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Still steelhead season

How to beat

back pain

Anglers are continuing to have luck on the Lower Deschutes • SPORTS, D1

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Increasing cloud cover, mild High 73, Low 36 Page C6

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Dam bypass is working, but what’s next for fish?

Odd odor in southeast Bend likely to remain a mystery

IN JOHN DAY, NEW BIOMASS PLANT COULD SIT IDLE

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

This year, about 100,000 chinook, sockeye and steelhead swam into the large fish collection facility at Round Butte Dam on Lake Billy Chinook. Biologists sorted and measured the young fish, then trucked them around three dams and released them into the Lower Deschutes, where they’ll continue their migration down to the Columbia River and out to the Pacific Ocean. “We’re just elated with all these numbers,” said Don Ratliff, senior aquatic biologist with Portland General Electric, which co-owns the Pelton Round Butte complex with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. After more than a decade of planning, and a significant setback in 2009 when the $100 million-plus fish passage facility tower snapped during construction, those involved in the effort to bring back runs of salmon and steelhead to the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River basins said they are encouraged by the number of fish making their way to the facility. Now, however, biologists are debating what to do with the salmon and steelhead once they return to the Deschutes River. Some are worried the returning fish will bring new diseases with them that could harm existing fish populations in the upper stretches of the river. See Fish / A6

Reregulating dam Warm Springs Indian Reservation

l

Lake Simtustus

Cre

ek

Madras

Round Butte Dam

Underwater tower and fish collection station Metolius

26

Lake Billy Culver Chinook Deschutes River

97 To Redmond and Bend

Crooked River

Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

TOP NEWS FORECLOSURES: Legal battles loom over documentation, Page B1

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Timber manager Mike Billman gives a tour Wednesday of the biomass plant being built by the Malheur Lumber Co. in John Day. Company officials are afraid that new EPA standards might kill the market for the pellets and bricks the plant produces.

Environmental rules may doom $6M facility New EPA standards restrict boilers that use pellets, bricks the plant produces The Bulletin

26

w

By Erin Golden

By Ed Merriman

Pelton Dam Wi lo

Hazmat team called in from Salem unable to determine its source

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JOHN DAY — $6 million biomass processing plant built with the help of a $4.8 million federal stimulus grant may be put out of business before the switch is turned on due to a new environmental regulation. During a tour Wednesday of the biomass plant being built by Malheur Lumber Co. in John Day, company officials expressed concern that a new Environmental Protection Agency standard imposing dramatically stricter limits on emissions from solid-fuel boilers could kill the market for wood pellets and wood bricks produced by the plant. “I agree with the concept of trying to reduce air pollution, but virtually no commercial boiler currently oper-

A

ating in the country would meet the new EPA rule as currently written,” said John Shelk, managing director of Ochoco Lumber in Prineville, parent company of Malheur Lumber. “Here we are doing something that is very positive. We are taking wood biomass from forest health thinning projects and we’re using it to manufacture a renewable energy product that replaces fossil fuels, and the EPA rule could kill it before it gets off the ground,” Shelk said. As published in the Federal Register on June 4, the EPA’s new boiler emission standards appear to run counter to President Barack Obama’s stated goal to reduce dependence on fossil fuels, he said. The EPA rules are currently scheduled to take effect in January. See Biomass / A4

Wood pellets and bricks like these would be produced at the Malheur Lumber biomass plant in John Day.

“Here we are doing something that is very positive ... and the EPA rule could kill it before it gets off the ground.” — John Shelk, managing director of Ochoco Lumber, Malheur Lumber’s parent

“It has been an eye-opening experience to see not only what we throw away as a society, but how it can be used, with some imagination.” — UNC Charlotte student Kaitlyn Tokay, 20, on Dumpster diving

Finding dinner in the Dumpster By Mark Price

Kaitlyn Tokay, front, and her friends say Dumpster diving is catching on. Here, they explore a supermarket site in Charlotte, N.C.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Dumpster diving is far from a fad with UNC Charlotte students, but 20year-old Kaitlyn Tokay and her friends say it’s catching on. A self-described community activist, she began digging through grocery store trash bins in May and blogging on Facebook about the “perfectly good” food she found, cooked and ate. It was meant to be a monthlong experiment, to expose society’s continued wastefulness, even in a recession. But five months later, Tokay is still at it, only now she’s part of a team. And as for her blog, readership is at 1,600 and growing.

Gary O’Brien Charlotte Observer

“It has been an eye-opening experience to see not only what we throw away as a society, but how it can be used, with some imagination,” says Tokay, a junior majoring in communication studies.

“I decided to make it a lifestyle habit, and to perpetuate it. A lot of friends were amazingly grossed when I told them about it, but others say they admire it.” See Dumpster / A5

An unusual smell wafting through a southeast Bend neighborhood on Wednesday led police and fire officials to block off streets, ask residents to stay indoors and call for help from a Salem-based hazmat team. About 10:40 a.m., someone called from Southeast Fifth “When Street, near Southeast Wil- you’re not son Avenue able to and Southeast E d g e w a t e r identify Lane, to report the smoke in the source, area. Firefighters who came you to check it out suspect didn’t find any smoke, but they the worst. did notice an It didn’t unusual odor. With the help smell like of the Bend smoke Public Works D e p a r t me nt , or wood fire officials burning tested the air ... It was and pinpointed the smell unusual.” to a house on E d g e w a t e r — Bend Lane, which Deputy Fire was vacant at Marshal the time. Bend Larry Medina Deputy Fire Marshal Larry Medina said the tests didn’t turn up anything hazardous and there didn’t appear to be anything unusual around the home. But because it wasn’t clear what was causing the smell, firefighters stayed out of the house. Around noon, officials called in the regional hazardous materials response team. The team was unable to locate the source of the odor. Medina said in a statement released Wednesday night that the odor had dissipated and “no hazard exists at this time.” See Odor / A5

Safety concerns are having no impact on football helmets Gear remains untested against concussive forces By Alan Schwarz New York Times News Service

NORMAN, Okla. — Moments after her son finished practicing with his fifth-grade tackle football team, Beth Sparks examined his scuffed and battered helmet for what she admitted was the first time. She looked at the polycarbonate shell and felt the foam inside before noticing a small emblem on the back that read, “MEETS NOCSAE STANDARD.” “I would think that means it meets the national guidelines — you know, for head injuries,

concussions, that sort of thing,” she said. “That’s what it would mean to me.” That assumption, made by countless parents, coaches, administrators and even doctors involved with the 4.4 million children who play tackle football, is just one of many false beliefs in the largely unmonitored world of football helmets. Helmets both new and used are not — and have never been — formally tested against the forces believed to cause concussions. See Helmets / A4


A2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Virginia history book says thousands of blacks fought for the South

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

7 17 20 39 59 17 Power Play: 3. The estimated jackpot is $59 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

5 12 21 32 38 43 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $4.8 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Textbook criticized for claims about black soldiers in Civil War

A wind turbine turns behind a solar house built in 2005 for the Solar Decathlon competition on campus at Crowder College in Neosho, Mo. Tiny Crowder College has long been a leader, in the state and nation, in the push to educate students for a world that will demand expertise in green technologies, but jobs haven’t been keeping up with the supply of graduates.

Job market a red light on the road to a green degree By Tim Barker

Andrew Poor, from left, Ben Cade and Arthur Barker insert tubes into a tank while assembling a Sun Maxx Solar thermosyphon during a lab for a solar thermal systems class at Crowder College in Neosho, Mo., on Oct. 12.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NEOSHO, Mo. — With the nation investing billions of dollars in clean energy, it stands to reason that tiny Crowder College should be quite popular these days. After all, this is a place that’s been educating students about alternative energy for more than three decades. The school offers degree tracks in solar, wind and biofuels. It offers courses locally and through its online program. Yet fewer than 60 students are pursuing green degrees from the school. That’s not terribly surprising, considering that jobs in this sector have been slow to materialize. It’s a market, instructors say, that depends heavily on using government incentives to get companies to invest in green endeavors. And that’s just not happening right now. “Frankly, with these market conditions, it’s turned out to be very hard to make a living in this industry,” said Daniel Boyt, whose uncle founded Crowder’s alternative energy program in the 1970s. Boyt studied wind technology at Crowder and returned last year as a full-time instructor. It’s not that the government hasn’t tried, at least on the money side of the equation, with the Obama administration setting aside $25 billion in stimulus money for clean energy. So far, the investment hasn’t yielded the kinds of results the administration had hoped for.But it has spurred fresh interest from colleges and universities eager to get in on the green action. “It wasn’t too long ago that we couldn’t get anyone’s attention,” said Alan Marble, Crowder’s president. “Now everyone’s got the fever.”

School’s green heritage The community college near the Ozark Mountains with 5,200 students seems an unlikely place to serve as the state’s go-to school for all things green. Many schools around the state have their own green-flavored programs. But in 1992, Crowder was designated by the Legislature as the state’s renewable energy education center. Later this year, school leaders hope to break ground on a $7 million home for its Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology Center. The squat school — the tallest building is three stories — sits on a sprawling campus of nearly 600 acres, including land set aside for grazing livestock. Here and there are reminders of the school’s military heritage — in the 1940s,

it was a U.S. Army base, Camp Crowder. The National Guard still maintains a base adjacent to campus. But in the late 1970s, an instructor named Art Boyt started pushing the school toward its current position as a bastion of renewable energy education. In 1984, Crowder joined the ranks of schools battling for solar car supremacy — its first car is now at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. — in an annual cross-country race. In 2002 and 2005, Crowder took part in the Solar Decathlon, a contest of student-built solar-powered houses. In that first year, the school finished sixth, but also captured the people’s choice award — based on voting by the touring public — with 20 percent of the vote. “Second place got 4 percent. So it’s not like it was even close,” said Amy Rand, associate dean of program development and educational support. The school still races solar bikes, but has been sitting out the bigger competitions because of rising costs. Administrators say they’d rather focus on campus programs. Part of that focus, however, includes the realization that jobs still haven’t caught up with the supply of graduates. To counter that, Crowder employs a jobhedging system, in which each of the green degrees teaches something extra. A student who studies wind turbines, for example, also

learns about general industrial maintenance.

Where are the jobs? Among the students enrolled in Crowder’s alternative energy program is Edwin Moore, a freelance writer from nearby Anderson, Mo. Like many students in the program, Moore sees it both as an opportunity to learn something that could help his current job and something that could lead elsewhere. “As much as I enjoy my work, it would be nice to have a steady paycheck and health insurance,” said Moore, who’s studying biofuels with an eye toward working in a corn-based ethanol processing plant. It’s a similar story for Victorio Angulo, a chemical engineer based in Bentonville, Ark., who is considering a career shift. “I’d like to work more in that area,” Angulo said. “And one thing might lead to another.” But figuring out whether Angulo and Moore will get those green jobs is a bit of a guessing game. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics only recently started tracking the sector, figuring the nation had around 2.2 million green jobs. The bureau has not yet offered forecasts on expected growth from the sector. Economic experts, however, aren’t optimistic. The problem, some say, is that the U.S. lags in green industries compared to Europe and other

parts of the world. And it’s still cheaper to use traditional energy sources — though most expect that to change. “Over time, we know that energy prices have gone up and down. But they are more likely to go up,” said Jack Strauss, an economics professor at St. Louis University. “I would think the jobs are coming.”

Making it happen To some, it’s simply a matter of making it happen. Dan Eberle, the former director of Crowder’s alternative energy programs who’s building a similar program at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kan., sees parallels to the 1950s, when the country decided to build a network of roads across the nation. “When we wanted to build the interstate highway system, we incentivized it. We made it possible,” Eberle said. The $25 billion set aside by the Obama administration two years ago has, thus far, produced little in terms of job growth. “It’s happening. But it’s happening at a very slow and methodical pace,” said Rico Kolster, a Kansas City-based lawyer on Bryan Cave’s energy industry team. Kolster said efforts have been hampered by the higher costs of alternative energy. He said businesses also are leery of incentive dollars, which they fear will come with regulatory strings such as increased scrutiny and mandatory federal contracting guidelines. At the same time, smaller start-ups eager to grab the federal money often lack the resources and expertise needed to secure the funds. And it’s not even clear that new jobs will do anything more than put back to work those people who’ve been idled by the move away from coal-powered plants and other traditional power sources. Others, however, say the problem with creating green jobs is the same one experienced by virtually every other sector during these tough economic times. “It’s not good. But that’s because the overall job market is not good,” said Robert Pollin, economics professor at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a consultant to the U.S. Department of Energy. Pollin said getting the stimulus money out into the economy has been tough partly because of a reluctance on the part of businesses to invest matching dollars. “You will get a lot of jobs if you spend a lot of money,” he said. “But we haven’t spent the money.”

A textbook distributed to Virginia fourth-graders says that thousands of African-Americans fought for the South during the Civil War — a claim rejected by most historians but often made by groups seeking to play down slavery’s role as a cause of the conflict. The passage appears in “Our Virginia: Past and Present,” which was distributed in the state’s public elementary schools for the first time last month. The author, Joy Masoff, who is not a trained historian but who has written several books, said she found the information about black Confederate soldiers primarily through Internet research, which turned up work by members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Scholars are nearly unanimous in calling these accounts of black Confederate soldiers a misrepresentation of history. Virginia education officials, after being told by The Washington Post of the issues related to the textbook, said that the vetting of the book was flawed and that they will contact school districts across the state to caution them against teaching the passage. “Just because a book is approved doesn’t mean the Department of Education endorses every sentence,” said spokesman Charles Pyle. He also called the book’s assertion about black Confederate soldiers “outside mainstream Civil War scholarship.” Masoff defended her work. “As controversial as it is, I stand by what I write,” she said. “I am a fairly respected writer.” The issues first came to light after College of William & Mary historian Carol Sheriff opened her daughter’s copy of “Our Virginia” and saw the reference to black Confederate soldiers. “It’s disconcerting that the next generation is being taught history based on an unfounded claim instead of accepted scholarship,” Sheriff said. “It concerns me not just as a professional historian but as a parent.”

Trying to make peace with the past Virginia, which is preparing to mark the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War, has long struggled to appropriately commemorate its Confederate past. The debate was reinvigorated this spring, when Republican Gov. Robert McDonnell introduced “Confederate History Month” in Virginia without mentioning slavery’s role in the Civil War. He later apologized. The Sons of Confederate Veterans, a group of male descendants of Confederate soldiers based in Columbia, Tenn., has long maintained that substantial numbers of black soldiers fought for the South The group’s historian-in-chief, Charles Kelly Barrow, has written the book “Black Confederates.” The Sons of Confederate Veterans also disputes the widely accepted conclusion that the struggle over slavery was the main cause of the Civil War. Instead, the group says, the war was fought “to preserve their homes and livelihood,” according to John Sawyer, chief of staff of the Sons of Confederate Veterans’ Army of Northern Virginia. He said the group was pleased that a state textbook accepted some of its views. The state’s curriculum requires textbook publishers and educators to explore the role AfricanAmericans played in the Confederacy, including their work on plantations and on the sidelines of battle. Those standards have evolved in recent years to make lessons on the Civil War more inclusive in a state that is growing increasingly diverse.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 A3

T S Chicago man pleads not guilty in bomb plot

Government unveils radical spending cuts

By Andrew Grimm

By Sarah Lyall and Alan Cowell

Chicago Tribune

New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — A Chicago man has pleaded not guilty to federal charges in connection with planting what he believed was a bomb outside a bar near Wrigley Field. Sami Samir Hassoun entered a not guilty plea in front of U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan Cox on Wednesday to counts of attempting to detonate a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to use an explosive device. “My client is not a terrorist,” said Hassoun’s defense attorney, Myron Auerbach, after the hearing. “My client is a troubled young man. ... He’s a big talker; (it was) a lot of bluster.” Prosecutors allege that Hassoun plotted with a confidential FBI source to plant a backpack loaded with explosives outside the crowded nightlife district near Wrigley Field, and discussed with undercover agents other plans that included contaminating the city’s water supply or attacking police officers. Auerbach said Hassoun was provided a video camera, cash and, on the night of Sept. 18, a mocked-up explosive device by federal agents. “My client did not bring anything to the party,” Auerbach said. Hassoun was arrested after dropping the backpack loaded with a fake bomb into a trash can outside Sluggers, a tavern a few blocks south of the ballpark. Prosecutors say FBI agents and an informant had been in contact with the 22-year-old Lebanese immigrant for more than a year.

LONDON — The British government on Wednesday unveiled the country’s steepest public spending cuts in more than 60 years, reducing costs in government departments by an average of 19 percent, sharply curtailing welfare benefits, raising the retirement age to 66 by 2020 and eliminating hundreds of thousands of public sector jobs in an effort to bring down the bloated budget deficit. “Today is the day when Britain steps back from the brink,” a confident George Osborne, who as chancellor of the Exchequer is Britain’s top finance minister,

Palestinians appeal to international organizations for statehood By Ethan Bronner New York Times News Service

RAMALLAH, West Bank — The Palestinian leadership, near despair about attaining a negotiated agreement with Israel on a two-state solution, is increasingly focusing on how to get international bodies and courts to declare a Palestinian state in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem. The idea, being discussed in both formal and informal forums across the West Bank, is to appeal to the United Nations, the International Court of Justice and the signatories of the Geneva Conventions for opposition to Israeli settlements and occupation and ultimately a kind of global assertion of Palestinian statehood that will tie Israel’s hands. The approach has taken on more weight as the stall in U.S.-brokered peace talks lengthens over the issue of continued settlement building. “We cannot go on this way,” said Hanan Ashrawi, a former peace negotiator who is a part of the inner ruling circle of the Palestine Liberation Organization, which oversees the Palestinian Authority. “The two-state solution is disappearing. If we cannot stop the settlements through the peace process, we have to go to the Security Council, the Human Rights Council and every international legal body.” In an interview, she said that the PLO was holding high-level discussions on these options this week. Israeli officials reject the move as unacceptable and a violation of the 1993 Oslo accords that govern Israeli-Palestinian relations.

BRITAIN

told the House of Commons. Wednesday’s announcement of 83 billion pounds, about $130 billion, in cuts by 2015 represents a big political gamble for Britain’s fledgling Conservative-led coalition government. Britain’s public deficit is one of the highest among developed economies, running at 11.5 percent of total economic output, compared with 10.7 percent for the U.S. and 5.4 percent for Germany. Britain has been bracing for the cuts for months, after Osborne announced in June the details of the so-called spending review, but Wednesday was the first time the government had set out its plans, department by

department. Though the Conservatives have so far made a persuasive case for the deep cuts, outmaneuvering a weakened Labour opposition, the country has yet to feel anything like the pain that is to come as the retrenchment begins to take hold. Osborne said 490,000 publicsector jobs would be lost over the next four years, some to attrition. At the same time, payments to the long-term unemployed who fail to seek jobs will be cut, he said, saving $11 billion a year. Additionally, he said, a new 12month limit will be imposed on long-term jobless benefits, and measures will be taken to curb benefit fraud.

Andrew Testa / The New York Times

Demonstrators march to Downing Street during a protest against the government’s public spending cuts Wednesday in London.

Keynesians fall out of favor By Landon Thomas Jr. New York Times News Service

LONDON — British economist John Maynard Keynes may live on in popular legend for his global influence. But in much of Europe, and most acutely here in the land of his birth, his view that deficit spending by governments is crucial to avoiding a long recession has lately been willfully ignored. In Britain, George Osborne, chancellor of the Exchequer, delivered a speech Wednesday that would have made Keynes — who himself worked in the British Treasury — blanch. He argued forcefully that Britons, despite stumbling growth and negligible bank lending, must accept a rise in the retirement age to 66 from 65 and $130 billion in spending cuts because of what he insisted was the overwhelming need to reduce the country’s budget deficit. In Ireland, where the economy is suffering through its third consecutive year of economic slump, Keynes is doing no better. Devastated by a historic property crash and banking bust, the Irish government is preparing another round of spending cuts and tax increases. Indeed, across Europe, where

A N A LY S I S the threat of a double-dip recession remains palpable, governments from Germany to Greece are slashing public outlays. But the debate in Europe is more on how fast to cut government spending rather than whether such reductions are the right thing to do under the circumstances. “Everything Keynes established about the primacy of maintaining demand at a steady pace is gone,” Brad DeLong, a liberal economist and blogger at the University of California, Berkeley, said mournfully. “Europe obviously thinks it can focus on sound finances while the U.S. manages world demand,” he said in a telephone interview, “but unfortunately we are not doing that.” Joseph Stiglitz argued that the British government’s plan was “a gamble with almost no potential upside” and that it would lead to lower growth, lower demand, lower tax revenues, a deterioration of skills among the unemployed and an even higher national debt. “We cannot afford austerity,” he wrote in The Guardian. DeLong and others on the left

have long argued for more stimulus spending in the United States and abroad to lift growth, even if deficits rise temporarily as a consequence. While that notion may have its adherents in the White House and among many U.S. and European academics, in Europe there is hardly a policymaker to be found who is making the argument that governments need to spend more, not less. This is particularly true in Britain, where a combination of collapsing tax revenues and government spending to prop up banks and support the unemployed during the financial crisis has contributed to a budget deficit equal to 11 percent of gross domestic product, second-highest in Europe after Ireland. “Keynesians are regarded here as heterodox, not orthodox,” said Andrew Lilico, an economist at the London-based research institute Policy Exchange, which has close intellectual ties to the Conservative Party. “And it goes back to one thing: We have this internal fear of losing control of our deficits and having foreigners telling us what to do. There is also a sense that deficits of this scale are morally lax.”

Federal officials stymied in efforts to prosecute Blackwater contractors Legal hurdles mount in trials of guards accused of killing civilians in war zones By James Risen New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Nearly four years after the U.S. government began a string of investigations and criminal prosecutions against Blackwater Worldwide personnel accused of murder and other violent crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan, the cases are beginning to fall apart, burdened by a legal obstacle of the government’s own making. In the most recent and closely watched case, the Justice Department on Monday said it would not seek murder charges against Andrew J. Moonen, a Blackwater armorer accused of killing a guard assigned to the Iraqi vice president on Dec. 24, 2006. Justice officials said they were abandoning the case after an investigation that began in early 2007 and included trips to Baghdad by federal prosecutors and FBI agents to interview Iraqi witnesses. The government’s decision to drop the Moonen case follows a series of failures by prosecutors aimed at former personnel of Blackwater, which is now known as Xe Services. In September, a Virginia jury was unable to reach a verdict in the murder trial of two former Blackwater guards accused of killing two Afghan civilians. Late last year, charges were dismissed against five former Blackwater guards who had been indicted on manslaughter and related weapons charges in a September 2007 shooting incident in Nisour Square in Baghdad, in which 17 Iraqi civilians were killed.

Issues of jurisdiction, evidence, immunity Interviews with lawyers involved in the case, outside legal experts and a review of some records show that federal prosecutors have failed to overcome a series of legal hurdles, including the difficulties of obtaining evidence in war zones, of gaining proper jurisdiction for prosecutions in U.S. civilian courts and of

overcoming immunity deals given to defendants by U.S. officials on the scene. Justice Department officials declined to comment Wednesday about specific Blackwater cases. But they noted that the government has had a number of successful prosecutions against contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan, including several for sexual assaults and other violent crimes. More than 120 companies have been charged by the Justice Department for contract fraud and related crimes in Iraq, Afghanistan and Kuwait, officials said. Still, a Justice official who spoke on the condition of anonymity acknowledged that the government had faced tough obstacles. “There are substantial difficulties in prosecuting cases committed in war zones,” the official said. “There’s problems with the availability of witnesses, availability of evidence, and the quality of the evidence. You also have claims of self-defense, which are generally difficult, although not insurmountable.” One of the problems in the Moonen case was that while Moonen admitted in a statement to a U.S. Embassy official that he did shoot the Iraqi guard, he asserted that he had done so in selfdefense. The guards in the Virginia case also said that they shot in self-defense when they believed they were facing an attack from insurgents. In the Nisour Square case, the five Blackwater guards who were charged also claimed that they shot only after they believed they were under attack. Jurisdictional problems also plague the Blackwater cases. Since the Blackwater guards were working under a contract with the State Department, they did not fall under the laws that govern contractors working for the Defense Department overseas. Contractors for the Defense Department are subject to criminal prosecution under the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act, but it has never been clear whether the law can be applied to contractors for the State Department, like Blackwater. Those contractors generally have greater protections because of the possibility that they might be engaged in fighting.

Protesters block French airports By Greg Keller

Travelers make their way to Orly Airport, south of Paris, through cars in a traffic jam as airport workers block the access of the airport on Wednesday.

Associated Press Writer

PARIS — Workers opposed to a higher retirement age blocked roads to airports around France on Wednesday, leaving passengers in Paris dragging suitcases on foot along an emergency breakdown lane. Outside the capital, hooded youths smashed store windows amid clouds of tear gas. Riot police in black body armor forced striking workers away from blocked fuel depots in western France, restoring gasoline to areas where pumps were dry after weeks of protests over the government proposal raising the age from 60 to 62. Riot officers in the Paris sub-

Thibault Camus Associated Press

urb of Nanterre and the southeastern city of Lyon sprayed tear gas but appeared unable to stop the violence. Finance Minister Christine Lagarde said both the strikes and the violence were taking an

economic toll. “I’m calling on people to be responsible, in particular those who are having a roaring time blocking access and breaking things,” she said on TF1 television. “It’s serious for our country.”

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A4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Helmets Continued from A1 The industry, which receives no governmental or other independent oversight, requires helmets for players of all ages to withstand only the extremely high-level force that would otherwise fracture skulls. The standard has not changed meaningfully since it was written in 1973, despite rising concussion rates in youth football and the growing awareness of how the injury can cause significant shortand long-term problems with memory, depression and other cognitive functions, especially in children. Although some injuries are the unavoidable results of football physics, helmet standards have not kept up with modern football, industry insiders said. The one helmet standard was written by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment, or NOCSAE, a volunteer consortium that includes, and is largely financed by, the helmet makers themselves. NOCSAE accepts no role in ensuring that helmets, either new or old, meet even its limited requirement. One frustrated vice president of NOCSAE, Dr. Robert Cantu of the Boston University School of Medicine, said the organization has been “asleep at the switch” for five years. Cantu joined other prominent voices involved in youth sports concussions in calling for stronger standards.

One limited standard After more than 100 high school and college football players in the 1960s were killed by skull fractures and acute brain bleeding, NOCSAE was formed to protect players against the extreme forces that caused those injuries. The resulting standard, phased in by all levels of football through the 1970s, requires helmets to withstand a 60-inch free fall without allowing too much force to reach the skull. This standard has accomplished its intent: skull fractures in football have essentially disappeared, and the three or four football-related deaths each year among players under 18 are caused by hits after a concussion

Players on the Montclair Jr. Bulldogs pee-wee football team huddle together before a game with the Hillside Comets, in Hillside, N.J., on Oct. 17. Helmet safety standards have not changed meaningfully since 1973, when they were written, despite a growing awareness of the dangers of concussions. James Estrin New York Times News Service

that has not healed rather than by a single fatal blow. As the size and speed of players have increased since the full adoption of the NOCSAE standard in 1980, concussion rates have as well. An estimated 100,000 concussions are reported each season among high school players alone, according to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, but many times that figure are believed to go unreported or unrecognized. Preventing concussions is trickier than preventing skull fractures. Scientists have yet to isolate where thresholds are in different players at different positions and at different ages. “When you have something that has worked well for a lot of years, you have to be pretty cautious,” said Mike Oliver, NOCSAE’s executive director and general counsel since 1995. “If we save 15,000 concussions with a new standard but allow one skull fracture, if we save 5,000 concussions and allow one subdural hematoma, is it worth it? I can’t tell you that would be the trade-off, but you’ve got to ba-

sically be really sure that change wouldn’t adversely affect something else.”

Dangerous misconceptions That helmets are held to no standard regarding concussions surprised almost every one of dozens of people interviewed for this article, from coaches and parents to doctors and league officials. Even one member of the NOCSAE board, Grant Teaff — who represents the American Football Coaches Association — said he was unaware of it. NOCSAE receives no oversight from any independent agency, such as the Consumer Product Safety Commission or the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Its 16-member board features five representatives of the helmet industry, six volunteer doctors, two athletic trainers, two equipment managers and one coach. NOCSAE’s annual budget of about $1.7 million is funded mostly by sporting-goods manufacturers whose products bear

Biomass Continued from A1 Under the Clean Air Act, the EPA is charged with setting emission standards for hazardous pollutants based on the best performing, lowest-emitting technology available and in use. But Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., has submitted three letters to the EPA over the past six months, urging the agency to use its flexibly to adopt different standards for different types of boilers, rather than using a one-size fits all approach. “If the EPA does not utilize its flexibility in this area, I am concerned about the potential impact such regulations could have on boilers utilized by thousands of small and mid-size businesses already hit hard by the recession,” Wyden wrote. “I am especially concerned with the impact on the wood products industry, which has been dramatically affected by the downturn in the housing and construction markets.” Mike Billman, timber manager at Malheur Lumber, told media and others invited to tour the plant Wednesday that its construction has kept 15 to 30 workers employed since last spring. The construction jobs pay prevailing union scale wages, which range from around $22 per hour to nearly $30 per hour, under the Davis Bacon Act, said Rick Minster, business development officer with the Oregon Business Development Department, which submitted the grant request for funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Helping forests, heating buildings Doug Gochnour, supervisor of the Malheur National Forest, said there’s such a backlog of thinning needed to reduce fuel loading and thin overstocked forests at high risk of massive fires that he originally supported two stimulus grant applications, but there wasn’t enough stimulus funds awarded to fund the second plant planned for Burns in Harney County. “We have a 10-year strategy for thinning projects to improve forest health and reduce fuel loading,” Gochnour said. “We are currently planning several projects ranging from 15,000 acres to 40,000 acres each where some pretty large-scale thinning and prescribed burning is needed.”

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

John Shelk, managing director of Ochoco Lumber, left, gives Royce Dotson a tour of the interior of the biomass plant under construction at Malheur Lumber. He said much of the 1.7-million acre Malheur National Forest are so overstocked that the trees can’t get enough nourishment to grow health and strong enough to resist disease. “Our forests are too overcrowded to do prescribed burning. We need to thin them first before we can reintroduce fire to play its proper role,” Gochnour said. “If we tried to introduce prescribed burning with the current level of fuel loading, instead of creeping along the ground like in a natural healthy stand, we’d have massive spreading through the canopy and burning out of control.” He said the type of forest health thinning projects that remove smaller trees ideal for supplying biomass is similar to the thinning that originally created most of the giant old growth forests prior to European settlement, when nomadic aboriginal tribes cut and utilized the smaller trees for firewood, building huts and teepees and other uses. Under terms of the federal grant received for the John Day biomass plant, Billman said the plant is expected to create 10 to 12 long-term jobs, but that won’t be possible if the EPA rules kill the market for wood pellets and wood bricks. Billman told tourgoers the plant is designed to grind up small logs from forest health and fire mitigation thinning projects and turn the sawdust into wood pellets and wood bricks for burning in wood stoves, pellet stoves and solid-fuel boilers used to heat schools, hospitals, airport terminals, prisons and government buildings. He said the John Day airport has already installed one of the

most efficient and cleanest boilers fired with wood pellets to support the biomass plant being built by Malheur Lumber, and the hospital in John Day is converting to a wood-pellet boiler as well. “The boiler at the Burns hospital has already been converted to a pellet boiler, and we are working with the Prairie City School District to get pellet boilers in the schools,” Billman said.

the NOCSAE seal of approval. The largest share of that comes from football helmet makers and reconditioners. Oliver, NOCSAE’s longtime president, said helmet companies do not unduly influence the organization’s policies. Cantu agreed, but said the board has become as concerned about legal liability as about child safety. If NOCSAE were to supplement its helmet standard in an attempt to address concussions, it could open itself to lawsuits brought by players saying that their helmet did not prevent the injury. NOCSAE officials insisted that the organization does not mandate adherence to its standard; it is merely used, voluntarily, by every level of football from Pop Warner to the NFL. NOCSAE goes so far as to state in its testing instructions that its standard “does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use.”

Borrower beware Everyone with experience in youth football has his favorite

airport and Burns hospital are the cleanest, most efficient boilers in the world. “These boilers are 23 times cleaner than an EPA-certified wood stove,” Haden said. “These are very, very clean boilers, but the EPA standards they are proposing would mandate 50 times cleaner emissions than wood stoves.” “These boilers burn so clean you can’t seen anything coming out of the smokestack. Compare that to the clouds of smoke that fill the sky when they burn slash piles, which is the alternative,” he added. He said the problem with the EPA rules is that the agency has put small boilers that heat buildings like schools and hospitals under the same regulations targeting massive coal-fired power plants like the one in Boardman. Haden said woody biomass industries are booming in other

horror story. The helmet with socks inserted where the padding should have been. The helmet with a nail holding parts together. Hundreds of cracked helmets with detached foam that had no business being worn at all. At Stadium System, a family-operated business in northern Connecticut that for decades has been the primary helmet reconditioner for New England schools and youth leagues, owners Mike and Ken Schopp shook their heads in August at one typical rack of helmets awaiting work. One youth helmet had torn ear padding that compromised safety for who knew how many games or seasons. Another high school helmet, covered with skull-andcrossbones stickers, had padding that was switched from front to back and placed upside down, probably because it was itching the player’s neck. “That’s a fairly common thing for kids to do — and the kid’s wondering why he has a bloody forehead,” Mike Schopp said. Ken, his brother, added, “And it would probably pass the NOCSAE test, no problem.”

countries like Germany, Sweden, Australia and Finland because the governments are working with industry. “(Governments) help them achieve the target together. It is not an adversarial situation like you have here, with the regulations going into effect in six months,” Haden said.

Appealing to the EPA Earlier this month, Wyden and a number of other senators and representatives signed a letter urging the EPA to apply different standards to the smaller woodfired boilers. “We have heard positive signals that the EPA has gotten the message from all the senators who have spoken out on this,” Haden said. Shelk said if the EPA rules are implemented as written, they would shut down most remain-

Only about 10 percent to 20 percent of football players of high school age or younger wear a new helmet, which can cost from $150 to $300. The vast majority of headgear is handed down for years and at various points undergoes a reconditioning process that costs about $25 to $45. Most get reconditioned every one or two seasons, which most experts recommend. But data closely held by the National Athletic Equipment Reconditioners Association, NAERA, indicated that about 500,000 young players this fall were wearing helmets that had not undergone this basic safety check.

The future After four years of national debate over sport-related concussions as a public-health concern, and after several officials were interviewed for this article, NOCSAE decided earlier this month to consider moving on the matter of a concussion-related helmet standard. Strongly pressured by Cantu, Oliver scheduled a meeting for Saturday to have experts in the field discuss the matter. Even if adjustments begin that day, the process will take at least three or four years. Meanwhile, young football players will continue to wear helmets whose limitations are obscured by their communities’ love for football. Nowhere was this more clear than here in Norman in August, when fifth-graders lined up to receive their headgear for the season. One of the players, Joseph Kirk, stood at attention as his team, the Punishers, received its primary brain protection for the season. A league volunteer reached into a rack of helmets and chose No. 5045 — a worn white Riddell Little Pro with no known age, no known history and one NOCSAE sticker. “That good, big man?” the volunteer asked as Joseph peered unblinkingly from behind the face mask. The man fiddled with the fit, handed Joseph a leather chin strap and said, “Put this on when you get home.” The entire process took nine seconds. Joseph shuffled to the next station to get his shoulder pads as the volunteer beckoned, “Next!”

ing lumber mills and disrupt the supply of kiln-dried lumber that is produced with steam heat from wood-fired boilers. “You’d see a devastating ripple effect throughout the economy,” Shelk said. “The effect would be disproportionate in rural areas where most of the lumber mills and secondary wood products companies are that manufacture wood window frames, doors, paneling, wood cabinets, furniture and other products made with kiln-dried lumber,” Shelk said. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

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About the boilers Boyd Britton, a member of the Malheur County Board of Commissioners, said biomass projects like the plant under construction in John Day can bring back at least some of the thousands of timber sector jobs lost over the past 20 years in rural counties across the state. “If we don’t do more things like this, we are never going to rebuild the rural economies,” Britton said. Unfortunately, he said the EPA’s new boiler emission standards are dampening those hopes. “We are familiar with the new EPA rule. I am just hoping it gets derailed, and most of the folks I know are hoping it gets derailed,” Britton said. He said the government ought to support more innovative ideas like biomass plants that can help rebuild rural economies and help break the nation’s dependence on foreign oil. Andrew Haden, vice president of A3 Energy Partners of Portland, who is a boiler expert and consultant on the Malheur Lumber biomass plant, said the German-made wood pellet-burning boilers installed at the Malheur

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 A5

Dumpster

W   B

Continued from A1 Tokay and many other Dumpster divers consider themselves “freegans,” practicing a form of environmentalism based on minimal use of resources. Rescued food, hand-me-down clothes and found furniture are all part of the lifestyle. Volunteerism is big, too, and Tokay does that by sharing her found food with the homeless, sometimes working with a program that serves meals on the streets of Charlotte. Freegan or not, grocery stores maintain that Dumpster diving is a form of trespassing. Food Lion, for example, not only “strongly discourages” digging in Dumpsters, but says it will “take appropriate action as necessary to prevent this activity.”

Members of a hazardous materials response team from Salem, top center, search a mailbox in front of a home on Southeast Edgewater Lane in Bend on Wednesday afternoon. The team was called to investigate a strange smell coming from the home.

‘A scavenger hunt’

Odor

Grocery stores note that there are compelling reasons food is deemed unfit, including damage, exposure and being past its “sell by” date. Some store chains solve this dilemma by donating whatever they can save. Last year, Harris Teeter gave 539,000 pounds of food to Second Harvest Food Bank, rather than see it go to waste, store officials said. Tokay and her peers realize they’re considered a nuisance, which is why they only come out at night, between midnight and 4 a.m. Most work in teams, with one in the trash bin, handing out the loot to someone waiting on the outside. Tokay typically works with several people, including Stephanie Braun, 23, a social work major who is also president of the UNCC Earth Club. Braun considers Dumpster diving a form of recycling, and has been on outings with as many as four people. “We’re college students, so we’re already up at midnight, at coffee shops or doing our homework,” says Braun. “It’s really like going on a scavenger hunt, and it’s exciting, because you never know what you’ll find.” Or whom you’ll meet. Tokay once had the wits scared out of her when she stumbled onto a homeless man who was already in a Dumpster, looking for a meal. And another time, she and Braun were diving and heard that dreaded “beep, beep, beep” sound that garbage trucks make when they’re backing up to something. “I was terrified that I was about to be dumped into a garbage truck,” Tokay says. “Then, we realized that it was someone who was going to dump trash into the Dumpster.” Awkward, indeed. “I didn’t know what to do, so I got out of the Dumpster holding a bunch of bananas and offered the driver one. They didn’t know what to think.”

2 Americans among 24 new cardinals

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Continued from A1 “When you’re not able to identify the source, you suspect the worst,” he said earlier in the day. “It didn’t smell like smoke or wood burning. ... It was unusual.” Medina said it was hard to describe the smell, but compared it to the odor left by fireworks that have recently been set off, with a bit of a sulfur scent. Police and a few curious onlookers were on the scene through the afternoon, waiting for the arrival of the team from

Salem. Devyn Kilby, 19, who was watching with her mother, Barbara, said the house officials were investigating belongs to her grandparents, who were not at home on Wednesday morning. Both women said they weren’t sure what could be causing the strange smell. As the hazmat team held a safety briefing and pulled on heavy-duty protective clothing, complete with two jumpsuits, gas masks, oxygen tanks and helmets, neighbor Joanna Jones, 16, snapped photos of the scene on her cell phone. Her mother, Stephanie Jones,

42, said she wasn’t overly concerned about the situation because she was familiar with the residents of the house that seemed to be the source of the smell. “They’re very nice, very safe people,” she said. Medina said incidents that require the help of the specialized team are rare, adding that Wednesday’s call was the first in more than a year. “It’s one of those low-frequency, high-hazard events,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Court reinstates military’s policy on gays The Washington Post WASHINGTON — The Obama administration won a temporary stay against the moratorium on “don’t ask, don’t tell” Wednesday, granting the Pentagon the right to once again enforce the 17-year ban on gays in the military. A three-judge panel on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals

issued the decision, giving itself more time to consider the Justice Department’s appeal of an injunction issued last week by U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips. Wednesday’s stay was the latest volley in an issue ping-ponging its way through the courts. The Log Cabin Republicans, a gay-rights group that brought

the suit challenging the constitutionality of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” have until Monday to appeal the court’s decision. “While we are disappointed with the court’s ruling granting a temporary administrative stay, we view the decision as nothing more than a minor setback,” said Dan Woods, the attorney representing the LCR.

Is it good for you? Jacob Hanks, 22, is a recent UNCC grad who is among Tokay’s partners. He’s been at it longer, though, having started last year after hearing about it from a friend who had been Dumpster diving in Portland, Ore. There have been occasions when he’s gone with as many as seven people, creating a kind of party atmosphere. And at least once, he ran into another team of students who were complete strangers. “They came up after we were already there and joined in. We split everything,” says Hanks. He says he gets most of his meals these days from trash bins. “There is an abundance of stuff. We’ve had times where we found enough food to fill up the entire kitchen floor, including pastries, packaged cakes, shrink-wrapped barbecue ribs and a lot of bread.” Among Hanks’ observations is that Dumpster divers tend to be more active in the fall and winter, because the colder weather is “natural refrigeration.” He says they also tend to eat better, because they find fruits, vegetables and meats that struggling college students can seldom afford. He and other Dumpster divers contend that much of this food was tossed out unnecessarily due to health regulations. The USDA concurs, noting the country has no universally accepted system for food dating. In fact, it says on its website that many products should still be safe after the sell-by date, if handled properly and kept at the recommended storage temperature of 40 degrees or below. Tokay says she’s living proof, having never gotten sick from eating items found in the trash. “Just because a product says it’s out of date on June 2, or whatever, doesn’t mean it’s gone bad exactly on June 2. A lot of times, they’re still good.”

B E N D R I V E R P R O M E N A D E , B E N D • 5 4 1 . 3 17. 6 0 0 0

VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict XVI named 24 new cardinals on Wednesday, adding fresh blood to the institution that will one day elect his successor and raising the chances that more electors of the next pope will be Italian. The group of cardinals, which is to be installed next month, includes two Americans: Archbishop Donald Wuerl of Washington, an expert in doctrine who delivered a prayer at President Barack Obama’s inauguration; and Archbishop Raymond Burke, the prefect of the Vatican’s supreme court. The new group, which Benedict said he would formally install in a ceremony at the Vatican on Nov. 20, also includes prelates from Latin America, Africa and Europe, including 10 Italians, raising their numbers among voting members. This is the third time Benedict has appointed cardinals since becoming pope, and he has now named more than half of the members of the body that will one day elect his replacement.

Afghanistan annuls 1.3 million ballots KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan has thrown out nearly a quarter of ballots cast in last month’s parliamentary elections because of fraud, according to full preliminary results released Wednesday. The findings, which confirmed earlier reports, indicated that cheating was pervasive in the Sept. 18 vote. But observers also praised the voided ballots as an achievement because it meant that the election officials had kept fraudulent ballots out of the totals. Election commission chairman Fazel Ahmad Manawi said about 1.3 million votes were disqualified out of 5.6 million — meaning about 23 percent of

Pier Paolo Cito / The Associated Press

Pope Benedict XVI named 24 new cardinals on Wednesday. ballots — because of ballot-box stuffing or manipulated totals.

S. Korea arrests suspected assassin SEOUL, South Korea — The South Korean authorities said Wednesday that they had arrested a North Korean spy who had been on a mission to assassinate the highest-ranking North Korean official ever to defect. The official, Hwang Jangyop, 87, was found dead in his bathtub here 10 days ago. News reports said that the authorities had concluded that he had died a day earlier after suffering heart failure while bathing, and then inhaling water. The authorities have maintained that Hwang died of natural causes, and said there was no connection between the death and the arrest. The North has long been suspected of sending determined assassins after defectors. The man accused of seeking to assassinate Hwang, Ri Dong-sam, 46, was described as an agent with North Korea’s premier intelligence organization, the Reconnaissance General Bureau, who had begun five years of espionage training in 1998. — From wire reports


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fish

This is the old intake tower, installed when the dam was built, between 1961 and 1965.

The slope of Round Butte Dam

Continued from A1 And after anglers grew concerned over warm water and fewer steelhead on the Lower Deschutes this summer, officials with the Pelton project began refining the mix of warm and cold water released from the dam, to bring the river temperatures closer to their natural range.

— Don Ratliff, senior aquatic biologist with Portland General Electric

Water and fish intake Water-only intake

270-foot tower

Early results are encouraging This year, the fish passage facility collected about 42,000 spring chinook salmon, about 7,800 steelhead and about 50,000 kokanee, Ratliff said. Kokanee are the same species as sockeye salmon, except that kokanee stick to freshwater while sockeye migrate to the ocean. Biologists hope that by moving kokanee past the dam, their ocean-going instincts will kick in, and they will become sockeye — a theory they’re testing now. While the numbers of chinook and sockeye caught were promising, Ratliff said that he was a little disappointed with the number of steelhead collected at the dam. However, those figures could pick up next year as the layers of warm and cold water in the reservoir settle into a natural pattern, he said, and it gets easier for the fish to find their way to the passage facility. “We expect to have significantly better reservoir conditions next year than we did this year,” he said. “It will be easier next year than it was this year.” Biologists’ goal is to see half of all the fish entering the reservoir make it to the facility at Round Butte Dam. “I was very encouraged by the results they’ve had the first year,” said Mike Gauvin, Pelton mitigation coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Plus, the fish that did reach the collection facility were generally healthy, he said, with few injuries or fatalities as fish went through the facility. PGE and the Warm Springs Tribes are required to do the fish reintroduction project as a part of their federal relicensing agreement for the Round Butte

“We’ve been working at this for a long time, and if we get many (fish) back, we sure want to put them up above (the dam).”

9

How fish get past Round Butte Dam Water and fish mix and move through the system 1 2 3

4

5

6 7 8 9

6

To tank truck

8

7 5 1 2

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Water movement To turbines Fish movement

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Surface water from Lake Billy Chinook is sucked into these two openings. Water sucked in from the surface travels down this tower and joins the water that is sucked from the reservoir floor. The bottom component of the tower can also take in water. Managers can adjust how much water comes from the top of the tower and how much from the bottom. The water travels through an underground tunnel to the turbines, which generate electricity. Once it has passed through the turbines, the water spills into another reservoir — Lake Simtustus — before flowing through  the second hydroelectric dam.  Water is sucked through the screens that line the side walls of these V-shaped openings. Fish bounce off the screens and travel straight into the point of each “V.” The current builds until it is too fast for fish to escape. Here, big fish are separated from little fish so the little fish don’t get eaten. Once they’ve been sorted, the fish are pumped through a pipe. The fish are then deposited into these holding ponds. At this transfer facility, fish are marked and loaded onto a truck that drives them around the series of dams and releases them.

Source: Portland General Electric Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Dam. The Round Butte, Pelton and Reregulating dams blocked the path of migrating fish on the Deschutes River about 50 years ago, and early efforts at fish passage were unsuccessful. But the long-term goals of the current project are to have 1,000 steelhead, 1,000 chinook and 1,000 sockeye return each year.

Hatching a plan for returning fish The fish biologists involved in the project are now starting to talk about what to do when the first batches of fish return, Gauvin said.

A handful of fish might return next fall, but for the most part the ones that left for the ocean this year are expected back in 2012. And even then, it would be considered a good year if 1 percent survive the trip to the ocean and back, Gauvin said. “Nobody knows until it actually happens how many of the adults are going to come back,” he said. The fish that do make it back, however, are very valuable, he said — they’re the strong ones that can evade predators, find food and survive trips around the dams. So if only a few fish come

back, it might be best to keep those fish in a hatchery to breed and pass those good genes down to the next generation, which biologists could then release upstream, he said. If only 20 or 30 fish are swimming around the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River waterways, it could be hard for them to find each other to spawn. Also, he said, there’s a risk that if the returning adult fish are released upstream, they could bring diseases with them that they picked up in the Columbia River or the ocean, including whirling disease. One disease, caused by a parasite that attacks the head and spine cartilage of trout and salmon, can be fatal and can cause fish to whirl around, making them vulnerable to predators. “One of the big things we’re concerned about, by introducing diseases above the project that aren’t currently there, that could have a drastic impact on native fish,” Gauvin said. But Ratliff said that biologists already have been studying the diseases for years, and that it would be disappointing to not move fish upstream if enough return. “We’ve been working at this for a long time, and if we get many back, we sure want to put them up above (the dam),” he said. Biologists will continue to talk about the issue, he said, and probably come up with an answer next year.

Mixing cold and warm water Project officials are also addressing the mix of warm and cold water that will be released from the dam over the course of a year. The new facility at Round Butte Dam can take up cold water from the bottom of the reservoir, warmer water from the top of the reservoir, or a mix of the two and send it downstream, affecting the Lower Deschutes

flows. Previously, the dam only took water from close to the bottom of the reservoir, disturbing the natural cycle of water temperatures, Ratliff said — now, the goal is to have the water temperatures go back to what they would be if the dams and reservoir weren’t there. This summer, the water released was warmer than it should be early in the summer, upsetting some anglers downstream. But Ratliff said the correct mix of temperatures should be in place for next year. “By July of 2011, then the reservoir should be set up the way it will be from now on at that point in the year,” he said, “and we’ll have more cold water.” Making the whole system work will take some refinement, said Jim Manion, manager of Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises. “But for the first year, all in all we’re very pleased with how it’s operating,” he said. The change in temperatures did cause a bit of an uproar in the steelheading community this summer, said Matt Shinderman, a fishing guide and natural resources instructor at Central Oregon Community College. But overall, it was an average year for steelhead on the Lower Deschutes. “Steelheading, particulary from a guiding perspective, it’s always a variable thing,” he said. “Some years are going to be better than others.” By nature, anglers are optimistic, said Dave Merrick, manager of Fly and Field Outfitters in Bend. He thinks the ability to control the temperature, and help cool down the lower reaches of the river at certain times, will be a good thing in the years to come. “That should be an advantage to us — and the fish, most importantly,” Merrick said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Pentagon plans to sell $60B worth of arms to Saudi Arabia B y Tony Capaccio and Viola Gienger Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — The Defense Department notified Congress on Wednesday that it plans to sell Saudi Arabia as much as $60 billion worth of weapons to help confront threats from Iran and violent regional extremists. The proposed weapons sale, which may be the largest to another country in U.S. history if all purchases are made, includes Boeing F-15 fighter jets, attack helicopters and satelliteguided bombs, according to notices sent to Congress. It also contains helicopters made by United Technologies and advanced radar from Raytheon. Congress has 30 days, or until Nov. 20, to stop the sale before the Defense Department and companies proceed into more detailed talks with Saudi Arabia on contracts that, if executed, could extend a decade. Congress will review the proposed sale during its scheduled Nov. 15-19 post-election session. The proposed sale “represents a powerful symbol of the robust strategic relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia,” said Colin Kahl, deputy assistant secretary of defense for the Middle East. The Saudis instead could have bought equipment from Britain, France, Russia or China, he said. The sale reflects a common view of threats facing Saudi Arabia and the U.S. that undermine stability in the Middle East, the world’s biggest oilproducing region. The Obama administration has failed to persuade Iran to curb its missile and nuclear programs, and militant groups, including those linked to al-Qaida, continue to operate in the region.


B

Few recall the tax cut that came with the $787 billion stimulus package in ’09, see Page B3. www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,457.39 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +20.44 +.84%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

s

11,107.97 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +129.35 +1.18%

s

1,178.17 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +12.27 +1.05%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.46 treasury CHANGE -.40%

The Bulletin

The game of golf generated $1.2 billion in direct economic activity for the state in 2008, according to a study released Tuesday night. It also accounted for 27,200 jobs with $703.6 million in wages, according to the study conducted for the Golf Alliance of Oregon. For comparison, paper manufacturing contributed $3.7 billion directly to Oregon’s economy and software publishing $1.4 billion, Peter Ryan, who led the study for SRI International, in Menlo Park, Calif., said in a news release. Golf also helped raise $28.5 million for charitable organizations in the state in 2008, according to the study, which was conducted to quantify golf’s impact, Barb Trammell, CEO of the Oregon Golf Association, said in the news release.

State: Workers’ comp 11th-lowest in U.S. Oregon’s workers’ compensation rates are the 11th-lowest in the nation, according to a study released Wednesday by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. Oregon’s index rate, $1.69, was 17 percent below the 2010 median of $2.04. Rates are expected to drop an additional 1.8 percent in 2011, the fifth straight year they will lower. The rate was 13th-lowest in 2008. In 1986, Oregon had the sixth-highest rate in the nation. Since then, the Department of Consumer and Business Services has ranked Oregon’s workers’ compensation rate in comparison to the 49 other states and Washington, D.C. The department said the rate is a factor in creating a favorable business climate.

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$1343.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$8.20

Short move could mean big gains for the Visit Bend Welcome Center By Tim Doran

Study puts Oregon’s golf impact at $1.2B

The Visit Bend Welcome Center might be moving only about one block, but the new downtown location could mean a world of difference for tourists. Bend tourism officials want to move the center to the storefront at the corner of Northwest Lava Road and Northwest Oregon Avenue in Putnam Pointe, Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend, told the agency’s board Tuesday. Located three blocks from the Hawthorne Avenue exit off the Bend Parkway, Putnam Pointe would be easier to reach than the center’s current location on Harriman Street. “It runs directly into the front door,” he said, referring to the

Courtesy Visit Bend

Visit Bend, the city’s tourism-promotion agency, is negotiating to move its welcome center into Putnam Pointe, seen in this conceptual design. route off the parkway. The Putnam Pointe location also would provide more nearby parking for visitors, a number of whom are traveling in

recreation vehicles. The building is next to the city’s parking garage. A lease agreement has not been reached, La Placa said,

and significant issues remain. But “if all goes according to plan, we’ll be entering a new lease in the next 14 days,” he said Wednesday. The Welcome Center is located at 917 N.W. Harriman St., just south of The Blacksmith Restaurant. Along with providing information to visitors, it serves as offices for Visit Bend, the city’s tourism-promotion agency, and a retail outlet for Bend-related items. The Bend Convention and Visitors Bureau — Visit Bend’s former name — moved into the Harriman Street location in November 2004, according to The Bulletin’s archives, about the time downtown commercial rents began to climb. See Bend / B2

THE FORECLOSURE FIASCO

Legal battles loom over documentation

U.S. weekly average retail price Since last week for one Up gallon of 1¢ regular unleaded gasoline: Week ending Oct. 18, 2010

$2.83

Two-year trend $4 $3 $2 $1 2008

2009

2010

© 2010 MCT Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration MCT

$23.848 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.084

Bend an exception to state property tax trend Many Oregonians likely to see increases By James Mayer The Oregonian

PORTLAND — For the second consecutive year, home values fell across Oregon in 2009. So the silver lining for homeowners should be a break on property taxes, right? Well, probably not. At least for most Portland-area homeowners, tax bills that began hitting the mail last Friday will show tax increases. The big exception is in the Bend area — one of the state’s hardesthit real estate scenes after years of explosive growth — where market values have fallen far enough to reduce taxes for a significant number of property owners. The reasons can be found in the mysteries of Measure 50, passed by voters in 1997. It reduced assessed values to 1995 levels, less 10 percent, and limited assessment growth to 3 percent a year, with exceptions for remodeling. That limited tax increases to 3 percent, plus approved levies and bonds. The measure, a response to rapidly rising taxes pegged to climbing values, forever divorced property taxes from market value. See Property / B2

By Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

Kelly Jordan / New York Times News Service

Cynthia Veintemillas, right, an attorney with the Apple Law Firm, meets with her client, Patrick Jeffs, about his home foreclosure case at the firm’s law offices in Jacksonville, Fla. She said the paperwork was riddled with problems.

Moratorium As big lenders try to put issue behind them, may present federal officials say review is far from over ‘moral hazard’ By Brady Dennis By Gretchen Morgenson and Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

Pump prices

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Strangulation fears prompt largest-ever stroller recall

Study warns of municipal bond risks The municipal bonds that help finance a major portion of the nation’s water supply may be riskier than investors realize because their credit ratings do not adequately reflect the growing risks of water shortages and legal battles over water supplies, according to a new study. As a result, investors may see their bonds drop in value when these risks become apparent, and water and electric utilities may find it more expensive to raise money to cope with supply problems, the study warned. Looking at significant water bond issuers across the southern part of the country, the report concluded that Wall Street’s rating agencies had given similar ratings to utilities with secure sources of water and to those whose water sources were threatened. — From staff and wire reports

B

Personal Finance

About a month after Washington Mutual Bank made a multimillion-dollar mortgage on a mountain home near Santa Barbara, Calif., a crucial piece of paperwork disappeared. But bank officials were unperturbed. After conducting a “due and diligent search,” an assistant vice president simply drew up an affidavit stating that the paperwork — a promissory note memorializing the borrower’s commitment to repay the mortgage — could not be found, according to court documents. The handling of that lost note in 2006 was hardly unusual. Mortgage documents of all sorts were treated with an almost lackadaisical recklessness during the mortgage lending spree from 2005 through 2007, according to court documents, analysts and interviews. Now those missing documents and possibly fraudulent documents are at the center of a potentially seismic legal clash that pits big lenders against homeowners and their advocates concerned that the lenders’ rush to foreclose flouts pri-

vate property rights. That clash — expected to be played out in courtrooms across the country and scrutinized by law enforcement officials investigating possible wrongdoing by big lenders — leaped to the forefront of the mortgage crisis this week as big lenders began lifting their freezes on foreclosures and insisted the worst was behind them. Federal officials meeting in Washington on Wednesday indicated that a government review of the problems would not be complete until the end of the year. In short, the legal disagreement amounts to whether banks can rely on flawed documentation to repossess homes. While even critics of the big lenders acknowledge that the vast majority of foreclosures involve homeowners who have not paid their mortgages, they argue that the borrowers are entitled to due legal process. Banks “have essentially sidestepped 400 years of property law in the United States,” said Rebel Cole, a professor of finance and real estate at DePaul University. See Foreclosure / B5

The Washington Post

FORT MYERS, Fla. — In his spacious cookie-cutter townhouse on a tidy street near downtown Fort Myers, Joshua Bartlett has waited nearly three years for the knock on the door that never came. He hasn’t made a mortgage payment since late 2007 and doesn’t plan on starting now. He could benefit from the recent halt on foreclosures announced by major lenders, amid concerns that flawed paperwork has been used to seize homes across the country, because it means he’ll likely be able to stay even longer without paying. This is one of the unintended consequences of the spreading foreclosure freeze. Although there are no statistics on how many homeowners are taking advantage of a foreclosure moratorium to avoid making monthly payments, some economists warn that this practice could become more common if a national freeze is put in place, as some lawmakers are trying to do. See Moral / B5

In the largest recall of strollers ever, Graco Children’s Products Wednesday urged the owners of about 2 million older-model strollers to stop using them because of concerns about possible strangulation. The strollers, manufactured before July 2007, were tied to the deaths of four infants and five instances of entrapment that resulted in cuts and bruises and, in one case, breathing difficulty. The company said it was making available a free repair kit. Doug McGraw, Graco’s president, said the recall was prompted in part because many more parents were buying and selling secondhand strollers. Some consumer advocates questioned why it took so long for federal authorities and Graco to issue the recall, which applies to Graco models Quattro Tour and MetroLite strollers and travel systems (car seat and stroller combinations). See Strollers / B5

New York Times News Service

The MetroLite stroller is one of two models included in Graco Children’s Products’ recall of about 2 million strollers.


B USI N ESS

M 

FRIDAY

SATURDAY INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION: Learn to create animations in Flash that can be incorporated into Web pages. Class continues Oct. 23; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor

BUILDING HIGH-PERFORMANCE WALLS AND ROOFS: Learn to achieve high-performance assemblies that qualify for the Oregon High Performance Home tax credit. Registration required; $85; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-4807303 or bsullivan@earthadvantage.org. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Sponsored by Jones and Roth. Tonia Meyer and Kelly Walker, of Incyte Marketing, will discuss integrated marketing strategies. Register online by Oct. 25 for the advance price; $25 for chamber members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org. USING FOODHUB TO BUILD YOUR WHOLESALE FOOD BUSINESS: Learn how FoodHub can open doors to new wholesale accounts at this workshop for wholesale food buyers and food producers in Central Oregon; 2-4 p.m.; Madras Aquatic Center, 1195 S.E. Kemper Way; meet@food-hub.org. REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Summit Mortgage Corp., 950 S.W. Veterans Way, Ste.103; 541-548-7788. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Once a year the Bend Chamber of Commerce offers a chance for small or home-based businesses to co-host a Business After Hours. These events showcase businesses that may otherwise be unable to host a networking event. Cost for members to host a space is $150. Contact Robin Rogers for details of participating; 5-7 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or robin@bendchamber.org. MOVING IN A NEW TENANT: Sponsored by Central Oregon Rental Owners Association, learn about move-in procedures, fees, forms and tenants rights. Class includes a light supper. Call Plus Property Management to register and for pricing information. 541-389-2486; 5:30-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Please call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 SW Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps to starting a business in a workshop offered by Central Oregon Community College’s business development center. Cost includes handouts. Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. UNDERSTANDING CAR INSURANCE: Presenter Joseph Brinkley, of Cascade Insurance, will discuss legal requirements, who is insured, eligible vehicles, coverage differences, methods of buying insurance, how a policy is rated, policy credits and claims/ accident information. Refreshments will be served; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795. WEB GRAPHICS WITH PHOTOSHOP/ DREAMWEAVER: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. USING FOODHUB TO BUY LOCAL: Learn how FoodHub can help you find local food producers so you can showcase local products on your menu at this workshop offered for wholesale food buyers and food producers in Central Oregon; free; 2-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; meet@food-hub.org. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNONLOGY SPECIALIST COURSE: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning department, this four-session course will prepare participants for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam 70-680. Required text and test fee not included. Registration required; $259; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Agency wants to make networks faster for mobile phones and tablet computers By Cecilia Kang The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski said he plans to encourage broadcasters to voluntarily auction spectrum to wireless carriers, an initial step toward achieving an agency goal of making networks faster for mobile phones and tablet computers. In an interview Wednesday, Genachowski said he planned to introduce a proposal at the agency’s Nov. 30 meeting that would lay the groundwork for broadcasters to sell unused airwaves to mobile carriers, which have been struggling to keep up with consumer demand for Internet-capable wireless devices. His comments come as the FCC struggles to assert its regulatory authority over broad-

band networks in the face of court challenges and industry pressure. Genachowski declined to comment on whether the meeting would include a vote on his controversial Net-neutrality proposal, which would essentially require Internet service providers to treat all Web traffic equally. “I have nothing to add to what I’ve said before,� he said when asked whether he thought he would be able to move forward on Net-neutrality rules if he didn’t hold a vote on his proposal next month. Analysts on Wednesday called the auction proposal incremental and said it would not provide immediate relief to users struggling to keep their smart phones from grinding to a halt in congested metropolitan areas such as New York.

B  B  Boeing tops forecasts Morgan Stanley as it sells more planes posts surprise loss MINNEAPOLIS — Boeing posted an $837 million thirdquarter profit on Wednesday and raised its profit guidance for the full year as it sold more commercial airplanes. Boeing has already made plans to raise production rates on the 737, its best-selling plane. The improved 2010 guidance reflects a strong outlook for commercial planes. Orders and deliveries have rebounded this year, reversing a decline that occurred when airlines pulled back on orders during the recession. Boeing expects to deliver 460 commercial planes this year, at the low end of what it predicted in April. The aircraft maker repeated its hope to deliver the new 787 in the middle of the first quarter of 2011, and the latest version of the 747 in the middle of the year. Both planes are late — more than two years for the 787. Boeing’s revenue for the quarter ended Sept. 30 rose 2 percent to $16.97 billion. Net income worked out to $1.12 per share. Analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters were expecting a profit of $1.06 per share on revenue of $16.81 billion.

Airlines beat analyst estimates Delta Air Lines Inc., American Airlines parent AMR Corp. and US Airways Group Inc. posted profits Wednesday that beat analysts’ estimates, buoyed by rising fares in what may be the industry’s best quarter since 2007. Delta’s profit excluding some costs was $1.10 a share, topping the 94-cent average of 13 estimates compiled by Bloomberg, while US Airways’ $1.23 a share on that basis exceeded the $1.17 estimate. AMR had net income of $143 million, or 39 cents a share, to beat the 32cent average estimate. Restraint in adding seats helped Delta, American and US Airways fill planes and boost prices after year-earlier losses, and the Bloomberg U.S. Airlines Index jumped the most since February.

NEW YORK — Morgan Stanley, owner of the world’s largest brokerage, reported an unexpected third-quarter loss Wednesday after its worst trading quarter since 2008 and a $229 million writedown on a New Jersey casino project. The loss of 7 cents a share, or profit of $131 million before preferred dividends, compared with earnings of $757 million, or 38 cents, in the third quarter of 2009, the New York-based company said today in a statement. Earnings from continuing operations were 5 cents a share, which included a 12-cent tax gain and a 30-cent loss from charges related to changes in the firm’s credit spreads. Morgan Stanley hired about 400 new employees for the sales and trading unit since posting a per-share loss in last year’s second quarter. Those efforts didn’t pay off for Chief Executive Officer James Gorman, 52, as trading revenue last quarter fell to less than half that of Goldman Sachs, Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase.

City of Redmond

CSARE Properties LLC, 625 S.E. Salmon Ave, $143,000 City of Bend

Bend Equity Group LLC, 2502 N.E. Saranac Place, $172,022 A 1 Excavation Inc., 63240 Logan Ave., $149,849 Tennbrook Financing LLC, 19141 N.W. Park Commons Drive, $326,244 Michael T. Giebelhaus, 19959 Ashwood Drive, $223,130

Continued from B1 As property values continued to soar over the next decade, growing by 20 percent a year in some cases, assessed values crept along at 3 to 5 percent a year. Today, the only way declining home values can lower taxes is if market value falls below the assessed value, and that hasn’t happened in most parts of the state. Deschutes County, home to Bend, shows the biggest exception to the general rule of increasing property taxes. At the housing-price peak in 2007, Bend’s overheated real estate market pushed the median home price to $397,000. Last month, it was $190,000, according to Deschutes County Assessor Scot Langton. About 20 percent of property tax accounts in Deschutes County will decline or increase by less than 3 percent, Langton said. In Crook County, 31.5 percent of property tax accounts will fall into this category, Crook County Assessor Tom Green said. The percentage of Jefferson County accounts facing the same situation this year was not available. It’s also important to note that market values are calculated as of Jan. 1, based on sales in the previous year. Drops in value this year won’t be reflected in tax statements until October 2011. In Clark County, the levy rate rose from $10.06 per $1,000 assessed value to $11.60. In Multnomah County, assessed values for residential

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

properties were 60 percent of market value. That’s up from 50 percent last year, but still a long way from the 100 percent level it would have to exceed to have an effect on taxes. In Clackamas County, property tax statements were mailed starting Tuesday. The total amount of property taxes to be collected in the county will increase 1.7 percent over last year. The average real market value of a home in Clackamas County was $309,000, compared with average assessed value of $225,000. Most homeowners will see increases of 2 percent to 4 percent. Taxpayers on the higher side of that range live in areas where voters approved new taxes. Clackamas County Assessor Bob Vroman said the decline in property values may be leveling out. “I don’t think we’re seeing as much decline as we saw in prior years,� he said. “The difficult thing is that segments of the market behave differently.� Residential properties were the first to show signs of market decline, and they didn’t go down as much in 2009 as the year before. “But commercial and industrial showed a harder hit,� Vroman said.

541-322-CARE

Wells Fargo reports record profit SAN FRANCISCO — Wells Fargo, the nation’s largest home lender, reported record thirdquarter profit Wednesday that beat most analysts’ estimates as credit conditions improved, and said it’s not planning to halt foreclosures. Net income rose 3.1 percent to $3.34 billion, or 60 cents a diluted share, from $3.24 billion, or 56 cents, in the same period a year earlier, the San Franciscobased bank said in a statement. Analysts surveyed by Bloomberg estimated profit of 56 cents. Revenue dropped 7.1 percent to $20.9 billion. “Wells Fargo continues to be one of our top picks,� Oppenheimer & Co. bank analyst Christopher Kotowski wrote in a Sept. 20 report. “Near term, the continued improvement in asset quality will be the driver.� — From wire reports

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS

Property

than 120 seats to be set up. Recently, the Harriman Street office has become increasingly more crowded as the number of people visiting has soared. In the first five months of this year, the center recorded 1,993 visitors, according to Visit Bend statistics. The count for three months from June to August: 5,611. In July alone, Visit Bend staff recorded 2,200 visitors, the largest number since July 2005, La Placa said. He attributed much of the increase to the popularity of the Bend Ale Trail, and plans for similar projects in the future could further increase visits. “We’ve outgrown it,� La Placa said, referring to the Harriman Street office. “It’s a good sign.�

Greg Welch Construction Inc., 2139 N.W. Clearwater Drive, $180,000 Deschutes County

Thayne and Margaret Dutson, 71285 Holmes Road, Sisters, $427,315.51 Diane Whitmire, 11495 N.W. Dover Road, Terrebonne, $422,383 Brent R. Irwin, 17561 Forest Lane, Sunriver, $152,018.40 Hendrix Family Trust, 70305 Mahonia, Black Butte Ranch, $130,000 David L. Parsons, 15650 Park Drive, La Pine, $287,416.89



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PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS JOB MATCH CERTIFICATION: Learn about PREP’s business focused personality reports; $795, or $595 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST, PROPERTY TAXES, YOU HAVE OPTIONS: Find ways to reduce the cost of property taxes through appeals. Sponsored by ServiceMaster; $25 for chamber members, $35 at the door; 7:30-9 a.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way; http://www.icebase.com/go2. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Redmond Athletic Club and Cenral Oregon Crossfit, Redmond Athletic Club, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 541-923-6662. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Learn about the current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS: Learn the basics of small site building and blogging using WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704. KEYWORDS, WEBMASTER TOOLS AND ANALYTICS.: Learn about keywords, content development, traffic analysis and content performance analysis; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. THE FRESH WEB: A brief review of Web news for the week ending Oct 22; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

TUESDAY

Continued from B1 In March 2004, rates ranged from $1 to $1.75 per square foot, depending on the age of the building and other factors, according to newspaper archives. By July 2005, they were approaching $2.25 a square foot. Fratzke Commercial Real Estate lists rates for Putnam Pointe at $1.25 to $1.75 per square foot on its website. La Placa said nondisclosure agreements prevent him from saying what rate he’s seeking, but he expects to negotiate “a very attractive deal� that reflects the current market, and get about 50 percent more usable space as well. The offices also would be available for community events, he said. Preliminary designs suggest room for more

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PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prepprofiles.com or www.prep-profiles.com. PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS JOB MATCH CERTIFICATION: Learn about PREP’s business focused personality reports; $795, or $595 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. BARRAN LIEBMAN LLP EMPLOYMENT LAW SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS, THE SLIPPERY SLOPE: Designed for employers, human resource professionals, and in-house counsel, this seminar will cover current state and federal legislation affecting employee and independent contractor classifications. Fee includes program, printed materials and breakfast. Registration required; $15; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 503-228-0500 or clientservices@barran.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day�; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMERCE “NETWORKING SOCIAL�: Hosted by Laurie Kanehl and staff. You do not have to be a chamber member or own a business to attend; 5:30 p.m.; Desert Oasis Salon and Spa, 5105 Clubhouse Road; 541-923-2679. ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK & TWITTER: Second in the Online Marketing Series offered by Central Oregon Community College. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FCC plans to encourage auctioning of spectrum to wireless companies

POTTERY

TODAY

Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

B2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 B3

P F   Changes complicate reverse mortgages Insurance premiums have risen, but new federal offer may slash upfront cost By Eileen Ambrose The Baltimore Sun

Photos by Travis Dove / The New York Times

Robert Paratore, left, Linda Spitz, center, and Judith Thomas look over campaign materials at the “Pig Pickin’ and Politickin’ ” campaign rally at the Northstone Country Club in Huntersville, N.C., on Oct. 12. According to a New York Times/CBS News Poll last month, fewer than one in 10 respondents knew that the Obama administration had lowered taxes for most Americans.

The tax cut no one noticed Few know they saved money in the $787B stimulus bill, perhaps because they didn’t receive rebate checks

“This was the tax cut that fell in the woods — nobody heard it.” — North Carolina state Rep. Thom Tillis

By Michael Cooper New York Times News Service

HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. — What if a president cut Americans’ income taxes by $116 billion and nobody noticed? It is not a rhetorical question. At Pig Pickin’ and Politickin’, a barbecue-fed rally organized here last week by a Republican women’s club, a half-dozen guests were asked by a reporter what had happened to their taxes since President Barack Obama took office. “Federal and state have both gone up,” said Bob Paratore, 59, from nearby Charlotte, echoing the comments of others. After further prodding — including a reminder that a provision of the stimulus bill had cut taxes for 95 percent of working families by changing withholding rates — Paratore’s memory was jogged. “You’re right, you’re right,” he said. “I’ll be honest with you: It was so subtle that personally, I didn’t notice it.” Few people apparently did. In a troubling sign for Democrats as they head into the midterm elections, their signature tax cut of the past two years, which decreased income taxes by up to $400 a year for individuals and $800 for married couples, has gone largely unnoticed. In a New York Times/CBS News Poll last month, fewer than one in 10 respondents knew that the Obama administration had lowered taxes for most Americans. Half of those polled said they thought that their taxes had stayed the same, a third thought that their taxes had gone up and about a tenth said they did not know. As Thom Tillis, a Republican state representative, put it as the dinner wound down here, “This was the tax cut that fell in the woods — nobody heard it.”

Bob Deaton was one of many people handing out campaign materials at the “Pig Pickin’ and Politickin’ ” rally in Huntersville, N.C.

Incentive to spend Actually, the tax cut was, by design, difficult to notice. Faced with evidence that people were more likely to save than spend the tax rebate checks they received during the Bush administration, the Obama administration decided to take a different tack: It arranged for less tax money to be withheld from people’s paychecks. They reasoned that people would be more likely to spend a small, recurring extra bit of money that they might not even notice, and that the quicker the money was spent, the faster it would cycle through the economy. Economists are still measuring how stimulative the tax cut was. But the hard-to-notice part has succeeded wildly. In a recent interview, Obama said structuring the tax cuts so that a little more money showed up in people’s paychecks “was the right thing to do economically, but politically it meant that nobody knew that they were getting a tax cut.” “And in fact what ended up happening was six months into it, or nine months into it,” the president said, “people had thought we had raised their taxes instead of cutting their taxes.” There are plenty of explanations as to why many taxpayers did not feel richer when the cuts kicked in, giving typical families an extra $65 a month. Some people were making less money to begin with, as businesses cut

back. Others saw their take-home pay shrink as the amounts deducted for health insurance rose. And taxpayers in more than 30 states saw their state taxes rise, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. That is what happened here in North Carolina. The Treasury Department estimated that the federal tax cut would put $1.7 billion back in the hands of North Carolina taxpayers this year. Last year, though, North Carolina, facing a large budget shortfall, raised a variety of state taxes by roughly a billion dollars. “It was a wash,” said Tillis, the state representative. The Obama administration wants to extend the little-noticed tax cut next year. Jason Furman, the deputy director of the National Economic Council, said the administration still believes that changing the withholdings was a more effective form of stimulus than sending out rebate checks would have been. “In retrospect, we think that judgment was right,” he said. “It’s harder to predict what’s good for politics. Ultimately, the best thing for politics is going to be helping the economy.”

Was method effective? But at least one prominent economist is questioning whether the method really was more effective. Joel Slemrod, a professor of economics at the University

Societal impatience may erode saving habit By Dan Serra McClatchy-Tribune News Service

When we were growing up, most of our parents encouraged us to save our money if we wanted to buy something (and most parents still should). Developing good money skills as a child was important and would create habits for life. But for many of us, those habits are gone. Why don’t adults save their money as much as children? Credit may have something to do with it. Credit abuse and the unraveling of savings habits have destroyed finances as adults and brought down economies. Are we as individuals to blame for this, or is society? Interesting research shows it could be society. As consumers, we expect to get what we want fast and hate to wait. We want to walk into the

doctor’s office exam room when we get there. We want money out of the ATM at 2 a.m. We want our food out the drive-through window in 30 seconds. So it’s not surprising we want more money now instead of waiting to build it up through saving. A group of researchers in Canada found the cause of this “instant financial gratification need” could be because of our “now”-obsessed society. Just a glimpse of fastfood restaurant signs resulted in people becoming impatient about their finances. Most of those who saw the signs first said they were unwilling to postpone immediate gain for future rewards. They sacrificed savings even when it would put them at an economic disadvantage. Those sign-seers were also more likely to accept a smaller

amount of cash than be willing to wait to receive a larger amount. “Fast food seemed to have made people impatient in a manner that could put their economic interest at risk,” researchers reported in Psychological Science. We’ve seen this behavior in investors, too. More are looking to make a short-term gain in the next hot stock versus investing over the long term to build up for the future. These investors cause market volatility by fleeing the market in panics and jumping in when things look better. And this is the worse way to invest. So the next time you feel the urge for instant financial gratification, whether through an investment, loan or salary, ask yourself if what you are doing is harmful to your long-term prospects, personal and financial.

of Michigan, analyzed consumer surveys after the last rebate checks were sent out in 2008 by the Bush administration, and after this tax cut, called Making Work Pay, went into effect. After the 2008 rebates, he found that about a quarter of the households surveyed said they would mostly use the money to increase their spending. After the Obama tax cut took effect, he said, only 13 percent said they would mostly use the money to increase their spending. The Obama administration believes that people did spend the money and cites analyses calling the cut one of the more effective forms of stimulus. Slemrod said it was not unheard of for voters to miss tax cuts. Just a few years after a 1986 overhaul of the tax system made significant cuts to most people’s taxes, he said, a survey asked people what had happened to their taxes. “Most people didn’t answer that they went down,” he said.

If you have been toying with the idea of taking out a reverse mortgage, note that the market today is significantly different from what it was just a couple of months ago. Monthly insurance premiums on new loans went up this month, making an expensive product even more so. But the Department of Housing and Urban Development has offset that rise by introducing another reverse mortgage — the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage Saver — which slashes the upfront cost. “It’s a mixed bag,” said David Certner, legislative policy director for AARP, of the reverse mortgage market. A reverse mortgage is suited for older homeowners who have lots of equity built up in their home, but little cash and no other ways to increase their income. The amount you can borrow is tied to your age — you must be at least 62 — the value of your home and the interest rate. And you can get the money in a lump sum, monthly payment, line of credit or any combination of these. Unlike a traditional mortgage, you don’t make monthly repayments with a reverse mortgage. Instead, the principal, interest and fees add up month to month. The loan is repaid when you sell the house, move out or die. High fees have been a major drawback of reverse mortgages. With these loans, you have many of the same expenses you do with any mortgage, such as an appraisal. On top of that, the origination fee on a reverse mortgage can be as much as $6,000. You also must pay a monthly mortgage insurance premium for reverse mortgages that are federally insured, which is almost all of them. This insurance protects lenders in case a house ends up being worth less than the amount Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Before you borrow • If you’re in the market for a reverse mortgage, seek independent counseling before you even talk to a lender to learn about loan alternatives or tips on negotiating with a lender. Find a government-approved counselor near you at www.hud.gov. • Check out the National Council on Aging’s Benefits CheckUp.org for assistance programs that could make a reverse mortgage unnecessary. • To find out how much you can potentially receive through a reverse mortgage, check online calculators at aarp.org or reversemortgage.org. borrowed. It also covers borrowers in case a lender fails. That monthly insurance premium for new loans went from an annual rate of 0.5 percent on balance to 1.25 percent. This was raised to protect the government — and ultimately taxpayers — from having to make big payouts to lenders because of falling house prices, Certner said. The new Saver mortgage offers some relief, though, by substantially cutting one of the upfront fees. With the standard reverse mortgage, borrowers must pay an upfront insurance premium worth 2 percent of the value of the property, up to a certain limit. That’s $4,000 on a $200,000 house. The Saver loan’s upfront premium is 0.01 percent, or $20 on that same home. The trade-off is that you can’t borrow as much under the Saver program. For example, a 70year-old with a $200,000 home could borrow up to $116,279 in a lump sum from a regular reverse mortgage, compared with $89,985 under the Saver loan. The Saver mortgage with its lower fee is better suited for homeowners who don’t expect to remain in their home for long and don’t have a need to borrow as much, said Peter Bell, president of the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association.

Homesites starting at just

$33,000 IronHorse is developed by Brooks Resources, Corp.

www.IronHorsePrineville.com REALTOR


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med n AGCO AGIC Cv AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL n ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds AcmePkt h AcordaTh AcornEngy Actel ActivIden ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdvClayCv AecomTch Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AldIrish 10 AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AVangrd AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC ApldSig Approach AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArcSight ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEnt wt AsiaInfoL AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr gn AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv

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CenovusE n 0.80 28.48 -.04 Centene 24.30 +.31 CenterPnt 0.78 16.39 +.24 CnElBrasil 1.56 15.01 +.42 CentEuro 23.16 -.02 CFCda g 0.01 17.62 +.31 CentAl 13.39 +.46 CntryLink 2.90 40.21 +.69 Cenveo 5.49 +.09 Cephln 63.79 +.15 Cepheid 17.59 -.16 Cerner 86.87 +1.71 CerusCp 3.28 -.08 ChRvLab 32.40 +.08 ChrmSh 3.63 +.10 ChkPoint 40.19 +1.63 Cheesecake 27.46 +.32 ChelseaTh 4.87 -.09 CheniereEn 2.81 +.09 CheniereE 1.70 20.57 +.07 ChesEng 0.30 22.16 +.20 ChespkL n 0.20 18.81 +1.26 Chevron 2.88 84.02 +1.23 ChicB&I 25.31 +.94 Chicos 0.16 10.25 +.04 ChildPlace 51.88 +.57 Chimera 0.69 4.26 +.04 ChinAgri s 11.80 -.02 ChiArmM 4.33 +.33 ChinaBAK 2.03 +.02 ChinaBiot 12.65 +.76 ChinaDigtl 7.22 +.17 ChinaDir 1.75 +.39 ChiGengM 1.84 +.38 ChinaGreen 9.29 -.11 ChiINSOn h .15 -.01 ChinaInfo 6.31 +.16 ChinaLife 1.54 70.31 +3.77 ChinaLdg n 25.61 -.49 ChinaMda 15.17 +.89 ChinaMed 0.55 11.97 +.48 ChiMYWd n 10.51 -.24 ChinaMble 1.85 53.27 -.08 ChinaNGas 5.80 +.16 ChinaNepst 0.28 4.33 -.01 ChNBorun n 18.80 +.70 ChinNEPet 7.18 +.15 ChinaPet 2.79 97.07 +2.45 ChinaPStl 1.60 +.05 ChinaSecur 6.00 -.07 ChinaShen 4.13 +1.93 ChinaSun 4.44 +.02 ChinaUni 0.23 14.82 +.27 ChiValve n 7.85 +.13 ChinaYuch 0.35 21.02 +1.22 Chipotle 180.75 -1.11 Chiquita 14.16 -.03 ChrisBnk 0.24 5.83 -.94 Chubb 1.48 58.71 +1.00 ChungTel 1.27 23.06 +.02 ChurchDwt 0.68 68.32 +.16 CIBER 3.70 +.15 CienaCorp 13.88 +.33 Cimarex 0.32 71.67 +.70 CinciBell 2.53 CinnFin 1.60 30.26 +.48 Cinemark 0.72 17.29 +.36 Cintas 0.48 27.79 +.41 Cirrus 16.33 +.27 Cisco 23.40 +.43 Citigp pfJ 2.13 26.44 -.08 Citigp pfN 1.97 26.19 +.15 Citigrp 4.11 +.05 CitiTdecs n 7.50 122.00 +1.50 Citigrp pfP 25.90 +1.80 CitzRepB h .89 -.04 CitrixSys 56.72 -.04 CityNC 0.40 52.27 -.59 Clarient h 3.77 +.09 ClaudeR g 1.54 +.08 CleanEngy 14.23 -.26 ClearEFd n 0.35 20.76 -.12 Clearwire 7.13 +.26 ClevBioL h 7.06 -.07 CliffsNRs 0.56 64.97 +2.27 Clorox 2.20 67.97 +.34 CloudPk n 17.71 +.57 Coach 0.60 44.15 +.63 CocaCE 24.19 +.05 CocaCl 1.76 61.15 +.81 Coeur 20.02 +.68 CogentC 10.89 +.49 Cogent 10.50 -.01 CognizTech 66.13 +1.10 CohStInfra 0.96 16.62 +.13 CohStQIR 0.72 8.46 +.32 CohStRE 1.20 13.73 +.29 Coinstar 47.93 +1.68 ColdwtrCrk 3.41 -.06 ColgPal 2.12 77.18 +.93 CollctvBrd 17.29 +.30 ColonPT 0.60 17.90 +.36 ColBnkg 0.04 19.54 -.23 Comcast 0.38 19.38 +.27 Comc spcl 0.38 18.26 +.25 Comerica 0.20 35.94 -2.45 CmcBMO 0.94 36.68 +.01 CmclMtls 0.48 14.71 +.29 CmwReit rs 2.00 26.08 +.12 ComScop 22.55 +.38 CmtyHlt 30.65 +.07 CommVlt 26.85 +.43 CBD-Pao s 0.35 37.14 -.12 CompDivHd 1.36 16.77 -.34 Compellent 17.94 +.47 CompPrdS 24.88 +1.84 CompSci 0.60 49.33 +.38 Compuwre 8.73 +.06 ComstkRs 23.43 +.47 Comtech 1.00 30.38 +.40 Con-Way 0.40 31.31 +.18 ConAgra 0.92 22.61 +.05 ConchoRes 67.57 +.59 ConcurTch 48.71 +.68 Conexant 1.76 +.02 ConocPhil 2.20 61.27 +1.27 ConsolEngy 0.40 39.38 +.88 ConEd 2.38 49.11 +.27 ConstellA 19.31 +.24 ConstellEn 0.96 32.28 +.23 ContlRes 46.55 +.58 Cnvrgys 11.47 +.21 ConvOrg h .54 -.02 CooperCo 0.06 50.82 +.98 Cooper Ind 1.08 50.68 +1.60 CooperTire 0.42 20.65 +.41 CopaHold 1.09 47.63 -.15 CopanoEn 2.30 28.80 +.17 Copart 33.83 +.34 Copel 1.09 24.07 -.28 CoreLab s 0.24 84.80 -1.03 CoreLogic 18.24 +.54 CorinthC 4.76 -.11 CornPdts 0.56 39.70 +.78 Corning 0.20 18.54 +.25 CorpExc 0.44 30.55 +.15 CorpOffP 1.65 38.64 +.73 CorrectnCp 26.01 +.40 Cosan Ltd 12.54 +.23 Costco 0.82 62.61 +.40 Cott Cp 7.81 +.03 Cntwd pfB 1.75 23.21 -.24 CousPrp 0.12 7.34 +.31 Covance 47.23 -.13 CovantaH 1.50 15.67 -.01 Covenant 6.85 -.12 CoventryH 23.39 +.64 Covidien 0.80 39.50 -.37 Crane 0.92 39.29 +.61 Credicp 1.70 125.86 -.82 CSCush30 20 0.61 22.70 +.08 CredSuiss 1.85 45.02 +.57 CrSuiHiY 0.32 2.99 +.03 Cree Inc 50.08 -2.92 Crocs 13.66 +.26 Crossh glf .23 +.03 CrosstexE 0.28 8.10 +.11 CrosstxLP 1.00 13.33 +.17 CrwnCstle 42.35 +.68 CrownHold 30.81 +.19 CrwnMedia 3.25 -.04 Crucell 34.18 +.65 Crystallx g .33 -.00 Ctrip.com s 50.03 +.88 CubistPh 23.02 -.32 CullenFr 1.80 52.81 -.52 Cummins 1.05 92.05 +1.88 Curis 1.46 +.02 CurEuro 138.97 +2.16 CurrCda 97.30 +.94 CurJpn 121.88 +.53 Cyclacel 1.59 -.02 Cymer 36.91 -.16 CypSemi 12.39 -.10 CypSharp 2.40 13.44 +.06 CytRx h .87 Cytec 0.05 60.66 +2.33 Cytori 5.08 +.14 DCT Indl 0.28 5.09 +.15 DG FastCh 21.32 +.76 DJSP Ent 1.23 -.07 DNP Selct 0.78 10.03 +.05 DPL 1.21 27.51 +.33 DR Horton 0.15 10.37 -.01 DTE 2.24 47.28 +.38 DanaHldg 13.32 +.27 Danaher s 0.08 41.59 +.38 DaqoNEn n 12.00 +.29 Darden 1.28 44.73 +.89 Darling 9.95 +.10 Datalink 4.11 +.67 DaVita 72.26 +1.03 DayStar rs 2.38 -.01 DeVry 0.20 44.89 +.73 DeanFds 10.14 -.15 DearbrnBc 2.08 +.33 DeckOut s 52.79 +.69 Deere 1.20 76.44 +1.52 DelMnte 0.36 14.41 -.19 Delcath 8.32 +.14 Dell Inc 14.69 +.20 DelphiFn 0.44 27.35 -.02 DeltaAir 12.97 +1.27 DeltaPtr h .79 +.02 Deluxe 1.00 20.74 +.34 DemandTc 10.46 -.01 DenburyR 17.22 -.17 Dndreon 36.25 +.03 DenisnM g 2.21 +.09 Dennys 3.23 +.09 Dentsply 0.20 32.07 +.44 Depomed 5.04 +.11 DeutschBk 0.93 59.06 +1.50 DB Cap pf 1.90 25.99 -.30 DB AgriDL 12.04 +.58 DBGoldDL 38.58 +.68 DBGoldDS 8.95 -.19 DevelDiv 0.08 13.00 +.51 DevonE 0.64 67.46 +.58 DexCom 14.07 -.06 Diageo 2.38 73.16 +.40

Nm

D

DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DimeCBc DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollrFn DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.18 42.76 -.68 0.50 68.87 +.21 0.03 10.92 +.23 13.45 -.04 28.95 +.16 1.08 32.40 +.55 2.12 59.44 +.67 35.17 +.67 0.16 26.65 +.16 0.56 14.60 +.24 46.79 -.94 18.97 -.13 42.67 +.18 6.26 37.97 +.72 5.68 37.25 +1.49 29.75 -.56 22.76 -.72 0.20 19.26 -1.38 36.59 -1.53 0.01 31.61 +.52 24.41 -1.22 12.38 -.42 22.66 +.77 7.35 36.92 -.16 4.97 45.16 +.19 3.41 57.44 +3.73 4.77 52.57 +1.56 11.21 -.36 8.06 57.71 +1.66 5.06 38.01 +1.44 0.08 17.54 +.22 43.37 +.71 38.15 +.63 .25 +.01 2.00 19.57 +.41 0.35 34.62 +.38 0.24 36.40 60.60 +.45 24.04 +.33 28.10 -.01 48.21 +.22 51.15 +.99 1.83 44.70 +.20 15.59 +.04 1.00 72.91 +2.85 0.50 47.98 +.87 1.04 18.45 +.53 0.40 18.56 +.55 1.10 53.80 +1.12 0.60 30.19 +.85 1.00 35.11 +1.22 8.35 +.26 33.15 +.23 24.30 +.15 37.76 +.06 0.52 4.52 67.98 +2.29 1.73 -.01 4.23 -.01 1.64 47.08 +1.10 0.48 23.95 +.42 0.98 17.79 +.12 0.68 12.24 +.31 1.40 74.68 -.49 13.89 +.36 2.72 +.01 2.74 +.01 2.45 +.05 10.96 +.36 1.95 +.02 4.84 +.02

E-F-G-H E-House 0.25 18.18 -.05 ETrade rs 14.75 +.26 eBay 25.66 +.13 EMC Cp 21.19 +.36 EMCOR 25.69 +.34 ENI 2.51 45.34 +1.01 EOG Res 0.62 100.12 +.64 EQT Corp 0.88 38.00 +.13 eResrch 8.01 +.01 ETF Pall n 58.54 +1.87 EagleBulk 5.30 +.14 EagleMat 0.40 23.81 +.38 ErthLink 0.64 8.68 +.03 EstWstBcp 0.04 16.79 +.20 EastChm 1.76 79.07 +1.90 EKodak 4.00 +.04 Eaton 2.32 86.82 +3.41 EatnVan 0.72 29.93 +.57 EV EnEq 1.40 13.04 +.01 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.54 +.11 EVRiskMgd 1.80 13.56 +.04 EV TxAG 1.23 14.19 +.06 EV TxDiver 1.62 11.59 +.03 EVTxMGlo 1.53 11.01 +.01 EVTxBWIn 1.80 15.20 -.08 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.64 +.14 Ebix Inc s 23.75 -.08 Ecolab 0.62 51.16 +.40 Ecopetrol 1.34 47.59 +.06 EdisonInt 1.26 35.98 +.31 EducMgmt 10.16 +.02 EducRlty 0.20 7.71 +.19 EdwLfSci s 66.21 +.79 8x8 Inc 2.37 +.03 ElPasoCp 0.04 13.14 +.07 ElPasoEl 24.64 -.05 ElPasoPpl 1.60 32.83 -.14 Elan 5.82 -.02 EldorGld g 0.05 17.25 +.23 ElectArts 15.40 -.18 EBrasAero 0.38 28.30 +.75 Emcore hlf 1.07 +.04 EMS 53.06 +.30 EmersonEl 1.34 53.98 +1.22 Emulex 10.72 +.25 EnbrEPtrs 4.11 60.22 +.67 EnCana g s 0.80 28.49 -.76 EndvrInt 1.34 -.05 EndvSilv g 4.56 +.16 EndoPhrm 35.89 +.55 Ener1 4.05 +.02 Energen 0.52 45.29 +.43 Energizer 74.60 +.08 EngyConv 4.58 -.06 EngyTsfr 3.58 50.09 +.53 EgyXXI rs 23.26 +.43 EnergySol 4.91 +.07 Enerpls g 2.16 26.64 +.32 Enersis 0.68 23.39 +.02 EnerSys 25.93 +.52 ENSCO 1.40 47.75 +1.31 Entegris 5.09 +.06 Entergy 3.32 77.11 +.58 EnteroM rs 2.07 +.29 EntPrPt 2.33 41.88 +.21 EntGaming .39 -.04 EnterPT 2.60 47.15 +.66 EntropCom 7.83 +.24 EnzonPhar 11.44 +.17 Equifax 0.16 32.43 +.35 Equinix 75.36 -.05 EqLfPrp 1.20 58.70 +1.78 EqtyOne 0.88 18.98 +.46 EqtyRsd 1.35 51.51 +1.27 EricsnTel 0.28 10.85 +.26 EssexPT 4.13 115.17 +2.45 EsteeLdr 0.55 66.24 +.73 EtfSilver 23.77 +.50 EthanAl 0.20 16.33 -1.25 EverestRe 1.92 84.43 +1.45 EvergE rs 1.12 -.05 EvrgrSlr h 1.02 +.05 ExactSci h 8.04 +.04 ExcelM 5.65 +.01 ExcoRes 0.16 14.81 +.15 Exelixis 4.75 +.14 Exelon 2.10 44.28 +.54 ExeterR gs 5.89 +.30 ExideTc 5.52 +.03 Expedia 0.28 27.16 +.31 ExpdIntl 0.40 49.32 +1.23 ExpScrip s 48.71 +.85 Express-1 2.42 +.05 ExterranH 24.90 +.71 ExtraSpce 0.33 16.17 +.23 ExtrmNet 3.02 -.05 ExxonMbl 1.76 66.01 +.89 EZchip 23.59 +.39 Ezcorp 21.78 +.47 F5 Netwks 91.93 +.94 FLIR Sys 25.42 +.36 FMC Corp 0.50 70.03 +.76 FMC Tech 71.53 +1.19 FNBCp PA 0.48 9.15 +.08 FSI Intl 2.55 -.53 FTI Cnslt 35.71 +.37 FactsetR 0.92 88.16 +.95 FairchldS 10.34 +.32 FamilyDlr 0.62 45.41 +.41 Fastenal 0.84 52.40 +.73 FedExCp 0.48 88.92 +1.78 FedRlty 2.68 83.55 +1.41 FedSignl 0.24 5.68 +.12 FedInvst 0.96 24.19 +.48 FelCor 6.03 +.23 Ferro 13.43 +.66 FibriaCelu 16.19 -.25 FidlNFin 0.72 14.74 +.25 FidNatInfo 0.20 28.72 +.50 FifthStFin 1.26 11.49 +.21 FifthThird 0.04 12.40 +.03 Finisar 18.79 -.02 FinLine 0.16 16.06 +.08 FstAFin n 0.24 14.97 +.48 FstBcpPR .30 FstCashFn 29.64 +1.14 FstCwlth 0.04 5.60 -.07 FstHorizon 0.72 10.17 -.08 FstInRT 6.26 +.18 FstIntB A n 0.45 12.42 -.20 FMidBc 0.04 10.83 -1.69 FstNiagara 0.56 11.77 +.04 FstPotom 0.80 16.60 +.76 FstSolar 143.39 -.53 FtTrGlob 1.56 18.03 -.05 FT ConDis 0.06 17.56 +.21 FT RNG 0.08 17.07 +.19 FirstEngy 2.20 39.67 +.24 FstMerit 0.64 18.26 -.13 Fiserv 55.50 +.63 FlagstB rs 2.48 +.05 Flagstone 0.16 10.53 +.24 Flextrn 6.14 +.03 Flotek h 1.64 +.02 FlowrsFds 0.80 24.68 +.08 Flowserve 1.16 112.48 +.86 Fluor 0.50 49.20 +.21 FocusMda 23.38 +.83 FEMSA 0.32 53.62 +.54 FootLockr 0.60 15.73 +.07 ForcePro 5.42 +.27 FordM 13.64 +.32 FordM wt 5.33 +.26 FordC pfS 3.25 49.30 +.17 ForestCA 14.08 +.03 ForestLab 33.40 +.38 ForestOil 32.00 -.22 FormFac 8.83 -.08

Nm

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FMCG FresKabi rt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GettyRlty GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlbXSilvM GloblOptns Globalstar GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GtChina GreenMtC s GreenbCos Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GugSolar GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HNI Corp HSBC HSN Inc Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelicosBio HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HilltopH HimaxTch HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira

D 25.16 -.02 4.20 +.04 0.76 55.80 +.63 53.97 +.54 24.24 +.22 1.77 23.22 +.45 0.88 116.12 +2.51 0.76 13.87 +.27 1.20 95.35 +2.63 .03 7.23 +.38 0.75 8.80 +.13 13.51 +.10 1.90 26.81 -.68 1.16 -.01 0.28 20.52 +.17 0.12 9.32 -.18 7.32 -.04 5.46 -.23 9.69 +.08 1.12 31.03 +.60 0.20 4.88 +.10 4.32 -.16 24.51 -.16 8.46 +.22 0.84 14.26 +.03 0.48 5.21 +.07 1.68 17.44 +.18 0.14 17.07 +.37 1.28 27.24 +.37 18.96 +.54 6.95 +.15 0.16 12.30 +.17 0.40 19.32 -.23 0.20 55.76 +1.19 1.50 31.51 +.63 30.81 +.24 .34 -.02 32.07 +.60 47.63 -.38 16.04 +.24 5.09 +.12 25.95 +.37 1.68 63.83 +.87 0.48 16.05 -.02 17.36 +.94 0.04 4.01 +.04 1.12 37.17 +.06 4.27 +.29 2.85 +.03 .31 -.06 0.18 16.85 -.77 0.44 21.58 +.40 23.64 +.31 1.64 47.62 +.38 .61 +.02 13.46 +.10 72.11 +.22 25.40 +.39 20.03 +.35 0.21 12.62 -.09 5.78 -.03 1.92 29.75 +1.20 0.18 6.63 +.15 1.94 -.03 26.70 -.24 38.39 +1.66 0.52 14.69 -.12 0.36 12.53 -.01 1.98 40.92 +.20 2.12 -.02 0.40 7.20 +.45 3.94 5.96 +.21 0.08 38.41 +.04 19.32 +.44 2.24 +.07 1.72 -.03 0.15 15.03 +.24 0.40 18.01 +.25 0.16 15.41 +.34 0.09 20.58 +.16 0.18 42.44 +.44 4.99 +.10 1.40 159.60 +2.88 1.16 77.87 +1.86 13.81 +.12 11.88 +.21 607.98 +.15 1.64 28.03 +.41 29.55 +.64 0.80 34.23 +.71 16.59 +.55 2.16 122.74 +1.58 2.36 +.10 7.35 +.12 20.26 +.03 0.92 24.69 +.64 3.52 +.09 2.86 -.17 2.60 +.06 0.07 6.35 +.02 0.83 18.92 +.08 0.01 13.25 +.46 31.31 +.86 18.44 +.10 32.14 +.58 1.11 -.14 11.04 +.73 0.52 22.12 +.28 0.64 41.48 +.24 0.03 31.31 +.43 8.55 +.13 16.11 +.25 .87 -.04 64.95 +.04 0.58 26.88 +.36 1.86 37.26 +.60 0.81 179.33 -.08 0.86 29.56 +.07 1.70 52.34 +.52 30.77 +.36 0.36 33.79 +.61 7.53 -.01 0.96 32.15 +.48 28.08 +.60 18.61 +.42 1.23 +.02 1.00 45.95 +.39 1.74 -.08 50.34 +.61 23.03 +.01 0.40 30.95 +.65 35.40 +.27 6.98 +.16 0.07 11.01 +.26 1.00 43.51 +.18 0.82 23.93 +.12 0.20 23.74 +.21 1.81 24.16 +.21 11.82 +.47 1.00 46.25 +.04 4.60 29.77 +.26 1.24 22.74 +.24 7.13 +.92 3.49 -.02 2.76 50.80 +.69 7.37 +.18 1.20 24.27 +.38 27.15 +.51 17.98 +.01 27.27 +1.05 0.08 14.77 -.12 4.17 +.13 6.81 +.21 1.80 49.25 +.66 .42 -.01 12.31 +.33 0.24 42.17 +.23 .52 -.00 58.72 +.49 1.00 64.01 +1.40 2.37 -.09 0.20 6.07 +.03 1.28 51.10 +.12 10.43 +.41 0.40 63.28 +1.01 0.32 42.82 -.01 18.51 +.56 23.91 -.20 26.46 +.55 1.70 34.61 +.58 0.41 37.06 +1.21 9.96 +.13 0.25 2.32 -.03 0.60 33.91 +.33 16.31 +.16 0.95 30.73 +.32 50.45 +.52 2.32 55.87 +1.22 36.65 +.17 1.21 46.41 +.25 0.84 44.66 +.23 20.34 +.43 10.63 +.25 58.01 +.24

Nm HospPT HostHotls HovnanE HuanPwr HubGroup HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 1.80 23.81 +.78 0.04 16.36 +.36 3.69 -.01 1.23 24.05 -.69 32.03 +2.69 0.60 11.72 -.21 26.40 +.47 55.98 +1.86 0.48 36.45 +.64 0.04 5.60 -.13 0.40 12.80 +.48 3.97 -.21 40.48 +.32 6.32 +.15 3.02 -.23

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICO Glb A IdexxLabs IDT Corp iGateCorp II-VI ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOG iShEur350 iShSCGrth iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX Ikanos ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp Immersion Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndBkMI rs IndiaGC IndoTel Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm Insmed h InspPhar IntegLfSci IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig InterMune IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InternetB InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntervestB IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia IxysCp JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba

25.47 +.02 0.06 17.17 +.46 0.53 50.20 +.75 1.44 -.10 62.50 +.11 15.18 +.37 0.26 18.85 +.57 35.80 -2.63 0.54 7.47 +.04 1.20 11.55 +.05 10.92 +.20 0.32 5.70 +.02 5.02 +.07 13.14 +.10 30.88 +.64 0.81 24.47 +.56 2.58 78.44 +.79 0.42 28.81 +.40 0.96 36.79 +.83 0.60 25.34 +.60 0.30 23.59 +.58 0.48 19.18 +.29 0.45 17.89 +.45 0.16 10.20 +.08 0.39 53.98 +1.19 0.25 13.88 +.17 0.75 56.11 +.98 0.38 13.71 +.15 1.37 45.92 +.88 1.36 68.30 +.63 0.21 13.33 +.28 0.44 16.98 +.20 1.20 63.73 +1.11 0.68 73.80 +.68 1.22 75.61 +1.25 23.33 +.49 1.08 53.32 +.53 1.69 48.40 +.43 2.65 111.78 -.03 0.87 62.50 +.73 0.68 46.18 +.94 1.01 85.69 +1.85 2.34 118.22 +1.10 3.75 108.62 +.13 0.59 45.98 +.72 5.35 112.34 +.20 0.89 39.89 +.53 5.64 112.17 -.06 1.13 61.71 +.60 1.22 52.10 +.84 1.24 55.70 +.61 3.82 101.91 +.22 3.77 99.54 -.06 1.10 84.47 +.01 1.38 57.45 +1.06 0.83 41.89 +.55 0.52 50.66 +.52 1.42 92.80 +1.06 0.99 81.89 +.97 7.98 89.99 +.28 0.44 47.72 +.32 88.19 +.05 1.85 65.92 +1.34 1.28 60.68 +.65 0.72 53.21 +.49 1.11 65.16 +.66 1.06 64.87 +.70 3.26 105.15 +.04 0.47 77.22 +.71 0.79 70.21 +.71 2.91 39.34 +.04 1.19 69.67 +.73 0.67 21.93 +.31 1.88 56.14 +1.10 0.08 11.58 -.05 0.59 53.32 +.58 0.58 61.64 +.54 0.91 68.23 +1.55 0.82 46.00 +.93 0.20 53.91 +.45 1.02 39.74 +.77 0.38 64.89 +.57 3.20 +.11 1.00 48.33 +1.12 58.91 +2.08 20.08 -1.17 17.47 +.30 1.20 36.84 +.42 4.30 +.11 0.60 36.25 +.72 1.26 +.02 1.36 46.56 +.08 50.80 +.97 10.93 +.59 18.36 +.54 6.26 +.19 17.21 +.01 7.96 +.25 3.93 +.14 21.03 +.48 17.03 +.06 1.53 +.18 .99 +.10 1.25 41.32 +.94 2.82 39.65 -.44 8.13 +.18 37.21 +.46 0.91 66.83 +.49 0.28 38.43 +.44 17.70 +.21 2.11 -.03 0.57 9.17 +.32 1.15 -.02 .69 +.01 6.84 40.57 +.61 6.02 +.07 9.05 +.06 2.72 53.48 +.55 0.63 19.64 +.43 17.31 +.13 115.99 +.02 29.76 +.41 14.55 +.02 2.60 139.07 +1.04 5.94 +.19 1.08 49.94 +.99 0.24 14.36 +.12 0.50 23.64 +.54 21.76 +.24 6.90 +.25 13.28 -.03 69.12 +3.03 10.58 +.34 0.48 11.85 +.16 2.00 +.05 30.15 +.94 46.02 +.17 259.45-19.59 0.44 22.66 +.23 3.57 21.83 +.03 0.29 4.67 +.04 14.85 +.03 0.69 8.83 +.12 8.51 0.25 22.11 +.22 26.77 -.47 9.40 +.02 4.47 -.22 0.59 25.67 +.47 60.69 +.32 2.20 +.01 23.45 +.60 13.53 +.06 10.45 +.35 33.12 -1.76 8.47 +.42 22.35 +.02 11.59 +.19 0.20 38.10 +.41 1.80 34.95 +.23 1.68 25.21 -.01 0.28 14.31 +.22 0.38 26.47 +.28 23.42 -.09 .94 -.07 39.23 +.60 6.67 -.02 2.44 +.07

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D 16.54 +.54 0.04 11.53 +.28 0.33 32.67 +.40 0.30 23.83 +.29 6.95 +.44 28.68 +1.01 41.25 +.10 1.86 +.01 2.16 63.60 +.31 0.52 33.55 +1.04 0.20 19.44 -.11 0.20 84.45 +1.22 1.08 -.04 45.36 +.45 4.66 -.11 0.70 71.38 +2.24 32.13 +1.59 0.25 10.76 -.32 0.20 25.19 +.58 0.08 11.38 +.43 0.48 9.00 +.02 1.00 35.59 +.43 21.21 +.26 2.68 -.02 5.55 -.09 42.22 +1.37 0.76 34.10 +.50 1.62 50.02 +.12 0.48 33.69 +.65 5.16 -.02 10.07 +.21 0.04 8.08 -.22 4.95 -.41 1.40 34.43 +.76 2.64 66.58 +.51 0.64 17.30 +.50 4.36 71.39 +.34 13.46 +.05 36.33 +.82 14.16 0.10 18.14 +.40 0.24 4.83 +.11 13.02 -.04 0.24 18.11 -.22 1.20 20.55 +.27 0.08 14.78 +.17 3.91 +.10 51.94 -.05 3.79 +.14 13.51 +.06 41.21 +.80 17.64 +.41 1.16 31.80 +.35 33.97 +1.42 5.39 +.10 0.42 21.76 +.34 5.95 -.16 8.78 +.09 11.85 +.02 1.60 69.67 +.80 0.46 30.37 +.77 11.03 +.04 18.00 +.36 4.92 +.35 21.89 +.36 4.64 +.06 1.68 27.07 +.73 8.25 -.27 1.07 +.05 78.32 -.67 3.40 -.20 1.22 +.01 41.25 +.48 33.64 +.91 0.20 37.53 +.43 38.59 +1.50 0.44 25.67 +.68 4.90 +.04 8.56 +.01 0.50 35.28 +.25 11.34 +.05 84.87 +.36 2.16 -.08 0.16 31.46 +.47 1.08 22.88 -.56 0.40 27.10 -.19 0.16 14.39 -.39 0.60 42.37 -.18 25.11 +.38 .86 -.01 1.77 +.14 0.40 7.75 +.20 46.22 +1.02 13.91 -.80 10.66 +.03 0.29 4.50 +.03 34.13 +.58 33.70 +.57 14.44 +.43 57.52 +.60 66.59 +1.33 1.90 33.50 +.79 46.10 +.59 39.99 +.27 34.45 +.07 10.10 +.09 1.96 36.01 -1.44 5.91 +.07 0.60 29.05 +.42 0.80 25.96 +.18 1.12 60.07 +1.93 0.04 25.91 +.55 17.52 +.44 0.34 57.78 +8.48 0.92 30.61 +.31 2.52 32.37 +.25 5.09 +.17 7.49 +.01 9.53 -.13 9.18 +.51 6.60 +.15 1.45 4.44 +.06 4.43 -.11 3.00 69.83 +.36 0.25 39.74 +.45 19.26 +.42 34.45 -.37 38.31 -.38 2.85 -.02 4.50 83.20 +.29 8.22 +.25 0.44 21.65 +.60 1.44 113.79 +2.82 0.50 45.58 -1.76 43.55 +.24 27.13 +.61 27.09 +.63

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes Majesco h MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MartenT

2.80 74.07 -1.66 0.04 16.32 -.62 12.85 +.71 0.24 6.27 +.09 1.00 25.94 -.48 0.63 21.01 +.24 7.27 -.02 12.54 -.12 7.87 +.09 0.90 7.89 +.06 0.58 6.90 10.11 -.22 10.95 +.17 10.27 -.02 19.42 -.18 2.68 -.03 0.88 55.88 +1.36 37.23 +.07 2.00 44.99 +1.14 1.80 33.51 +.98 17.84 +.51 0.20 22.43 -.21 48.51 +1.33 2.98 52.87 +.83 4.11 +.06 1.20 88.72 +3.11 4.72 -.07 .57 -.03 0.24 2.35 +.01 0.08 11.31 +.41 6.57 -.35 0.74 56.76 +1.90 0.52 12.71 +.48 1.00 35.68 +.58 25.29 +.11 0.11 55.46 +.93 0.08 33.62 +.40 34.58 +1.19 0.42 49.88 +1.11 0.45 59.27 +1.44 0.18 87.73 +2.06 0.31 40.15 +.99 0.16 36.03 +1.00 0.84 24.76 +.37 0.04 6.24 -.71 23.08 -.57 0.08 21.90 -1.96

Nm MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth MediaGen Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MergeHlth MeridBio Meritage MerL pfM MerL pfP Mesab Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt Middleby MdwGold g Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk MoleInsP h Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Motricity n MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanophase NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Ness Tech NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin

D 1.60 78.54 +.70 17.05 +.34 0.30 10.84 +.10 2.00 29.01 -.01 0.24 39.25 +1.92 11.93 +.16 0.60 240.52 +3.47 0.75 22.33 -.35 2.84 -.03 0.84 19.22 +.22 3.00 -.15 1.04 42.80 +.29 14.86 +.03 2.44 77.41 +.42 0.94 36.03 +1.04 0.72 61.08 -.12 15.91 +.23 47.39 +.01 0.90 57.92 +.52 0.92 25.33 +.46 23.82 -.06 21.84 +.47 51.97 -.45 6.89 -1.09 7.08 +.01 0.80 10.95 +.25 13.84 +.31 0.24 30.39 +.21 23.79 +.23 11.90 -.09 0.90 34.70 +1.33 5.71 +.34 20.89 +.50 0.36 24.90 +.79 10.75 +.20 61.99 +1.34 1.52 36.99 +.47 0.92 35.05 +.67 3.16 +.03 0.76 23.00 +.51 18.63 +.01 1.61 22.00 -.42 1.84 24.38 -.23 2.39 40.19 +3.10 4.39 +.11 .68 +.07 0.62 27.26 +.94 0.74 40.34 +.41 10.69 +.15 0.14 10.71 +.13 1.37 30.74 +.18 7.37 +.08 7.69 +.39 43.40 +.48 19.84 -.18 0.64 25.31 +.21 2.01 -.03 2.46 62.04 +1.40 71.86 +2.23 .64 +.02 7.24 94.12 +.38 1.21 +.06 0.20 29.30 +.07 7.42 -.05 8.75 +.05 10.79 +.39 4.78 +.07 2.96 +.04 22.19 -.07 12.66 +.09 56.89 +1.83 1.09 +.10 0.61 21.50 +.18 1.12 47.01 +.04 32.69 -1.57 14.72 +.41 15.22 -.49 1.12 57.80 +.50 13.87 +.85 0.36 18.04 +.17 0.42 27.11 +.67 0.20 25.38 -.01 1.20 17.21 -.03 0.20 67.12 +2.75 7.96 +.07 16.73 +1.43 0.07 2.93 +.09 1.10 64.49 +1.10 18.98 +.15 19.81 +.74 14.05 +.17 29.06 +1.36 0.60 15.90 +.13 .67 -.00 38.33 +1.73 2.60 -.10 6.73 -.02 20.55 +.09 0.44 13.19 +.05 1.20 30.08 +.40 18.92 +.59 0.14 26.69 +.54 13.13 -.31 1.30 +.06 20.62 +.45 0.29 2.41 +.06 0.72 18.37 +.10 14.18 +.29 1.38 54.30 +.26 7.17 46.33 +.68 0.40 48.81 +1.34 0.04 6.51 -.02 1.52 27.56 +.55 0.40 12.97 +.15 1.84 41.03 +.42 12.31 +.30 0.24 5.99 +.11 1.68 18.57 +.34 47.80 +.23 15.80 +.15 5.07 +.27 25.91 +.23 51.67 +.67 39.51 +.74 26.92 +.02 153.15 +3.82 3.41 +.02 21.26 2.04 -.01 13.36 +.36 19.86 +.51 1.43 -.04 0.24 3.83 +.06 8.53 +.69 24.96 +.31 14.41 +.03 5.23 +.16 .04 +.00 .09 6.81 +.35 1.36 40.78 +.17 94.35 +.92 1.00 16.81 +.17 7.63 -.16 0.28 12.78 +.03 3.86 -.06 0.20 17.82 +.16 58.85 +.84 0.60 60.48 +.55 8.33 +.13 12.72 +.13 0.15 14.56 +.60 0.15 16.15 +.56 0.20 21.62 +.31 2.00 56.03 +.52 0.92 17.85 +.12 1.86 48.00 +.41 1.08 81.24 +.51 15.97 -.19 22.71 +.05 1.40 19.94 +.02 0.20 35.00 +.27 0.72 76.66 -.23 0.56 10.83 +.23 5.27 +.07 1.55 26.65 -.07 0.80 36.95 -.39 1.44 61.87 +1.33 4.45 +.10 1.03 30.90 +.11 8.94 +.30 17.71 -.06 1.12 48.92 -.37 2.84 +.06 1.88 61.15 +.72 0.40 4.37 +.12 0.40 11.40 +.10 9.18 +.57 1.99 59.50 +.69 10.60 +.18 2.39 +.05 6.01 +.05 26.96 +.09 1.41 100.42 +9.43 1.60 40.36 +.50 0.50 31.54 -.05

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NuVasive 37.30 +1.64 NuanceCm 15.02 +.07 Nucor 1.44 39.38 +.86 NutriSyst 0.70 19.14 +.31 NuvFltOp 0.78 11.87 +.10 NuvMuVal 0.47 9.91 -.05 NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.93 +.03 NuvQPf2 0.66 8.44 +.11 Nvidia 11.29 +.00 NxStageMd 21.32 +.41 OGE Engy 1.45 43.68 +.85 OM Group 33.08 +.87 OReillyA h 53.73 +.72 OasisPet n 20.29 +.03 OcciPet 1.52 80.97 -.23 Oceaneer 53.04 +.35 OceanFr rs 1.02 -.01 Oclaro rs 14.10 +.01 OcwenFn 9.30 +.20 OdysMar 2.15 +.08 OfficeDpt 4.69 OfficeMax 15.08 +.37 OilSvHT 2.66 117.54 +2.05 OilStates 49.90 +.90 Oilsands g .45 -.01 OldDomF s 26.17 +.63 OldNBcp 0.28 10.11 +.05 OldRepub 0.69 13.91 -.05 Olin 0.80 20.82 +.13 OmegaHlt 1.48 23.60 +.57 Omncre 0.13 23.09 +.19 Omnicell 13.00 -.17 Omnicom 0.80 42.45 +1.16 OmniVisn 25.07 +.41 Omnova 7.62 +.15 OnSmcnd 7.16 +.12 OncoGenex 17.58 +1.22 ONEOK 1.84 49.20 +.85 OnyxPh 27.30 -.18 OpenTable 57.33 -.33 OpnwvSy 1.78 +.01 OpkoHlth 2.72 +.11 optXprs 15.78 +.16 Oracle 0.20 28.64 -.49 OrbitalSci 15.37 +.24 Orexigen 5.71 -.23 OrientEH 11.34 OriginAg 8.81 +.28 OrionMar 12.71 -.74 Oritani s 0.30 10.32 +.02 Orthovta 2.11 +.04 OshkoshCp 31.77 +1.34 OvShip 1.75 33.80 -.11 OwensM s 0.71 28.30 +.62 OwensCorn 27.67 +.67 OwensIll 28.88 +.26 Oxigene h .26 -.01 PDL Bio 1.00 5.59 +.12 PF Chng 0.42 47.34 +.16 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.50 +.59 PHH Corp 19.75 +1.07 PMC Sra 7.01 -.07 PMI Grp 4.34 -.05 PNC 0.40 52.74 -.30 PNM Res 0.50 12.12 +.09 POSCO 1.43 108.21 +1.30 PPG 2.20 77.46 +1.69 PPL Corp 1.40 27.88 +.09 PSS Wrld 21.91 +.26 PacWstBc 0.04 17.87 -.39 Paccar 0.48 50.80 +1.30 PacerIntl 5.93 +.33 PacCapB h .77 +.04 PacEth h .95 -.03 PacSunwr 5.91 +.02 PackAmer 0.60 23.92 +.68 Pactiv 33.17 +.02 PaetecHld 4.26 +.09 PallCorp 0.64 43.20 +.86 PampaEng 0.08 12.94 +.34 PanASlv 0.05 30.32 +.54 PaneraBrd 89.91 -.55 ParagShip 0.20 3.85 -.01 ParamTch 20.31 +.26 ParaG&S 1.66 +.05 Parexel 20.74 +.25 ParkDrl 4.59 +.11 ParkerHan 1.08 75.49 +.41 PartnerRe 2.00 81.36 +.63 PatriotCoal 13.40 +.62 Patterson 0.40 27.65 +.17 PattUTI 0.20 19.55 +.44 Paychex 1.24 27.76 +.37 PeabdyE 0.28 51.57 +1.04 Pebblebk n 19.23 +.24 Pegasys lf 0.12 25.26 -.63 Pengrth g 0.84 11.40 +.20 PnnNGm 31.18 +.53 PennVa 0.23 14.71 +.15 PennWst g 1.80 22.37 +.25 Penney 0.80 32.96 +.23 PenRE 0.60 13.65 +.44 Penske 13.76 +.27 Pentair 0.76 34.51 +.43 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.19 +.01 PepBoy 0.12 11.68 +.35 PepcoHold 1.08 19.64 +.15 PepsiCo 1.92 64.97 -.44 PeregrineP 1.73 -.03 PerfectWld 28.59 +.21 PerkElm 0.28 23.10 +.38 Perrigo 0.25 64.46 +.78 PetMed 0.50 15.44 -.01 PetChina 3.97 127.32 +2.57 Petrohawk 17.84 +.50 PetrbrsA 1.18 30.36 -.26 Petrobras 1.18 33.05 -.13 PetroDev 30.17 +.07 PtroqstE 5.86 PetsMart 0.50 36.22 +.61 Pfizer 0.72 17.66 +.27 PhrmAth 4.20 -.05 PharmPdt 0.60 24.64 +.43 Pharmacyc 6.73 -.32 Pharmerica 9.85 +.12 PhilipMor 2.56 57.48 +.41 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.24 +.55 PhlVH 0.15 60.67 +.65 PhnxCos 2.37 +.06 PhotrIn 6.36 +.08 PiedNG 1.12 29.50 +.06 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.09 +.33 Pier 1 7.52 +.04 PilgrmsP n 5.88 -.08 PimCpOp 1.38 17.37 -.05 PimIncStr2 0.78 10.37 -.02 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.01 +.09 PinnclEnt 11.18 +.17 PinnaclFn 11.00 +1.04 PinWst 2.10 42.37 +.58 PionDrill 6.52 +.06 PionFltRt 0.87 12.57 +.07 PioNtrl 0.08 72.37 +.84 PitnyBw 1.46 22.02 +.47 PlainsEx 26.91 +.42 Plantron 0.20 35.45 +.80 PlatGpMet 1.89 +.06 PlatUnd 0.32 43.40 +.11 PlaybyB 5.07 -.02 Plexus 32.99 +.28 PlugPwr h .42 PlumCrk 1.68 37.25 +.49 Polaris 1.60 72.28 -.06 Polo RL 0.40 93.62 +.48 Polycom 28.82 +.26 PolyMet g 1.60 -.01 PolyOne 12.55 +.20 Polypore 33.74 +.80 Pool Corp 0.52 20.91 +.06 Popular 2.81 -.03 PortGE 1.04 21.00 +.20 PortglTel 0.77 14.27 +.46 PositvID h .66 +.06 PostPrp 0.80 30.81 +.94 Potash 0.40 142.43 -1.00 Potlatch 2.04 36.04 +.73 Power-One 10.35 +.48 PSCrudeDS 65.56 -3.71 PwshDB 25.03 +.58 PwShCurH 23.31 +.30 PS Agri 29.17 +.77 PS Oil 25.57 +.54 PS BasMet 22.75 +.43 PS USDBull 22.39 -.31 PwSClnEn 10.02 +.09 PSTechLdr 0.02 21.59 +.32 PSFinPf 1.30 17.96 +.03 PSDvTecLd 0.44 20.98 +.40 PSETecLd 0.11 17.73 +.23 PSBldABd 1.24 26.39 +.11 PSHYCpBd 1.53 18.45 +.08 PwShPfd 1.02 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D 0.42 33.62 -.03 4.81 +.11 37.72 +.45 5.25 +.04 0.41 5.27 +.01 23.53 +.72 26.68 +.69 0.08 8.96 +.31 2.40 98.20 +2.08 51.67 +.27 8.20 +.01 4.14 +.08 1.35 +.01 35.14 -.49 24.10 -1.38 0.16 15.01 +.53 21.51 +.24 3.57 -.05 7.35 +.16 13.41 +.10 3.88 +.03 0.84 57.07 +.47 16.47 -.05 1.60 62.83 +.67 22.36 +.87 0.62 51.12 +1.01 60.25 +1.09 10.35 +.26 17.15 0.30 45.53 +1.39 17.61 +.44 3.31 -.07 10.47 +.21 9.06 -.21 10.11 -.12 1.12 34.64 +.21 3.17 -.12 0.28 33.21 +.34 0.20 37.88 +1.34 28.80 +.17 1.82 38.01 +.14 1.43 42.69 +1.88 0.60 24.73 +.13 0.02 13.16 +.47 11.75 -1.37 34.54 +.50 1.00 23.46 +.12 .94 +.03 21.37 +.41 12.81 +.17 4.61 +.04 11.98 +.08 0.80 39.25 +.09 1.05 34.55 +.70 0.58 31.14 +.29 0.77 28.61 +.25 0.43 34.57 +.44 1.00 58.94 +.75 0.16 14.61 +.14 0.60 32.23 +.45 0.31 24.02 +.20 1.27 32.22 +.26 3.63 -.12 1.36 61.32 -1.04 0.36 20.27 +.27 1.98 +.07 0.52 27.45 +.37 0.20 54.68 +1.07 1.32 20.16 +.11 0.04 40.53 +.23 1.02 21.61 +.45 0.30 14.42 +.37 0.16 8.48 +.28 .90 +.01 72.27 +1.09 0.06 5.58 -.01 .60 -.02 0.08 15.56 -.05 41.98 +.55 0.12 5.52 +.11 0.05 11.23 +.06 16.20 +.57 16.09 +.29 4.72 +.07 3.00 129.96 +1.96 0.60 50.57 +.50 0.35 15.38 -.04 25.15 +.60 .48 +.02 8.55 +.13 1.44 26.96 +.57 0.40 33.52 +.24 .34 +.01 0.60 39.85 +.24 6.18 +.19 13.52 +.02 13.13 +.04 3.62 -.09 10.76 +.13 8.72 -.13 0.04 25.45 +.71 10.72 -.34 2.44 +.16 26.32 +.25 1.64 +.18 0.35 10.21 -.34 0.04 8.62 -.09 9.47 +.27 8.29 +.22 32.14 +.60 15.59 +.08 26.08 +.29 1.13 56.79 +.78 23.95 +.47 24.97 +.19 0.04 2.44 -.08 2.06 23.30 -.96 1.00 29.04 +.26 32.30 +.04 15.00 0.92 24.19 +.56 0.20 15.10 -.36 16.73 +.16 0.82 17.77 +.32 8.51 -.10 4.15 -.02 0.71 32.36 +.57 0.60 44.96 +.40 44.04 +1.13 10.03 18.00 +.40 0.47 10.33 +.13 10.26 +.16 9.90 -.17 23.88 +.08 28.48 +.23 0.25 17.65 +.28 1.55 48.23 +.90 7.05 +.16 2.15 28.90 +.10 1.00 54.18 +.68 6.42 +.13 4.46 +.20 0.32 27.77 +.44 1.66 48.50 +1.03 41.95 +.62 0.10 4.65 +.16 0.40 44.40 +1.87 1.27 30.40 +.04 1.12 12.18 +.15 12.98 -.19 5.41 -.10 1.65 15.47 +.51 0.85 7.74 +.05 0.68 15.02 +.53 4.78 81.11 +1.35 1.35 15.35 +.40 0.08 7.73 +.12 0.44 20.84 +.96 1.00 16.95 -.01 0.54 10.56 +.07 32.81 +.02 0.68 41.49 +.97 4.34 -.06 32.62 +.91 37.80 +.49 11.27 +.11 24.76 +.75 9.84 -.30 .17 +.01 20.65 +.60 13.92 -.11 18.84 +.10 21.51 +.18 9.76 -.28 0.72 53.50 -.30 17.52 -.17 0.30 34.09 +.21 0.52 28.09 +.06 15.14 +.03 0.08 20.78 -.16 0.10 2.84 +.01 21.96 +.04 48.86 +.94 45.04 +1.15 11.06 +.30 1.16 38.65 +.61 0.40 31.52 +.57 33.15 -1.52 2.10 89.47 +.92 17.82 +.18 1.00 45.99 +.66 1.00 49.85 +.45 21.46 +.61 1.21 -.01 1.60 57.60 +.35 0.85 31.71 +.51 0.52 41.52 +.80 0.02 14.88 +.55 19.32 +.29 10.41 +.38 18.12 -.11 0.64 54.98 +.82 14.08 +.27 2.44 74.28 +1.43 3.23 54.39 +1.01 0.28 15.98 +.28 0.50 23.71 +.25 2.78 -.05 71.69 +.34 0.28 37.99 -.20 6.15 -.02 1.60 38.00 +.14 3.08 +.01 7.65 63.47 +1.07 10.53 +.61 66.05 +.53 1.44 54.64 +.88 26.78 +1.12 45.92 -.54 2.46 +.09 35.42 +.98 27.10 +.84 0.32 24.41 +1.45 9.56 +.24 14.63 +.28 0.26 5.51 +.04 0.92 22.45 +.36 5.32 +.26 1.00 45.42 -3.20 0.66 18.69 +.36

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Moral Continued from B1 This is called a “moral hazard” — the notion that borrowers might decide to stop paying back what they owe or continue to withhold payment because they see no repercussions. Bartlett, a soft-spoken 29year-old, said he feels no obligation to the bank that sold him a risky mortgage at the peak of the housing boom and then did little to help him keep his home once the bottom fell out of the market. “I don’t feel remorse, because it’s just a corporation,” he said. “I kind of feel guilty, but then I think about my down payment and the payments I made. . . . I was an indentured servant for them, and now I’m living for free.” At the same time, Bartlett said he can’t understand why he still has a roof over his head. “I was expecting to be out of here 18 months ago,” he said. “I don’t know if I’m just slipping through the cracks.” In 2004, Bartlett moved south

Foreclosure Continued from B1 “There are so many questionable aspects to this thing it’s scary.”

Assessing the damage The country’s mortgage lenders contend that any problems that might be identified are technical and will not change that they have the right to foreclose en masse. “We did a thorough review of the process, and we found the facts underlying the decision to foreclose have been accurate,” Barbara Desoer, president of Bank of America Home Loans, said earlier this week. “We paused while we were doing that, and now we’re moving forward.” Some analysts are not sure that banks can proceed so freely. Katherine Porter, a visiting law professor at Harvard University and an expert on consumer credit law, said that lenders were wrong to minimize problems with the legal documentation. “The misbehavior is clear: They lied to the courts,” she said. “The fact that they are saying no one was harmed, they are missing the point. They did actual harm to the court system, to the rule of law. We don’t say, ‘You can perjure yourself on the stand because the jury will come to

from West Virginia, fresh from college with a marketing degree to work in Florida’s flourishing construction industry. He had a respectable salary and a company car. He bought his 1,700square-foot condo in March 2005 for $158,000, according to Lee County property records, and said he put 20 percent down when he took out a loan with BB&T. “The American dream,” he said. “It was great for two years.” In the first year, the value of his home surged past $200,000. But the good times didn’t last. As boom turned to bust, Bartlett lost his steady job and his company car. To reduce his monthly payments and pay off other debts, he refinanced into a larger home loan with an adjustable rate that was initially low. He figured that he would sell his home before the interest rate on the loan, taken out from Countrywide Financial, now owned by Bank of America, reset at a higher level. But by then, the value of his home had plummeted, eventually losing more than two-thirds of

what he’d paid for it. There was no longer any way to refinance. Over time, Bartlett said, the interest rate shot up to 10 percent and his monthly payments soared to more than $2,100, including escrow. For a while, he tried to keep up. He took jobs waiting tables. He rode his bike to work. He burned through his retirement savings. Finally, he realized it was a lost cause. “I just said, ‘I can’t do this,’ ” he said. “It took a lot for me to call it quits.” Bartlett says he called Countrywide — and later Bank of America — dozens of times, pleading with them to modify his mortgage or lower his principal. Nothing materialized, so he simply stopped paying. Bank of America did not respond to a request for comment on this case. There was no way he could build up equity in his house. “Not in a hundred years — not even if it had gold toilets,” he said. And he figured his credit rating was already shot. “I would be an idiot to pay. . . . Why just keep pumping money if it’s going out the door?”

the right verdict anyway.’ That’s what they are saying.” Robert Willens, a tax expert, said that documentation issues had created potentially severe tax problems for investors in mortgage securities and that “there is enough of a question here that the courts might well have to resolve the issue.”

managers at lenders and loan servicers sometimes patched such holes by issuing affidavits meant to prove control of a mortgage. In Broward County, Fla., alone, more than 1,700 affidavits were filed in the past two years attesting to lost notes, according to Legalprise, a legal services company that tracks foreclosure data. When many mortgage loans went bad, lenders outsourced crucial tasks like verifying the amount a borrower owed or determining which institution had a right to foreclose. Now investors who bought mortgage trusts — investment vehicles composed of mortgages — are wondering if the loans inside them were recorded properly. If not, the tax advantages of the trusts could be wiped out, leaving mortgage securities investors with significant tax bills.

Speed and profits As the legal system begins sorting through the competing claims, one thing is not in dispute: The pell-mell origination of mortgage loans during the real estate boom and the patchwork of financial machinery and documentation that supported it were created with speed and profits in mind, and with little attention to detail. As lenders and Wall Street firms bundled thousands of mortgage loans into securities so they could be sold quickly, efficiently and lucratively to legions of investors, slipshod practices took hold among lenders and their representatives, former employees of these operations say. Banks routinely failed to record each link in the chain of documents that demonstrate ownership of a note and a property, even though they assured investors they would do so, according to court documents, analysts and interviews. When problems arose, executives and

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 B5

Strollers Continued from B1 The strollers were deemed dangerous, especially to children under 1 year of age, because children, when left unharnessed, can crawl through the opening between the seat and stroller tray and become trapped. “We assume that if something is sold and hasn’t been recalled, the product must be safe,” said Nancy Cowles, executive director of Kids in Danger, a nonprofit group that campaigns for safer children’s products. The Consumer Product Safety Commission defines a recall as a repair or replacement of, or offer of a refund for, a product. The commission began investigating the safety of the newly recalled strollers after the first death, of a 7-month-old child, was reported in 2003, and staff members reported its findings to an industry committee that creates voluntary safety standards for children’s products the following year. In a Feb. 8, 2005, letter to the

Boyko ruled that the entities trying to seize properties had not proved that they actually owned the notes, and he blasted the banks for worrying “less about jurisdictional requirements and more about maximizing returns.” He also said that lenders “seem to adopt the attitude that since they have been doing this for so long, unchallenged, this practice equates with legal compliance,” and that now that their practices were “put to the test, their weak legal arguments compel the court to stop them at the gate.” Yet aside from the actions of a few random judges, little was done to force lenders to change their practices or slow things down. Since March 2009, more than 300,000 property owners a month have received foreclosure notices or lost their homes in foreclosures, according to RealtyTrac, which tracks foreclosure listings. What finally prompted a reexamination of the foreclosure wave was the disclosure in court documents over the past several months of so-called robo-signers, employees who signed affidavits so quickly that they could not possibly have verified the information in the document under review. Lenders and their representatives have sought to minimize the significance of robo-signing and, while acknowledging legal

Legal precedents For years, lenders bringing foreclosure cases commonly did not have to demonstrate proof of ownership of the note. Consumer advocates and consumer lawyers have complained about the practice, to little avail. But a decision in October 2007 by Judge Christopher Boyko of the U.S. District Court in northern Ohio to toss out 14 foreclosure cases put lenders on notice.

industry group, part of ASTM International, a voluntary standards organization, Patricia Hackett, the commission’s directorate of engineering sciences, noted that two more children had died of strangulation in the strollers and urged the group to expedite revisions to the stroller standards. “CPSC staff requests that the ASTM subcommittee make this issue a priority,” she wrote, “so that proposed new revisions to the standard can be considered expeditiously.” A revised standard, requiring a larger opening between the seat and stroller tray, was adopted by the ASTM committee in 2008. Ultimately, the agency tied four deaths to the strollers between 2003 and 2005. McGraw, the Graco president, said both the company and federal regulators decided that a recall was not warranted at the time of the deaths because of “a strong belief that when used properly with a safety harness, this is a fundamentally safe product.” Instead, they decided to “dial up” education to consumers on the importance

lapses in how they documented loans, have argued that foreclosures should proceed anyway. After all, the lenders say, the homeowners owe the money. But such reasoning is the “Guantánamo Bay argument” said Adam Levitin, an associate professor of law at Georgetown University. “We know these guys are terrorists, we picked them on the battlefield, and we don’t need to give them any legal rights,” Levitin said. “Yet the courts have said they get some rights. Surely American families are entitled to that same level of process, that they get a fair trial, even if they are deadbeats.”

Maximizing profits People who have worked at loan servicers for many years, who requested anonymity to protect their jobs, said robosigning and other questionable foreclosure practices emanated from one goal: to increase efficiency and therefore profits. That rush, they say, allowed for the shoddy documentation that is expected to become evidence for homeowners in the coming court battles. Problems are also likely to arise in court involving whether those who signed documents required in foreclosures actually had the authority to do so — or if the documents themselves are

of using a safety harness in a stroller. “As is the case when anything happens with a product, you have to look at the facts you have on hand at the time and you make a judgment call,” McGraw said, adding, “We take this very, very seriously.” Graco is part of Newell Rubbermaid, a public company based in Atlanta. In a statement Wednesday, the company urged parents to immediately stop using the strollers, but said there was no need to return them. Instead, they asked consumers to contact the company, either by phone or via the website, for the free repair kit. The kit consists of a piece of cloth with leg holes that goes across the opening at the front of the stroller. “Our intent was, without any shadow of a doubt, with or without the harness use, to make it impossible for the child to slide down in the stroller,” McGraw said. Even without the repair kit, Graco said it was still safe to use the strollers as a travel system, meaning with an infant car seat attached.

even authentic. For example, Frederick Tygart, a circuit court judge overseeing a foreclosure case in Duval County, Fla., recently ruled that agents representing Deutsche Bank relied on documents that “must have been counterfeited.” He stopped the foreclosure. Deutsche Bank had no comment Wednesday. Cynthia Veintemillas, the lawyer representing the borrower in the case, Patrick Jeffs, said the paperwork surrounding her client’s foreclosure was riddled with problems. “Everybody knows the banks screwed up and loaned out money to people who couldn’t pay it back,” she said. “Why are people surprised that they don’t know what they are doing here either?” Meanwhile, another judge Wednesday indicated that the courts would not simply sign off on the banks’ documentation. Jonathan Lippman, the chief judge of New York’s courts, ordered lawyers to verify the validity of all foreclosure paperwork. “We cannot allow the courts in New York State to stand by idly and be party to what we now know is a deeply flawed process, especially when that process involves basic human needs — such as a family home — during this period of economic crisis,” Lippman said in a statement.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

10 14 17 29 56 ... ... 28 21 52 17 11 34 11 ... ... 20 ... 15 ... 7

49.41 +2.93 +43.0 21.70 +.10 +.5 11.75 -.05 -22.0 15.71 -.02 +27.8 71.36 +2.31 +31.8 .54 +.02 -21.2 37.05 +1.61 +34.8 57.29 +.44 +46.7 62.61 +.40 +5.8 6.25 +.15 +160.4 25.42 +.36 -22.3 42.82 -.01 -16.9 12.50 +.01 -6.1 19.64 +.43 -3.7 8.08 -.22 +45.6 21.76 +.34 +6.0 4.90 +.04 +81.5 8.22 +.25 +17.8 21.01 +.24 -11.0 10.75 +.20 +21.7 25.31 +.21 -17.0

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1345.00 $1343.30 $23.848

Pvs Day $1335.00 $1335.10 $23.764

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 16 18 26 81 ... 37 20 ... 23 18 9 26 22 ... 16 87 10 ... ...

81.24 +.51 +23.0 36.95 -.39 -1.7 50.37 +.31 +11.8 15.08 +.37 +18.8 50.80 +1.30 +40.1 2.26 +.03 -19.6 37.25 +.49 -1.4 129.96 +1.75 +17.8 21.81 -.07 +2.4 49.06 -.29 +2.9 72.79 +.05 +18.1 39.25 +.09 -1.9 27.45 +.37 +19.0 9.56 +.24 +59.3 11.26 +.10 -16.0 22.83 +.02 +1.4 15.60 +.30 -19.3 25.60 +1.05 -5.2 2.58 -.04 +22.9 15.30 +.07 -3.4

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm Citigrp S&P500ETF WellsFargo SPDR Fncl

6345200 4712904 1832958 983641 926345

11.75 -.05 4.11 +.05 117.87 +1.14 25.60 +1.05 14.61 +.14

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Lindsay 57.78 +8.48 +17.2 MLSel10 5-12 7.30 +.91 +14.2 AMR 7.34 +.82 +12.6 DeltaAir 12.97 +1.27 +10.9 NovoNord 100.42 +9.43 +10.4

Losers ($2 or more) Name ChrisBnk MediaGen Comeric wt MarshIls DB AgDS

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

5.83 -.94 -13.9 6.89 -1.09 -13.7 12.44 -1.51 -10.8 6.24 -.71 -10.2 23.75 -1.87 -7.3

Most Active ($1 or more) Name RareEle g PhrmAth ChinaShen Hyperdyn ChiGengM

Vol (00)

Last Chg

118134 12.74 +1.24 106405 4.20 -.05 91901 4.13 +1.93 46895 3.02 -.23 36356 1.84 +.38

Gainers ($2 or more) Name ChinaShen Uranerz MtnPDia g RareEle g Versar

Last

4.13 +1.93 +87.7 2.05 +.50 +32.3 4.64 +.49 +11.8 12.74 +1.24 +10.8 3.24 +.29 +9.9

Name NewConcEn Vringo n Hyperdyn HMG Libbey

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Intel PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Microsoft Comcast

Last Chg 19.64 51.19 1.35 25.31 19.38

+.43 +.37 +.01 +.21 +.27

Last

Verenium PacPreBc Datalink DearbrnBc ZionO&G wt

4.38 +1.13 +34.8 5.05 +.83 +19.7 4.11 +.67 +19.5 2.08 +.33 +18.9 2.99 +.46 +18.2

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

3.51 2.50 3.02 2.90 13.91

-.58 -14.2 -.25 -9.1 -.23 -7.1 -.18 -5.8 -.80 -5.4

Amylin Alkerm FSI Intl FMidBc AcornEngy

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

839709 706979 642533 548551 405105

Name

Last

Diary 2,302 742 92 3,136 183 7

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

11.03 -9.46 -46.2 10.50 -4.00 -27.6 2.55 -.53 -17.2 10.83 -1.69 -13.5 4.33 -.59 -12.0

Diary 313 169 35 517 15 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,870 779 110 2,759 91 22

11,258.01 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 411.04 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,118.77 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,107.97 4,749.38 411.33 7,523.81 2,086.47 2,457.39 1,178.17 12,412.21 702.11

+129.35 +102.10 +3.44 +100.16 +25.59 +20.44 +12.27 +132.57 +7.96

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.18 +2.20 +.84 +1.35 +1.24 +.84 +1.05 +1.08 +1.15

52-wk %Chg

+6.52 +15.85 +3.35 +4.72 +14.33 +8.30 +5.66 +7.48 +12.27

+11.65 +20.51 +7.56 +5.86 +12.33 +14.26 +8.95 +10.98 +16.03

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

339.71 2,669.27 3,828.15 5,728.93 6,524.55 23,556.50 34,880.47 21,425.79 3,243.01 9,381.60 1,870.44 3,179.15 4,694.50 5,746.80

+.17 s +.12 s +.55 s +.44 s +.52 s -.87 t +1.24 s +.91 s -.46 t -1.65 t +.71 s -.41 t -.69 t +.03 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9861 1.5855 .9779 .002065 .1502 1.3961 .1288 .012322 .080626 .0325 .000885 .1505 1.0383 .0323

.9692 1.5699 .9672 .002056 .1503 1.3744 .1288 .012275 .080231 .0325 .000886 .1469 1.0307 .0322

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.56 +0.18 +6.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.93 +0.06 +7.9 GrowthI 23.76 +0.23 +7.8 Ultra 20.95 +0.18 +7.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.43 +0.15 +5.5 AMutlA p 24.29 +0.22 +6.9 BalA p 17.30 +0.14 +8.5 BondA p 12.53 +0.01 +9.5 CapWA p 21.32 +0.11 +9.1 CapIBA p 50.03 +0.51 +7.4 CapWGA p 35.32 +0.51 +5.9 EupacA p 41.09 +0.65 +7.2 FdInvA p 34.55 +0.38 +6.7 GovtA p 14.77 +0.01 +7.8 GwthA p 28.78 +0.28 +5.3 HI TrA p 11.28 +0.01 +12.8 IncoA p 16.40 +0.14 +9.3 IntBdA p 13.71 +6.5 ICAA p 26.87 +0.28 +5.1 NEcoA p 24.38 +0.29 +8.4 N PerA p 27.51 +0.42 +7.3 NwWrldA 54.47 +0.51 +15.4 SmCpA p 36.76 +0.41 +16.6 TxExA p 12.47 +6.8 WshA p 25.96 +0.29 +7.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.41 +0.41 +4.1 IntlEqA 28.65 +0.39 +3.9 IntEqII I r 12.17 +0.17 +3.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.67 +0.28 +4.9 MidCap 29.93 +0.34 +17.1 MidCapVal 19.23 +0.24 +7.0 Baron Funds: Growth 45.08 +0.38 +9.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.22 +10.8 DivMu 14.73 -0.01 +4.8 TxMgdIntl 15.80 +0.29 +3.4 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.75 +0.21 +6.8 GlAlA r 18.96 +0.15 +6.3 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.69 +0.14 +5.7 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.79 +0.21 +7.0 GlbAlloc r 19.05 +0.14 +6.5 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.50 +0.44 +9.1 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.32 +0.13 +6.9 DivrBd 5.10 +9.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.51 +0.27 +11.6 AcornIntZ 39.02 +0.43 +16.0 ValRestr 45.50 +0.71 +7.5 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.82 +0.19 +8.7 USCorEq2 10.00 +0.12 +10.4 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.27 +0.32 +4.2 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.67 +0.33 +4.4 NYVen C 31.05 +0.31 +3.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.78 +0.01 +9.1 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.24 +0.21 +17.9 EmMktV 35.99 +0.28 +15.6 IntSmVa 16.18 +0.25 +8.4 LargeCo 9.30 +0.10 +7.3 USLgVa 18.50 +0.25 +9.9 US SmVa 22.64 +0.31 +15.5 IntlSmCo 16.08 +0.25 +14.5 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 17.94 +0.32 +7.3 Glb5FxInc 11.71 +0.01 +7.9 2YGlFxd 10.24 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.71 +0.65 +6.1 Income 13.44 +7.5 IntlStk 35.22 +0.51 +10.6 Stock 100.20 +1.30 +5.3 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.04 +0.18 +2.6

NatlMunInc 10.00 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.32 LgCapVal 17.09 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.86 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.97 FPACres 26.24 Fairholme 33.30 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.23 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.77 StrInA 12.95 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.98 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.40 FF2015 11.17 FF2020 13.47 FF2020K 12.87 FF2025 11.17 FF2030 13.30 FF2035 11.00 FF2040 7.68 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.25 AMgr50 14.93 Balanc 17.49 BlueChGr 41.32 Canada 53.88 CapAp 23.84 CpInc r 9.31 Contra 63.83 ContraK 63.87 DisEq 21.58 DivIntl 29.38 DivrsIntK r 29.41 DivGth 25.75 EmrMk 25.48 Eq Inc 41.05 EQII 16.92 Fidel 29.40 FltRateHi r 9.72

+9.6 -0.01 +4.3 +0.18 +2.9 +0.13 +5.1 +3.1 +0.13 +7.3 +0.26 +10.7 +0.03 +12.2 +0.16 +9.1 +0.03 +10.4 +0.17 +9.3 +0.09 +0.08 +0.11 +0.11 +0.10 +0.13 +0.12 +0.09

+7.8 +7.9 +8.1 +8.3 +8.2 +8.0 +7.9 +8.0

+0.15 +7.1 +0.09 +9.3 +0.13 +8.6 +0.43 +8.9 +1.01 +11.1 +0.50 +11.2 +0.03 +13.2 +0.55 +9.7 +0.55 +9.8 +0.28 +2.7 +0.42 +4.9 +0.43 +5.1 +0.29 +9.4 +0.19 +12.7 +0.47 +6.2 +0.20 +4.8 +0.29 +4.3 +5.9

GNMA 11.75 GovtInc 10.81 GroCo 75.34 GroInc 16.81 GrowthCoK 75.39 HighInc r 8.96 Indepn 22.01 IntBd 10.81 IntmMu 10.42 IntlDisc 32.10 InvGrBd 11.75 InvGB 7.53 LgCapVal 11.76 LatAm 57.29 LevCoStk 24.76 LowP r 35.82 LowPriK r 35.81 Magelln 66.28 MidCap 25.81 MuniInc 12.93 NwMkt r 16.40 OTC 49.54 100Index 8.35 Ovrsea 31.49 Puritn 17.11 SCmdtyStrt 11.40 StIntMu 10.78 STBF 8.52 SmllCpS r 17.51 StratInc 11.55 StrReRt r 9.37 TotalBd 11.04 USBI 11.63 Value 63.62 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 52.53 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.74 IntlInxInv 35.24 TotMktInv 34.17 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.74 TotMktAd r 34.17 First Eagle:

+8.1 +7.4 +0.31 +9.2 +0.16 +5.1 +0.31 +9.4 -0.01 +11.7 +0.39 +10.5 +9.6 +5.4 +0.49 +5.8 +9.1 +9.9 +0.14 +4.6 +0.81 +12.1 +0.35 +8.2 +0.35 +12.4 +0.35 +12.5 +0.81 +3.2 +0.35 +10.5 +0.01 +7.2 +0.01 +14.0 +0.33 +8.4 +0.09 +5.3 +0.54 +1.8 +0.12 +8.4 +0.23 +4.6 +3.2 +4.2 +0.19 +9.8 +0.02 +10.7 +0.08 +10.6 +0.01 +9.8 +8.3 +0.74 +11.7 +0.78 +23.7 +0.44 +7.3 +0.51 +5.4 +0.37 +8.6 +0.44 +7.3 +0.37 +8.6

GlblA 44.27 +0.18 +10.7 OverseasA 21.88 +12.4 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.10 +6.6 FoundAl p 10.30 +0.09 +6.6 HYTFA p 10.36 +9.4 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +9.6 USGovA p 6.87 +0.01 +6.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.9 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.01 +9.8 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.01 +9.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.01 +0.17 +6.0 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.90 +0.10 +5.3 GlBd A p 13.71 +0.04 +11.7 GrwthA p 17.50 +0.22 +4.1 WorldA p 14.48 +0.16 +3.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.74 +0.04 +11.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.00 +0.44 +3.1 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.70 +0.16 +2.9 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.71 +0.40 +5.9 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.04 +0.15 +14.6 IntlCorEq 28.62 +0.54 +7.1 Quality 19.70 +0.16 +3.0 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.27 +11.5 HYMuni 8.85 +0.01 +12.8 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.18 +0.01 +10.3 CapApInst 34.05 +0.29 +3.3 IntlInv t 58.87 +1.35 +8.2 Intl r 59.57 +1.37 +8.6 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.10 +0.43 +4.6 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.08 +0.43 +4.8 Hartford HLS IA :

CapApp 39.16 +0.54 +7.1 Div&Gr 18.59 +0.23 +6.1 Advisers 18.71 +0.16 +7.2 TotRetBd 11.49 +0.01 +9.1 HussmnStrGr 13.07 -0.05 +2.3 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.20 +0.17 +1.2 CmstkA 14.67 +0.17 +7.4 EqIncA 8.14 +0.06 +6.0 GrIncA p 17.82 +0.19 +4.2 HYMuA 9.65 +10.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.66 +0.21 +4.0 AssetStA p 23.32 +0.21 +4.7 AssetStrI r 23.52 +0.21 +4.9 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.75 +8.7 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.75 +0.01 +8.9 HighYld 8.19 +12.5 IntmTFBd 11.13 +4.6 ShtDurBd 11.07 +3.4 USLCCrPls 19.33 +0.23 +6.3 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.23 +0.59 +15.8 PrkMCVal T 21.13 +0.20 +6.7 Twenty T 63.43 +0.49 +3.0 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.68 +0.10 +9.2 LSGrwth 12.47 +0.12 +8.9 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.90 +0.34 +10.5 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.46 +0.24 +19.6 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.80 +0.24 +19.3 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.09 +5.6 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.63 +0.31 +10.5 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.42 +0.07 +13.0 StrInc C 14.99 +0.07 +12.1 LSBondR 14.36 +0.07 +12.7 StrIncA 14.92 +0.07 +12.8

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.67 +0.05 +12.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.55 +0.13 +3.9 BdDebA p 7.76 +0.01 +10.8 ShDurIncA p 4.68 +0.01 +6.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.73 +0.08 +6.5 ValueA 21.54 +0.19 +4.8 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.64 +0.20 +5.0 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.92 +0.01 +10.7 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.60 +0.15 +6.6 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.13 +0.10 +16.3 PacTgrInv 23.24 +0.10 +20.9 MergerFd 15.93 -0.01 +2.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.77 +0.01 +12.9 TotRtBdI 10.77 +0.01 +13.1 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.87 +0.23 +8.1 GlbDiscZ 29.27 +0.23 +8.3 QuestZ 18.22 +0.16 +5.8 SharesZ 20.20 +0.17 +6.3 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.14 +0.48 +9.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.66 +0.50 +8.7 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.32 +12.2 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.42 +0.19 +3.4 Intl I r 18.74 +0.14 +11.3 Oakmark r 39.44 +0.37 +6.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.96 +0.04 +12.6 GlbSMdCap 14.78 +0.18 +15.7 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.69 +0.45 +1.9 DvMktA p 34.31 +0.26 +19.3 GlobA p 58.06 +0.70 +9.5 GblStrIncA 4.38 +16.9

IntBdA p 6.95 +0.06 +12.2 MnStFdA 30.44 +0.30 +8.2 RisingDivA 14.55 +0.16 +5.7 S&MdCpVl 29.03 +0.28 +9.2 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.21 +0.15 +4.9 S&MdCpVl 24.95 +0.24 +8.6 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.16 +0.14 +5.0 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.33 +0.01 +10.2 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.01 +0.27 +19.6 IntlBdY 6.95 +0.06 +12.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.70 +0.01 +10.8 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.27 +0.01 +13.0 AllAsset 12.69 +0.04 +14.3 ComodRR 8.73 +0.16 +14.2 HiYld 9.34 -0.01 +13.0 InvGrCp 11.94 +14.2 LowDu 10.72 +0.01 +5.8 RealRtnI 11.86 +11.9 ShortT 9.94 +2.0 TotRt 11.70 +0.01 +11.0 TR II 11.27 +0.01 +9.9 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.72 +0.01 +5.5 RealRtA p 11.86 +11.5 TotRtA 11.70 +0.01 +10.6 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.70 +0.01 +10.0 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.70 +0.01 +10.8 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.70 +0.01 +10.9 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.00 +0.35 +13.8 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.81 +0.46 +6.6 Price Funds: BlChip 35.46 +0.37 +8.2 CapApp 19.43 +0.13 +7.0 EmMktS 34.36 +0.28 +14.2

EqInc 21.98 EqIndex 31.76 Growth 29.91 HlthSci 28.22 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.51 IntlStk 13.99 MidCap 54.16 MCapVal 22.26 N Asia 19.24 New Era 45.71 N Horiz 29.87 N Inc 9.79 R2010 15.18 R2015 11.63 R2020 15.92 R2025 11.57 R2030 16.49 R2040 16.51 ShtBd 4.90 SmCpStk 31.63 SmCapVal 33.09 SpecIn 12.48 Value 21.75 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.55 VoyA p 22.16 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.52 PremierI r 18.23 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.58 S&P Sel 18.61 Scout Funds: Intl 31.42 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.07 AmShS p 39.00 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.28 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.79 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.98 IntValue I 27.58

+0.22 +6.3 +0.33 +7.1 +0.33 +8.7 +0.14 +7.8 +0.01 +12.5 +0.10 +8.6 +0.19 +11.0 +0.60 +14.0 +0.23 +7.4 +0.05 +19.2 +0.71 +4.8 +0.34 +16.8 +0.01 +8.9 +0.11 +8.8 +0.10 +9.0 +0.14 +9.0 +0.11 +9.0 +0.17 +9.1 +0.18 +9.0 +3.7 +0.33 +17.4 +0.40 +12.2 +0.04 +9.4 +0.24 +6.2 +0.15 +5.4 +0.25 +12.3 +0.13 +11.3 +0.24 +11.8 +0.39 +7.9 +0.20 +7.3 +0.51 +8.8 +0.41 +4.9 +0.40 +4.6 +0.26 +5.4 +0.13 +9.7 +0.24 +9.4 +0.25 +9.8

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.09 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.25 CpOpAdl 70.27 EMAdmr r 38.73 Energy 112.37 500Adml 108.56 GNMA Ad 11.13 HlthCr 52.36 HiYldCp 5.76 InfProAd 26.76 ITsryAdml 12.03 IntGrAdm 60.40 ITAdml 13.87 ITGrAdm 10.45 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 9.66 LT Adml 11.31 MuHYAdm 10.72 PrmCap r 65.14 STsyAdml 10.93 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.90 TtlBAdml 10.91 TStkAdm 29.36 WellslAdm 52.87 WelltnAdm 52.21 Windsor 42.14 WdsrIIAd 43.04 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.67 CapOpp 30.41 DivdGro 13.77 Energy 59.82 EqInc 19.33 Explr 65.03 GNMA 11.13 GlobEq 17.38 HYCorp 5.76 HlthCre 124.04 InflaPro 13.62 IntlGr 18.97 IntlVal 32.14

+0.07 +8.9 +7.1 +0.63 +1.3 +0.39 +13.7 +1.19 +0.3 +1.15 +7.3 +0.02 +7.9 +0.33 +4.3 +12.1 -0.01 +9.9 +11.4 +0.90 +11.8 -0.01 +6.1 -0.01 +13.4 +3.0 +0.01 +13.4 +6.6 +7.9 +0.55 +5.6 +3.5 +1.3 +5.9 +8.5 +0.32 +8.5 +0.24 +10.2 +0.45 +7.2 +0.61 +5.6 +0.45 +3.6 +0.20 +10.9 +0.27 +1.2 +0.14 +5.7 +0.63 +0.2 +0.20 +8.2 +0.56 +13.5 +0.02 +7.8 +0.24 +10.9 +12.0 +0.78 +4.2 -0.01 +9.8 +0.28 +11.7 +0.50 +5.0

ITIGrade 10.45 LifeCon 16.18 LifeGro 21.22 LifeMod 19.19 LTIGrade 9.66 Morg 16.53 MuInt 13.87 MuLtd 11.16 PrecMtls r 24.46 PrmcpCor 12.94 Prmcp r 62.75 SelValu r 17.66 STAR 18.70 STIGrade 10.90 StratEq 16.94 TgtRetInc 11.33 TgRe2010 22.34 TgtRe2015 12.30 TgRe2020 21.69 TgtRe2025 12.30 TgRe2030 20.96 TgtRe2035 12.60 TgtRe2040 20.66 TgtRe2045 13.04 USGro 16.88 Wellsly 21.82 Welltn 30.23 Wndsr 12.49 WndsII 24.25 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 108.55 Balanced 20.66 EMkt 29.42 Europe 27.20 Extend 37.20 Growth 29.31 ITBnd 11.79 MidCap 18.55 Pacific 10.51 REIT r 18.49 SmCap 31.46 SmlCpGth 19.34 SmlCpVl 14.88 STBnd 10.75

-0.01 +13.2 +0.08 +8.8 +0.21 +9.2 +0.15 +9.4 +0.01 +13.3 +0.18 +8.3 -0.01 +6.0 +3.0 +0.56 +19.7 +0.12 +6.9 +0.53 +5.6 +0.21 +10.7 +0.15 +7.7 +5.8 +0.26 +10.9 +0.04 +8.7 +0.13 +8.9 +0.09 +8.8 +0.17 +8.7 +0.11 +8.7 +0.21 +8.5 +0.13 +8.4 +0.22 +8.5 +0.14 +8.5 +0.19 +2.6 +0.09 +10.1 +0.26 +7.1 +0.18 +5.5 +0.25 +3.5 +1.15 +7.2 +0.15 +8.7 +0.29 +13.6 +0.60 +4.9 +0.46 +13.9 +0.30 +8.2 -0.01 +13.6 +0.22 +13.4 +0.11 +8.6 +0.42 +27.7 +0.38 +14.5 +0.21 +14.9 +0.19 +14.0 +0.01 +5.1

TotBnd

10.91

TotlIntl

15.53 +0.24 +7.8

+8.4

TotStk

29.35 +0.31 +8.3

Value

19.55 +0.22 +6.8

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.04 +0.18

EmMkInst

29.48 +0.29 +13.7

NS

ExtIn

37.26 +0.46 +14.0

FTAllWldI r

92.75 +1.46 +8.2

GrwthIst

29.32 +0.30 +8.4

InfProInst

10.90

+9.9

InstIdx

107.85 +1.14 +7.3

InsPl

107.85 +1.14 +7.4

InsTStPlus

26.53 +0.28 +8.4

MidCpIst

18.62 +0.22 +13.6

SCInst

31.52 +0.38 +14.6

TBIst

10.91

TSInst

29.37 +0.32 +8.5

+8.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

89.67 +0.94 +7.3

STBdIdx

10.75 +0.01 +5.2

TotBdSgl

10.91

TotStkSgl

28.34 +0.31 +8.4

+8.5

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.59 +0.09 +5.0

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.01

+13.0


B6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BID-N-BUY Below Retail.

INTRODUCING THE BULLETIN’S HOLIDAY BID-N-BUY ONLINE AUCTION EVENT BRINGING QUALITY PRODUCTS AT LOW-AUCTION PRICES TO CENTRAL OREGON BID ON

QUA

LITY

ITEMS

FROM L

OCAL RETAILERS ALL BEING SOLD TO THE H

DD I B T S IGHE

ER

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

Two Nights Lodging in Inglenook Room

Polk Audio LCi-RTS105 Speakers

One Year Couples Tennis Membership

Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material

Set of Bridgestone J33R Drivers

$100 Bead Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $390 FROM: Overleaf Lodge

RETAIL VALUE: $1250 FROM: QB Digital Living

RETAIL VALUE: $2388 FROM: Athletic Club of Bend

RETAIL VALUE: $1000 FROM: Carpetco Flooring

RETAIL VALUE: $300 FROM: Missing Link Golf

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Azillion Beads

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

YOU CAN BID ON:

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YOU CAN BID ON:

$100 Dining Gift Certificate

Scott Kay Designer Necklace

Nine Lipolaser Treatments

Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set

8-Week Gymnastics Program

Western Couture Gift Certificate

RETAIL VALUE: $100 FROM: Fountains Bar & Grill

RETAIL VALUE: $735 FROM: Ice Fine Jewelry

RETAIL VALUE: $2800 FROM: Body By Laser

RETAIL VALUE: $2098 FROM: Lance and Sandy’s Maytag

RETAIL VALUE: $110 FROM: Acrovision Sports Center

RETAIL VALUE: $250 FROM: Desperado

Central Oregon’s BIGGEST On-line Auction Event Is Coming November 7th Watch For More Details Coming Soon!

ATTENTION RETAILERS:

If you would like to participate in the BID-N-BUY Auction, call 541-382-1811. Hurry and call today. Time to participate is limited.


L

Inside

OREGON Historians delve into Salem’s underground, see Page C2.

C

Obama stumps for Kitzhaber in Portland, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Origami sculptor Eric Joisel dies at 53, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

BEND COUNCIL

NARROW WINDOW OF PUNCTUALITY

On quest to spur growth, city OKs fee break Program allows builders downtown to postpone payment for parking spots By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Redmond High School students board a shuttle bus Wednesday that takes them between the main campus and the Hugh Hartman campus. Many students end up missing the shuttle, which runs between periods, because of the short time between classes. School administrators are trying to find a way to ease the students’ rush between campuses and hope to have a solution by next year.

“How can I hold kids accountable for a flaw in the system? I can’t.” — Brian Lemos, Redmond High School principal

LEARNING ON A TIGHT SCHEDULE

When students have to switch campuses, they are often late to class — and it’s not their fault By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — ach day, some of the students rushing between classes at the main Redmond High School campus and the Hugh Hartman campus are bound to be late. Attendance and tardiness are two of the school’s top issues, Redmond High Schools Principal Brian Lemos said, but he can’t blame students when they are late either for the bus or class at Hartman. There just isn’t the time in the schedule, he said. “How can I hold kids accountable for a flaw

E

Crook County schools not facing budget crisis this year By Lauren Dake

in the system? I can’t,” Lemos said. A shuttle bus runs several times a day between the campuses, which sit less than a half mile apart. Some students take classes on both campuses.

Six minutes between classes With six minutes between each class period, those students must rush between class, the bus and the next class. Or, they walk. About 100 students take the shuttle each day, and many end up late for class at one building or another. Along with his staff, Lemos is trying to

fix the problem, but for now, students must rush. Driving between the two campuses takes about four minutes, and walking takes just more than seven. If students walk, that means they will be late. Even with the shuttle, they have about one minute to get to the bus and one minute to get to class after arriving. When the shuttle pulls up to Hartman’s main entrance, the students hurry off the bus. By the time they get inside, teachers are standing at the classroom doors checking for stragglers. Jose Gradilla, 15, goes between the two campuses twice a day, and so far he has been late only once. That one instance, though, represents one of the reasons why the rush between Hartman and Redmond High worries Lemos: Students may rush so much they don’t ask for extra instruction. See Tardy / C5

OREGON TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION

Advisory board gives Juniper Ridge proposal mixed review Officials likely to approve deal allowing city to sell land before upgrading infrastructure

The Bulletin

The budget battle in Crook County School District continues to loom, but for the first time in about two years, the district has money in the bank and is not anticipating any large cuts midway into the school year. “At this point in time, we have enough cash flow in reserves that we need not make cuts this time, for this year,” said Crook County School District Ivan Hernandez. “However, we’re still looking toward the future. We still have concerns. We can’t say there won’t be cuts in the future.”

$5 million budget cut in 2008-09 The district has been fighting back from a hole since the 2008-09 school year when officials overestimated enrollment numbers. That school year, the district cut approximately $5 million from the approximate $25 million budget. Teachers lost their jobs, the funding for the majority of athletics was pulled. The 2009-10 school year, more positions were cut, days were slashed and the athletic funding was pulled once again. See Crook / C5

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

A deal to open the city of Bend’s 1,500-acre Juniper Ridge property to some development is all but done, city and state transportation officials said Wednesday. Bob Bryant, manager of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s Central Oregon region, said after a public process he will likely sign off on the proposed agreement with the city. The agreement breaks the infrastructure stalemate between ODOT and the city. Development at Juniper Ridge has been constrained by state requirements for more road improvements before allowing more businesses near busy roads. The trouble for Bend has been that the city didn’t have money for improvements without being able to sell land to businesses.

“You’ve done, I think, a remarkable job of being creative and innovative and coming up with ways to address those issues. Still, some of the issues remain because there’s so much uncertainty here.” — David Lohman, Oregon Transportation commissioner City Councilor Mark Capell said Wednesday he felt confident the City Council will also approve the agreement. “I firmly believe that when this comes to council in early Novem-

ber, that it will pass unanimously,” Capell said. “The council is anxious to create jobs at Juniper Ridge.” The proposal was presented Wednesday to the Oregon Transportation Commission, the advisory board for state transportation policy, at its meeting in Bend. Members of the commission voiced a mixture of praise and concerns for the proposed agreement. They will provide input but not vote on the agreement. “Obviously, this whole Juniper Ridge enterprise raises a lot of serious questions for us,” said Commissioner David Lohman. “You’ve done, I think, a remarkable job of being creative and innovative and coming up with ways to address those issues. Still, some of the issues remain because there’s so much uncertainty here.” Lohman did not specify his concerns, but he did question whether the state commission would support a similar proposal, if it were put forward by a private developer instead of a city. See Commission / C5

Bend city councilors approved a new program Wednesday that will allow developers building in Bend’s downtown to defer costs associated with parking for up to one year. Like other incentives the city has offered lately, such as program that forgives certain fees for small businesses that relocate, it’s an effort to spur growth during a tough economic time. Today, developers must pay a $21,340 fee for each vehicle parking space a building might need. That money is used to help the city add more parking downtown. The city code requires one space per 500 square feet of building that is constructed in the downtown area. Under the new program, builders would be able to delay paying that fee for up to a year without interest. In fiscal year 2008-09, one downtown project paid $140,566 in these fees, and the year before three other developments paid $682,926 to help offset parking impacts. The city has a similar program that allows builders to defer system development charges — the fees that help offset the impacts to the city’s water, sewer and roads systems from new development — for up to nine months to help reduce the initial cost of construction. The council approved a one-year extension of that program in August. Bend’s new downtown parking fee deferral program will take effect Dec. 1, and will expire on Nov. 30, 2011.

City’s financial outlook ominous In other news, councilors received a grim financial update that included information about how a six-year $17 million deficit in the general fund could grow by as much as $10 million over the same period. The increase in the shortfall is because of a decline in home values in 2009 that changed the city’s property tax revenue projections for the coming years. Since the city’s general fund, which helps pay for code enforcement, public safety and street maintenance, gets more than 60 percent of its revenue from property taxes, this will leave councilors with a daunting task as they look for places to cut. “We’ve got our work cut out for us,,” Councilor Tom Greene said. City staff is planning a workshop for councilors in January to discuss possibilities for how to resolve Bend’s budgetary problems. See Council / C5

Have you voted? Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. Nov. 2. Postmarks do not count. Voters may mail their ballots or take them to drop-off locations, listed online at the following sites: Deschutes County: http://bit.ly/deschutesclerk • Anyone registered to vote in Deschutes County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541-388-6547. Crook County: http://bit.ly/crookclerk • Anyone registered to vote in Crook County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541-447-6553. Jefferson County: http://bit.ly/jeffersonclerk • Anyone registered to vote in Jefferson County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541-475-4451.

ELECTION

So far, the following percentages of registered voters have returned their ballots: Deschutes County:

8 percent Crook County:

12 percent Jefferson County:

11 percent


C2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B  Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Boat education class location has changed

visit http://sheriff.deschutes. org/Divisions/Marine-Patrol.

A class scheduled for today to assist residents in getting their Oregon Boater Education Cards has changed locations and will now be held at 63360 Britta Street, Building No. 3 in Bend, according to a news release. The free class will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and is sponsored by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The class will help prepare boaters for obtaining their boater cards from the marine board. Those interested in registering for the class can call 541388-6503. For more information,

Bend police welcome trick-or-treaters Trick-or-treaters are invited to stop by the Bend Police Department on Halloween night to pick-up a bag of fun and safe treats, according to news release. Children can stop by the department at 555 N.E. 15th St. between the hours of 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Items in the treat bags were donated from several businesses including the American Licorice Company, Fred Meyer, Red Robin and the Bend Police Association among others.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:08 a.m. Oct. 19, in the 61300 block of Huckleberry Place. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:17 a.m. Oct. 19, in the 1800 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Theft — A leaf blower was reported stolen at 8:40 a.m. Oct. 19, in the 61200 block of Bighorn Court. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 9:15 a.m. Oct. 19, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 9:19 a.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Brooks Alley Plaza. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:08 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 61200 block of Bighorn Court. Theft — A camera was reported stolen at 2:10 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — Appliances were reported stolen at 3:05 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 400 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:18 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 200 block of Northeast Irving Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:51 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 63400 block of Barton View Place. DUII — Franklin David Abbey,

46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:04 a.m. Oct. 20, in the 1000 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. DUII — Jason Briese, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:25 a.m. Oct. 20, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Franklin Avenue. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:01 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 2000 block of Northwest Jackpine Place. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:27 a.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Southwest Seventh Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. DUII — Aaron Marshall Strong, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:47 a.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Black Butte Boulevard. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:47 a.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Togo Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:11 a.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Southeast Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:47 p.m. Oct. 19, in the area of Southwest Rimrock Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:36 p.m. Oct. 19, in the 18600 block of Couch Market Road in Bend.

Off-duty Marion County deputy charged with DUII The Associated Press SALEM — An off-duty Marion County sheriff’s deputy has been charged with drunken driving after a two-vehicle crash. The Statesman Journal reported that 61-year-old Dennis Parson had a blood alcohol content of 0.227 percent after the crash last Monday, or nearly three times Oregon’s legal

limit of 0.08 percent. Salem police said Parson was driving a pickup when he struck a car driven by 24-yearold Justin Smith of Salem, who suffered minor injuries. Parson, who was not injured, was taken to the neighboring Polk County Jail after he was arrested. He was placed on paid administrative leave.

Salem’s hidden world uncovered Opera house creative director, historian delve into city’s tunnels By Thelma Guerrero-huston (Salem) Statesman Journal

SALEM — fter decades lying dormant beneath the streets of downtown Salem, rooms frozen in time one day could be visible to the public. For the past four months, Rebecca Maitland, the creative director at Reed Opera House, and retired Linfield College historian John Ritter have been working to unearth hidden worlds in the core of Salem. “There’s a lot of history in Salem,� Ritter said, “but you have to dig for it, literally.� Much of that history exists under some downtown Salem buildings constructed about a century ago. Buildings in the city’s business district, including Marion County Courthouse, were linked by tunnels that stretched to the Oregon State Penitentiary on State Street, Ritter said. “People could go from one building to the next without being seen,� he said. “Men could enter speakeasies, where illegal liquor was sold, card games were common and opium was smoked.�

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Chinatown Ritter’s most prized quarry is Salem’s former Chinatown, which he believes to be below Liberty Street NE. Historical records show Chinese immigrants came to Oregon around the time the Transcontinental Railroad was being constructed in the 1860s. The immigrants settled in Salem around the 1870s and early 1880s, with the population peaking at 300. “Salem had a very active Chi-

Today is Thursday, Oct. 21, the 294th day of 2010. There are 71 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 21, 1805, a British fleet commanded by Adm. Horatio Nelson defeated a French-Spanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar; Nelson, however, was killed. ON THIS DATE In 1797, the U.S. Navy frigate Constitution, also known as “Old Ironsides,� was christened in Boston’s harbor. In 1879, Thomas Edison perfected a workable electric light at his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J. In 1917, members of the 1st Division of the U.S. Army training in Luneville, France, became the first Americans to see action on the front lines of World War I. In 1944, during World War II, U.S. troops captured the German city of Aachen.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1959, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opened to the public in New York. In 1960, Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon clashed in their fourth and final presidential debate in New York. In 1967, the Israeli destroyer INS Eilat was sunk by Egyptian missile boats near Port Said; 47 Israeli crew members were lost. In 1971, President Richard Nixon nominated Lewis F. Powell and William H. Rehnquist to the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1985, former San Francisco Supervisor Dan White — who’d served five years in prison for killing Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights advocate — was found dead in a garage, a suicide.

Photos by Thomas Patterson (Salem) Statesman Journal

natown; dozens of stores sold everything from tea to clean shirts,� Ritter said. The 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act resulted in a surge of antiChinese sentiment in Salem, and most of the city’s Chinese population headed south to San Francisco, Ritter said. Others stayed in Salem, going underground, where they set up gambling, bootlegging and opium dens, he said. So far, Ritter and Maitland have not been able to uncover the elusive Chinatown. The pair said they are stymied by walls built to limit access to the city’s tunnel system. It doesn’t appear there is anything that would prohibit them from digging, save, perhaps, a building’s owner. Sean O’Day, the city’s deputy city manager, said the city would not have a role in the pair’s unearthing efforts, unless it were to affect a right of way, such as a city street. “Our role would be supporting John (Ritter),� O’Day said. “We think what’s he’s doing is exciting and intriguing, and if there’s a role for the city to play, we’ll be more than happy to engage in it and support John. We wish John

in downtown Salem,� she said. “Anything that helps businesses would be good.� In the meantime, Ritter and Maitland continue to trek into underground spaces with flashlights in hand, peering through whatever slight crack a door or wall may have, in the hope of finding more pieces of Salem’s underground history.

Anqitues

The forgotten remains of a disco under the McGilchrist Building in Salem. good luck as he continues his work.� Ritter is hoping his research will culminate in underground tours in the near future. Kathy Goss, president of the Go Downtown Salem! Board, welcomed the idea. “It would add to the interest

They’ve made their way through spider webs and secret catacombs, finding an antique bank vault, an intact gold drop, a 1920s stairwell that goes to nowhere, a 1930s grocery drop with painted grocery aisles and lockers, a 1980s disco, a 1920s mural in what was once an underground cafe and a number of odd architectural finds. “What I found most interesting were the rusting elevators, the empty shafts where people lived, (and) dusty, rusted chains hanging as silent witnesses to a bustling business long gone,� Ritter said. Even so, he’s determined to find the underground Chinatown, even if he has to dig it out inch by inch.

Lane college campus face-lift complete By Greg Bolt The Register-Guard

EUGENE — Summer term is usually a quiet time on the Lane Community College campus. But not this year. Workers swarmed the campus as soon as spring term ended, rushing to complete millions of dollars worth of construction and renovation work in time for the start of classes three weeks ago. With only a few exceptions, they succeeded. Fueled by an $83.5 million construction bond measure approved by voters in 2008 and another $8 million in state stimulus money last year, the campus on East 30th Avenue has been part construction site and part college for the past two years. In the past 23 months, LCC has completed projects that have pumped $56.7 million into the state’s economy. “We’ve been busy,� said Dennis Carr, LCC’s human resources director and one of its construction coordinators. That includes the Health and Wellness Center, a $15 million

Edison perfects electric light in 1879 The Associated Press

Retired Linfield College historian John Ritter leads a tour in the basement of the Oregon Building on Aug. 3. Holding a flashlight is John McGregor.

TEN YEARS AGO Fifteen Arab leaders convened in Cairo, Egypt, for their first summit in four years; the Libyan delegation walked out in anger over signs the summit would stop short of calling for breaking ties with Israel. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Joyce Randolph is 86. TV’s Judge Judy Sheindlin is 68. Actor Everett McGill is 65. Musician Lee Loughnane (Chicago) is 64. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is 61. Musician Charlotte Caffey (The Go-Go’s) is 57. Actress-author Carrie Fisher is 54. Actor Ken Watanabe is 51. Actor Jeremy Miller is 34. Actor Will Estes is 32. Actor Michael McMillian is 32. Actress Kim Kardashian is 30. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “There are different kinds of wrong. The people sinned against are not always the best.� — Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett, English author (1892-1969)

project funded by $6.75 million in state bonds and the rest from donations and grants. The 42,000square-foot building opened last month with much fanfare, but it’s only one of many projects that are gradually remaking the LCC campus. The college promoted the bond measure as a way to preserve the investment taxpayers already have made in the campus by focusing on improving and extending the life of existing buildings rather than replacing them. No local bond money went to the new health building; about the only new construction funded by the bond is $9 million half of which has been committed in the past year for a new downtown campus building.

Effects already visible Carr said the effect of the new taxpayer investment already is apparent. “The learning environment and work environment in so many of the buildings on cam-

pus have been completely transformed,� Carr said. “From a campus that was 40 years old using older technology and poorly configured spaces that were difficult to both teach and learn in, to absolutely state-of-the-art smart classrooms, the best technology, safe lighting and safe and healthy and welcoming facilities for both the students and the instructors. It’s remarkable what this investment has resulted in.�

5 buildings remodeled Five existing buildings on campus received major remodeling or expansion over the past year, and other projects have replaced old and outdated infrastructure and improved utilities, lighting, security and communications. So far, the college has spent $31.1 million of the bond money and has started planning the next round of improvements. So far, the college has added about a half-dozen new classrooms and increased the capac-

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ity of several others. All of those spaces now have the latest teaching technology, turning them into “smart� classrooms with state-of-the-art audio-visual and computer gear. Several buildings have new heating and cooling systems, replacing what at best were highly inefficient and at worst unhealthful equipment with modern, energy- efficient systems. And the campus’ technology backbone the system of servers and infrastructure that powers its computer system has been relocated and upgraded.

VOTE

GERI

HAUSER Deschutes County Clerk

www.gerihauser.com

541-280-2947


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 C3

O OSHA fines state hospital $3,750 for safety violations Workers inadequately trained to respond to patient violence, investigation finds The Associated Press SALEM — The Oregon State Hospital has been fined $3,750 for safety violations after regulators found self-defense training was inadequate for employees dealing with violent mental patients. Oregon OSHA also cited the Salem psychiatric facility for three other safety violations, the Statesman Journal reported: • Failing to provide timely training for staffers to use shields as “a tool to protect employees from projectiles, riots, and to approach patients in order to secure them.” • Not reporting to OSHA that a worker was hospitalized in late January after being assaulted by a patient. • Lack of written verification showing that a “hazard assessment” had been performed to ensure employees were provided with adequate personal protective equipment. The hospital has until Nov. 7 to submit a letter of corrective action to the regulatory agency, said Melanie Mesaros, a spokeswoman for Oregon OSHA. The newspaper said OSHA began investigating April 13 after an April 9 complaint by a hospital employee who works on a maximum-security ward, which has separate units for male and female patients. “There is little to no safety equipment,” states an OSHA form summarizing the employee’s complaint. “We were told we would be trained in use

of a Plexiglas shield by February 1, 2010, however, this training has not happened yet. We are told we cannot wear protective equipment as it is intimidating.” The hospital employee also took issue with self-defense training: “Training is book/ verbal, but does not teach us how to restrain violent people. We don’t have hands-on training on how to handle patients who are attacking or violent. Most employees on this ward were trained as CNAs (certified nursing assistants) and nurses for nursing home type environment.”

Protective equipment The OSHA inspector who looked into the complaint determined that personal protective equipment was not readily available for staffers on the maximum-security ward. The inspector also concluded that the hospital wasn’t providing “active” self-defense training for employees. “It was felt that Oregon State Hospital did not meet the self defense training as they have had hundreds of injuries and have only provided passive self defense, not active self defense, nor do they provide active self defense to emergency response staff,” the inspector wrote in a document summarizing the investigation. Superintendent Greg Roberts, who assumed leadership of the state hospital Sept. 20, said Tuesday the hospital would ask OSHA to clarify the reported shortcomings in selfdefense training for employees. The hospital will also explore the possibility of creating a specialized emergency response team, Roberts said.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Kitzhaber stands with President Barack Obama at a rally Wednesday in Portland. Obama was in the region to back Kitzhaber’s bid for the state’s top office. Rick Bowmer The Associated Press

Obama rallies for Kitzhaber Don’t let GOP undo progress, president tells beleaguered party at Portland rally By Darlene Superville The Associated Press

PORTLAND — President Barack Obama urged Oregon Democrats on Wednesday night to “defy the conventional wisdom” and vote to send John Kitzhaber back to the governor’s office Nov. 2. Obama tried to rally the troops on the West Coast less than two weeks before an election that will determine control of Congress for the next two years. But his message was meant for Democrats around the country too. “This election is not about anger, it’s not about fear. It’s about a choice, and the stakes couldn’t be higher,” the president said, reinforcing his campaign message about where Republican leadership would take the country. Obama charged that the GOP would repeal new health care changes designed to keep insurers from denying coverage to

O  B Man walking on I-84 killed near The Dalles THE DALLES — A 67-yearold Oregon man was struck and killed walking down the middle of Interstate 84 near The Dalles despite efforts by truck drivers to avoid him in early morning darkness. Oregon State Police said George Elmo Balzer of The Dalles appeared to be staggering along the eastbound lanes of the freeway just before 5:30 a.m. Wednesday when a group of commercial trucks spotted him and slowed down. But troopers said he fell underneath one truck driven by 52year-old Mark Gosson of Wasco. State police and the Wasco County medical examiner were investigating whether a medical condition may have been a factor. Balzer lived a short distance from the freeway.

Religious skit draws complaint in Lebanon LEBANON — Lebanon High School administrators say they’ll do a better job of screening pep assembly plans after a skit about the Mormon religion prompted a complaint. Principal Bo Yates said they should stay clear of religion and religious stereotypes. The student who came up with the skit, senior Kaylie Probert, says she didn’t intend any offense. She says it was a lighthearted look at her own religion — Mormonism — with friends of the same faith. The skit at the Friday homecoming assembly involved students pretending to be missionaries. The student who complained to the Albany Democrat-Herald said she was offended by what she perceived as religious bias.

UO president accused of skirting pay order EUGENE — The president of the University of Oregon has

the sick, and cancel new rules to keep credit card companies from slapping people with hidden fees. “We’ve tried that before, and we’re not going back,” he said. Kitzhaber, a doctor who occupied the governor’s office from 1995-2002, is in a tight race against Republican Chris Dudley, a former NBA player and a political rookie.

‘Delivered change’ Obama said the former governor is the only candidate “that’s actually delivered change.” “Here is a guy who’s already done the job and done it well,” he said. But the fact that Obama flew to Oregon so late in the campaign to stump for Kitzhaber, long considered one of the state’s most popular politicians, is a sign of how beleaguered Democrats are

Lane County group sterilizing feral cats EUGENE — Volunteers with the Greenhill Humane Society are trying to reduce the population of feral cats in Lane County by slowing down reproduction. They’ve been setting out traps baited with tuna or cat food. The trapped cats are spayed or neutered and then released back in their neighborhoods. Humane Society Executive Director Cary Lieberman said nearly 2,000 cats have been sterilized in the past three years. There are an estimated 20,000 feral cats in the county.

Police eye N. Portland for training center PORTLAND — Portland police are considering a 16-acre site near Portland International Raceway for a new training center. The Oregonian reported the police chief and Mayor Sam Adams like the site because the city owns the North Portland property. They say it would be a convenient place where officers could

practice driving, defensive tactics and possibly firearms training. It says racetrack officials also support the idea. Adams told the newspaper the proposal is far from a done deal, but it’s promising. He said other police departments would be invited to use the facility, as well as the city’s Fire Bureau and transportation agencies. He also hopes Portland Community College can join the project and share classroom space. — From wire reports

— President Barack Obama

this year — including Obama. Obama has suffered from a presidency weighed down by a sluggish economy, high unemployment, a poor housing market, two wars and a public largely disapproving of his performance in office. Two years ago, presidential candidate Obama drew 75,000 people to a riverfront park rally in Portland, including 15,000 who couldn’t get in. But political organizers weren’t expecting such a sizable crowd for Obama’s return Wednesday night, his first visit here since the campaign. The goal was for a far more modest showing of 5,000 people

at the convention center, which holds twice that number. The convention floor appeared about three-fourths full, with tightly packed crowds in front and behind the stage where Obama spoke and a wide open space behind the press section in the rear. Oregon was the first stop on Obama’s longest campaign swing of the season, a four-day, five-state blitz of fundraisers and rallies that also will take him to Washington state, California, Nevada and Minnesota. Obama is scheduled to campaign separately with Sens. Patty Murray of Washington and Barbara Boxer of California, plus Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada — Senate allies also in tight contests against their Republican challengers. Obama already has campaigned with each senator, sometimes more than once. But he made the 3,000-mile return trip to help keep them and a Democratic majority in the Senate. It’s what he needs to boost his agenda in Congress in the final two years of his term.

Dallas, Ore., Marine killed in Afghanistan The Associated Press

been criticized by an aide to Gov. Ted Kulongoski for allowing overtime to offset pay cuts lost through furloughs required for state workers. The Register-Guard reported that university President Richard Lariviere said he was not avoiding the state mandate to cut spending. Lariviere said the university chose to make other cuts in the budget equal to what would have been saved by furlough days rather than take money out of the pay for the university’s lowest-paid workers. But Tim Nesbitt, the governor’s chief of staff, said the required furlough days are a policy issue and not just a matter of shifting resources. The disagreement emerged from e-mail first reported in Willamette Week.

“This election is not about anger, it’s not about fear. It’s about a choice, and the stakes couldn’t be higher.”

PORTLAND — The family of a U.S. Marine from Oregon killed in Afghanistan says he always had strong ties to home but loved to explore. Sgt. Ian Tawney died last Saturday when an improvised explosive device blew up during combat operations in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan. The 25-year-old Tawney grew up in Dallas, Ore., and joined the Marines five years ago.

“As a very young child, he had a very strong sense of self and was very decisive about what he wanted to do with his life,” said his mother, Theda Tawney. A top student in squad leader school, his numerous awards included the Purple Heart, Combat Action Ribbon, Iraq Campaign Medal and Navy Unit Commendation. Tawney served with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force

from Camp Pendleton, Calif. Friends and family remember Tawney as a devoted husband, a loyal friend and an avid outdoorsman. He is survived by his wife, Ashley, who is pregnant, his parents, two brothers and three sisters.

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C4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Students forced to fund campaign

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ike their counterparts at most colleges and universities, students at Central Oregon Community College must pay a mandatory fee each quarter to finance the school’s student

association. The money thus collected goes to a variety of things, from specific school programs to student clubs to social events. Last year $10,000 of the roughly $260,000 collected also went to support passage of the college’s $41.6 million building bond request. Students had a stake in the fate of the request, no doubt about it. New health careers and science buildings in Bend, new buildings in Prineville, Redmond and Madras and remodeling of existing facilities will give the college badly needed space to expand course offerings and classes. The council that governs the Associated Students of Central Oregon Community College recognized that, and when asked contributed $10,000 to the campaign to get the measure approved. That $10,000 check, plus another $10,000 from the Central Oregon Community College Foundation, were the two largest contributions to the COCC Yes: Friends of the College political action committee. It may well be that the student association contribution is perfectly legal, but it does have a serious problem. Students were compelled to contribute fees to the association but were neither asked whether they wished to contribute to the political campaign for the bond measure nor given the chance to withhold their money from the check supporting it. Had they been members of the Oregon Education Association or other unions, they’d have been allowed to choose not to have their fees spent on politics. The Bulletin supported the building bond proposal, by the way. COCC

Students were compelled to contribute fees to the association but were neither asked whether they wished to contribute to the political campaign for the bond measure nor given the chance to withhold their money from the check supporting it.

Crooked River water vote is part of the answer to creating and sustaining a healthy economy in Central Oregon, and unless it has adequate space it cannot do its job. That said, it is bad business for the student association to make political contributions, no matter how worthy and close to home the cause it is supporting. Students have no choice but to support the ASCOCC financially — the fees they pay are assessed as part of the regular cost of attending the college. They have no ability to withhold funds from political causes with which they might disagree. Unless the ASCOCC can come up with a way to allow students to do just that, the association should steer clear of such contributions in the future.

Dudley makes grade for education reform

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arack Obama may be in Oregon this week supporting John Kitzhaber, but a group whose founders include Arne Duncan, his outspoken secretary of education, thinks Chris Dudley would be a better education governor. The group, the Education Equality Project, teamed with Education Reform Now to grade the candidates in 37 gubernatorial races this fall. Dudley received an “A,” while Kitzhaber earned an “F.” The two groups are hardly a bunch of rock-ribbed conservative Republicans. In addition to Duncan, EEP founders include Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker, another Obama pal, and New York Schools Chancellor Joel Klein. ERN, meanwhile, has on its board of directors Joe Williams of Democrats For Education Reform. The groups combined efforts to rate the candidates in all 37 gubernatorial races by asking each to answer a series of seven questions on everything from K-12 funding to accountability. While fewer than half answered the seven questions di-

My Nickel’s Worth

rectly, Dudley did provide enough information to answer them. Kitzhaber provided no information, meanwhile. Instead, the groups graded him based on information they found on his website and elsewhere. So where did the two men differ? Kitzhaber earned less than half the points possible (six on three questions, three on the remaining four) in all but one area, the current level of K12 funding in Oregon. His final score was 10.25 of a possible 30 points. Dudley fell below half only on the question dealing with accountability and turnaround strategies for failing schools. His final score was 22.5 of the 30 possible points. He was one of nine candidates to earn an “A,” while Kitzhaber joined 53 others in earning an “F.” Links to the full report are available at both groups’ websites, edequality.org and educationreformnow.org. Interest-group ratings like these focus on a very small range of issues, of course. Still, the results are telling, and they don’t reflect well on Kitzhaber.

My relationship with her as the county clerk shows she is a true expert in her field. I always get my questions answered accurately and expeditiously. Her office functions like a well-oiled machine when it comes to processing election paperwork. I am always impressed by how quickly documents are analyzed and approved. Blankenship’s commitment to our Redmond community, where she lives, is quite extraordinary. She volunteers for many and varied kinds of volunteer opportunities. Most recently she contributed her expertise to Redmond’s centennial celebrations. Our successes were due in no small measure to Nancy’s input and advice. She is a true asset to the entire county as well as Redmond, and I fully support her election to continue as our county clerk. George Endicott Redmond

Crooked River Ranch Water Co. customers will soon elect a new board of directors. One of the major issues in this election is whether to continue with inhouse maintenance. The current manager has the knowledge, ability, equipment and willingness to maintain the system, and has been doing just that 24/7, 365 days a year! He works tirelessly to ensure we all have a ready supply of clean, chlorine-free water to enjoy every time we turn on the tap. The importance of this cannot be overemphasized. His opponents propose to sell the heavy equipment and put all necessary work, from meter installation to major repairs, out to bid. Just imagine the time that would be required to get multiple bids, hold a board meeting to select a contractor, schedule the work, etc. This would no doubt result in service interruptions and an incredible increase in costs. The current manager can have a line leak fixed in a matter of hours; he just goes out and does the work! Seems to me that when it comes to the simple goal of clean water, delivered efficiently and at a reasonable price, we already have the best deal around. Please show your support for the current manager by voting for the following board candidates — Brian Elliot, Bert Platz, Dora Johnson, Bill Pemberton and Larry Miller. Sue Combs Crooked River Ranch

Replace Wyden There are a lot of good reasons to not send Ron Wyden back to the Senate, and Huffman is definitely the lesser of two evils, which is not an endorsement. In a Wyden town hall meeting years ago, he put forth the following disgusting question: “How much would you be ‘willing to pay’ to take your dog for a lovely walk in our beautiful national forests just outside the borders of the city of Bend?” The woman addressed answered, “I wouldn’t be willing to pay anything.” “Not anything?” Wyden said. “How about a buck or two?” “No, nothing,” she said. This dialogue occurred during the “fee demo” farce, which The Bulletin bandwagoned for. Wyden did not listen then, he is not listening now. Now, the U.S. Forest Service offers us a “free day” each year in commemoration of its confiscation of our public lands for its profit.

Support Blankenship Nancy Blankenship is running for another term as county clerk. She is eminently qualified to continue her service to Deschutes County. Blankenship is an outstanding county clerk and a dedicated city citizen.

It’s time to send the USDA and Wyden packing. Yeah, I hold a grudge against Wyden. He has sold us all out in so many different ways. Say, health care? My vote is going to reflect that I haven’t gotten over it. As for Huffman, here’s a hint: Bailouts? No, I haven’t gotten over that, either. Andre Pinette Redmond

Vote for Conger The Bulletin’s endorsement of Jason Conger over Rep. Judy Stiegler raised a number of salient points. One key point was the question of whether Stiegler actually represents the voters of Bend or others, such as public employee unions or Willamette Valley Democratic leaders. Given her support of Measures 66 and 67 over the wishes of Bend residents, this is a question worth asking. I feel this question was answered for me this week when I received a call from a Stiegler supporter asking for my vote, citing her opposition to a beer tax and support of the OSU-Cascades Campus as reasons for my support. Caller ID is a useful tool. Although the caller’s name wasn’t listed, the call’s origin was. It was from Gresham, in the heart of Multnomah County, the most influential part of the state. It is often said that as Multnomah County votes, so goes the state. This raises a question for voters who need to choose between Stiegler and Conger. If Stiegler is re-elected, who will be her true constituency? Will it be the residents of Bend, or will it be the people at the other end of the phone line in Gresham who helped get her elected? I believe it will be the latter and encourage Bend voters to vote for Conger. Bill Brackett Bend

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Effects of campaign spending are vastly overrated O

ver the past few months, there’s been a torrent of commentary about political donations and campaign spending. This lavish coverage is based on the premise that campaign spending has an important influence on elections. I can see why media consultants would believe money is vitally important: The more money there is, the more they make. I can see why partisans would want to believe money is important: They tend to blame their party’s defeats on the nefarious spending of the other side. However, I can’t see why the rest of us should believe this. The evidence to support it is so slight. Let’s start with the current data. A vast majority of campaign spending is done by candidates and political parties. Over the past year, the Democrats, most of whom are incumbents, have been raising and spending far more than the Republicans. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Democrats in the most competitive House races have raised an average of 47 percent more than Repub-

licans. They have spent 66 percent more, and have about 53 percent more in their war chests. According to the Wesleyan Media Project, between Sept. 1 and Oct. 7, Democrats running for the House and Senate spent $1.50 on advertising for every $1 spent by Republicans. Despite this financial advantage, Democrats have been sinking in the polls. After all, money wasn’t that important when Phil Gramm and John Connally ran for president. In those and many other cases, huge fundraising prowess yielded nothing. Money wasn’t that important in 2006 when Republican incumbents outraised Democrats by $100 million and still lost. Money wasn’t that important in the 2010 Alaska primary when Joe Miller beat Lisa Murkowski despite being outspent 10 to 1. It wasn’t that important in the 2010 Delaware primary when Mike Castle, who raised $1.5 million, was beaten by Christine O’Donnell, who had raised $230,000. The most alarmed coverage concerns the skyrocketing spending of independent groups. Republicans have an edge

DAVID BROOKS when it comes to outside expenditures. This year, for example, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is spending $22 million for Republicans, while the Service Employees International Union is spending about $14 million for Democrats. Moreover, there’s no real evidence that independent expenditure is any more effective than candidate expenditure. Year after year, independent money follows passion but doesn’t ignite it. In 2008, Democrats had a huge independent advantage; now the Republicans do. The main effect of this money is to make the rubble bounce. Let’s say you live in Colorado. Conservative-leaning groups have spent $6.6 million attacking Michael Bennet, the Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, according to

Opensecrets.org, a nonprofit site that monitors spending in politics. Liberalleaning groups have spent $6.9 million attacking his Republican opponent, Ken Buck. Overall, there have been 5,358 pro-Democratic ads and 4,928 pro-Republican ones in their race, according to the Wesleyan Media Project. This isn’t persuasive; it’s mind-numbing. Amid this onslaught, there is no way a slightly richer ad campaign is going to make much difference. Political scientists have tried to measure the effectiveness of campaign spending using a variety of methodologies, but there is no consensus in the field. One large group of studies finds that spending by incumbents makes no difference whatsoever, but spending by challengers helps them get established. Another group finds that spending by neither incumbent nor challenger makes a difference. Another group finds that both kinds of spending have some impact. There’s no evidence, though, to suggest that campaign spending has the outsize role that the candidates, the consultants

and the political press often imagine. So why is there so much money in politics? Well, every consultant has an incentive to tell every client to raise more money. The donors give money because it makes them feel as if they are doing good and because they get to hang out at exclusive parties. The candidates are horribly insecure and grasp at any straw that gives them a sense of advantage. In the end, however, money is a talisman. It makes people feel good because they think it has magical properties. It probably helps in local legislative races where name recognition is low. It probably helps challengers get established. But these days, federal races are oversaturated. Every federal candidate in a close race has plenty of money and the marginal utility of each new dollar is zero. In this day and age, money is almost never the difference between victory and defeat. It’s just the primitive mythology of the political class. David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 C5

O Donald E. Edwards

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N   Francis Leo Cummings, of Crescent Dec. 31, 1922 - Oct. 19, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Graveside Service: At his request, no service.

John Walter Poe, of Salem, OR Aug. 29, 1937 - Oct. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service, 1-503-364-2257 Services: At his request no public services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Alzheimer’s Network of Oregon, or John’s favorite charity, The Union Gospel Mission.

Laura Elder Thompson, of Bend Aug. 29, 1918 - Oct. 16, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Private Family Services will be held at a later date.

Ruben August Reisenbichler, of Bend Sept. 3, 1925 - Oct. 18, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial service will be held Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010 at 1:00 PM at the Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 NE Butler Market Road, Bend, OR 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or to the Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. , Bend, OR 97701.

Shirley Elvina Krohnke, of La Pine Jan. 13, 1925 - Oct. 15, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A funeral service will be held, Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010 at 11:30 AM at the Faith Lutheran Church, 52315 Huntington Road, La Pine, OR 97739. A visitation will be held at Autumn Funerals, 61555 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR from Wednesday 8am to 5pm through Friday.

Walter P. Berkland, of Burns Oct. 15, 1930 - Oct. 17, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.

April 17, 1937 - October 18, 2010 Life began April 17, 1937, in Prineville, Oregon, when Don was the first born to Wilbur Edwards and Bessie (Kincaid) Edwards. He passed away on October 18, 2010, at the age of 73 after a serious fall at home. All are invited to the Prineville Golf and Country Club for a Celebration of Don’s life and potluck Donald E. on Sunday, Edwards October 24, at 1:00 p.m. Wear your hipwaders, the stories are gonna fly! Don attended and graduated from Crook County Schools in 1955. His work career began at age nine, when he had a job at the 5 & 10 store on Main Street, working for Dick LeMert. He also worked with his Dad picking up milk from local dairy farms and delivering it to the creamery. He then went to work at Pine Products and was the youngest known ratchet setter at that time. Other jobs included working on power lines from the Columbia River to Central Oregon, various rock crushing jobs, worked on building Round Butte and Bowman Dams, and his biggest and last with the encouragement of Clyde Purcell was 40 years of owning his own business known as Don Edwards Construction, with the earned slogan of “Dirty Don the Dandy Dirt Digger”. He first saw Jean (Houston) Edwards while driving down the street and offered to pick her up (she refused the ride) and take her to her clarinet lesson. They were married three years later and stayed that way for the next 53 years. They were soon blessed with three children, Kim, Tia and Tony. Don was an avid hunter, fisherman, trapper, and outdoorsman. He enjoyed this lifestyle for many years with son, son-in-laws, and grandchildren and anyone else who would join him, until his death. He is survived by wife, Jean; son, Tony; daughters, Kim Waetjen (Jim), and Tia Ontko (John); grandchildren, Trevor (Jenny), and Kelsea Waetjen, Celee and McKenna Ontko, Valli and Katelyn Edwards; and sister, Penny McCloughan all of Prineville and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by mother, father, grandson, Brody Waetjen; and sisters, Beverly Sikes and Katy Edgerly. If you wish, the donation of choice is Crook County Historical Society. The family has placed their trust in Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home for the final arrangements 541-382-2471. Please visit our website at www.niswonger-reynolds.co m and sign the electronic guest register for the Edwards’ family.

Martha Georgia Grimes Sept. 10, 1916 - October 18, 2010 Martha Georgia Grimes, 94, passed away Monday, October 18, 2010, at Redmond Healthcare Center where her family and the loving staff of the Redmond Healthcare Center surrounded her. Georgia was born September 10, Martha Georgia 1916, to John and Alma Grimes Edison in Golden City, MO. The family resided there until 1925, when they moved to Exeter, California. On May 6, 1935, she married Shelby F. Grimes, her husband of 61 years. In 1951, Shelby, Georgia and their two sons relocated to Central Oregon. Georgia enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, reading, and her weekly Bible Study; they were her treasured friends and provide much joy and support to her. She was preceded in death by her husband, Shelby; and son, Willard. Surviving children include a son and daughter-in-law, Wayne and Gayle Grimes of Redmond; and a daughter and son-in-law, Martha and Larry Hansen of Federal Way, WA. Georgia left six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Autumn Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangement. A graveside ceremony will be held on Friday, October 22, at 1:00 PM, at the Deschutes Memorial Gardens, in Bend. A reception will follow at the Tumalo Community Church 64671 Bruce Ave.

Robert Lyle Coen August 4, 1937 - October 12, 2010 Robert (Bob) Coen was born to James B. and Nellie Coen on August 4, 1937. He married Jo Ann Bennett on April 6, 1958. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Jo Ann; sons, David and wife, Nancy of Bend, Terry of Bend, Robert of Florida; brother-in-law, Glenn Bennett of Bend; sisters, Betty and Bob Shaw of Portland, Bonnie Jones of Eugene, Brenda and Jerry Rowe of Madras; four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Bob served in the USAF for eights years as a B52 mechanic and became a car salesman for 30 years at Bob Thomas Chevrolet. A memorial service will be held at 12 PM, Saturday, October 23, 2010 at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Chapel, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home was honored to serve the family. 541-382-2471. Please visit and sign the online guestbook at www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

Eric Joisel, renowned French origami artist, dies at 53 By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

It is no small thing to make a hedgehog. The first time Eric Joisel tried it, it took nearly six years. But what a hedgehog it turned out to be: folded from a single sheet of paper, each crenellation sharp as the crease in a new pair of trousers, it captures the very essence of hedgehogness. Joisel, a solitary Frenchman who was widely regarded as one of the most illustrious origami artists in the world, died on Oct. 10 in Argenteuil, outside Paris. He was 53 and lived nearby in Sannois. The cause was lung cancer, said Vanessa Gould, a filmmaker whose 2009 documentary about modern origami masters, “Between the Folds,” features him prominently. Not for Joisel were the paper boats and wobbly tables that have embodied origami for generations of children. His pieces, which can fetch thousands of dollars, have been exhibited around the world, including at

Tardy Continued from C1 “The only time I missed the bus was when I had to stay in class for extra help,” Gradilla, a sophomore, said. A special education instructional assistant, Sharon Mennealy, rides the shuttle at around noon each day. So far, she has missed the shuttle three times and sometimes take her car when running late. Each of those times, she said, have been when she’s waited after class to help a student. “Then you just miss the bus,” Mennealy said. The problem isn’t new. The Redmond School District moved high school students onto Hartman four years ago. The building has housed several programs, including the International School of the

Crook Continued from C1 For the 2010-11 school year, the district’s general fund budget is about $28 million. Currently, the district has about $3.2 million in reserves. Hernandez said the district is in no position to start reinstating slashed programs or positions, but for the first time in a while, those in the district have hope more large-scale cuts won’t be made this school year. “I think it speaks to taking the bull by the horns and making the decisions we had to make, as painful and as unpleasant as they were,” said Scott Cooper, a Crook County school board member. The news comes despite the

New York Times News Service

An origami rooster sculpted by Eric Joisel is displayed. Joisel, 53, a Frenchman who was widely regarded as one of the most illustrious origami artists in the world, has died. the Louvre, and are in many private collections. Originally trained as a sculptor, Joisel was largely self-taught in origami, and his

Cascades and the district’s alternative education Phoenix Academy. Several options are offered at Hartman, including International Baccalaureate classes and a careers course. Lemos, in his first year at Redmond High, said he hopes to address the scheduling problem by next year. Redmond High could limit students to one campus or the other, though that’s a solution Lemos opposes. “I don’t think that’s fair,” he said. The district’s transportation department does what it can, and the buses can’t speed up because of safety, Lemos said. The school could extend the time between class by a few minutes, but that’s a fine balance. Not only does that cut into class time, but it also means students have more time to do whatever. “If you give kids too much

district’s enrollment being down about 170 students. The state gives districts money based on enrollment, known as average daily membership. Each student garners about $5,730 for the district. The biggest drop in enrollment is in kindergarten through third grade. The district doesn’t do exit interviews, but district officials said they aren’t surprised. “People with younger kids are more mobile. A lot of people moved here that didn’t have ties to the area. They moved here in the boom times and they are starting to leave,” Cooper said. Hernandez said he will continue to make small reductions throughout the year in anticipation of one-time stimulus money and other monies leaving the district. The superintendent

work resembles that of no other artist in the genre. Part sculpture, part paper-folding and all rigorous engineering, his art embodies people, animals and fantasy figures in an array of dimensions from palm-size to life-size. To devise the blueprint for a single figure could take him years. To fold one could take hundreds of hours — a very large work might entail a rectangle of paper measuring more than 15 feet by 25 feet, roughly the size of a New York studio apartment. No two figures were precisely alike. “Origami is very difficult,” Joisel wrote in English in an introductory passage on his website. “When people ask how long it takes me to make a sculpture I say ‘35 years,’ because that is how long it’s taken me to get to this level.” His best-known recent art includes a bevy of musicians, each less than a foot high, with minute sculptured details like furrowed brows and veined, careworn hands.

time, you know what’s going to happen,” Lemos said. Sarah Wilson, a junior at Redmond High, has missed the bus often. If the school could carve out just a couple of minutes between each class, that could make all the difference, Wilson, 16, said. “I miss the bus like every other day,” she said. School administrators might have a long way to go before every student makes it to class at Hartman on time. About a minute after the Hartman bell rang, Jacob Nace, a 17-year-old senior, walked up to the front door. After pulling out his earphones, Nace said he’s about a minute or two late to careers class most days. “I walk every day,” he said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

said he’s believes the stimulus money alone is about $300,000. “We’re still looking at ways to be more efficient,” he said. Cooper said he’s hoping the news that the district is battling back from it’s budget problems will make it easier to hire a superintendent. The district is about to start the search for their next leader. Hernandez is stepping down after this school year. “Having a healthy ending fund balance is one thing that is particularly important as we seek a new superintendent,” Cooper said. “Having money in the bank, instead of facing … further cuts, puts us in a more competitive position.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Commission Continued from C1 David Ditz, Juniper Ridge project manager, said the proposed agreement could serve as a “template” solution for other areas of the state, where development is stalled because developers do not have the money to build necessary road infrastructure. But Lohman disagreed, and said that idea made him “nervous.” Oregon Department of Transportation Director Matthew Garrett said he still has concerns about the risks involved in “this new way of doing business.” “I’ll be very blunt,” Garrett said. “What we have is a corridor that has significant freight. As the congestion continues to grow, I see dollar signs there. I see commerce and goods and services stalled.” Michel Bayard, president of the Hunnell United Neighbors group, said neighbors of Juniper Ridge were left out of the process to draft the proposed agreement. On Oct. 5, the city of Bend e-

mailed Hunnell United Neighbors an invitation to discuss the agreement. “That meeting was canceled and never rescheduled,” Bayard said. Since then, the group has asked to reschedule the meeting and requested a draft copy of the agreement, but only received it recently. “We request that no action be taken on the (agreement) for 30 days, until we have an opportunity to provide our input,” Bayard said. “And we ask the commission to make sure that happens.” City Manager Eric King said a public meeting will be scheduled. The proposed agreement would resolve a long-standing problem at Juniper Ridge in north Bend. Oregon’s transportation agency typically requires developers to pay for roadwork to offset the increased traffic from new businesses, but the city of Bend — the developer in this case — cannot raise the money for traffic improvements until it sells land at Juniper Ridge. Instead of requiring the city

to pay for roadwork upfront, the proposed solution would allow development at Juniper Ridge to add a limited amount of traffic to the area. The state transportation agency is concerned about traffic volumes at rush hour, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., so the agreement focuses on the number of trips — or the number of vehicles that travel to and from new businesses in Juniper Ridge — at this time of day. Under the proposed agreement, development at Juniper Ridge could increase traffic by 700 trips during rush hour, before the city of Bend would have to pay for road improvements. City officials plan to take the proposed agreement to the City Council for a vote as early as Nov. 3, and they expect Bryant to sign the necessary documents by Nov. 19, according to a timeline the city presented to the transportation commission.

Bend DMV move The commission also heard other concerns from local residents Wednesday.

Bend residents who want stop the DMV from moving into the Brookswood Meadow Plaza spoke to the commission. Chairwoman Gail Achterman told them the commission typically is not involved in these decisions. Achterman asked Garrett to work with DMV to review of all the options available for the office location, and report back to the commission in November. “You have my commitment to do that,” Garrett said. “This director knows who we serve,” Garrett added, and that is Oregonians.

Council

Phil Hetz, who lives near the Reed Lane crosswalk on the Bend Parkway, urged the state commission to close the crosswalk until permanent safety improvements can be made. A man on a bicycle was killed when he was struck by a car at the crosswalk on Oct. 9.

Continued from C1 There they are expected to look at programs or services that should be trimmed or cut, and find other avenues to the city’s shortfall. “We’ve done a lot to trim lowhanging fruit over the years,” City Manager Eric King said. “Now we have to start asking the question of can we do this anymore.” Bend has already gone through five rounds of cuts and laid off 58 and eliminated 48 vacant positions over the past several years. And a committee is now looking at ways to fund public safety, which makes up about 80 percent of the city’s general fund. Not everything in Wednesday’s financial update was bad news. Some revenue sources, such as transient occupancy, or hotel taxes, saw slight increases in the first quarter of the fiscal year when compared with 2009-10.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Parkway crosswalk


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 21 Today: Increasing cloud cover, remaining mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

66/40

67/39

69/38

56/36

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

69/43

69/33

Mitchell

Madras

71/38

66/41

Camp Sherman 67/33 Redmond Prineville 73/36 Cascadia 72/37 72/37 Sisters 70/35 Bend Post 73/36

Oakridge Elk Lake 70/35

70/32

69/34

71/32

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

65/31

68/33

Fort Rock



Missoula



65/34

62/47

Bend

70/36

Boise

73/36

69/38

70/42



Idaho Falls Elko

70/49

67/34

69/34

70/35



Reno

66/31

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Increasing clouds tonight.

Crater Lake 56/31



Helena

Eugene

Redding

Silver Lake

65/30

City

62/50

Grants Pass

68/43

San Francisco



60/54

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:28 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:11 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:29 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:10 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:14 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:13 a.m.

Salt Lake City 69/50

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Cloudy, steady light rain, cool, breezy. HIGH

LOW

Moon phases Last

New

First

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Nov. 5

Nov. 13

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 68/46/0.00 . . . . . . 61/48/c. . . . . . 58/47/sh Baker City . . . . . . 68/22/0.00 . . . . . . 69/36/s. . . . . . 61/38/pc Brookings . . . . . . 55/44/0.00 . . . . . 61/51/sh. . . . . . 60/51/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 70/24/0.00 . . . . . 68/39/pc. . . . . . 59/40/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 71/36/0.00 . . . . . 62/47/pc. . . . . . 61/46/sh Klamath Falls . . . 72/29/0.00 . . . . . 64/34/pc. . . . . . 53/34/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 72/21/0.00 . . . . . 65/35/pc. . . . . . . 53/33/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 74/22/0.00 . . . . . 71/32/pc. . . . . . 57/33/sh Medford . . . . . . . 81/38/0.00 . . . . . 70/43/pc. . . . . . 59/44/sh Newport . . . . . . . 64/45/0.00 . . . . . 58/48/sh. . . . . . 54/51/sh North Bend . . . . . 63/41/0.00 . . . . . 61/46/sh. . . . . . 59/51/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 67/31/0.00 . . . . . . 69/42/s. . . . . . 66/44/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 65/35/0.00 . . . . . . 68/39/s. . . . . . 65/42/sh Portland . . . . . . . 71/42/0.00 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . 60/49/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 75/32/0.00 . . . . . 72/37/pc. . . . . . 61/36/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 76/25/0.00 . . . . . 71/33/pc. . . . . . 61/36/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 80/39/0.00 . . . . . 67/45/sh. . . . . . 63/47/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 72/39/0.00 . . . . . 66/47/pc. . . . . . 61/47/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 73/26/0.00 . . . . . 70/35/pc. . . . . . 63/34/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 73/36/0.00 . . . . . . 70/44/s. . . . . . 67/46/sh

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

3MEDIUM

0

2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 in 1974 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 in 1949 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.32” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.01” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.19” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.92 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.31 in 1947 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras..........High Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

50 30

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, isolated showers, chilly. HIGH

55 33

PLANET WATCH

Full

MONDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:50 a.m. . . . . . .6:19 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .8:43 a.m. . . . . . .5:53 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:53 a.m. . . . . . .7:17 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .4:54 p.m. . . . . . .4:35 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .5:48 a.m. . . . . . .5:37 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .4:55 p.m. . . . . . .4:50 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

Christmas Valley

Chemult

61/46

65/32

72/34

64/26

Vancouver

65/51

Burns

La Pine

58 40

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 81° Medford • 21° Lakeview

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, scattered showers, cool, LOW becoming breezy late.

HIGH

58 34

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

65/33

Brothers

70/33

Mostly cloudy, isolated showers, significantLOW ly cooler.

NORTHWEST

Portland

Partly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy with isolated showers tonight. Eastern

SATURDAY

Showers will be possible along the coast, while increasing sunshine will be seen inland.

Paulina

69/34

Sunriver

61/24

Chance of showers far west today. Showers possible tonight. Central

75/42

HIGH

36

STATE

Maupin

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of showers.

LOW

73

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,533 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,676 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,105 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 23,464 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92,642 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.9 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39.6 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . 80.3 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.56 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 61/46

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 65/32

Las Vegas 75/61

Salt Lake City 69/50

Los Angeles 65/57

Albuquerque 65/44

St. Paul 55/41

Kansas City 70/49 Oklahoma City 81/60

Tijuana 65/54

Dallas 86/66 Houston 88/69

Chihuahua 84/51

Anchorage 42/37

La Paz 83/61 Juneau 44/30

S

S

S

Thunder Bay 44/28

S

Green Bay 50/34

To ronto 48/36

Louisville Nashville 68/40 75/41 Charlotte 78/43

Little Rock 83/53 Birmingham 81/49 New Orleans 83/63

Atlanta 78/49

Orlando 86/61

Monterrey 90/65

FRONTS

Study: Erosion may hurt state forests more than wildfires Soil erosion may be a bigger threat to forests in Southern Oregon than wildfire, according to a study that reconstructed a 2,000-year history of forest fires in the Siskiyou Mountains. It determined that wildfires are no more severe, but the soil erosion rates are now four times greater, the Mail Tribune in Medford reported. The study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., was based on charcoal layers in a sediment core sample taken from the bottom of

New York 60/44

Miami 85/72

Mazatlan 87/72

The Associated Press

Halifax 54/43 Portland 57/35 Boston 59/40

Buffalo

Detroit 53/36

St. Louis 70/50

S S

Quebec 45/34

50/38 Philadelphia 64/43 Des Moines 64/43 Chicago Washington, D. C. 56/43 Omaha 68/44 Columbus 69/45 60/34

Denver 69/48

Phoenix 74/59

Honolulu 85/72

S

Winnipeg 55/34

Rapid City 73/43 Cheyenne 67/38

San Francisco 60/54

S

Bismarck 62/33

Boise 69/38

• 1.72” Natchez, Miss.

Saskatoon 60/34

Billings 72/41

Portland 65/51

Harlingen, Texas Stanley, Idaho

S

Seattle 62/50

• 91° • 18°

S

upper Squaw Lake in the Applegate River watershed. Researchers concluded the erosion threat is higher because logging and road-building have removed broad areas of low vegetation. The study comes after recent severe forest fires in Southern Oregon, and suggested recent wildfires are no more severe in the region than those that occurred naturally during the past 2,000 years. In addition to charcoal, the scientists also studied pollen and other materials in the sediment.

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .82/55/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . 79/58/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .62/36/0.00 . .54/32/sh . . 55/39/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . .53/32/sh . . 49/34/pc Albuquerque. . . .75/50/0.00 . . .65/44/t . . 64/43/pc Anchorage . . . . .46/33/0.00 . .42/37/sh . . 43/33/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .82/60/0.07 . . .78/49/s . . . 76/53/s Atlantic City . . . .59/43/0.24 . 66/45/pc . . . 60/47/s Austin . . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . 88/67/pc . . 82/67/pc Baltimore . . . . . .58/45/0.00 . 67/42/pc . . . 60/43/s Billings. . . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . . .72/41/s . . . 63/39/s Birmingham . . . 78/58/trace . . .81/49/s . . . 79/52/s Bismarck . . . . . . .60/38/0.00 . . .62/33/s . . . 62/35/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . .69/38/s . . 64/41/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .62/45/0.00 . .59/40/sh . . . 53/39/s Bridgeport, CT. . .60/43/0.00 . .61/36/sh . . . 54/40/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .50/38/sh . . 49/44/pc Burlington, VT. . .59/44/0.00 . .50/31/sh . . .42/33/rs Caribou, ME . . . .54/33/0.00 . .50/31/sh . . .41/29/rs Charleston, SC . .80/60/0.00 . . .80/56/s . . . 74/56/s Charlotte. . . . . . .71/52/0.10 . . .78/43/s . . . 72/46/s Chattanooga. . . .76/59/0.03 . . .77/43/s . . . 75/48/s Cheyenne . . . . . .68/34/0.00 . . .67/38/s . . . .58/42/t Chicago. . . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 56/43/pc . . 63/53/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .70/35/0.00 . . .64/34/s . . . 65/44/s Cleveland . . . . . .64/38/0.00 . .53/44/sh . . 53/47/pc Colorado Springs 72/37/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . .59/43/t Columbia, MO . .71/41/0.00 . . .70/48/s . . . .73/54/t Columbia, SC . . .75/54/0.00 . . .81/46/s . . . 75/45/s Columbus, GA. . .84/59/0.02 . . .81/47/s . . . 79/51/s Columbus, OH. . .66/39/0.00 . 60/34/pc . . . 61/42/s Concord, NH . . . .61/25/0.00 . .55/31/sh . . 50/30/pc Corpus Christi. . .86/63/0.00 . 84/73/pc . . 84/72/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .82/62/0.00 . 86/66/pc . . . .80/67/t Dayton . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . 61/34/pc . . . 62/43/s Denver. . . . . . . . .72/39/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . . .59/43/t Des Moines. . . . .73/43/0.00 . . .64/43/s . . 73/51/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . .53/36/sh . . 56/44/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .56/42/0.00 . 50/31/pc . . . 57/39/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .83/60/0.01 . . .74/48/t . . 74/48/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .36/10/0.00 . 33/10/pc . . 30/15/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .60/42/0.00 . . .55/36/s . . . 63/37/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .58/41/0.11 . . .52/29/t . . 54/30/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .64/44/0.00 . . .55/35/c . . 59/40/pc Green Bay. . . . . .59/42/0.06 . 50/34/pc . . . 59/43/s Greensboro. . . . .65/56/0.19 . . .76/42/s . . . 70/41/s Harrisburg. . . . . .61/37/0.00 . .62/40/sh . . . 60/39/s Hartford, CT . . . .61/39/0.00 . .57/35/sh . . . 54/36/s Helena. . . . . . . . .67/33/0.00 . . .70/36/s . . 63/35/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/69/0.00 . .85/72/sh . . . 86/73/s Houston . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . 87/72/pc Huntsville . . . . . .75/54/0.09 . . .77/43/s . . . 75/47/s Indianapolis . . . .70/38/0.00 . . .62/37/s . . 65/45/pc Jackson, MS . . . .79/62/0.01 . . .83/55/s . . . 84/58/s Madison, WI . . . .70/47/0.00 . 54/35/pc . . 64/48/pc Jacksonville. . . . .83/57/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . . 81/61/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .44/37/0.00 . .44/30/sh . . 44/33/sh Kansas City. . . . .74/43/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . . .72/57/t Lansing . . . . . . . .65/41/0.00 . . .54/33/c . . 59/39/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .69/60/0.16 . . .75/61/c . . 75/60/pc Lexington . . . . . .69/40/0.00 . . .65/37/s . . . 66/45/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/34/0.00 . 71/45/pc . . 72/51/sh Little Rock. . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .83/53/s . . 80/59/pc Los Angeles. . . . .66/61/0.10 . 65/57/pc . . 64/56/pc Louisville . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . . .68/40/s . . . 71/47/s Memphis. . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . 82/59/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .85/72/s . . . 85/73/s Milwaukee . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 54/40/pc . . 64/51/pc Minneapolis . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .55/41/s . . . 66/46/s Nashville . . . . . . .72/49/0.00 . . .75/41/s . . . 75/49/s New Orleans. . . .84/63/0.12 . . .83/63/s . . . 82/64/s New York . . . . . .59/47/0.00 . .60/44/sh . . . 57/45/s Newark, NJ . . . . .60/45/0.00 . .62/41/sh . . 57/41/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .66/59/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . . 66/46/s Oklahoma City . .80/44/0.00 . 81/60/pc . . . .74/59/t Omaha . . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . 69/45/pc . . 74/49/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . . .86/61/s . . . 84/63/s Palm Springs. . . .75/63/0.05 . 77/57/pc . . 76/56/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .70/40/0.00 . . .61/37/s . . . 67/50/s Philadelphia . . . .62/46/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 58/44/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .73/65/0.07 . . .74/59/t . . 79/61/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .61/35/0.00 . .55/35/sh . . 54/39/pc Portland, ME. . . .59/32/0.00 . .57/35/sh . . 49/34/pc Providence . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .61/38/sh . . . 53/37/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .65/58/0.10 . . .78/42/s . . . 71/41/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .70/32/0.00 . . .73/43/s . . 67/45/pc Savannah . . . . . .83/59/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 77/58/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . 68/43/pc . . . 61/41/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . 62/50/pc . . 59/47/sh Richmond . . . . . .58/53/0.41 . . .77/43/s . . . 67/42/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .63/40/s . . . 70/48/s Rochester, NY . . .62/38/0.00 . .50/38/sh . . 48/42/pc Spokane . . . . . . .62/36/0.00 . . .66/39/s . . 63/40/pc Sacramento. . . . .77/53/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . . 67/50/c Springfield, MO. .73/40/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . . .72/57/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .76/46/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . 73/54/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . . .85/64/s . . . 85/65/s Salt Lake City . . .70/42/0.00 . . .69/50/s . . 64/50/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .73/60/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 76/51/pc San Antonio . . . .85/63/0.00 . 87/69/pc . . 84/68/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .79/47/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . . .77/61/t San Diego . . . . . .68/62/0.78 . 68/58/pc . . 65/59/pc Washington, DC .59/54/0.02 . 68/44/pc . . . 62/45/s San Francisco . . .61/50/0.00 . 60/54/pc . . 61/54/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .82/43/0.00 . 77/56/pc . . . .70/58/t San Jose . . . . . . .69/53/0.00 . 67/56/pc . . 67/54/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .70/32/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . 65/42/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .74/43/0.01 . . .60/37/t . . 59/40/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . 80/58/pc . . 83/57/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .48/41/0.56 . .45/38/sh . . 48/40/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .75/60/s . . 65/51/sh Auckland. . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .60/49/sh . . . 63/49/s Baghdad . . . . . .100/71/0.00 . . .98/74/s . . . 98/72/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/77/0.28 . . .89/77/t . . . .90/76/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .50/46/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . . 69/50/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . 87/74/pc . . 86/72/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .46/32/0.00 . .44/35/sh . . 46/36/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .63/51/r . . . .62/51/r Budapest. . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . 50/29/pc . . . 51/28/s Buenos Aires. . . .84/61/0.00 . 82/55/pc . . . 70/50/s Cabo San Lucas .82/68/0.00 . . .85/67/s . . . 86/67/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . . 85/67/s Calgary . . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .65/32/s . . 49/34/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .86/67/s . . . 87/69/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . 50/36/pc . . 54/44/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .46/28/0.00 . .46/39/sh . . 51/45/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .54/37/0.18 . . .55/38/s . . . 58/39/s Harare . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . .91/64/s . . . 90/62/s Hong Kong . . . . .84/77/0.00 . 86/76/pc . . 88/78/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .72/60/sh . . 63/41/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .98/69/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . 87/65/pc Johannesburg . . .82/55/0.51 . 85/62/pc . . . .78/59/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 64/57/pc . . . 66/57/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .75/57/s . . 71/56/pc London . . . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . 50/38/pc . . . 54/43/c Madrid . . . . . . . .72/37/0.00 . . .72/39/s . . 70/40/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .86/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .109/82/0.00 . .106/81/s . . 107/81/s Mexico City. . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .80/49/s . . . 82/50/s Montreal. . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . .45/34/sh . . . 43/31/c Moscow . . . . . . .39/28/0.27 . .46/34/sh . . .39/32/rs Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . .80/57/sh . . . .79/58/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/77/0.02 . . .86/74/t . . . 85/72/s New Delhi. . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .90/69/s . . 87/70/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.03 . .73/63/sh . . 74/61/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .37/23/0.00 . .41/36/sh . . 42/32/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . .44/33/sh . . . 44/31/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .52/34/0.06 . . .51/34/s . . . 53/36/s Rio de Janeiro. . .77/64/0.00 . . .78/67/s . . . 83/70/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . 68/49/pc Santiago . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . 80/49/pc . . 71/42/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . . 85/64/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . . 61/45/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .65/49/s . . . 68/51/s Shanghai. . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . .72/62/s . . . 74/63/s Singapore . . . . . .88/79/0.39 . . .90/79/t . . . .90/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .45/30/0.00 . .42/38/sh . . 41/36/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .72/58/t . . 75/56/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/75/0.00 . . .78/74/r . . . .77/73/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . .106/73/0.00 . 89/68/pc . . 87/68/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .68/64/0.00 . . .69/64/r . . 73/64/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . .48/36/sh . . . 48/41/c Vancouver. . . . . .55/41/0.00 . 61/46/pc . . . .55/47/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . 45/31/pc . . . 52/33/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . . 40/31/rs . . .42/34/rs

SWINGING INTO THE SUNSET Amy Anderson, second from left, of Tualatin, gives her daughter Elisabeth Anderson, 2, a boost as her older daughter Aliviah, 5, and aunt Jean Dougherty, right, of Fort Worth, Texas, play on a swing set after sunset on the beach in Seaside on Monday. Alex Pajunas The Daily Astorian


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Hunting & Fishing Inside Gary Lewis remembers John Nosler, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

GOLF Bend’s Kearney tied for 50th at Q-School DAYTON, Nev. — Bend pro golfer Brandon Kearney shot a 74 in the second round of the first stage of the PGA Tour’s Qualifying School at Dayton Valley Golf Club on WednesBrandon day and is Kearney now tied for 50th place. Kearney, 31, is at one over par with a total of 145 and is currently not in position to advance past the four-round 72-hole event, which continues through Friday. The top 23 players from the Dayton tournament, plus those tied for the last position, advance to the second stage of QSchool. Kearney is six shots behind five players that are tied for 23rd place. Scott Gordon, of Fair Oaks, Calif., is in first place at 13 under par, with a total of 131. There are 13 first-stage sites played over a two-week period. Players who make it through the first stage must make it through two more stages before earning a PGA Tour card, which allows players to enter tour events. — Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

UCLA has realistic view of No. 1 Oregon The Bruins know they face a tall task in trying to beat the Ducks By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Next up • UCLA at Oregon • When: Today, 6 p.m. • TV: ESPN • Radio: KBND-AM 1110

EUGENE — There’s really no spinning Oregon’s No. 1 ranking and the challenge the Ducks pose for UCLA on Thursday night. Coach Rick Neuheisel says he doesn’t need to point out what the Bruins already know. “Whether or not I talk about it, our guys are going to be well aware of it,” the coach said. “This is a team that has risen to the top of the land.” The Bruins (3-3, 1-2 Pac-10) visit heavily favored Oregon (6-0, 3-0) at raucous Autzen Stadium, where the Ducks will be celebrating their first-ever appearance atop the AP Top 25. Oregon popped up the rankings after two straight weeks of upsets for the No. 1: Alabama lost to South Carolina before Ohio State lost at Wiscon-

PREP CROSS-COUNTRY

No secret: LeBron, Heat are looking for a title By Tim Reynolds The Associated Press

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Larry Scott, commissioner of the Pac-10, will announce plans for the future of the conference during a press conference today. Scott is expected to announce detailed alignment plans for the expanding league, which will become the Pac-12 with the addition of Colorado and Utah starting in 2011. The press conference will be carried live on www.Pac-10.org. — From wire reports

ALCS (best of seven) Yankees ........................................7 Rangers ........................................2 • Rangers leads series, 3-2 NLCS (best of seven) Giants ...........................................6 Phillies..........................................5 • Giants lead series, 3-1

Coverage, see Page D4

San Francisco celebrates the game-winning run in the ninth inning Wednesday.

Today NLCS • Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants (Fox), 4:57 p.m.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Sports in Brief ...........................D3 Football .....................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Hunting & Fishing ............ D5, D6

Ben Margot / The Associated Press

NBA

Pac-10 commissioner to announce plans for alignment today

Wednesday

UCLA and quarterback Kevin Prince will attempt to make Oregon’s stay at No. 1 a short one.

sin last weekend. The only time an AP No. 1 has lost three straight weeks was November 1960, when Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri all fell. But while all the signs point to an Oregon victory, the Ducks are wary. “We’re obviously aware with what happened the last two weeks with the No. 1 ranking, and that’s gone a little bit into our preparation of ‘You gotta keep doing what you did to get here,’” offensive lineman Mark Asper said. The Ducks, who run an innovative spreadoption installed by coach Chip Kelly, have the top-ranked scoring offense in the country with an average of 54.3 points per game. They also have the nation’s third-ranked rushing offense, averaging 321.7 yards a game. See Oregon / D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

MLB P L AYO F F S

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Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Chase Nachtmann, center, hands off to teammate Krysta Kroeger during the Central Oregon Cross-Country Relays at Bend’s Pine Nursery Park on Wednesday afternoon. Their team won the mixed relay race.

Ready to relay Local high school teams compete in a fun running event in Bend By James Williams The Bulletin

The inaugural Central Oregon CrossCountry Relays meet served its purpose to a T. Wednesday’s race, a low-key event hosted by Mountain View High School and staged at Bend’s Pine Nursery Park provided a perfect setting for the four-member team relay event, which required each runner to complete two 1.2-mile loops for a total of 9.6 miles on a flat course with some grass and dirt trails and a short pavement

Inside

• Results, Page D2

section. The meet format allowed for three divisions: an all-girls division, an all-boys division, and a coed division, with teams composed of two girls and two boys. Organizer and Mountain View coach Don Stearns said he was hoping to provide a fun opportunity for area cross-country runners to get some speed work in as they prepare for the upcoming district meets on Oct. 30.

For some, like Mountain View’s Chase Nachtmann — whose coed team won the mixed relay race in 57 minutes, 52 seconds — it was a chance to work on leg speed while racing over a distance considerably shorter than the standard 5,000 meters (roughly three miles) for a high school cross-country event. For others, like Summit’s Kyle Kolisch — a runner who will not be making the trip to Ashland for the district meet — it was their last hurrah of the season and a time to get together with friends under the banner of fitness. See Relay / D5

MIAMI — So far, everything about the latest chapter of LeBron James’ storied life has been different. The forklift ride toward the stage where a packed arena showed up just to celebrate his signing of a Miami Heat contract. The accusations of quitting, selfishness, being a heartbreaker from Cleveland. The often negative, sometimes even venomous reaction, from around the league not only his decision, but the way he made “The Decision.” It’s been like nothing he’d ever experienced. “I’ve stayed the same,” James said. “All business.” Here’s something else he hasn’t experienced: A championship parade. The entire basketball world knows that’s the goal, the only possible thing that will make the NBA’s two-time MVP sit back and say his first season in Heat colors was a success. He came close in Cleveland. In Miami, with Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and the rest of a hand-picked roster, close won’t be close to enough. A season of colossal expectations starts in Boston on Tuesday night. And those NBA schedulemakers knew what they were doing. Boston. Where Wade’s season ended last year, followed by his partthreat, part-prediction that he wouldn’t again exit the playoffs in the first round anytime soon. Where James’ season, his Cleveland chapter, came to an inglorious end a few weeks later. See Heat / D4

Still time for steelhead Despite a smaller run than last year and sediment from the White River, anglers can find success on the Lower Deschutes By Mark Morical

number was only about 330,000. “It hasn’t been quite as good as last The steelhead run on the Lower year,” Rod French, fish biologist for the Deschutes this year will not match last Oregon Department of Fish and Wildyear’s record-setting number, but anlife in The Dalles, said this week. “Last glers should still find good fishing on year was off-the-charts good. It’s too HUNTING early to say what the run will end up the river well into November, according to fish biologists. & FISHING like, but it’ll be above average.” By this time last fall, more than Steelhead — large, ocean-going rain500,000 steelhead had made their way bow trout revered by anglers for their over The Dalles Dam, the highest annufeistiness — return to the Deschutes al number since the dam was completed in 1957, River from the Pacific Ocean via the Columbia according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers River. fish passage reports. This week, that year-to-date See Steelhead / D5 The Bulletin

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Bill Valentine corrals a Deschutes River steelhead he tamed with his Spey rod last year.


D2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Boys soccer: Bend at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Bend 4 p.m.; Summit at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Bend at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 6 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 6:45 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver, 6 p.m.

6 a.m. —PGA European Tour, Castello Masters Costa Azahar, first round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville Open, first round, Golf Channel. 2 p.m. — PGA Tour, Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, first round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 4:30 p.m. — Major League Soccer, New England Revolution at New York Red Bulls, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4:57 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, Fox.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, preseason, Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks, TNT.

FOOTBALL 6 p.m. — College, UCLA at Oregon, ESPN.

RODEO 6 p.m. — Professional Bull Riders, PBR World Finals, VS. network.

VOLLEYBALL 11:30 p.m. — High school, Cottage Grove at Sisters, COTV (same-day tape).

FRIDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Castello Masters Costa Azahar, second round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia, first round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville Open, second round, Golf Channel. 2 p.m. — PGA Tour, Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, second round, Golf Channel. 5:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Administaff Small Business Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Tums Fast Relief 500, qualifying, ESPN2. 1:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Gateway 250, final practice, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — NBA, preseason, Miami Heat vs. Orlando Magic, ESPN. 7 p.m. — NBA, preseason, Golden State Warriors vs. Los Angeles Lakers, ESPN.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, South Florida at Cincinnati, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — High school, Bend at Mountain View, COTV.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, TBS.

RODEO 6 p.m. — Professional Bull Riders, PBR World Finals, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 4:57 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940.

FOOTBALL 6 p.m. — College, UCLA at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

FRIDAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Bend at Mountain View, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m. — High school, Molalla at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

NHL ROUNDUP

Blackhawks stay hot with shootout win over Canucks The Associated Press CHICAGO — Jonathan Toews, Patrick Sharp and Patrick Kane scored in the first three rounds of a shootout to give Chicago a 2-1 victory over Vancouver on Wednesday night, extending the Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks’ winning streak to four games. Kane scored on a backhander in the third round, sending the puck between Patrick Luongo’s legs. Vancouver’s Mikael Samuelsson then sent a backhand attempt wide. Samuelsson was the only shooter to miss. Daniel Sedin and Ryan Kesler converted for Vancouver in the first two rounds. Sedin and Chicago’s Viktor Stalberg scored in regulation. Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LOS ANGELES — Andrei Loktionov scored his first NHL goal from behind the Carolina net early in the third period, and Los Angeles completed a perfect three-game homestand. Anze Kopitar scored his first goal of the season for the Kings, who lost star defenseman Drew Doughty to an upper-body injury while earning their fourth win in five games. Blue Jackets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Rick Nash scored two goals and Steve Mason stopped 31 shots for Columbus before 9,802 fans — the smallest home crowd in Blue Jackets history. Derek MacKenzie also scored for the Blue Jackets, who had been pushed around in a 5-2 loss to Stanley Cup champion Chicago last week in their home opener. Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ATLANTA — Tyler Myers and Cody McCormick scored early in the second period, and Ryan Miller made 17 saves to help Buffalo end a five-game winless streak. Tyler Ennis and Thomas Vanek also scored for Buffalo. The Sabres, the defending Northeast Division champions, were 0-4-1 since winning their opener at Ottawa.

22. Texas 4-2 267 — 23. Virginia Tech 5-2 122 — 24. Mississippi St. 5-2 111 — 25. Miami 4-2 85 — Others receiving votes: Southern Cal 80, Kansas St. 40, Nevada 19, Hawaii 8, North Carolina 8, Northwestern 8, Michigan 7, Georgia Tech 5, Oregon St. 3, Baylor 2, N.C. State 2, Air Force 1, East Carolina 1, Kentucky 1, Washington 1.

IN THE BLEACHERS

PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. Ov’ll W L W Oregon 3 0 6 Oregon State 2 1 3 Stanford 2 1 5 Arizona 2 1 5 Washington 2 1 3 USC 2 2 5 California 1 2 3 Arizona State 1 2 3 UCLA 1 2 3 Washington State 0 4 1 Today’s Game UCLA at Oregon, 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 Arizona State at California, 12:30 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 2 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 7:15 p.m.

Friday Football: Redmond at Lincoln, 7 p.m.; Bend at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Regis at Culver, 7 p.m.; Prospect at Gilchrist, 3 p.m. Cross country: Summit, Madras at Wildhorse Invitational in Pendleton, TBA Volleyball: Prospect at Gilchrist, 5 p.m.; Paisley at Trinity Lutheran, 4:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Central Christian at C.S. Lewis Academy in Newberg, 3:30 p.m. Saturday Volleyball: Summit, Crook County at West Linn tournament, 8 a.m.; Sisters at Junction City, TBA; La Pine at Sweet Home, 3:30 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, 1 p.m.; Butte Falls at Trinity Lutheran, 2:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Umatilla at Central Christian, 1 p.m.

PREP SPORTS Cross-country

Betting Line

CENTRAL OREGON CROSS-COUNTRY RELAYS at Pine Nursery Park, Bend 9.6 miles Wednesday’s results Top-five teams only GIRLS 1, Mountain View (Hyati Wolfenden, Logan Brown, Jessica Wolfe, Ayla Rosen), 1:00.30. 2, Bend High (Mika Fristedt, Kira Smiley, Maria Sarao, Melissa Hubler), 1:02.43. 3, Bend (Lindsey Peterson, Brandon Bartlett, Kari Hattestad, Kelcey Canfield), 1:05.21. 4, Summit (Taylor Reiter, Veronica West, Sarah West, Taylor Westlund), 1:08.06. 5, Summit (Amy Geiber, Emily Righie, Mel Hopkins, Brooke Walsh), 1:08.17. BOYS 1, Mountain View (Jake McDonald, Will Stevenson, Chris McBride, McKenna Hand), 53:05. 2, Summit (Alan Nielson, Jake Hill, Connor Barrett, Erik Garner), 54:30. 3, Mountain View (Logan Myers, Angel Hernandez, Keelin Crew, Cody Arlint), 55:30. 4, Mountain View (Sam King, Caleb Cockrum, Jason Dodge, Joel Kercher), 55:57. 5, Bend (Daniel Ewing, Justin Norris, Peter Schwarz, Louis McCoy), 56:16. COED 1, Mountain View (Riley Anheluk, Mikhaila Thornton, Chase Nachtmann, Krysta Kroeger), 57:52. 2, Crook County (Brooke Buswell, Jordan Dunn, Jordan George, Kellie Foley), 59:33. 3, Mountain View (Imran Wolfenden, Kiersten Hatton, Daniel Yager, Karen Eberle), 1:00.27. 4, Bend (Makeila Lundy, Drake Ember, Jenna Mattox, Duggar Anderson), 1:01.38. 5, Mountain View (Preston Crenshaw, Chad Schoenborn, Amanda Lawrence, Anna Stenkamp), 1:03.53.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 5 1 0 .833 159 New England 4 1 0 .800 154 Miami 3 2 0 .600 89 Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 South W L T Pct PF Houston 4 2 0 .667 153 Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 163 Tennessee 4 2 0 .667 162 Jacksonville 3 3 0 .500 110 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 4 1 0 .800 114 Baltimore 4 2 0 .667 112 Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 88 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 2 0 .600 108 Oakland 2 4 0 .333 120 Denver 2 4 0 .333 124 San Diego 2 4 0 .333 157 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 134 Philadelphia 4 2 0 .667 153 Washington 3 3 0 .500 113 Dallas 1 4 0 .200 102 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 2 0 .667 130 New Orleans 4 2 0 .667 130 Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 80 Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 2 0 .667 112 Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 139 Minnesota 2 3 0 .400 87 Detroit 1 5 0 .167 146 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 3 2 0 .600 88 Seattle 3 2 0 .600 98 St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 103 San Francisco 1 5 0 .167 93 ——— Sunday’s Games Buffalo at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Washington at Chicago, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Kansas City, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Carolina, 10 a.m. Arizona at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 1:15 p.m. New England at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit, Houston AFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Week 6 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds P. Manning, IND 254 171 1916 P. Rivers, SND 220 137 2008 Fitzpatrick, BUF 85 52 595 V. Young, TEN 101 62 745 Brady, NWE 166 112 1203 Orton, DEN 247 155 1942 Schaub, HOU 197 127 1538 S. Wallace, CLE 100 63 693 Sanchez, NYJ 177 98 1100 Henne, MIA 170 107 1195 Rushers Att Yds Avg A. Foster, HOU 115 635 5.52 Chr. Johnson, TEN 139 596 4.29 Mendenhall, PIT 116 495 4.27 Tomlinson, NYJ 92 490 5.33 Jones-Drew, JAC 119 463 3.89 Rice, BAL 115 451 3.92 Charles, KAN 66 418 6.33 Addai, IND 93 406 4.37 Benson, CIN 103 406 3.94 D. McFadden, OAK 85 392 4.61 Receivers No Yds Avg Wayne, IND 45 602 13.4 Collie, IND 44 503 11.4 B. Marshall, MIA 37 467 12.6 Gaffney, DEN 37 408 11.0 Dal. Clark, IND 37 347 9.4 B. Lloyd, DEN 34 663 19.5 Welker, NWE 33 270 8.2 And. Johnson, HOU 32 488 15.3 Boldin, BAL 32 426 13.3 E. Royal, DEN 32 367 11.5 Punters No Yds Lechler, OAK 27 1354 Scifres, SND 22 1089 Sepulveda, PIT 25 1168 Weatherford, NYJ 32 1455 B. Colquitt, DEN 29 1310 Hodges, CLE 34 1522 Huber, CIN 26 1165 McAfee, IND 24 1072 Moorman, BUF 26 1152 Mesko, NWE 16 707 Punt Returners No Yds Avg McCluster, KAN 7 146 20.9

L 0 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 3 6

PA 101 116 112 161 PA 167 125 98 167 PA 60 95 102 125 PA 92 151 140 126 PA 118 120 119 111 PA 101 108 111 110 PA 97 112 88 140 PA 138 97 113 139

TD 13 12 7 7 10 9 9 4 9 7

Int 2 5 2 2 4 3 5 2 2 5

LG 74t 76t 50t 31 23 30 56t 46 22 33

TD 6 7 5 5 1 2 1 3 2 1

LG 42 73t 46 28 50t 61 27 48 38 41

TD 2 6 1 1 3 3 3 2 4 2

LG 68 67 62 61 63 57 72 66 61 65

Avg 50.1 49.5 46.7 45.5 45.2 44.8 44.8 44.7 44.3 44.2

LG 94t

TD 1

E. Royal, DEN Leonhard, NYJ Arenas, KAN Mariani, TEN Jac. Jones, HOU Parrish, BUF Mi. Thomas, JAC Powers, IND Higgins, OAK

10 124 12.4 11 135 12.3 11 113 10.3 8 82 10.3 10 97 9.7 9 83 9.2 13 105 8.1 8 63 7.9 10 78 7.8 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg Br. Tate, NWE 19 620 32.6 Bra. Smith, NYJ 14 445 31.8 Ant. Brown, PIT 7 219 31.3 Karim, JAC 11 313 28.5 Mariani, TEN 21 587 28.0 Carroll, MIA 7 184 26.3 Spiller, BUF 24 630 26.3 T. Underwood, JAC 17 421 24.8 Sproles, SND 20 448 22.4 Parmele, BAL 14 312 22.3 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec A. Foster, HOU 7 6 1 Gates, SND 7 0 7 Chr. Johnson, TEN 7 7 0 Collie, IND 6 0 6 Hillis, CLE 5 4 1 Keller, NYJ 5 0 5 Marc. Lewis, JAC 5 0 5 Mendenhall, PIT 5 5 0 Tolbert, SND 5 5 0 Tomlinson, NYJ 5 5 0 Kicking PAT FG Folk, NYJ 16-16 13-15 Janikowski, OAK 10-10 14-19 Bironas, TEN 17-17 11-12 Vinatieri, IND 19-19 10-12 Prater, DEN 13-13 11-12 Rackers, HOU 18-18 9-11 Nugent, CIN 8-8 12-13 Scobee, JAC 11-11 11-11 Gostkowski, NWE 19-19 7-10 Kaeding, SND 18-18 7-9

NFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Week 6 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds Vick, PHL 96 59 799 Kolb, PHL 105 71 804 Brees, NOR 231 163 1673 Romo, DAL 206 143 1566 Cutler, CHI 141 85 1202 Rodgers, GBY 201 129 1546 E. Manning, NYG 204 132 1479 M. Ryan, ATL 219 132 1415 Freeman, TAM 159 94 1043 Sh. Hill, DET 208 127 1309 Rushers Att Yds Avg Bradshaw, NYG 110 582 5.29 A. Peterson, MIN 112 553 4.94 S. Jackson, STL 127 507 3.99 Gore, SNF 116 471 4.06 M. Turner, ATL 108 466 4.31 L. McCoy, PHL 89 429 4.82 DeA. Williams, CAR 68 317 4.66 Forte, CHI 80 311 3.89 Bra. Jackson, GBY 67 305 4.55 Forsett, SEA 61 282 4.62 Receivers No Yds Avg R. White, ATL 43 546 12.7 Sa. Moss, WAS 37 485 13.1 H. Nicks, NYG 36 417 11.6 Amendola, STL 36 322 8.9 St. Smith, NYG 34 370 10.9 Austin, DAL 33 486 14.7 Pettigrew, DET 33 336 10.2 Gore, SNF 33 284 8.6 L. McCoy, PHL 32 239 7.5 Best, DET 31 285 9.2 Punters No Yds Morstead, NOR 20 938 Rocca, PHL 30 1405 Donn. Jones, STL 33 1533 Dodge, NYG 25 1130 A. Lee, SNF 33 1491 N. Harris, DET 29 1283 McBriar, DAL 18 794 Be. Graham, ARI 27 1180 J. Baker, CAR 30 1309 Kluwe, MIN 26 1123 Punt Returners No Yds Avg Banks, WAS 8 155 19.4 D. Hester, CHI 16 272 17.0 G. Tate, SEA 12 142 11.8 Amendola, STL 16 177 11.1 Tra. Williams, GBY 14 135 9.6 Logan, DET 11 105 9.5 D. Bryant, DAL 10 93 9.3 Ginn Jr., SNF 8 73 9.1 Spurlock, TAM 8 62 7.8 De. Jackson, PHL 10 76 7.6 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg L. Washington, SEA 13 481 37.0 Logan, DET 20 604 30.2 Ginn Jr., SNF 10 283 28.3 Dev. Thomas, WAS 12 336 28.0 D. Manning, CHI 13 355 27.3 Harvin, MIN 16 435 27.2 Stephens-Howling, ARI 22 579 26.3 Roby, NOR 16 402 25.1 Goodson, CAR 19 464 24.4 Weems, ATL 14 338 24.1 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Forte, CHI 6 3 3 Maclin, PHL 6 0 6 H. Nicks, NYG 6 0 6 Ca. Johnson, DET 5 0 5 Best, DET 5 4 1 L. McCoy, PHL 5 5 0 R. Williams, DAL 5 0 5 Harvin, MIN 4 0 3 De. Jackson, PHL 4 1 3 Jacobs, NYG 4 4 0 Kicking PAT FG M. Bryant, ATL 13-13 13-16 Ja. Hanson, DET 15-15 11-13 Gano, WAS 11-11 12-16 Gould, CHI 10-10 12-14 Jo. Brown, STL 10-10 11-14 Crosby, GBY 16-16 9-12 Akers, PHL 18-18 7-11 Buehler, DAL 12-12 6-9 Feely, ARI 10-10 6-7 Tynes, NYG 13-13 5-8

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Today’s Games SOUTH

32 32 36 38 39 26 41 13 53

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

LG 103t 86 89t 51 98t 37 95t 53 33 39

TD 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Ret 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Pts 42 42 42 36 30 30 30 30 30 30

LG 56 54 55 47 59 49 54 59 43 48

Pts 55 52 50 49 46 45 44 44 40 39

TD 6 5 12 10 6 10 10 9 6 9

Int 0 2 6 7 3 7 8 4 3 7

LG 45 80t 42t 64 55 46t 39t 68t 71 32

TD 3 4 2 1 1 5 1 3 1 1

LG 45t 56 31t 36 45 69t 35 41 31 75t

TD 3 1 6 0 1 2 1 2 0 1

LG 58 63 63 64 60 66 60 62 57 59

Avg 46.9 46.8 46.5 45.2 45.2 44.2 44.1 43.7 43.6 43.2

LG 53 89t 63 42 52 21 62t 20 23 22

TD 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

LG 101t 105t 61 42 62 95t 102t 39 46 35

TD 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

Ret 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

Pts 36 36 36 32 30 30 30 24 24 24

LG 49 52 49 53 48 56 49 51 53 50

Pts 52 48 47 46 43 43 39 30 28 28

Lambuth at Tenn.-Martin, 4 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff at Alcorn St., 4:30 p.m. FAR WEST UCLA at Oregon, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Cent. Connecticut St. at Albany, N.Y., 4 p.m. MIDWEST South Florida at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Temple at Buffalo, 9 a.m. Notre Dame vs. Navy at East Rutherford, N.J., 9 a.m. Rutgers at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. Syracuse at West Virginia, 9 a.m. Penn at Yale, 9 a.m. Cornell at Brown, 9:30 a.m. Bucknell at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. Maine at Rhode Island, 9:30 a.m. Maryland at Boston College, 10 a.m. Holy Cross at Colgate, 10 a.m. Lafayette at Fordham, 10 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. at Monmouth, N.J., 10 a.m. Harvard at Princeton, 10 a.m. Georgetown, D.C. at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Duquesne at Wagner, 10 a.m. Dartmouth at Columbia, 10:30 a.m. Massachusetts vs. New Hampshire, 12:30 p.m. James Madison at Villanova, 12:30 p.m. SOUTH VMI at Charleston Southern, 8:30 a.m. Marist at Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Duke at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Delaware at William & Mary, 9 a.m. Delaware St. at Morgan St., 10 a.m. Georgia Southern at The Citadel, 10 a.m. Wofford at Elon, 10:30 a.m. Presbyterian at Gardner-Webb, 10:30 a.m. Howard at N. Carolina A&T, 10:30 a.m. Hampton at S. Carolina St., 10:30 a.m. Savannah St. at Alabama St., 11 a.m. Chattanooga at Furman, 11 a.m. Bethune-Cookman at N.C. Central, 11 a.m. Florida A&M at Norfolk St., 11 a.m. Grambling St. at MVSU, noon Appalachian St. at W. Carolina, noon LSU at Auburn, 12:30 p.m. Georgia Tech at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. Connecticut at Louisville, 12:30 p.m. Georgia St. at Old Dominion, 12:30 p.m. Towson at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Rice at UCF, 12:30 p.m. Austin Peay at Jacksonville St., 1 p.m. Marshall at East Carolina, 1:15 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Middle Tennessee, 1:30 p.m. W. Kentucky at Louisiana-Lafayette, 2 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Nicholls St., 2 p.m. Prairie View vs. Southern U. at Shreveport, La., 2 p.m. E. Michigan at Virginia, 3 p.m. UAB at Mississippi St., 4 p.m. McNeese St. at SE Louisiana, 4 p.m. Alabama at Tennessee, 4 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Tennessee St., 4 p.m. South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Stony Brook at Coastal Carolina, 4:30 p.m. Georgia at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. North Carolina at Miami, 4:30 p.m. MIDWEST Indiana at Illinois, 9 a.m. Penn St. at Minnesota, 9 a.m. Michigan St. at Northwestern, 9 a.m. Purdue at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Morehead St. at Butler, 10 a.m. Campbell at Dayton, 10 a.m. Ohio at Miami (Ohio), 10 a.m. Davidson at Drake, 11 a.m. W. Illinois at Missouri St., 11 a.m. E. Kentucky at SE Missouri, 11 a.m. Murray St. at E. Illinois, 11:30 a.m. Youngstown St. at S. Dakota St., noon W. Michigan at Akron, 12:30 p.m. Kent St. at Bowling Green, 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Iowa, 12:30 p.m. Oklahoma at Missouri, 12:30 or 5 p.m. Indiana St. at N. Dakota St., 1 p.m. Cent. Michigan at N. Illinois, 1 p.m. Illinois St. at N. Iowa, 2:05 p.m. Texas A&M at Kansas, 4 p.m. Ball St. at Toledo, 4 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. at Texas, 9 a.m. Mississippi at Arkansas, 9:21 a.m. Florida Atlantic at Arkansas St., 10 a.m. Jackson St. at Texas Southern, 10 a.m. Sam Houston St. vs. Stephen F.Austin at Houston, noon Kansas St. at Baylor, 12:30 p.m. Houston at SMU, 12:30 p.m. Nebraska at Oklahoma St., 12:30 or 8 p.m. Northwestern St. at Texas St., 1 p.m. Air Force at TCU, 5 p.m. Tulane at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Wyoming at BYU, 11 a.m. N. Arizona at Montana, noon South Dakota at S. Utah, noon N. Colorado at Montana St., 12:05 p.m. Arizona St. at California, 12:30 p.m. Texas Tech at Colorado, 12:30 p.m. Sacramento St. at E. Washington, 1:05 p.m. New Mexico St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Valparaiso at San Diego, 2 p.m. Washington St. at Stanford, 2 p.m. South Alabama at UC Davis, 2 p.m. Hawaii at Utah St., 2 p.m. Portland St. at Weber St., 2 p.m. Colorado St. at Utah, 3 p.m. Fresno St. at San Jose St., 5 p.m. North Dakota at Cal Poly, 6:05 p.m. San Diego St. at New Mexico, 7 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 16, total points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Oregon (39) 6-0 1,471 2 2. Boise St. (15) 6-0 1,433 3 3. Oklahoma (3) 6-0 1,355 6 4. TCU (3) 7-0 1,340 4 5. Auburn 7-0 1,279 7 6. LSU 7-0 1,132 9 7. Alabama 6-1 1,121 8 8. Michigan St. 7-0 1,062 13 9. Utah 6-0 1,019 11 10. Wisconsin 6-1 920 18 11. Ohio St. 6-1 895 1 12. Stanford 5-1 828 14 13. Iowa 5-1 768 15 14. Nebraska 5-1 684 5 15. Arizona 5-1 619 17 16. Florida St. 6-1 615 16 17. Oklahoma St. 6-0 575 20 18. Missouri 6-0 552 21 19. South Carolina 4-2 372 10 20. West Virginia 5-1 346 25 21. Arkansas 4-2 343 12

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Sunday Steelers 3 3 DOLPHINS FALCONS 4.5 3.5 Bengals CHIEFS 4.5 4.5 Jaguars TITANS 3 3 Eagles BEARS 3 3 Redskins SAINTS 14 13.5 Browns RAVENS 14 13.5 Bills 49ers 3 3 PANTHERS BUCCANEERS 2.5 2.5 Rams SEAHAWKS 4 5.5 Cardinals CHARGERS 3 3 Patriots BRONCOS 8.5 8.5 Raiders PACKERS 3 3 Vikings Monday COWBOYS 3 3 Giants COLLEGE Thursday OREGON 21.5 24 Ucla Friday CINCINNATI 8.5 7.5 S. Florida Saturday e-Notre Dame 7 7 Navy Connecticut 1 PK LOUISVILLE VIRGINIA TECH 26.5 26 Duke MIAMI-FLA 6.5 6.5 N. Carolina CELMSON 5.5 5.5 Georgia Tech BOSTON COL 5 4 Maryland E. CAROLINA 13 12.5 Marshall Temple 7 7.5 BUFFALO IOWA 5.5 5.5 Wisconsin Penn St 9.5 9.5 MINNESOTA OHIO ST 23 23.5 Purdue Michigan St 6.5 5 NORTHWESTERN PITTSBURGH 12 13 Rutgers WEST VIRGINIA 16 14 Syracuse ILLINOIS 13 13.5 Indiana TEXAS 22 21 Iowa St S. Carolina 12.5 12 VANDERBILT ARKANSAS 9.5 9.5 Mississippi Ohio U 3 3 MIAMI-OHIO BYU 9.5 10.5 Wyoming BAYLOR 7.5 6 Kansas St Texas A&M 14 13.5 KANSAS MISS ST 20 19.5 Uab SMU 9 7.5 Houston Kent St 1.5 2 BOWLING GREEN W. Michigan 8.5 7.5 AKRON N. ILLINOIS 10 9.5 C. Michigan Oklahoma 3.5 3 MISSOURI Nebraska 5.5 5.5 OKLAHOMA ST ARIZONA 7.5 6.5 Washington CALIFORNIA 3 3 Arizona St Alabama 17 16.5 TENNESSEE AUBURN 6 6 Lsu IDAHO 22.5 23.5 New Mexico St Hawaii 3.5 3 UTAH ST UTAH 31 30.5 Colorado St STANFORD 34.5 34.5 Washington St VIRGINIA 23 24 E. Michigan Georgia 3.5 3.5 KENTUCKY C. FLORIDA 21 22 Rice TOLEDO 12 11.5 Ball St Texas Tech 1 2.5 COLORADO Frenso St 17 19.5 SAN JOSE ST TCU 18.5 18.5 Air Force UTEP 10.5 10 Tulane San Diego St 23 23.5 NEW MEXICO UL-LAFAYETTE 6 6 W. Kentucky ARKANSAS ST 7 7.5 Fla. Atlantic MID TENN ST 11 11.5 UL-Monroe e-East Rutherford, N.J.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Charlotte 105, New Orleans 98, OT Chicago 110, Toronto 103 Orlando 101, Dallas 76 Philadelphia 118, New York 91 Boston 107, New Jersey 92 Today’s Games Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Columbus, Ohio, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Denver at Portland, 7 p.m. Golden State vs. L.A. Lakers at San Diego, Calif., 7 p.m.

TENNIS WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— LUXEMBOURG OPEN Wednesday Luxembourg Singles First Round Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def. Timea Bacsinszky (6), Switzerland, 7-5, 6-1. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Ivana Lisjak, Croatia, 6-2, 1-1, retired. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Yanina Wickmayer (3), Belgium, 6-4, 6-4. Ana Ivanovic (4), Serbia, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-0. Second Round Julia Goerges (8), Germany, def. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 6-1. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def. Jarmila Groth (7), Australia, 6-4, 7-5. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-0, 6-1. KREMLIN CUP Wednesday Moscow Singles Second Round Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (8), Spain, def. Alona Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 1-6, 6-1. Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-4, 2-6, 6-1. Dominika Cibulkova (2), Slovakia, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-1. Alisa Kleybanova (7), Russia, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 7-6 (0), 6-4.

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— STOCKHOLM OPEN Wednesday Stockholm Singles First Round Matthias Bachinger, Germany, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Jan Hajek, Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-2. Second Round Stanislas Wawrinka (5), Switzerland, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Tomas Berdych (3), Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Michael Ryderstedt, Sweden, 6-4, 6-4. KREMLIN CUP

Wednesday Moscow Singles First Round Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, def. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. Second Round Radek Stepanek (5), Czech Republic, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-2. Marcos Baghdatis (4), Cyprus, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-4, 6-3. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, def. Nikolay Davydenko (1), Russia, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5).

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Islanders 6 3 1 2 8 20 17 Pittsburgh 7 4 3 0 8 23 16 Philadelphia 5 2 2 1 5 11 14 N.Y. Rangers 4 1 2 1 3 14 16 New Jersey 6 1 4 1 3 10 21 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 5 4 0 1 9 17 11 Montreal 5 3 1 1 7 14 13 Boston 4 3 1 0 6 12 7 Buffalo 7 2 4 1 5 16 19 Ottawa 6 1 4 1 3 12 21 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 5 4 1 0 8 17 18 Washington 6 4 2 0 8 18 14 Atlanta 6 3 3 0 6 18 20 Carolina 6 3 3 0 6 17 18 Florida 4 2 2 0 4 12 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 8 5 2 1 11 25 21 Nashville 5 3 0 2 8 13 10 Detroit 5 3 1 1 7 14 12 Columbus 5 3 2 0 6 13 13 St. Louis 5 2 1 2 6 14 12 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 6 4 2 0 8 19 19 Calgary 5 3 2 0 6 9 11 Vancouver 7 2 3 2 6 15 20 Minnesota 5 2 2 1 5 16 13 Edmonton 4 2 2 0 4 12 11 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 5 4 1 0 8 20 15 Los Angeles 5 4 1 0 8 14 9 Anaheim 7 2 4 1 5 14 26 Phoenix 4 1 2 1 3 8 10 San Jose 4 1 2 1 3 9 14 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Chicago 2, Vancouver 1, SO Buffalo 4, Atlanta 1 Columbus 3, Anaheim 1 Los Angeles 4, Carolina 3 Today’s Games Washington at Boston, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Calgary at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Nashville, 5 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF x-New York 14 9 6 48 36 x-Columbus 13 8 8 47 37 Kansas City 10 13 6 36 32 Chicago 8 12 9 33 33 New England 9 15 5 32 32 Toronto FC 8 13 8 32 30 Philadelphia 8 14 7 31 34 D.C. 6 19 4 22 19 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF x-Los Angeles 17 7 5 56 42 x-Real Salt Lake 15 4 10 55 43 x-Seattle 14 9 6 48 38 x-FC Dallas 12 3 14 50 41 x-San Jose 13 9 7 46 33 x-Colorado 12 8 9 45 42 Houston 8 15 6 30 38 Chivas USA 8 17 4 28 30 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Wednesday’s Game San Jose 3, Chivas USA 0 Today’s Game New England at New York, 4:30 p.m.

GA 29 33 34 37 48 39 46 44 GA 25 18 33 26 29 30 48 41

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Removed 1B Mark Teixeira from the postseason roster. Added INF Eduardo Nunez to the postseason roster. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Named Joel Skinner bench coach; Gerald Perry hitting coach and Tye Waller first base coach. Will not renew the contract of Stephen Sayles head athletic trainer. Renewed the contract of Curt Young pitching coach; Mike Gallego third-base coach and Ron Romanick bullpen coach. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS — Released F Evan Brock, G Richard Delk and F Ricardo Marsh. DETROIT PISTONS — Requested waivers on G Vernon Hamilton and F Ike Diogu. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Waived G Aaron Miles. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Requested waivers on G Jason Hart and F John Thomas. SAN ANTONIO SPURS — Exercised the fourth-year contract option on G George Hill. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed DE Robaire Smith and OT Tony Pashos on injured reserve. Signed WR Yamon Figurs and OL Paul McQuistan. DETROIT LIONS — Released DB Dante Wesley and DB Paul Pratt. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Suspended P Pat McAfee one game after his arrest for public intoxication on Wednesday. Placed DB Brandon King on injured reserve. Signed TE Gijon Robinson. Waived FB Matt Clapp from the practice squad. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Signed LB Curtis Johnson from the practice squad. Signed RB Chauncey Washington and DB Antoine Thompson to the practice squad. Released DT Jimmy Saddler-McQueen from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Vancouver F Rick Rypien for an altercation with a fan during Tuesday’s game against Minnesota. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Activated F Jamie Lundmark from injured reserve and assigned him to Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned F Zack Smith to Binghamton (AHL). COLLEGE CONNECTICUT — Suspended QB Cody Endres for the remainder of the season for an unspecified violation of a university policy. NORTH TEXAS — Fired football coach Todd Dodge. Promoted offensive coordinator Mike Canales to interim coach.

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 372 70 188 44 The Dalles 383 78 584 228 John Day 198 35 565 235 McNary 326 71 1,200 480 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 806,268 92,060 413,315 154,927 The Dalles 541,071 75,007 327,886 120,381 John Day 462,440 69,068 276,059 100,953 McNary 415,189 44,324 254,284 86,166


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 D3

FOOTBALL

S  B

Players are confused by NFL crackdown on hard hits

Prep sports • Sisters runners take fifth: The Sisters boys cross-country team placed fifth out of 24 teams at the Country Fair Classic hosted by Elmira on Wednesday in Veneta. Taylor Steele led the Outlaws with a third-place finish on the flat three-loop, 3-mile course. Steele clocked in at 16 minutes, 18 seconds. Sisters’ girls squad took 11th-place out of 22 girls teams and were led by Hayley Palmer who finished in 22:01 (her place was unavailable). Sisters coach Charlie Kanzig said the race should serve as a good tune-up before Thursday’s test at the Sky-Em League district race at Lane Community College in Eugene.

By Barry Wilner

Baseball • Injured 1B Teixeira removed from Yankees roster: Mark Teixeira’s season is over. The All-Star first baseman was removed from the New York Yankees postseason roster Wednesday, one day after straining his right hamstring while running out a grounder against Texas in Game 4 of the AL championship series. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said before Game 5 that Teixeira would be replaced on the roster by infielder Eduardo Nunez. Should the Yankees overcome a 3-1 deficit against the Rangers in the best-of-seven ALCS, Teixeira would not be eligible for the World Series. Teixeira said the injury will need six-to-eight weeks to heal.

Soccer • FIFA suspends senior officials over bribery probe: FIFA provisionally suspended two executive committee members and four lower-ranked officials on Wednesday in a World Cup vote-selling scandal. Executive committee members Amos Adamu of Nigeria and Reynald Temarii from Tahiti are barred from soccer-related duties until the probe ends, said Claudio Sulser, chairman of FIFA’s ethics committee. His panel is scheduled to meet again in mid-November. FIFA’s ethics panel also will continue investigating whether two unnamed bidders competing for either the 2018 and 2022 World Cups engaged in collusion. “Today is a sad day for football,” FIFA president Sepp Blatter said, asking for time to restore FIFA’s credibility. “We have to fight for respect and especially we have to fight that the people here in charge of FIFA behave as they should do. Our society is full of devils and these devils you find them in football.” FIFA’s executive committee, led by Blatter, will select the two World Cup hosts in a Dec. 2 secret ballot in Zurich.

Basketball • ’Melo goes about business amid latest speculation: Carmelo Anthony keeps on preparing for the upcoming season unaware of, and ostensibly unfazed by, where that will be. Amid the latest report that he could be headed to the Big Apple — this time, to the Knicks, not the Nets — Anthony said after practice Wednesday that he isn’t affected by the renewed trade talk swirling around him. “I’m still able to wake up in the morning, smile, come here, laugh and joke with my teammates, play basketball and compete,” the Denver Nuggets’ star forward said. “That stuff doesn’t bother me.” ESPN reported the New York Knicks got back into the bidding after Anthony let the Nuggets know he wasn’t going to change his mind and sign a three-year, $65 million extension that’s gone without his signature since June. Three weeks ago, a proposed four-team deal that would have sent Anthony to New Jersey fell apart when the Nuggets decided to seek a sweeter package of players and picks for the man who’s taken them to the playoffs in each of his seven NBA seasons.

Football • Upset Harrison excused from Steelers practice: This time, James Harrison sacked himself. The unhappy Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker was excused from Wednesday’s practice after meeting with coach Mike Tomlin about the $75,000 fine Harrison incurred for a helmet hit on a Browns receiver. Tomlin felt Harrison needed time to cool off. Harrison was so upset with the fine — and the NFL’s stricter enforcement of dangerous hits — that he said he was weighing retirement, although Tomlin expects him to practice on Thursday. “I thought it was beneficial for him and for us if I gave him a little time to cool off and give him the day off,” Tomlin said. “I excused him at that time and we went on and had a productive day. I’m sure he will be back in the building tomorrow.”

Golf • Els wins the Grand Slam: Ernie Els ran off three straight birdies on the back nine Wednesday and turned a three-shot deficit into a one-shot victory over David Toms in the PGA Grand Slam of Golf in Bermuda. Els, an alternate who was filling in for Masters champion Phil Mickelson, closed with a 2under 69 and earned $600,000. It was his second victory in the 36-hole event for the year’s four major champions. Els also won in 1997 when it was at Poipu Bay. Toms, another alternate who replaced British Open champion Louis Oosthuizen, chipped in for birdie on No. 12 and stretched his lead to three shots when Els bogeyed the 13th. Els made the first of his successive birdies on the 14th at Port Royal Golf Course, but his hopes for a two-shot swing ended when Toms again chipped in, this time for par. The turning point came on the 15th, when Els made birdie and Toms bogeyed for a share of the lead. Els pulled ahead with his third straight birdie on the 15th, and he holed a 10-foot par putt on the 17th to keep his one-shot advantage. Toms shot 71 in his first appearance in the PGA Grand Slam since 2001, when he won the PGA Championship. He earned $300,000. U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell (73) and PGA champion Martin Kaymer (71) tied for third, eight shots behind, and each earned $225,000.

Tennis • Azarenka qualifies for WTA Tour Championships: Victoria Azarenka qualified for the WTA Tour Championships for the second straight year after defeating Andrea Petkovic 6-4, 2-6, 6-1 in the second round of the Kremlin Cup in Moscow on Wednesday. The 10th-ranked Azarenka will replace Serena Williams in the eight-player, season-ending event that starts next week in Doha, Qatar. In men’s play, top-seeded Nikolay Davydenko lost 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5) to Pablo Cuevas of Uruguay. — From wire reports

The Associated Press

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press ile

Oregon’s head coach Chip Kelly, second from right, has the program at No. 1 in the nation for the first time ever.

Pac-10 race: Everyone is still chasing the Ducks By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX— The top of the Pac-10 is easy to figure out: Top-ranked and unbeaten Oregon is barreling toward a shot at a national championship. Same with the bottom: Washington State, despite its progress, is still playing catch-up. The rest of the conference? A mishmash of teams that can’t distinguish themselves and are prone to wild fluctuations. So, as the Pac-10 heads into the second half of the season, starting tonight with UCLA-Oregon, expect more of the unexpected. “I don’t think you can predict anything,” UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel said. “You just have to play great football as often as you can and hopefully you’re good enough to take a team down and be consistent enough not to be that team.” Inconsistency has been the defining characteristic of most teams through the first six games. Washington has been on an every-other plan this season, following losses with wins every week, the latest a doubleovertime victory over Oregon State on the heels of a loss to Arizona State. The Beavers were respectable in losses to Top 10 teams TCU and Boise State, then beat Arizona — No. 9 at the time — on the road before failing on a potential game-winning two-point conversion attempt in the loss to the Huskies. Arizona had an impressive win over then-No. 9 Iowa, held off Cal, then got bumped from the Top 10 with the loss to Oregon State. Arizona State pulled out a solid win over Washington to end a three-game losing streak, USC had its first losing streak in nine years before running over Cal last week. The biggest fluctuations have come from the Bruins and Bears. UCLA played Kansas State tough on the road, was blown out by Stanford, beat ranked teams Houston and Texas in consecutive weeks, then had a lopsided loss to Cal. The Bears were caught off guard by Nevada’s pistol, played tough at Arizona, had the 28-point win over UCLA, followed by last week’s pummeling at the hands of the Trojans. “Our team has the potential, if we execute, to be a very good team,” Cal coach Jeff Tedford said. “That said, if we don’t (execute), the conference is so competitive you have a chance to not be successful.” How competitive? There are five teams at 3-3 and all but Oregon have at least one conference loss. The muddling will become clearer as the season winds down, though based on the way the first half went, it’ll probably be a few weeks. Here’s a look at some of the highlights of those first six games:

Conference king Oregon has been the best team in the Pac-10 so far. Hasn’t been close, really.

The Ducks lead the nation with 54.3 points and 567 yards per game, have a Heisman Trophy candidate in LaMichael James and enough talent on both sides of the ball to make teams dizzy. Oregon turned its highly anticipated Top 10 showdown with Stanford into a runaway and this week climbed atop the rankings for the first time in program history. The Ducks still have some tough tests ahead — at USC, against rival Oregon State — but they’ve got their sights set higher than another Rose Bowl berth.

Heisman hopefuls Washington’s Jake Locker and Stanford’s Andrew Luck were the conference’s Heisman Trophy front-runners at the start of the season. Luck still has a shot, Locker doesn’t. Luck has the nation’s ninth-best passing efficiency on a team ranked No. 12, while Locker has too much ground to make up after a rough start to the season. The Pac-10’s best bet? James at Oregon.

Most impressive win UCLA 34, Texas 12. The Longhorns were ranked No. 7 and looking for long-awaited redemption from the last time the Bruins were in Austin, a humiliating 66-3 loss in 1997. Instead, UCLA forced four turnovers and churned out yards against the nation’s No. 2 rushing defense to bounce Texas from the Top 10.

Biggest surprise Arizona’s defense. As expected, the Wildcats have been able to move the ball behind quarterback Nick Foles but the defense playing like this? A little tougher to predict. Arizona currently leads the conference in total, scoring and rushing defense, keeping the Wildcats in the Rose Bowl hunt.

Toughest break Oregon State losing flanker James Rodgers. The dynamic senior went down with a season-ending left knee injury against Arizona two weeks ago, leaving the Beavers without one of the conference’s best playmakers. Silver lining for him and Oregon State: it happened early enough to qualify him for a medical redshirt and a return next season.

Gutsiest call that didn’t work No contest: Oregon State coach Mike Riley’s decision to go for a two-point conversion in Saturday’s double overtime loss to Washington. Trailing by 1 after matching TDs with the Huskies, Riley decided to end the game right there. It did — when Joe Halahuni couldn’t hold on to Ryan Katz’s pass after being hit.

NEW YORK — Ray Lewis is worried about what’s happening to his sport. The Baltimore linebacker who epitomizes hard hits in the NFL fears that the league is stripping away the inherent violence and “the game will be diluted very quickly.” “My opinion is play the game like that game is supposed to be played, and whatever happens happens,” Lewis said Wednesday about the NFL’s decision to crack down on dangerous and flagrant hits. The NFL imposed huge fines on three players — Pittsburgh’s James Harrison, Atlanta’s Dunta Robinson and New England’s Brandon Meriweather — for illegal hits last weekend. It warned that, starting with this week’s games, violent conduct will be cause for suspension. Arizona Cardinals linebacker Joey Porter was clearly perplexed by the decision. “There’s no more hitting hard. That’s what our game is about. It’s a gladiator sport,” Porter said. “I mean, the whole excitement of people getting hit hard, big plays happening, stuff like that. “Just watch — the game is going to change.” Violence has always been a part of the NFL, bringing soaring TV ratings and strong attendance. The question is how much to allow. “Physical, tough football is what people are attracted to,” said Ray Anderson, the NFL’s executive vice president of football operations. “Violent, unnecessary hits that put people at risk, not just for the careers but lives ... we’re not subscribing to the notion fans want that.” Commissioner Roger Goodell told the teams that “further action is required to emphasize the importance of teaching safe and controlled techniques and of playing within the rules.” “It is incumbent on all of us to support the rules we have in place to protect players,” he said. But some players think the league is asking for something much more difficult: complete changes in playing style — changes that fans don’t want to see. Not surprisingly, defensive players are most critical. “What they’re trying to say — ‘We’re protecting the integrity’ — no, you’re not,” Bears cornerback Charles Tillman said. “It’s ruining the integrity. It’s not even football anymore. We should just go out there and play two-hand touch Sunday if we can’t make contact.”

Players waging battle against Lockout Island By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

T

here’s a widget you can add to your laptop if you really want to be bummed out. A countdown clock, courtesy of your favorite NFL players, to the time when football, as we know it, will surely end. Ticking away on the new NFL union’s website, it stood at 131 days and counting on Wednesday. NFL owners, an accompanying cartoon tells us, are already flying this plane blindly on a one-way trip to a place they’ve been before. Lockout Island. If you can’t understand how the league and players could be so close to killing the cash cow that is the NFL, it’s all explained in cartoons that even the average Dallas Cowboys fan can figure out. The players, it turns out, are standing as one with the fans. Take that, greedy owners, who are not only threatening the future of America’s favorite sport but endangering the health of a lot of innocent babies. Yes, babies. Listen to union leader DeMaurice Smith, who worries that players won’t have health insurance for their children if the NFL locks them out, as widely anticipated on March 1. Smith told Minnesota Vikings fans on Tuesday that some players

N F L C O M M E N TA R Y “have children who need heart transplants. We have several players who have children who are on kidney dialysis. We will have over 100 players who will have children who are born in the March, April, May timeframe. Right now all of those players need health insurance.” Makes it easy to pick a side in this one. Have to be pretty heartless to be against sick babies. It’s a little more complicated, of course. There’s billions of dollars at stake, and how they’re divided over the term of the next collective bargaining agreement will decide which side gets even richer than they are right now. But the fact the rhetoric is getting so heated so soon isn’t a good sign that things will end happily. Though both sides have, at times, expressed optimism that a deal can be reached, both are digging in for a lockout that many see as inevitable. “From a seriousness standpoint, the players believe this lockout is going to occur,” Smith said. To prepare for that, players are making the tactical move of voting to decertify the union for a possible legal battle ahead. But a public-relations battle may eventually decide

this looming conflict, and the union under Smith is showing some savvy in that area. Ordinarily, painting owners as the culprits wouldn’t be so tough because no one likes heartless billionaires who want to make even more billions. But it’s also hard to think of NFL players as victims, especially when they head to the bank to deposit their $20 million signing bonus checks. So there are cartoons, and talk of sick babies. There’s even an online petition at NFLLockout.com, which fans can sign to show that are standing as one with the players. Owners aren’t above digging in their own bag of tricks, either. Their claims earlier this month to the Wall Street Journal that the league could lose nearly $1 billion if there was a lockout — even if there is a 2011 season — were clearly intended to step up the pressure on the union to agree to concessions before it’s too late. Included in that $1 billion is a claim of $400 million in lost season ticket sales in March alone, the month a lot of teams send out renewals. That’s almost laughable, since it assumes a certain percentage of fans will just give up on football. But when you’re going up against cartoon characters and sick babies, every million counts.

What isn’t in dispute is that the gulf between the two sides is wide. The NFL generates some $9 billion annually, with about $1 billion going to operating expenses, and owners get 40 percent of the rest. But they want about $1 billion more before the players get their 60 percent, and they also want players to work harder for their money with an 18-game season. The players’ union, of course, doesn’t want to give up a dime. But if it wants to come away with a new contract that protects most of its current riches, it has to make its case to the same kind of skeptical fans whose lack of support in the strike of 1987 eventually helped crush the union. So the union bashes the owners as rich fools who don’t have a humanitarian bone in their bodies. It draws cartoons, draws up petitions, and tries to draw fans to rallies on its behalf. If it can’t make progress at the bargaining table, the union will settle for progress in the court of public opinion. While the show goes on, the countdown clock keeps ticking. Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org.


D4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NATIONAL LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

M L B P L AYO F F SCOREBOARD

Heat

AT A GLANCE MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT Subject to change ——— LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Friday, Oct. 15 New York 6, Texas 5 Saturday, Oct. 16 Texas 7, New York 2 Monday, Oct. 18 Texas 8, New York 0 Tuesday, Oct. 19 Texas 10, New York 3 Wednesday, Oct. 20 New York 7, Texas 2, Texas leads series 3-2 Friday, Oct. 22 New York (Hughes 18-8) at Texas (Lewis 12-13), 5:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 New York (Pettitte 11-3) at Texas (Lee 12-9), 5:07 p.m., if necessary National League Saturday, Oct. 16 San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3 Sunday, Oct. 17 Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 1 Tuesday, Oct. 19 San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 0 Wednesday, Oct. 20 San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5, San Francisco leads series 3-1 Today, Oct. 21 Philadelphia (Halladay 21-10) at San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10), 4:57 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 12:57 p.m. or 4:57 p.m., if necessary Sunday, Oct. 24 San Francisco (Cain 13-11) at Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11), 4:57 p.m., if necessary WORLD SERIES Wednesday, Oct. 27 American League at National League, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28 AL at NL, 4:57 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30 NL at AL, 3:57 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 31 NL at AL, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1 NL at AL, if necessary, 4:57 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3 AL at NL, if necessary, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4 AL at NL, if necessary, 4:57 p.m. Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press

BOX SCORES

The San Francisco Giants’ Pablo Sandoval reacts after hitting a two-run double during the sixth inning of Game 4 of the National League Championship Series against the Philadelphia Phillies Wednesday in San Francisco.

Wednesday’s Games

Giants 6, Phillies 5 Philadelphia Victorino cf Utley 2b Polanco 3b Howard 1b Werth rf Rollins ss B.Francisco lf C.Ruiz c Blanton p Contreras p a-Do.Brown ph Durbin p Bastardo p Madson p c-Gload ph Oswalt p Totals

AB 4 5 3 2 3 4 4 4 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 32

R H BI BB SO 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 9 4 3 11

Avg. .200 .133 .286 .385 .250 .267 .250 .231 .000 --.000 ------.000 .333

San Francisco Renteria ss Br.Wilson p F.Sanchez 2b A.Huff 1b Posey c Burrell lf Romo p Uribe ss C.Ross rf-lf Sandoval 3b Rowand cf S.Casilla p b-Ishikawa ph Ja.Lopez p Schierholtz rf Bumgarner p A.Torres cf Totals

AB 4 0 5 5 5 2 0 0 3 4 2 0 1 0 1 1 2 35

R H 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 3 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 6 11

Avg. .083 --.235 .313 .313 .182 --.143 .417 .250 .200 --.500 --.000 .000 .167

BI 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 7

Philadelphia 000 040 010 — 5 9 1 San Francisco 101 012 001 — 6 11 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Contreras in the 6th. b-struck out for S.Casilla in the 6th. c-grounded out for Madson in the 9th. E—Rollins (1). LOB—Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 9. 2B— Polanco (2), Howard (3), Werth (1), Posey 2 (2), C.Ross (1), Sandoval (1). RBIs—Victorino (1), Polanco 2 (4), Werth (3), A.Huff (2), Posey 2 (2), Uribe (2), Sandoval 2 (2). CS—Rollins (1), A.Torres (1). S—Blanton. SF—Uribe. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (Rollins 3, C.Ruiz); San Francisco 5 (Bumgarner, Burrell, F.Sanchez, Sandoval 2). Runners moved up—Renteria, Sandoval. GIDP—Polanco, Sandoval. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Utley, Rollins, Howard); San Francisco 1 (F.Sanchez, Renteria, A.Huff). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton 4 2-3 5 3 3 1 3 63 5.79 Contreras 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Durbin BS, 1-1 1 2 2 2 2 1 38 18.00 Bastardo 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Madson 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 32 0.00 Oswalt L, 1-1 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 18 2.08 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner 4 2-3 6 3 3 1 6 85 5.79 S.Casilla 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 30 5.40 Ja.Lopez H, 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 16 3.38 Romo BS, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Br.Wilson W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Contreras 1-0, Madson 1-0, S.Casilla 2-2, Romo 1-1. IBB—off S.Casilla (Howard). HBP—by Blanton (C.Ross), by S.Casilla (Werth), by Bumgarner (Polanco). WP—Blanton 2, S.Casilla. T—3:40. A—43,515 (41,915).

Yankees 7, Rangers 2

Giants win in ninth, take commanding 3-1 series lead By Janie McCauley The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — The castoff comes through with another big hit, the rookie delivers again. The slumping slugger emerges at exactly the right time, the guy too banged up to start comes through at the end. It’s been that kind of season for the charmed San Francisco Giants, now just one win away from the World Series. Juan Uribe, sore left wrist and all, hit a sacrifice fly off reliever Roy Oswalt with one out in the ninth inning Wednesday night, sending the Giants past the Philadelphia Phillies 6-5 for a 3-1 lead in the NL championship series. “It seems like all the baseball talk is all East Coast,” said Aubrey Huff, who slid home with the final run. “Everybody watching tonight saw exactly how we’ve played all year.” Boosted by yet another big hit from lateseason pickup Cody Ross, four hits and two RBIs from rookie Buster Posey and a timely double from struggling Pablo Sandoval, the Giants pushed the two-time defending NL champion Phillies to the brink of elimination. Philadelphia will send Roy Halladay against Tim Lincecum in Game 5 tonight. It’s a rematch of aces that Lincecum won in the opener. “Two of the best arms in the game,” Posey said. “We’re in a good position. But at the same time, we know anything can happen in baseball.” A champion with the White Sox in 2005,

AB 5 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 37

R H 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 2 2 13

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 2 10

Avg. .364 .348 .316 .273 .353 .333 .222 .200 .333 .400

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Cano 2b A.Rodriguez 3b Thames dh Berkman 1b Posada c Granderson cf Gardner lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 3 2 4 4 3 30

R H BI BB 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 9 6 6

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 4

Avg. .273 .105 .421 .176 .154 .222 .250 .333 .200

Texas 000 011 000 — 2 13 1 New York 032 010 01x — 7 9 0 E—Francoeur (1). LOB—Texas 8, New York 7. 2B—N.Cruz (3), A.Rodriguez (1), Posada (1), Granderson (1). HR—Treanor (1), off Sabathia; Swisher (1), off C.Wilson; Cano (4), off C.Wilson; Granderson (1), off Ogando. RBIs—Treanor 2 (2), Swisher (1), Cano (5), Berkman (2), Posada (1), Granderson 2 (3). SB—Andrus (4), Kinsler (2), A.Rodriguez (1). S—Gardner. SF—Berkman. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 6 (Treanor, J.Hamilton 2, Francoeur, Moreland 2); New York 5 (Jeter 2, Posada, Swisher, Berkman). Runners moved up—M.Young, Treanor, Granderson. GIDP— M.Young, J.Hamilton, Swisher. DP—Texas 1 (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland); New York 2 (Jeter, Cano, Berkman), (Cano, Jeter, Berkman). Texas IP H R ER BB C.Wilson L, 0-1 5 6 6 5 4 Kirkman 2 1 0 0 2 Ogando 1 2 1 1 0 New York IP H R ER BB Sabathia W, 1-0 6 11 2 2 0 K.Wood 2 1 0 0 0 Ma.Rivera 1 1 0 0 0 IBB—off C.Wilson (Thames). WP—K.Wood. T—3:48. A—49,832 (50,287).

SO 2 1 1 SO 7 3 0

NP 93 50 23 NP 112 28 23

ERA 6.00 0.00 4.50 ERA 6.30 0.00 0.00

ety. I got a mini-ulcer developing, but it’s all worth it. We never lost focus.” After Freddy Sanchez lined out to right to start the bottom of the ninth, Huff and Posey singled. Phillies right fielder Jayson Werth made a nice sliding stop on the warning track to keep Huff from scoring. “We faced him a couple nights ago,” Posey said. “He’s got great stuff, just battling.” Then came Uribe, a quiet one for seven in the NLCS before this one. On a 1-1 pitch, he claimed he got hit in the hand by Oswalt’s fastball, but umpire Wally Bell said it was a foul. Uribe wound up with the game-winner moments later, leaving the Giants just one victory shy of reaching the World Series for the first time in eight years. Sandoval came jumping out of the dugout as Uribe’s ball was in the air. Giants players streamed out of the dugout and mobbed Uribe after he rounded first base. Huff and Posey exchanged high-fives near the mound and Sandoval and Sanchez hugged. Posey starred at the plate and behind it, too. He made a great play at the plate to save a run earlier, neatly handling a short hop and tagging out Carlos Ruiz at the plate. Werth’s double in the eighth made it 5-all after Ryan Howard doubled against Javier Lopez leading off the inning. Posey had an RBI double in the first and run-scoring single in the third — both coming with two outs — for his first RBIs of the postseason. He added a seventh-inning double as well. Philadelphia’s Placido Polanco hit a two-run double in the fifth inning of a game that went back and forth.

AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

Yankees top Rangers, stave off elimination By Ronald Blum

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b J.Hamilton cf Guerrero dh N.Cruz lf Dav.Murphy lf Kinsler 2b Francoeur rf Treanor c Moreland 1b Totals

Uribe made his mark on this NLCS in a matter of moments — a great play with his glove, then one swing to win it. Huff singled with one out in the ninth and took third when Posey singled for his fourth hit of the game. Uribe hit a medium-deep fly, leaving left fielder Ben Francisco with no chance to get Huff. “Who doesn’t want to play now? I want to be here,” Uribe said. “In that moment, everybody knew my wrist was hurting a little bit. I think that’s why he threw a lot of fastballs in because he knew. I was trying to hit the ball deep enough to get the run home and for us to win the game.” Going to Oswalt to begin the ninth backed manager Charlie Manuel’s words this was his club’s biggest game yet this year. Now, it will be Thursday. “We know what is at stake, but the game is the same. We have an opportunity to win a game tomorrow,” Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins said. Oswalt is one of the majors’ top starters and beat the Giants in Game 2. He has made only a few relief appearances in the last several years, including a stint in the 2004 NLCS for Houston. Uribe entered at shortstop in the top of the ninth. He immediately picked up a hard onehopper by pinch-hitter Ross Gload in the hole and made a strong throw while falling away for the out. That started a perfect ninth for winning pitcher Brian Wilson, the major league saves leader. “I got butterflies,” Wilson said. “I got anxi-

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — They were facing the end of their season and a miserable winter after that. Not to worry, Joe Girardi said. Speaking in the wee hours before his players went home for a few hours sleep ahead of Game 5, the New York Yankees manager implored them not to give up. “That was huge,” CC Sabathia said. “Just having us be able to relax and not panic.” No panic here. Sabathia pitched like a champion, and the Yankees are heading for Texas. Nick Swisher and Robinson Cano hit consecutive homers to build an early cushion, Sabathia made the lead stand up and the Yankees beat the Rangers 7-2 Wednesday to close within 3-2 in the AL championship series. “We’re right where we need to be,” Swisher said. A late-arriving crowd for the late-afternoon game wondered whether this would be it for the defending World Series champs after Texas outscored them 25-5 while winning three straight. A difficult comeback? Yes. Impossible? No. As Girardi remembered telling his players, “Before we lost the three games in a row, we won four in a row.” He added: “Just look at tomorrow. Win a game tomorrow.” By the time Curtis Granderson hit an eighth-inning homer for his second RBI of the game, belief among the Yankees was

starting to grow. Now the teams will go deep in the heart of Texas to decide the pennant in the best-ofseven series. When they resume in Arlington for Game 6, Phil Hughes starts for the Yankees against Colby Lewis in a rematch of Game 2, won by the Rangers 7-2. “It’s great. We’re going back home,” Lewis said. “We’ve got to win one out of two.” Texas may be holding the ultimate postseason ace in the hole: Cliff Lee would start a Game 7 against Andy Pettitte. “Who cares about Cliff going in Game 7?” Texas right fielder Jeff Francoeur said. “We’ve got a game to win in Game 6.” Still, Lee’s 7-0 postseason record is on their minds. In the 50th anniversary of a franchise that has never reached the World Series, Texas remains one win away. “We’re in a good position,” second baseman Ian Kinsler said. New York is trying to overcome its first 3-1 postseason deficit 1958. Since the LCS went to a best-of-seven format, 24 of the 30 previous teams to take 3-1 series leads have won pennants. Sabathia recovered from an erratic opener, staying away from too much trouble against Josh Hamilton and Texas’ big bats. Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz made an early exit with hamstring trouble, a day after Yankees star Mark Teixeira was lost for the postseason with a hamstring injury. Cruz expects to play Friday. But no matter what, the season is over for Teixeira. The All-Star first baseman was removed from the postseason roster and replaced by Edu-

ardo Nunez, and Teixeira would not be eligible for the World Series. Lance Berkman took over at first base and had a scare when he slipped chasing Kinsler’s foul pop, causing his head and back to snap back. Berkman needed smelling salts in the dugout at the half inning. He stayed in, and caught Elvis Andrus’ foul pop for the final out. On what would have been Bob Sheppard’s 100th birthday and Mickey Mantle’s 79th, the Yankees took a 3-0 lead in the second as losing pitcher C.J. Wilson had trouble with the muddy mound and created a hole with a pair of four-pitch walks. Jorge Posada and Granderson had run-scoring singles, and another run scored on an overthrow of third by Francoeur for an error in right field. Posada, a snail-like runner with just 20 steals in 16 seasons, sped home from first base. “He looked like Rickey Henderson out there,” said Derek Jeter, Posada’s core four buddy. Girardi had sensed a change in attitude. “There was determination that we were going to go out and play our game today,” he said. “I saw it during BP.” Sabathia lasted just four innings in the opener, when he started on eight days’ rest and the Yankees rallied from a five-run deficit. Leads of 5-0 and 6-1 never seemed comfortable in this one as he allowed two runs and 11 hits — matching his season high — in six innings with no walks. “I just wanted to fight, no matter what the situation was, no matter how many runners were on base in any given inning,” he said

Continued from D1 Where Bosh has lost 11 times, the highest total he’s had as a visitor to any NBA arena. “The big thing is that everybody is in this room together,” said Heat guard Eddie House, who, like just about everyone else on the roster, spurned higher-paying offers elsewhere. “We’re all together. We’re not worried about anything else. I don’t think guys are worried about stats. I don’t think guys are worried about getting paid. I think guys are just worried about playing and proving what we know to everybody else.” Motivation is there in bunches for the Heat, starting with all the doubters. Miami was considered by many an afterthought in the free agency sweepstakes of 2010. Forget landing James, or Bosh. Some thought the Heat would have a hard enough time keeping Wade. So Heat President Pat Riley pulled out all the stops. At 12:01 a.m. on July 1, when the freeagent window opened, just about all Miami’s free-agent targets got iPads, loaded with a recruiting pitch about the team, the city, the makeup of the franchise. A whirlwind week of cross-country flights and sleepless nights followed. “When you have two players like Dwyane and LeBron, then you have a dynamic that anything can happen on any given night, on both ends of the court,” Riley said. “When you add Chris Bosh to the equation, a guy now on the inside that also can stretch the floor with enough shooting coming off the bench and enough size and enough quickness, you have the elements of putting together a very complete team.” Of course, the Heat didn’t stop there. Udonis Haslem — the guy who James and Wade both thought would be absolutely crucial — took $14 million less to stay. Mike Miller was the next target and once he heard Haslem, his old teammate at Florida was aboard, his mind was made up. Juwan Howard and Zydrunas Ilgauskas followed for veteran leadership. James Jones and Carlos Arroyo were wanted for continuity. Dexter Pittman and Da’Sean Butler were targeted for the future. “We know what we’re playing for,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. Everything’s changing. Even for Wade, who’s missed virtually the entire preseason with a hamstring injury. He won’t be called upon to score 30 points all the time for the Heat to have their best chance of winning. He might not see double-teams constantly. He might not even have the ball at the end of close games. “When they gave me the ball and told me to make every play, I tried to do that,” Wade said. “So whatever role that coach Spo puts out there for each of us, especially for me, I’m going to try to be the best at that role I could possibly be and hopefully that’s enough.” There’s even more irony that this title chase will begin in Boston. After all, the 2010-11 Heat are basically trying to be the 2007-08 Celtics — a group of superstars that, together, became a super team. “They were able to win a championship in their first year together,” Wade said. “And they came into a team that wasn’t, at the time, as complete as this team is, but they all made sacrifices. They were the individual leaders of their team. And it worked, so, of course, you have to take from the history of the game, and put it within your team, but put your own twist on it.” James has been asked the question so many times now, he’s got the answer pared down to one word. His expectations for his first season with the Heat couldn’t be more simple. “Win,” he said. That’s the only question that matters. So the others — Can James average a triple-double? Can the Heat eclipse Chicago’s 72-win record? Can this team become one for the ages? — all seem irrelevant to the Heat at this point. Especially so in James’ case. This week, James encouraged his “haters” to keep bashing him on Twitter, and he got a slew of negative responses, many of them racially charged. James said he wasn’t bothered. Sometimes, he said, he needs to be reminded of what’s going to fuel him on this title pursuit. “It doesn’t affect me at all,” James said. “You have that throughout life, no matter who you are. There’s always people doubting you and doubting what you can do. “For me, I have enough motivation,” he added, “but I can always use a little more.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 D5

Ducks-Bruins preview UCLA (3-2, 1-2 Pac-10) at No. 1 Oregon (6-0, 3-0), 6 p.m. (ESPN). Line: Oregon by 24. Series Record: UCLA leads 39-24. Last Meeting: 2009, 24-10 Oregon.

WHAT’S AT STAKE Oregon takes over at No. 1 in the AP poll after the top-ranked team in the country has toppled for two straight weeks. Can the Bruins extend that streak and pull off the upset at Autzen Stadium? The only time an AP No. 1 has lost three straight weeks was November 1960, when Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri all fell. Oregon has never been No. 1 before, but if the Ducks can stay there, they could play for a national championship in January.

KEY MATCHUP Oregon’s defense against UCLA’s quarterback, whoever that may be. Kevin Prince sat out of practice earlier this week after an MRI on his right knee. That could mean Richard Brehaut will get to start at intimidating Autzen.

PLAYERS TO WATCH Oregon: RB LaMichael James. He’s likely the Oregon player to watch for the rest of the season, as the speedy sophomore makes a steady climb up Heisman Trophy watch lists. James has run for 848 yards and nine touchdowns in five games. He leads the nation with an average of 169.6 rushing yards per game. UCLA: QBs Kevin Prince or Richard Brehaut or both. Prince’s right knee has been bugging him since the Bruins upset victory over Texas back on Sept. 25. Prince had an MRI on Monday, and coach Rick Neuheisel would not say if he would be available tonight, although it was looking unlikely. we’re going to play, but either way, we have to be ready for both of them,” Oregon linebacker Casey Matthews said. The Bruins will be without receiver Josh Smith and F-back Morrell Presley. The pair was suspended for the Oregon game for violating team rules. Neuheisel has refused to comment on the specifics. On Oregon’s side, quarterback Darron Thomas is fully recovered after tweaking his right shoulder in Oregon’s 43-23 victory over the Cougars on Oct. 9. The Ducks had an open date last weekend that helped. “(It started feeling better) through the whole week of the

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Continued from D1 They must make their way over Bonneville Dam and then over The Dalles Dam before they can turn south into the Deschutes. From the Deschutes, they eventually find tributaries in which they can spawn in late winter and early spring. Despite the downturn from last year, French said it has still been a “pretty good year” for steelhead fishing on the Deschutes. He noted a strong return of wild fish and of larger two-salt fish — fish that have spent two years in the Pacific Ocean and weigh 7 to 12 pounds. And French said that stray Brun steelhead, destined for the Clearwater River in north-central Idaho, can also be caught in the Lower Deschutes this time of year while on their 900-mile migration. Those fish can weigh up to 20 pounds because they spend more time in the ocean feeding. River conditions have cleared since glacial sediment from the White River muddied the Lower Deschutes during the first couple weeks of October, according to French. That happens most years, and it effectively halts angling success for at least several days because the fish cannot see the lures or flies. French did warn that rain forecasted for this weekend could cause the White River to once again bring sediment into the Deschutes and harm fishing. But if that does occur, French noted, fishing will remain good upstream of the White River, where the sediment does not flow. “Generally, October is an excellent month,” French said of steelhead fishing on the Lower Deschutes. Steelhead are currently dispersed throughout the Lower Deschutes, according to French, all the way upstream to Pelton Dam. But even this time of year, he noted, anglers will find more fish as they move downstream. But the advantage to fishing farther upstream is that the river is smaller, making the fish easier to target.

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bye week, working with the trainers and things like that, working on some stuff to strengthen it,” Thomas said. “I’m 100 percent now and will be ready for the game.” Thomas has thrown for 1,231 yards and 14 touchdowns through six games. He has been intercepted five times, but he’s also run for 221 yards and two scores. UCLA, also coming off a bye week, leads the all-time series against Oregon 39-24, but the Ducks won the last one 24-10 in Pasadena. The Bruins are 4-10 against AP top-ranked teams. Their last win over a No. 1 came in the 1976 Rose Bowl against Ohio State.

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Continued from D1 A lot of Oregon’s success on the ground can be attributed to sophomore LaMichael James, who averages a national-best 169.6 yards a game. “How hard is it to tackle that kid? It’s ridiculous. He looks better than he did a year ago, too, so that’ll be a crazy challenge,” UCLA safety Tony Dye said. The Bruins’ most glaring issue going into the game is the status of quarterback Kevin Prince, who has been hampered by a sore knee since UCLA’s upset victory over Texas on Sept. 25. Prince practiced for the Bruins on Sunday, but sat out Monday and Tuesday and reportedly underwent an MRI. Neuheisel would not commit to a quarterback earlier this week, while Prince was playing it cool. “It hasn’t been getting better as fast as we would like it to,” Prince said. “I don’t think there’s any serious issue, but it’s dragging on.” If Prince can’t go, Richard Brehaut will get the daunting job of trying to guide UCLA’s dismal passing offense at intimidating Autzen, which will host a “Yellow Out” for the national television audience. The Bruins installed a trendy Pistol offense this season — but in the process their passing game suffered with an average of just 95.5 yards a game. In five games, Prince has thrown for only 384 yards and three touchdowns. He’s been intercepted five times. Brehaut made his first career start this season in UCLA’s 42-28 victory over Washington State on Oct. 2. He completed 12 of 23 passes for 128 yards. He also ran a yard for the go-ahead touchdown. “They both play the same and I think they’re both very similar quarterbacks. I’m not sure who

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“It’s kind of a trade-off,” French said. “Fewer numbers of fish, but a smaller river.” The biologist added that fall chinook salmon are currently spawning in the Lower Deschutes, so anglers should avoid wading in spawning beds, usually located in shallow areas with large gravel bars. Fall chinook fishing downstream of Sherars Falls continues through the end of the month, and French said the run has been really strong. “A lot of anglers have reported catching (fall chinook) in the lower river while fishing for steelhead,” French said. “It’s definitely a last chance for them, and some of those fish (fall chinook) are in surprisingly nice shape.” In July, anglers and biologists alike were concerned about abnormally high water temperatures on the Lower Deschutes and how they might affect the fish in the river. With the activation of a new fish transfer facility in April at the Round Butte Dam on Lake Billy Chinook, temperatures on portions of the Lower Deschutes in July were up 2 to 5 degrees over the historical average.

Relay Continued from D1 “I liked being able to run by myself (and not in a big pack),” said Kolisch, who was surrounded by friends and teammates waiting near the race’s baton handoff area. “Sometimes a girl from another team might pass me and I’d think, ‘Oh, no!’ ... But it’s okay, it was fun.” Mountain View’s Hayati Wolfenden echoed Kolisch’s sentiments. “There’s definitely a lot less pressure,” she said. “It’s nice to have all the Central Oregon teams together for something other than districts.” Summit, Mountain View, Bend High,

A project of Portland General Electric and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the $110 million fish and water intake at Round Butte Dam was designed to restore historical populations of chinook and steelhead that once migrated up the Middle Deschutes, Crooked and Metolius rivers before the dam was built. Concerns about the high water temperatures dwindled after PGE added more cooler water from the bottom of Lake Billy Chinook to release into the Lower Deschutes. French said that high temperatures will not be an annual problem for the health of the fish or the success of anglers on the Lower Deschutes. “It will be warmer than it has been, but part of the problem was (PGE) didn’t have the full complement of cold water it could use to blend,” French explained. “We don’t think it will be an issue like it was this year. It mostly just affected the fishing. We didn’t see much effect on fish health.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

John Nosler collection

John Nosler at work at the drafting table in 1965.

In memoriam: Bend’s John Nosler The local resident and bullet manufacturer helped to revolutionize big-game hunting Editor’s note: John A. Nosler died of natural causes at his Bend home on Oct. 10. He was 97. Nosler revolutionized big-game hunting when he invented the Partition Bullet and founded Nosler, Inc., in 1948. The longtime Bend resident is remembered by columnist Gary Lewis, the author of a 2005 biography of Nosler titled “John Nosler — Going Ballistic.”

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e called him Big John. He was the tall, angular architect of a bullet that revolutionized big-game hunting around the world. For two years, the two of us worked on the story of his life and I came to know the young man that was John Nosler. To me, his was the story of America in the 1900s. In John’s words: “In those days, little boys were made to wear dresses and since we had so many girls in our family, I had plenty of lace and ruffles for my first few years. When I got a little older Mom dressed me in short pants. When she gave me my first pair of long pants, I finally felt I was making some progress.” From an early age, Nosler showed an interest in mechanics and how things worked. He got his first car when he was 8 years old and when he sold it, he began to look for a Model T Ford. “It was common to see neglected Model Ts in the backyards of ranches, so I rode around on my bicycle until I found one in the backyard of an old clapboard farmhouse. I went up to the door and asked the lady if she wanted to sell it. She said, “I don’t know. I guess we don’t have any use for it anymore.” I asked her if she could use a bicycle. She said that one of her kids needed one, so I traded my bike for the Model T and had a heck of a time bringing it home.” His dad had a pump-action BB gun and with it taught John to shoot. When John managed to save up a little money, he sent away for his first gun.

“There’s definitely a lot less pressure. It’s nice to have all the Central Oregon teams together for something other than districts.” — Mountain View runner Hayati Wolfenden

Crook County, La Pine and Madras all had various teams in contention. Wolfenden was able to enjoy herself but still put in a solid effort on the fast course. The junior harrier led the Cougars to a first-place result in the girls relay with a combined time of 1 hour, 30 seconds. Logan Brown, Jessica Wolfe and Ayla Rosen joined Wolfenden on the

winning girls squad. Mountain View also recorded the fastest boys team time: Jake McDonald, Will Stevenson, Chris McBride and McKenna Hand won in 53:05. As the runners came and went from the loosely defined handoff zone, which doubled as a cheering section for the scores of waiting runners on a warm and sunny afternoon, transition tech-

GARY LEWIS “I bought my first single-shot Stevens Favorite 22 when I was still in fifth grade. I think I paid less than $5 for it. I still remember going down to the mailbox, about a quarter of a mile from the house, and finding my new gun from Montgomery Ward waiting for me.” In 1929, the bottom fell out of the stock market and John, a 17-year-old athlete who played football, basketball, baseball and ran track, dropped out of school. “I went to the neighborhood Ford garage in Chino and asked them if they would hire me as a clean-up boy. They said they had been looking for someone and so I got the job. I cleaned up after the mechanics and did odd jobs around the dealership, cleaning parts, floors, and cars. But I had a world of experience before that from living on the ranch and working on all the equipment we had on the farm. No one mentioned how much I would be paid. No one talked about that because just having a job was the important thing. I worked a month or two and finally the guy said ‘John, we like you, so we’re going to give you 15 cents an hour.’ ” A lifetime of shooting and mechanics and innovation lay ahead. When Ford Motor Company offered him the chance at a college education and a career, Nosler turned them down to get married to his sweetheart Louise. The couple moved to Oregon in 1936 to start a Ford dealership. When the Ford dealership fell on hard times, Nosler took one truck and moved to Ashland, where he started a trucking business. In 1941, Nosler headed north for a moose hunt in British Columbia and returned every year for almost a decade. In 1946, he carried a Winchester Model 70 300 H&H Magnum. Toward the

niques included high-fives, slaps on the back, and efficient exchanges of the small baton. Mostly, the teams racing in Wednesday’s meet were organized not by the coaches but by the participants themselves. Some teams were built for speed, but most were, as Bend High coach Lisa Nye put it, “teams of friendship.” “We just told them, ‘you choose,’” Nye said. Nachtmann’s winning team included Riley Anheluk, Mikhaila Thornton and Krysta Kroeger and was formed in an effort to post fast times. “We tried to get some track runners in and not necessarily the top 5K kids,” Nachtmann offered. The Cougar senior was the leadoff

end of the trip, he came upon a bull feeding in a patch of willows. That encounter was the turning point in his life. Back home, he began to puzzle out how to build a better bullet. It was inside his truck shop where he turned out the first Partition projectiles in 1948. On the other side of the Cascades, Bend’s Industrial Committee was looking for businesses to fill the void left by the fading lumber industry. They heard about the upstart company and called John to arrange a meeting. A week later, Chuck Cleveland and Bob Chandler walked into John’s Ashland office. They told him his growing business was just what Central Oregon and the City of Bend needed. John loved the hunting and fishing east of the Cascades. He wasn’t hard to convince. By 1958, John Nosler, who had lived all over Southern California and bounced around the Northwest in a truck for the better part of 20 years, felt like he had come home. Big John passed away at his home in Bend last week, leaving behind Vivian, his wife of the last 18 years, his son Bob, his daughter-in-law Joan, their children and grandchildren. When I heard that John had passed, I was in hunting camp. I had a letter on my desk to him, not yet mailed. I wanted to tell him about my deer hunt, how the bulls still bugled in the canyons where he spent so many seasons, how the story of his life meant much to so many. We’ll miss you, Big John. A memorial service will be held this Saturday at the Riverhouse Convention Center. The service will begin at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family encourages a donation to the NRA Foundation—John A. Nosler Endowment. Checks may be submitted to: The NRA Foundation, Inc./ John A. Nosler Endowment, 11250 Waples Mill Road, Fairfax, VA 22030. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

runner for his coed team, and he was also the first competitor back to the relay zone, making a pass to Kroeger. Near the end of the meet, after some teams had already finished and others were still waiting to go out for their last lap, a Bend High runner in the handoff area summed up the spirit of the meet. As his teammate approached the transition zone, clearly winded from the effort and doubled over with fatigue, the waiting runner accepted the baton and, in no particular rush to get going himself, bent down to greet his buddy with a slap on the back. “Good job, man,” he said. James Williams can be reached at jwilliams@bendbulletin.com.


H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

D6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Prineville youth pond set to be stocked Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE CULTUS LAKE: There have been reports of nice rainbow trout and lake trout being harvested from Cultus over the last several weeks. KINGSLEY RESERVOIR: Kingsley was stocked with lots of trout and should continue to offer good fishing. Anglers have the opportunity to catch all size classes of trout including large trophy trout and steelhead. LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Fish should be moving to shore as temperatures cool.

FISHING REPORT METOLIUS RIVER: The Forest Service road accessing the river north of Allingham Bridge (including Wizard Falls Hatchery) will be closed through Friday for habitat work. The Forest Service will be using helicopters to place wood debris in the river. Call the Sisters Ranger District for more information, 541-549-7700. PAULINA LAKE: Trout fishing has been good. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Anglers should continue to target bass, but the pond will be stocked heavily with trout in the next two weeks.

FLY-TYING CORNER

SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to anglers 17 and younger with a bag limit of two fish. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: South Twin is a good lake for younger anglers as it has a good shoreline and is protected from the wind. TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch bass and bluegill. WALTON LAKE: Access to Walton Lake will reopen to the public in the spring of 2011, when the U.S. Forest Service campground renovation is complete; the lake will not be stocked this year. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-416-6500 for more information. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: The water is very low and the only places to launch a boat are off the sandy beaches. Four-wheel drive is a must to pull your boat back out. Rainbow trout and brown trout will be following spawning kokanee to feed on eggs.

Ryan Brennecke / For The Bulletin

Morrish’s Puff Pastry, courtesy Ken Morrish and Idylwilde Flies.

Youth elk hunt ends Friday in Ochoco Unit Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE OPEN: Cascade bull elk (Oct. 16-22), chukar, pheasant, quail, forest grouse, duck, goose, antlerless elk, cougar, bear, waterfowl (see regulations). PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT GENERAL: Fall weather conditions have been variable, with wide temperature extremes, and frost occurring at all elevations. The Ochoco National Forest and Prineville BLM should be contacted regarding the latest information on motorized access and camping (BLM 541-416-6700, Ochoco Nat. For. 541-416-6500). Two cooperative travel management areas (Rager

HUNTING REPORT and South Boundary) are in effect in the Ochoco unit. Maps are available at entry portal signs and at ODFW and Ochoco National Forest offices in Prineville. ANTLERLESS ELK: Hunts are ongoing in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units, with the seven-day special youth antlerless Ochoco hunt ending this Friday. Portions of these hunts include private agricultural and range lands where permission from the landowner is needed. Typically elk move onto private lands in greater numbers during the fall to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. COUGAR: Are present at all elevations in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. Like coyotes, cougar will be attracted to deer and antelope, but also elk. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their greater amounts of public lands and better

accessibility. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days after harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts and be sure to call first to make an appointment. UPLAND GAME BIRD: Opportunities are primarily available for valley and mountain quail, and chukar. A cold wet spring resulted in poor early hatches for these species, but the late hatches appear strong. Hunters should check the synopsis for mountain quail, as only selected counties (including Crook) are open for hunting. FOREST GROUSE: Opportunities are limited to higher elevation forest lands on the Ochoco National Forest. Hunters should check the more heavily forested portions of the Lookout Mountain and Paulina ranger districts for these elusive birds. DUCK AND GOOSE SEASONS: Are ongoing, with opportunities limited due to the minimal habitat present on public lands. Much of the better hunting opportunities are associated with private agricultural lands where hunters must have landowner permission.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

A simple pattern that employs movement and sparkle, Morrish’s Puff Pastry is tied to imitate the crustaceans upon which bonefish and permit prey. It has legs that twitch, synthetic hair that puffs and pulsates, vulnerable eyes. Krystal Flash borrows the light that winks in the beams that penetrate the chop on the surface of the water. Morrish’s Puff Pastry is designed to ride with the hook riding up. Cast it 10- to 15-feet ahead of the moving school. Bring it back to you in slow pulls, with subtle twitches to give it action. Tie this pattern with white 6/0 thread on a No. 6 Mel 0391 or equivalent hook. For the tail, use tan craft fur, pearl Krystal Flash and bleached elk hair. Tie in 1⁄8 -inch black nickel Dazl Eyes. Build the thorax with fluorescent shell pin Ice Dub tied in a figure-8 through the eyes. Tie in a “wing” of mini orange rubber Centipede legs. For the abdomen, use clear Ice Braid. Finish with a barred tan craft fur wing.

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Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the Chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly

anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-3064509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend

Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING

OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE

BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-

1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-Stand open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to dusk; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (changes to 4 p.m. on Nov. 2); skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.;

2011 Family Memberships now available for $50; non-members are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.


O

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

SPOTLIGHT Carving for Kids to help family center Carving for Kids will take place at Newport Avenue Market on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event is a fundraiser for MountainStar Family Relief Nursery and is being organized by Webfoot Painting Co., both of Bend. Volunteers will carve and sell pumpkins donated by the Central Oregon Pumpkin Co. for $10 to $100. The market is at 1121 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

Take a tour of Bend’s historical haunts

Photos by Betsy Q. Cliff / The Bulletin

Odell Lake at sunrise. The lake, which is about an hour-and-a-half south of Bend, has a healthy Kokanee salmon population. Kokanee salmon spawn at this time of year, attracting dozens of bald eagles to the area.

Where the

Bring references for horse auction

Kokanee play

Eagles, salmon, water in motion at Odell Lake By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

short walk in the woods can be relaxing, rejuvenating or even awe-inspiring. Rarely would I describe it as exciting. But last weekend, a walk at Odell Lake was exciting. This time of year, Kokanee salmon spawn along the lakeshore and in the creeks running in and out of the lake. The fish, normally a sleek silver, change color, their backs becoming a deep red. Along Trapper Creek, an easily accessible stream, hundreds run at once. The creek looks like a fish hatchery with fish on top of fish. Drawn in by the hordes, bald eagles flock to the lake. They pose high in the branches near Trapper Creek and swoop through the trees just above visitors’ heads. Right now is the prime time to see this spectacle. The

A

Kokanee spawn on Odell Lake typically has two waves, said Paul Powers, a fish biologist with Deschutes National Forest. They run up the creeks in early October and then again in late October to early November. We left Bend on Saturday morning and took Cascade Lakes Highway to its end, just minutes from Odell Lake. (The highway may close soon; you can also get to Odell by driving south on U.S. Highway 97 to Crescent and turning west. See “If you go.”) This outing could be done in a day, but if you have the time, I would recommend staying at least one night, as we did. That affords you not only several chances to see the eagles, but also lets you take advantage of side trips in the area, any of which could be an outing by itself. In addition to seeing Odell, we did a short hike at the pristine Waldo Lake, about 15 minutes away. Salt Creek Falls, Oregon’s second-highest waterfall, is also close by and just a short hike from the highway. See Outing / E6

The Des Chutes Historical Museum invites visitors to participate in its Historical Haunts of Downtown Bend Walk on Oct. 29 and 30. The museum will stay open late both evenings for this first-time program, featuring six historical buildings in the downtown area said to have paranormal activity, beginning with the museum itself. The walk is offered six times from 5-7 p.m. each evening. The approximately 45-minute tour is included with museum admission of $5 for adults and $2 for youth 13-17. Admission is free for kids 12 and younger. At 8 p.m. Oct. 29-31, the museum will also host “An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe.” Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door. The museum is located at 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., in Bend. Contact: 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org.

Eagles perch high above the creek in trees, waiting for the chance to grab a fish.

To assure horses go to fit homes, people planning to participate in Equine Outreach’s auction of rescued horses Saturday will be asked to provide veterinarian and farrier references, plus photos of where the horse will live. Those documents can be brought to Friday’s advance viewing or e-mailed to info@ equineoutreach.com. Daylong viewing begins at 8 a.m. Friday. Auction begins at 10 a.m. Saturday. Equine Outreach is at 63220 Silvis Road, in Bend. Contact: 541-419-4842 or www.equineoutreach.com.

Friday last day for holiday fair submissions Friday is the deadline to submit information for The Bulletin’s list of holiday fairs and bazaars scheduled for publication Oct. 30. Each submitted event must include a brief description of what will be sold, dates, times, location, admission price and a contact phone number. Submit events by e-mail to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Bulletin to host costume contest

Kokanee salmon run up Trapper Creek, which flows into Odell Lake.

Friday at noon is the deadline to enter The Bulletin’s Halloween costume contest. The winners’ pictures will appear in the Oct. 29 Family section. The costumes will be judged on creativity and craftsmanship in three age categories: ages birth-4; 5-12; and 13 and older. Homemade costumes will be favored. All costumes must be family-friendly. The winners in each age category will receive 20 Downtown Dollars — gift certificates good at any business in downtown Bend. One grand prize winner will receive 40 Downtown Dollars. The winners must be able to come to The Bulletin in costume for a photo shoot at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26. To enter, visit www.bend bulletin.com/costume or e-mail Alandra Johnson at ajohnson@ bendbulletin.com. Attach a photo and include: Full name, age, city of residence, costume description and phone number. Feel free to include any relevant information about the costume. Winners will be notified Monday. Contact: 541-617-7860. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Feet, inches don’t establish the full measure of a man Dear Abby: Regarding the letter from “Lost in the Land of Aloha” (Sept. 1) and whether short men are considered less desirable — height is relative. I am 5-foot-3 and have dated taller men, usually 6 feet and over, because those were the guys who just were around and seemed to be attracted to me. Then I met my husband. He’s 5 feet 6 inches and absolutely wonderful. Before me, he dated much taller women. He’s kind, loving, showers me with affection, offers me understanding, is a fantastic father and a complete kid-magnet. He cooks, washes dishes, does laundry, changes diapers, and actually picks things up off the floor instead of vacuuming around them. I am the luckiest woman on this planet, and I know it. Never pass up a short guy. They’re not short — they’re fun-sized! — Very, Very Happy Wife In Texas Dear Wife: I received a tsunami of responses to my question, “Does height really matter?” And it shows there’s no “shortage” of support for men like “Kal” (“Aloha’s” friend) and your honey of a husband. Read on: Dear Abby: My husband and I are both 5 feet 6 inches. In the past I was concerned that we didn’t fit the stereotype of the man being taller than the woman, but it has actually worked out great. We can switch cars without having to adjust the seats and mirrors. Our lips line up exactly when we kiss. I never have to stand on my toes! On our wedding day, I wore gorgeous ballet flats. “Kal” will eventually find a woman who appreciates him for the breadth of his heart and not the length of his body. — Seeing Eye to Eye in Illinois Dear Abby: It’s all a matter of personal preference. I need to think the man I’m with will be able to protect me if need be. I

DEAR ABBY don’t have that feeling with a short guy. And it doesn’t matter how muscular he is — it’s the height that counts in my mind. — Likes Looking Up at the Guy Dear Abby: This may seem shallow, but height does matter to me. I’m a tall woman, and when I date men who are shorter than I am, I feel even bigger. It makes me uncomfortable, which does not make for a good date. — Tall Drink of Water in Eugene, Ore. Dear Abby: Aren’t you aware that the vast majority of females prefer taller men? “Heightism” is a rampant and virulent prejudice. Even if a guy is an inch or two taller than the woman, he will be considered too short if he isn’t taller than she is when she’s wearing heels. Women go gaga over the really tall guys. I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard them brag about how tall their man happens to be. I have never heard a female boast, “My boyfriend’s only 5 feet 6, but he really is all man.” — Roland in Maine Dear Abby: Does height matter? Not a whit! I’m a 6-foot-2inch guy. The men who catch my eye are in the 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-9inch range, but I certainly don’t draw the line. Shorter guys? Bring ’em on! (One at a time, though.) — Don in California Dear Abby: No matter how tall or short you are, the most important thing in a relationship cannot be measured: It’s LOVE. — Wise One in Yukon, Okla. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Fame hasn’t changed much for ‘Bored’ creator By Alex Williams

‘Bored to Death’

New York Times News Service

It’s not exactly Poets’ Corner of Westminster Abbey, but the blond pine shelves at BookCourt in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, do confer a certain prestige in this literary-minded neighborhood. So it was at a recent Wednesday event, when a small crowd was leaving a reading from a graphic novel about the Cuban revolution by Inverna Lockpez and Dean Haspiel, and passed a shelf filled with T-shirts printed with the names of famous writers: “Whitman,” “Poe,” “Vonnegut” ... “Ames.” A voice from the parade of comics geeks and middleaged bohemians rose: “Hey, that’s my T-shirt!” Wearing a frayed newsboy cap and threadbare brown corduroy jacket, Jonathan Ames stopped and pondered the maroon-colored shirt for a moment. The 46-year-old neighborhood fixture looked more like a peddler who sells poems for a dollar than a literary lion. “I’m the only living writer,” he said before he headed, shoulders slumped, back to his apartment a few blocks away. But Ames is famous now, and not just in the quirky, artist-filled coffee shops and bars of brownstone Brooklyn, which serve as the setting for much of his writing as well as “Bored to Death,” the HBO show he created, now in its second season. After 20 years of struggling along as a cult act — he has published eight books filled with cringingly frank comic accounts of his sexual misadventures and struggling-writer ennui — he has achieved the kind of breakout success that most writers in those same cafes and bars only dream of. In addition to

When: 10 p.m. Sundays Where: HBO

Deidre Schoo / New York Times News Service

Jonathan Ames, author and creator of the cable television series “Bored to Death,” is famous now, and not just in the quirky, artist-filled coffee shops and bars of brownstone Brooklyn — which serve as the setting for much of his writing as well as his HBO series now in its second season. the HBO show, his novel, “The Extra Man,” was made into a movie starring Kevin Kline and Katie Holmes. Success has changed his life, but only so much. Gone are the days of fretting about a bank account hovering around $800. Gone is the “carbuncle of credit card debt,” as he put it, that reached as high as $30,000. Now that Hollywood has embraced him, he even pals around with a few movie stars. The show has also helped cement his status as everyone’s favorite local-boy-makes-good story among Brooklyn’s creative class. “Bored,” after all, is about a floundering Brooklyn writer — who happens to be named Jonathan Ames — who tries to make it as a private detective. It has helped make the real Jonathan Ames a face that is recognized more than ever around the neighborhood, especially since his recent cameos on the show. That includes an episode in which he appeared nude. “Since the whole episode was

about being insecure about one’s genitals, I thought that as the creator of the show, I should put on display genitals worthy of insecurity,” he said. “I was calling it ‘faux-frontal nudity.’ ” Fame, of course, feels different for someone who seems to balance Woody Allen’s neuroses with Franz Kafka’s zest for life. “The thing is, when these things happen, and we see them happening to other people, they think, ‘Oh, they must be ecstatic,’ ” Ames said in his trademark deadpan, which makes him sound like an undertaker, each lugubrious sentence trailing off, as if he is losing the energy to finish it. You’re “still waking up in your body with your concerns and your neuroses and your sense of mortality,” he said. “It’s not like these outer signifiers of success are like serotonin IV bags that you can suck on.” “Most of the time I’m still fretting,” he added. “If anything, now the fretting feels worse, because I shouldn’t be fretting.”

He still lives “like a grad student,” he said, alone in the same one-bedroom third-floor rental he has had for 11 years. It’s furnished with mismatched overstuffed chairs from the Nixon years that his landlord’s cat uses as scratching posts. He picked up his kitchen table for about $10, “but I never eat at home, so it’s just got papers on it,” he said. These days, he also uses Twitter to supplement his material needs. When he posted that he wanted to come over to someone’s house to watch the show because he didn’t have a working television, HBO bought him a flat-screen Sharp, he said. When he shared that he didn’t have a bicycle, a fan gave him an old 10-speed (it was promptly stolen). With the exception of a Fire Island beach house he rented in July — the first time he had a summer place — the only noticeable change is his slightly expanded social circle. Nowadays, he might drop in on the RussianTurkish baths in the East Village with Jason Schwartzman, or take turns riding Zach Galifianakis’ bike around Vinegar Hill, Brooklyn, with Ted Danson (all are stars of the show). He also gets invited to movie premieres, “which can be fun,” he said, “because you get to see a movie for free, and then there’s a nice meal afterwards.” “I’m still operating from that mentality,” he added. “A free meal!”

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Å 23 25 123 25 NBA Western Conference semifinal game 3, from May 13, 2005. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids America’s Funniest Home Videos ›› “Van Helsing” (2004, Fantasy) Hugh Jackman. A monster-hunter battles creatures in Transylvania. Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped Good Eats Good Eats Iron Chef America Symon vs. Vetri Food Feuds (N) Ace of Cakes Chopped Piquillo peppers. ‘G’ 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Football Preview Runnin’ With PAC Huskies My Own Words Bellator Fighting Championships (Live) Football Preview The Final Score Tennis 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Windsor, Ont. (4:00) ›› “When a Stranger Calls” › “Deception” (2008, Suspense) Hugh Jackman, Ewan McGregor. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Always Sunny The League (N) Always Sunny The League 131 Bang, Buck Holmes/Homes Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place My First Sale ‘G’ Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Bang, Buck UFO Hunters Code Red ‘PG’ Å UFO Hunters Area 52 ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens The Evidence Seeking clues about ancient aliens. ‘PG’ UFO Hunters ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 UFO Hunters The NASA Files ‘PG’ Project Runway A Look in the Line ‘PG’ Å Project Runway We’re in a New York State of Mind ‘PG’ Project Runway Finale, Part 1 (N) ‘PG’ Å On the Road On the Road On the Road 138 39 20 31 (4:30) Project Runway ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Jersey Shore Dirty Pad ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Gone Baby Gone ‘14’ Jersey Shore Girls Like That ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Back Into the Fold ‘14’ (11:02) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore All in the Family ‘14’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iDo ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Gangland All Hell Breaks Loose ‘14’ Gangland Kill ’Em All ’ ‘14’ Å Gangland Kill or Be Killed ‘14’ Å TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å TNA ReACTION (N) ’ 132 31 34 46 Spike’s Most Amazing Videos ‘14’ Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth (N) ’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å 133 35 133 45 “Anaconda 3: Offspring” (2008) David Hasselhoff, Crystal Allen. ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Annie Moses Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “White Cargo” (1942) Hedy Lamarr. An Englishman suc››› “Tortilla Flat” (1942, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr, John Garfield. (10:45) ››› “H.M. Pulham, Esq.” (1941, Romance) Hedy La›› “Algiers” (1938, Crime Drama) Charles Boyer, Hedy Lamarr, Sigrid Gurie. A 101 44 101 29 wealthy young woman is dazzled by a notorious thief. Steinbeck’s story of life in a California fishing village. Å cumbs to a woman’s charms in Africa. Å marr, Robert Young, Ruth Hussey. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ LA Ink Wet Paint ’ ‘PG’ Å Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å Lottery Changed My Life (N) ’ ‘PG’ Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress ››› “3:10 to Yuma” (2007, Western) Russell Crowe, Christian Bale, Logan Lerman. Å Bones The Dentist in the Ditch ‘14’ Law & Order Deadlock ’ ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 NBA Preseason Basketball Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks (Live) Å Scooby-Doo “Scooby-Doo! And the Legend of the Vampire” (2003) Scary Godmother: Revenge Total Drama Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Barbecue Wars ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 House House vs. God ’ ‘PG’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Bret Michaels 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs ‘14’ 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs ‘14’ 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs ‘14’ Hard Rock 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33

›› “If Looks Could Kill” 1991 Richard Grieco. Å › “Beverly Hills Ninja” 1997 Chris Farley. ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “The Sixth Sense” 1999, Suspense Bruce Willis. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ››› “Superman” 1978 Christopher Reeve. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper. ‘R’ Å ›› “Marked for Death” 1990 ‘R’ ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper. ‘R’ Å

Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Swimsuit Issue The Daily Habit Cubed The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Swimsuit Issue The Daily Habit Golf Central ››› “Tin Cup” (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner, Rene Russo, Cheech Marin. PGA Tour Golf Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, First Round Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “The Wish List” (2010) Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ›› “Planet of the Apes” 2001 Mark ›› “Enough” 2002, Suspense Jennifer Lopez, Billy Campbell. A woman takes her Bored to Death ’ Real Sex 28: Bedroom Tricks and Treats ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw. A well-to-do white Conviction: HBO HBO 425 501 425 10 Wahlberg. ‘PG-13’ Å ’ ‘MA’ Å daughter and flees her abusive husband. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å First Look ‘PG’ ‘MA’ Å ››› “Fast Food Nation” 2006, Drama Greg Kinnear. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. ›› “The Center of the World” 2001 Peter Sarsgaard. ››› “The Wicker Man” 1973 Edward Woodward. ‘R’ “Tormented” 2009, Comedy Alex Pettyfer. ‘NR’ IFC 105 105 (3:00) ›› “Watchmen” 2009, Action Billy (6:05) “Deadly Impact” 2009, Suspense Sean Patrick Flanery, (7:45) ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009, Action Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law, Rachel McAdams. The detective › “The Fourth Kind” 2009, Suspense Milla Jovovich, Will Patton, Co-Ed Confidential MAX 400 508 7 Crudup. ’ ‘R’ Å Joe Pantoliano, Amanda Wyss. ’ ‘NR’ Å and his astute partner face a strange enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Elias Koteas. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 4 PLAY ‘MA’ World’s Toughest Fixes ‘PG’ America’s Secret Weapon ‘PG’ Hubble’s Amazing Universe ‘G’ World’s Toughest Fixes ‘PG’ America’s Secret Weapon ‘PG’ Hubble’s Amazing Universe ‘G’ Ultimate Factories Ferrari ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air (7:05) The Troop Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air (10:05) The Troop Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘Y’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Monster Bucks American Hunter Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Steve’s Outdoor Jackie Bushman Beyond, Lodge Legends of Fall Bone Collector Pheasants For. Drop Zone OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Everyone Stares: The Police Inside (6:15) “Staten Island, New York” 2009, Crime Drama Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio. “The Narrows” 2008, Drama Kevin Zegers, Vincent D’Onofrio, Sophia Bush. iTV. A Dexter Beauty and the Beast Dexter must Zalman: Body Beach Heat: Miami SHO 500 500 iTV. The lives of three residents of Staten Island intersect. ‘R’ student has to balance his roots with a new world. ‘R’ save a life. ’ ‘MA’ Å Out” 2006 iTV. ’ ‘NR’ Language (N) ‘MA’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Formula One Racing Korean Grand Prix, Practice (Live) Test Drive SPEED 35 303 125 (4:45) ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:05) ››› “District 9” 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley. ’ ‘R’ Å › “Old Dogs” 2009 John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:35) ›› “Rush Hour 2” 2001 Jackie Chan. ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) ›› “Paris, je t’aime” 2006 Steve Buscemi. A collection (6:20) ›› “Everybody’s Fine” 2009 Robert De Niro. A widower ›› “An American Haunting” 2005 Donald Sutherland. Super- “Walled In” 2009 Mischa Barton. A woman investigates a build- (11:05) “Staunton Hill” 2009, Horror Kathy TMC 525 525 has 18 vignettes set in Paris. ’ ‘R’ Å wants to reconnect with his grown children. ’ natural forces plague a family in 1817 Tennessee. ing where people were entombed. ’ ‘R’ Å Lamkin, Cristen Coppen. ‘NR’ Bull Riding ‘G’ Bull Riding 2010 PBR World Finals From Las Vegas. (Live) The Daily Line (Live) Bull Riding 2010 PBR World Finals From Las Vegas. VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Carley & Erica ‘14’ Å Bridezillas Erica & Delilah ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘G’ Å Ghost Whisperer Reunite. ‘PG’ Å John Edward Cross Country ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www .scaremegood.com. TENTH AVENUE NORTH: The progressive pop band performs; with Addison Road and Matt Maher; $15 in advance, $20 day of show, $25 VIP; 7 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-389-8241 or www.itickets.com. THE DEFIBULATORS: The Brooklyn, N.Y. based urban honky-tonk sevenpiece outfit plays; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

FRIDAY GARAGE AND TACK SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Equine Outreach; free; 8 a.m.; Equine Outreach Ranch, 63220 Silvis Road, Bend; 541-419-4842, adopt@equineoutreach.com or www.equineoutreach.com. CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S EXPO: Educational seminars, entertainment, cooking demonstrations, vendors, a fashion show and more; with keynote speaker Kathleen Flinn; followed by a bachelor auction, proceeds from which will benefit Grandma’s House; free admission; 11 a.m.6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-385-7988 or www .celebratingeverywoman.info. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Robert Goldstein talks about his book “Riding With Reindeer,” with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “THE ODD COUPLE”: The Crook County High School drama department presents the Neil Simon play about a tidy man and a sloppy man living together; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www. scaremegood.com. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: David Brauner presents “The Fur Trade Era at Champoeg”; free;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. JIGU! THUNDER DRUMS OF CHINA: More than a dozen Chinese drummers perform, with rhythms, traditions and contemporary special effects; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based blues-punk band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; followed by a bazaar; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school; free; 7 a.m.-3 p.m.; Morning Star Christian School, 19741 Baker Road, Bend; 541-382-5091. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, BORIS GODUNOV”: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in a presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. SPORTS SALE: Sale of winter clothing and gear; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor National Ski Patrol; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia Ave., Bend; info@mtbachelornsp.org. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. THE GREAT PUMPKIN HUNT: Hunt for and decorate pumpkins and sip apple cider; proceeds benefit the Miller’s Landing project; $5 suggested donation; 10 a.m.noon; Miller’s Landing, Northwest Riverside Boulevard and Northwest Carlon Avenue, Bend; 541-382-2092 or Kristin.Kovalik@tpl.org. CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S EXPO: Educational seminars, entertainment, cooking demonstrations, vendors, a fashion show and more; with keynote speaker Kathleen Flinn; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-385-7988 or www .celebratingeverywoman.info. FUR TRADE DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1831; talk to live trappers, see blackpowder firearms, authentic cooking and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

CULVER MINT & GARLIC FESTIVAL: Featuring presentations from the local agricultural community, recipes, and dishes prepared by Daniel Taylor; free; 1-4 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave.; 541-546-6494 or cityhall@cityofculver.net. “WINTERVENTION”: A screening of the Warren Miller film featuring skiers and snowboarders traveling around the world; $18; 2, 6 and 9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www. towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Steve Duno talks about his book “Last Dog on the Hill”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: Drum circle followed by a bonfire and community sweat; free; 6-8 p.m.; Steve and Teri’s home, 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Robert Goldstein talks about his book “Riding With Reindeer,” with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE”: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 503-928-1428 or www. beattickets.org. “THE ODD COUPLE”: The Crook County High School drama department presents the Neil Simon play about a tidy man and a sloppy man living together; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www. scaremegood.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. RITA HOSKING AND COUSIN JACK: The country-folk musicians perform; bring a lawn chair; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Harmony House, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. MATT MILLER: The Flagstaff, Ariz.based jazz folk musician opens for Mark Ransom and The Mostest; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY SPORTS SALE: Sale of winter clothing and gear; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor National Ski Patrol; free; 9 a.m.-noon; Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia Ave., Bend; info@mtbachelornsp.org. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. FUR TRADE DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1831; talk to live trappers, see blackpowder firearms, authentic cooking and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE”: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 503-928-1428 or www.beattickets.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. MIGRATING TOWARD JUSTICE: Augusto Cesar Castillo Obregon talks about migration and the impacts of free trade in Nicaragua; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-633-7354.

MONDAY MIGRATING TOWARD JUSTICE: Augusto Cesar Castillo Obregon talks about migration and the impacts of free trade in Nicaragua; free; 11:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pioneer Building, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3726. “MONSTROSITY”: Innovation Theatre Works presents a reading of the modern Gothic fable by Dan Duling; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677 or www.bendpac.org.

TUESDAY THE CAPITOL STEPS: A parody, with music, of contemporary politics; VIP tickets benefit the Tower Theatre Foundation; $40 or $45, $52 VIP; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. ED EDMO — ONE MAN THEATER: A performance by the poet, performer, storyteller and lecturer on Northwest tribal culture; free; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782.

M T For Thursday, Oct. 21

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

GET LOW (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG13) 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50 LEBANON (R) 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:25, 7:10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) Noon, 2:30, 7:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:40, 6:55 A WOMAN, A GUN AND A NOODLE SHOP (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:45

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

CASE 39 (R) 3:35 EASY A (PG-13) 1:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:05, 4:30, 7:50 JACKASS (R) 12:45, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 12:20, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LET ME IN (R) 12:40, 3:45, 6:25, 9:25

LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 MY SOUL TO TAKE 3-D (R) 1:45, 5, 7:35, 10:15 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) Noon PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION WITH GARRISON KEILLOR LIVE (no MPAA rating) 8 RED (PG-13) 12:10, 1:30, 4, 4:50, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20, 10:10 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:30, 4:10, 7, 9:50 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 THE TOWN (R) 12:50, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 YOU AGAIN (PG) 12:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:35 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The University of Oregon football game will screen at 6 p.m today (doors open at 5 p.m.).

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

JACKASS (R) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 4, 6:30, 9 RED (PG-13) 5, 7:15, 9:30 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3:45, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

JACK GOES BOATING (R) 7 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 6:45 RED (PG-13) 6:45

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.)

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

SECRETARIAT (PG) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 4, 7

N   N  In excelsis D’oh! Vatican declares Homer, Bart Simpson Catholic VATICAN CITY — Homer Simpson a Catholic? Don’t have a sacred cow, man. The Vatican newspaper has declared that Homer is part of the pope’s flock — a claim that is leaving “The Simpsons” TV producer baffled and amused. “Few people know it, and he does everything to hide it, but it is true: Homer J. Simpson is Catholic,” L’Osservatore Romano wrote in its weekend edition under the headline: “Homer and Bart are Catholic.” Last December, the newspaper also praised the show on its 20th anniversary for its philosophical leanings and irreverent take on religion. The weekend story was the latest example of the Vatican paper’s efforts to be more relevant in the last few years, and follows stories not only lauding Harry Potter but even praising the Beatles and waxing philosophical about John Lennon’s boast that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus. The paper quoted an analysis by a Jesuit priest, the Rev. Francesco Occhetta, discussing Homer’s and his son Bart’s conversion in a 2005 episode after meeting with a sympathetic priest, Father Sean, voiced by actor Liam Neeson. L’Osservatore says the analysis shows that behind the TV program’s jokes are themes “linked to the sense and quality of life.” “ ‘The Simpsons’ remain among the few programs for children in which the Christian faith, religion and the question of God are recurring themes,” it said. “The family recites prayers together before meals and, in its own way, believes in heaven.” While noting that “The Simpsons” often takes jabs at religious

Paltrow to sing at CMA Awards NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Actress Gwyneth Paltrow will be taking the stage at next month’s Country Music Association Awards — as a performer. She’ll sing the title track of her new movie, “Country Strong,” and will be joined by Vince Gill. The film hits theaters nationwide Jan. 7. The soundtrack will be released Oct. 26. The CMA Awards will air live from Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena Nov. 10 on ABC.

Elton John: U.S. needs more compassion NEW YORK — Elton John says he’s heartbroken by a mean tone that he says is enveloping America. John spoke at his annual Elton John AIDS Foundation benefit Monday night and honored Elton John the memory of AIDS activist Ryan White. The teen died of AIDS 20 years ago and helped combat prejudice and ignorance

Fox via The Associated Press

The Simpson family is seen with priest Father Sean. The Vatican newspaper has declared “Homer and Bart are Catholic.” figures, it said parents should not be afraid to let their children watch “the adventures of the little guys in yellow.” “My first reaction is shock and awe, and I guess it makes up for me not going to church for 20 years,” EW.com quoted executive producer Al Jean as saying. Jean noted that the Simpson family attends the First Church of Springfield, “which is decidedly Presbylutheran.” “We’ve pretty clearly shown that Homer is not Catholic,” he told the entertainment website. “I really don’t think he could go without eating meat on Fridays for even an hour.” But L’Osservatore would seem to take that in stride, too. “Skeptical realism seems to prevail in the Simpson stories,” it wrote. “Young generations of television watchers are educated to not let themselves be fooled. The moral? None. But one knows that a world without easy illusions is a more human world and, perhaps, more Christian.”

associated with the disease at the time. John said White is the reason he started his foundation and he’s “saddened and disturbed” that the same issues exist today. He added there needs to be frank talk about race and sexuality in discussions about AIDS. John also said White was an “amazing boy who had no prejudice, no bitterness. ... God, do we need that kind of thing in America at this moment.”

T.I. says new prison sentence is final lesson ATLANTA — Rapper T.I. says he’s learned his final lesson after a federal judge ordered him back to prison for 11 months. A federal judge in Atlanta ruled last week that the Grammy-winning rap artist, whose real name is Clifford Harris Jr., must return to prison for violating the terms of his supervised release on federal weapons charges. He was arrested in California last month on suspicion of drug possession. T.I. told radio station V103-FM in Atlanta on Monday that he’s learned by trial and error after each arrest and has learned his final lesson. — From wire reports


E4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Oct. 21, 2010: This year, you frequently question reality and facts. This might reflect that often the information you are given is far from correct. Create a more solid base of fact rendering. Opinions often will differ. Learn to respect where others come from. If you are single, you certainly seem to have a magic wand, as you draw in many suitors. Forget a lack of romance. If you are attached, the two of you often have differences of opinion. Emotional reactions could be strong, but you will be more grounded if you look at the issue behind the differences. Understanding and accepting them is the way toward peace. ARIES can often challenge you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You are in prime shape. You don’t want to push too hard to achieve your goals, as others could be reactive. Play the waiting game if need be. Explain piece by piece what is going on. Others still might have trouble grasping your ideas. Tonight: Delve into your basket of creativity. Give up judgments. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Use your sixth sense to the max. Someone inevitably could test your patience using a gentle type of coercive logic. You need to compensate for time spent trying to convince others you are right. Is it worth it? Tonight: Vanish, because you can.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Meetings and groups prove to be most fortunate. Someone you see on a regular basis could pull you in but not help you accomplish what you absolutely must at the moment. Let your creativity flow. Tonight: Start the weekend early. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Be direct with others, though you could find it to be problematic. Tension rises in an unprecedented manner. You want to get to the bottom of a problem. You could be more upset than in the past. Tonight: Could be late. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Take the high road in order to gain understanding with a matter that has been challenging. Detach from the whole story, and solutions will appear. Sometimes we have too much information, which could be the case here. Tonight: Do more research if need be. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH A partner does get domineering at times. You tend to respond well to his or her attitude. Make time for a discussion, though don’t expect agreement over money. Tonight: Hook up with a pal for dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might be in sharp disagreement with someone. How you deal with others could change radically because of another person’s reaction to your generally easygoing attitude. Remember, you don’t need to say yes. Tonight: Just don’t be alone.

SCORPIO ( Oct 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You might say a little too much. Sometimes lying back and being the listener is the smart role. Stop being so hard on yourself. Just drop the word “no.” Tonight: Get some exercise. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You might want to rethink a special tie that could involve a creative project. Be careful about taking another’s comments personally. Stay on top of discussions in a meeting. Tonight: Having fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You know what needs to happen between you and another person. Your fatigue could hold you back, to an extent. Be willing to slow down and take a personal day or work from home. Tonight: Order in. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Listen to others who seem to want to call the shots. Just because you listen doesn’t mean you agree. Know that and understand it. Confusion surrounds information where there is an issue about what is fact and what is fiction. Tonight: Ask key questions. Don’t hold back. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Be aware of the expenses of proceeding on the present course. You could be overly tired and pushed. You might want to rethink a money matter, as there could be an issue or discrepancy between facts and figures. Tonight: You might spend more than you want to! © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND COIN CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Stone Lodge Retirement Center, Bend; 541-693-3438 or bendcoinclub@hotmail.com. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; Morning Star Christian School, Bend; 541-389-5400. DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS: 5:30 p.m. potluck social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Bend VFW Hall; 541-389-0775. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT II — SANITATION DISTRICT: Board meeting; open to the public; 11 a.m.; District Plant Office, Sunriver; 541-923-3124. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www .redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www .bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. PINOCHLE: The Vintage of Bend; 541-388-4286. SWINGING MOUNTAINEERS PLUS SQUARE DANCE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church;

541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: 6-8 p.m.; 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 3 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www. latinocommunityassociation.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363. SASSY LADIES GROUP: Hospitality coffee; 10 a.m. to noon; call Darlene at 541-382-0267.

SUNDAY 99ER BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0069. A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BAND OF BROTHERS: For all veterans; 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-382-0118. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY:

9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-3859198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-382-5376. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room,

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON GOAT PRODUCERS: 7 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-322-6992 or 541-420-3294. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB OF BEND: 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room; 541-312-1046 or kevinb@deschuteslibrary.org. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PINOCHLE PARTY: 7 p.m.; City Hall, Culver; 541-546-4281. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA: 6 p.m.; VFW Post 1643, Bend; 541-388-1512.

WEDNESDAY ASSOCIATION OF NAVAL AVIATION: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-318-3833. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: 6-8 p.m.; Orvis casting course, Bend; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com.

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 4 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. CASCADE BRIDGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, Bend; 541-788-7077. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6-8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition.org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: Jacket night; 7 p.m.; Slick’s Que Co., Sisters; 541-923-1369. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmond kiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541-383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SERVICE FOR PEACE: 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-4401. Wednesday Morning Birders: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

If you go What: Odell Lake Getting there: There are two routes. The quickest is to drive south on U.S. Highway 97 to Crescent. Turn west at the Crescent cut-off toward state Highway 58. Go west at state Highway 58 and turn left after about 10 miles; signs will point to “West Odell Lake Campgrounds” and Shelter Cove Resort. Shelter Cove Resort is about two miles down the road. The Cascade Lakes Highway is a slightly longer but more scenic route. Stay on the highway past Davis Lake to where it intersects with state Highway 58, then turn west for several miles to the west lake access. Cost: Free to park at Shelter Cove Resort and walk to Trapper Creek. Cabins from $95 per night at Shelter Cove. Contact: Crescent Ranger District, 541-433-3200; Shelter Cove Resort, 800-647-2729. Photos by Betsy Q. Cliff / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Shelter Cove Resort is a good home base for exploring Odell Lake and areas nearby. LEFT: In Trapper Creek, the spawning Kokanee salmon cover the stream bed. Each year, hundreds run up the creek near Odell Lake.

Outing Waldo Lake

5897

46

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

Waldo Lake La Pine Odell Lake 31 46

5897

Gold Lake

97

58

Crescent Crescent Cutoff Rd.

58

Willamette Pass

Odell Lake Trapper Creek 58

Crescent Junction Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Continued from E1 Our home base for the adventure was Shelter Cove Resort, which sits on the west side of the lake. The resort has a variety of accommodations from campsites to a brand new, spacious lodge. We stayed overnight in an old, cozy lakefront cabin with a wood stove. Odell Lake sits near the summit of Willamette Pass, and its proximity to the west side of the mountains gives it a much different climate from Central Oregon’s. A dense forest of fir and spruce trees close in the lake and protect a thick green undergrowth. The lake is ringed by hills and a few mountain peaks. It’s much closer to a wet-side climate than to the dryside vegetation we see most often. From the resort, the walk to Trapper Creek to see the Kokanee spawn is about a half mile along a well-worn lakefront path. A bridge near the mouth of the creek offers the best Kokanee and eagle viewing. Over the years, visitors have tramped down vegetation near the mouth of the creek, and fences and signs put up by the Forest Service implore visitors to stay on the path. I headed down to Trapper Creek from the resort in the late afternoon, shortly after we arrived at the resort. As I walked up to the creek, it seemed as if there was nothing going on. At first I worried that I had made a mistake; perhaps the Kokanee were not running right now. Then, as I got close to the water, I saw them. Peering into the creek, I saw one red body. As soon as I saw one, I saw hundreds. The fish were spread all across the

bottom of the stream. In one area of deep water, there were dozens, swimming on top of and around each other. I sat on the bridge to look for eagles. Soon, one flew up behind me and perched in a tree. Then I saw another soaring over the lake. As I rested quietly on the bridge, a show unfolded before me. “It isn’t very common to see concentrations (of eagles) like that around” Central Oregon, said Paul Miller, a wildlife biologist with the Crescent Ranger District. Miller said that one count, done in the mid-1990s, found 125 eagles at Odell Lake during this time of year. Odell has a healthy Kokanee population, Miller said, which he guessed was the main draw for the birds. “The eagles remember or are able to communicate to other eagles that the fish are spawning, and literally dozens upon dozens congregate at this time of year.” I went back to Trapper Creek the next morning, just after dawn. Dawn and dusk, we had heard, were the best times to see the eagles feeding. This time, I walked past the bridge, upstream on the creek. Just minutes after I arrived, the action started. One eagle swooped in, then another. Then I turned and saw another in a tree. One flew from its perch, just over the back of my head, causing me to duck reflexively. I stayed for about 45 minutes, until my hands got too cold. I counted nine eagles along the sides of the creek. Two women came to look, just as I was leaving. “Isn’t this thrilling?” one said. Yes, it is. Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

MORROW’S SEWING & VACUUM CENTER 304 NE 3rd Street Bend 541-382-3882

Largest Selection

FREE TEXTBOOKS Today’s newspapers become tomorrow’s textbooks, and with the NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION program we’re offering FREE newspapers for teachers to use in their classrooms. So, if you are an educator and would like to include newspapers in your classroom studies, please call Kristen, our NIE coordinator, today.

541- 617-7852 HOW CAN YOU HELP THE NIE PROGRAM? It’s easy, and any Bulletin subscriber can do it. Whenever you leave town, just call and we’ll deliver your newspapers to a local classroom. It’s just that simple. To donate your papers to NIE, call 541-385-5800


F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

H

Medicine Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is often diagnosed in late childhood, but the effects last for life, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010

MEDICINE

A new look at melanoma

FITNESS

Local doctor’s own cancer treatment could lead to better care coordination By Markian Hawryluk

Inside

The Bulletin

Photos by Andy Tullis. Illustrations by Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Rotary torso This machine isolates and exercises the front abdominal and mid-back muscles. It is generally used for people with low back problems. Here, Scott Platko, a physical therapist at NorthStar Neck and Back Clinic, demonstrates how to use it.

Getting

Back pain can be debilitating for many ...

stronger

As a general surgeon, Dr. Andrew Jones has seen dozens of melanomas. A large part of his practice in Central Oregon is removing melanomas and conducting lymph node biopsies of skin cancer patients referred to him by dermatologists. But last year, when his wife noticed a growth on the back of his ear, he could truly understand, for the first time, what his patients were experiencing. “My wife was walking behind me and saw this pigmented lesion behind my ear and said, ‘Andrew, I don’t think this looks very good,’” he recalled. “She took a picture of it and showed it to me, and I kind of panicked.” Jones has seen that sort of lesion before. He barely slept that night and called a dermatologist in the morning. She saw Jones immediately and cut out a piece of the lesion to send for analysis. The next day at noon, Jones got a phone call in the middle of an office meeting. “The pathologist said, ‘Andrew, do you have a minute to talk?’ and I knew that was a bad opener,” Jones said. The pathologist confirmed that Jones had a melanoma, the most serious of the three forms of skin cancer. “I remember so vividly the rush of emotions I had,” he said. “Who’s going to take care of my kids when I die? Who’s going to deliver my eulogy? All these catastrophic thoughts.” See Melanoma / F2

By Betsy Q. Cliff • The Bulletin

A

ngie Crouse was in her car and stopped at an intersection six years ago when she was rear-ended. The resulting pain in her neck and shoulder did not go away for more than five years. Crouse, now 39, had been to multiple doctors. She’d seen physical therapists for years. She’d stopped doing activities that she loved — golf and tennis — because it hurt too much. Then last spring, she went to Dr. Laura Schaben, a neurologist at NorthStar Neurology in Bend. Schaben told her about NorthStar Neck and Back Clinic, founded and owned by doctors from Schaben’s office. The NorthStar Neck and Back Clinic opened about a year ago to offer an alternative to other types of treatment for pain. Using sophisticated equipment, the clinic employs a program of specific exercises designed to strengthen the back muscles. Described by practitioners as more intense than most other methods of treating back pain, the NorthStar clinic uses heavy weights to build muscles. Unlike other ways to treat a bad back — massage or gentle exercise, for example — this clinic is almost guaranteed to make you hurt. Crouse, of Bend, said she was sometimes sore after her sessions, though never in actual pain. She felt the intensity helped her build muscles that made all the difference. “I just felt stronger,” she said. “I went out and played golf, and I wasn’t sore.” See Back pain / F4

utes

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NUTRITION

One researcher answers the weight gain question By Edward M. Eveld

but exercising core muscles could help prevent surgery

• Recognizing melanoma • Why does Oregon have high rates of skin cancer? • A look at national and state cases See Page F2

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

We eat too much, and it’s making us fat and sick. So why don’t we stop? David Kessler gave himself the task of finding out. An admitted overeater — and dieter — he’s a man who owns a suit in every size. He’s also one of the country’s leading health advocates, past commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration and former medical school dean. Kessler’s research led him to coin a term for what’s happening, “conditioned hypereating.” It’s complicated, he says, but this much is certain: While we’re

forever trying to determine why our bodies are growing larger, the more important question is about what’s going on in our brains. That’s the process that needs attention, he says. Kessler, author of “The End of Overeating,” recently explained his theory and discussed his book, now out in paperback. “I’ve gained and lost weight repeatedly,” he says. “Now I think I understand what’s happening. This research took me inside what makes us human, how our brains get hijacked, how we get focused on the most salient stimuli in our environment.” See Overeating / F6

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F2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN LTH H E A B OOK . N E DAT RE TUR es ss L W IL t o f cl a ,

M

lis ot s For a d flu sh F6. n a age see P

Recognizing melanoma Potentially life-threatening, the skin cancer can spread rapidly from the initial site. Asymmetrical Irregular edge

Uneven color

1/4 inch or wider

Regarded as cured if it does not recur in five years. Sources: AP, American Cancer Society Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Dr. Andrew Jones stands in the procedure room at Inovia Vein Specialty Center in Bend. As a surgeon, Jones removed melanomas for his patients. Last year, he was diagnosed with the cancer himself.

Oregon’s high melanoma rates simply more aware of skin cancer and doing a better job of diagnosing it and reporting it than in other states. But doctors are also concerned that melanoma diagnoses are on the rise nationwide, and many believe that increase could be due to the rise in tanning bed use in past decades. Officials like Lemon stress that skin cancer is preventable by avoiding tanning beds and taking care to protect exposed skin when outdoors. “I think of it as slip, slap and slop,” he said. “If they slip on a shirt with long sleeves, slap on a hat, and slop on some sunscreen, then that really does make a difference with skin cancer broadly, and we think by extension with melanoma.” He also urged people who find any new lesion or mole on their skin to have it checked out by a doctor, particularly if it has an irregular shape, uneven color or changes shape or size quickly. “By going in to see your health care provider, that’s how you catch it early and get it off,” he said. “Maybe that increases the number of cases that we get reported in Oregon, but I’m fine with that. I want to catch them as early as possible because that’s when we cure them.” And while rates of melanoma are higher in Oregon than elsewhere, melanoma death rates are not. It suggests doctors are finding more early-stage cancers and removing them before they can spread.

Oregon has one of the highest rates in the nation of melanoma cases reported to its state cancer registry, ranked seventh with about 23 cases per 100,000 residents. And Deschutes County has one of the highest rates in the state, with 32 cases per 100,000 residents. So what’s behind the increased skin cancer rates? Public health experts aren’t sure. “It is kind of a head-scratcher,” said Dr. Richard Lemon, an epidemiologist with Oregon’s Public Health Division. Lemon said sun and tanning booth exposure, as well as family history, are the biggest risk factors for melanoma. But outside of Central Oregon, the state isn’t exactly known for its sunny weather. “Certainly not all melanoma is occurring in native Oregonians who have been here their whole lives,” he said. “It may be we’ve got a bunch of people who moved up here from the sun belt.” Dr. Stephen Kornfeld, an oncologist with the Cancer Center of the Cascades, said the same may be true about Deschutes County. “I don’t think it has anything to do with where you live now. It’s what you did 20 years ago,” he said. Kornfeld said most skin cancer takes a long time to get to the point where it can be identified and diagnosed. Others believe the county may have more melanoma cases because it attracts people who like the sun and like the outdoors. It may be that doctors locally are

— Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

High prevalence Oregon has the seventh-highest rate of melanoma in the U.S., and Deschutes County has one of the highest rates in the state.

Rates of melanoma per 100,000, by state, 1999-2006 8.9 to 16.3

18.6 to 21.3

16.4 to 18.5

21.4 to 28.8

Did not meet USCS data quality criteria

Wash. Mont.

Ore.

23

Idaho

Nev.

Utah

Colo.

Ariz.

N.M.

Alaska

Maine Mass.

N.Y.

Mich.

Neb.

Calif.

N.H.

Wis.

S.D.

Wyo.

Vt.

Minn.

N.D.

R.I.

Pa.

Iowa

Conn.

Ill. Ind. Ohio W.Va. Va. Kan. Mo. Ky. N.C. Tenn. Okla. Ark. S.C. Miss. Ala. Ga. La. Texas Fla.

N.J. Del. Md. D.C.

Hawaii

Rates of melanoma, by Oregon county, 1997-2006 Statistically higher than Oregon rate

Similar to Oregon rate

Statistically lower than Oregon rate Clatsop

Columbia Washington Gilliam Multnomah Hood River

Tillamook

Umatilla

Sherman Morrow

Yamhill Clackamas Wasco Polk Marion Lincoln Jefferson Benton Linn

Wheeler

Wallowa

Union Baker

Grant Crook

Lane

Coos

Curry

Deschutes

Lake

Douglas

Josephine Jackson

Harney

Malheur

Klamath

Melanoma Continued from F1 Jones knew that melanoma had good survival rates, especially when it was caught early. But he also knew that even though his surgery went well, there are no guarantees. “I have a 90 percent five-year survival,” he said. “Pretty good. Not baseline, but pretty good.” The experience, however, provided Jones with the type of insight few doctors can claim: the ability to understand and empathize with his patient’s emotions. Now he’s using that experience to help improve the care of melanoma patients in Central Oregon. “What’s changed for me is I’m able to relate to the patients,” he said. “I understand what they’re going through.”

Melanoma basics Melanoma is the sixth most common form of cancer, trailing only breast, prostate, lung, colorectal and bladder cancers. And although it is the rarest form of skin cancer, it is the most deadly. Doctors still don’t know what causes melanoma. It’s a cancer of the cells that produce melatonin, the compound that’s responsible for the darkening of skin when you tan. But while sun exposure, and in particular severe sunburns, are risk factors, melanomas can appear on parts of the body that don’t typically get much sun. They appear as dark, irregular-looking moles on the skin. It’s one of the few cancers that can be seen without an invasive procedure, and one of the easiest cancers to screen. Most are diagnosed when patients show the growths to their primary care physicians, who may biopsy the growths themselves or refer patients to a dermatologist. The biopsy sample is sent to a pathologist who can determine whether or not it is cancerous. The cancer is categorized as thin, medium or thick. The thicker the cancer, the higher the risk it has already spread to other parts of the body, making treatment much more difficult. But with early diagnosis, a surgeon is usually able to cut away the entire cancer before it spreads. “A lot of these lesions are discovered as what is called melanoma in situ. Those are still technically malignant, but they really have no possibility of spreading. So the surgical cure rate is 95 percent,” said Dr. Stephen Kornfeld, an oncologist with Cancer Center of the Cascades. “Melanoma in general remains a surgical disease. It’s not a medical disease. Medical oncologists only get involved when there’s evidence of spread.” Melanoma doesn’t typically respond well to chemotherapy or radiation, or to treatments used to prevent breast cancer or lung cancer. Jones will have to undergo much more frequent screening for the next five years to ensure the cancer hasn’t spread or that a new cancer doesn’t emerge. “Whatever puts you at risk for melanoma, he has that risk, because he had it,” Kornfeld said. “It’s no different than somebody who has breast cancer or colon cancer. The risk of having a new cancer in that organ is higher than the average.”

Fragmented care

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oregon Department of Human Services Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Despite the need for regular follow-ups, Jones has found that the number of different special-

© 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ists involved in treating melanomas often leaves patients with no one person coordinating their ongoing care. The primary care physician, the dermatologist, the pathologist, the surgeon and even the oncologist may all play vital roles in diagnosing and treating the patient. But after surgery, nobody takes the lead in helping the patient deal with the remaining issues. He’s now trying to organize a better system of care for melanoma patients at St. Charles Bend, bringing together the various doctors who treat melanoma to better prepare patients for their surgery and to coordinate the follow-up care. Dr. Linyee Chang, medical director for the Cancer Treatment Center at St. Charles, said that patients with more advanced melanomas generally get good follow-up and care coordination because all tumor cases are discussed at a weekly meeting of the hospital’s oncologists. But patients with lower-stage cancers that haven’t spread sometimes fall through the cracks. “A lot of our efforts have been focused on our top four cancers, which are breast, prostate, lung and colorectal,” she said. “We’re still in the process of refining those programs and so melanoma hasn’t been a focus because it’s further down the list.” The initiative is still in the planning stage, but Chang believes this could be an exciting development for melanoma patients. In the meantime, Jones is using his newfound insight to connect with patients. “It gives me the opportunity to talk to these patients about sorting through the psychological aspect of having a new cancer diagnosis,” he said. “How do you manage those catastrophic thoughts, not letting it paralyze you, working through the treatments and moving on with your life, being realistic that your future may be changed.” Jones himself is playing a waiting game. He has no way of

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“When you tell them they have cancer, you can just see it on people’s faces. They just go blank and start to quickly cycle through all the bad things that can happen.” — Dr. Andrew Jones, who was diagnosed with melanoma in 2009

knowing whether there are cancer cells that have strayed from their original site and are now growing in another part of his body. “You don’t know if it’s going to come back. And if it does, it could be in your liver or your brain,” he said. “So there’s this ongoing hand-wringing about whether this is going to come back.” In many ways, Jones relives his diagnosis on a weekly basis when he talks to patients. “When you tell them they have cancer, you can just see it on people’s faces,” he said. “They just go blank and start to quickly cycle through all the bad things that can happen.” He now tells patients that he, too, faced cancer, and he understands the thought process and how scary it can be. “It allows the patient to see you more as a person. It allows them to open up emotionally more and tell you what their feelings are,” Jones said. “Frequently I’ll find that patients in my office will start crying and really let out their emotions related to how scared they are. And I was there. The same thing happened to me. As soon as I got that diagnosis, I just remember the tears rolling down my face.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 F3

M CELEBRITY M EDICINE Chemotherapy’s side effects can last for years after cancer is gone Olympian Dorothy Hamill recently and increased risk of bruising, told People magazine she is still bleeding or infection. experiencing the side For many patients, the effects of chemotherapy side effects end after two years after being the last chemotherapy declared cancer-free. sessions, but for others, The former figure side effects can last for skater underwent months or even years. surgery, radiation and Some people may chemotherapy to treat experience long-term her breast cancer. Most damage to the heart, patients undergoing Dorothy lungs or other organs. chemotherapy Hamill Of course, that must be experience some side balanced against the effects, although the benefits of eliminating variety, duration and the cancer. And doctors can provide severity can differ from patient to medications that will alleviate many patient. According to the American of the side effects. Cancer Society, the most common side effects of chemo include — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin anemia, fatigue, hair loss, nausea

How to keep your arteries young By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

The blood vessels that carry oxygen throughout your body get stiffer over time, which can put you at risk for heart attack, stroke, dementia and a wide range of other health problems. But you can slow down how fast your arteries age, doctors say: Eat less salt. Many people focus on fat and calories in foods, but too much salt may be the worst thing for your arteries. Shun the salt shaker and read labels: salt can lurk in unexpected places, from breakfast cereals to otherwise healthy frozen dinners. Eat more fruits and vegetables. According to one recent study, cells that regulate blood flow inside arteries become six percent more effective with each daily serving of fresh produce. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage and colorful fruits — blues, reds, yellows and purples — may be especially beneficial. Do regular aerobic exercise.

Workouts increase the production of nitric oxide, a gas that relaxes and dilates blood vessels. Don’t cheat on your diet (at least not often). A single fatty meal can strain your arteries. Within a few hours of loading up on saturated or trans fats, in fact, your blood vessels likely will be narrower and working harder move blood along. Lose excess weight. Arteries stiffen as people gain weight, especially if the fat accumulates deep within the abdomen. Manage chronic conditions. High blood pressure, which places extra force on arterial walls, damages proteins that help keep blood vessels flexible. Uncontrolled diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels that cause strands of proteins in arteries to bind together, which increases overall rigidity. Quit smoking. The chemicals in cigarettes damage the inside lining of arteries, allowing more fatty plaques to stick to vessel walls.

FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

Effects of drinking linger for children By Michele Munz

About FASD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — When Ellen Corona adopted her now 16year-old son Scott, he was a perfectly healthy baby. But in the third grade, he started to have problems. He was treated for ADHD and bipolar disorder. Four years later while seeing a specialist in Tourette Syndrome, he was finally diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. But the diagnosis didn’t provide answers. “There’s a lot of gray areas, areas they don’t understand,” said Corona, 53, of Wildwood, Mo. “There’s no specific line of treatment.” Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a group of mild to severe physical, neurological and behavioral conditions caused by a mother drinking alcohol during pregnancy. The term “fetal,” however, can be misleading. The disorder is often diagnosed during late childhood, and the symptoms are lifelong. Despite the need, no social services programs in the U.S. are geared to treat the specific symptoms of youth and young adults with FASD, said Leigh Tenkku, assistant professor of family and community medicine at St. Louis University. Instead, those suffering with the disorder are treated with a hodgepodge of programs for other developmental disabilities. “The brains of individuals with FASD are not fully developed, which affects their ability to handle emotions, problem solve and pick up on social cues,” Tenkku said. “As they get older, these problems affect their ability to maintain a job, their relationships and their parenting abilities.” Researchers at SLU are trying to change the course for youth struggling with the disorder. The university is conducting one of two research

Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder may have these traits, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: • Abnormal facial features, such as a smooth ridge between the nose and upper lip • Small head size • Shorter than average height • Low body weight • Poor coordination • Hyperactive behavior • Difficulty paying attention • Poor memory • Learning disabilities Elie Gardner / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ellen Corona adopted her son, now 16, as an infant but didn’t notice symptoms of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder until he was in third grade. The disorder is often diagnosed in late childhood, and the effects last for life. projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop evidence-based treatment targeting older youth and young adults. The other is at the University of California, Los Angeles. SLU’s research project, called Partners for Success, combines a personal mentor with biweekly therapeutic home visits for the family. The mentor will model appropriate behavior and help those with the disorder to integrate techniques taught during home visits into their daily lives. Researchers are trying to recruit 100 study participants ages 16 to 25. “This is a totally new approach to mentoring older children and adults with FASD, but it’s built on well-established research in the field,” Tenkku said. “This program is very promising, and we’re hopeful that it will revolutionize the way we support these individuals.” Corona recalls how the medication for ADHD left her son without an appetite and sleepless. Middle

Get Back to Your Life

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Ear buds. Earphones. Naked ears. How one listens to music does not matter in terms of potential hearing damage as much as the combination of volume, proximity to the noise source and length of exposure. This is common sense, yes. But when studies emerge like a recent one in the Journal of the American Medical Association that estimated one in five teenagers has hearing loss, the message of auditory moderation seems to bear repeating. Or perhaps it should be shouted at 79 decibels. That’s about the highest level of noise intensity a person should be exposed to for an extended time, according to Susan Kaplan, an audiologist with the University of California-Davis health system. “The louder you like to listen to music, the shorter amount of time” you should listen to it, Kaplan said. “It doesn’t matter if you are 15 or 60.” Hearing loss occurs more often with sound above 80 decibels, or about the noise level of a ringing telephone, Kaplan said. At 100 decibels (lawn mower, chain saw, approximate maximum volume on an iPod), things get truly dicey. Music fans who insist on listening to iPods at 100 percent volume through earbuds — those in-ear speakers that seem permanently attached to today’s teens — should do it for only five minutes at a time, Kaplan said. At 80 percent volume, they can go an hour, Kaplan recommends. At 70 percent to 79 percent, a few hours, and 69 percent and below, four to five hours. Earbuds are slightly more dangerous than over-the-ear earphones, Kaplan said, due to the

buds’ closer proximity to the cochlea, or auditory portion of the inner ear. “The farther away you are from the source of the sound, the less impact it will have, even if it has the same intensity,” Kaplan said. By that token, music lovers who want to hear their favorite bands live as well as recorded should beware the giant speaker. “If your body is vibrating, then so is your ear,” Kaplan said. She urged fans of live music always to consider ear plugs. “It sounds dorky, but I do advise it, especially if (people) know they are going to a concert where the band plays really loud music,” Kaplan said. “If you are listening to James Taylor play acoustic guitar, it is going to be different than listening to KISS.” Kaplan said the soft, foamy earplugs available at most drugstores will do the trick. But for a Deftones show last month, Carol Gale, of Sacramento, Calif., went industrial. “I got mine from the hardware store,” Gale said of the rubber earplugs she bought for the hardrock show at cacophonous Memorial Auditorium. “I knew (the Deftones) were going to be loud. It was the first time I ever wore earplugs, and I was so glad I did.” Kaplan said she has seen musicians with noise-induced hearing loss at the University of California-Davis audiology clinic. But she has not encountered many teens affected by high volumes on personal listening devices. That’s because their hearing loss might still be slight enough that they have not noticed it, Kaplan said. “I imagine that when these teens are middle-aged, we definitely will see a lot more of them needing hearing aids,” Kaplan said.

school was the hardest time, she said. He struggled to fit in, was angry and impulsive. She’s tried everything from chiropractic care to massage therapy to help, even buying punching bags for him to help let off steam. “We just gritted our teeth and got through,” she said. “Every day was so sad and so depressing.” There is no known safe amount of alcohol to drink while pregnant, health experts say. Because about 60 percent of women do not know they are pregnant at four weeks’ gestation, a critical period in organ development, the CDC warns women to not drink alcohol if they are sexually active and

do not use birth control. Fetal alcohol syndrome was first labeled in 1973 and represents the severe end of the FASD spectrum. People with FAS have abnormal facial features and growth problems along with a mix of other physical and behavioral problems. Scientists have and are still learning about different levels of neurological damage caused by alcohol use during pregnancy. The CDC and other experts have developed guidelines for diagnosing FAS, but the diagnostic criteria for FASD is still in the works. “This is still a very new field, and we are still learning about this,” Tenkku said.

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F4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week New study finds exercise helps elderly women avoid hip fractures.

Back pain

Exercise first Many experts say exercise is a good start when your back begins to hurt. The theory is that stronger muscles support the skeleton better and relieve some pain. “I think it should be first-line treatment for most people,” said Dr. Marc Wagner, a physiatrist at The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research in Bend. A lot of people come into the office wanting advice, he said, “and really all they need to do is some exercise and maybe (take) some anti-inflammatories.” Wagner said exercise helps by aiding in weight loss, engaging stiff muscles and encouraging blood flow into the discs of the back. Scientific literature suggests that any kind of exercise can improve back pain, said Scott Weber, a physical therapist at Alpine Physical Therapy in Bend. “It doesn’t matter if they ride a bike or work out at the gym or run.” There will be a segment of people, however, for whom exercising on their own is not enough. These people, said Weber and other experts, need to be evaluated by a professional. But, Nelson said, not just any professional. “If it doesn’t work, your next step should not be to go see a spine surgeon.” Dr. Richard Koller, a neurologist in Bend who played an instrumental part in opening the NorthStar clinic, said that too often, people go straight to a neurosurgeon for pain. “Someone will go to their primary care provider with neck or back pain … then they will be referred to a neurosurgeon,” he said. “That’s what we are trying to change.” Instead, what might help is having someone guide you who has experience in treating back pain with physical movement. There are a number of different exercise professionals in Central Oregon who offer less invasive treatments than surgery. In fact, if you go see a spine surgeon you very well may be referred to one of the exercise professionals. The most common exercisebased treatment is physical therapy. The regimen in physical therapy depends on the diagnosis, said Chuck Brockman, a physical therapist at Therapeutic Associates. For some patients, he said, he’ll start in the pool. Others do land-based exercises, while still others need to exercise without moving the spine. “There’s not one generic way to take care of it,” he said. Weber said, too, that what he does depends on a patient’s diagnosis. For some people, such as those with central back pain or whose back goes out intermittently, he sometimes recommends core strengthening. “The muscles that are supposed to

CORE WORKOUT

Seated side bend

1 Photos by Andy Tullis. Illustrations by Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Lumbar extension This machine isolates the lumbar muscles near the base of the spine. It is primarily used for people with lower back pain. Here, Peggy Koller and Scott Platko of NorthStar Neck and Back Clinic demonstrate its use.

control (spinal) movement need to be retrained.” At Pilates Connection, a studio in Bend, Gabi Davis focuses on core strength with all her clients. She’s helped a lot of people through back pain, she said, by strengthening the muscles in the core to better support the trunk. When people have weak abdominal muscles, she said, “their back has to keep them going.” It tires and begins to hurt. Pilates restores the muscle, she said. “I can’t take arthritis away, but I can strengthen the muscle in your back,” so that the arthritis hurts less, she said.

Bulletin every other week through January. How to do it: Seated on an exercise ball, grip a bar with both hands (you can also use a broomstick) across your back at your shoulder blades (1). Without changing the position of the bar, bend sideways, tilting the bar to the ceiling (2). Come back to the center and then tilt to the other side. The exercise ball should stay still under you. Touchette suggests 10 to 20 repetitions for each exercise. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

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Different philosophies The NorthStar clinic operates on many of the same principles as existing clinics. It, too, believes that a solid core and stronger muscles are the keys to a soothed back. The difference, said Koller and Nelson, is the intensity of the workout. The machines used at the NorthStar clinic use heavier weights than most physical therapy practices, Koller said. They also isolate specific muscles in the back or neck by using a sophisticated restraint system to immobilize the muscles that are not meant to be used in a particular exercise. For example, one machine looks somewhat like a Nautilus machine that could be used at a gym for a leg workout. When you get in it, however, you see that it has a large lap belt, a strong shoulder restraint and a computer that measures resistance. Each of the machines at the NorthStar clinic costs about $20,000 new. (The clinic bought them refurbished for about $11,000 each.) “You need specialized equipment,” to target the correct muscles, said Nelson, who uses this equipment in his clinic in Minneapolis. Doctors and physical therapists at NorthStar see patients for about 10 to 12 weeks. Then, they give them maintenance exercises to continue at home. “They take me about eight minutes, so it’s easy to maintain,” said Crouse. The other difference between the NorthStar clinic and other area clinics is the reaction to pain. Though physical therapists have different philosophies, many feel as Brockman does. “The idea is to get the spinal muscles as strong as you can without causing pain,” he said. “Pain is an indicator that something’s going on. I liken it to a scab. If you constantly run into a scab, it’s not going to heal. If you constantly push into that pain, it’s not going to heal.” Nelson and Koller have a different philosophy. If a patient wants to stop because of pain, said Nelson, “that may be the wrong thing to do.” The back muscles, he said, need the intensity of exercise that often causes pain in order to become stronger. Then, those muscles adapt to handle the demands of the workload, resulting in a less painful back. “You have to make sure you exercise in some way that is intense enough to change muscle.” Nelson said the program works for most, but not everyone. In a study published in the journal Orthopedics, Nelson

2

No more sit-ups, said Cherie Touchette, a personal trainer at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center who teaches a functional core class there. Instead, Touchette emphasizes moves that teach people to keep their spines correctly aligned while strengthening the abdominal muscles. “It’s all about posture, posture, posture,” she said. This exercise and all of those in this series work the muscles in the abdomen and the back. It can be done individually or you can combine all nine; this is the second in a series that will run in The

Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., PC

Cervical extension This machine works the muscles in the neck and the trapezius muscles in the upper back. It is primarily used for people with neck pain.

and his colleagues reported that, with their program, three out of four patients reported good or excellent results. Some, he acknowledged, do not get better with strengthening. “Then, it’s time to look at more invasive procedures.” Koller said he still sees a place for back surgery, but he thinks people should consider other options first. Not only is it less

invasive, it is very likely less expensive. A full course of treatment at the NorthStar clinic costs $4,000, significantly less than most spinal surgeries, and is paid for by most commercial insurers. “We are not anti-surgery,” said Koller. “We just want to do what works best in a conservative manner.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

www.corapc.com www.cascademedicalimaging.com

Continued from F1 Back pain is one of the most common complaints of patients, and the NorthStar clinic is just one among myriad options in Central Oregon for treating it. An aching back can take you anywhere from a Pilates studio to an acupuncturist’s office to the operating room, and many places in between. “There’s no human condition for which more treatments exist than back pain,” said Dr. Brian Nelson, an orthopedic surgeon at Physicians Neck & Back Clinic in Minneapolis, who developed many of the protocols used by the NorthStar clinic. And, said Nelson, there is “very little consensus” on the best way to treat a bad back. Those who treat backs say the recommendation often depends more on whom a person goes to see rather than what is wrong with a person’s back. So, go to a surgeon and she’ll suggest surgery; go to a chiropractor and he will offer those services. Central Oregon has the dubious distinction of having a higher concentration of spine surgeons than many other areas, and some evidence suggests patients here are more likely to get surgery for back pain. According to a national database of Medicare patients, Bend does more spine surgeries per capita than almost any other city in the country. Physicians and others say that if more people would try exercise first, it might reduce the area’s reliance on back surgeries. But that’s about all they agree on. What exercise works best, and where to get it, is up for debate.

EXERCISE TIPS

WELCOMES NEW PHYSICIAN Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., P.C. Is proud to present our newest physician Dr. William Wheir 1460 NE Medical Center Drive Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6633 Appointments: 541-382-9383

William H. Wheir, MD Radiologist

Dr. Wheir comes to Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., PC From the New Mexico School Of Medicine with Fellowship training in Neuroradiology.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 F5

K S A A

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL c/o The Bulletin • 1526 NW Hill St., Bend OR 97701

DENTISTRY

PA I N M EDICINE QUESTION: Is there Naturopathic Relief for Fibromyalgia? Answer: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by widespread chronic pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. FMS can also present with a myriad of other symptoms, including but not limited to: gastrointestinal problems, numbness/tingling, depression and anxiety. The syndrome does not have an identified single cause often making treatment difficult. Naturopathic physicians recognize Dr. Payson Flattery many co-conditions in FMS including, but not limited to: N.D., D.C., PC euthyroid sick syndrome, delayed (IgG mediated) food allergy, intestinal overgrowth of candida/yeast or specific bacteria, metabolic toxicity, adrenal dysfunction, and underlying chronic viral infection. Testing is generally encouraged as it gives specific information to help guide treatment. This may include a comprehensive stool analysis using DNA probes, conventional laboratory testing, and delayed food allergy testing. Most patients seen at CIM are put on low dose thyroid hormone, despite often low normal laboratory findings, and undergo a metabolic cleanse which includes specific treatment of gastrointestinal pathogens such as candida. Outcomes are generally very good and rarely require conventional medication beyond thyroid hormone. For more information please contact the clinic at 541.504.0250 or visit www.CenterforIntegratedmed.com.

WELLNESS QUESTION: How can I make sure my mother takes her medications? I’m not able to check on her every day.

QUESTION: I see advertisements all the time that talk about conservative dentistry. What exactly does that mean? ANSWER: Technology today is playing a major factor in the way we can ix teeth. There used to be two ways in which we would ix teeth. We would either replace the missing tooth structure with an amalgam (silver illing) or we would ix it with a crown (cap). Replacing tooth structure with an amalgam requires changing the shape of the tooth to accommodate and hold the amalgam. Amalgam can’t be too thin or else it Kelley Mingus, will break and it doesn’t bond to the tooth so the tooth has to D.M.D. be reshaped with undercuts, requiring additional tooth structure to be removed. Crowns are even more aggressive as they require a layer of tooth structure to be removed all the way around the entire tooth to the gum line. Teeth treated with amalgams will usually become a crown at some point. These treatment options worked well when we didn’t have the options that we have today but they were by no means conservative. Conservative treatment to me means the preservation of tooth structure. Although technology is providing us with some amazing treatment options for replacing teeth, the fact remains that nothing works as well as your natural tooth. Technology is now providing us a way to treat teeth without removing as much tooth structure as well as providing the ability to bond the tooth to the illing. These newer treatment options allow us to minimize the number of times a tooth will need dental work during your lifetime, resulting in a more conservative result not just now but also in the future. In my ofice I now treat at least 50% of the teeth that used to be crowns with a much more conservative treatment.

ANSWER: Not taking medications as ordered can cause serious health problems, which is why medication management is vitally important. Unfortunately, many elders struggle with this. Medication management services are Winona Phelps, available through Touchmark’s Home Care R.N. agency. Licensed nurses can review and assess an individual’s prescribed and over-thecounter medications and provide education about how they work together to treat chronic health conditions. A Home Care nurse also can develop a plan of care and set up a medication organizer to take the guesswork out of daily dosing. Another option is moving to a retirement community. If your mother moves into a community offering residential care/assisted living, her medications will be managed and administered by trained caregivers. Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village is able to assist your mother and answer any questions she and your family might have. Call us at 541-383-1414.

WINONA PHELPS, R.N.

DISTINCTIVE DENTISTRY AT BROKEN TOP 916 SW 17th ST. • Suite 202 • Redmond • 541-504-0250 www.centerforintegratedmed.com

1475 SW Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend www.bendcosmeticdentist.com • 541-382-6565

EYE CARE

PERMANENT MAKEUP

Q

ANSWER: Permanent cosmetics last a long time, but not forever. As you become accustomed to your new makeup it’s not uncommon to want more deinition or more color. You will want to freshen Susan Gruber, up your look every couple of years. The Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional darker the original color, the longer it will remain unchanged. Lighter, natural, delicate colors are oftentimes more vulnerable to the effects of the sun, chlorine and breakdown by the body’s natural responses over time. Use of exfoliating skin-care products containing glycolic and retinols will accelerate the fading process. It’s not a luxury. It’s an investment. Call for more information 541-383-3387.

ANSWER: Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina causing gradual loss of central acuity. Those who have been diagnosed with macular degeneration need a complete, dilated eye exam to determine the level of severity and type of macular degeneration present. Progression of some forms Winter Lewis, of macular degeneration may be slowed with O.D., F.A.A.O. therapeutic intervention by a retinal specialist. Those who have experienced significant central acuity loss may benefit from magnification devices or specialty glasses. It is important to realize that magnification devices do not restore original vision but work to enhance the visual acuity that remains intact. The use of magnifiers will allow for images to be enlarged and projected onto the retina such that peripheral viewing system can “understand” the image better. This takes time and practice to become comfortable with. Support and training is most effective with an Occupational Therapist and Low Vision specialist. Locally, St. Charles Outpatient Rehabilitation program has trained Occupational Therapists who can assist those with central acuity loss. Low Vision Specialists are available locally as well. Ask your eye care provider for more information.

ADAM ANGELES, M.D. MEDICAL DIRECTOR, BEND PLASTIC SURGERY www.bendprs.com 541-749-2282

SKIN CARE

Frequently BCC and SCC will appear as a small pink sore that doesn’t heal or a scaly red patch that won’t go away. Sometimes they will itch or bleed. Often times they are not symptomatic at all. Watch your skin closely and have any suspicious lesions examined by a provider specializing in dermatologic care.

541.330.0900

At Healing Bridge Physical Therapy we often treat patients with headaches, with excellent results. Our private hour long sessions are ideal for treating patients with these conditions.

ZEYLA BRANDT, PT WWW.HEALINGBRIDGE.COM

404 NE PENN AVE, BEND, OR 541-318-7041

SPINE / CHIROPRACTIC

QUESTION: I have a lot of heartburn & reflux. Should I have an endoscopy even though I get temporary relief with Tums or OTC Prilosec? ANSWER: If you have had long standing heartburn that is Stephen Archer, MD, FACS incompletely controlled with medication, then an endoscopy is reasonable. If you have symptoms such as regurgitation, cough or asthma related to reflux, endoscopy should be performed. There is research that suggests that any white male over 50 with reflux should have at least one endoscopy to screen for precancerous cell, also known as Barrett’s Esophagus.

QUESTION: My wife is currently suffering from a whiplash injury related to being hit from behind by another car. What can we do to help prevent whiplash injuries? Answer: One of the main preventable risk factors for rear impact crash related whiplash injuries is related to head restraint geometry. When a vehicle is struck in the rear, an occupant suddenly moves forward with the seat, and if the head isn’t supported, it will lag behind the body. This bends and stretches the neck backward Brad Pfeiffer, in a whiplash injury. Seat/head restraints can reduce DC these injuries by keeping the head and body moving together in a rear impact. A properly positioned head restraint should have the top of the restraint at or above the top of the occupants ears, and should also be positioned as close to the back of the head as possible (ideally no more than 2 inches from the back of the head). A seat reclined back too far will increase this distance, as will poor posture.

Stephen Archer, MD, FACS Advanced Specialty Care 2084 NE Professional Court • Bend • (541) 322-5753 www.AdvancedSpecialtyCare.com

In 2007, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that twothirds of all SUVs, pickup trucks, and minivans did not offer adequate protection against whiplash. They reported that in some pickups especially, the head restraints couldn’t be adjusted enough to provide the right kind of support during a crash. Before buying a new car, truck, or van, do your research to make sure that you’re getting the best protection for your neck. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact our office.

Brad Pfeiffer, DC • 383-4585

FA M I LY M E D I C I N E Q U E S T I O N : Heart disease runs in my family:

grandparents, uncles & aunts have all had heart problems as early as their 40’s. I am a healthy person, exercise & eat well. Should I be worried enough to get a heart scan or am I too young? I am a 38 year old female. ANSWER: EBT or ultrafast coronary computed

tomography scans show plaque within the coronary arteries. Recently, these tests have come down markedly in price ($99.00 at St. Charles Medical Center) and they are quick and easy to complete. They are accurate and well-validated for diagnosing heart disease. In your situation, you really only have one risk factor for heart disease, that being family history. However, we know that genetics plays a large role in predicting individual disease burden and you would benefit, in my opinion, by having the test done. Even if your scan is completely negative, you still need to see your doctor at least yearly for annual exams and blood work as a negative EBT does not mean that you won’t develop heart disease in the future. You will need yearly fasting blood work to check cholesterol and you will need to keep your blood pressure under tight control to help minimize your chance of heart attack and stroke. Maintaining a diet low in saturated fat and exercise are also very important for your cardiovascular health. Kevin Reuter, M.D.

HIGH LAKES HEALTHCARE

325 SW UPPER TERRACE DRIVE, SUITE 100 • BEND

“Just” headaches may be related to muscle tension or positional issues, and can be extremely severe. These respond very well to physical therapy, which addresses the muscle tension and movement issues that may cause the pain.

A D VA N C E D C A R E

QUESTION: I have heard a lot about melanoma, but I’m wondering if there are other types of skin cancer I should be concerned about? A NSWER : Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common types of skin cancer. They develop from ultraviolet damage on sun exposed skin and are therefore most commonly found on the Carrie Baxter, head, neck, arms and legs. There are roughly MSPAS, PA-C one million cases of BCC and 300,000 cases of SCC each year. These types of skin cancer are different than melanoma in that they rarely metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body. They are slow growing and easily treated in general. However, if left untreated for a long period, BCC and SCC can invade local deeper tissues below the skin.

problem, resulting from temporarily reduced blood flow to a small part of the brain. This reduced blood supply can cause specific sensations, and when the Zeyla Brandt, artery dilates again the severe pain starts. Migraines P.T. are usually only one sided. These headaches respond to specific medications which address the arterial spasm, and sufferers should be evaluated by a doctor. Physical Therapists can help with the headache that follows the resolution of the circulatory issue. Some of the factors that trigger migraines may also respond to PT, including tension and muscle weakness, resulting in fewer migraines.

24509 NE Mary Rose Pl, Ste 110 • Bend 318-8388 • www.infocus-eyecare.com

PLASTIC SURGERY

ANSWER: Many people qualify for a panniculectomy (removal of the lower abdominal skin and soft tissue) and have this covered by their insurance company. In addition, many patients elect to have a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty) performed concomitantly, saving them a considerable amount of money and resulting in a more youthful abdominal contour. At Bend Plastic Surgery, we specialize in all types of body contouring and work with insurance companies to help get your operations covered.

Answer: Migraines are actually a circulatory

INFOCUS EYE CARE

www.permanentmakeupbysusan.com 1265 NW Wall Street • Bend 383-3387

Adam Angeles, M.D.

Question: I have really severe headaches. Could they be migraines or are they “just headaches”, and can anything this severe be “just a headache”? Can physical therapy help?

WINTER LEWIS, O.D., F.A.A.O.

PERMANENT MAKEUP BY SUSAN, CPCP

QUESTION: I am interested in having a tummy tuck but also have a large lower belly that hangs down a bit. I’ve had problems with rashes, especially during the summer, in the creases that have not gotten better with powders and good hygiene. Will my insurance pay for removal of the lower part of my abdomen so I can stop these rashes? Can I also get a tummy tuck at the same time?

PHYSICAL THERAPY

QUESTION: My mother was told that she has macular degeneration and that glasses were of limited help. Is there anything available to help her see clearer?

How long should permanent makeup last? UESTION:

Bend - Downtown • 18 NW Oregon Ave Sisters • 354 W Adams St. Bend - Eastside • 1247 NE Medical Center Dr.

541.318.4249 www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Ask any Health Question in the area of: • Dermatology • Homeopathic/Holistic Medicine • Plastic Surgery • Chiropractic • Home Health • Pain Medicine • Optometry • Family Medicine • Ear, Nose & Throat • Colon & Rectal Surgery • Cosmetic Dentistry • Thoracic, Vascular & Vein Surgery • Physical Therapy • Aesthetic Procedures

Send, fax or e-mail your question to: Ask a Health Professional c/o Kristin Morris, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • Fax: 541-385-5802 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com

My question is:


F6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N Overeating

G O O D F O R YO U Whole-wheat bread has higher amounts of fiber and protein You’re at the grocery store and picking out a loaf of bread. Your kids or your husband or even your own taste buds are lobbying for white, so why go with wheat? Many of us have heard that it’s healthier but don’t know exactly what that means. Here you go: While individual brands of wheat bread vary, most of the time wheat bread contains more fiber than white bread. Both breads contain many of the same vitamins and minerals, but wheat bread has them in higher concentrations. You get more fiber, more of some minerals including selenium and manganese and more protein in wheat bread. If you (or your shopping partners) don’t like the taste, look for white whole-wheat bread, which is made with a different type of wheat for a milder flavor. The important part is that some type of whole grain, almost always with the word “whole,” is listed near the top of the ingredients list.

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Watch out: Of course, what you put on the bread also matters. If you are trying to lose weight, skip fattening butters for tuna or chicken salad made with light mayonnaise. How to eat: For a twist on breakfast toast, top a piece of wheat bread with sliced tomatoes, a sprinkle of parmesan cheese and a little salt and pepper. Then broil until cheese melts and tomatoes are soft. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

FLU SHOTS

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Diane Sparkling, left, prepares to give a flu shot to Dennis Foster at Newport Avenue Market in 2008. Many insurance plans will cover seasonal flu shots. The following prices apply only to recipients without insurance accepted by the provider. Saturday — Noon-6 p.m.; $30; Erickson’s Thriftway, Bend. Wednesday — Noon-6 p.m.; $25; Food 4 Less, Bend. The following locations have flu

shots available on an ongoing basis. Call for times or appointments. Rite Aid, Prineville — $24.99; 541-447-2466. Walgreens, Redmond — $29.99; 541-548-1731. Walmart, Bend — $24; 541-389-8184. Walmart Supercenter, Redmond — $24; 541-923-1718.

CLASSES CANCER AND END OF LIFE CARE TELECONFERENCE: Panel discussion on end of life care with local oncologists; free; 9 a.m.-noon Friday; Partners In Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-3825882 or www.partnersbend.org. HEALTH CARE REFORM FORUM WITH VIGILANT: Benefits forum, with discussion of health care reform, health care exchanges, value driven health care and more; registration required by Friday ; free; 4-6 p.m. Wednesday ; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 503-789-8328 or r.sumner@vigilantcounsel.org. MEDICARE INFORMATION SESSION: SHIBA presents a workshop on Medicare changes, including what

to do if your plan leaves the area, changes for 2011, shopping for drug plans and more; registration requested; free; 1-3 p.m. Tuesday ; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-548-8817. PATIENT APPRECIATION DAY: With demonstrations and chiropractic adjustments; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; donations accepted; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today ; Hanes Chiropractic Wellness Center, 446 N.E. Third St., Suite 200, Prineville; 541-447-7230. THE VANCE STANCE: Learn perfect posture and flexibility to eliminate pain; $100 for series; 6-8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, noon-2 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays; register for east Bend location; 541-330-9070.

Continued from F1 “Why does my hand reach for that chocolate chip cookie?” he says. “It’s not because I’m weak-willed. This really involves the learning, memory and motivational circuitry in the brain. Once you understand, at least it gives you the tools.” The brain wants what it wants. And what makes it happiest is sugar, fat and salt. But it’s never satisfied. The more we supply, the more it demands. Foods high in sugar, fat and salt trigger the release of dopamine and endorphins, firing up the brain’s pleasure center, he says. Soon enough, the brain is wired to react even to cues about the food — sights and smells but also thoughts and suggestions. We get trapped in a cycle that starts with a food cue, which triggers the urge, which we quickly and easily satisfy. But that’s only part of the equation, Kessler says. What’s different about food today, including in supermarkets and at restaurants, is that it’s fully “layered and loaded” with sugar, fat and salt. It’s manufactured and prepared for premium “mouthfeel,” multiple “flavor notes,” even ease of chewing. Hyperpalatable foods are hyperstimulating, he says, and they are rewiring our brains. Then there’s the added “emotional gloss” of advertising, the fact that food is available around every corner and that it’s one of the chief ways we entertain ourselves. “What did we expect to happen?” says Kessler, who as FDA commissioner was well-known for his advocacy of food nutrition labels and tobacco industry regulation. In earlier decades, he says, body weight remained relatively stable, increasing a few

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David Kessler, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, said that most foods today are full of sugar, fat and salt. Those three elements, he says, trigger the brain to want more. pounds in our 20s to 40s and then dropping in our 60s and 70s. In recent decades, our weight gain begins in childhood, hits 20 pounds in our 20s and continues much longer. The heaviest people get even heavier. In his book, Kessler breaks down packaged food in the grocery store and offerings at restaurants such as Chili’s Grill & Bar and T.G.I. Friday’s, describing how something like Friday’s “Parmesan-Crusted Sicilian Quesadilla,” with its load of sausage, chicken, bacon and cheese, hits all of the palatability buttons. Unfortunately, the calorie load is also enormous. Consider a plate of cheese fries, he writes. Instead of eating a simple potato, a carbohydrate that breaks down to sugar, we’re eating something fried, salted and layered with cheese, which equates to “salt on fat on fat on sugar.” Exercise can be part of the answer to overeating, Kessler says, but not because it burns calories. The calories in a candy bar or a couple of cookies, eaten in two minutes, could take 45 minutes of walking to burn off. While regular exercise isn’t an antidote to overeating, it can become a “substitute reward.” Only about 15 percent of us aren’t susceptible to conditioned

overeating, he says. For the rest, the important work is in our heads. “We’ve got to lay down new neural circuitry,” he says. “There are no magic bullets, but there are tools.” Typically, he says, going cold turkey doesn’t work.

“That’s the stuff of obsessions and cravings,” he says. One method is to implement structure to your eating, Kessler says. Decide ahead of time when and what you’re going to eat, and keep your focus there. Don’t expect food at every social and business gathering. Be aware of the size of the food and how it’s layered and loaded, he says. A hamburger can be satisfying without doubling or tripling it and adding piles of cheese and bacon. Take a “fighting back” stance, he says. Knowing that layered and loaded foods will just stimulate you to eat more, see such food as a manipulation and say, “I don’t want that.” Look at food not as a repeated reward or constant stimulant but as a means of nourishment, he says. You can’t expect to avoid all of the food cues you encounter, but you can cool down your brain circuitry with a set of rules and boundaries. But they need to be your rules. “No one can do it for you,” Kessler says.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 G1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959.

1 7 7 7

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY LAST ONE! FEMALE AKC REGISTERED, CHAMPION LINES. UP TO DATE ON ALL SHOTS & MICROCHIPPED $1750 541 416-0375 English Springer Spaniels, AKC Reg., black/white ready to go! $750. 541-408-6322

Parrots -Dbl. Red Factor Congo African Greys,3 babies, nearly weaned, & 3 yearlings, babies are Abundenced weaned & are allowed to glide to floor before wing clipping, snuggly babies, DNA sexing will be completed prior to sale. $500-$700, For more info call Aleta 541-548-4750.

AUSSIE Toy/Sheltie mix pups 10 wks, 2 sable colored females, $125. 541-390-8875. Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $150. 541-923-1174. Boxer, rescued purebred neutered male, 2 yrs old. $100. 541-576-3701

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Mini-Dachshund 6-wk-old black & tan male; 1st shots & wormed, adorable, family raised! $300 541-610-7341 Dog Kennels, 1 large, $10, 1 extra, extra large, $15, call 541-923-0041. English Bulldog. $500 AKC male, intact, 2 yrs, brindle/ white. 541.588.6490 English Bulldog puppies, AKC, exc. champion pedigree, 8 weeks old, ready to go! $1700/ea. 541-306-0372

Shepherd

ready 10/15, male & female, black & tan or all blacks, exc. temperament, both parents on site+grandma, sire Chateau De Chiefs, AKSC #02BGG872-IM, Dam Sonja Vom Holtzberg, AKC #DN17285408, $800, 541-815-2888. Lab mix, 1½, spayed, shots, dog/ cat friendly,free to good home w/lotsof space. 541-504-2814

Papillons, Beutiful puppies, exceptionally well cared for, $300-$400, 541-367-7766

246

260

266

267

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Heating and Stoves

Fuel and Wood

STILL KITTEN SEASON! Over 3 dozen friendly, altered, shots, ID chip, more! $25/1, $40/2. Adult cats $15 or 2/$25, or free as mentor cat with kitten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt. 541-598-5488; 389-8420 map/ photos at www.craftcats.org.

Table, Oak dinette, 30x48, $20; 5 Shelf Wicker Etegere, 18x65, $20, 541-504-9078.

Enviro Fire II Pellet Stove, heats 1000 sq ft, good condition, $450. 541-923-8202

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Yorkie-Poo, 5 yrs. old, rescued & fixed, $100, call 541-576-3701,541-576-2188

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $550, 541-536-3108

210

Furniture & Appliances # 1 A p p li a n c e s • D r y e r s • W a s h ers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

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Baker’s Rack, white with 2 drawers, $25, please call 541-923-0442

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Desk, 1940’s wood office, 3+1 drawers & wood chair, $75, 541-317-5156. Dining Table, unique, oak, 3’x4’, 4 wood chairs, $100, 541-639-2069. Entertainment center. Excellent condition. Oak-finish hardwood veneer with bi-fold doors. 55" high, 42" wide, 22-1/2" deep. $210 cash only. Call 541-385-0542.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Rocker Recliners (2), (1) lovesseat, good cond., $20/ea, or all 3 for $50, 541-280-4976.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Sofa, circa 1900, Mission Oak style, in good shape, $4000 or make offer, 541-980-2204

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Tools Husqvarna 18” Chainsaw with case, like new, $325. Please call 541-383-8528. Ladder, 12 foot aluminum extension, $45, please call 541-0923-0442.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

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Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

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TV, Stereo and Video TV 52” Samsung, big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $400. 541-480-2652. Kitchen Queen, Hoosier type from 1920’s, reduced $500 to 255 $1000 firm. 541-420-7470 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those The Bulletin Classifieds selling multiple systems/ The Bulletin reserves the right software, to disclose the to publish all ads from The name of the business or the Bulletin newspaper onto The term "dealer" in their ads. Bulletin Internet website. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

WANTED TO BUY

260

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS Currency collect, accum. Pre 541-389-6655 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold BUYING coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Lionel/American Flyer trains, dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex accessories. 541-408-2191. & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bed- Carved Wood Bear, 50” H, 15” W, $550 Cash. Pictures avail rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 upon request. 503-638-2028

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Golf Equipment Golf Balls, exc. cond., $20/100, PRO-V, $50/100, 541-383-2155.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing 1874 Sharps 45-70, manufactured by Pedersoli. Dies, brass, and lead. Creedmore sites, $1600. 541-385-7446 357 Colt Trooper, 6” Barrel, exc. cond., $550; Remington 700 XCR .338 Ultra-Mag, 4.5x14 pwr. Leupold Boone & Crockett scope, like new, $1250, 541-447-7248 or 541-420-1888.

Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

541-322-7253

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Bonsai pots, 30 medium & large training pots, good cond., $4/ea., 541-385-7416. FREE LLAMA MANURE 5 miles east of Bend. You Load! 541-389-5071 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found: Jack Russell Terrier, male, 10/16, North Madras, call to ID, 541-475-3889. FOUND large set of keys on blue carabiner clip, corner of Cimarron Drive & McGrath Rd. Call 541-385-7999. Found Ring, (silver band) in SE Bend. Please call to identify. 541-420-5423

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

LOST Jansport backpack, blue, US Forest Svc Rd 900, 10/17. Need it back! 541-385-6211

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

LOST Wedding & Engagement ring. Reward! Please Call 541-382-3418.

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Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Ad must include price of item

Rossi 410-22, new condition, both a 22 cal. rifle and 410 shotgun. Incl. case. $130 Shurflo Extreme Series Smart Sensor 4.0 RV Water Pump. OBO. 206-660-4228. New, in box. Paid $206. Asking $165. 541-390-7726. 251

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Coins & Stamps

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Marquis Spa 2000, 2-spd pump, seaspray color, holds 4-6 people. Has been inside. $1595 OBO. 541-389-7326

Reach thousands of readers!

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Hot Tubs and Spas

Furniture

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

REMINGTON rifle, 4XWeaver scope, exc. condition, asking $425. 541-382-4508.

China Cabinet, interior lighted, glass doors, $350. Dresser, 6 draws w/ doored shelves in middle, $150. 541-383-3951. Computer Desk, with Hutch, $80, very nice, please call 541-382-4477

COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

Reloading Equip., all new, too much to list, please call 541-728-1036.

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

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Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Browning Gold hunter mossy oak 3½" 12 ga. new $850; Browning Belgium light 12 ga. auto 5 $425; Winchester '66 centennial 30-30, $600. Ken 541-410-2829 others for sale.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Floral couch, Exc. cond., $100 OBO, must sell by Thurs., 541-389-3622.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

9 7 7 0 2

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Siberian Husky AKC puppies, vet checked, 9 weeks old. Josh @ 541-633-9160

Find It in

O r e g o n

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Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne Style, wing back, burgundy plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323.

LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, Sponsors desperately needed OFA hips, dew claws, 1st for vet costs for Emma, a shots, wormed, parents on rescued, abandoned kitten site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. found blind due to injury & www.kinnamanranch.com infection. What tissue was left had to be immediately Labradoodles, Australian removed & eyes closed up. Imports - 541-504-2662 Emma is only about 8 weeks www.alpen-ridge.com old & very sweet, & needs a Maltese AKC female, 12 wks, loving, safe forever home silky, non-shed coat. Family once she has healed. Donaraised. $800. 541-610-7905 tions are tax deductible. To meet Emma at her foster Mini-Dachshunds, males, great home or for more info, call bloodlines. Reds w/black 541-389-8420; 541-598-5488 markings, $400.541-788-1289 Cat Rescue, Adoption & Fosolesonmd@hotmail ter Team, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708, www.craftcats.org Min Pin Puppy, 13-wk female, has crate, food, toys, bed, etc. $200/obo 541-280-0219

B e n d

Furniture & Appliances

POODLES AKC Toy, tiny toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Joyful, friendly! 541-475-3889

Shih-tzu/poodle mix,ready to go! 4 males, 2 females. Great with kids! 541-233-8202

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To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Pups,

C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

Pomeranians, Beautiful pups, exceptionally well cared for, $250-$350, 541-367-7766

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, Free (2) Flemish giant male rabbits with extra large silver & gold Jewelry. Top 2-story hutch, 541-389-0371 Purebred Lab Puppies dollar paid, Estate incl. HonPapered Chocolate, Yellow, est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Free Dog, wonderful companion, and Black, $300 OBO To apAll shots, great w/kids & dogs. Wanted washers and dryers, proved homes only! Ready 65lbs Aussie Shepard cross. working or not, cash paid, 11/5, 541-771-9800 Very friendly 541-306-1103 541- 280-7959. Retriever Mix, rescued neuFREE KITTIES, 8 weeks old and tered male, with shots, 208 up, to good homes only, 1st $100. Call 541-576-3701. shots. 541-504-0463 Pets and Supplies Shihtzu AKC male puppy, 11 weeks. Very huggable Please The Bulletin recommends call (541)306-7479 $499 extra caution when purchasing products or Shihtzu, female, 8 mo., $400; services from out of the Chihuahua Puppy, male, 8 area. Sending cash, checks, weeks, $200, 541-728-4367. Golden Retriever AKC puppy, or credit information may English Cream. Has all his be subjected to fraud. For FIND IT! shots, very sweet & calm, 10 more information about an BUY IT! wks. Paid $2300. Needs great advertiser, you may call the home quickly. Asking $1100. SELL IT! Oregon State Attorney Have all family paperwork. The Bulletin Classiieds General’s Office Consumer 541-654-3878 541-318-5566 Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839.

King

S . W .

Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893.

Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim A Central Oregon Mix Cord. Split, Delivered, Bend, $125 boards, all primered; roof for 1 or $240 for 2. Cash, vents; 2 doors; all reasonCheck, Visa/MC Accepted. ably priced. 541-647-0115 541-312-4027 Bend Habitat RESTORE All Year Dependable Building Supply Resale Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole Quality at LOW PRICES cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 740 NE 1st 312-6709 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Open to the public . Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Business Opportunity

Week of October 18, 2010

Manufactured Homes

ALL CASH vending SAVE THOUSANDS! route! Be your own Repossessed dealer boss! 25 machines plus manufactured home candy all for $9995. inventory. Instant 1-877-915-8222 equity. Buy At Factory Cost. All Homes new with Factory Warranty. Employment Call: 541-928-1471. DRIVERS - COMPANY jandmhomes.com. drivers up to 40k first year. New Team Pay! Up to .48 cents/mile. CDL training available. Regional locations! (877) 369-7104, www. centraldrivingjobs.net.


G2 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies

Farmers Column

Employment Opportunities

3 White Doves, young, great for 4H or FFA project, $20 for all. 541-382-2194 Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 325

Hay, Grain and Feed

541-385-5809

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831

FREE older hens, about 10, would make great stewers. Call 541-388-2620.

Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713

Horses and Equipment

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., $40 per bale. Also feeder hay, $30 bale. Call Redmond, 541-548-2514

341 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

ASPC registered Shetland pony gelding. He will make a great kids or 4H project. $300 OBO 541-788-1649,541-548-2887

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Brand New L3400 HSD

Find It in

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

with loader, 34HP, 4x4, industrial tires.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Reach thousands of readers!

Was $21,950

NOW $16,700 Cash Price Only!

Premium Pasture mix, 3x3, 800lb. bales, 2nd cutting, $40 ea., please call 541-419-2713. Credit Cards Accepted.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

454

Looking for Employment Exp. Male Caregiver looking for Afternoon Client, Refs avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Will pick-up unwanted horses; cash paid for some. Please call 509-520-8526.

2 home-raised pigs, free-will grain, buy half or whole, $1.85 lb. + cutting and wrapping. 541-318-7555.

541-617-7825 Administrative Assistant needed to assist busy real estate Broker. Must have basic computer skills including familiarity with Word, Excel and Outlook. The right candidate will be detail oriented, organized and self-disciplined. Must be able to work independently. Working knowledge of the real estate business a plus, real estate licensee preferred. Full time Monday through Friday, pay commensurate with experience. Send cover letter and resume to Box 16265684, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Grass Fattened All Natural Angus Steer Beef, $2.40/lb hanging weight incl. cut & wrap. No additional processing fees. 541-508-8541. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Endoscopy Technician (40 hr. per week) - 4 X 10 hr. shifts per week. Eligible for full benefits. Experienced and Certified GI Technician preferred. Interested persons should obtain job application from www.bendsurgery.com /employment.htm. Please submit resume and application to: Bend Surgery Center, PO Box 6329, Bend OR 97708. Position open until filled.

BANKING Now Hiring Teller I, II or III Job# 3-1010-06 Bend Main Branch

Apply online at wcbjobs.com

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

EOE, M/F/V/D

375

Free Clydesdale gelding, 17+H; & female mini horse, to good homes only. 541-389-0371

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Meat & Animal Processing

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

400

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Manger Horse Feeders (2), each $40, please call 541-923-0442

Redmond

Employment

The Bulletin Classifieds

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for Caregivers, FT/PT, in La Pine. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am6pm, Monday.-Friday.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Customer Service The Bulletin is accepting applications for a position in its Circulation Department. This position is full time. The applicant must be computer literate, have strong communication, sales and phone skills, be able to multi-task, be customer oriented, and a team player. Shift will include weekends and some holidays.

The Bulletin offers an excellent benefit package and opportunities for advancement. Monthly bonus incentives are available. Pre-employment drug screen is req. EOE. Send resume to: PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Attn: Customer Service Manager or email ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Gallery Director for fine art gallery in Sisters. Appropriate candidate must have computer skills (MS Office, database management), great communication skills and a desire to succeed. Interviews will be conducted on Sun., 10/24, 12-3. Please call Mark, 503-528-4006.

The Bulletin

280

Estate Sales Estate Sale, Fri., Sat. & Sun. 9:30am - 4pm. Full house and garage, quality furniture, sporting goods, saddles, guns and tack. 19377 Piute Circle, Bend. 541-420-1985.

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Fundraiser Sales 300 GARAGE SALES at the Portland EXPO Center, November 5th & 6th Vendor Spaces still open: www.portlandgsale.com

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Tumalo - 20245 Sturgeon Rd. No phone. Tools, tire chains, furniture, lawn mower. Saturday only 9am-4pm.

Lots of great items for sale, new gift items, wine related, food and other restaurant goods. Clothes, appliances, holiday and decorative items, pool table, furniture and more. 4173 SW Reservoir Drive. Fri., 10am-2pm Sat. 9am-3pm, Sun. 10am-2pm. 541-548-0932.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

284

Sales Southwest Bend Estate Sale: Whole house & garage! Snowblower, tools, 20’ ext ladder.... Fri-Sat, 9-4. 60914 Duke Ln, Romaine Vill. Garage Sale, 19428 Goldenwood Ct, Sat-Sun, 9 ‘til stop selling! Toys, clothes (mostly girls); hsehld/sporting/fishing items; antiques, shop tools

Sales Northwest Bend Garage Sale- 19962 SW Covey off Powers/Bkswood. TONS of items, incl clothes. Fri/Sat Oct 22-3, 8-1.

COOL, UNIQUE STUFF! Furniture. antiques, decor, clothes, books, many household items. Fri., 9-2 & Sat., 9-noon. 1788 NW Trenton.

Sales Northeast Bend

ESTATE SALE! Shabby chic to crystal chandeliers! Fri. & Sat., 9 - 4. 2205 NW Awbrey Rd.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Ex Blind Business, selling dozens of design & upholstery fabric, $1/yard, new & used blinds for fraction of cost, also misc. tack, bedding, barnwood frames & mirrors, 65950 93rd St., off Old Bend Redmond Hwy, Fri.-Sun, 8:30-4:30. 541-350-3665.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

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Big Sale - Friday & Saturday, 10/22 & 10/23 8am-4pm. Old farm equipment, collectables and lots more. 21825 Bear Creek Road.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Moving Sale! FRI Oct 22 & SUN Oct 24. 9am to 3pm. 2420 NW Antler Court, Redmond. 541-279-7511

541-385-5809 290

Sales Redmond Area Garage Sale: Sat. 8-4, No signs, follow directions: Cline Falls Hwy. to Eagle Crest, W. on Coopershawk to 885 Victoria Falls Dr, 1st street on right. BBQ, vacuum, pictures, clocks, ice chest, luggage, VCR, tools, clothes, shoes, purses, florals, household items, Christmas villages & decor & much more!

ESTATE

SALE

Bend pioneer family 5 generations Glassow/Smith/Reed families. FULL OF ANTIQUES FROM THE 1850s TO EARLY 1900s .... Furniture & wicker, 2 Hoosiers, amazing Victorian clothing & hats, linens, beautiful antique china & glassware, silver, jewelry costume & gold, crocks, enamelware, primitives & great kitchenware, framed pictures, Victorian prints, political memorabilia, toys & games, dolls, Bend memorabilia, early photos & postcards, perfume bottles, and so much more, from a family who saved everything! Very limited parking! 1721 Tempest off SE 15th Friday - Sunday 9-4 Crowd control numbers Friday 8:00 a.m. Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 for pics & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Rug Sale, Heirloom quality wool hand braided rugs, by Nancy Ceccato. Oct. 23 & 24, 9am-4pm. 52014 Elderberry Lane, La Pine. 541-536-2435.

ESTATE SALE MOVING SALE

Operate Your Own Business

20743 ALAN-A-DALE

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Andy Anderson Garage Sale: Toys, books, animal cages & more. 61415 Gosney Rd Sat. 8 am-1pm. 541-749-0314

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Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Older camping and sports gear, misc lawn care and household items inc sewing machines, games, teen boy t-shirts. Fri-Sat 9:30 to 4:30. 1789 SE Karena Ct.

Critical Facility Engineer Prineville. McKinstry seeks union technicians to maintain and troubleshoot mechanical and electrical systems in a data center environment. Previous hands on mech and/or elect. exp. is preferred. Apply online at www.mckinstry.com

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Barbara Anderson

NOTTINGHAM SQUARE Friday, Oct. 22 • Saturday, Oct. 23 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday

(Take Reed Market Rd. to 15th Street SE and go south to Sherwood Forest Dr. follow across canal and go to the last street. Find parking - Last house at end of cul-de-sac.) Crystal chandelier; leather sofa and loveseat-cream color; Electric lift chair; Electric lift bed-double size; Thomasville tower and light bar for king size bed; King size headboard; Four: 9, 6 and 4-drawer dressers; Amana refrigerator with bottom freezer; Whirlpool washer and GE Dryer; Electric kitchen stove-self cleaning oven; 40" glass coffee table with nice base; Garage refrigerator; Computer and desk and chair; Sewing supplies and materials; Large folding sewing/cutting table; Two wing-back chairs; Several large mirrors; Console stereo; 32" Sharp 2005 Flat screen TV, nice; Overstuffed chair; Boxes of Violin parts; Lots of different stands and cabinets; Hydraulic pump barber chair and sit-under hair dryer; Large extended lamp; Lots of kitchen electrical appliances: Showtime and Vita-Mix units; Records and cassettes and VCRs; Plastic patio furniture; Four very large double pane windows; some misc. shop items; Office supplies; Men's and ladies clothing; Books; Christmas decorations; Lots and lots of picture frames; Half ceramic Christmas tree picture; Lamps; Small drop leaf dinette table; lots of other items. Presented by:

Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days ~ 541-382-5950 eves

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! OPTICIAN Wanted FT/PT. Salary based on experience. Send resume to eows@msn.com or fax to 541-382-4455 Property Manager, On-site for mobile home park in Prineville, OR. Please e-mail resume to: pmworegon@gmail.com Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH All Ages Welcome. No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $800/wk Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-861-8166

Home Delivery Advisor

Home Delivery Advisor P

The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer great benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

15x44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499 8’ x 20’ Container, $75 per month. Secured area. Pay 2 months, 3rd month free. Call 541-420-6851.

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

528 WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

605

Roommate Wanted STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours

Rooms for Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

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631

573

Business Opportunities

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $675, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath 1/2-off 1st Mo. Rent

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

** Pick Your Special ** 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & Heat Pumps. Lease options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

(Private Party ads only)

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1104 NW 7th St., #22, 1 Bdrm., 1 bath, $425, no credit checks, 1st & last only, avail. 10/1, please call 541-788-3480.

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894. Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353 I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., dependable, exc. references, Senior discounts available! Call 541-420-0366

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

FREE 1st mo. RENT! 2/2 Duplex Garage, central heat, dishwasher, W/D hookup. Clean & quiet, small pet, HUD OK, EZ move in. WSG paid. $625/mo. 2031 NW Cedar. 541-815-9848

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

CRESCENT, OREGON 2 bdrm, fenced yard, 1 car garage, w/d. $500 month. 541-6726359. 541-430-1594.

4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced yard, 2 car garage, RV parking, fireplace, close to schools and hospital. $845/mo., 541-948-4531

Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet country home with wood stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068

Brand new 3 bdrm 2 bath single level, fenced yard, near Jewell Elementary, $1100/mo, lease. CallJeff Parsons, Taft Dire, LLC, 541-480-7455.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Furnished, laundry facilities, all utilities & TV/Wi-fi included, pet on approval, no smoking. $500/mo. 541-508-6118 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. References. $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Autumn Specials Are Here! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

4 units, ranging from 2,250 to 8,750 sq ft, @ 25¢/sq ft. 3-phase power, fire sprinkler sys. Prime loc., 61510 American Ln, Bend. 530-305-0104

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Old Mill. No smoking/pets. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, single car ga$975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call rage, storage, W/D hookup, Rachel 541-604-0620. excellent location, additional parking, $750 mo+dep; pets 658 negotiable. 541-382-8399.

NOTICE:

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Houses for Rent NE Bend

1 Bedroom Studio Apt.

4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, plus $300 cleaning deposit. Call 541-480-9041

Houses for Rent Redmond

2 Bbdrm, 1 Bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, no pets/smoking. $700 mo. + dep. Call 541-598-6807 or 541-815-2249

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

541-385-5809

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 1 mo. Free! La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, fitness center, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

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An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to Find It in schools, pools, skateboard 652 park, ball field, shopping cenThe Bulletin Classifieds! Houses for Rent ter and tennis courts. Pet 541-385-5809 NW Bend friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek Mill Quarter Area, exc. street with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063

subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

exposure, corner office location, great as office or health services, 1600 sq.ft., good parking, call 541-815-2182.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Masonry

Remodeling, Carpentry

I DO THAT!

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Re placement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Repair & Remodeling:

Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

541-322-7253

CCB#180420

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Handymen at affordable prices: sheds to changing a light bulb, hanging a picture, to shovelling a walk, give a call, we do it all! 541-788-1354

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up

Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

House Sitting

Snow Removal

Exp. couple for executive house sitting. Keep your property safe, avail. 11/1,605-595-2293

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Irrigation Equipment

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

Handyman

Randy, 541-306-7492 Excavating

Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

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Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Accounting/Bookeeping

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

Houses for Rent General

632 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt.,

Apt./Multiplex General Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's Dishes & Collectibles" Pattern matching china & dish business...very fun! Extensive large inventory all incl. w/storage racks & packing material. Work from home part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email me at patorre@msn.com for more information if you are interested.I am moving to AZ to retire again. $20,000 OBO!

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648

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

541-382-3678

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. W/S/G paid; small pet OK. $750/mo. Call 541-480-2233

fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-322-7253

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

630

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-322-7253

616

Want To Rent

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Westside Apt. For Rent, 1 bdrm. Washer & Dryer, Quiet neighborhood, 15 min walk to town, $435/mo., 541-388-0182,541-617-8457

Loans and Mortgages

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or online@bendbulletin.com

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D Hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

604

541-385-5809

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Storage Rentals

507

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Job

WE

Rentals

500 600

541-383-0386

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

P

Sales

636

Finance & Business

Sprinkler Blowouts Discounts available. Call Kent for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097• LCB #8451

Holiday Lighting EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

MASONRY 541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates.

Sprinkler Blowouts: Time to Blow out your irrigation system. Call Cutting Edge Lawn Works for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097. LCB# 8451 Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012

If you need assistance cleaning up your property, I have a tractor w/scoop, bush hog and harrow. $40/hr, min 2 hrs. Call Victor 541-383-5085 Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Bend Landscaping Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows/doors • Garages/Additions/Remodels www.remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

700 800 705

860

Real Estate Services

Motorcycles And Accessories

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Commercial building for sale: $130,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale property at 907 Highland Ave, Redmond, through a sealed bid process. OPEN HOUSE: Oct. 15, 10-2:00 pm. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com

744

Open Houses OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY OCT 23rd FROM 9 am - 1pm.

64790 Cloverdale Road, 1999 home/ranch, 23+ acres w/irrigation, 3 bdrms, 3.5 baths, 3200+ sq.ft., bonus room, large garage and finished shop, Cascade views, only $850,000. FSBO -Agents welcome and 3% commission offered. Contact Debora at 541-382-9150

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

*** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

748

Northeast Bend Homes

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $159,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes STICK-BUILT 1 bedroom house on an acre for sale in La Pine. Only $72,5000. 541-536-9221.

762

Homes with Acreage Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes MOVE IN TODAY! 2b/1b $11,999; 2b/2b, $13,000; 3b/2b $16,000. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, $14,000 cash.John,541-350-1782 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

times $3500 OBO Call 541-306-8321 like new

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

HUNTER SPECIAL! 18’ 1972 Kit camp trailer Everything works! $900 OBO. 541-462-3067. JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

The Bulletin Classifieds 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $17,500. 541-548-3985.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

865

ATVs

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Tires, Studless Snows, Schwab Big Horn, 31x10.5x15, on Director, radar altimeter, Ford 5x5.5 Rims, used 1 seacertified known ice, LoPresti son, $400, 541-536-3252. speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage 932 history, exc. cond. $175,000, Antique and at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Classic Autos Airplane Hangars now available for lease at Redmond Municipal Airport. $270/mo. Please contact airport administration, 541-504-3499 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns. HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Suzi King Quad 1998, low hrs well cared for $2000 OBO mest see 541-389-3831

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Chrysler Cordoba 1982, 29K 1-owner mi, mint cond, loaded. Come take a look! $3195 OBO. 541-330-8969

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

933

Pickups

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354. FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

885

Canopies and Campers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Fiberglass canopy, red, for Ford Heavy duty pickup bed trailer, Ranger, w/carpet bedliner & will haul 2 cords of wood. clamps. Some damage to 1 $495 OBO. 541-480-8521 corner, $200. 541-504-7836

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221 FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Automotive Wanted Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

I have a friend who desperately needs a dependable vehicle. If you can sell for $400 cash, please call 541-815-9939

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, NEWER 6L 3/4 ton 4WD SUV or king cab short-bed pickup, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non in exc. cond., 541-389-1913. smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

The Bulletin Classiieds

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, upgraded queen bed, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

2006 Polaris Ranger 700 XP Snow Plow, winch, stereo, custom rear seats, front and rear running lights, 2nd battery, windshield. $8000 541.280.6246

VW Super Beetle 1974

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 90% tires, cab & extras, 541-598-5111. Chevy Wagon 1957, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277 4-dr., complete, $15,000 CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 OBO, trades, please call extended cab 3/4 ton 541-420-5453. turbo-diesel. 79,000 Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 miles. Line-X bed liner, engine, auto. trans, ps, air, break controller, CB radio. frame on rebuild, repainted $6250. Call 541-548-2258 original blue, original blue International 1981,T-axle-300 13 or 503-970-3328 interior, original hub caps, spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good exc. chrome, asking $10,000 tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepor make offer. 541-385-9350. deck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

929

Queen

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Fifth Wheels

Travel 1987,

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Utility Trailers

882

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712.

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Wilderness 2007 26'. Front queen bed, rear bath. Couch & dinette table in slide-out. One owner. $18,000. OBO. 541-419-6215

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Studded snow tires mounted on 4-lug new rims, used 1 season, less than 3,000 miles. Have original receipts. (4) `195/60R-15. $400 cash 541-383-3857.

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

MICHELIN X-ICE studless snow tires, mounted on 4 Lexus GS300 rims plus extra brand new tire. $325 541-317-4945.

Tires, (4), 225/60R16 Studded, great tread & studs, $200, 541-390-6016.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Spingdale 29’ 2007,slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Boats & Accessories Allegro

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

908

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

880

14’ Fiberglass boat, current license, good trailer w/spare, $250 OBO. 541-382-9012 Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Motorhomes

870

900 Aircraft, Parts and Service

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Autos & Transportation

Travel Trailers

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

881

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

Reach thousands of readers!

A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $115,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

875

Watercraft

Baja Vision 250 2007,

745

CHECK YOUR AD

865

ATVs

Yamaha YFZ450 2006 , low hrs hard

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

To place an ad, call 541-548-2184

GMC ¾-ton 4x4 1976, newer engine good tires, extras. $1400 obo. Joe 541-948-6284


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 21, 2010 G5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 933

935

940

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

October Deals Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. Nissan, 1993, 68,000 miles, original owner, 4x4 regular cab, 2.4L 4-cyl, short bed, A/C, AM/FM cassette, 5-spd, fiberlgass canopy, good rubber, $1500. 541-548-3610

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1800, 541-815-9939. GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

Sport Utility Vehicles

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Leather-36,000 miles,

$17,129 VIN#234708.

Yukon SLT 2003 4x4

541-598-3750

Moonroof, leather

$12,984 VIN#132979

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Very Clean! VIN #269458

Only $13,377

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $4950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2006

935

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Chrysler Town & Country Limited 2005

DLR 0225

smolichmotors.com Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Nissan Murano SL 2007, Only 17,600 miles, Back up camera. $23,987 VIN#653334

541-598-3750

BMW X5 2002 1

DLR 0225

owner 153K, very clean, all records. $9300 541-598-8100

October Deals

541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Buick Lucerne 2008 Only 59K Miles! Vin #132596

Only $17,877 Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edition, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

541-749-4025• DLR

$13,878 VIN#-#604795

541-598-3750

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 28,000 miles-loaded $25,437

DLR 0225

DLR 0225

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto, A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4400. Call 541-429-2966

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

GRAND AM 2002 with V-6. great shape! $3600, 541-536-9221

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

SUBARUS!!! Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

October Deals

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Low 45K Miles! VIN #107987

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Loaded! Low 64K Miles! Vin #743192

Only $7,788

541-389-1178 • DLR

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

366

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-749-0316

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Smolich Auto Mall

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

October Deals

541- 385- 5809

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Lexus IS250 2007 A must see Vehicle....Best Bang for the Buck! Vin #023074

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Only $24,377 Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Jaguar XJ6 1995

NISSAN

Chrysler Aspen 2008

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C, Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

Only $23,888

Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

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Automobiles

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Honda Accord EX 2003, 42K orig. mi., 1 owner, clean, $10,800, 541-593-2554.

Find It in

VIN#B29136

541-598-3750

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Subaru Outback 2004 Limited Wagon leather - moon - 5 speed,

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The Bulletin

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

975

975

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(Private Party ads only)

366

October Deals

Automobiles

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

HYUNDAI

Smolich Auto Mall Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

smolichmotors.com

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167. Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

541- 385- 5809

366

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 194K highway miles. $7500, 541-410-7586

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5000. 541-593-4016 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

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1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


G6 Thursday, October 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx4448 T.S. No.: 1290365-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0726 T.S. No.: 1295998-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Candice Uptegrove, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Securitynational Mortgage Company, A Utah Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated December 13, 2006, recorded December 19, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-82552 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-one, Larkspur Village, Phases I and II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61210 Larkspur Loop Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,173.26 Monthly Late Charge $49.71. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $207,500.00 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 25, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by David J. Luoma, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated August 31, 2005, recorded September 06, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-59627 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block sixteen (16), Tillicum Village Third Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61356 Eena Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,108.65 Monthly Late Charge $42.86. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $141,319.92 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7901 T.S. No.: 1295468-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kyle Robert Hellar, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, Llc., A Limited Liability Company, as Beneficiary, dated January 30, 2006, recorded February 06, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-08404 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot fifty-five Elkhorn Estates Phase 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61442 Rock Bluff Lane Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,143.76 Monthly Late Charge $46.63. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $203,499.18 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 25, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 26, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-344926 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26141-5 Loan No.: 0205344112 Title No.: 4480669 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Sally L. Rhyner, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/04/2007, recorded on 04/18/2007 as Document No. 2007-22218, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 362 OF RIVERRIM P.U.D., PHASE 8, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Account No.: 248279 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60848 Goldenwood Loop, Bend, OR 97702. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,276.84 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $307,552.80 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.250% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/16/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 8-3-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. (RSVP# 202463, 10/21/10, 10/28/10, 11/04/10, 11/11/10 )

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4780 T.S. No.: 1298224-09.

R-341687 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2266 T.S. No.: 1293174-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert T. Ludwick, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., A Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated March 07, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15546 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 21, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums Recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit. Commonly known as: 1525 Northwest Juniper Street #1 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $764.67 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $76,280.45 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341720 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

S O T AU

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Earl H. Cordes, Jr., Tenants In Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 20, 2008, recorded June 23, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-26909 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land situate in and being the South 70.00 feet of Lot One (1), Block Five (5), of BROWN'S 2ND Addition, recorded January 9, 1961, in Cabinet A, Page 307, as measured along the east and West lines of said foot, located in Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range thirteen (13), East of the Willamette meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows commencing at a 1/2" pin at the Southwest corner of Lot 1, Block S of Brown's Second Addition, the initial Point as well as the true POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 00°33'00" West along the West line of said Lot - 70.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe, thence north 89°46'00" East along the North line of the South 70.00 feet of said Lot as measured along the East and West line of said Lot 150.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe on the East line of said Lot; thence South 00°33'00" Last along said Lest line - 70.00 feet to the Southeast corner of said Lot thence South 89°46'00" West along the South line of said Lot - 250.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 3145 SW 25th St. Redmond OR 97756-9535. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,203.10 Monthly Late Charge $49.64. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $158,032.80 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 25, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-344951 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04

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es ehicl V y es t i l rt Uti orhom o t p o S M ps • s RV’s • & Picku s t cycle r a o o t B o M s• obile ilers • m a r o T t l u e A • Trav ATV’s

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LEGAL NOTICE Mr. Nick Yesterday: Lakeshort R.V. Park is trying to locate this person in regard to his motorhome at Lakeshore R.V. Park. If anyone knows of this person or his phone number, please contact Lakeshore R.V. Park, 541-447-6059.

for examination during the RFP period at the office Deschutes Public Library of the Director of Facilities located at 507 N.W. Wall Street, Bend, Oregon, 97701; at the offices of BLRB/GGL Architects, 497 SW Century Drive S105, Bend, OR 97702 (541)330-6506; via on line at Ford Graphics Plan Center www.fordgraphics.com, and at Central Oregon Builders Exchange 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, Phone (541) 389-0123; Fax (541) 389-1549 www.plansonfile.com

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LEGAL NOTICE Swalley Irrigation District Notice of Election LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Request For Proposal Deschutes Public Library District is conducting a selection procedure for construction services. The District intends to award the East Bend Library 2010 Tenant Improvement Project to the highest ranked proposer from those contractors submitting proposals.

Swalley Irrigation District is holding a vote-by-mail election November 9, 2010. SID office hours: 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday. Polls will be open for dropping off ballots from 7:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. on November 9, 2010. Polls will be at District office: 64672 Cook Ave., Ste. 1, (Tumalo), Bend, OR 97701. Phone: 541-388-0658.

Sealed responses must be received by the District prior to 2:00 p.m., November 11, 2010. Proposals must be addressed to Joe Flora, Facilities Manager, Deschutes Public Library District, 507 N.W. Wall Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, or hand delivered to the same address before 2p.m. November 11, 2010. The proposed project is a public work, subject to ORS 279C.800 to 279C.870, Oregon's prevailing wage rate statutes. Copies of the Request For Proposals for the East Bend Library 2010 Tenant Improvement may be obtained at http://www.deschuteslibrary.org/rfp. Copies of this Request For Proposals are also available at the Administration Building, 507 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. Documents for the work are those prepared by BLRB/GGL Architects, 497 SW Century Drive, S105, Bend, OR 97702. Bona fide General Contractors interested in responding to the RFP as a General Contractor may obtain documents by contacting Ford Graphics, 1151 SE Centennial Court #3, Bend, Oregon 97702 (541) 749-2151. Contractors are responsible for the cost of all reproductions of the documents.

LEGAL NOTICE THE CONTENTS OF THE FOLLOWING LOCKERS FROM DAVIS STORAGE, 1191 N. HWY. 26, Madras will be sold at public auction on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, 10 a.m. Bring truck. Units to be broom cleaned by 5 p.m. Unit #33 Puerta; #36 Hayden, #1 and #4 Gillian. These units are with unknown names #2, #3, #11, #12, #16, #18, #31, #37.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030930879 T.SNo.: 10-10263-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ANTONIO MENDEZ as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE ESCROW AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on January 25, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-05527 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 241009 LOT NINETEEN (19), FORREST COMMONS, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 19, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1327 NW 18TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $803.91 Monthly Late Charge $40.20 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 154,349.99 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25000 % per annum from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance re-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6986 T.S. No.: 1290541-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jennifer Shea, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Wealthbridge Mortgage Corp., An Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 17, 2007, recorded April 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-23954 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land lying in the West Halt of the Southeast Quarter (W1/2 SE1/4) of Section Eight (8), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: beginning at the South Quarter corner of said Section 8; thence North 89°52' 48" East along the South Line of said Section 8, 1025.40 feet; thence North 25°08' West along the Northeasterly Right of Way of the Bend-Tumalo State Highway No. 20, 1982.94 feet (sometimes shown as 1,974.85 feet) to the True Point of Beginning, same being the Northwesterly corner of the Nancy Hoefling tract described in a deed recorded November 2, 1389, in nook 195, Page 2320, Deschutes County Records; thence continuing North 25°08' West along said Right of Way, 255,00 feet to the Southwesterly corner of the Games N. Saul, et ux tract, described in a deed recorded March 17, 1989, in book 280, Page 1509, Deschutes County Records; thence North 03'10' East, 558.76 feet along the Saul Southerly boundary to the Southeasterly corner thereof; thence South 04'09 West, 99.25 feet; thence South 42'06' East, 105.23 feet to the Northeasterly corner of the aforementioned Hoefling Tract; thence South 76'37'20" West along Hoefling's Northerly boundary, 524.14 feet to the true point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed in instrument recorded May 3, 2977, in Book 249, Page 657, Deed Records, Commonly known as: 63743 Scenic Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,918.17 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,278.94 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 14, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 06, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 14, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-346213 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28

quired under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fideljtyasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee'' and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 30, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3759199 10/07/2010, 10/14/2010, 10/21/2010, 10/28/2010

541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN A. SWAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Eight (8), THE WILLOWS PHASE I, recorded May 13, 1993 in Cabinet C, Page 773, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 16, 2005. Recording No. 2005-79120 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $971.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid

real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $135,816.26; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from February 1, 2010; plus late charges of $563.30; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30297). DATED: August 5, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The undersigned hereby gives notice of a Trustee's sale of real property located in Deschutes County, Oregon. The sale is to be conducted for the purpose of foreclosing all of the Grantor's interest in the real property covered by the following described Deed of Trust: (1) Grantor: Keith A. Campisi and Mary E. Campisi; Trustee: Deschutes County Title; Beneficiary: Dennis M. Harny; Successor Trustee: Craig K. Edwards, Edwards Law Offices, 225 NW Franklin Ave., Ste. 2, Bend, OR 97701 (2) The property covered by the Deed of Trust is as follows: Lot Eight in Block III, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as 60025 Crater Road, Bend, Oregon 97702 (3) The Deed of Trust is dated October 6, 2006, and was recorded in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon on October 10, 2006 as fee number 2006-67760.

(4) The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sum: monthly payments beginning with payment due on January 10, 2010. (5) The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $130,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 12% per annum from January 10, 2010 until paid; together with all title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. (6) The Beneficiary has elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligation. A Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded in the Deschutes County official records on July 16, 2010 as fee number 2010-27747. (7) The undersigned will sell the property on November 30, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 a.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110 at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, Deschutes County, Oregon.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1630 T.S. No.: 1291570-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patrick Whelan, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 02, 2007, recorded March 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-13975 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6, Gallatin, Phases I and II, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61529 Tall Tree Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,786.55 Monthly Late Charge $75.53. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,600.00 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Susan K. Takemoto, a single person, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as solely as nominee for First Franklin a Division of National City Bank, as beneficiary, dated 08/09/06, recorded 08/22/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-57508 and subsequently assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as trustee for the holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-FF15 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FF15 by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWELVE (12), SUMMIT PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. More accurately described as: Lot twelve (12) SUMMIT PARK, recorded July 7, 2004, in Cabinet G, page 343, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 21381 Kristine Court Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,524.78 beginning 11/01/09; plus late charges of $68.56 each month beginning 11/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $463.29; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $223,513.67 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 10/01/09; plus late charges of $68.56 each month beginning 11/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $463.29; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 01/07/2011 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from person named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/7/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/8/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503) 620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800) 452-8260) and ask for the lawyer referral service. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance, a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: 09/03/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. By Chris Ashcraft, Assistant Vice President Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No. 7236.22478/Takemoto, Susan Kay. This communication is from a debt collector and is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Nathan R. Fincham, as Grantor to Amerititle., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage Inc., A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 01, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-29760 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot thrity-six (36), Westside Meadows, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2462 NW Summerhill Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,162.73 Monthly Late Charge $92.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $278,222.65 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 26, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 26, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3724628 10/14/2010, 10/21/2010, 10/28/2010, 11/04/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx9353 T.S. No.: 1296668-09.


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(8) The Grantor or any other person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not be due had no default occurred) together with all costs, and Trustees and attorney's fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. DATED at Bend, Oregon, this 22 day of July, 2010. Craig K. Edwards, Trustee Edwards Law Offices PC 225 NW Franklin Avenue, Ste. 2 Bend, OR 97701 541/318-0061

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JULIE B. GRAHAM. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), ALPENVIEW ESTATES PHASE I, recorded March 16, 1995, in Cabinet D, Page 107, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: February 20, 2007 Recording No. 2007-10247 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,186.06 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2010 through

July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $222,371.76; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2010; plus late charges of $138.27; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not

then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30781). DATED: August 3, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

PUBLIC NOTICE Prineville-Crook County All Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update Notice is hereby given that Crook County and the City of Prineville are currently in the process of updating the Prineville-Crook County All Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan. An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process will include: (1) An opportunity for the public to comment on the plan during the drafting stage and prior to plan approval; (2) An opportunity for neighboring communities, local and regional agencies involved in hazard mitigation activities, and agencies that have the authority to regulate development, as well as businesses, academia and other private and non-profit interests to be involved in the planning process; and (3) Review and incorporation, if appropriate, of existing plans, studies, reports, and technical information.

The Crook County Office of Emergency Management invites you to become involved in this update process. To become involved in the initial planning process or to submit information to be considered as part of the planning and update process, please contact the Crook County Office of Emergency Management prior to November 1, 2010. James Savage Office of Emergency Management Crook County Sheriff's Office 308 N.E. 2nd St. Prineville, Oregon 97754 James.savage@co.crook.or.us Office: (541) 447-6398

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4290 T.S. No.: 1296428-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1660 T.S. No.: 1289433-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Charles E. Clausen Jr., as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated September 21, 2005, recorded September 30, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-66707 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 42 of Braeburn Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19322 Brookside Wy Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,907.45 Monthly Late Charge $75.84. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $316,566.90 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 05, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 03, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 06, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John T. Ristick, and Judith E. Ristick, as Grantor to David Federal Attorney, as Trustee, in favor of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis, as Beneficiary, dated January 23, 2003, recorded January 24, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-05792 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 in block 55 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 9, Part 2. Deschutes County, Oregon. Model: BD565F-4 serial #GW3OREED49204 Manufacturer: Golden West Homes HUD tags ORE199530, ORE199531 Commonly known as: 17053 Sacramento Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,107.59 Monthly Late Charge $36.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $108,722.48 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-341112 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

R-341653 09/30/10, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3450 T.S. No.: 1295964-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8247 T.S. No.: 1298346-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2947 T.S. No.: 1274071-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Travis Anderson, An Unmarried Person, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin Financial Corp., Subsidiary of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated October 10, 2003, recorded October 15, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-71446 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot four in block six of Choctaw Village Tract "A", Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2790 N.E. Broken Bow Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $863.78 Monthly Late Charge $43.19. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $119,752.44 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 20, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 15, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 21, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-351141 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2991 T.S. No.: 1299672-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ron Varcoe, An Unmarried Person, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For American Mortgage Network, Inc., Dba American Mortgage Network of Oregon A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 17, 2007, recorded July 20, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-40150 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel 2 of partition plat no. 2005-8, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20548 Fred Meyer Rd. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $978.71 Monthly Late Charge $32.80. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $172,579.40 together with interest thereon at 3.875% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 20, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 21, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Neil D. Laursen and Julie E. Laursen, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 07, 2005, recorded September 08, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-60463 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 266, Northwest Crossing, Phase 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2363 NW Labiche Lane Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 15, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,166.46 Monthly Late Charge $82.04. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $371,048.51 together with interest thereon at 5.090% per annum from May 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 19, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott D. Lutz and Deborah K. Lutz, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Response Mortgage Services, Inc., A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated October 03, 2007, recorded October 10, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-54454 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 19, Fairhaven, Phase X, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 643 NW Greenwood Loop Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,957.84 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $346,657.18 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 26, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 f Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-343436 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04

R-345541 10/14/10, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04

R-345303 10/21/10, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11

Bulletin Daily Paper 10/21/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday October 21, 2010

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