #641758

AWD, 41K Miles! Vin #140992

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Jeep Wrangler 2008

VIN#251359

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111. Dodge 1986 Power Ram 4 x 4, long bed, tow package, 85,258 miles. Runs great. $2650. 541-447-8165

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999, 1 owner, micro, A/C, gen, 2 awnings, tv, stereo, elec. jacks, non smoker, $8950, 541-410-8617

Smolich Auto Mall

GMC ENVOY2005

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door clean, runs good -$8,500. panels w/flowers & humAustin Western Super 500 mingbirds, white soft top & Grader - All wheel drive, low hard top, Reduced to $5,500, hours on engine - $10,500. 541-317-9319,541-647-8483 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer People Look for Information $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 About Products and Services Every Day through XState 12 yd. Diesel Dump Truck, w/big snow plow, The Bulletin Classifieds bargain at $3650, Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, 541-410-3425. original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 925 OBO. 530-515-8199

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Special Offer for Hunters

DLR 0225

smolichmotors.com

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

Smolich Auto Mall

541-598-3750

Toyota Tundra 2004

Pickups

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Jeep Wrangler 2010

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221 FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Priced BETTER then NEW! 3K Miles! VIN #158726

Chrysler Aspen 2008 SUV AWD, Limited Edition! 41K Miles! Vin #132288

Now Only $21,735

Now Only $25,825

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer for Hunters

NISSAN

541-923-1655

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Utility Trailers

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Randy’s Kampers & Kars

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 970-812-6821

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

933

Pickups

TIRES: P265/70R/17 Bridgestone Dueler AT, $200. 541-388-8198.

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

17’

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Tires (4) Michelin Primacy Studless Snows, 215/55HR16, hardly used, $250, 541-480-5205.

916 KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

908

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006 , low hrs hard

900 Aircraft, Parts and Service

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

Autos & Transportation

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Wrangler 2002

Special Offer

KIA Sportage 1996: 4X4 $1950, 153k, AC, 5 Spd, New Whls, tires Clutch, Slave Cyl. Runs Great. Yakima Locking Snowboard Rack. Buy before the snow flies! Rick 541-416-0566. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Lifted & Loaded with extras for the trails. Very clean! VIN #719887

Now Only $16,387

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Lexus GX470 2009 sport utility 4 WHEEL DRIVE Sport package, Navigation, 14,000 miles. $48,995

Dodge Journey SUV 2009

VIN#X590171829

smolichmotors.com

541-598-3750

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

DLR 0225

Call for Great Value information. 36K Miles! Vin #195855

Now Only $13,989 You Can Bid On: 3 Oil Changes for Car or Light Truck, $120 Value at Bryan's Automotive (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

881

Travel Trailers Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

WE BUY OLD BOATS!

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Central Oregon Boat Recycling 541-480-0415

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Accounting/Bookeeping

Domestic Services

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353

Barns

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

Building/Contracting

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler is bonded and insured. 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc. Verify the contractor’s CCB cond. sleeps 8, black/gray inlicense through the terior, used 3X, $29,900. CCB Consumer Website 541-389-9188. www.hirealicensedcontractor.com or call 503-378-4621. The 882 Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior Fifth Wheels to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Excavating

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Handyman

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

875

Watercraft

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

CCB#180420 Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Snow Removal Clear those rain gutters now, before winter sets in. Call Mindin’ The Gutter at 541-848-2457 for free estimate now!

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Holiday Lighting EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

SPRINKLER BLOW-OUT & Repair • Fall Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Flower bed clean up

• Snow Removal •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Bend Landscaping Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling Harris Custom Crating: We provide custom crating, palletizing, strap & wrap and arrange shipping if required. 541-390-0704,541-390-0799

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Pet Services Serious On-site Horse Care Full service sitting w/options for more in-depth care. Call EquiCare, 541-706-1820 (leave message if no answer)

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling: Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Repair & Remodeling: Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows/doors • Garages/Additions/Remodels www.remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

935

940

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Subaru Outback 2004 Limited AWD Wagon

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Chrysler Town & Country SX, 155K: 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Leather, moonroof, 5 speed,

$13,508 VIN#-#604795

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Suzuki Grand Vitara 2010

975

Automobiles

AWD, Loaded like you want it including Navigation. 2K Miles! Vin #100784

Now Only $23,345

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Chrysler New Yorker 1990, 3.3 V6, new tags, tires, battery, etc. excellent condition, $1600. 541-549-6523

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Premium, Loaded, Roof Rack, 7 Passenger, 39K Miles! Vin #106479

Now Only $17,789

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, asking 12,500. Please call 541-419-2181

GRAND AM 2002 with V-6. great shape! $3600, 541-536-9221

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Special Offer Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 194K highway miles. $7500, 541-410-7586

4 Motion AWD! Vin #302694 VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Smolich Auto Mall

Now Only $9,999

Special Offer

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

541-749-4025 • DLR

Special Offer

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Toyota Avalon 2003

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Smolich Auto Mall

VW Passat Wagon 2004

Super Nice!! Vin #300271

Now Only $11,450

541-385-5809 HYUNDAI

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 spd, sunroof, gold color, good running cond, reduced, now $1500. 541-923-0134.

Subaru Outback Special Edition Wagon 2007, auto, exc. cond,$18,750, 541-312-8829

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edi-

Suzuki XL7 2008

Mercedes-Benz SL 550 2007 Only 38,750 miles. Excellent, pristine condition. No body damage, chips, etc. Loaded with extras. Comes with 4 studded snow tires with less than 2000 miles wear. $46,000. 541-388-7944

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

smolichmotors.com

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

VW New Beetle Bug 2006 Leather, Roof Rack, Manual, FWD, 35K Miles! Vin #400435

Now Only $11,945

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

366

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

940

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Buick Park Avenue 2004, ultra super charged V-6, loaded, white diamond, exc. cond. Vin #148993, $11,500 541-480-3265 • Dlr #8308

Vans

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $17,500. 541-788-8626

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda CRV EX 2002, 4WD, only 63K, auto, many orig. extras+deer alarm, Demco front base plate for towing, exc. cond., $12,250, 541-549-7587.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160. Mercedes-Benz 450GL 2007, exc. cond., all options incl. navigation & TV/DVD players, 80K all road miles, $32,000, 541-350-5373.

M O T O R S

BELOW BLUE BOOK SALE Kelly Blue Book Prices as of 11/03/2010

2000 Audi A6

Must See, Great Condition Stk. A31035B, VIN 128314

Kelly Blue Book $8,850

NOW

$8,849

2007 VW Beetle Stk. 90102A, VIN M504921

Kelly Blue Book $12,865

NOW $12,495

Kelly Blue Book $14,600

Stk. A30093A, VIN 182354

NOW $16,895

2009 VW Routan VW Certifed Mini Van

NOW $17,995

Kelly Blue Book $19,250

VW Certified, Great Buy Stk. 3421, VIN 071339

VW Certified, Wolfsburg

Stk. 3514, VIN R501073

2007 VW Jetta

NOW $13,995

2007 Beetle Convertible

2007 Mini Cooper S Low Miles, Full Options Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

NOW $18,495

Kelly Blue Book $21,130

VW Certified, One Owner Stk. 70066C, VIN M524831

Kelly Blue Book $15,635

NOW $14,995

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876

VW Certified, One Owner Stk. 3497, VIN M196211

Kelly Blue Book $15,480

Kelly Blue Book $21,565

NOW $15,395

2009 VW Beetle Kelly Blue Book $15,770

NOW $21,495

2004 BMW X5

One Owner, Low Miles Stk. 71031J, VIN LU22273

VW Certified, Low miles Stk. 3519, VIN M505864

2009 VW Jetta TDI

Only 16k Miles, Navigation, Moonroof

2007 VW Jetta

NOW $15,495

2003 Mercedes C320 Stk. 3520, VIN F410694

Kelly Blue Book $16,725

NOW $21,995

Kelly Blue Book $22,860

Stk. 3465, VIN 125841

NOW $15,995

Kelly Blue Book $25,485 NOW

$23,995

Carrera AUTO OUTLET GREAT VALUES ON RECENT TRADE-INS! 2000 VW Beetle

2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Great Value

Navigation, One Owner, Low, Low Miles

Stk. 90201A, VIN M72269

NOW $5,995

Kelly Blue Book $6,445

2005 Acura MDX NOW $17,995

Stk. 90131B, VIN FZ78172

Kelly Blue Book $22,760

2004 GMC Yukon Loaded! DVD, 3rd Row Seat Stk. 71023A, VIN J295729

Kelly Blue Book $20,810

NOW $18,995

Kelly Blue Book $20,035

XLT Super Cab, Low Miles

Stk. A31036A, VIN H526917

Kelly Blue Book $18,625

Stk. A31040A, VIN C366044

2006 Ford F-150

One Owner, Must See!

NOW $19,995

2007 Nissan Pathfinder

NOW $17,995

2005 GMC Yukon

One Owner, Like New Stk. 71055A, VIN C621723

Kelly Blue Book $26,165

NOW $22,995

Incredible Condition & Value Stk. 71056B, VIN J174687

Kelly Blue Book $19,695

Porsche | Audi

NOW $17,995

M O T O R S

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and this Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due principal payment of $162,157.05 plus accrued interest in the amount of $41,426.63 through August 25, 2010.

Trust, together with any interest which the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Deed of Trust reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal and interest as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Deed of Trust, together with Trustee’s and attorneys fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753.

LEGAL NOTICE Estate of Dorothy L. Nelson NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case No. 10PB0122ms NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry Miller has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative, at c/o Harold S. Harding, Attorney at Law, P.O. Box 1201, Corvallis, OR 97339-1201, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorney for the personal representative whose contact information is below.

Harold S. Harding Attorney for Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Jerry Miller 4990 Nadine Dr. S. Salem, OR 97302-3530 503-949-0466 ATTORNEY Harold S. Harding Attorney at Law P.O. Box 1201 Corvallis, OR 97339-1201 541-757-7594 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON A public hearing regarding a proposed annexation, Hellmuth Annexation, to the Four Rivers Vector Control District, will be held on November 22, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Hearing Room, First Floor, 1300 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. To view the legal description of the boundaries of the proposed annexation, contact the Deschutes County Counsel's Office at 388-6623.

2007 Audi A4

Audi Certified, Low Miles

4-Matic, Low Miles

1000

Legal Notices

Dated and first published October 23, 2010.

2008 VW Jetta

Kelly Blue Book $16,910

VW Certified

1000

Legal Notices

VW | BMW

Find every car on the lot at www.carreramotors.com 10 4 5 S E 3 r d S t. | B e n d | 5 41-3 81-1711

The purpose of the proposed annexation is to provide fire protection services for the area proposed to be annexed. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. At meetings of the Board of County Commissioners the county will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Dennis R. Luke, Chair LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No.: 1715020050 T.S. No.: 7101550 Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kent R. Cramer and Leslie J. Cramer, Husband and Wife as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, dated 3/2/2005, recorded 3/7/2005, in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-13281 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: ALL

OF LOT TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN AND A PORTION OF LOT THREE HUNDRED FOURTEEN OF BROKEN TOP LOCATED IN SECTION 1, OF TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 11 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A 5/8" IRON ROD AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF TAM MCARTHUR LOOP; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 24 DEGREES 07'53" EAST 19.28 FEET TO A 5/8" IRON ROD; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 71 DEGREES 4733" WEST 186.81 FEET TO A 5/8" IRON ROD AT THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE FOLLOWING THE BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NORTH 27 DEGREES 50'00" WEST 57.23 FEET TO A 5/8" IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 04'54" EAST 185.36 FEET TO A 5/8" IRON ROD ON SAID RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE FOLLOWING SAID RIGHT OF WAY 99.09 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A 300.00 FOOT RADIUS CURVE RIGHT (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS SOUTH 33 DEGREES 35'37" EAST 98.64 FEET) TO A 5/8" IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES 07'53" EAST 25.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. APN# 184548 Commonly known as: 61602 Tam McArthur Loop, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's failure to: Make the monthly payments of $3,002.58 each, commencing with the payment due on 5/1/2010 and continuing each month until this trust deed is reinstated or goes to trustee's sale; plus a late charge of $150.13 on each installment not paid within fifteen days following the payment due date; trustee's fees and other costs and expenses associated with this foreclosure and any further breach of any term or condition contained in subject note and deed of trust. By the reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The principal sum of $624,577.65 together with the interest thereon at the rate 3.125% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 12/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Entrance Entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured (and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee). Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes; has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed; the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/30/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee C/O Max Default Services Corporation 43180 Business Park Drive, Ste 202 Temecula, CA 92590 (619)465-8200 DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# 3678035 10/23/2010, 10/30/2010, 11/06/2010, 11/13/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Eric Michael Meloling, as Grantor, to AmeriTitle, Trustee, in favor of Ronald L. White, as Beneficiary, dated May 17, 2004, recorded on May 17, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-28954, Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in Deschutes County Oregon: Lot 191 Northwest Crossing, Phase V Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Chris Hatfield of Hurley Re, P.C., 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, was appointed Successor Trustee by the Beneficiary on August 23, 2010. Both the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee have

By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The principal sum of $162,157.05, plus accrued interest in the sum of $41,426.63 through August 25, 2010 and continuing to accrue at the rate of 10% per annum until paid, plus attorneys fees, foreclosure costs, and sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said Trust Deed. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned Successor Trustee will, on January 12, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, which is the hour, date and place last set for the sale, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the said Deed of

In construing this Notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “Grantor” includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, and the words “Trustee” and “Beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: August 25, 2010 Chris Hatfield, OSB No. 872426 Successor Trustee Telephone: 541-317-5505

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-109502 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KENNETH J. CROSS AND SUSAN C. CROSS, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 4/2/2003, recorded 4/4/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-22335, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT THIRTY-SEVEN (37) AND THIRTY-EIGHT (38) IN BLOCK SEVENTY-TWO (72) OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 6, PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 54600 CARIBOU DR. BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 22, 2010 Delinquent Payments from March 26, 2010 7 payments at $ 663.88 each $ 4,647.16 (03-26-10 through 10-22-10) Late Charges: $ 75.00 TOTAL: $ 4,722.16 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 3/26/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $40,940.80, PLUS interest thereon at 11.490% per annum from 2/26/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 24, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 10/22/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: 877-237-7878 Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3787714 10/30/2010, 11/06/2010, 11/13/2010, 11/20/2010


For homes online

THE BULLETIN

|

S AT U R D AY, N O V E M B E R 6 , 2 0 1 0

|

www.bendhomes.com

ADVERTISING SECTION F

Cascade View, RV Parking & 1/3 Acre

New Homes Starting at $214,990

Located in SE Bend, this single-level, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2,086 sq. ft. custom home with designer inishes offers plenty of room with 1/3 acre, 3-car garage, workshop, RV parking and full RV hookup. Priced at $379,900, this movein ready home has craftsman features plus plenty of natural lighting and Cascade views. Open House: Sat., 124 p.m. From Reed Mkt, south on 15th, left on Ferguson, right on Ladera, left on Sky Harbor and right on Sedonia. For more, call Mike Gregory, Broker, at (541) 749-0830.

TAFT DIRE LLC (541) 728-0033 / www.taftdire.com

Paid Advertisement

Discover Aspen Ridge on the Rim, a stellar community in Southwest Bend. This award-winning neighborhood features a central park, pool and pavilion. Hayden Homes continues it’s reputation of offering signature quality homes at an exceptional value. With five wellappointed home plans available, you're certain to find one to call your own. Directions: south on parkway, west on Powers Road, south on Brookswood Blvd, west on Montrose Pass. Find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information.

ASPEN RIM - BEND WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES.COM 541-306-3085

Paid Advertisement

Affordable Housing

Outside of the Box Southeast Bend’s newest neighborhood gives more individuals the opportunity to own a home while putting others back to work.

, by Susan Thomas Springer, for The Bulletin Advertising Department If you’re a buyer in today’s housing market hoping to find the perfect house at an affordable price, you may believe your prospects don’t seem too rosy. However, there’s a shining example of teamwork that is bringing 10 houses to the Bend market that are affordable and green. Government, nonprofit and for-profit have come together to develop the new Shady Pines subdivision in southeast Bend, and the result

communities suffering from foreclosures and abandonment, NSP is providing qualified buyers with a $25,000 no-interest, no-payment loan which essentially lowers the sales price. “We are very excited to get the process going, get people back to work and meet a community need at the same time,” said COBA Executive Vice President Tim Knopp. The existing house has recently been listed by Taft Dire Real Estate Resources. It is a threebedroom, two-and-a-half-bath home packed with amenities. The 1,661 square-foot home is

When the other nine homes are built and on the market, both contractors and buyers will benefit from the program as the lot is donated to the builder. The value is then passed on to the buyer. In addition, the program offers builders a zero-interest loan. “One of the problems in the market today is no money for construction loans,” said Knopp. The program essentially adds up to a $25,000 savings to qualified buyers. Knopp added that Building Partners creates several winners in the process since it gets con-

and advantageous to build green homes,” said Knopp. Duffey pointed out that the NSP program can help “open doors” for buyers in Shady Pines and in other neighborhoods too. The program aids middle-income families. Duffey said it’s a good choice for buyers who don’t want to go through a short sale or foreclosure. “If you’re in the market for a $200,000 house and under, and qualify for the NSP program, it gives you the opportunity to buy $25,000 more house,” said Duffey.

“We are very excited to get the process going, get people back to work and meet a community need at the same time.” benefits more than just the home buyers. Contractors, Realtors, and even taxpayers will feel the effects. Central Oregon Builders Association (COBA), with support from the City of Bend, formed a nonprofit called Building Partners for Affordable Housing which purchased the subdivision consisting of one finished house and nine lots. A federal program called The Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) aids in keeping the homes priced low. Established to stabilize

listed at $164,900 and features hardwood floors, granite countertops, a tile master bath, and a fenced and landscaped backyard on a corner lot. The house was built two years ago but was never lived in. Instead, it got caught in the downturn and was returned to the bank. Now a buyer qualified for the NSP program can purchase it for $139,900. “It’s one of those deals that you’d look back on and say it was a sweetheart of a deal,” said Taft Dire’s principal broker, Bill Duffey.

tractors and subcontractors back to work and gets stalled property under construction once again. “It’s a win for the City and for city residents because you put real estate back on the tax rolls,” said Knopp. The new homes in Shady Pines will also be third-party certified for energy efficiency, so the financial advantages continue over time in the form of lower energy bills. “We want to demonstrate that it is possible

The price range for the Shady Pines homes will range from $140,000 to $160,000. Building Partners will soon send out a Request for Proposal to find builders interested in building energy-efficient homes on the remaining lots. Building Partners will phase the construction and bring two homes to the market at a time. The existing house, located at 20071 Shady Pines Place on the corner of Parrell Road and Shady Pines Place, will be open to the public today from noon to 4 p.m.


F2 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 631

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals 32’x34’ Shop w/2 roll-up doors, Between Redmond & Terrebonne, $400 per mo., taking applications, Please Call 541-548-6812

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Avail. now,unfurnished 1 bdrm. condo at Mt. Bachelor Village, W/S/G/elec, amenities, lower level, no smoking/pets $650+dep, 541-389-1741

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin A Westside Condo @ Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G pd. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

631

634

636

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

1/2 Off First Full Month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $775+dep. With lease. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191

Westside Village Apts.

130 NE 6th 1 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no smkg or pets, close to Bend High. $495+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District www.ThePlazainBend.com

OPEN HOUSE Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing Call 541-743-1890

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

638

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

642

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hkups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable 541-388-8203

642

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $600 +dep. no pets,541-480-4824 1 Mo. Free Option.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

642

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

638

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

632

2 BDRM, $495

1459 NW Albany * 3 bdrm, $610 * Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. Call 382-7727 or 388-3113.

719 SE Centennial 2 bdrm, all appliances, w/d hook-up, woodstove, fenced yard, single garage, cat ok $575. 541-382-7727

Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

640

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 640 Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1104 NW 7th St., #22, 1 20070 Beth Ave. #2 Old Mill 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances including w/d, gas heat, garage, irrigation/ water/sewer pd. Cat ok $695. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. views. No pets or smoking $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500

Bdrm., 1 bath, $425, no credit checks, 1st & last only, avail. 10/1, please call 541-788-3480. 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. References. $550+utils. 541-420-7613

541-322-7253

Autumn Specials Are Here! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced yard, central heat, fully landscaped, $675+dep. 541-545-1825.

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

20940 Royal Oak Circl. Unit B 1 bdrm/ 1 bath attached apt. Furnished or unfurnished avail. kitchen, private ent. all utlts pd. no pets. $595+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

634

Avail. Now, Beautiful 2 bdrm., 1 bath w/view in tri-plex., W/D hookup, 1 car garage, W/S paid, no pets/smoking, $625/mo., 541-508-1097.

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows $675, 2 bdrm, 1½ bath ½ off 1st Mo. Rent

** Pick your Special **

541-330-0719

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

1026 NE Rambling #1 2 bdrm, all appl. + micro, w/d hook-ups, gas heat/ fireplace, garage, landscaping incl., small pet ok. $695. 541-382-7727

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

1070 NE Purcell #2 $200 off first month! 1 bdrm, all appliances, gas heat/fireplace, garage, w/d. W/S paid. $575. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Newly painted 2 Bdrm 1 bath in triplex, gas stove, private yard, plenty of parking space, no smoking; cat OK. $520/ mo + deposit. 541-419-4520

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

636

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

(Private Party ads only)

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Comfy furnished studio., all util. included, indoor pool, no pets, ref. and credit check, $495, 1st, last and $300 dep. 541-382-3672 leave msg.

1085 NE Purcell - Pilot Butte Village 55+ Community 2 bdrm rentals @$850, in hospital district. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

1/2 OFF 1ST MO! 2 bdrm., 1 bath in 4-plex near hospital. Laundry, storage, yard, deck, W/S/G paid. $600+dep. No dogs. 541-318-1973.

Small studio close to downtown and Old Mill. $450 mo., dep. $425, all util. paid. no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870.

630

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

JUST REDUCED SAT & SUN 1-3PM • Gated community-pool • Spotless-1716 sq. ft. • 3 bedroom, 2 bath • Single level • Open floor plan • Huge vaults • Gas FA heating and AC • Private backyard • Low maintenance • Mtn. View Park

SATURDAY 12-3

2375 NE Buckwheat Court Directions: Hwy. 20 East to 27th, left on 27th past Neff to Rosemary. Left at Rosemary to last street in park.

PRICED TO SELL!

$147,500

Listed by: MARILYN ROHALY Broker

541-322-9954

WESTSIDE - DOWNTOWN AREA

Bend, Oregon

3 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath home with hardwood floors, granite kitchen, tile bath, AC, new carpet, 455 NW Saginaw huge deck PLUS Directions: Go west on Portland or attached 1 bedroom Newport from Wall, take a right on 5th apartment rents for St., right on Saginaw, house on the right. $775.00. 2184 sq. ft.

$379,900

Hosted by: CHRIS AHERN Broker

G B

541-728-1281

G O B E N D R E A LT Y C e nt ra l

O r e g o n

Re a l

E s t a t e


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 F3

642

650

654

656

658

687

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

20371 Rocca Way 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, 1675 sq. ft. gas fireplace, fenced yard, pets ok! $995 541-382-7727

$925: 2 bdrm, 1 bath log home, 19427 Kemple Dr., west side location, $250 cleaning dep., call 503-860-2824.

834 NE Modoc Ct.

1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ Alley Access, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727

Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood floors, granite counters, back deck, garage, W/D hookup, quiet st., 2025 NW Elm, $625. 541-815-0688. TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $600 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

648

Houses for Rent General BEND RENTALS • Starting at $450. Furnished also avail. For virtual tours & pics apm@riousa.com 541-385-0844 Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, all appl. incl. W/D, near Lodge $775, 541-617-5787

CROOKED RIVER RANCH $675 2/2 Views! 1 Acre, single garage w/ opener, w/d hookups, deck, fence. 8797 Sand Ridge Rd. $750 2/2 Views, 1.5 acres, pellet w/d, loft, large deck, 12599 SW Spur Pl.

Houses for Rent NE Bend

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1435 NE Boston 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, gas frplce, all kitchen appl incld small pet neg. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 2875, 2883, & 2903 Jackdaw, Bend Call 4 Pricing!! 2 Exciting Floor plans. Near Forum Shops. Fully appli. kitchen. Pets OK!

7 Days a week• 389-2486 www.investoregon.com

3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1092 sq.ft., wood stove, newer carpet, vinyl, fenced yard, single garage, $825/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

656

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

1700 NW 9th Street #3 $1,200/Fully Furnished! Beautiful 2/2 near COCC. Dbl car garage, fully appli. kitchen, W/D, W/S/Yard included!

19964 Ashwood Dr.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

$795 3 bedroom / 2 bath, newly remodeled, 2-car garage, gas fireplace, open floor plan, gas stove, built in microwave, ceiling fan, large yard with patio. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

Houses for Rent Redmond 1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot, close to dwntwn. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

7 Days a week• 389-2486 www.investoregon.com 61717 NW Metolius, Bend $1,900/Furnished•$1,400/ Unfurnished - 3/3.5, W/D incl., Gas Fireplace, Patio!!

7 Days a week• 389-2486 www.investoregon.com 61875 NW Broken Top #22B & #30A, Bend Starting at $495/mo. 2 Furnished Options. High-end units! W/D incl. Biking trails.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Beautifully furnished (or unfurnished) 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2695, incl. cable, internet, garbage, lawn care; min 6 mo lease. 541-944-3063 CLEAN, small 2 bedroom. Large yard, wood heat. $675 + last + dep., Local ref., no pets. 1015 NW Ogden. FABULOUS 3500 sq. ft. 5 bdrm, 3 bath home in great neighborhood, fenced yard. $1850 +$500 security deposit. Avail. 11/10. 541-749-0724.

Great NW Location! Exquisite, Studio cottage, short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $575 Avail. 12/1, 503-729-3424 .

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

693

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com 3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1.15 ac. 800 sq ft shop/4-car garage, utilities furnished except elec. $995/mo + $750 sec dep. 541-228-5131; 541 517-4345

3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, A/C, w/d hook-up, oversized dbl garage w/attached workshop, storage, RV Parking, carport, Lrg. Deck $850 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

61284 Kristen St. 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, 1613 sq. ft., gas heat and fireplace, dbl garage, dogs neg. $1095+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

$650 2/2 w/d hookups, central air, wood stove, soaking tub! RV parking. 4041 NE Upas Ave $675 3/2 w/d hookups, family room, fenced, deck, sheds 3125 SW Pumice Ave $695 3/1.5, new paint, single garage, w/d hookups, oil heat. 915 SW Dogwood Ave $725 3/2, dbl. garage w/opener, w/d hookups, bonus room, shed, fenced. 2236 SW 34th St. $775 3/2, double garage w/ opener, w/d hookups, breakfast bar, patio, fenced 1748 SW Kalama Ave $795 3/2.5 double garage w/opener, w/d, gas fireplace, fenced, yard maint 2885 SW Indian Circle $895 4/2 single garage, w/d hookups, wood fireplace, formal dining, deck, fenced 458 SW 12th St $1300 5/3 - Move-In Special Nov. Rent Free! Views, 3 car garage w/ opener, w/d hookups, deck, fenced, sprinkler system, 2855 SW 49th St $1350 3/2 - $200 off 1st month, views, .5 acre lot, dbl garage, large deck! 2345 Linnet Ln

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

335 NE Greenwood Ave. Prime retail/office space, Greenwood frontage, 1147 sq. ft., ample parking, includes w/s. $1200 mo. 541-382-7727

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

659

The Bulletin

541-385-5809

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Houses for Rent Sunriver VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

347 NE Greenwood Ave. 400 sq. ft. office space, private entrance & restroom, 3 small offices + reception area, ample parking, includes water/sewer/ electric. $500! 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe. piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1450. 541-593-1414

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295, 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

541-389-7910

105 NW Greeley Avenue • Bend, OR 97701

www. hunterproperties.info LAWNAE HUNTER, Principal Broker/Owner

E US HO 4 PM EN 1OP AT. S

Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. 541-389-5408

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $850/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

$750. Ideal for someone needing add’l parking/storage. 3 bdrm mfd home, O/S garage, huge yard, greenhouse. Full size laundry, bonus rm, decks front & back. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

61154 Chuckanut

7 Days a week• 389-2486 www.investoregon.com 63842 Johnson Rd. Country Home! 3 bdrm 3 bath house, 3500+ sq. ft., all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, landscaping maintained, pet OK. $3000 mo. 541-382-7727

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Cozy 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car garage, close to hospital, shopping, Mtn View HS. Available now, no smkg or pets. $850/ mo, 1yr lease. 541-923-7453

925 NW Poplar Ave.

The Bulletin Classifieds

652

1131 NE Locksley 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, bonus room, gas heat/fireplace, fenced yard, 1798 sq. ft., dbl. garage, extra storage, pet cons. $1095. 541-382-7727

20422 Bullblock 4 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, family room, large decks, 2000 sq. ft., dbl. garage, landscaping maintained. $995 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

658

61166 Larkspur Loop - Cute 3 Bdrm 2 bath, fenced yd, dbl garage, 1100 sq ft, 1 yr lease, $850/mo + $800 dep; $200 off 1st month. 541-389-9303

541-923-8222

650

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

www.MarrManagement.com The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet country home with wood stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068

TERREBONNE $895 3/2 - Move In Special! 1st month rent $495. Views! dbl garage, w/d hookups, deck, fenced, 1423 Barberry

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $850 mo.+ dep. Call (503) 803-4718

E US M O P H EN 1-4 OP AT. S

2307 NE BUCKWHEAT COURT

2891 NE JACKDAW

$169,900

$132,900

Gated Community! Beautifully maintained, 1872 sq. ft. 3 bdrm, 2 bath SUZANNE STEPHENSON, BROKER 541-848-0506

Excellent Value! Perfect opportunity for first-time home buyers or investors. AARON BALLWEBER, BROKER 541-728-4499

GREAT WEST SIDE location, $895. 2 bdrm/2 bath home, separate 2-car garage, house totally restored. W/D. Call 831-901-9020. Older 1 Bdrm cottage, garage, large yard, no pets, washer & dryer incl, refs & credit check, $525, 1st/last/dep. 541-382-3672 leave msg. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

$319,900 Traditional Sale! Immaculate & move-in ready. Upgrades throughout and access to trails AARON BALLWEBER, BROKER 541-728-4499

$468,000 An Exceptional Custom Home! .72 acre lot; 3 bdrm/2 bath. High-end finishes include slab granite, custom wood trim and beautifully landscaped. 2,500 sq. ft. RV and shop. MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

20336 Donkey Sled Rd $900. Large 2 bdrm, 2 bath w/ bonus rm, 2nd fairway, Bend Country Club. Furnished, W & D, pool table, 2-car garage, all yard work done for you! 6 month rental only. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 bdrm/1 bath with private fenced back yard & patio. No pets. $425 incl. w/s/g •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495/mo. Includes w/s/g •1/2 Off Move-in Rent! Spacious Hillside Apt. Floor-level with balcony & fireplace. 2 bdrm/1 bath. Laundry facilities on site. Central Location. $495 includes w/s/g & Basic Cable. •Spacious 2 bdrm/1 bath apts. Off-street parking. Nice shade trees. On site laundry. Near hospital. $525 includes w/s/g • Near Old Mill Dist. - Spacious 2 bdrm/1bath upstairs unit w/balcony. On-site laundry. $525 mo. incl.CABLE + w/s/g • Great Older Duplex in NW - 2 bdrm/1 bath on Large lot. Private back yard. New carpets & paint plus. Single garage & W/D hookups. Pets? $550 w/ s included. • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy bed. $550 includes WST/wireless • Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 bdrm/2 bath. W/D included. No Pets. $550 w/s Included. • Charming, cozy 2 bdrm/1bath cottage in central location. Fenced backyard. Country kitchen. $625 per month. • Adorable 2 brdm/1 bath at end of Wells Acres. Huge fenced yard, single garage. Laundry area. $725 mo. • Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 master suites + ½ bath downstairs. W/D included. Huge kitchen and dbl. garage. Wood burning fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. • LOVELY 1408 sq. ft. Home in Nottingham Square. 2 bdrm/2 bath + office. Lrg. kitchen. Wood stove. End of road in park-like setting. Dbl. garage. Laundry room. $775 mo. • Cheerful, bright 3 bdrm/2 bath, 1500 sq. ft.+ SW Home. Large living room with gas fireplace, GFA. Double garage. Small fenced backyard. $875 mo. • Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. With media room downstairs and extra space upstairs. Garage and access to community pool. $1025 mo. •Unique Combination - Nice NE home off Boyd Acres on corner lot. 3 bdrm, 2 bath home PLUS 2 bdrm, 1 bath apt. above garage. 2775 sq. ft. Total. Whole Pkg is $1800. Various options available. Prefer no pets. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

$139,000

$139,900

Not a Short Sale! Immaculate & move-in ready MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Just Reduced! Nice Southside location! Corner lot; perfect for first time home buyer or investor. AARON BALLWEBER, BROKER 541-728-4499

$105,000 Just Reduced! Corner lot & a great home for first time home buyers or investors. SUSAN PITARRO, BROKER 541-410-8084

$79,000 Perfect Hide Away! Large lot offers beautiful landscape, backs up to BLM, perfect for horses, corrals in place, outbuildings on property. MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Lots & Land LAWNAE HUNTER, PRINCIPAL BROKER, 541-550-8635 $327,900 - 22 Improved lots; Ready to build.

$140,000 - 7 contiguous lots; utilities in; Priced to sell!

$599,000 - 13.4 acres; Residential; utilities in.

$751,100 - 29 fully approved lots; Ready to build!

$239,500 - Retail & mixed use; Sisters

$1,560,000 - 39 fully approved Westside lots; Ready to build!

$20,000 - Lot 1; Excellent Opportunity; utilities in.

$112,000 - 7 Lots fully approved. Nice established neighborhood!

What is a Short Sale? A short sale is a sale from seller (owner) to buyer that the Lenders agree to take a pay-off less than the existing loan amount. Owners benefit by avoiding a foreclosure on their credit, lenders get the house sold & the buyer generally receives a home that has been occupied & may be in better shape than a foreclosure home. There are many advantages to a Short Sale for all parties. Hunter Properties Brokers have a very high closing rate in this type of a sale. Call for Details! 541-389-7910


F4 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item $ 00

Under 200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item to be sold.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

700

745

745

755

773

775

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Acreages

Bid Now!

***

CHECK YOUR AD

STICK-BUILT 1 bedroom house on an acre for sale in La Pine. Only $72,5000. 541-536-9221.

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

*20-ACRE Foreclosures* $99/month*, $0-Down, $12,900, GREAT DEAL! Near El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures. 800-343-9444.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, November 6, 2010 F5

You Can Bid On: Premium Storage Building 10'x10' with Peaked Roof, $5,375 Value at HiLine Homes (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

The Bulletin Classified ***

The Bulletin Classiieds

763

Recreational Homes and Property

Lots Exceptional Investment 1+ acre in Bend: $65,000 Property Zoned RM. **Bids Due Nov 10th!** Call Steve: 503.986.3638

HUGE price reduction! Cascade views, 2.2 acres. Water hookup pd.; septic approved. $99,900. Sonnie Grossman & Assoc., 541-388-2159.

Steelhead, Bass, 26” Catfish! Bear, Deer, Elk, Pheasants! 16 acres prime riverfront! 1000 sq. ft. cabin. $249,000. 541-934-2091.

NEW HOME at 745

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: $1000 Gift Certificate Toward Lennox System at Mountain View Heating (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

771

www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $112,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material, $1000 Value at Carpetco Flooring (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: $150 Cooking Class for Two People at Allyson's Kitchen

20114 Carson Creek, Bend. 3 bdrms, 2.5 bath, 1488 sq. ft., corner lot. Will consider trades. Call 541-480-7752. Price $159,900

You Can Bid On: Oreck Little Hero Canister Vacuum and Car Vac Combo Pack, $189.99 Value at Oreck (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

FARM FOR SALE! Vale, OR. 151 acres irrigated land w/150 acres dry hillside pasture. 4 Bdrm home, outbuildings & corrals. Irrigation well & 1884 water rights from creek. Near Bullycreek Reservoir w/fishing, boating & camping. Area known for pheasant, quail & chukkar hunting; deer & elk hunting nearby. Shown by appt only! $1,250,000. 1-208-466-8510.

North Fork John Day River

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $159,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Get 3 lines, 4 days for $17.50.

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809

14x50 2 bdrm, 2 bath sgl. wide in park. Super Good Cents package, drywall, vaulted ceiling, good condition, $15,000. 541-306-7951.

MOVE IN TODAY! 2/1 $9999; 2/2, $13,000; 3/2 $12,357. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, $13,782 cash.John,541-350-1782


F6 Saturday, November 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE 541-382-4123

Bend, OR 97702

REALTOR

For Lease-Prime Location Rivers Edge Village | $99,000 Close Mill District | $120,000

NE Bend | $127,500

BG&CC Lots | $130,000

SA O P T. EN 11 -2

NW Bend | $359,500

486 SW Bluff Dr.

1330 – 7500 sq. ft. available. Street front, corner of Reed Market & 3rd St. High traffic volume, great visibility & ample parking. $.75 - $1.50 per sq. ft. MONTH TO MONTH LEASE AVAILABLE. MLS#201007645

Enjoy the sunrise from this large east facing view lot. Some City, Smith Rock and southern views. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $99,000! MLS#201008710

Woodriver Village is the location of this lot which is .40 of an acre and you could subdivide into 3 lots. Just south of Farewell Bend Park and the Deschutes River. Great location, close to the Old Mill. MLS#201005580

Classic ranch style home conveniently located close to schools and shopping. Home has previously been used as a daycare and includes a large family room with an adjacent 4th bedroom. MLS#201008722

Two almost 1/2 acre level golf course homesites in Timber Ridge on the Bend Golf and Country Club golf course. Paved path to BG&CC clubhouse. BG&CC is a memberowned equity club. Each lot $130,000. MLS#2900979

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR 541-420-1111

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

SE Bend | $135,000

NE Bend | $139,000

Mountain Views on Acreage | $150,000

NE Bend | $170,000

La Pine | $175,000

SE Bend | $199,000

Back on the market and ready to go! 1-story home with huge great room, open kitchen, gas fireplace, lovely master suite & large fenced yard on corner lot. Great location near shopping. MLS#2906378

Bright and affordable with 4 bedrooms plus family room. Large windows bring in the sunlight while refinished wood floors, fresh carpet and paint invite you to make this your home. MLS#2910497

Cascade Mountain and Smith Rock views from this 6.64 acre lot at a great price. Very private, treed lot in area of fine homes. Just 2 blocks to the Deschutes River and backs to 120 acres of BLM land. MLS#2905812

Enjoy the peaceful surroundings of this home on over 4 acres in Alfalfa. Fenced for horses with a small barn/shelter. This home has an open floor plan and beautiful mountain views. MLS#201009260

3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1536 sq. ft. home located on .97 of an acre. Immaculately maintained. 30 x 24 shop and park-like setting. MLS#201009050

Sweet single level, vaulted ceilings, great room. Skylights, new wood stove, sun room. Cul-de-sac, private fenced backyard, access to trail. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Great location, owner owned. MLS#201009585

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

CATHY DEL NERO, Broker 541-410-5280

LI NE ST W IN G

1 owner immaculate home is a real showpiece! Spacious livable floor plan. Bonus room upstairs, main floor master, storage galore, over sized 2-car garage & beautifully landscaped. MLS#201008720 Directions: NW Awbrey Rd. to Greyhawk. 526 NW Greyhawk

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS JOY HELFRICH, Broker, e-Pro, GRI, GREEN 541-408-6720 541-480-6808

5 Acres/NE Bend | $219,000

SE Bend | $229,900

Mountain High | $259,000 Orion Estates | $269,000 Downtown Bend | $275,000

Single level home, attractive vaults & open space. Gas fireplace in living room. Inviting kitchen & family room, cozy den, gas heating & A/C. Fabulous landscaping, charming front porch, quiet cul-de-sac. MLS#201007450

Mini ranch, pastoral setting with pond, mountain views, electric perimeter fencing & cross fenced. 3.75 irrigated acres. Set up for animals. Shop + additional garage. Mountain views. 1400 sq. ft. home. MLS#201006611

Single level, lovely southern exposure, open vaulted living area, gas fireplace, gas forced air and central AC. Convenient kitchen, separate utility room and under house storage. Landscaped .18 of an acre lot. MLS#201007013

Easy Living on the Fairway! Private, peaceful setting in gated community with Golf Course Views on beautifully treed lot. Single level, 2 Bedroom + Den, 2 Bath. MLS#201001975

Single level home in SE Bend. .49 of an acre lot, fenced, landscaped, well maintained with large deck and many trees. Private setting on a cul-de-sac. Open floor plan, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1807 sq. ft. MLS#201009096

One bedroom, 1184 sq. ft. condo on the 5th floor of the Franklin Crossing building. Top quality finishes, parking space and storage. Water, sewer and garbage included in the HOA dues. MLS#201009649

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-383-4361

Widgi Creek | $310,000

NW Bend | $325,000

Sunriver | $334,900

PRNE IC W E

NE Bend | $210,000

West Ridge | $269,500 King’s Forest | $300,000

SA OP T. EN 12 -3

RE PRI DU CE CE D

NE Bend | $147,500

Perfect condition 2 bedroom, 2 bath home with Ponderosa Pines & peek-a-boo mountain views. No maintenance, large private lot. New interior & exterior paint, carpet, electrical, plumbing. MLS#201008580 61575 West Ridge

Nice 4 Bedroom, 2.75 Bath, 3200+ sq. ft. great room plan. Master bedroom on main level. Upstairs 20'x30' bonus room, loft, bedroom, bath & office. 4-car tandem garage, RV parking, flat backyard, 1/2 acre. MLS#201008568

Immaculate townhome on the way to Mt. Bachelor. River trails, golf course, tennis courts, swimming pool and more. Turnkey -price includes all contents. Great investment. MLS#201008990

Unbeatable downtown, riverfront location! Single level condo right on the Deschutes River and 1 block to Downtown. Gas fireplace, large deck off kitchen. Single car attached garage. MLS#2901699

You must see this classic Sunriver vacation home. One story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hot tub, fully furnished and convenient to everything! Cute, Cute, Cute! Call Jack Johns at 541-480-9300. MLS#201007949

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

SW Bend | $379,500

Wonderful West Hills Home | $389,000 NE Redmond | $399,900 Full Cascade Mountain Views | $425,000

LI NE ST W IN G

NW Crossing | $339,000 Broken Top Lot | $376,500

RE PR DU ICE CE D

3 bedrooms, 2 bath, light & bright interior, beautiful large fenced backyard with newer wood deck. Seller will contribute $2,500 towards buyer’s closing costs. Hosted by Becky Brunoe 541-350-4772 MLS#201008333 Directions: East on Butler Mkt., south on Stonebrook 3054 Stonebrook

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2481 sq. ft. Westside 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 1952 sq. ft. Large 18.3 acres with Cascade Mt. views. Shop/ south facing .29 of an acre lot. Beautiful home close to river & recreation trails. garage, kitchen has granite counters and Hardwood floors, stainless steel kitchen landscaping & decks. Great living spaces, wood floors, bathrooms with marble, tile vaulted ceilings & large windows. appliances. Cascade Mountain views, and slate. Large family room with lots of Location is Key! vaulted ceilings & large master suite. windows & big deck to enjoy the views. MLS#201006837 MLS#2902962 MLS#201008483

GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159 541-322-2404

SA OP T. EN 12 -3

LI NE ST W IN G

Sunrise Village | $465,000 Luxury Townhome | $470,000 Desirable Westside | $474,000

NW Bend | $475,000

Quiet 9.81 acres in Tumalo. 1 acre irrigated. 1700 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath like new home. Paved drive and 1440 sq. ft. pole barn/shop. Breathtaking views. Easy to see, incredible buy! MLS#2809508

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

Sisters | $495,900

Black Butte Ranch | $549,950

LI NE ST W IN G

OWNER WILL CARRY, 1 acre in gated community looking down on the 8th fairway. Big views of the 8th green, lake & mountains. At the end of a cul-desac. Terms are 20% down, 6% interest (30 yr amortization), 5 yr balloon. MLS#201006682

RE PRI DU CE CE D

Unique Earth Advantage Craftsman with mountain views. Open floor plan, hardwood, slate & tile floors. Spacious main level master suite, upstairs loft with vaulted ceilings. Beautifully landscaped corner lot. MLS#201009588

Contemporary home on a large corner lot. 2 master suites and a sauna. Enjoy the clubhouse, pool, trails, and tennis courts. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2196 sq. ft. MLS#201007810 Directions: Century Drive, left on Mammoth, left on Sunshine Way. 19670 Sunshine Way

Full on views of the lake at Painted Ridge. Ideal floor plan with great room and master suite on main level, upstairs loft area, 2 bedroom suites and office. Huge decks with privacy and views. MLS#2709663

Beautiful 3473 sq. ft. home with 5 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, bonus room & office. Living room with vaulted ceiling & kitchen with hardwood floor. Landscaped yard with water feature, patio & hot tub. MLS#201009573 1050 NW Stannium Rd.

Great location near market, shops and park in Northwest Crossing. Great room plan, large kitchen, 4 bedrooms with master on main. Quality finishes. Fenced back patio and extra parking area. MLS#201000475

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

LESTER FRIEDMAN, P.C., Broker 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

SE Bend | $625,000

NW Bend | $625,000

NW Bend | $709,000

Single level home on 4.71 acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2124 sq. ft. 5-stall barn, close to BLM land. Recently remodeled. MLS#201008335

Private 10.53 acre home site in The Highlands at Broken Top. Backs up to the Deschutes National Forest. Owner willing to carry. MLS#201009433

NW style home; timbers, stones, granite, grand gas fireplace, indoor & outdoor spas. 3490 sq. ft. with master on main. Flexible floor plan with 4 bedrooms & potential for 5. 3+ car garage/shop & Cascade views. MLS#2903564

Custom 3 bedroom + den/office, 4.5 bath. Golf course views. Gourmet kitchen, Wolf stove, Sub-Zero refrigerator & granite counters. Master on main with private Atrium & his/hers baths/closets. Seller offering lease/lease to purchase. MLS#201002777

Outstanding investment opportunity. 23 unit apartment building. Building includes 10 single room units, 8 double room units, & 5 three bedroom units. Professionally managed. Call for more info. MLS#201006403

Single level contemporary home overlooks the 3rd green at Broken Top. Canadian maple floors, all bedrooms are suites. Hot tub, water feature and 3 fireplaces. 4 bedrooms 3.75 baths, 3285 sq. ft. MLS#201003659

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

JUDY MEYERS, Broker, GRI 541-480-1922

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

Sunrise Village | $900,000 26 Acres/NW Bend | $950,000 A Piece of Heaven | $999,000 Cascade Views | $1,200,000 NW Bend | $1,200,000

Madras | $2,379,000

Beautiful remodeled home with Numerous upgrades have been completed incredible mountain views! New on this 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2034 sq. ft. windows and trim, siding, paint, flooring, furnished home that sleeps 15. Great lighting and baths have been updated. room floor plan with master bedroom on 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, plus huge bonus main level. Double attached garage. room. Horse ready too! MLS#201003074 MLS#201009496

MELANIE MAITRE, Broker 541-480-4186

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

RE PRI DU CE CE D

Broken Top | $739,000 Prineville Apartment Building | $800,000 Broken Top | $850,000

Contemporary home overlooking the Deschutes River, with cascade views. Light and bright, open floor plan with a separate guest suite. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2818 sq. ft. MLS#201009441

Big views, prime location, very private...1st time offering. Lupine Meadows Ranch, 20 acres Swalley Irrigation. 3440 sq. ft. home, deck facing mountains. 30’ x 60’ barn, 4 separate paddocks, 3 ponds. MLS#201005990

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

19+ acres, 14 irrigated, barn, shop, arena, corrals, pastures, ponds & a high quality home. Cascade views & direct access TO PUBLIC LAND. Also available on 1 tax lot for $749,900. Video at kellehers.com MLS#201007302

Exquisite Awbrey Butte home with Cascade Mountain Views from all living areas. African Ribbon Mahogany floors and cabinetry. 4823 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath on .58 of an acre. MLS#201002623

DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347 541-383-4349

23 +/- Private Easy Care Acres, custom built home with outstanding Cascade Views. NEW TERMS: Owner will finance second depending on terms and conditions. MLS#201006284

Incredible 234 acre scenic high production ranch with 214 acres of irrigation. 5500 sq. ft. beautiful custom home with dramatic entry, gourmet kitchen & separate apartment. Tour at www.darrinkelleher.com. MLS#201008613

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029


Bulletin Daily Paper 11/06/10