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Mental health facility set to open in January

Officials seek to bolster laws allowing wiretapping Law enforcement lags as carriers upgrade services and systems

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Susan Ross, director of the Deschutes County Property and Facilities Department, shows the great room in the new locked mental health facility in Bend during a tour Monday. The facility will serve patients who need less care than is provided at the Oregon State Hospital but who aren’t ready for more residential treatment.

Deschutes County is putting the finishing details on a new locked facility in Bend for 16 state mental health patients who were committed to state facilities or found guilty except for insanity by the courts. The facility, estimated to cost $2 million, will help to fill in a missing piece in the services provided for the mentally ill in the region. The patients need less care than provided at the Oregon State Hospital but are not ready for more residential treatment. Residents at the new facility will not be able to come and go at will. Some might earn privileges

to go on outings, first with staff and later on their own, based on clinical evaluations. “We don’t have this level of service now, so individuals who have needed this kind of facility have had to go elsewhere in the state,” said county Adult Treatment Program Manager Lori Hill. The building, called the Deschutes Recovery Center, will likely open in January, she said. Deschutes County will lease the facility at 20370 Poe Sholes Road in Bend to Telecare Corp., a private company that will operate the secure residential treatment facility for the state Addiction and Mental Health Division. See Facility / A4

By Charlie Savage New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Law enforcement and counterterrorism officials, citing lapses in compliance with surveillance orders, are pushing to overhaul a federal law that requires phone and broadband carriers to ensure that their networks can be wiretapped, federal officials say. The officials say tougher legislation is needed because some telecommunications companies in recent years have begun new services and made system upgrades that create technical obstacles to surveillance. They want to increase legal incentives and penalties aimed at pushing carriers like Verizon, AT&T, and Comcast to ensure that any network changes will not disrupt their ability to conduct wiretaps. An Obama administration task force that includes officials from the Justice and Commerce departments, the FBI and other agencies recently began working on draft legislation to strengthen and expand a 1994 law requiring carriers to make sure their systems can be wiretapped. There is not yet agreement over the details, according to officials familiar with the deliberations, but they said the administration intends to submit a package to Congress next year. To bolster their case, security agencies are citing two previously undisclosed episodes in which major carriers were stymied for weeks or even months when they tried to comply with court-approved wiretap orders in criminal or terrorism investigations, the officials said. See Wiretapping / A6

Investigating a killing: Police and volunteers comb downtown Bend neighborhood for weapon used in attack, other evidence

Hunting for clues

By Richard Simon Los Angeles Times

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

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“(These are) bills upon which the fate of the republic does not rest.” — Rep. John Campbell, R-Calif.

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Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue crews searched a large section of northwest Bend around downtown on Monday for evidence related to a reported homicide on Northwest Georgia Avenue on Sunday evening. Ne wp 97 ort Av e. Greenwood Ave.

Bend Parkway

FACEBOOK vows to fix flaw allowing leaks of private data, Page B1

Search for evidence in homicide

Wall St. Bond St. Staats St.

P

olice and search and rescue crews fanned out around downtown Bend on Monday, searching for a bloody baseball bat or other weapon that may have been used to kill a Bend man Sunday evening. At about 8:45 p.m. Sunday, an anonymous caller reported that there was an argument happening somewhere on Northwest Georgia Avenue near the intersection of Northwest Staats Street. Officers checked the area, but didn’t find anything suspicious. About a half-hour later, 911 dispatchers got another call: a neighbor reporting that he’d

found a man with serious head injuries. The caller gave the address, in the 600 block of Northwest Georgia Avenue, and soon the area was flooded with police officers and medics. The victim, whom police have identified only as an adult male, was still alive when police arrived. He was taken to St. Charles Bend by ambulance and later died of his injuries. Capt. Jim Porter said officers arrested a person of interest later Sunday evening on an unrelated charge of violating his probation. He said the two men involved in the incident knew each other and police do not believe members of the public are at risk. See Killing / A6

Ha

The Bulletin

rm De on sc Blv hu d. tes Riv er

By Erin Golden

SUPREME COURT to decide if detainee can sue Ashcroft, Page A3

WASHINGTON — The Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act, aimed at lowering the volume on loud TV ads, appears headed for approval. But a bill seeking to squash another annoyance, the Don’t Let the Bed Bugs Bite Act, is likely to fail. And the sponsor of the All-American Flag Act must figure that the bill’s name alone should ensure its success. With time running out on the congressional session, lawmakers are scrambling to get hundreds of their pet bills across the finish line, competing for attention against headlinegrabbing issues such as whether to extend the George W. Bushera tax cuts or end the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy for gays and lesbians in the military. If lawmakers fall short during the lame-duck session after the Nov. 2 election, they will be forced to start over next year, perhaps against longer odds — that is, if they are still in office. The workaday legislation awaiting action seemingly covers everything under the sun — including the Solar Uniting Neighborhoods, or SUN, Act. Rep. Joe Baca, D-Calif., wants Congress to honor Chi Chi Rodriguez, who “will go down as one of the all-time greats in golf history,” the congressman said when introducing legislation to recognize Rodriguez’s charitable work. See Bills / A4

IN CONGRESS

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue volunteers Teri Shamlian, left, and Mike Mauer search for evidence in a yard on Northwest Georgia Avenue in Bend on Monday. Crews spent the day looking for an aluminum baseball bat or other weapon believed to have been used to kill a Bend man on Sunday evening.

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Lawmakers scrambling to get their pet bills across the finish line

Navy hopes to win race to find famous shipwreck

“Sometimes that passion (for underwater archaeology) works for us. Sometimes it makes work for us.” — Bob Neyland, archaeologist with the U.S. Navy

By Annys Shin The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Capt. Ahab had Moby Dick. Bob Neyland’s white whale is the Bonhomme Richard. For decades, thrillseekers, archeologists and professional treasure hunters have searched for the wreckage of the USS Bonhomme Richard, a Continental Astrid Riecken / For the Washington Post

Navy ship captained by John Paul Jones during the Revolutionary War that sank on Sept. 25, 1779, off the coast of Yorkshire, England, in the choppy waters of the North Sea. But the ship is legally the property of the U.S. Navy, which is responsible for preserving whatever may be left of it. A big part of that job falls to Neyland,

chief archaeologist for the Navy’s Underwater Archeology Branch, based at the Washington Navy Yard. The tiny unit is responsible for identifying and preserving sunken and historically important Navy vessels from colonialera warships to World War II fighter planes. See Shipwreck / A6


A2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Get your credit score in order before applying for a card By Pamela Yip

It’s not impossible to qualify for a credit card these days, but consumers should be realistic about their chances.

The Dallas Morning News

If your mailbox is starting to fill up again with credit card offers and you’re tempted to apply, be realistic about your chances of qualifying. Increased credit card solicitations are an indication that things have gotten much better for card issuers, with declines in defaults and delinquencies, said Bill Hardekopf, CEO of LowCards.com and author of “The Credit Card Guidebook.” “They are once again aggressively pursuing new customers, but this time around, they seem to really be focusing on those with good or excellent credit scores,” he said. Consumers may have to jump through more hoops than before

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to get a credit card today. But it’s not impossible to get a card. Before you apply for a credit card, get a copy of your credit report and your FICO credit score, the dominant score used by lenders, which uses a score range of 300 to 850. Use your credit score as a guide to what kind of credit card you should apply for.

If your score is lower than you expected, check your credit report for errors and correct them before you apply for credit. If your score is too low, be prepared to pay. “If your FICO score is 750 or above, you should apply for the cards specifically offered for excellent credit,” Hardekopf said. “A score of 720 or above is con-

sidered good credit; 660 to 720 is acceptable.” If your score is below 650, you could find yourself in the subprime category, and you could have a tough time getting approved, he said. “Anything below a 650 FICO score seems to be the dividing line between prime and subprime,” agreed John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at Credit.com. The scary thing is that as of April, 35.2 percent of consumers had FICO scores below 650, according to the company that produces the influential number. “Scores below 650 are there for a reason,” Ulzheimer said. “It’s negative information, such as late payments, foreclosures, bankruptcy, tax liens, hitting

Fallout from recession combines with record prices to create ...

A new gold rush Judy Montgomery, left, pays Janell Schindler for pieces of gold jewelry she was selling at Land Park Gold and Silver in Sacramento, Calif., last month. With the rising price of gold and the effects of the recession still lingering, more people are cashing in on unwanted or broken jewelry and other items.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

15 20 24 33 35 45 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $4.6 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — As gold and silver prices sweep to record highs, the run-up is sparking interest among eager fortune hunters, inflation-fearing investors and recession-battered consumers. In recent weeks, as gold inched past $1,300 an ounce and silver reached new $20-plus highs, local owners of coin and jewelry shops say business is brisk. Customers are bringing in everything from Grandpa’s gold fillings to South African kruggerands to 12-piece place settings of silver flatware. “People are sweeping out the closet,” said Jeff Montgomery, co-owner of Land Park Gold & Silver, who relocated in May from a Woodland, Calif., mall to a former Sacramento bank building. “Right about mortgage time, we see more people,” said Montgomery, who said customers who have lost a job or are short on income need cash to pay bills, make car repairs or handle emergencies. Others, who bought gold for $375 an ounce a few years ago, “are finding it’s now one of the few assets they have that’s tripled in value.”

Selling At Marconi Coin & Currency in Carmichael, Calif., owner Bill Dunbar said traffic has doubled in recent years. And every customer’s motivation is different. He recently had a couple selling off a small stack of gold kruggerands — part of their retirement savings — to help pay for their daughter’s college tuition this year. In other cases, it’s gold buyers, like the grandfather who purchased nearly $10,000 in Canadian gold coins as a prop against inflation. Dunbar said his typical buyer is “a middle-aged white male getting tired of watching his dol-

FAMILY TRAVEL

Planning may put a longer trip within reach McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Carl Costas Sacramento Bee

By Claudia Buck

your credit report and excessive credit card debt.” According to Hardekopf, “consumers should not waste their time and apply for a card for which they are not qualified. If you apply for too many credit cards at once, this is a red flag and may actually cause your score to drop.” How you pay your credit card bill also should determine what kind of card you apply for. If you pay off your card each month, you should look for a card with a good rewards program, Hardekopf said. But if you carry a balance each month, you want a card with the lowest annual percentage rate and then work your tail off to pay off the card as quickly as possible.

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“People are sweeping out the closet. ... Right about mortgage time, we see more people.” — Jeff Montgomery, co-owner of Land Park Gold & Silver in Sacramento, Calif.

lar bills erode.” Given the federal government’s trillion-dollar deficit, Dunbar predicts, “We’re going to see inflation like we’ve never seen in our lives. That’s why people are going to safe havens like gold.” And even a little bit can add up. Montgomery recently sorted through a motley collection of U.S. coins brought in by a customer. When it was all added up, the 19 silver dollars and 104 “wheat back” pennies yielded a tidy bonus: $287.04. Another customer, Janell Schindler, a 30-year-old Sacramento student, stopped by with a few pieces of gold jewelry: several rings and a broken pendant that were “just sitting in the bottom of my jewelry box.” “You see all those cash-forgold ads where you mail it in, but I’ve always been leery,” said Schindler, who watched as her gold castoffs were tested and weighed by shop co-owner Judy Montgomery. She was “shocked” to get $120 “for just those three little things.” The price spike has also affected private gold-buying parties, the Tupperware-type gatherings where sellers — mostly women — bring their unwanted jewelry or other gold items to be weighed, evaluated and, they hope, traded in for cash. Two years ago, when Lisa Paragary Engelken launched her GoldBug Gold Recyclers house parties, gold was selling at around $600 an ounce. Today, the accelerating price has added an extra glimmer to her business. She said party bookings are up, turnouts are bigger and the average payout to attendees has

doubled, from $200 to $400 per person. “When gold hit $1,200 an ounce, people were beside themselves,” said Engelken, whose company has already booked 25 parties in October alone. “It has definitely added to the excitement.”

Buying But if you don’t urgently need cash now, is buying gold a smart investment? Kelly Brothers, a partner in Genovese, Burford & Brothers, a Sacramento wealth and retirement management com-

pany, said gold “can and should be” part of any diversified portfolio. But not, he said, sitting as a stash of gold bars or coins. Instead, Brothers recommends investing in a commodity-based mutual fund or exchange-traded fund. And he warned against getting caught up in gold’s current four-digit price euphoria. In 1980, gold peaked at well above $800 an ounce, the highest price ever on an inflationadjusted basis, Brothers noted. Less than three years later, gold had dropped to just $300 an ounce. “It’s something to be very cautious about. Gold can go down. ... People need to remember that and have a sell discipline,” said Brothers. “Whether it’s ‘I’ll sell half when gold hits $1,500 or when it drops below $1,000,’ they need to know when it’s time to get out.”

Traditional family vacations can take a few detours, but lengthier journeys can serve several purposes for families seeking to combine education with leisuretime travel and business. In fact, full-time family travel is gaining popularity. To save money, consider the following factors: Education: Home-schooling, independent study programs and Internet classes can accommodate students with an itinerary of full-time or extended journeys. A traveling classroom provides students with an opportunity to embrace history, geography and science in a new way. Money previously spent on sports equipment or dance lessons can be redirected to nature tours and museum fees. Career: Free-lance writing, public speaking and professional storytelling are portable careers well suited to long-term family travel. Establish work hours before and after each day’s family outing or scheduled lesson to focus on the opportunities in your immediate area. The realities of the 24/7 workplace have created new employment opportunities in a variety of industries. Health care, finance and technology companies are courting professionals who live abroad or helping homegrown workers establish satellite offices in other regions. Activities: International play dates offer lessons on language, customs and diversity. Playing with local children provides feefree cultural integration and lifetime memories. Homework: Research and preparation are important travel guides for families living abroad. If you plan to travel with schoolage children, create a lesson plan before leaving home and learn about independent study projects, online classes and tutoring programs. Track down discounts, career opportunities and cultural exchange programs.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 A3

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10 die as typhoon slams Philippines CAUAYAN, Philippines — Super Typhoon Megi dumped heavy rains over the Philippine capital today after killing 10 people, creating a wasteland of fallen trees in the north and sending thousands scrambling to safety in near-zero visibility. As it moved away from the Philippines, the strongest cyclone in years regained strength over the South China Sea today while heading toward China and Vietnam, where recent floods unrelated to the storm already have caused 30 deaths. In China, authorities evacuated 140,000 people from a coastal province ahead of the typhoon, which Chinese officials said could hit Thursday. Megi packed sustained winds of 140 miles per hour and gusts of 162 mph as it made landfall Monday in the northern province of Isabela.

Earthquake rattles New Zealand city WELLINGTON, New Zealand — An earthquake rattled the southern city of Christchurch today, cutting power and phone service and sending some residents running into the streets just weeks after a more powerful quake caused extensive damage. The magnitude-5 temblor was one of hundreds of aftershocks that have hit the city since a magnitude-7 quake on Sept. 4 that wrecked thousands of homes and tore up farmland but did not kill anyone. The latest one shook buildings and sent objects tumbling from shelves, but there were no immediate reports of injuries. Today’s quake was centered six miles southwest of the city and five miles below the surface, New Zealand’s geological agency GNS Science said.

Bomb kills Baghdad official, injures 8 BAGHDAD — A roadside bomb during the Monday morning rush here killed a member of Baghdad’s Provincial Council, the local governing body. The explosion, which wounded eight people, is the latest in a stream of attacks aimed at the police and government officials. The bomb killed Jassim Muhammad, the leader of the council’s services committee, which oversees electricity, water supply and other services. It exploded beside his convoy, killing him and wounding three bodyguards and five others, according to an official at the Ministry of the Interior, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to reporters. The attack follows a brazen robbery and shootout Sunday at three jewelry stores in Baghdad that left at least nine dead and 12 wounded, according to the Ministry of the Interior.

Nigerian killings linked to Islamic sect MAIDUGURI — A rash of mysterious killings by gunwielding motorcycle assassins of policemen, politicians and others has led authorities to declare that a radical Islamic sect thought to have been crushed by Nigerian troops last year has been revived. The violence comes at a delicate time for Nigeria, one of the world’s top oil producers and a major U.S. supplier. Although the nation remains stable, it is struggling to organize elections next year that will test the capacity and, ultimately, the legitimacy of its young democracy. Beyond that, the government faces a renewed threat from militants in the oil-producing south, who claimed responsibility for a deadly bombing during Independence Day celebrations in the capital, Abuja, this month. — From wire reports

CIVIL LIBERTIES CASE

Supreme Court to decide if detainee can sue Ashcroft College football star claims abuse of material witness law By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Abdullah al-Kidd, born in Kansas and once a star running back at the University of Idaho, spent 16 days in federal detention in three states in 2003, sometimes naked and sometimes shackled hand and foot. On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether he may sue John Ashcroft, the former attorney general, for what Kidd contends was an unconstitutional use of a law meant to hold “material witnesses.” Kidd says the law was used as a pretext for detaining him

because he was suspected of terrorist activities. The material witness law is typically used to hold people who have information about crimes committed by others when there is reason to think they would not appear at trial to give testimony. Critics say the Bush administration radically reinterpreted the law after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, using it as a tool for preventive detention. Laws allowing the preventive detention of suspected terrorists are common in Europe. The U.S. does not have such a law, but Kidd contends that a policy set by Ashcroft allowed federal

prosecutors to use the material witness law to the same end. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, last year allowed Kidd’s suit to proceed, rejecting Ashcroft’s claim that he was entitled to prosecutorial immunity. “To use a material witness statute pretextually, in order to investigate or pre-emptively detain suspects without probable cause,” Judge Milan Smith wrote for the majority of the divided three-judge panel, “is to violate the Fourth Amendment,” which bans unreasonable searches and seizures. “Some confidently assert,”

Smith continued, “that the government has the power to arrest and detain or restrict American citizens for months on end, in sometimes primitive conditions, not because there is evidence that they have committed a crime, but merely because the government wishes to investigate them for possible wrongdoing ... We find this to be repugnant to the Constitution, and a painful reminder of some of the most ignominious chapters of our national history.” Eight judges dissented from the full Ninth Circuit’s decision not to rehear the case. They said prosecutors’ subjective intentions were irrelevant so long as they followed the letter of the material witness law.

Protests threaten to paralyze France Transit stalls amid demonstrations against plan to raise retirement age

By Rod Nordland New York Times News Service

ROME — For the first time, Iran has sent a representative to a meeting of an international group that convenes regularly to discuss developments in Afghanistan and Pakistan, a move welcomed Monday by both U.S. and international officials. Mohammed Ali Qanezadeh, a high-ranking diplomat, even attended an in-depth briefing by the U.S. military commander, Gen. David Petraeus, on NATO’s strategy for transition in Afghanistan. Iran, which shares a long and porous border with western Afghanistan, has deep political, cultural and economic ties there. Iran may have been motivated to attend by the theme of the conference, which was transition — another term for so-called Afghanization, plans by NATO forces to hand over responsibility for security to the Afghans. The meeting was intended to prepare for transition talks at the NATO summit meeting next month.

Favorable response

By Angela Doland and Greg Keller The Associated Press

PARIS — Airlines flying into France were ordered to slash schedules — and to bring enough fuel for the trip out. Gas stations ran short or dry, while truckers jammed highway traffic Monday by driving at a snail’s pace, a tactic known in French as “operation escargot.” Strikes over the government’s plans to raise the retirement age to 62 from 60 disrupted daily life and a wide swath of industry — from oil refining to travel to shipping — as protesters fought a proposal they say tampers with the near-sacred French social contract. Teens, who usually don’t worry about old age, joined in the protests, with at least 261 high schools blocked or disrupted Monday. Some turned violent and 290 youths were arrested, the Interior Ministry said. Students set cars and tires on fire, toppled a telephone booth and hurled debris at police in the Paris suburb of Nanterre, as well as in Lyon and elsewhere. At least five police officers were injured. Street demonstrations were planned in more than 200 cities across France today — the

Iran sends delegate to international meeting on Afghanistan

Jacques Brinon / The Associated Press

Youths clash with riot police officers (not pictured) in Nanterre, outside Paris, on Monday. French oil workers are intensifying their fight against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s plan to raise the retirement age, a conflict that has hobbled transit and sparked gas shortages. Youths who have rallied to the cause, meanwhile, burned tires or set up blockades outside some schools in Paris and nearby suburbs. sixth nationwide day of protest marches since early September. Tuesday was also expected to bring more severe disruptions to air travel, trains, schools and beyond. Many in France consider retiring at 60 a pillar of France’s hard-won social contract — and fear this is just the first step in

eroding their often-envied quality of life. Critics say President Nicolas Sarkozy wants to adopt an “American-style capitalist” system and claim the government could find pension savings elsewhere, such as by raising contributions from employers. The protests in France come as countries across Europe are cut-

ting spending and raising taxes to bring down record deficits and debts from the worst recession in 70 years. Sarkozy’s conservative government points out that 62 is among the lowest retirement ages in Europe, the French are living much longer and the pension system is losing money.

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Richard Holbrooke, the Obama administration’s special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, said the United States had been forewarned of the Iranian presence. “We were asked if we had any problems with that, and we said no,” Holbrooke said. He said that Iran had serious concerns about drug trafficking and immigration from Afghanistan and stressed that the representative was there only to discuss that country. He said other issues between the United States and Iran, including friction over Iran’s nuclear program, would not be on the table. A Western diplomat said Qanezadeh had reacted favorably. “He said he was pleased by the transparency of the briefings, impressed by the transparency of the presentations,” the official said, speaking anonymously because of diplomatic sensitivities.

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By Barbara Demick

was purged in the early 1960s after a falling-out with Mao ZeBEIJING — Unless something dong. At the age of 15, Xi Jinping goes badly wrong for Xi Jinping was sent off to the countryside, over the next two years, it looks assigned to a rural commune in like a fait accompli that Shaanxi province where the 57-year-old Commupeople lived in caves and nist Party official, who did hard manual labor, in has been groomed his his case, farming wheat. entire career for leaderAfter the Cultural Revoship, will be China’s next lution, Xi was permitted president. to resume his education, At the end of a fourstudying chemical engiday meeting of the parneering at Beijing’s presty’s central committee on Xi Jinping tigious Tsinghua UniverMonday, Xi was named sity. He later received a vice chairman of the cenlaw degree. tral military commission, a posiXi rose through the party, servtion overseeing the People’s Lib- ing in Fujian and Zhejiang proveration Army that is considered inces and in Shanghai, where a stepping stone for assuming the he was party chief. He earned leadership. Hu Jintao was given a reputation for being tough on the same post in 1999, three years corruption and friendly toward before he became secretary-gen- business, even foreign busieral of the Communist Party. Hu nesses. U.S. Treasury Secretary became president in 2003. Henry Paulson, former head of Like many in the younger gen- investment bank Goldman Sachs eration of Chinese leaders, Xi is a Group Inc., once called Xi “a guy “princeling” — the son of a pro-re- who really knows how to get over form official, Xi Zhongzun, who the goal line.” Los Angeles Times

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A4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Facility Continued from A1 So far, the secure facility has generated only a small amount of opposition, in comparison with the outcry from neighbors near two new residential treatment homes in Bend. County and Telecare staff have scheduled an informational meeting where neighbors can get answers to their questions about the new facility Monday evening. The facility is the result of more than a year and a half of negotiations between the county and the state Department of Human Services. The center was originally supposed to have three beds reserved for clients of the Deschutes County Mental Health Department, but the state wanted its patients in separate facilities from county clients. Instead, the state agreed to pay Telecare Corp. to operate the two residential treatment homes in Bend, with six beds for local mental health patients and four beds for patients civilly committed to state mental health facilities. Telecare will pay $135,000 for the first year to lease the building from Deschutes County, with a 2.5 percent annual escalation after that, County Administrator Dave Kanner said. County mental health staff and Telecare are beginning the process of selecting clients for the secure facility. Mental health patients from all over the state will be considered, although county and Telecare staff will first look for patients with ties to Deschutes County and other areas of Central Oregon, Hill added. The center might also be able to take some patients from Sage View Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Center in Bend, who might otherwise have had to go to the Oregon State Hospital. Sage View provides short-term inpatient treatment for people going through acute mental health crises related to suicide attempts, bipolar disorder, and anxiety and panic disorders, among other things, according to the facility’s website. During a tour of the new Deschutes Recovery Center on Monday morning, county Property and Facilities Department Director Susan Ross said the county tried to balance security measures and the practical needs of a residential mental health treatment facility with a homey and welcoming atmosphere. Security measures include locked doors on a card reader system, tempered glass windows and an 8-foot-tall cyclone fence. Towel hooks in the bathrooms and clothes hanger hardware in the closets were designed to prevent residents from being able to hang themselves, Ross noted. Details aimed at creating warmth include wood doors, wood ceiling details and a fireplace in the great room, carpet throughout most of the building and lots of windows to let in light. Hill said these details are important. “It’s an individual’s first step back into the community, so the goal is to make it as welcoming and homelike as possible,” Hill said. That’s a challenge in a 16-bed facility, she added. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

If you go What: Community information meeting on Deschutes Recovery Center When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday Where: 1300 N.W. Wall Street, Bend

New York Times News Service ile photo

Local residents walk past the rubble of a collapsed school that is marked for removal by the Haiti Recover Group, a debris clean-up contractor, in downtown Port-au-Prince earlier this month. The school was destroyed in the magnitude-7 earthquake that struck the country on Jan. 12.

Scientists find new angle on intensity of quakes By Henry Fountain New York Times News Service

When the magnitude-7 earthquake struck the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, in January, the enormous destruction and loss of life were attributed largely to two factors: the proximity of the city to the fault that caused the shaking, and shoddy construction that allowed thousands of buildings to easily crumble. Seismologists know that local geology can also affect the severity of an earthquake, by increasing the seismic forces under certain conditions. This was thought to have happened in the Haitian earthquake, as large areas of Port-au-Prince lie on layers of relatively soft sedimentary rock that is conducive to amplifying the seismic waves. Now a new study finds that in addition to the underlying geology, the geometry of local surface features contributed to the earthquake’s intensity as well. Susan Hough, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, and her colleagues found evidence that the shaking was amplified along a narrow ridge of hard rock south of the central city. The ridge was home to a popular hotel and other relatively well-built structures that were destroyed.

Topography’s role The finding, published online Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience, should help scientists and planners working to map areas of the city at risk in future earthquakes, a process called microzonation. Hough said seismologists have long known that what is referred to as topographic amplification can occur, but it has often been dismissed as “kind of a fluke thing.” “It’s not something that scientists have been able to develop systematically,” she said. “Sedimentary layers are what people understand.” There were indications from the earthquake damage that

Justice Department sues Blue Cross Blue Shield DETROIT — The Justice Department filed an antitrust suit Monday against Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, accusing the giant health insurer of using its market clout to stifle competition and cause consumers to pay more for hospital care. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Detroit and joined by the state of Michigan, said Blue Cross contracts with at least 70 of the acute care hospitals in the state force them to raise prices and prevent other insurers from competing with them. Antitrust officials say the provisions likely resulted in Michigan consumers paying higher prices. The provisions being challenged are known as “most-favored nation” clauses or MFN

Bills

STUDYING THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE

MICHIGAN

Detroit Free Press

C OV ER S T OR I ES

clauses. In the health care realm, they generally refer to contractual clauses between health insurance plans and health care providers that — according to the Justice Department — “essentially guarantee that no other plan can obtain a better rate than the plan wielding the MFN.” Blue Cross defended its use of the discounts. “This lawsuit is without merit, and we will vigorously defend our ability to negotiate the deepest possible discounts for our members and customers with Michigan hospitals,” said Andrew Hetzel, vice president of Blue Cross corporate communications. “Through this lawsuit, the federal government seeks to deny millions of Michigan residents the lowest cost possible when they visit a hospital.”

“Potentially you can say, ‘You should build over here, and not there.’ ... The good news is that we can characterize the shaking. We can design for it.” — Susan Hough, seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey

the ridge, in the suburb of Petionville, had undergone severe shaking. Hough said that in addition to the destruction at the Hotel Montana, home to many foreign visitors, 7,000-pound battery racks at a cell-phone facility farther west on the ridge shifted more than a foot. But there was little data on local ground motion during the earthquake, which killed 230,000 people, according to official estimates. At the time, Hough said, Haiti had just one seismometer, an educational instrument that was improperly mounted. So Hough, with help from scientists with the Bureau of Mines and Energy in Haiti, installed eight portable seismometers, including two on the ridge and two in an adjacent valley, and used them to measure ground movement during some of the many aftershocks that have followed the earthquake. They found that the shaking along the ridge was more severe than in the valley, so it cannot be explained by amplification in sedimentary rocks that underlie the valley. Hough likened the shaking along the ridge to that which can occur in a skyscraper. “If you start shaking a long, skinny ridge, it sways back and forth, like a big building,” she said. The seismic waves reflect internally within the wedgelike

geometric structure of the ridge, combining to produce higher peak forces, a process called constructive interference.

Building a solid future Dominic Assimaki, a professor at Georgia Tech who reviewed Hough’s paper for Nature Geoscience but was not involved in the research, said the findings should help in developing more accurate models of amplification processes during earthquakes. “Analytically the problem has been studied quite extensively, but the models are very idealized,” she said. As computer simulations become more detailed and more accurately match data from the real world, they can be used to develop guidelines for earthquake-resistant construction — how much ground movement can be expected on a ridge of a certain height or slope, for example. “The objective is to translate what we find in research into simple parameters that a designer can plug in,” Assimaki said. In Haiti specifically, Hough said, scientists developing microzonation maps can now incorporate the topographic effects seen along the ridge in their work to help the country rebuild properly and better survive the next earthquake. And future earthquakes on or near the same fault are inevitable, seismologists say. “Potentially you can say, ‘You should build over here, and not there,’” she said. Hough said that even on the ridge, with its severe shaking, some well-built and well-anchored homes and other buildings survived the earthquake practically undamaged. “It shows that you can build safely, even in zones like that,” she said. “You just have to know what you’re up against. “The good news is that we can characterize the shaking,” she added. “We can design for it.”

Continued from A1 And Rep. Bruce Braley, DIowa, hopes his flag act, requiring U.S. flags purchased by the federal government to be made in America, will be waved on to passage. Rep. Marcy Kaptur, DOhio, bothered that some souvenirs sold in the Capitol gift shop are made in China, is awaiting Senate action on her bill requiring that congressional office supplies be made in America. These are “bills upon which the fate of the republic does not rest,” said Rep. John Campbell, R-Calif., sponsor of a bill to add more than 40 small rocks off the Orange County coast to the California Coastal National Monument. But he fretted that many of the bills dear to lawmakers, their constituents or politically important groups weren’t given enough priority by congressional leaders. Democratic House leaders blame the Senate, where more than 400 House-approved bills await action. An exception is the popular and cleverly named CALM Act to end those loud TV commercials. Rep. Anna G. Eshoo, D-Calif., is confident of winning final approval for a measure that her staff says has generated more enthusiasm than anything she has sponsored during her 18 years in Congress. The measure, which recently passed the Senate with a push by its lead sponsor there, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, DR.I., would require the Federal Communications Commission to regulate the volume of television advertisements.

Favorites and underdogs Most of the bills expected to clear Congress during the short lame-duck session have bipartisan support, though lawmakers might not be in the mood to do much after the bitter campaign season except decide must-pass legislation. Congressional leaders are working on packing into an omnibus lands bill dozens of conservation measures sought by members of both parties — including a measure sponsored by unlikely partners Sen. Barbara Boxer, DCalif., and conservative Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., to authorize federal purchase of the nation’s first Japanese settlement site in California’s Gold Country. “When they’re deciding which bills to include in the package, they’re also counting votes,” said a congressional staffer. Many other measures appear doomed. Of the thousands of bills introduced every session, relatively few make it into law. “It is frustrating,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., cosponsor of a bill to set up a na-

tional system for tracking arsonists, named the Managing Arson Through Criminal History, or MATCH, Act. It passed the House in 2007 and 2009 with bipartisan support but has never come before the Senate. Schiff has no idea why, but said, “My strategy is just to persevere.” Even the HAPPY Act, for Humanity and Pets Partnered through the Years, drew growls because the tax break it would give to pet owners would cost the U.S. Treasury. Also drawing little notice in Congress is a universal bane: bed bugs. A bill to fund increased bed bug inspections never got a hearing, even though the proliferating pests have garnered national attention. With Congress dealing with health care reform, offshore oil drilling legislation, food safety and climate change, “that doesn’t leave a lot of air in the room for bed bugs,” said Ken Willis, an aide to the sponsor, Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C.

Getting attention Sometimes, passing a bill isn’t the point. Legislation can be introduced to call attention to a cause or give sponsors a way to show constituents or politically important groups they’re trying to do something about an issue they care about. Whether a bill advances depends on a variety of factors, including whether it has broad support or, perhaps more important, the support of one person — the committee chairman. It was no surprise that a Republican-sponsored bill to put Ronald Reagan on the $50 bill in place of Ulysses S. Grant never got a hearing before the committee chaired by Rep. Barney Frank, a liberal Democrat from Massachusetts. Even broad support isn’t always enough. Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., has held up more than 100 bills — including measures sponsored by fellow Republicans — because of concern they will add to the federal budget deficit. “We ought to be about creating confidence so people will invest in this country rather than continuing to undermine that confidence with superfluous, well-meaning bills that are put up for political purposes instead of addressing the real problems that are facing our country,” he recently said after objecting to a spate of bills, including the Shark Conservation Act.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 A5


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Aspen’s killer slows, but worries over beloved tree persist

Shipwreck Continued from A1 Created in 1996, the branch has had as many as eight employees, but budget cuts have sliced that to four, including Neyland. After salaries, the branch operates on a budget of about $37,000. Neyland augments that by teaming up with other Navy offices, nonprofit groups, federal agencies and state governments. With their help, he has joined three expeditions in the past four years to look for the Bonhomme Richard. He would like to be part of the crew that finds the ship, but he has a lot of competition.

By Kirk Johnson New York Times News Service

Publicity takes a toll Treasure hunting has become mass infotainment, thanks to TV shows such as “Deep Sea Detectives” on the History Channel and “Treasure Quest” on the Discovery Channel. Shipwreck hunters include independent archaeologists, descendants of shipwreck victims and private salvagers seeking to cash in on what they find. That burgeoning interest in sunken treasure has an upside: a steady stream of discoveries. In 1995, a nonprofit group backed by adventure novelist Clive Cussler found the wreck of the H.L. Hunley, a Confederate Civil War submarine, off the coast of Charleston, S.C. In 2000, the Navy helped raise the Hunley, which contained the remains of its eight-man crew. The sub, propelled with a hand crank, was designed to pick off Union ships blockading the port of Charleston. The Hunley sank in 1864. The raised vessel and its contents, now in South Carolina, are estimated to be worth as much as $40 million. The downside to all the interest in shipwrecks is the threat it can pose to preservation. Neyland and his team devote a good chunk of their energy to persuading people to leave wrecks alone. Excavating warships, and the unused ordinance or potentially toxic substances that might be on board, can be dangerous. Artifacts can be destroyed as they are removed from under layers of sediment. “Sometimes that passion (for underwater archaeology) works for us,” Neyland said. “Sometimes

Astrid Riecken / For the Washington Post

Underwater archeologist Alexis Catsambis carefully opens a plastic container housing shipwreck artifacts at the Navy’s Underwater Archeology Branch, based at the Washington Navy Yard. The material is put in a solution that gently dissolves grime built up from years on the sea floor. it makes work for us.” Profit-seeking treasure hunters make some archaeologists nervous. The treasure hunters say they are doing the public a favor. Greg Stemm, chief executive of Odyssey Marine Exploration, one of the best-known firms, said his company gives governments cultural artifacts for museums “without putting any taxpayer dollars at risk for the search, excavation and conservation.”

Keeping busy Neyland’s team has learned to make do with its limited resources. At the Navy Yard, its main work area is a series of small rooms cluttered with handme-down desks, file drawers and large metal storage cabinets that hold hundreds of artifacts in different stages of conservation. During a recent tour, George Schwarz, 33, an archaeologist who runs the conservation lab, gingerly pulled out a toilet bowl recovered from the CSS Alabama, a Confederate ship that circled the globe raiding Union vessels in an effort to end the North’s blockade of southern ports. The toilet was so well-preserved that every de-

tail of the picturesque maritime scene that adorns the inside of the bowl is visible. In an adjacent warehouse, archaeologist Alexis Catsambis, 28, donned padded gloves and lifted the lid of a giant stainless steel vat. Inside was an anchor encrusted with decades of mineral gunk, some of which was now slowly being removed by a rust-colored bath that extracts salt from the metal. Once done, a machine will clean off the remaining mineral accretion. Once an item has been conserved, Neyland’s staff tries to find it a home, either in a museum or research facility. Of the 9,000 artifacts in the unit’s care, about 7,000 are on loan to museums or universities. Neyland and his staff handle requests for artifacts, make sure the Navy complies with historic preservation laws and monitor auction sites such as eBay for illegal sales of shipwreck loot. Those duties don’t leave a lot of time to hunt for wrecks.

On the hunt But Neyland goes out on the seas whenever he can. Last

Wiretapping Continued from A1 Albert Gidari Jr., a lawyer who represents telecommunications firms, said corporations were likely to object to increased government intervention in the design or launch of services. Such a change, he said, could have major repercussions for industry innovation, costs and competitiveness. “The government’s answer is ‘Don’t deploy the new services — wait until the government catches up,’ ” Gidari said. “But that’s not how it works. Too many services develop too quickly, and there are just too many players in this now.” Under the 1994 law, the Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act, telephone and broadband companies are supposed to design their services so that they can begin conducting surveillance of a target immediately after being presented with a court order. Officials from the Justice Department, the National Security Agency, the FBI and other agencies recently began working on a draft of a proposal to strengthen

FBI general counsel Valerie Caproni insists the government wants only to keep its surveillance power from eroding. New York Times News Service ile photo

and expand that law. There is not yet internal agreement over its details, according to officials familiar with the deliberations, but they said the Obama administration intended to submit a package to Congress next year. The disclosure that the administration is seeking ways to increase pressure on carriers already subject to the 1994 law comes less than a month after The New York Times reported on a related effort: a plan to bring Internet companies that enable communications — like Gmail, Facebook, BlackBerry and Skype — under the law’s mandates for the first time, a demand that would require major changes to some services’ technical designs and business models.

The push to expand the 1994 law is the latest example of a dilemma over how to balance Internet freedom with security needs in an era of rapidly evolving — and globalized — technology. The issue has added importance because the surveillance technologies developed by the United States to hunt for terrorists and drug traffickers can be also used by repressive regimes to hunt for political dissidents. An FBI spokesman said the bureau would not comment about the telecom proposal, citing the sensitivity of internal deliberations. But last month, in response to questions about the Internet communications services proposal, Valerie Caproni, the FBI’s

month, he hitched a ride on a Navy survey ship and joined colleagues from the Naval History and Heritage Command, the Ocean Technology Foundation, the Naval Oceanographic Service, the Naval Academy and the Naval Surface Warfare Center to look for the Bonhomme Richard. The group went at it for 10 days, 24 hours a day, using underwater robots and sonar to scour the ocean floor. The Navy has competitors: Cussler’s official-sounding nonprofit outfit, the National Underwater and Marine Agency, has also looked for the Revolutionary War vessel. The competition “is friendly,” Neyland said, “but we do not share data.” A British group recently claimed to have found the Bonhomme Richard, but after studying the group’s data and location, Neyland and his colleagues are dubious. “It is not consistent with where the ship would have sunk,” he said. The only thing Neyland can be certain of is that the Bonhomme Richard will turn up eventually. “With modern technology,” he said, “there is not any shipwreck that can’t be found.”

general counsel, emphasized that the government was seeking only to prevent its surveillance power from eroding. Starting in late 2008 and lasting into 2009, another law enforcement official said, a “major” communications carrier was unable to carry out more than 100 court wiretap orders. The initial interruptions lasted eight months, the official said, and a second lapse lasted nine days. This year, another major carrier experienced interruptions ranging from nine days to six weeks and was unable to comply with 14 wiretap orders. Its interception system “works sporadically and typically fails when the carrier makes any upgrade to its network,” the official said. In both cases, the FBI sent engineers to help the companies fix the problems. The official declined to name the companies, saying it would be unwise to advertise which networks have problems or to risk damaging the cooperative relationships the government has with them. For similar reasons, the government has not sought to penalize carriers over wiretapping problems.

GUNNISON, Colo. — Aspen trees, with their quivering, delicate foliage and the warm glow of color they spread across the high country of the Rocky Mountains this time of year, have an emotional appeal that their stolid, prickly evergreen cousins do not. So tree lovers and scientists alike felt the impact when the aspen in the West started dying around 2004 — withering away in a broad band from here in southwest Colorado through the mountains of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and into Wyoming. “There’s definitely something powerful about these trees,” said James Worrall, a forest pathologist for the U.S. Forest Service, gazing at a brilliant yellow swath of healthy aspen in the mountains here, about four hours southeast of Denver. “It’s partly, I think, an emotional impression,” he said. “Partly a very real impression that the aspen is very important in our forests — hydrologically, biologically, to wildlife, every kind of way you can imagine.” The good news is that the phenomenon known as sudden aspen decline, or SAD, appears to have stabilized, Worrall and other researchers say. Individual trees are still dying, but many stands of aspen are holding their ground against any new onset.

A sudden severe drought and heat wave early in the decade set off the decline, according to a paper co-authored by Worrall this year in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. Wetter, cooler seasons since then — more to the aspen’s liking — have halted SAD’s spread. Other evidence supports the weather as the cause. Although the aspen is the most widely distributed tree species in North America, the die-off struck mostly in the Southwest, where the drought beginning in 2002 was most severe. And lower elevations were affected more than upper ones, which tend to be cooler and wetter. The new research delivers some bad news as well. It has shown how profoundly vulnerable aspen are to environmental events outside their niche. In keeping with their delicate image, they do not like sudden weather shifts. And the 2002 drought was a doozy. The winter was dry, with snowpack about half the long-term average. Early heat then melted what snow there was weeks ahead of average, and June arrived with searing temperatures about six degrees above average. Long-term climate projections, Worrall and other scientists say, all point to more curveballs ahead — wider, more severe fluctuations and variations of hot, dry, wet and cold.

Aspen trees stand next to Highway 50 near Monarch, Colo. The phenomenon known as sudden aspen decline appears to have stabilized, said forest pathologist James Worrall. Benjamin Rasmussen New York Times News Service

Killing Continued from A1 “This was a focused, individual event, not a random act,” Porter said. “At this point, there is no concern for further attacks in the community.” Officers blocked off the area around the crime scene and Bend police detectives and Oregon State Police crime lab officials worked through the night, using a large spotlight. On Monday morning, yellow crime scene tape was still draped across the front yard of one house and police cars were parked on either end of the block. Deschutes County Search and Rescue volunteers spent the day searching a large section of northwest Bend for the murder weapon and any other valuable evidence, including clothing. “We’re searching for a blunt

trauma instrument, possibly a baseball bat, that was not at the scene,” he said. “We have reason to believe it was used to inflict the injuries.” Neighbors said the apartment — one of two units in a converted house — where police found the victim was typically a quiet place and not a problem spot in the neighborhood. They said the apartment residents were friends who seemed to get along, and frequently had other guests in and out of the home. Porter said police were attempting to notify the victim’s family before releasing his name or any additional information. He added that officials are also waiting for test results from evidence sent to the Oregon State Police Crime Lab, which could take weeks. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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Tech Focus Teachers embrace cell phones in the classroom, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,480.66 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +11.89 +.48%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Bend Research lands deal with drug giant Bend Research announced a three-year agreement Monday with Bristol-Myers Squibb pharmaceutical company to allow it to use Bend Research’s drug-formulation services. Under the deal, Bend Research also would manufacture drug products in its Bend facilities for BristolMyers Squibb clinical trials. The agreement allows the two companies to use their proprietary scientific capabilities to solve complex drug formulation and development challenges, according to a Bend Research news release. As part of the agreement, Bend Research is making its proprietary spray-dried dispersion technology available to Bristol-Myers Squibb. That technology has been shown to make a new generation of pills used to treat heart disease, cancer and other diseases more water-soluble and more easily absorbed into the bloodstream, according to officials at Bend Research.

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11,143.69 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +80.91 +.73%

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1,184.71 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +8.52 +.72%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.49 treasury CHANGE -3.11%

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$1371.20 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$0.10

BofA suspension still in effect for 27 nonjudicial states By Nelson D. Schwartz and Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

Bank of America Corp. announced Monday that it would resume home foreclosures in nearly two dozen states, despite the ongoing controversy over how banks handled tens of thousands of cases of homeowners facing eviction. Bank of America, the nation’s largest bank and the servicer of roughly one in five U.S. mortgages, insisted that it had not found a single example where a fore-

closure proceeding was brought in error. The move is likely to encourage other giant lenders, like JPMorgan Chase & Co., to resume the foreclosure process that threatens 2 million homeowners. Meanwhile, GMAC Mortgage, whose procedures helped prompt the controversy when one of its executives testified that he had signed 10,000 documents in a month, is also moving forward with foreclosures. “We announced a temporary suspension of evictions and foreclosure sales in

the 23 judicial states several weeks ago so we could commence the appropriate review,” said Gina Proia, a spokeswoman for GMAC. “As cases are being reviewed and, when needed, remediated, the foreclosure process moves forward as appropriate.” Guy Cecala of Inside Mortgage Finance, an industry publication, said: “This draws a line in the sand that the banks expect this problem will be over in relatively short order and it will be back to business as usual. If Bank of America can do it, certainly the smaller ones will follow suit.” See Foreclosure / B5

EXECUTIVE FILE

Finding quality of life at Seventh Mountain

Production unexpectedly dropped in September for the first time in more than a year, evidence of the slowdown in growth that is concerning some Federal Reserve policymakers. Output at factories, mines and utilities fell 0.2 percent, the first decline since the recession ended in June 2009, according to figures released Monday by the Fed. Another report showed builders were less pessimistic than projected this month. Confidence among homebuilders rose in October to the highest level in four months, a sign residential construction is steadying near record lows, a report released Monday by the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo showed.

$24.397 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.125

lawsuit over 1031 exchange By David Holley The Bulletin

Umpqua Bank has settled a lawsuit with the trustee and creditors of Bend-based Summit 1031 Exchange, which had accused Umpqua of aiding and abetting Summit in what the suit called a Ponzi scheme. The suit had sought $30 million. The parties involved would only say Monday that a settlement was reached, adding that a final document had not yet been signed. Terms were not available Monday. The case was dismissed at the end of September. Both Kevin Padrick, the courtappointed trustee for Summit’s 2008 U.S. Bankruptcy Court filing, and Michael Simon, the attorney for some of Summit’s creditors, said they were barred from discussing the settlement. Umpqua Bank’s general counsel, Steve Philpott, also declined to comment. The 16-month-old lawsuit was initially filed by Padrick, who is in charge of liquidating Summit’s assets, such as real estate, in the bankruptcy proceedings for the creditors. See Umpqua / B5

Facebook vows to fix leaking of private data

BP sale raises $1.8B to help pay for spill

By Miguel Helft Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

MOSCOW — BP raised $1.8 billion Monday to help pay for the cost of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico by selling assets in Venezuela and Vietnam to its own joint venture in Russia. The transaction will leave half the assets’ equity on BP’s books but give the company an immediate flow of cash for the entire value of the sale. The agreement with TNK-BP, the joint venture, is the first major deal for BP’s new chief executive, Robert Dudley, an American who was appointed to run BP midway through the Gulf disaster. — From staff and wire reports

Business inventories Estimated monthly inventories and retail sales for U.S. businesses.

$450.7B

$460 billion

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Bank of America, GMAC Umpqua settles resume some foreclosures

Production drops; builder confidence up

Inventories:

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Chris Otto, who took over as general manager of Seventh Mountain Resort on Aug. 1, talks about his plans for running one of Central Oregon’s original destination resorts now that a $15 million renovation project that began in 2006 is nearing completion.

Chris Otto left the Valley for a career in resort-friendly Central Oregon By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

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housands of families, honeymooners, skiers, whitewater rafters and mountain bikers have made memories of a lifetime at Seventh Mountain Resort, where a $15 million renovation that began in 2006 is nearing completion under a new general manager. Chris Otto took over Aug. 1 as general manager of the destination resort located along Cascade Lakes Highway between Bend and Mt. Bachelor ski area. Otto said the final phase of the renovations — redoing the exterior of the resort’s 21 lodging buildings — is nearly done. Fifteen of the buildings have been completed, two are under construction and the final four will be done next year. The units partially encircle the Rim-

The basics What: Seventh Mountain Resort Where: 18575 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Employees: 70 to 200, depending on seasons Phone: 877-276-8839 Website: www.seventhmountain.com

Rock Bar, Seasons Restaurant, Big Eddy’s Cafe and Provision Co., pool area, volleyball, softball and soccer fields and miniature golf course, which is converted to an ice rink in winter. Each of the 21 lodging buildings contains from 13 to 20 condominium-style units for a total of 222 units, which are owned by 235 members of the Association of Unit Owners. Otto said the asso-

ciation funded the renovation project, led by the Eugene-based Papé Group, which funded the new registration building and other common facilities such as the pools, restaurants and meeting rooms, along with improvements to condos the group owns. Otto got his start in the hospitality industry in 1989 at the Valley River Inn in Eugene, where he worked for 10 years, including four years as director of sales and six years as general manager. He moved to Bend in 2006 to be director of sales at Sunriver Resort before becoming GM at Seventh Mountain Resort. “Coming to Bend from Eugene was a personal choice for lifestyle and quality of life,” Otto said. “It is a beautiful place to raise a family. See Otto / B2

New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — When you sign up for Facebook, you enter into a bargain. You share personal information with the site, and Facebook agrees to obey your wishes when it comes to who can see what you post. At the same time, you agree that Facebook can use that data to decide what ads to show you. It is a complicated deal that many people enter into without perhaps fully understanding what will happen to their information. It also involves some trust — which is why any hint that Facebook may not be holding up its end of the bargain is sure to kick up plenty of controversy. The latest challenge to that trust came Monday, when Facebook acknowledged that some applications on its website, including the popular game FarmVille, had improperly shared information about users, and in some cases their friends, with advertisers and Web tracking companies. See Facebook / B2

450 440 430

Banks share clients’ profits, but not their losses

420 2009

2010

Sales:

$325.7B

$330 billion

By Louise Story New York Times News Service

320 310 300 2009

2010

Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Commerce AP

JPMorgan Chase & Co. has a proposition for the mutual funds and pension funds that oversee many Americans’ savings: Heads, we win together. Tails, you lose — alone. Here is the deal: Funds lend some of their stocks and bonds to Wall Street, in return for cash that banks like JPMorgan then invest. If the trades

do well, the bank takes a cut of the profits. If the trades do poorly, the funds absorb all of the losses. The strategy is called securities lending, a practice that is thriving even though investments linked to it were virtually wiped out during the financial panic of 2008. These trades were supposed to be safe enough to make a little extra money at little risk.

JPMorgan customers, including public or corporate pension funds of IBM, New York state and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, ended up owing JPMorgan more than $500 million to cover the losses. But JPMorgan protected itself on some of these investments and kept millions of dollars in profit, before the trades went awry. See Banks / B5

Jerry Davis, the chairman of the municipal employee pension fund in New Orleans, had a sour experience with JPMorgan Chase & Co. New York Times News Service


B2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Hotels are ‘going local’ with rooftop gardens, beekeeping

By Ronald D. Orol MarketWatch

Facebook Continued from B1 The company said it was talking to application developers about how they handled personal information, and was looking at ways to prevent this from happening again. Facebook’s acknowledgment came in response to an article in

David Garcelon, a chef, says he enjoys checking on the little alpine strawberries, Malabar spinach, mojito mint and several varieties of wine grapes in his small garden. But he is not out in his backyard; he’s on the 14th-floor roof of the Fairmont Royal York in Toronto, where the view is of the steel, glass and concrete of nearby skyscrapers. “You can just grab a handful of ripe tomatoes and they’re ready to add to a dish for a small lunch for a board meeting,” said Garcelon, executive chef of the hotel. “It is a much more interesting way to eat. It is almost inevitably fresher and better.” Eating local, homegrown cuisine is not new. There are plenty of practicing “locavores,” and restaurants have been serving fresh, local food for a while. But now, hotels are “going local,” establishing partnerships with area farmers and growing food in rooftop gardens as they begin to cater to travelers seeking to eat healthily on the road. Nor are the hotels’ efforts limited to growing fruits and vegetables. Some hotels are now keeping bees, whose honey sweetens tea and soups, desserts and cocktails. “There is almost not a more versatile product,” Garcelon said. The hotel installed hives in 2008, and last year harvested about 450 pounds of honey. Mariano Stellner, a corporate director of food and beverage for the hotel’s parent, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, said the company encouraged its chefs to “stay local, stay seasonal, when-

“You can just grab a handful of ripe tomatoes and they’re ready to add to a dish for a small lunch for a board meeting. It is a much more interesting way to eat. It is almost inevitably fresher and better.” — David Garcelon, executive chef of the Fairmont Royal York in Toronto ever possible.” Fairmont’s property in Montreal, the Queen Elizabeth, for example, adopted a goat whose milk is used to make fresh cheese, and the Fairmont in Washington features honeybased drinks. Eleven Fairmont hotels in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Kenya and China keep bees, overseen by local groups or resident beekeepers, and almost half of the brand’s 64 properties worldwide keep gardens. “Hotels have long had ornamental gardens,” said Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University, and author of “What to Eat” (North Point Press, 2006). But food-producing ones will “make them more friendly and help connect with the community, in ways I don’t think hotels have done in the past.” The number of hotels with

Papé Group, called Inspired, has managed the resort, Otto said.

working gardens and bees is quickly rising, said Bjorn Hanson, divisional dean of the Preston Robert Tisch Center for Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management at New York University. “It is kind of the ultimate version of local,” he said. “It creates a positive image, and people will pay a premium for it.” The Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile has its own garden, too. But it also cures its own meats, makes its own cheeses and pastas, and even stomps grapes in the lobby (with guests’ help) to create wines, said Myk Banas, executive chef and director of food and beverage operations. “If you order mac and cheese, we make the macaroni, and we make the cheese and the cheese sauce.” The hotel also has bees in its ninth-floor rooftop garden, and some of the honey is used in Rooftop Honey Wheat Beer, made in partnership with a local brewery. “It is so local, it’s only sold on one block,” Banas said. Some hotels do not have their own gardens but establish close relationships with nearby farms. “We change our dinner menu up until 5 p.m., depending on what products we get,” said Jason McLeod, the executive chef the Elysian Hotel in Chicago, which opened in December. It is more difficult than ordering everything through one distributor; because the hotel deals with a number of local farms, he said, “on some nights, we call 20 to 30 farms to place orders.”

Where do people who come to the resort ride horses and mountain bikes?

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

The Wall Street Journal that said several popular applications were passing a piece of data known as a user ID to outside companies, in violation of Facebook’s privacy policy. Having a user ID allows someone to look up that user’s name and any data posted on that person’s public profile, like a college or favorite movies, but not information that the user had set to be

visible only to friends. Privacy advocates and technology experts were split on the significance of the issue. “That is extremely serious,” said Peter Eckersley, a senior staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an online liberties group. Eckersley said advertisers could use the user IDs to link individuals with information

they had collected anonymously about them on the Web. “Facebook, perhaps inadvertently, is leaking the magic key to tracking you online,” he said. Several technology pundits and bloggers minimized the issue, with some saying that credit card companies and magazines have access to far more detailed information about customers than any Facebook application.

Q: A:

Q: A:

What are your secondary goals? My second goal is to reintroduce the resort to the Bend community and be a local option for fun activities. The public is welcome to come out and go horseback riding, ride mountain bikes or use our ice-skating rink, which we hope to open by Thanksgiving, weather permitting.

Q:

Citigroup reports third strong quarter Two years after Citigroup became the symbol of all that went wrong in the financial system, its executives expressed confidence Monday that the bank would be healthy enough to start buying back shares or raise its dividend in 2012. Buoyed by a resurgence in stock and bond underwriting deals as well as a reduction of losses on mortgage and credit card loans, Citigroup reported earnings of $2.2 billion, its

A:

“There was quite a bit of controversy over the renovations, but that was before my arrival,” Otto said. “Now that the renovation work is nearly completed, the property owners I’ve talked to are very happy with the quality of the renovations. “In the past, the owners association did not have a reserve fund for capital improvements. Therefore, to accomplish the improvements, they were assessed,” Otto said. To avoid large assessments in the future, Otto said a mechanism has been initiated to fund future improvements. “We are engaged in conversations with the owners, and they are very pleased with the quality of the improvements, and that a reserve fund has been created, so they won’t be hit with large assessments in the future,” Otto said. Otto said a handful of management companies have run the resort over the past 10 years. Most recently, the Premier Resorts company was managing the resort until the company filed for bankruptcy in October 2009. Since then, a subsidiary of the

What are your first goals as the new general manager? To continue to be a primary destination for longtime customers who come to enjoy everything we have to offer, from skiing at Mt. Bachelor to ice skating, mountain biking, tennis, hiking, whitewater rafting, swimming, relaxing in one of our hot tubs or participating in the many other outdoor recreational opportunities, dining, music venues and other amenities the area has to offer.

SAN FRANCISCO — IBM Corp. said Monday that its net income rose 12 percent as it wrung more out of its services and software divisions and gets a lift from a new mainframe computer. The technology company also raised its profit forecast slightly for the remainder of the year, demonstrating its skill at increasing profits faster than its businesses are growing. The stock fell, though, apparently on fears about a dip in IBM’s outsourcing business. IBM said that business would have grown if a big contract hadn’t been signed just after the quarter ended. IBM earned $3.59 billion, or $2.82 per share, in the July to September period, compared to $3.21 billion, or $2.40 per share, in the same period last year. Analysts on average expected $2.75 per share, according to a poll by Thomson Reuters.

We have lease agreements with the Forest Service for the trails we use for horseback riding and mountain biking.

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

Q: A:

Will you continue to market the resort to businesses and community groups? Yes. With the renovations, we have meeting space for groups as large as 500 to hold meetings, conventions, holiday parties and other events.

Q: A:

What else would you like people to know about the resort? We have a very dedicated staff who are passionate about making time at Seventh Mountain Resort the kind of experience where good memories are made, whether it’s a weekend of skiing or golfing in Central Oregon, a business meeting, a family vacation, wedding, anniversary, New Year’s celebration, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day or even Halloween.

Analysts forecast strong airline earnings DALLAS — Delta Air Lines and American Airlines parent AMR Corp. may help U.S. carriers report their biggest profit in three years this week, buoyed by higher fares and fuller planes. That would give the industry two consecutive profitable quarters for the first time since 2007, before the record-high jet fuel prices of 2008 and the recession. AMR will have net income of about $118 million, its first profit in two years, according to analysts’ average estimate compiled by Bloomberg News. The eight biggest airlines will post third-quarter combined net income ranging from $2.1 billion to $2.4 billion, according to estimates by analysts Michael Linenberg of Deutsche Bank and Michael Derchin of CRT Capital Group. Planes are flying fuller than ever as carriers maintain the cuts in seats they put in place in 2008, allowing them to charge more for tickets.

India and Boeing discuss C-17 order MUMBAI, India — India is in negotiations to buy as many as 10 Boeing military transport aircraft ahead of President Barack Obama’s visit next month. “Talks are going on,” Sitanshu Kar, a spokesman at India’s Ministry of Defence, said by phone Monday from New Delhi. The U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency has notified Congress that it may permit the sale of 10 C-17 Globemaster III aircraft to India, the U.S. embassy in India said April 26. The sale may be valued at as much as $5.8 billion, it said. Boeing, the second-largest U.S. defense contractor, expects to bid for $31 billion worth of military contracts in India in the next 10 years as it competes with Lockheed Martin and other suppliers for orders following a tripling of the nation’s defense budget. — From wire reports

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New York Times News Service

IBM net income beats expectations

third profitable quarter in a row. The bank also said its exposure to troubled assets had been cut nearly in half since starting its turnaround plan two and a half years ago. “We should be in a position to return capital to our shareholders in 2012,” Vikram Pandit, Citigroup’s chief executive, told investors in a Monday morning conference call. Although still a way off, that would be a remarkable comeback for a bank that was so weak it needed a $45 billion bailout from the government in fall 2008. Taxpayers still own about 12 percent of the company.





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Continued from B1 “I feel very lucky to live in a place people come to visit, and I chose to come over to Seventh Mountain Resort from Sunriver because of the opportunity to get into a top leadership position,” Otto said. For following green building practices, Otto said Seventh Mountain Resort received the 2010 Award for Greening the Built Environment, which hangs on the wall in the registration building along with a plaque naming it one of the 2010 Top 25 Northwest Resorts chosen by the Portland Business Journal, as well as the Expedia Insider Select Award for being chosen One of the World’s Top 1 Percent of Hotels in 2008. The Seventh Mountain Resort also has received the three-diamond rating from AAA every year since 2006. Otto acknowledged that some members of the resort’s Association of Unit Owners were unhappy about the cost of the renovations for which they were assessed.

By Tanya Mohn

Apple Inc. trounced analyst expectations yet again Monday while continuing its string of record quarters. Riding booming sales of its blockbuster iPhone 4 — the company said it sold 14.1 million units of the smart phone during the new model’s debut quarter — Apple reported an all-time-high $20.34 billion in sales. That handily beat Wall Street analysts’ expectations of $19.3 billion. Sales of the new iPhone rose more than 90 percent over the previous quarter, an increase that seemed to mute concerns that the company might have lost momentum after the phone stumbled through problems with its antenna shortly after its release. “We are blown away to report over $20 billion in revenue and over $4 billion in after-tax earnings—both alltime records for Apple,” said Apple CEO Steve Jobs, adding, “We still have a few surprises left for the remainder of this calendar year.”

POTTERY

Otto

Chris Young / New York Times News Service

David Garcelon, executive chef of the Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto, inspects honey in the hotel’s rooftop garden. Hotels are going local, establishing partnerships with area farmers and growing food in rooftop gardens. They are catering to travelers seeking to eat healthily on the road.

Strong iPhone sales boost Apple earnings



WASHINGTON — The Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday proposed rules that would give institutional investors a vote starting in 2011 on the pay packages of top executives at U.S. corporations. The agency is implementing a provision of the Dodd-Frank Act that requires the agency to approve the rules. The provision is one of roughly 100 rules the agency must approve based on the Dodd-Frank Act. While the vote is nonbinding and corporations are not required to follow the wishes of shareholders, the provision is expected to have a transformative impact on the relationship between chief executives and institutional investors — in part because of the embarrassment a company could experience if investors turn out strongly against its executive compensation. In addition, the provision seeks to provide institutional investors with a nonbinding vote on “golden-parachute” payments: compensation arrangements for top executives associated with merger transactions. The proposed rules would also require that institutional investors report their votes on executive compensation and “goldenparachute” arrangements at least annually to the SEC. The agency adopted such rules for corporations that have capital injections from the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program. Under the proposal, companies would be required to allow shareholders to vote on how often they would like to cast a “say-on-pay” vote with three options: annually, once every two years or once every three years. Shareholders would be allowed to cast this nonbinding “frequency” vote at least once every six years beginning with the first annual shareholders’ meeting in 2011, according to the proposal. For the nation’s top chief executives, much is at stake. In 2009, the median total compensation for S&P 500 chief executives was roughly $7.5 million, down from approximately $8.2 million in 2008, according to Equilar Inc., a Redwood City, Calif.-based executive-compensation research firm. Many regulatory observers believe the U.S. system will soon resemble, in part, the system that already exists in Britain, where investors have long had the right to an annual vote on executive compensation.

B  B

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

SEC rule proposal would give investors say on pay

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 B3

T F Rather than fight it, schools embrace cell phone use With sophisticated technology, devices easily turned into tools for learning By Tara Malone and Lisa Black Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — With the election weeks away, Fremd High School teacher Jason Spoor asked students in his government class, some of them first-time voters, to research local candidates vying for office. They would have 15 minutes and one learning tool: their cell phone. “If you are driving down the street and headed to vote, you don’t have a computer at the touch of a hand. You have a cell phone,” Spoor told his students last week. The lesson would have been impossible in the past. But with cell phones tucked in the book bags and pockets of three-fourths of today’s teens, many high schools are ceding defeat in the battle to keep handheld technology out of class and instead are inviting students to use their phones for learning. Under a teacher’s guidance, students might record themselves speaking a foreign language, text an answer to an online quiz or send themselves a homework reminder. “It’s one of those things — if you can’t beat them, join them,” said Jill Bullo, principal of Wheaton North High School, which plans to review its policy this year. As a first step, Wheaton administrators allowed students to use cell phones before and after classes last year, instead of requiring them to be powered off at

Stacey Wescott / Chicago Tribune

Julia Ostoich, from left, David Parzynski and Kayla Price use cell phones to look up information on political races during a Social Science Survey class at Fremd High School in Palatine, Ill., earlier this month. all times. It is the latest twist in the debate about how schools react to the gear that students carry with them every day. An estimated 83 percent of 17year-olds across the country have cell phones today, according to a report released in April by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. That grew from 64 percent five years earlier. Among all high school-age students, 75 percent have them. Younger children were less likely to have cell phones, research showed. But even among 12-year-olds, 58 percent reported owning one compared with 18

percent in 2004. Across all ages, nearly eight of every 10 students surveyed carried their phone with them to school every day, the study showed. “Every year, it seems to trickle down one more grade level,” said Liz Kolb, author of “Toys to Tools: Connecting Student Cell Phones to Education.”

Redialing the rules Confronted with such widespread use, many schools are redialing the rules. Educators say they attempt to balance the opportunity to boost

student learning with the concerns of classroom distractions or cheating. “If I was teaching a class and all the students had their phones and someone was texting them or they used the device to communicate with other students about material on a test ... that’s when it becomes problematic,” said Greg Fantozzi, principal of Kaneland High School in Maple Park, Ill., where teens must stow their phones in lockers during the school day. What’s more, many phones come equipped with cameras and video, which make teachers and administrators “a little ner-

vous about potentially bad things Cram took a picture, e-mailed it to they can do,” Bullo said. “If it himself and then imported the imwere a simple phone, it would be age to Photoshop, where he could different.” more precisely measure each air Still, York Community High pocket to calculate the cupcake’s School Principal Diana Smith porosity. plans to sit down this week with “It was out of necessity, really. students to talk about the pos- It was just a natural step,” Cram sibility of their using cell phones said of turning to his cell phone. for academic purposes. The ElmOn a recent Wednesday, Fremd hurst school curstudents huddled rently requires that in groups to rephones remain off “What we know search candidates during the day. for state and fedabout kids now “What we know eral office, their about kids now is is they are used thumbs dancing they are used to to having so across the palmhaving so many sized screens. Of sources of technol- many sources the 31 students ogy available to of technology in class, only one them,” Smith said. did not have a cell “I think we need available to them. phone. Others had to be in step with I think we need two. them on it.” “Double proto be in step with In writing new ductivity,” senior cell phone rules, them on it.” Lucas Lassila some schools offer quipped, holding a training seminars — Diana Smith, cell phone in each to show teachers high school principal hand. how to make good For students use of the gadgets. who forget their Glenbrook North High School phones or don’t have one, Spoor now provides sessions for teach- makes phone-related assignments ers on “how can you leverage group activities. Some educators what they have in their pockets,” keep a cell phone or iPad to loan technology coordinator Ryan students for classroom use. Bretag said. Similar primers are Teacher Jason Spoor said he provided for students. The north asks students for their e-mail adsuburban district began allowing dresses and cell phone numbers students to use cell phones at a at the start of the school year. teacher’s discretion when they re- Spoor — who asked the teens for vamped the personal technology pointers when he first bought an policy last year. iPhone — said he often texts a reminder about big assignments, and he invites students to text or ‘A natural step’ e-mail him in return. Glenbrook senior John Cram “Look, this is just a part of who pulled out his phone during a lab we are now,” Spoor said of the experiment in his material science personal technology. “It’s a tidal class this fall. He wanted to mea- wave.” sure the porosity of a cupcake. Using the camera in his cell phone,

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

As Google tries to tap social networks, some wonder if it has necessary skills By Claire Cain Miller

is counting on as its next big business.

New York Times News Service

Google has been stunningly adept at devising computer algorithms to help people search the Internet. But when it comes to building features for social networking, the company has been much less effective. And changing that is one of the company’s biggest business challenges these days. Google depends on having its finger on the pulse of the entire Internet, and maintaining its status as the Internet’s primary entree. But as people spend more time on closed social networks like Facebook, where much of the data they share is off-limits to search engines, Google risks losing the competition for Web users’ time, details of their lives and, ultimately, advertising. “Google’s made a lot of money helping people make decisions using search engines, but more and more people are turning to social outlets to make decisions,” said Charlene Li, founder of Altimeter Group, a technology research and advisory firm. “And whenever people make decisions, there’s money involved.” Google has been trying to create social components, most recently with Buzz, a service that gives Gmail users the ability to share status updates, photos and videos. But that, and earlier efforts, have not been hugely popular. Now the company will try again, with tools to be unveiled this fall, said Eric Schmidt, Google’s chief executive. Although the details remain murky, Schmidt and other Google officials sketched a broad outline of their plans in recent interviews. Some of the tools are still being developed, they said; others will add features to existing products, like search, e-mail, maps, photos, video and ads. The company plans to “take Google’s core products and add a social component, to make the core products even better,” Schmidt said. But some wonder whether Google understands enough about social connections to create the tools people want to use. “Google’s culture is very much based on the power of the algorithm, and it’s very difficult to

541-322-CARE

What to expect

Illustration by Minh Uong New York Times News Service

algorithm social interaction,” Li said. For example, the introduction of Buzz in February caused a wave of criticism from privacy advocates and everyday users, because it automatically included users’ e-mail contacts in their Buzz network. Google quickly changed the service so that it suggested friends instead of automatically connecting them. Before Buzz’s release to the public, it was tested only by Google employees. “There is some belief at Google that their DNA is not perfectly suited to build social products, and it’s a quite controversial topic internally,” said a person who has worked on Google’s social products who would speak only on the condition of anonymity. “The part of social that’s about stalking people, sharing photos, looking cool — it’s mentally foreign to engineers,” the person said. “All those little details are subtle and sometimes missed, especially by technical people who are brought up in a very utilitarian company.”

The Facebook threat Google has a social network,

Orkut, but that never took off in the United States, although it is popular in Brazil and India. There are also Google profiles, which let people link Google to LinkedIn and Twitter, for example, so that information their friends have published online can appear in search results. Only a small percentage of Google users have created these profiles. And as Facebook gains in popularity, it grows as a threat. Google sites, including the search engine and YouTube, get more unique visitors than Facebook. But in August, for the first time, people spent more time on Facebook than on Google sites, according to Score, the Web analytics firm. Some people are beginning to turn to their friends on Facebook for information for which they had used Google, like asking for recommendations on the best sushi or baby sitter. Through a new partnership with Microsoft, an investor in Facebook, the things your friends like on Facebook can show up in the search results from Bing, Microsoft’s search engine. The threat goes straight to the bottom line, too. Facebook is increasing its sales of display ads with images, which Google

Google has assembled a team of engineers to work on social networking, led by two executives who worked on Buzz — Vic Gundotra, vice president for engineering responsible for mobile applications, and Bradley Horowitz, a vice president for product management overseeing Google Apps. “Google, as part of our mission to organize the world’s information, also needs to organize and make it very useful for you to see the interactions of your friends, to participate with them and benefit,” Gundotra said. The company has also been piecing together a puzzle of social networking companies, technologies and engineers. It acquired Slide and Jambool, which made apps and virtual goods and currency for social networks, and Angstro, which built tools to exchange information among social services. This year, it bought Aardvark, to which users can post questions that are answered by individuals, and invested in the gaming company Zynga. But the new project will not include a big gaming element, despite previous reports, said a person who has worked on the products. “Google’s a pretty serious place,” Schmidt said. “It’s hard to see how we could end up as becoming a significant gaming or entertainment source. It’s much more likely that we would become an infrastructure for those sorts of things.” Whatever Google does, its officials said, it would not build a Facebook reproduction that requires users to re-enter all their personal and social data. “I think that there is social networking fatigue,” Horowitz said. Larry Yu, a Facebook spokesman, said his company expected competitors large and small to emerge but was focused on building a valuable service. Privately, though, Facebook executives have said that their biggest worry is that Google will prioritize a Google profile page over a Facebook page in search results.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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7.83 -.04 22.34 +.40 0.48 22.35 +.04 0.54 22.55 +.47 1.28 60.40 +.73 12.65 -.04 12.46 +.14 1.20 55.64 +1.12 20.70 +5.99 42.73 -.17 1.76 39.13 +.23 0.20 14.08 +.08 20.66 +.10 1.12 27.01 +.08 5.39 +.16 6.38 +.12 25.96 +.52 .40 +.02 0.27 33.08 +.27 1.68 28.62 +.29 24.90 +.03 16.11 +.50 9.96 -.08 2.07 +.16 6.86 -.03 0.05 17.58 -.19 1.54 +.07 1.76 53.67 +.50 0.70 45.60 +.35 0.42 6.94 -.14 3.00 +.06 21.20 -.42 0.72 19.80 +.29 0.90 45.43 +.14 0.23 19.91 +.02 0.20 7.63 +.32 36.93 -.53 27.57 -1.36 20.88 +.02 3.22 -.01 1.54 -.04 0.15 11.25 -.12 0.04 22.98 +.01 0.52 49.25 +.27 18.00 +.08 28.06 -.02 0.36 32.55 +.28 0.25 4.91 +.04 0.24 60.36 -.60 4.11 +.15 15.13 +.44 6.96 -.16 0.06 4.01 6.44 -.05 25.88 +.27 0.04 17.14 -.28 6.47 +.12 12.52 +.04 27.08 -.24 1.27 -.01 0.04 31.99 +.25 86.51 +.73 5.40 +.31 4.75 +.17 2.85 -.02 34.66 +.18 0.18 72.39 -.19 0.11 86.13 -.92 1.96 82.95 +1.29 6.83 +.03 5.71 +.01 0.40 8.72 +.11 1.00 69.82 +.11 7.38 -.01 0.18 31.43 -.60 45.94 -1.15 .57 +.01 4.72 +.06 47.59 +.44 0.86 10.13 +.14 0.56 48.38 -.11 0.34 37.54 -.18 3.69 +.02 0.12 13.14 +.01 3.95 169.88 +1.58 31.29 +.12 1.26 35.22 +.78 1.40 75.07 +1.81 5.84 -.20 68.31 +.54 1.34 +.02 21.00 +.52 14.99 +.19 0.60 24.91 +.29 0.72 47.73 -.18 0.20 72.61 +3.75 67.90 -.45 4.59 +.06 1.20 15.09 -.05 0.48 8.38 +.01 2.06 26.60 +.35 1.58 36.48 +.33 2.75 +.06 1.23 +.04 76.45 +1.67 25.40 -.12 4.90 +.23 4.63 +.07 18.59 -.17 0.80 32.56 +.13 2.73 -.03 45.87 -.80 2.57 +.07 0.40 7.09 0.66 5.73 -.03 15.79 .63 -.03 0.24 29.64 -.18 0.48 20.95 +.15 25.84 -.04 1.52 24.90 +.02 26.49 -.16 2.22 -.08 4.23 140.87 +.73 3.10 -.03 163.56 -1.08 .92 -.13 30.02 +.10 26.00 +.04 1.54 29.24 +.36 43.93 +.02 1.31 56.89 +.55 9.10 +.11 1.35 32.49 +.77 5.60 27.85 +.24 6.44 +.15 34.10 +.79 0.44 16.70 -.02 1.68 36.33 +.39 0.08 10.88 +.03 0.72 39.55 +.46 0.65 31.28 +.15 42.26 +.79 1.61 21.88 -.24 1.93 24.21 -.10 20.51 +.17 8.81 +.10 2.65 -.04 1.18 7.79 +.05 35.66 -.34 50.49 -.32 0.84 23.65 +.01 0.72 51.40 +1.47 0.32 32.34 +.05 0.24 49.62 +.65 57.96 +1.25 6.86 -.05 0.06 49.89 -.26 19.66 +.21 21.22 +.18 0.36 58.48 +.84 5.70 -.28 1.67 -.08 0.88 31.55 -.12 .46 -.02 3.00 54.13 +.16 0.18 47.02 -.27 0.49 62.41 -.31 3.25 53.82 +.51 22.21 +.84 2.60 18.04 +.04 1.31 -.12 46.09 +.50 1.01 -.04 0.92 7.10 +.02 0.60 40.04 +.58 9.29 +.29 0.60 106.35 +2.21 3.00 60.40 +.90 0.40 22.96 +.34 37.27 +.69 1.12 10.60 +.18 318.00 +3.26 0.28 11.95 -.07 9.61 -.09 13.59 0.62 20.94 +.25 5.76 +.31 0.40 30.06 +.21 0.75 35.06 +.31 0.40 26.59 -.34 0.60 33.58 +.31 43.46 1.69 -.01 1.40 16.31 +.35 3.95 +.04 18.89 -.55 0.12 25.37 +.86 0.12 19.11 +.25 3.58 +.12 9.89 +.03 27.48 +.05 1.00 +.02 4.32 +.01 20.09 -.17 16.50 -.03 4.80 +.11 0.60 51.79 -.85 .22 -.03 20.72 +.16 0.60 31.16 +.07 .33 -.01 0.04 13.29 +.30 0.68 14.10 +.30 0.64 41.68 +.73 0.18 21.48 -.02 31.50 +.50 0.52 12.96 +.10 2.41 53.50 +.31 31.79 -.61 27.23 +.35 1.09 13.48 -.01 56.37 +1.25 32.07 +.23 19.49 +.50 8.35 -.04 1.34 29.27 +.09 32.57 +.36 4.12 +.03

Nm Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel h Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcSanChile BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm pfJ BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkAm pfC BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkEnhC&I BlkEnDiv BlFltRtInc2 BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I BlkLtdD Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueChp BlueCoat BlueLinx BdwlkPpl BodyCen n Boeing Boise Inc BonTon Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CPFL En CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive Cal-Maine CalmsAst CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf Callidus Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapellaEd CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapFedF CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardiacSci CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh

D 7.00 -.05 1.97 -.19 23.89 +.15 .84 -.05 33.16 -.16 1.40 68.95 -.47 1.36 42.96 +.02 232.80 -.16 25.69 -1.00 22.74 +.05 3.57 112.40 +2.35 3.23 0.80 38.28 +.04 4.48 +.04 11.36 +.31 27.82 +.19 0.88 34.39 -.47 2.07 +.07 0.84 33.81 +.17 .75 -.02 0.60 23.13 +.49 1.83 34.01 +.44 32.41 +.33 0.42 6.86 +.23 1.74 82.26 -.15 1.74 69.71 -.56 28.52 -.39 43.94 -.24 44.02 -.66 41.49 +.87 3.45 +.05 1.50 43.60 +.76 0.10 15.13 -.01 3.79 -.01 22.17 +.32 103.40 +4.74 0.60 45.12 -.50 0.68 41.94 +.48 0.40 62.38 +.20 34.75 -.22 1.34 67.08 +1.27 0.57 13.93 +.23 0.51 22.11 +.13 0.80 13.46 +.26 0.33 14.89 -.16 2.67 92.23 -.05 0.88 14.25 +.24 0.04 12.34 +.36 2.05 25.40 +.31 1.81 24.35 +.44 6.64 +.29 2.26 +.15 2.16 26.18 +.31 1.72 24.28 +.15 1.80 46.12 +.71 1.04 3.43 +.02 2.80 60.23 +.47 0.36 26.62 +.78 .94 +.06 0.04 1.79 +.02 44.41 +.48 23.75 +.52 80.50 +1.83 0.22 18.54 +.32 79.86 +.11 14.03 -.39 0.72 85.16 +.79 1.00 15.62 +.36 0.32 17.53 +.01 0.48 47.82 -.17 11.33 +.01 1.16 49.00 +.24 .30 +.00 14.96 +.04 4.18 +.08 1.00 6.63 +.05 0.72 50.39 +1.33 1.48 76.82 +.69 43.41 -.23 0.20 29.00 +.34 6.44 -.02 0.92 33.81 +.01 0.28 28.08 +.30 83.50 +.13 0.30 35.20 +.67 0.60 42.53 +.38 33.40 +.28 39.02 -.22 5.11 +.09 4.00 -.21 2.38 -.16 58.53 +.87 22.12 +.15 0.68 19.05 +.37 1.68 +.03 1.28 12.69 +.17 40.06 +.93 4.00 176.50 +.76 1.94 14.73 +.08 0.98 8.69 +.03 0.90 13.77 -.18 2.28 18.75 -.04 1.36 10.57 -.02 1.05 17.06 +.07 0.40 13.46 +.08 0.60 10.94 -1.42 14.35 +.34 3.55 +.04 24.71 -.30 3.96 -.03 2.04 33.95 -.13 13.06 +.06 1.68 70.23 +.12 6.86 +.10 12.09 +.52 1.40 -.03 54.14 -.05 0.04 6.94 +.16 2.00 88.45 +1.49 6.20 +.05 7.81 +.13 0.60 12.40 +.25 22.06 +.33 14.14 +.12 0.44 18.56 +.16 20.58 +.18 1.65 -.04 0.56 20.03 +.13 0.40 23.74 +.10 1.28 27.33 +.13 3.24 78.01 +.41 0.32 37.42 -.31 0.60 20.95 +.22 2.22 5.79 -.17 16.58 -.09 0.52 29.98 +.16 0.56 17.37 +.19 0.34 9.93 +.08 7.28 +.15 0.31 20.73 -.01 15.05 +.14 0.05 16.35 +.34 0.80 30.20 -.12 0.10 74.44 +.15 0.42 51.63 +.49 0.92 60.78 +.13 0.25 23.98 0.16 22.16 -.01 19.06 +.11 6.00 +.05 0.80 15.06 +.38 0.40 23.20 +.72 0.20 17.49 -.05 0.40 118.85 -1.01 1.00 71.76 -.48 0.04 35.71 -.16 41.34 +.04 4.76 +.02 1.00 31.07 +.27 4.60 280.87+13.36 0.84 18.75 -.06 28.15 -.07 40.77 -.15 5.45 +.13 0.26 24.40 -.37 5.05 73.51 -.48 1.04 60.12 +.58 0.26 23.50 +.10 0.34 8.06 +.20 0.35 31.25 -.06 19.37 +.34 0.50 26.67 +.01 0.72 33.56 +.23 0.12 31.05 +.53 9.65 -.04 7.82 -.15 5.40 +.01 0.95 27.39 -.09 0.30 12.68 +.20 0.60 8.19 -.02 0.63 9.02 +.07 15.34 +.02 12.95 -.04 0.04 7.20 +.04 4.75 +.07 12.54 +.15 3.18 -.07 1.80 50.13 +.54 0.28 30.85 +.30 17.99 -.45 42.79 -.30 1.10 36.41 -.20 12.70 +.12 1.08 66.58 +.11 0.30 37.26 +.06 1.08 65.13 -.07 15.75 +.27 .42 -.05 67.94 +.17 4.61 +.03 0.20 37.23 +.37 0.90 8.71 -.04 0.04 5.96 +.10 2.00 24.45 +.71 1.66 11.12 +.11 .77 -.01 0.80 81.45 +.42 2.10 +.27 0.78 33.29 +.07 .51 +.01 16.40 +.19 24.88 +.25 17.43 +.47 0.68 32.91 +.19 29.39 -.27 0.40 39.69 +.36 0.72 38.69 +.34 24.52 -.21 26.45 -.29 1.76 80.24 +.49 0.04 12.81 +.38 29.35 +.16 0.25 14.01 +.10 .69 -.01 0.20 34.18 +.14 6.10 +.22 8.64 -.01 59.70 +1.49 .41 -.02 4.63

Nm Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereEn ChesEng ChespkL n Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChiElMot n ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChIntLtg n CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTDv lf ChinaUni ChiValve n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire ClevBioL h ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrwnCstle CrownHold CrwnMedia Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn CushTRet Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DJSP Ent DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DayStar rs DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DeutBk pf DB Cap pf DeutBCT2 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk

D 0.43 7.77 -.14 0.86 18.10 +.18 0.80 29.67 -.07 4.89 +.06 0.78 16.15 +.02 1.56 14.83 -1.09 23.77 +.09 0.01 17.93 +.23 11.08 +.16 13.96 +.08 2.90 39.91 +.03 5.57 +.21 64.60 +.71 18.87 -.23 10.04 +.14 85.71 -.78 3.65 -.17 32.88 -.17 3.70 +.11 38.97 -.30 27.72 -.08 5.11 -.16 2.79 -.09 0.30 22.69 -.30 0.20 17.52 +.77 2.88 84.48 +.87 25.22 -.58 0.16 10.73 +.02 52.47 -.21 0.69 4.21 +.06 12.36 +.41 4.31 -.26 2.08 +.03 12.47 -.55 7.33 -.42 1.49 +.03 5.53 +.31 9.72 +.21 2.38 +.12 .15 +.02 6.46 -.29 7.57 -.36 2.90 -.02 18.36 -1.07 1.54 67.85 +.09 26.29 +.16 6.60 +.24 15.02 -1.18 0.55 11.73 +.30 10.90 -.25 1.85 53.71 +.04 0.28 4.58 -.01 18.17 -.38 7.57 -.13 6.20 +.19 4.74 +.06 2.55 +.13 0.23 14.60 -.07 8.02 +.15 183.69 +1.82 14.59 +.30 1.48 58.02 +.43 1.27 23.15 +.03 0.68 69.16 -.63 3.54 +.17 14.54 +.04 0.32 73.52 +.53 2.59 +.03 1.60 30.13 +.26 0.72 17.33 +.27 0.48 27.43 +.07 16.41 +.32 23.30 -.07 2.13 26.56 +.53 1.97 26.00 +.17 4.17 +.22 .94 +.01 58.53 -.66 3.66 +.07 1.53 14.54 -.25 0.35 20.93 +.09 6.94 +.01 6.88 +.59 6.18 -.03 0.56 66.17 -1.37 2.20 68.23 +.28 17.66 -.44 0.60 44.77 +.04 9.43 -.07 24.16 +.06 1.76 60.00 +.06 20.40 +.43 10.51 +.01 66.49 -.06 0.96 16.64 +.14 0.72 8.18 +.02 46.51 -.49 5.36 -.10 2.12 76.73 +.84 17.62 +.58 0.60 17.67 +.34 0.72 57.96 +.19 0.38 19.01 +.07 0.38 17.91 +.04 0.20 39.25 +1.07 0.94 37.00 +.60 0.48 14.77 +.53 2.00 26.53 +.19 22.69 +.23 32.19 +.32 27.52 +.36 0.35 37.61 -.59 1.36 18.02 +.44 18.06 -.48 24.07 -.26 0.60 50.01 +.62 8.89 -.07 24.22 +.69 1.00 30.47 +.76 0.40 31.74 +.46 0.92 22.60 +.18 69.39 +.14 48.70 -.12 1.80 +.03 2.20 61.26 +.48 0.40 40.34 +.14 2.38 49.09 +.49 21.20 +.04 19.41 +.39 0.96 32.93 +.19 47.75 4.31 +.03 11.54 +.16 .56 +.02 0.06 50.82 +.32 1.08 50.49 +.09 0.42 20.94 +.16 1.09 48.50 -.68 2.30 28.76 -.80 34.12 -.10 1.09 24.52 +.20 18.02 -.07 4.96 +.23 0.56 39.50 +.24 0.20 18.86 +.08 1.65 38.10 +.48 25.91 +.37 12.58 -.10 0.82 63.21 -.49 7.86 +.18 1.75 23.70 +.25 0.12 7.07 +.03 48.93 +1.18 1.50 15.88 +.14 23.41 +.07 0.80 40.54 -.22 0.88 53.21 +.52 1.85 45.08 +1.24 0.32 2.94 +.01 55.56 -1.00 14.08 +.05 .21 -.03 42.11 -.31 29.74 -.18 3.50 +.18 .35 -.03 50.78 +1.04 .69 -.03 25.25 +.02 1.80 53.86 +.72 1.05 91.35 -2.29 1.42 139.42 +.17 121.86 +.35 0.90 9.07 -.01 1.61 -.03 38.04 -.41 4.13 +.06 12.82 -.29 2.40 13.42 +.01 .89 -.00 0.05 59.22 +.01 5.04 +.30 0.28 4.95 +.02 21.54 -.16 1.60 +.09 1.21 27.51 +.14 0.15 10.54 +.05 32.30 +1.00 2.24 47.27 +.16 0.10 11.01 +.55 13.38 -.16 0.08 41.97 +.05 13.40 -.81 1.28 44.46 -.28 10.02 +.01 72.43 +.13 2.64 +.35 0.20 43.76 +2.04 10.66 +.29 1.81 +.18 53.85 -.45 11.88 +.54 1.20 76.05 -.11 0.36 14.98 -.15 8.66 -.07 14.66 +.17 11.51 +.13 .81 -.00 1.00 21.01 +.31 10.59 -.28 18.31 +.24 37.45 -.38 2.15 +.15 3.25 0.20 32.19 +.30 5.15 +.11 0.93 58.40 +1.73 1.66 24.72 +.14 1.59 24.01 +.01 1.90 26.47 -.29 1.64 25.02 +.27 11.75 +.11 40.24 +.29 8.52 -.11 0.08 12.78 +.36 0.64 68.86 +1.20 2.38 72.40 +.28 0.50 72.00 +.35 0.03 10.96 +.24

Nm

D

DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DurectCp DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs

1.08 2.12 0.16

6.26 5.68 0.20 0.01

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 14.08 +.10 29.34 -.14 32.25 -.11 59.61 +.30 35.23 +.33 27.20 +.54 49.15 -1.66 19.15 -.10 42.54 -.11 39.33 +.48 39.45 +.24 28.83 -.32 22.23 -.55 19.90 -.79 35.65 -.68 32.45 -.77 23.36 -.07 12.40 -.71 22.62 +1.11 37.65 -.95 55.84 +1.97 54.27 +1.30 11.14 -.12 58.01 +.36 39.31 +.70 17.20 +.10 43.28 +.09 38.09 +.10 .23 -.01 19.08 -.17 34.75 -.13 36.97 +.65 10.03 -.04 61.21 -.08 9.77 +.06 29.34 +.41 48.07 +.01 50.22 +.14 44.92 +.38 14.63 +.01 69.52 +.57 18.19 +.04 1.59 +.04 18.39 +.40 53.59 -.43 29.84 +.41 34.36 -.61 8.49 +.45 33.23 +.38 25.13 +.03 38.73 +.37 4.50 -.03 66.04 +.06 1.81 -.04 4.50 -.10 47.11 +.44 24.18 +.48 17.65 +.06 12.08 +.09 75.85 -.18 13.76 +.54 2.82 -.08 2.78 +.03 2.45 +.05 1.96 4.85 +.06

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EGShConsu EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch EV Engy EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore hlf EmersonEl EmmisCm Emulex EnCana g s EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO EnsignGp Entegris EntArk40 n Entergy EntPrPt EntGaming EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EtfSilver Euronet EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h Exar ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FBR Cap FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FidClayOp FifthStFin FifthThird 51job Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstPacTrst FstPotom FstSolar FTNDXTc FTDJMic FTDJInet FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs Flagstone FlrtyPfdOp Flextrn FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc

0.25 18.50 -.04 14.79 +.12 25.72 +.04 22.53 +.28 20.80 -.29 25.77 +.01 2.51 45.72 +.31 0.62 101.33 +1.29 0.88 38.34 +.38 8.02 +.25 3.03 36.40 +.25 5.28 +.05 0.40 22.74 -1.29 0.64 8.73 +.14 0.04 16.76 +.22 1.76 78.87 +.37 4.17 +.10 2.32 84.30 +.42 0.64 30.06 +.60 1.39 16.41 -.07 1.80 14.03 +.02 1.23 14.42 +.06 1.62 11.69 -.01 1.53 11.04 -.02 1.56 12.53 +.01 23.69 +.17 0.62 51.73 -.33 1.34 48.19 +1.04 1.26 35.97 +.35 10.01 +.11 0.20 7.53 +.10 66.95 -.53 2.42 +.15 0.04 13.35 +.19 24.78 +.12 1.60 33.04 +.04 6.15 +.15 0.05 18.03 -.17 15.77 -.19 0.38 27.72 +.45 1.08 -.04 1.34 53.82 +.15 .78 -.01 10.60 +.04 0.80 30.19 -.05 1.47 +.05 4.78 -.08 35.66 +.24 1.00 41.16 +.37 4.35 +.07 30.66 +.45 0.52 46.13 +.21 75.32 +.44 4.99 +.06 3.58 49.82 +.38 23.01 -1.40 4.99 +.23 2.16 26.88 +.07 0.68 23.65 +.03 26.33 -.24 1.40 47.50 -.04 0.20 18.33 +.08 5.22 +.05 1.44 24.89 +.07 3.32 77.46 +.49 2.33 41.85 +.13 .42 +.03 2.60 46.89 +.85 7.75 -.76 11.58 +.09 10.05 +.13 0.16 32.38 +.28 75.06 +1.12 1.20 56.37 +1.08 0.88 18.65 +.41 1.35 50.67 +.72 0.28 10.89 +.04 0.55 67.04 -.19 24.40 +.20 18.70 -.10 1.92 84.71 +.49 1.21 -.03 1.03 +.10 8.92 +.04 6.61 -.05 5.88 +.16 0.16 15.47 +.26 4.81 +.21 2.10 44.01 +.86 5.99 -.04 5.58 +.14 0.28 27.45 -.37 0.40 49.02 -.46 48.34 -.03 25.07 -.29 0.33 16.21 +.21 1.76 66.28 +1.09 93.17 -4.03 3.56 +.07 25.77 -.02 0.50 70.60 +.07 71.95 -.95 0.48 9.15 +.24 3.03 -.17 0.92 87.63 +.90 0.08 24.38 -.44 10.25 -.05 0.62 45.73 +.16 0.84 51.89 -.21 0.48 89.47 -.15 2.68 82.67 +.66 0.96 23.92 +.18 5.79 +.34 13.10 -.18 17.07 -.01 0.72 14.61 +.06 0.20 28.44 +.37 1.34 19.63 +.18 1.26 11.55 +.20 0.04 12.54 +.41 44.69 +1.29 21.28 +.14 0.16 16.56 +.32 0.24 14.73 +.27 .32 -.00 0.04 5.73 +.10 0.72 10.09 +.06 6.24 +.07 0.04 12.75 +.52 0.56 11.79 +.24 0.20 11.33 +.63 0.80 15.55 +.05 147.07 +2.51 0.03 23.56 -.02 0.06 21.50 +2.08 31.08 -.01 0.08 17.46 +.29 2.20 39.43 +.50 0.64 18.20 +.20 55.32 -.02 5.88 +.24 2.52 -.05 0.16 10.32 +.14 0.87 10.13 -.42 6.13 -.00 0.80 24.90 +.22 1.16 114.71 +.96 0.50 49.23 -2.64 23.87 -.13 0.32 55.38 +1.19 0.60 15.90 -.05 5.30 -.05 13.88 +.08 5.55 +.06 13.94 +.28 33.59 +.28 33.10 +.46 17.95 +.33 8.98 -.20 26.12 +.09 4.10 +.05 0.76 56.03 -.10 53.81 -.09

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D 24.45 -.14 1.77 23.38 +.21 0.88 116.56 +.15 0.76 14.00 +.50 1.20 96.30 -1.75 .03 -.00 21.85 -.19 7.19 -.19 0.75 8.62 +.08 13.70 -.01 1.90 27.99 +.17 41.07 +.88 1.23 +.01 0.28 20.54 -.02 0.12 9.65 +.12 7.93 +.17 5.92 -.06 9.97 +.35 1.12 30.70 +.14 0.20 5.08 +.06 4.62 +.30 25.02 +.02 8.99 -.08 0.84 14.38 +.07 0.48 5.24 +.05 1.68 17.95 0.14 17.59 -.17 1.28 27.10 +.57 .25 -.04 18.27 -.05 7.19 -.08 0.16 12.47 -.38 0.40 19.81 +.29 0.20 54.76 -.22 1.50 31.07 -.33 31.34 +.12 .36 32.44 +1.30 48.47 +.53 16.48 +.03 5.22 +.17 26.14 +.16 1.68 64.37 +.44 0.48 16.25 -.05 1.50 25.58 +.25 16.48 +.36 0.04 4.03 -.04 1.12 37.41 +.13 4.35 +.28 2.98 -.05 .37 -.01 0.18 18.30 +.07 0.44 21.43 +.08 23.73 +.13 1.64 47.96 +.26 .62 +.05 13.25 +.13 72.05 -.14 25.33 +.33 7.42 -.03 19.71 +.07 0.21 13.20 -.06 5.91 -.04 2.02 -.08 27.48 -.55 37.54 -.19 0.52 15.08 +.45 1.98 41.62 +.09 2.11 +.06 0.40 6.80 +.15 3.96 -.04 6.02 +.17 0.08 39.07 +.17 3.27 +.07 20.14 -.06 1.83 -.08 0.15 15.69 +.15 0.40 17.96 -.27 0.16 15.69 -.08 0.09 21.30 -1.40 0.18 44.00 -.45 23.00 +1.95 5.21 -.04 1.40 153.70 +3.01 1.16 77.39 +.41 14.46 -.05 12.11 +.14 617.71+16.26 29.50 -.01 0.80 33.70 +.35 16.79 +.28 2.16 122.18 +.86 2.54 -.19 7.64 +.06 20.17 +.27 0.92 24.40 +.51 3.52 +.03 2.00 3.16 +.09 2.75 +.09 0.07 6.31 +.07 0.83 18.98 +.02 6.00 63.70 +.46 30.37 +.38 11.93 -.01 18.49 +.56 32.64 -.53 0.52 22.31 +.33 0.64 43.32 -.01 0.20 19.45 +.11 0.03 32.00 +.43 8.89 -.02 8.85 +.16 16.40 +.03 .95 -.04 65.00 +.02 0.58 26.93 +.11 1.86 36.84 +.55 3.58 -.02 1.70 52.59 +.31 0.36 34.09 -1.73 8.01 +.08 0.96 31.98 +1.37 0.73 14.99 +.05 1.49 19.38 -.19 1.35 16.82 -.17 27.82 +.19 16.59 +.15 1.26 +.01 1.00 45.80 -.46 1.93 +.02 50.00 -.16 23.10 -.10 0.40 32.49 +.20 36.07 -.05 6.97 0.07 11.20 -.05 1.00 44.11 -.36 0.82 24.31 -.41 0.20 24.26 +.53 11.58 -.06 1.00 46.81 +1.73 4.60 29.68 +.33 1.24 22.78 +.14 6.42 3.63 +.09 2.76 50.27 +.81 7.57 +.14 1.20 24.10 +.27 27.33 +.15 18.40 +.23 27.37 +.60 0.08 15.24 -.22 4.13 -.03 7.16 +.17 1.80 49.30 +.21 .42 -.01 12.33 +.20 0.24 43.76 -.38 .52 -.00 59.29 -.36 1.00 64.75 -.42 2.55 -.02 0.20 6.24 +.24 1.28 51.33 -.29 10.30 +.30 0.40 64.36 +.53 0.32 43.32 +.50 18.60 -.05 24.10 +.14 26.66 +.02 0.08 2.95 +.86 1.70 34.43 +.50 0.41 36.42 +.22 0.60 33.29 +.28 16.50 +.33 0.95 30.53 -.17 52.55 +.26 2.32 55.44 +1.09 34.37 +.83 36.99 +.38 1.21 47.00 +.51 0.84 44.87 -.07 20.93 +.35 58.42 +.11 1.80 23.45 +.70

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D 0.04 16.31 +.20 0.28 6.12 +.10 3.71 -.01 0.60 11.92 +.22 1.64 +.09 27.02 -.34 55.43 +.59 0.48 36.05 0.04 5.74 +.05 0.40 12.57 +.31 4.30 +.12 6.24 -.07 3.46 +.03

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25.41 +.12 0.06 17.56 -.18 0.53 51.16 -.13 15.26 -1.01 0.26 18.64 +.20 71.96 +.36 0.54 7.54 -.12 1.20 11.60 +.03 11.19 +.11 2.13 25.19 -.09 0.32 5.69 +.09 5.12 +.05 29.45 +1.00 0.16 1.26 +.04 13.44 +.06 30.92 +.03 0.81 24.76 -.08 0.76 21.55 +.26 2.58 80.07 -.33 0.42 29.01 -.07 0.30 23.75 +.25 0.48 19.14 +.07 0.16 10.21 +.07 0.39 56.00 +.36 0.25 13.96 -.06 0.75 56.23 +.32 0.38 13.88 +.02 1.37 46.68 +.32 1.36 70.89 +1.35 2.26 43.52 +.26 0.61 29.64 -.06 0.36 24.15 +.15 0.21 13.47 -.12 0.44 17.20 +.05 1.20 64.06 -.31 0.68 73.50 -.76 1.22 77.38 +.34 23.96 +.21 1.08 53.57 +.40 1.69 48.48 +.31 2.65 111.75 +.25 0.87 63.31 +.15 0.68 46.33 +.13 1.01 84.98 +.31 2.34 118.66 +.54 3.75 108.40 +.38 0.59 46.74 +.02 5.35 112.13 +.77 0.64 45.12 +.12 5.64 112.41 -.65 0.08 29.56 -.04 1.13 62.18 +.31 0.36 36.73 +.17 1.22 52.99 +.60 1.24 55.86 +.47 3.82 101.08 +.81 3.77 99.26 +.47 1.40 33.32 +.12 1.10 84.42 +.02 1.38 57.66 +.13 0.83 41.96 +.23 0.52 50.99 +.01 1.42 93.14 +.22 0.99 82.14 +.30 7.98 89.72 -.12 0.44 48.07 -.33 89.54 +.42 1.28 60.67 +.29 0.72 53.64 +.21 1.11 65.46 +.34 1.06 65.50 +.96 3.26 105.10 +.12 0.47 78.40 +.55 0.79 70.88 +.59 0.08 110.22 -.02 2.91 39.39 -.02 1.19 70.07 +.46 0.67 21.93 +.03 1.88 54.77 -.28 0.08 11.67 +.01 0.59 53.35 +1.04 0.50 34.43 +.34 0.58 61.98 +.25 0.91 68.63 +.27 0.82 46.84 -.32 3.20 +.05 1.00 48.07 +.26 58.26 +1.81 21.48 +.11 17.77 +.20 1.20 36.70 +.54 4.29 -.13 0.60 37.08 +.53 1.36 49.18 +.22 49.50 +.76 18.00 +.05 17.39 +.23 7.77 -.09 3.94 +.37 21.25 -.11 17.11 +.15 0.09 38.75 +.12 2.82 41.18 +.03 12.33 -.12 8.54 +.22 37.00 -.08 0.54 68.73 +.12 0.28 38.84 +.10 17.75 -.01 2.20 +.19 0.57 8.89 +.28 1.22 25.87 -.02 6.92 +.22 6.10 -.02 9.18 +.33 2.72 53.31 +.12 0.63 19.19 -.13 17.49 +.56 116.79 +1.79 29.90 +.29 15.01 +.40 4.98 -.02 2.60 142.83 +1.77 5.94 -.03 1.08 49.84 +.04 0.24 14.44 -.10 0.50 24.04 +.51 21.92 -.09 6.93 -.08 1.27 54.62 -.03 69.08 +.07 10.62 -.19 0.48 11.93 +.11 1.95 18.60 -.35 30.04 -.51 45.99 -.64 285.59 +5.78 0.44 22.99 +.13 3.57 21.70 +.08 0.29 4.61 +.01 14.75 +.20 0.69 8.69 +.13 8.65 +.15 0.25 21.91 +.38 27.95 +.23 9.46 +.34 4.73 +.25 0.59 26.14 +.30 62.60 +.35 2.30 -.02 23.95 -.52 13.86 +.02 35.40 8.98 -.13 22.75 +.21 12.13 -.12 0.20 38.20 +1.05 1.80 35.00 +.05 2.00 27.03 +.06 1.68 25.38 +.23 0.28 14.84 +.09 0.38 26.45 -.01 24.02 +.74 1.01 39.68 +.30 7.25 -.31 19.18 +.10 2.46 -.05 16.41 -.29

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D 0.04 11.58 +.27 0.33 32.59 -.16 11.20 -.11 0.30 23.52 +.48 6.63 +.04 28.96 -1.24 0.14 12.60 +1.52 43.20 -.70 1.81 -.04 2.16 63.86 +.29 0.52 32.76 +.02 0.20 20.12 +.07 0.20 85.01 +.01 1.20 +.01 45.99 -.57 0.70 72.21 -.41 31.97 +.03 0.25 11.24 +.07 0.20 25.37 -.03 12.98 +.33 0.08 11.22 +.24 0.48 9.03 +.13 1.00 35.65 -.02 21.57 +.03 2.76 -.09 0.56 26.54 +.38 41.57 +.15 13.15 +.09 0.76 33.90 -.33 1.92 26.48 +.08 0.15 21.60 -.01 1.62 50.10 +.02 0.48 33.17 +.38 5.37 -.08 10.35 -.29 0.04 8.30 +.27 14.96 +.50 1.40 33.86 +.53 2.64 66.81 +.43 0.64 17.11 +.08 1.94 25.61 -.24 4.36 71.22 +.27 13.51 +.03 38.10 +.22 14.18 +.02 0.10 18.76 -.26 40.29 +.37 0.24 4.77 +.01 13.40 +.38 0.24 19.20 -.11 1.20 20.49 +.26 0.08 15.27 -.77 4.00 -.05 52.93 -.24 3.81 +.13 13.80 -.24 17.60 +.43 1.16 31.66 +.01 32.40 +1.32 5.30 +.19 0.42 22.19 +.18 6.21 +.04 9.08 +.04 11.84 1.60 70.79 -.26 0.46 30.59 -.36 12.82 +.70 18.42 -.06 4.43 -.57 21.88 4.68 +.02 6.32 +.19 8.85 +.15 1.04 79.96 +.84 4.05 +.08 1.27 +.01 41.45 +.09 33.30 +.10 0.20 37.43 +.34 38.81 +.14 0.44 25.64 +.78 5.11 +.22 8.87 -.13 0.50 35.19 +.50 11.49 -.17 85.71 -1.60 2.33 -.10 0.16 31.52 +.57 1.08 23.82 +.02 0.40 26.86 +.39 0.16 15.14 -.18 0.60 42.86 -.21 25.33 +.27 .87 -.01 1.79 +.07 0.40 7.85 +.26 45.59 -.04 10.63 +.04 1.73 +.01 0.29 4.57 +.05 33.33 -.15 32.98 -.20 14.21 -.29 56.94 -.22 66.95 +.35 1.90 33.19 +.37 46.74 -.36 41.00 +.34 35.88 +.55 1.69 +.04 10.12 +1.08 1.96 38.06 +.30 6.17 -.05 0.60 29.35 +.09 0.80 27.46 -.21 0.04 25.99 +.90 0.92 30.58 -.16 2.52 32.99 +.02 7.55 -.10 9.82 +.05 8.81 +.19 6.83 -.01 1.45 4.57 +.13 4.85 +.45 3.00 70.04 +.02 2.83 +.05 0.25 39.83 +.17 19.33 +.07 39.84 +.84 3.03 +.06 4.50 83.46 +.49 8.29 +.45 0.44 21.05 -.40 1.44 113.82 +.85 0.50 49.12 -.60 45.59 -.44 24.70 -.03 16.59 +.66 26.75 +.25 26.75 +.09

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MAKO Srg ManTech MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktVCoal MktAxess

2.80 76.79 +1.57 12.60 +.13 0.24 6.30 +.03 1.00 26.05 -.74 10.83 +.42 0.63 21.02 +.13 6.96 +.01 13.00 -.39 7.93 -.06 0.90 7.73 +.13 0.58 6.93 9.57 -.50 11.17 +.11 10.11 +.27 2.90 +.02 0.88 54.91 -.07 36.95 +1.07 2.00 44.44 +.99 1.80 32.78 +.13 17.28 +.15 0.20 24.00 -.18 47.71 +.25 2.93 52.56 -.30 4.14 +.11 1.20 87.08 -.69 4.73 +.01 10.84 +.12 42.16 +.69 0.24 2.38 0.08 11.19 -.06 6.76 +.06 0.74 56.57 +1.91 0.52 12.52 +.24 1.00 35.87 +.12 25.77 +.40 0.11 57.14 -.27 0.08 34.23 +.07 35.63 -.02 0.42 50.10 -.04 0.45 60.25 -.93 0.18 87.95 -.16 0.31 40.27 -.35 0.28 17.77 +.35

Nm MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedQuist s MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith Meritage MerL pfK Mesab MetaFincl Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk MoleInsP h Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap3 MS China MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Motricity n MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NCR Corp NETgear NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Nautilus Navios NaviosMar NaviSite Navistar NektarTh Ness Tech NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NexxusLtg NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord

D 2.56 37.46 -.39 0.16 35.49 -.11 0.84 24.35 +.43 0.04 7.12 +.09 23.90 +.16 1.60 78.66 -.88 16.90 -.20 0.30 10.90 -.11 2.00 29.09 +.15 0.24 35.56 +.34 11.64 +.12 0.60 235.45 +1.75 0.75 22.55 +.10 2.92 +.10 0.84 19.11 +.07 3.42 -.14 1.04 43.20 +.28 15.14 -.16 2.44 77.32 -.16 0.94 35.52 -.02 0.72 62.61 +.23 16.02 -2.42 47.40 +.04 0.90 58.09 +.27 0.92 25.60 +.31 25.24 -.10 4.70 8.39 +1.45 53.72 +.39 7.16 -.07 0.80 10.92 +.16 13.98 +.26 0.24 30.36 +.50 24.63 -1.15 12.25 +.20 0.90 34.00 +.71 5.60 +.03 20.56 +.53 0.36 25.34 +.23 10.92 +.10 62.94 -2.32 1.52 37.23 +.28 0.92 34.88 +.29 18.85 +.08 1.61 22.74 -.24 1.70 41.22 -1.12 0.52 14.71 -4.24 4.53 +.12 0.62 27.09 +.13 0.74 40.48 +1.26 10.84 +.19 4.00 +.01 0.14 10.43 -.11 1.37 30.88 -.12 7.58 +.18 7.54 -.07 43.45 -.98 20.13 +.07 0.64 25.82 +.28 2.14 +.04 2.46 61.49 +.98 .63 -.00 0.09 20.02 +.26 7.24 96.27 -2.78 0.20 29.88 7.93 -.01 9.09 -.23 10.54 +.18 4.72 +.09 2.89 +.05 23.07 +.03 12.99 +.11 6.67 +.14 55.27 +.22 1.07 -.20 0.61 21.70 -.07 1.12 47.78 -.93 30.96 +2.71 14.52 +.09 1.12 56.78 13.05 +.04 0.36 18.07 +.19 0.42 26.61 +.11 0.20 25.40 +.38 1.56 23.86 -.14 5.82 30.11 -.32 1.20 17.40 -.10 7.27 +.35 0.20 66.66 -1.73 7.89 -.07 18.00 +1.00 0.07 3.01 -.11 1.10 65.24 -.37 18.94 -.37 19.33 -.01 4.97 +.05 14.25 -.02 28.00 +.07 .70 +.01 37.01 -1.02 2.77 +.12 6.85 -.03 20.86 0.44 13.25 +.09 1.20 30.04 +.59 19.44 -.11 0.14 26.79 +.14 13.99 +.13 20.47 +.56 0.29 2.34 +.01 14.22 +.24 1.38 55.12 +.32 7.17 45.90 +.03 0.40 48.31 -.29 0.04 6.62 +.16 1.52 27.11 +.39 0.40 12.99 -.05 1.84 41.02 +.58 1.50 +.08 0.24 6.10 +.15 1.68 18.37 -.11 3.36 +.06 49.30 +.55 15.88 +.35 4.81 +.07 13.63 -.05 26.46 -.23 50.30 -.03 39.00 +.05 26.90 -.02 153.00 -2.72 3.63 -.13 2.08 +.10 20.52 -.04 1.51 -.01 0.24 3.79 +.03 8.30 +.26 24.84 +.02 14.86 +.55 5.50 -.13 .04 -.00 .09 -.01 7.02 -.02 94.06 +2.56 3.32 +.22 1.00 16.62 +.10 8.04 -.24 0.28 12.79 +.21 4.06 +.06 0.20 18.23 +.12 59.77 +.10 0.60 62.49 +.61 8.68 +.09 12.67 +.17 0.15 14.02 -.16 0.15 15.82 -.20 0.20 22.29 +.17 2.00 55.82 +.50 2.73 +.03 0.92 17.90 +.12 1.86 48.20 +.08 1.08 81.66 -.34 16.34 +.47 22.79 +.13 0.20 35.81 -.09 0.72 78.63 +.63 0.56 10.94 +.06 5.22 +.06 1.55 26.90 +.27 0.80 38.86 +.06 1.44 61.49 -.02 4.59 +.02 1.03 30.42 -.28 9.08 +.14 18.17 -.25 1.12 50.15 +1.41 2.86 -.04 1.88 61.62 -.25 0.40 4.30 +.06 0.40 11.40 +.25 9.31 -.16 1.99 59.77 +.75 10.51 -.10 2.40 +.08 6.07 -.01 27.09 -.04 1.41 95.87 -4.83

NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvDCmdty NuvFltOp NvIMO NuvMuVal NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvPI NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt OmegaP Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncothyr 1800Flowrs ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpkoHlth OptimerPh optXprs Oracle Orexigen OrientEH OrienPap n OriginAg OrionMar Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordRs n Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PimShMat PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld PacWstBc Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB h PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PampaEng PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd Pantry ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo Peregrne rs PerfectWld PerkElm PermFix Perrigo PetMed Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PionFltRt PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS BasMet PS USDBull PwSClnEn PwSLgCV PSFinPf PSETecLd PSVrdoTF PSHYCpBd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinctnR PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProUSSlv rs

D 1.60 39.30 -.23 0.50 32.03 +.02 34.84 +.80 15.29 -.15 1.44 39.51 +.26 0.70 19.22 -.60 25.05 +.01 0.78 11.76 -.01 0.86 14.70 -.04 0.47 9.97 +.01 0.75 8.48 -.02 0.75 8.92 +.02 0.92 14.19 -.12 0.66 8.46 -.02 11.36 +.07 21.48 +.05 1.45 43.62 +.32 33.09 +.34 53.12 -.57 21.66 +.02 1.52 85.45 +.51 54.39 -.73 1.12 +.17 0.85 14.95 +.09 16.75 8.72 -.04 2.18 +.16 4.90 +.04 15.52 -.01 2.66 119.16 -.93 50.07 -.10 .46 -.00 25.96 +.03 0.28 10.12 +.11 0.69 14.11 +.19 0.80 21.36 +.27 1.48 23.15 +.29 5.98 +.14 0.13 23.03 +.07 0.80 42.07 +.31 24.71 +.09 7.62 +.10 7.10 -.12 3.34 -.04 1.76 1.84 49.47 +.14 27.92 +.52 47.81 -.35 62.90 -.13 1.77 +.03 2.61 +.09 9.99 +.14 15.74 +.37 0.20 29.23 +.33 6.21 +.02 11.85 +.23 4.80 -.06 9.00 +.02 13.52 -.34 2.13 +.08 31.18 -.27 1.75 34.28 +.60 0.71 28.50 +.09 27.29 +.26 29.32 +1.32 21.23 -.49 .27 +.00 1.00 5.64 +.12 0.42 47.88 1.82 47.21 +.31 19.06 +.05 0.71 101.06 7.15 -.06 4.22 -.31 0.40 53.01 +1.69 0.50 11.98 +.09 1.43 110.78 -1.07 2.20 76.88 +.11 1.40 27.93 +.40 21.90 -.02 0.04 18.71 +.57 0.48 50.43 -.04 5.74 +.16 .82 +.02 1.01 -.01 6.12 +.13 0.60 24.35 +.19 33.15 4.30 +.03 0.64 43.50 +.02 0.08 12.69 +.26 0.05 31.20 -.10 0.11 14.68 +.07 91.08 -.95 21.50 -1.01 33.59 -.14 0.20 3.90 -.01 20.26 +.09 1.77 +.03 21.01 +.28 4.81 1.08 72.42 +1.39 2.00 81.31 +.24 13.18 -.08 0.40 28.36 -.14 0.20 19.59 +.05 1.24 27.63 +.02 0.28 51.53 -.25 0.12 26.72 -.03 0.84 11.55 +.17 31.00 +.39 0.23 15.22 +.16 1.80 22.69 +.18 1.04 11.20 +.19 0.80 33.30 -.57 0.60 13.28 +.41 13.87 +.12 0.76 34.99 +.29 0.62 13.16 +.01 0.12 11.71 +.22 1.08 19.67 +.24 1.92 66.50 -.18 1.89 +.25 29.89 +.69 0.28 23.60 +.39 1.78 -.05 0.25 64.67 -.36 0.50 15.70 -.26 17.94 +.41 1.18 31.99 +.13 1.18 34.46 +.17 6.01 -.08 0.50 35.76 -.09 0.72 17.80 +.05 4.00 +.81 3.81 66.78 +.28 0.60 24.53 +.39 7.35 +.09 10.21 +.50 2.56 58.38 -.16 0.95 31.71 -1.82 0.15 62.47 -.45 2.38 +.10 6.43 -.03 1.12 29.45 -.05 1.26 18.75 +.36 7.67 -.07 6.02 +.11 1.38 17.27 -.04 1.46 13.03 +.04 11.36 -.05 2.10 41.87 +.21 6.72 +.08 0.87 12.65 -.14 0.08 73.55 -.02 1.46 21.56 -.30 3.80 63.37 -.13 27.72 -.46 1.89 -.08 0.32 43.53 +.26 .44 -.01 1.68 37.26 +.39 1.60 69.52 +1.58 0.40 95.66 +.39 28.94 +.52 1.67 -.04 12.88 +.06 33.87 -.22 0.52 20.92 +.16 2.89 +.05 1.04 20.87 +.16 0.80 30.50 +.52 0.40 143.21 -1.70 2.04 35.68 +.14 0.20 31.78 -1.03 10.50 +.18 62.94 -2.99 25.19 +.25 28.60 +.08 23.15 +.34 22.32 -.02 10.28 -.01 0.39 17.86 +.19 1.30 17.99 -.01 0.11 18.18 +.10 0.08 24.99 1.53 18.42 -.01 1.02 14.24 -.04 1.62 28.24 -.09 0.12 25.82 -.03 0.33 51.30 -.19 1.87 +.02 1.80 90.78 +.07 0.12 130.41 -2.33 7.49 +.35 1.08 52.92 +.54 353.76 -.84 31.64 -.31 1.80 0.50 26.92 +.44 0.04 12.30 +.34 46.63 -.24 36.91 -.09 47.14 -.20 27.40 -.34 0.40 49.90 +.48 22.97 -.23 72.66 -.21 13.35 +.10 0.43 42.27 +.44 33.55 -.62 27.35 -.26 34.74 +.18 19.36 -.37 49.64 -.88 25.59 -.01 0.41 49.40 +1.19 18.82 -.79 0.09 56.98 +2.11 38.10 +.05 0.23 35.64 +.64 0.10 39.59 -.06 36.04 -.26 125.74 15.77 -.30 0.01 35.03 +.59 41.79 -.37 25.20 +.63 0.48 164.99 -2.34 10.89 +.43 17.32 -.34

Nm

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ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProceraNt ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PureBio PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

12.29 -.54 104.25 +1.87 15.77 -.09 18.83 .52 -.01 1.93 63.35 +.59 2.48 44.97 +.27 36.81 +.68 0.16 20.66 -.05 0.60 12.58 -.08 1.21 9.98 +.19 0.62 32.87 +.81 9.96 +.57 0.56 22.83 +.60 0.72 7.78 +.07 0.70 54.66 +.84 33.62 +.01 1.37 33.73 +.48 3.20 101.92 +.96 9.08 -.27 8.21 +.24 2.63 +.11 0.53 7.85 +.11 0.64 6.41 +.03 0.71 6.96 +.02

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Banks

bounded after plummeting during the crisis.

Continued from B1 How JPMorgan won while its customers lost provides a glimpse into the ways Wall Street banks can, and often do, gain advantages over their customers. Today’s giant banks not only create and sell investment products, but also bet on those products, and sometimes against them, putting the banks’ interests at odds with those of their customers. The banks and their lobbyists also help fashion financial rules and regulations. And banks’ traders know what their customers are buying and selling, giving them a valuable edge. Some of JPMorgan’s customers say they are disappointed with the bank. “They took 40 percent of our profits, and even that was OK,” said Jerry Davis, the chairman of the municipal employee pension fund in New Orleans, which lost about $340,000, enough to wipe out years of profits that it had earned through securities lending. “But then we started losing money, and they didn’t lose along with us.” Through a spokesman, JPMorgan’s chairman and chief executive, Jamie Dimon, declined a request for an interview. The spokesman, Joseph Evangelisti, said that JPMorgan had a long record of success in securities lending, and that the losses represented only a small fraction of the funds in the program. Moreover, Evangelisti said, all of the investments had been permitted under guidelines negotiated with the bank’s clients. JPMorgan, he said, did not take undue risks. The financial regulation bill that Congress just passed, after fierce lobbying by banks, is aimed at curtailing some of the practices that caused the financial crisis. But much of Wall Street has mostly gone back to business as usual. Nowhere are the potential conflicts more apparent than on the trading floors, where executives must balance their pursuit of profits and their duty to customers. In addition to losing money for New Orleans workers and others, securities lending also played a central role in the near-collapse of the American International Group. Through securities lending, pensions and mutual funds borrow money to make trades, adding to the risks within the financial system. Lawsuits are flying against JPMorgan and others, including Northern Trust. Clients say that they were not warned of the risks associated with this practice and that the banks breached their fiduciary duty. Despite such troubles, the securities lending business has re-

Quiet growth James Wilson entered the securities lending business in the 1990s, when it was still a backwater. The financial industry was then in the midst of a transformation that was threatening some of its traditional sources of earnings. Stock brokerage commissions were being squeezed, and profits from making loans were dwindling. So at Chemical Bank, which was later absorbed into the JPMorgan empire, Wilson ratcheted up securities lending. Though he was ambitious, former colleagues say Wilson had an unassuming way that won the confidence of clients. He was well-known at industry conferences, and he often stepped up to the microphone as a master of ceremonies. Moreover, he saw the growth potential in securities lending and stayed in it longer than many of his peers and competitors. Wilson, 55, retired after the 2008 losses. He declined to comment last month when reached by phone at his home in New Jersey. The idea behind securities lending is simple: It allows big investors like pension funds to make extra money on their investments, without having to sell them. In a typical transaction, a pension fund or other institution lets a bank like JPMorgan lend some of its stocks or bonds to other investors, like hedge funds or banks. In return, those investors put up a cash security deposit, in case they are unable to return the securities. The pension funds and other institutions then authorize JPMorgan traders, like Wilson, to use that cash deposit to trade. To pension fund managers, this is an attractive proposition. That is because eking out marginally higher returns on investments — even just another quarter or half of a percentage point a year — can make a difference over time. At Chemical Bank and later at JPMorgan, Wilson pushed the trading linked to securities lending to new heights, according to former colleagues. He urged his customers — funds like the one for New Orleans workers — to let him put the cash into longer-term investments. The bigger risks led to bigger rewards, and more pensions signed on. Securities lending also fostered the rapid growth of hedge funds, which often borrow shares from pension funds to bet against those stocks. The practice also helped spur the creation of some of the arcane investments that eventually threatened the nation’s financial system. Today, institutions around the

world have about $20 trillion of securities that they are offering to lend out. That is roughly twice the market value of every corporation included in the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 B5

collapsed after JPMorgan pulled out to protect itself. When Sigma collapsed, in September 2008, CashCo lost $99 million and other JPMorgan clients lost roughly $400 million more, according to JPMorgan client presentations. Sigma’s notes recovered a little since then and are now worth 4 cents on the dollar.

Dangerous investments When Matthew Sarson arrived on the securities lending floor at JPMorgan in 2004, as part of the bank’s merger with Bank One, Wilson and his team were hunting for new ways to expand their business. Under Wilson, Sarson soon began managing a fund called CashCo, which pooled together the cash deposits that small pensions received for lending out their securities. One of those small pensions was the New Orleans fund. Former colleagues described Sarson, 44, as a low-key Wall Street everyman. He invested his customers’ money according to guidelines to which the funds had agreed, according to former employees, and he adopted the don’tblame-us attitude that pervaded the department. JPMorgan’s contract with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, for instance, stated that the customer bore the “sole risk” for the investments. It included a five-page appendix describing investments that were permitted. Among the requirements was that the investment carry a safe credit rating, of A or better. That turned out to be a problem in 2008, as the financial crisis began to unfold. Sarson bought a variety of investments that, while highly rated, turned out to be risky, including IOUs from Bear Stearns Cos. and Lehman Brothers, two Wall Street banks that sunk in the collapse. As Bear Stearns hit trouble in March of that year, the phones on the securities lending trading floor began ringing nonstop. Pensions and other clients were demanding to know why JPMorgan had left its cash in the plunging Bear Stearns investments, former JPMorgan employees said. JPMorgan’s response: the Bear investments were allowed under the clients’ guidelines. The calls were particularly tense because JPMorgan had bought the stricken Bear Stearns on attractive terms. Some clients believed the bank should have known trouble was coming. In the end, investors did not lose money on the Bear notes, but the tremors were a sign of trouble. Around that time, Sarson and other traders began to focus on another troubled trade: an investment vehicle known as Sigma. JPMorgan had inside knowledge of Sigma, because the bank had helped finance it. But Sigma

Bearing losses alone When the bottom fell out, the officials in New Orleans were stunned. In January 2009, a representative from JPMorgan, Robert Bentz, visited to discuss the situation. “These are not easy meetings,” Bentz began, according to a tape recording from the meeting. Bentz told the New Orleans officials that former workers from Citigroup Inc. created Sigma. “So it was like Bernie Madoff!” one city official exclaimed. Bentz replied: “I would like to think he was more of a crook, and these people were just smart.” But a deal was a deal, Bentz said, and he said JPMorgan did not plan to help the New Orleans workers cover their losses. There are few signs of change in the industry. Some pensions have begun asking banks whether they will agree to share not only potential profits but also potential losses. The Missouri State Employees’ Retirement System, for instance, asked banks if they would promise to cover any such losses. All of the banks that replied declined to do so, according to Christine Rackers, a spokeswoman for that fund. In late September, JPMorgan bankers paid another visit to the New Orleans fund, which decided not to sue the bank but stood to benefit if two class actions were successful. The conversation shifted to the Lehman and Sigma losses, the lawsuits against JPMorgan and the pension officials’ belief that the bank had failed them. A JPMorgan banker mumbled apologies and rushed out. Davis said in an interview that the pension was considering looking for a new bank, even though leaving that would mean his fund would have to immediately pay JPMorgan for its losses. He also said he was disappointed that regulators had not intervened on behalf of funds like his. He added, half-joking, that he wished his pension fund were a JPMorgan shareholder, rather than a JPMorgan customer. “If I were a shareholder, I would say, ‘I love Jamie Dimon to death because he’s going to go out there and make money every way he can, no matter what happens to his customers,’ ” he said. “He’s making money off of me.”

Umpqua Continued from B1 In the suit, Padrick accused Umpqua Bank of continuing to solicit bank deposits from Summit and promote Summit, even after the suit says Umpqua learned of what Padrick alleged was a Ponzi scheme. As a 1031 exchange, named after section 1031 of the U.S. Tax Code, Summit would help real estate investors avoid the capital gains tax on the sale of a property. Investors can avoid the tax by purchasing another property of equal or greater value within 180 days, if the sale is handled by a third-party administrator like Summit. Summit eventually ran into liquidity problems, stating on its website that it was short $14.2 million. It later filed for bankruptcy in December 2008 because the money was tied up in real estate, in which Summit clients’ money had been invested, rather than in liquid bank accounts, according to previous articles in The Bulle-

Foreclosure Continued from B1 Bank of America plans to begin filing new paperwork for 102,000 foreclosures by Monday. Consumer advocates and lawyers for homeowners expressed skepticism that Bank of America could complete a review of the paperwork so quickly. But the banking industry has come under increasing pressure from investors to resolve the problem. Investors have fled bank stocks in recent days, worrying that the foreclosure halt would cost banks billions of dollars and inflict further harm on the nation’s struggling housing market. Bank of America is scheduled to report its latest quarterly results Tuesday. Its shares have suffered more than other big banks, so any sign that the crisis is easing is likely to be greeted favorably by shareholders. Reports of improper procedures at mortgage servicers have set off a political furor. On Wednesday, all 50 state attorneys general announced an investigation of mortgage servicing . Bank of America said it would resume foreclosures in the 23 states where judicial approval was required after an internal review turned up no

tin citing court documents. In the complaint against Umpqua, Padrick alleges that the principals of Summit had embezzled money for years by loaning Summit’s funds to another business they controlled. The suit said Summit could only pay back former clients by finding new ones and alleged “the principals engaged in a classic Ponzi scheme.” Umpqua always denied wrongdoing in the case it settled with Padrick and the creditors. While Padrick had first filed a suit in June 2009, the creditors filed a suit of their own later that year. Eventually, the two suits were combined in Multnomah County Circuit Court. At the beginning of March, Summit’s four principals agreed to pay the creditors a total of $16.8 million in damages as a part of a settlement in a separate lawsuit Padrick filed in 2009 in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

evidence that cases were filed in error. However, the company’s suspension of the process will remain in effect in the 27 other states that do not require a judge’s approval to foreclose, as the bank’s paperwork review proceeds state by state. It was the only bank to initiate a nationwide freeze. “We did a thorough review of the process, and we found the facts underlying the decision to foreclose have been accurate,” said Barbara Desoer, president of Bank of America Home Loans. “We paused while we were doing that, and now we’re moving forward.” In the other 27 states, Desoer said, she expects foreclosures to resume within weeks. Bank of America was careful to note that the major holders of mortgages — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — as well as private investors had signed off on its decision and had been consulted during the review. Of the 14 million mortgages it services — about $2.1 trillion worth — about half are owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the giant mortgage holding companies now controlled by the Treasury. About 30 percent are owned by institutional investors, like hedge funds, pension funds and insurance companies, while Bank of America holds 20 percent.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

9 14 82 29 55 ... ... 29 22 54 17 12 34 10 ... ... 20 ... 15 ... 7

47.59 +.44 +37.7 21.76 +.09 +.8 12.34 +.36 -18.1 16.15 +.08 +31.4 70.23 +.12 +29.7 .54 +.01 -20.6 37.17 +1.51 +35.2 57.96 +.19 +48.5 63.21 -.49 +6.8 6.44 +.30 +168.3 25.77 -.02 -21.3 43.32 +.50 -15.9 12.66 +.27 -4.9 19.19 -.13 -5.9 8.30 +.27 +49.5 22.19 +.18 +8.1 5.11 +.22 +89.3 8.29 +.45 +18.8 21.02 +.13 -10.9 10.92 +.10 +23.7 25.82 +.28 -15.3

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1372.00 $1371.20 $24.397

Pvs Day $1365.00 $1371.10 $24.272

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 17 18 27 80 ... 37 20 ... 24 17 9 26 22 ... 17 86 10 ... ...

81.66 -.34 +23.6 38.86 +.06 +3.4 50.64 +.26 +12.4 15.52 -.01 +22.3 50.43 -.04 +39.0 2.24 +.04 -20.3 37.26 +.39 -1.3 130.41 -2.33 +18.2 22.44 +.68 +5.4 51.60 +1.25 +8.2 72.17 +.17 +17.1 39.76 +.79 -.6 27.35 -.19 +18.6 9.49 -.02 +58.2 11.25 +.14 -16.1 23.16 +.62 +2.9 15.40 +.26 -20.4 24.87 +1.29 -7.9 2.71 +.20 +29.0 15.32 -.20 -3.3

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl GenElec

8694748 3951157 1222385 753260 669207

Last Chg 4.17 12.34 118.54 14.67 16.25

+.22 +.36 +.84 +.33 -.05

Gainers ($2 or more) Name QksilvRes Raythn wt Compx FstPfd pfA FTDJMic

Last 14.65 10.33 10.84 8.65 21.50

Chg %Chg +2.04 +1.20 +1.17 +.90 +2.08

+16.2 +13.1 +12.1 +11.6 +10.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name McMoRn McMo pfM Valhi BlockHR IDT Cp C

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name PhrmAth RareEle g AbdAsPac GoldStr g Taseko

Name

407610 63202 35833 27281 26142

4.00 +.81 9.62 +1.97 6.94 -.14 5.21 -.04 6.69 -.07

PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft AGA Med n SiriusXM

Gainers ($2 or more) RareEle g PhrmAth GoldenMin InvCapHld SearchMed

Last

CCA Inds PacOffPT GoldResrc ChiArmM iMergent

2,031 1,003 110 3,144 169 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Last Chg

541911 540459 460878 382537 369708

51.30 -.19 19.19 -.13 25.82 +.28 20.70 +5.99 1.38 -.01

Name

Last

AGA Med n RockAgs YRC Ww rs GS Fncl SkyPFrtJ n

Chg %Chg

20.70 +5.99 +40.7 5.14 +1.04 +25.4 4.50 +.80 +21.6 11.42 +1.74 +17.9 5.69 +.77 +15.7

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.89 -.37 4.30 -.30 21.30 -1.40 4.31 -.26 4.51 -.20

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

9.62 +1.97 +25.8 4.00 +.81 +25.4 23.00 +1.95 +9.3 4.09 +.34 +9.1 2.19 +.16 +8.0

Name

-13.1 -13.1 -12.3 -11.5 -7.9

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

16.02 -2.42 109.21 -16.48 21.88 -3.08 10.94 -1.42 12.29 -1.06

Nasdaq

Name

Last

-7.0 -6.5 -6.2 -5.8 -4.2

MetaFincl LJ Intl EntropCom FstUtdCp ChinaMda

225 242 48 515 15 1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Chg %Chg

14.71 -4.24 -22.4 4.43 -.57 -11.4 7.75 -.76 -8.9 4.10 -.35 -7.9 15.02 -1.18 -7.3

Diary 1,735 896 143 2,774 137 25

11,258.01 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,118.77 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,143.69 4,713.00 410.37 7,571.10 2,105.99 2,480.66 1,184.71 12,486.95 710.13

+80.91 +18.22 +4.14 +50.50 +5.36 +11.89 +8.52 +86.97 +6.97

YTD %Chg %Chg +.73 +.39 +1.02 +.67 +.26 +.48 +.72 +.70 +.99

52-wk %Chg

+6.86 +14.96 +3.11 +5.37 +15.40 +9.32 +6.24 +8.12 +13.55

+10.42 +16.72 +5.85 +4.83 +12.09 +13.98 +7.91 +9.84 +14.11

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.72 2,672.38 3,834.50 5,742.52 6,516.63 23,469.38 34,919.31 21,258.59 3,262.35 9,498.49 1,875.42 3,181.27 4,723.40 5,747.43

+.08 s +.51 s +.19 s +.69 s +.37 s -1.21 t +.51 s +.93 s +.20 s -.02 t -1.41 t -.72 t -.73 t +.40 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9933 1.5936 .9857 .002078 .1504 1.3998 .1289 .012315 .080597 .0329 .000896 .1508 1.0448 .0324

.9884 1.5985 .9869 .002087 .1505 1.3963 .1289 .012280 .080470 .0330 .000901 .1508 1.0419 .0326

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.68 +0.15 +7.7 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.94 +0.04 +8.0 GrowthI 23.94 +0.07 +8.6 Ultra 21.12 +0.10 +8.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.53 +0.10 +6.1 AMutlA p 24.39 +0.14 +7.4 BalA p 17.32 +0.10 +8.6 BondA p 12.51 +0.03 +9.3 CapWA p 21.40 +0.01 +9.6 CapIBA p 50.11 +0.15 +7.6 CapWGA p 35.47 +0.16 +6.4 EupacA p 41.33 +0.08 +7.8 FdInvA p 34.74 +0.15 +7.3 GovtA p 14.74 +0.04 +7.6 GwthA p 28.97 +0.15 +6.0 HI TrA p 11.28 -0.01 +12.7 IncoA p 16.43 +0.06 +9.5 IntBdA p 13.70 +0.03 +6.4 ICAA p 27.02 +0.16 +5.7 NEcoA p 24.41 +0.10 +8.5 N PerA p 27.67 +0.07 +7.9 NwWrldA 54.81 +0.02 +16.1 SmCpA p 36.96 +0.05 +17.2 TxExA p 12.47 +6.8 WshA p 26.02 +0.17 +7.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.69 -0.06 +5.1 IntlEqA 28.92 -0.07 +4.9 IntEqII I r 12.29 -0.02 +4.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.82 +0.08 +5.6 MidCap 30.19 +0.04 +18.1 MidCapVal 19.30 +0.03 +7.3 Baron Funds: Growth 45.40 +0.32 +9.9 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.21 +0.04 +10.7 DivMu 14.74 +0.01 +4.9 TxMgdIntl 15.95 +0.09 +4.4 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.82 +0.12 +7.2 GlAlA r 19.09 +0.06 +7.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.81 +0.06 +6.4 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.86 +0.12 +7.5 GlbAlloc r 19.19 +0.07 +7.3 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.03 +0.05 +10.3 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.35 +0.05 +7.2 DivrBd 5.10 +0.01 +9.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.81 +0.12 +12.8 AcornIntZ 39.28 +0.06 +16.8 ValRestr 45.83 +0.26 +8.2 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.90 +0.06 +9.5 USCorEq2 10.07 +0.08 +11.2 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.49 +0.19 +4.9 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.88 +0.19 +5.1 NYVen C 31.26 +0.18 +4.3 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.78 +0.02 +9.1 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.46 -0.10 +19.2 EmMktV 36.47 -0.19 +17.1 IntSmVa 16.35 +0.10 +9.5 LargeCo 9.35 +0.07 +7.9 USLgVa 18.59 +0.15 +10.4 US SmVa 22.85 +0.27 +16.6 IntlSmCo 16.23 +0.09 +15.6 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 18.06 +0.12 +8.0 Glb5FxInc 11.69 +0.02 +7.8 2YGlFxd 10.24 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.70 +0.31 +6.1 Income 13.42 +0.03 +7.4 IntlStk 35.52 +0.15 +11.5 Stock 100.26 +0.58 +5.3 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.14 +0.18 +3.2

NatlMunInc 10.00 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.34 LgCapVal 17.19 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.90 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.97 FPACres 26.42 Fairholme 33.37 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.29 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.94 StrInA 12.96 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.14 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.44 FF2015 11.21 FF2020 13.53 FF2020K 12.92 FF2025 11.22 FF2030 13.36 FF2035 11.06 FF2040 7.72 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.30 AMgr50 14.97 Balanc 17.53 BlueChGr 41.65 Canada 54.14 CapAp 23.75 CpInc r 9.31 Contra 64.39 ContraK 64.43 DisEq 21.70 DivIntl 29.62 DivrsIntK r 29.64 DivGth 25.97 EmrMk 25.72 Eq Inc 41.24 EQII 17.00 Fidel 29.63 FltRateHi r 9.72

+9.5 +4.4 +0.19 +3.5 +0.05 +5.4 +0.01 +3.1 +0.04 +8.0 +0.37 +10.9 +13.5 +0.05 +10.1 +10.5 +0.05 +10.3 +0.04 +0.04 +0.05 +0.05 +0.04 +0.05 +0.05 +0.04

+8.1 +8.3 +8.5 +8.7 +8.7 +8.5 +8.4 +8.5

+0.06 +7.5 +0.04 +9.6 +0.07 +8.9 +0.11 +9.8 -0.08 +11.7 +0.10 +10.8 +13.1 +0.16 +10.7 +0.16 +10.8 +0.13 +3.3 +0.07 +5.8 +0.06 +5.9 +0.17 +10.3 -0.13 +13.8 +0.36 +6.7 +0.15 +5.3 +0.19 +5.1 +5.8

GNMA 11.73 GovtInc 10.80 GroCo 76.62 GroInc 16.93 GrowthCoK 76.68 HighInc r 8.97 Indepn 22.05 IntBd 10.80 IntmMu 10.42 IntlDisc 32.34 InvGrBd 11.73 InvGB 7.52 LgCapVal 11.83 LatAm 57.96 LevCoStk 24.86 LowP r 36.11 LowPriK r 36.10 Magelln 66.82 MidCap 26.05 MuniInc 12.92 NwMkt r 16.49 OTC 50.18 100Index 8.39 Ovrsea 31.69 Puritn 17.17 SCmdtyStrt 11.40 StIntMu 10.78 STBF 8.52 SmllCpS r 17.68 StratInc 11.56 StrReRt r 9.35 TotalBd 11.02 USBI 11.61 Value 64.03 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.15 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.97 IntlInxInv 35.46 TotMktInv 34.37 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.97 TotMktAd r 34.38 First Eagle:

+0.02 +7.9 +0.03 +7.3 +0.12 +11.1 +0.12 +5.9 +0.12 +11.2 +11.8 +0.09 +10.7 +0.03 +9.5 +5.4 +0.02 +6.6 +0.02 +8.9 +0.02 +9.7 +0.12 +5.2 +0.15 +13.4 +0.15 +8.6 +0.17 +13.3 +0.17 +13.4 +0.14 +4.0 +0.09 +11.5 +7.1 -0.03 +14.6 +0.30 +9.8 +0.07 +5.8 +0.04 +2.5 +0.09 +8.8 +0.05 +4.6 +3.2 +0.01 +4.2 +0.08 +10.9 +10.8 +0.03 +10.4 +0.02 +9.6 +0.03 +8.1 +0.41 +12.5 -0.41 +27.5 +0.30 +7.9 +0.17 +6.1 +0.24 +9.3 +0.30 +7.9 +0.24 +9.3

GlblA 44.57 +0.14 +11.5 OverseasA 22.07 +0.05 +13.4 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.10 +0.01 +6.6 FoundAl p 10.32 +0.04 +6.9 HYTFA p 10.36 +9.3 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +9.6 USGovA p 6.85 +0.01 +6.6 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.5 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.01 +9.8 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.01 +9.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.06 +0.11 +6.2 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.93 +0.01 +5.8 GlBd A p 13.78 -0.04 +12.3 GrwthA p 17.59 +0.03 +4.6 WorldA p 14.55 +0.03 +4.2 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.81 -0.03 +12.0 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.14 +0.24 +3.5 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.84 +0.14 +3.6 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.88 +0.15 +6.7 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.19 -0.07 +15.8 IntlCorEq 28.86 +0.15 +8.0 Quality 19.84 +0.13 +3.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.28 +11.6 HYMuni 8.84 +12.6 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.16 +0.02 +10.1 CapApInst 34.35 +0.14 +4.2 IntlInv t 59.07 +0.18 +8.6 Intl r 59.77 +0.19 +8.9 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.17 +0.22 +4.9 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.15 +0.21 +5.0 Hartford HLS IA :

CapApp 39.29 +0.23 +7.5 Div&Gr 18.69 +0.15 +6.6 Advisers 18.75 +0.12 +7.4 TotRetBd 11.47 +0.04 +8.9 HussmnStrGr 13.06 -0.08 +2.2 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.25 +0.04 +1.5 CmstkA 14.74 +0.09 +8.0 EqIncA 8.17 +0.05 +6.4 GrIncA p 17.90 +0.14 +4.6 HYMuA 9.64 -0.01 +10.7 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.79 -0.14 +4.6 AssetStA p 23.46 -0.14 +5.3 AssetStrI r 23.66 -0.14 +5.5 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.73 +0.03 +8.5 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.73 +0.04 +8.7 HighYld 8.19 +12.5 IntmTFBd 11.13 +4.6 ShtDurBd 11.06 +3.3 USLCCrPls 19.42 +0.15 +6.8 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.65 +0.26 +16.8 PrkMCVal T 21.24 +0.09 +7.3 Twenty T 63.99 +0.55 +3.9 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.73 +0.04 +9.7 LSGrwth 12.54 +0.04 +9.5 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.04 +0.17 +11.2 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.65 -0.10 +20.6 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.99 -0.11 +20.3 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.10 -0.03 +5.7 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.74 +0.01 +11.0 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.44 +0.03 +13.1 StrInc C 15.01 +0.03 +12.2 LSBondR 14.38 +0.03 +12.9 StrIncA 14.94 +0.03 +12.9

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.68 +0.04 +12.6 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.58 +0.09 +4.2 BdDebA p 7.77 +0.01 +11.0 ShDurIncA p 4.67 +6.5 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.77 +0.10 +6.8 ValueA 21.67 +0.22 +5.4 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.76 +0.22 +5.6 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.91 +10.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.66 +0.02 +7.3 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 18.23 -0.03 +17.0 PacTiger 23.41 -0.10 +21.7 MergerFd 15.94 +2.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.76 +0.03 +12.8 TotRtBdI 10.75 +0.02 +12.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.91 +0.14 +8.2 GlbDiscZ 29.30 +0.13 +8.4 QuestZ 18.25 +0.09 +5.9 SharesZ 20.26 +0.12 +6.6 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.38 +0.18 +9.6 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.91 +0.19 +9.3 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.32 +12.1 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.57 +0.05 +4.0 Intl I r 18.82 +0.05 +11.8 Oakmark r 39.62 +0.11 +7.0 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.98 +12.9 GlbSMdCap 14.82 +0.02 +16.1 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.00 +0.20 +2.7 DvMktA p 34.68 +20.6 GlobA p 58.53 +0.32 +10.4 GblStrIncA 4.39 +17.2

IntBdA p 6.99 +12.8 MnStFdA 30.71 +0.22 +9.2 RisingDivA 14.62 +0.09 +6.2 S&MdCpVl 29.31 +0.12 +10.3 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.27 +0.09 +5.4 S&MdCpVl 25.19 +0.11 +9.6 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.22 +0.08 +5.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.34 -0.01 +10.3 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.37 +20.9 IntlBdY 6.99 +13.1 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.69 +0.02 +10.7 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.27 +0.02 +13.0 AllAsset 12.70 +0.03 +14.3 ComodRR 8.73 +0.04 +14.2 HiYld 9.36 +0.01 +13.2 InvGrCp 11.93 +0.04 +14.0 LowDu 10.71 +0.01 +5.7 RealRtnI 11.84 +0.01 +11.7 ShortT 9.94 +2.0 TotRt 11.69 +0.02 +10.9 TR II 11.25 +0.03 +9.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.71 +0.01 +5.3 RealRtA p 11.84 +0.01 +11.3 TotRtA 11.69 +0.02 +10.5 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.69 +0.02 +9.9 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.69 +0.02 +10.6 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.69 +0.02 +10.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.27 +0.14 +14.5 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.00 +0.17 NE Price Funds: BlChip 35.69 +0.18 +8.9 CapApp 19.54 +0.11 +7.6 EmMktS 34.67 -0.07 +15.2

EqInc 22.09 EqIndex 31.93 Growth 30.14 HlthSci 28.69 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.57 IntlStk 14.10 MidCap 54.54 MCapVal 22.35 N Asia 19.39 New Era 46.30 N Horiz 30.06 N Inc 9.77 R2010 15.23 R2015 11.68 R2020 16.00 R2025 11.64 R2030 16.59 R2040 16.61 ShtBd 4.90 SmCpStk 31.95 SmCapVal 33.38 SpecIn 12.49 Value 21.88 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.63 VoyA p 22.38 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.61 PremierI r 18.35 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.76 S&P Sel 18.71 Scout Funds: Intl 31.51 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.34 AmShS p 39.27 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.40 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.99 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.12 IntValue I 27.71

+0.17 +0.22 +0.13 +0.19

+6.9 +7.7 +9.6 +9.6 +12.5 +9.2 +0.06 +11.9 +0.20 +14.8 +0.12 +7.9 -0.14 +20.1 +0.03 +6.1 +0.12 +17.5 +0.02 +8.6 +0.06 +9.2 +0.05 +9.5 +0.07 +9.6 +0.06 +9.7 +0.08 +9.7 +0.08 +9.6 +0.01 +3.7 +0.24 +18.6 +0.34 +13.2 +0.02 +9.5 +0.14 +6.8 +0.11 +6.1 +0.14 +13.4 +0.08 +12.3 +0.10 +12.5 +0.24 +8.4 +0.13 +7.9 +0.10 +9.1 +0.22 +5.6 +0.22 +5.3 +0.02 +6.0 +0.08 +10.1 -0.10 +10.0 -0.11 +10.3

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.11 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.25 CpOpAdl 70.75 EMAdmr r 39.19 Energy 114.34 500Adml 109.14 GNMA Ad 11.09 HlthCr 52.99 HiYldCp 5.75 InfProAd 26.70 ITsryAdml 12.01 IntGrAdm 61.05 ITAdml 13.88 ITGrAdm 10.44 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 9.61 LT Adml 11.31 MuHYAdm 10.72 PrmCap r 65.42 STsyAdml 10.93 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.89 TtlBAdml 10.89 TStkAdm 29.53 WellslAdm 52.85 WelltnAdm 52.35 Windsor 42.21 WdsrIIAd 43.32 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.74 CapOpp 30.62 DivdGro 13.83 Energy 60.87 EqInc 19.40 Explr 65.78 GNMA 11.09 GlobEq 17.50 HYCorp 5.75 HlthCre 125.53 InflaPro 13.60 IntlGr 19.17 IntlVal 32.44

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ITIGrade 10.44 LifeCon 16.20 LifeGro 21.33 LifeMod 19.24 LTIGrade 9.61 Morg 16.64 MuInt 13.88 MuLtd 11.16 PrecMtls r 25.12 PrmcpCor 12.99 Prmcp r 63.03 SelValu r 17.69 STAR 18.76 STIGrade 10.89 StratEq 17.00 TgtRetInc 11.34 TgRe2010 22.38 TgtRe2015 12.34 TgRe2020 21.77 TgtRe2025 12.35 TgRe2030 21.06 TgtRe2035 12.67 TgtRe2040 20.77 TgtRe2045 13.11 USGro 16.96 Wellsly 21.82 Welltn 30.31 Wndsr 12.51 WndsII 24.41 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 109.13 Balanced 20.71 EMkt 29.77 Europe 27.40 Extend 37.47 Growth 29.51 ITBnd 11.78 MidCap 18.66 Pacific 10.60 REIT r 18.31 SmCap 31.74 SmlCpGth 19.59 SmlCpVl 14.96 STBnd 10.74

+0.04 +13.1 +0.06 +9.0 +0.14 +9.7 +0.10 +9.6 +0.05 +12.6 +0.05 +9.0 +6.0 +3.0 -0.03 +23.0 +0.04 +7.3 +0.28 +6.0 +0.10 +10.9 +0.09 +8.0 +5.6 +0.08 +11.3 +0.04 +8.8 +0.09 +9.1 +0.06 +9.1 +0.11 +9.1 +0.07 +9.1 +0.12 +9.1 +0.07 +9.0 +0.12 +9.0 +0.08 +9.1 +0.08 +3.0 +0.09 +10.1 +0.19 +7.4 +0.09 +5.7 +0.25 +4.2

TotBnd

10.89 +0.03 +8.1

TotlIntl

15.66 +0.06 +8.7

500Sgl

90.16 +0.65 +7.9

+0.78 +7.8 +0.11 +8.9 -0.10 +14.9 +0.17 +5.6 +0.24 +14.7 +0.11 +8.9 +0.05 +13.5 +0.06 +14.1 +0.09 +9.5 +0.25 +26.5 +0.25 +15.5 +0.11 +16.4 +0.16 +14.6 +0.01 +5.0

STBdIdx

10.74 +0.01 +5.0

TotBdSgl

10.89 +0.03 +8.2

TotStkSgl

28.50 +0.19 +9.1

TotStk

29.53 +0.21 +9.0

Value

19.63 +0.20 +7.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.11 +0.06

EmMkInst

29.84 -0.10 +15.1

NS

ExtIn

37.53 +0.24 +14.9

FTAllWldI r

93.54 +0.34 +9.1

GrwthIst

29.51 +0.10 +9.1

InfProInst

10.88 +0.02 +9.7

InstIdx

108.43 +0.78 +7.9

InsPl

108.43 +0.78 +7.9

InsTStPlus

26.69 +0.18 +9.1

MidCpIst

18.73 +0.06 +14.2

SCInst

31.80 +0.25 +15.7

TBIst

10.89 +0.03 +8.3

TSInst

29.54 +0.21 +9.1

Vanguard Signal:

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.65 +0.02 +5.6

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.00 +0.03 +12.9


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-3821401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www.prep-profiles.com. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WEB DESIGN WRITING THAT SELLS: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. CRITICAL TAX PLANNING IDEAS AND STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS: Live broadcast for tax practitioners. Program is eligible for CPE/CFP/EA credit. Register online at www. allstarttax.com Lunch provided; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. SAVING AND INVESTING: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn strategies to reduce spending and increase income, resources to aid saving, savings tools and challenges, and the differences between saving and investing. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS JOB MATCH CERTIFICATION: Learn about PREP’s business focused personality reports; $795, or $595 for two or more people from the same

organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. BARRAN LIEBMAN LLP EMPLOYMENT LAW SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS, THE SLIPPERY SLOPE: Designed for employers, human resource professionals, and in-house counsel, this seminar will cover current state and federal legislation affecting employee and independent contractor classifications. Fee includes program, printed materials and breakfast. Registration required; $15; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 503-228-0500 or clientservices@barran.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMERCE “NETWORKING SOCIAL”: Hosted by Laurie Kanehl and staff. You do not have to be a chamber member or own a business to attend; 5:30 p.m.; Desert Oasis Salon and Spa, 5105 Clubhouse Road; 541-9232679. ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK & TWITTER: Second in the Online Marketing Series offered by Central Oregon Community College. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS JOB MATCH CERTIFICATION: Learn about PREP’s business focused personality reports; $795, or $595 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST, PROPERTY TAXES, YOU HAVE OPTIONS: Find ways to reduce the cost of property taxes through appeals. Sponsored by ServiceMaster; $25 for chamber members, $35 at the door; 7:30-9 a.m.; Touchmark at Mount Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way; http://bendchamber.org/. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Redmond Athletic Club and Cenral Oregon Crossfit, Redmond Athletic Club, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 541-923-6662. BEGINNING EXCEL 2007: Registration required. Class continues

Oct 29; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit. cocc.edu. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Learn about the current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

SATURDAY INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION: Learn to create animations in Flash that can be incorporated into Web pages. Class continues Oct. 23; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Oct. 26 BUILDING HIGH-PERFORMANCE WALLS AND ROOFS: Learn to achieve high-performance assemblies that qualify for the Oregon High Performance Home tax credit. Registration required; $85; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7303 or bsullivan@ earthadvantage.org. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Sponsored by Jones and Roth. Tonia Meyer and Kelly Walker, of Incyte Marketing, will discuss integrated marketing strategies. Register online by Oct. 25 for the advance price; $25 for chamber members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; http://www.bendchamber.org/. USING FOODHUB TO BUILD YOUR WHOLESALE FOOD BUSINESS: Learn how FoodHub can open doors to new wholesale accounts at this workshop for wholesale food buyers and food producers in Central Oregon; 2-4 p.m.; Madras Aquatic Center, 1195 S.E. Kemper Way; meet@food-hub.org. REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Summit Mortgage Corp., 950 S.W. Veterans Way, Ste. 103; 541-5487788. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Once a year the Bend Chamber of Commerce offers a chance for small or home-based businesses to co-host a Business After Hours. These events showcase businesses that may otherwise be unable to host a networking event. Cost for members to host a space is $150. Contact Robin Rogers for details of participating; 5-7 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or robin@bendchamber.org. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Recontrust Company NA, trustee to Bank of America NA, Estates at Pronghorn Phase I, Lot 76, $224,100 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to HSBC Bank USA NA, trustee, West Canyon Estates Phase I, Lot 37, $159,300 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, Oakview Phase II, Lot 19, $171,000 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, Tollgate First Addition, Lot 58, $175,960 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Amended Plat of Ranch Way Acres, Lot 1, Block 3, $154,801.80 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, Sandalwood Phase 2, Lot 37, $180,359 Riverpointe One LLC to Bonnett Properties LLC, T 17, R 12, Section 32, $284,500 Charles A. Bonnett to Charles A. Bonnett, trustee of Charles A. Bonnett Trust, T 17, R 12, Section 32, $284,500 Millpoint Riverbend LLC to CRB Investments LLC, Shevlin Corporate Park, Lot 2, $1,125,000 Mark W. and Kristina M. Vukanovich to Joseph W. and Karen J. Nibler, Parks at Broken Top Phase 3, Lot 104, $262,000 Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village LLC to Carolyn A. and Randy C. Hill, Mountain High, Lot 2, Block 5, $370,000 Barbara Hippe to Sheila A. and Kenneth O. Harrison, trustees of Sheila A. Harrison Revocable Living Trust, Tumalo Riverfront Estates, Lot 5, $289,000 Wells Fargo Bank NA to Charles H. and Kim P. Curtis, Fremont Crossing, Lot 21, $350,000

LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Wild Horse Ridge, Lot 5, $550,075 Federal National Mortgage Association to Loren D. and Robyn K. Anderson, RiverRim Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 3, $185,000 Mark L. and Dianna Weaver to Allen K. and Bernita A. Huggett, T 15, R 10, Section 36, $500,000 Vergent LLC to Kenneth Waletzki and Sara Machlin, Bonne Home Addition, Lot 11, Block 27, $344,500 Elizabeth A. Naidis, trustee of Naidis Living Trust to Felix and Christine Hector, Bluffs at River Bend Phase 5, Lot 6, $329,500 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, Eastwood Addition, Lot 2, Block 1, $197,762.04 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to HSBC Bank USA NA, trustee, Gardenside Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 46, $170,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Theodore F. and Erica J. Waldbillig, Ranch Way Acres 1st Addition, Lot 5, Block 5, $169,000 Patrick and Sharon Oliver to Tom and Annie Kauffman, Awbrey Butte Homesites Phase 8, Lot 7, Block 9, $1,020,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Selene RMOF REO Acquisition LLC, T 15, R 13, Section 05, $292,500 Federal National Mortgage Association to Marla G. Thompson, Northpointe Phase III, Lot 121, $225,000 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., T 15, R 12, Section 09, $245,592.66 Recontrust Co. NA, trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Lazy River West, Lot 3, Block 6, $152,436 Regional Trustee Services Corp., trustee to BankUnited, Three Sisters Lot 25, $168,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Ernest L. Baker and

Sandra Whitlock-Baker, Prospect Pines, Lot 14, $248,000 High Desert Bank to Jeffrey D. and Dina Lyons, T 18, R 13, Section 24, $485,000 Cinnamon Property One LLC to Dennis A. and Elaine L. Rector, Ridge at Eagle Crest 31, Lot 101, $265,000 DR Horton Inc.-Portland to Brandon C. Becker and Miranda N. Davies, Summit Crest Phase I, Lot 71, $161,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Hayden Village Phase IV, Lot 4, Block 12, $197,539.99 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Chase Home Finance LLC, Ni-Lah-Sha Phases 2 and 3, Lot 23, $181,983.26 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Terrebonne Estates Phase I-A, Lot 17, $224,037.49 Marc D. Frankel and Tracy J. DanishFrankel to Margaret Z. Brand, trustee of the Trust Agreement of Margaret Zeglin Brand, Lot 1, T 15, R 11, Section 04, $1,350,000 Larry R. and Nancy L. Snyder to Gary S. and Catherine A. Hook, trustees of Gary S. Hook & Catherine A. Hook Revocable Trust, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top Phase 10-D, Lot 265, $477,000 Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., receiver, to Susan K. Gaede, Shevlin Reserve, Lot 11, $353,000 Jackie M. Johnson, trustee of Dead Weight Trust to Gordon Kitaura, Bend Riverside Motel Condominium Unit C-62, $195,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to John A. and Pamela Chaky, Aspen Rim, Lot 136, $334,500 Latitude 44 Degrees to Jennifer I. Hector and Charlene D. Carter, Second Addition to Bend Park, Lots 6-7, Block 153, $239,785 Eugene and Julie Kolbe to Michael C. and Susan L. Murat, Ridge at Eagle Crest 56, Lot 150, $214,500

FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Please call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 SW Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps to starting a business in a workshop offered by Central Oregon Community College’s business development center. Cost includes handouts. Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. UNDERSTANDING CAR INSURANCE: Presenter Joseph Brinkley, of Cascade Insurance, will discuss legal requirements, who is insured, eligible vehicles, coverage differences, methods of buying insurance, how a policy is rated, policy credits and claims/accident information. Refreshments will be served; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-3821795. WEB GRAPHICS WITH PHOTOSHOP/ DREAMWEAVER: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. USING FOODHUB TO BUY LOCAL: Learn how FoodHub can help you find local food producers so you can showcase local products on your menu at this workshop offered for wholesale food buyers and food producers in Central Oregon; free; 2-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; meet@ food-hub.org.

Pests aggravate Southern Oregon vintner’s troubles The Associated Press MEDFORD — The delay in the Oregon wine grape harvest caused by a wet spring and mild summer has given hungry birds and animals a chance to plunder vineyards in the Rogue Valley. At Weisinger’s of Ashland, starlings and cowbirds have picked away at the grapes while trail cameras have recorded a nocturnal parade of black bears rummaging through the vineyard. “There’s been a skinny one, a medium-sized one and a greatbig daddy,” owner John Weisinger told the Mail Tribune. “I’ve got three photos of one looking left, looking right and then right at the camera. They’ve mostly been in the gewurztraminer.” General Manager Robert Trottmann says the birds have arrived by the hundreds, maybe the thousands, plucking away the gewurztraminer, along with the pinot noir and tempranillo grapes. “We’ve put up netting, but they’ve made a huge impact,” Trottman said. “Starlings and robins are the most devastating,” said Rex Garoutte at Rosella’s Vineyard. “If you leave them unchecked, they can do a ton a day. In 1999, we lost three tons of grapes to birds.” Garoutte’s answer has been a propane cannon, which can fire off every 30 seconds. “We do it three times to get their attention,” he said. “The fourth one chases them off. Then we let it set there for a while so that it’s effective.” Weisinger said it was one of the latest harvests he’s had at the vineyard he first planted on a hillside 33 years ago. “We were fortunate to have this warm weather the last few weeks,” Weisinger said. “When I first started testing grapes on

“We looked at our inventory and the economy and made a decision (to reduce production). We’re preserving cash flow, doing smaller batches and may raise prices on some wines.” Robert Trottmann, general manager, Weisinger’s of Ashland the same day we started picking last year, the grapes were just 65 percent of ripeness.” But Trottman said he expects both quality and a reasonable quantity based on sugar and acidity readings, not to mention how the grapes taste. Trottmann said the winery made a strategic decision to reduce the amount of wine it would make this year, based on the sluggish economy and the increase in wineries overall. Instead of bringing in 60 to 80 tons from other local vineyards, the company is supplementing its own 10-ton harvest with just 30 tons from around the region. “We looked at our inventory and the economy and made a decision,” Trottmann said. “We’re preserving cash flow, doing smaller batches and may raise prices on some wines.” For other growers, spring weather lightened the crop. “We had some damage early in the spring and lost probably 8 to 10 acres because of frost,” said Steve Gardner of Crater Lake Cellars outside Shady Cove. “This is the latest of our seven harvests, but it seems like it will be an awesome crop with big flavors and colors.”


L

Inside

Portland prepares for Obama’s visit, see Page C3. UO says coastal home not designed by John Yeon, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

Human rights author to speak

JEFFERSON

Attention, photographers! These photos were among scores readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.

We asked for readers’ photos, and today we’re publishing some of the best

Well sh t!

Installment 29:

Fall color

The Bulletin

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Right now, it’s a large cattle ranch in eastern Jefferson County. But someday, Clark Munkel hopes about 1,000 acres of it could be used to create a solar farm he believes would make him money, help the rancher who owns the land and, of course, create renewable, local energy. Before any of that can happen Munkel, a developer with Ashland-based Horizon Project Development, is hoping for a change in an administrative rule that prohibits landowners and developers from putting large solar farms on their property. Under the state rule, energygenerating facilities cannot exceed 12 acres on high-value farmland or 20 acres on lowvalue farmland. The Department of Land Conservation and Development recently agreed to take a look at changing the rule. That could expedite the process for people like Munkel if the commission decides to change the acreage amount for solar farms on low-value farmland. Otherwise, developers like Munkel would have to wait for the Legislature to make a change. See Solar / C5

“Old Canyon Creek Bridge, YT” Submitted by user Carolyn

More information For more about Nicholas Kristof’s book or how to help, visit www.halftheskymovement.org.

3 ousted from bar are hurt in brawl

TERREBONNE Submitted by user Dan Davis

“Fall in the Tetons”

Bulletin staff report Bend Police are investigating a fight that took place early Saturday morning at Wall Street Bar and Grill. According to a news release, Bend Police were called to the corner of Northwest Brooks Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue around 1:45 a.m. Saturday for a fight involving three people. Police say Samuel Ekhoff, Thomas Flemming and Benjamin King, all of Bend, allegedly got into an argument at Wall Street Bar and Grill, were asked to leave and were escorted from the bar by employees. Ekhoff and King, both 23, left on foot, while Flemming, 26, drove away from the bar. But near the corner of Northwest Brooks Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue, the three met again and allegedly got into another argument. The argument, according to police, was about Flemming’s driving. The argument turned physical, with all three suffering nonlife-threatening injuries and required medical treatment. Police say a knife may have been used in the fight. Police have not yet filed charges, and the case is still under investigation. Anyone who witnessed either of the two fights is asked to call Bend Police at 541322-2960 or 541-693-6911. The incident was one of at least two bar fights to which police were called over the weekend. Around 2 a.m. Saturday, police were called to Boondocks Bar and Grill at 70 N.W. Newport Ave., where a fight had broken out. See Fight / C5

Paving the way for big solar Officials seeking changes in state law to allow for larger energy operations

By Erin Golden A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author with roots in Oregon is returning home this week — and making a stop in Bend to talk about his latest best-selling book. Nicholas Kristof, a columnist for The New York Times, has worked as a correspondent in Los Angeles and as a bureau chief in Hong Kong, Beijing and Tokyo. In a phone interview M o n d a y, Kristof said he’d just returned to New Nicholas York after Kristof several days of reporting in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Oman and was gearing up for another trip, this time to Oregon. On Wednesday, before he heads to his home city of Yamhill, he’ll be at Bend’s Tower Theatre for a presentation on “Reporting the Truths of the World.” See Kristof / C5

C

OREGON Couple lives in renovated bus for sustainability, see Page C3.

Fire chief to address unification By Patrick Cliff

Submitted by user JQ

“Cyclamen near Ypres”

Submitted by user JSJ

“They all fall down”

The Bulletin

Redmond Fire & Rescue officials will hold a town hall meeting Wednesday at Terrebonne Community School to discuss a proposed annexation of the department into Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1. Terrebonne residents are not voting on the annexation — only Redmond city residents will — but Fire Chief Tim Moor wants them to understand the two-pronged proposal. Measure 9-80 would set a tax rate of $1.75 per $1,000 for Redmond property owners to pay for fire protection, and it would annex the fire department into the fire protection district. Measure 9-81 is a tax cut, limiting how high the Redmond City Council can raise taxes. The cut only takes effect if both measures pass. Redmond’s department already fights fires in the protection district, which includes the rural areas around the city. See Annexation / C5

ELECTION

“Fall reflections” Submitted by user Al Krause

Submitted by user Patrick Iler

“Leaves near Franklin underpass” The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

Readers’ photos

Each installment of Well shot! features photos submitted by readers for the previous week’s theme.

If you go Aug. 24 Cars

Sept. 7 Going rustic

Today Sept. 21 Oct. 5 Horses Nature’s Fall abstracts color

Nov. 2 Nov. 16 Nov. 30 Dec. 14 Dec. 28 Halloween The desert Cycling Flame Winter

What: Town hall meeting about measures 9-80 and 9-81 Where: Terrebonne Community School, 1199 B St., Terrebonne When: Wednesday, 6 p.m.


C2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lawyers: Officers lied about mentally ill man’s condition Teacher welcomed The Associated Press PORTLAND — Officers who took a mentally ill Portland man into custody withheld important information from paramedics and jail medical staff about his injuries and the use of force against him, attorneys for the man’s family said Monday. The attorneys also allege the officers made false statements about James Chasse Jr., The Oregonian reported. Chasse, who had schizophrenia, suffered broken ribs that punctured his lung and led to his death Sept. 17, 2006, after he was tackled by officers who chased him for allegedly urinating in public. He was also shot with a stun gun. “The cover-up did kill James Chasse because it kept him from getting to the hospital,� Thomas

Schneiger, one of the trial attorneys assigned to the case, said at a news conference. “If they would have just gone to the hospital, they (the officers) would have been in trouble; he would have lived.� In May, the family settled a federal wrongful death suit with the city of Portland for $1.6 million. Multnomah County approved a record $925,000 settlement in July 2009 to end its part of the lawsuit. Schneiger and attorney Tom Steenson held the news conference to discuss documents obtained during the lawsuit but only recently made public. U.S. District Judge Garr King lifted a protective order that allowed the release of Portland police internal affairs documents, the training division’s analysis, training

materials and depositions. Mayor Sam Adams, who serves as police commissioner, said his office asked the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division several months ago to review the Chasse case as part of an overall review of the Portland Police Bureau, KATU-TV reported. Adams added that he and Chief Mike Reese have agreed to ask the division to include an evaluation of “these new concerns.� Steenson contended police Sgt. Kyle Nice and Officer Christopher Humphreys failed to follow their training as well as bureau policies. Chasse, 42, suffered 16 broken ribs and a punctured lung that led to his death while officers were taking him to a hospital in a patrol car. Officers first took him to the Multnomah County jail, but a

nurse told them Chasse could not be booked in his condition. The attorneys said officers never should have pursued Chasse as there was no evidence he committed a crime or was a danger to himself or others. The knockdown of Chasse also was inconsistent with bureau training, they said. They said Nice failed to tell paramedics what actually happened to Chasse, not mentioning he was knocked to the ground or that other physical force was used on him, and that he had stopped breathing at one time. City officials earlier apologized to the family and said Nice and Humphreys had been disciplined. Then-Police Chief Rozie Sizer said the police bureau changed policy, training and practices after Chasse’s death.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11 a.m. Oct. 15, in the 400 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and golf clubs stolen at 3:50 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 500 block of Northeast Revere Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:17 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 1100 block of Northeast 12th Street. Theft — A stereo was reported stolen from a vehicle at 4:40 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 300 block of Southeast Ninth Street. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 6:20 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 1500 block of Northeast Forbes Road. Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 8:13 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 2500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:15 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 700 block of Northwest Franklin Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:05 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 1900 block of Northeast Red Rock Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:17 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:42 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 1000 block of Northwest Cumberland Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 3000 block of Northeast Madison Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a motorcycle was reported at 12:06 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:17 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 1100 block of Northeast Quimby Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:03 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 2000 block of Northeast Pheasant Court. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 1:29 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:06 p.m. Oct. 16, in the

20500 block of Anson Place. Theft — Cash was reported stolen at 5:57 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 2000 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Brian Christopher Cummings, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:13 a.m. Oct. 17, in the area of Northeast Ninth Street and Northeast Penn Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1:15 a.m. Oct. 17, in the 100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. DUII — Melissa Lavern Price, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:13 a.m. Oct. 17, in the area of Northeast Purcell Boulevard and Northeast Purser Avenue. DUII — Jacques E. Bash, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:41 a.m. Oct. 17, in the 1500 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:16 a.m. Oct. 17, in the area of Northeast Neff Road and Northeast Tucson Way. DUII — Steve Madsen, 65, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:20 p.m. Oct. 17, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Revere Avenue. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Thomas Lloyd Patton, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:52 p.m. Oct. 15, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Pumice Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:42 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:04 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 1400 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 2700 block of Southwest Indian Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:17 a.m. Oct. 15, in the 1600 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:40 a.m. Oct. 15, in the 2200 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:36 a.m. Oct. 15, in the 2700 block of Southwest Obsidian Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:45 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 3200 block of Southwest Lava Avenue.

Theft — A fish tank was reported stolen at 5:41 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 500 block of Northwest 17th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:34 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:21 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 1100 block of Southwest 32nd Court. Burglary — Tools were reported stolen at 10:59 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 700 block of Northwest Hemlock Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:28 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 2700 block of Southwest Indian Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:39 a.m. Oct. 17, in the 1900 block of Southwest 35th Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 11:53 a.m. Oct. 15, in the area of North Main Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:53 p.m. Oct. 15, in the area of Southwest Third Street. Theft — A theft with a loss of $2,100 was reported at 9:13 a.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Southwest Deer Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:21 p.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Northeast Hillside Loop. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:39 p.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Northeast Mountain View Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:16 p.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:08 p.m. Oct. 15, in the 11800 block of Larchwood Drive in La Pine. Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen at 7:28 a.m. Oct. 15, in the 62100 block of Byram Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:58 p.m. Oct. 16, in the 64900 block of Hunnell Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:27 p.m. Oct. 16, in the East Fort Rock Riding Area. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:06 p.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Crooked Rocks Road and Scenic Drive in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:34 a.m. Oct. 16, in the 16900 block of Covina Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:56 a.m.

Oct. 16, in the 69200 block of Lake Drive in Cloverdale. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:53 p.m. Oct. 17, in the 5500 block of Southwest 58th Place in Redmond. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — Tools and a pressure washer were reported stolen Oct. 11, in the 500 block of Northeast Juniper Lane in Madras. Burglary — Tools were reported stolen Oct. 11, in the 13800 block of Southwest Sheltered Place in Crooked River Ranch. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:51 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 1600 block of Southwest Culver Highway. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:02 p.m. Oct. 14, in the area of Shad Road in Crooked River Ranch. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported Oct. 15, in the area of Southwest G and Southwest Second streets in Madras. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — A multiple vehicle accident was reported at 8:40 p.m. Oct. 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 151. DUII — Tyrone Junior Coffey, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:18 a.m. Oct. 16, in the area of Greenwood Avenue and Northeast Azure Drive. DUII — Rafael Guillermo Alejandre, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:05 a.m. Oct. 17, in the area of Northwest Fourth Street and Northwest Birch Avenue in Redmond.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador Retriever — Adult male, brown; found near Southwest 31st Street.

French forces retreat from Moscow in 1812 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Oct. 19, the 292nd day of 2010. There are 73 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 19, 1960, the United States began a limited embargo against Cuba as President Dwight D. Eisenhower banned exports to the communist-ruled nation covering all commodities except medical supplies and certain food products. ON THIS DATE In 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York, drew up a declaration of rights and liberties. In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Va., as the American Revolution neared its end. In 1812, French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte began their retreat from Moscow. In 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal Early attacked Union forces at Cedar Creek, Va.; the Union troops were able to rally and defeat the Confederates. In 1951, President Harry S. Truman signed an act formally ending the state of war with Germany.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y In 1960, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested during a sit-down protest at a lunch counter in Atlanta. (Sent to prison for a parole violation over a traffic offense, King was released after three days following an appeal by Robert F. Kennedy.) In 1967, the U.S. space probe Mariner 5 flew past Venus. In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City. In 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value. In 1994, 22 people were killed as a terrorist bomb shattered a bus in the heart of Tel Aviv’s shopping district. Entertainer Martha Raye died in Los Angeles at age 78. TEN YEARS AGO A government advisory panel of scientists declared that PPA (phenylpropanolamine), an ingredient used in dozens of popular over-the-counter medicines, could not be classified as safe, saying it could be the cause of several hundred hemorrhagic strokes suffered annually by people under 50.

FIVE YEARS AGO A defiant Saddam Hussein pleaded innocent to charges of premeditated murder and torture as his trial opened under heavy security in the former headquarters of his Baath Party in Baghdad. The Houston Astros clinched their first World Series berth with a 5-1 win over St. Louis in Game 6 of the National League Championship Series. ONE YEAR AGO The Justice Department issued a new policy memo, telling prosecutors that pot-smoking patients or their sanctioned suppliers should not be targeted for federal prosecution in states that allowed medical marijuana. Actor Joseph Wiseman, 91, who played the sinister Dr. No in the first James Bond feature film, died in New York City. Mass killer Howard Unruh, who took 13 lives during a 1949 rampage in Camden, N.J., died in a Trenton nursing facility at age 88. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former U.S. ambassador to Russia Robert Strauss is 92. Author John le Carre is 79. Artist Peter Max is 73. Author and

critic Renata Adler is 72. Actor Michael Gambon is 70. Actor John Lithgow is 65. Feminist activist Patricia Ireland is 65. Singer Jeannie C. Riley is 65. Rock singer-musician Patrick Simmons (The Doobie Brothers) is 62. Talk show host Charlie Chase is 58. Rock singer-musician Karl Wallinger (World Party) is 53. Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele is 52. Singer Jennifer Holliday is 50. Boxer Evander Holyfield is 48. TV host Ty Pennington (“Extreme Makeover: Home Edition�) is 46. Rock singermusician Todd Park Mohr (Big Head Todd and the Monsters) is 45. Actor Jon Favreau is 44. Amy Carter is 43. “South Park� co-creator Trey Parker is 41. Comedian Chris Kattan is 40. Rock singer Pras Michel (The Fugees) is 38. Actor Omar Gooding is 34. Country singer Cyndi Thomson is 34. Writer-director Jason Reitman is 33. Actor Benjamin Salisbury is 30. Actress Gillian Jacobs is 28. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Speech is civilization itself. The word, even the most contradictory word, preserves contact — it is silence which isolates.� — Thomas Mann, German author (1875-1955)

back despite DUII The Associated Press ELGIN — A card circulated at Elgin High School in Eastern Oregon to welcome back a teacher has generated some criticism because the occasion was her release from jail on a drunken driving charge. Janet Marie Scoubes was charged with driving under the influence of intoxicants after her SUV rear-ended a parked Multnomah County sheriff’s cruiser Oct. 7 on Interstate 84 east of Portland. Scoubes was not hurt, but a deputy who dived inside the patrol car to keep from being hit suffered minor injuries. Sheriff’s Sgt. Diana Olsen was standing outside the car while she was working a construction zone traffic detail. Scoubes also was charged with reckless endangering, criminal mischief and assault. When Scoubes returned to

her job teaching English last week, students and teachers passed around a welcome-back card, The Oregonian reported. Elgin School District Superintendent Larry Christman said the district has not imposed any sanctions on Scoubes because the accident did not involve any students. “It’s none of our business,� Christman said. “It had nothing to do with kids.� Scoubes’ husband, Bud Scoubes, is on the Elgin school board. A phone number listed for the couple in Elgin was disconnected, and an attempt by The Associated Press to reach Janet Scoubes at Elgin High School on Monday was unsuccessful. Christman told the Portland newspaper that Scoubes “isn’t the only one in Union County who ever got a DUII,� adding she is an “excellent teacher.�

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Agriculture forum slated for Nov. 10

Mary’s Place gets grant of $350,000

A forum to discuss irrigation and agriculture energy efficiency in Central Oregon will be held Nov. 10 at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds, according to a news release. The free event, which will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., is being held by several organizations, including Pacific Power, the Energy Trust of Oregon and the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council. Topics to be covered include techniques to reduce energy bills, tax incentives and programs, and production efficiency. Those interested in attending can register online by going to http://energy efficiency.wufoo.com/forms/ centra l- or-ag r ic ult ure energyefficiency-workshop/.

A grant of $350,000 was awarded to Saving Grace and Deschutes County to help operate the supervised visitation program, Mary’s Place, according to a news release. The grant was provided through the federal Save Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange grant program, and will help Mary’s Place continue providing services to families in Central Oregon. Mary’s Place provides a safe and secure site for visitation between children and parents with a history of domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse or stalking. The organization has served over 200 families since it opened in 2006.

Officers on lookout for traffic violators

Central Oregon Community College security and Bend Police are working together to figure out who may have used a camera to record images of a student showering. According to COCC College Relations Director Ron Paradis, a female student reported that a camera was used to record her while she showered in the bathrooms at Juniper Hall between 7:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. Saturday. Paradis didn’t know whether it was a video camera or a photo camera. The college sent a note to all residents of Juniper Hall alerting them to the incident. Paradis noted that during the time of the incident, the doors to the residence hall would have been locked. “We’re trying to find out if we can figure out who the perpetrator is,� he said.

Officers will be on the lookout for traffic violators in the southern Bend area Wednesday as part of this month’s Multi Agency Traffic Team enforcement, according to a news release. Between the hours of 1 p.m. and about 5 p.m., officers from local law enforcement agencies will be patrolling from the south end of Bend to La Pine, including parts of South Century Drive and Huntington Road. The officers will specifically be looking out for drunk drivers, speed violations, and seatbelt safety violations. They will also be on the lookout for vehicles following too close and drivers failing to move over for emergency vehicles. Local law enforcement would like to remind drivers to pay extra attention to emergency vehicles parked along the side of the road, and to move over and slow down in accordance with the law.

Police investigating COCC shower incident

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 C3

O GOING GREEN

Kitzhaber hopes Obama reignites Portland’s ardor By Tim Fought The Associated Press

Jim Moore / The (Grants Pass) Daily Courier

Katarina Kobor and Jay Poloney have turned a school bus into a home in Josephine County. The young couple live on a friend’s property. They tap into their friend’s electricity and get their water from a well on the property, all for a nominal fee.

Jumping on the sustainability bus By Jim Moore The (Grants Pass) Daily Courier

GRANTS PASS — Sustainability. When it comes to the environment, sustainability means preserving an ecological balance by not using up the planet’s natural resources. Reduce, reuse, recycle. Few, though, can match — or even want to try to match — the sustainable lifestyle practiced by Katarina Kobor and Jay Poloney. The young couple live in a converted school bus on a friend’s property in rural Josephine County. They tap into their friend’s electricity and get their water from a well on the property, all for a nominal fee. They use a dry composting toilet. Things most of us consider trash — a short strip of copper wire, wood scraps, bits of fabric — they view as opportunities to enhance their everyday lives. The reasons they chose this lifestyle are simple: They want to have as little impact on the environment as possible, and they want to live as cheaply as possible so they can save their money. It starts with their home, a 36foot, 66-person former school bus that now features a lofted roof, a bed, a table, a kitchen and a 6-foot porch welded onto the back. Poloney, a 24-year-old student at Rogue Community College, is the handyman of the duo and, while some of his projects are new to him, he has a knack for do-it-yourself projects. “I’m learning as I go,” he said. He’s learned to salvage and use almost everything around him. Copper wire becomes hooks for coffee mugs and chunks of scrap metal become tools. “All of this stuff had a former

“I don’t think we can wait for politics to change the course we’re on. People need to take the steps they can, big or small, toward sustainability now. It’s not always, or even mostly, easy, but it is fun, and I’ve learned a lot about myself.” — Katarina Kobor, Josephine County resident life,” Poloney said while scanning the inside of the bus. Kobor, 25, the master recycling coordinator at RCC, isn’t quite as proficient with tools. “I don’t do much building,” she said. “I’m more the designer.” She’s also creative and has a knack for putting her imagination to good use. “We’re both wary of the chemicals that are used in body products, and I really love crafting, so we make our own soap, both body and shampoo, deodorant, laundry detergent and lotion,” Kobor said. She found the recipes on the Internet. She also found a recipe for making yogurt. “It’s super easy and delicious,” she said. The most visible product of her imagination is the couple’s bathroom, which they painted red using paint that Kobor made. “It’s milk, sour cream and mineral products,” she said, adding that it’s a way to “avoid icky chemicals on the interior of the bus. I figure the bus itself is already an ‘unnatural’ house, so I might as well use as many nat-

ural and eco-friendly things as possible on the inside. I’m hoping to paint the floor and walls of the bus with natural paints as well.” Neither of them anticipates other people completely ditching their lifestyles to mimic theirs. “Clearly, we’re an extreme example,” Kobor said. But they do believe there are many uncomplicated ways for people to become more environmentally friendly, just by becoming aware of their surroundings. People can adopt a mind-set of finding alternative uses for things and to reuse them. Kobor said she didn’t get into sustainability until recently, but “it’s pretty natural at this point.” As friendly as their lifestyle is for the environment, they admit their reasons aren’t completely altruistic. The money they save will allow them to travel. Poloney wants to hit the high seas. “I’m obsessed with boats and sailing,” he said. And Kobor — who has already been to many states as well as Australia, Germany and Vietnam — fancies visiting Mongolia, India or Guatemala. Their lifestyle “allows us to save up for the travel bug,” she said. But even without an ulterior motive, they are committed to maintaining a lifestyle that reins in consumption and has as little an impact on the planet as possible. “Bottom line, I don’t think we can wait for politics to change the course we’re on. People need to take the steps they can, big or small, toward sustainability now,” Kobor said. “It’s not always, or even mostly, easy, but it is fun, and I’ve learned a lot about myself, my goals, priorities and belief system, and I have much more of a sense of my impact on the planet as one person.”

PORTLAND — When he returns to Portland for a rally this week, there’s no chance Barack Obama will attract 75,000 people, as he did on a sunny May day two years ago. But his visit will be a chance to take Oregon’s temperature for Obama fever. In 2008, before he beat Hillary Clinton and John McCain, and before the bailouts, the stimulus, the health care bill and the troop surge in Afghanistan, Obama appeared at Tom McCall Park on the west bank of the Willamette River and seemed stunned by the crowd of 60,000 people. An estimated 15,000 more couldn’t get into the park. Bigger rallies were ahead as Obama was elected and inaugurated, but the Portland crowd was the largest he’d seen in 15 months of campaigning. On Wednesday, the president will be on the east bank of the river, indoors, as he tries

to stanch Democratic losses by shoring up a governor candidate, John Kitzhaber, in one of the bluest of blue states. The Kitzhaber camp says it hopes to attract 5,000 people to the rally at the Oregon Convention Center.

Motivate Democrats Two years ago, Obama won the state and swept Democrats along as they turned out a Republican incumbent from the U.S. Senate and secured decisive majorities in the state Legislature. Kitzhaber hopes Obama fever remains strong enough to motivate Democrats to stay with the party and return their ballots, which are arriving in mailboxes this week. In a year when some Democrats are shying from the president’s side, Kitzhaber had no reservation about inviting him, said spokeswoman Jillian Schoene. “Absolutely none,” she said Monday. “We welcome the sup-

port of the president of the United States.” State Republican leaders say Obama and the Democrats face an “enthusiasm gap,” meaning young people and others fervent for Obama two years ago aren’t so motivated now — and that’s as true in Oregon as it is nationally. “Things are very different in the nation from 2008 to now,” said Greg Leo, state GOP spokesman. “I think the Democrats have reason to be concerned. ... Our base is energized, mobilized and committed.” Obama’s approval ratings have sunk to the mid-40 percent level, but Oregon State political scientist Bill Lunch said the president probably has a good share of the support that was manifest at the 2008 rally. “In the states where he did well ... he retains a higher level of popularity,” Lunch said. “I wouldn’t be surprised if he has 50 percent or even a little better in Oregon.”

Transit conference opens in Portland The Associated Press PORTLAND — A national transit conference opened Monday in Portland, the host city for the 16th annual Rail-Volution. The Oregonian reported that the event brings together about 1,000 people from more than 300 cities to discuss the role of transit in building liv-

able communities. Portland was chosen to host the conference because organizers say it’s the birthplace of the livable city movement. City officials note that Portland kicked off America’s first streetcar revival in 50 years when it installed streetcars in 2001. U.S. Secretary of TransporHospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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Jackson sheriff shoulders horse neglect calls The Associated Press PHOENIX — The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office says it will now take the lead in responding to horse and livestock welfare calls. The Medford Mail Tribune reports that staff cuts at the Jackson County animal shelter and a steady increase in incidents of neglect prompted the sheriff’s office to act. Colleen Macuk, director of Jackson County Animal Care and Control, says that many families struggling economically often abandon pets. She says the double-digit unemployment in Oregon continues to fuel the abandoning of pets. “Overall, this is a very good change,” Macuk said. “We handed this over knowing it was go-

ing to be much better managed by them than we were able to do. ... We were not able to adequately respond to these (livestock) calls. We just don’t have the people or the facility. For the last couple months we’ve been referring everything to the sheriff’s.” Sheriff Mike Winters says his deputies already respond to 1,400 animal calls a year, so the new duties wouldn’t change too many things. “We get a lot of ‘at large’ calls where horses get loose, or are turned loose, and also abuse cases,” Winters said. He added that a few of the deputies received training in how to handle horses. “They learned how to handle horses that are trapped or in need

of rescue. They also got some information on their basic care and condition,” Winters said. Winters and Macuk stressed that many of these problems stem from people not understanding the cost of caring for horses. “People don’t have a clue. There are a lot of costs beyond feeding,” Winters said. “If they can’t do it properly, they shouldn’t go down that road.” Winters is personally caring for two horses that were abandoned in a wooded area near his property, he said. “People left them out in the middle of nowhere,” he said. “The horses hop in the trailer thinking they’re going for a day ride. And they end up nearly starving to death.”

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C4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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S

en. Ron Wyden has given Oregonians a number of reasons to appreciate his service over the years, from his role in securing timber payments for rural counties to his efforts to turn

the former Bend Pine Nursery into a developed park. But he’s given them even better reasons to appreciate Jim Huffman, the longtime law school professor who seeks to unseat the longtime lawmaker. Wyden likes to point to his record of bipartisanship. He and Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., have co-sponsored legislation that would simplify the tax code, earning praise from the conservative Heritage Foundation. And before that, Wyden and Republican colleague Bob Bennett co-sponsored the well-known Healthy Americans Act. The bill would have separated health insurance from employment (employers would have stopped providing health insurance, but moved the savings into salaries), and workers would have bought insurance from regulated, but presumably highly competitive, exchanges. Like Wyden’s tax-reform bill, the Healthy Americans Act drew interest from people across the political spectrum. Unfortunately, many of them seem to have liked Wyden’s bill much better than Wyden himself did. Notwithstanding his own, far better, reform bill, Wyden cast the crucial 60th vote needed to uncork the ill-conceived overhaul that eventually became law. Millions of Americans are now beginning to live with the consequences. Wyden explains that his support came at a price. In exchange for his “yes” vote, Wyden says he succeeded in amending the overhaul in a number of ways that will mitigate its harm. They may well do so. But it’s still an enormously disruptive piece of legislation that even Wyden concedes will — and should — undergo significant revision. No matter how Wyden attempts to justify his vote, it was a terrible mistake that Americans — and even Wyden’s own party — will live to regret. Would voters be less angry at Democrats today if Wyden had refused to support a reform effort he didn’t like much in the first place? We suspect so. It’s no small thing for a senator facing an important vote to buck his party on a matter of principle. But Wyden did just that eight years ago, when he voted against the authorization to use military force in Iraq. He also bucked his party in opposing the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP). It’s a shame he couldn’t bring himself to oppose the health care overhaul, too, particularly given the fact that he’d proposed a much more sensible alternative. Then again, taking a principled stand is much more difficult when it actually carries real weight. Wyden’s votes on TARP and the war didn’t affect the outcomes. A vote against the health reform plan would have. And that’s where Wyden’s brand of bipartisanship falls short. It’s fairly easy to be bipartisan on conceptual legislation that probably won’t go anywhere, as is the case with Wyden’s tax-reform bill. Meanwhile, bipartisan impulses count for nothing when you

simply vote the way your party wants to when it really matters, as is the case with Wyden’s reluctant vote for health care reform. Huffman may not become the poster child for bipartisanship, either, though he, like Wyden, argues that there’s room for compromise in a number of areas. These include health care, public lands management, entitlement reform and tax policy. But unlike Wyden, Huffman has no record against which to test these claims. He’s asking for the benefit of the doubt, and it seems to us he deserves it. The former dean of Lewis & Clark Law School, Huffman is exceptionally smart and well-informed. Though he disagrees profoundly with Congress’ recent direction, he isn’t an angry bomb-thrower. In fact, he says he would have voted for Supreme Court nominees Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, whom he calls competent and experienced. Besides, nominating justices is the president’s prerogative. Huffman is a thoughtful proponent of fiscal and regulatory restraint and tax-code simplicity. He considers the stimulus package — for which Wyden voted — a pig-out of colossal proportions and would have preferred a more modest stimulus directed at basic infrastructure projects that ought to be done anyway. Huffman also considers the health care bill a looming disaster, worrying that it’s simply an unaffordable entitlement program in the making. He faults the legislation’s architects for failing to create incentives to spend health care money wisely — for instance, through the use of health savings accounts. Huffman is committed, at the very least, to reforming the health care overhaul. Ron Wyden has done many of the small things very well. He’s steered hundreds of millions of dollars to rural states through his timber-payment legislation, as we noted. He’s opposed the Obama administration’s foolish tariffs on Chinese tires, which threaten businesses like Les Schwab. He’s also protected local kit plane makers from onerous and unreasonable federal regulations. When it comes to this sort of constituent service, Wyden has done the right thing more often than not. But on the big stuff — health care, spending, debt, you name it — Wyden and party colleagues have simply been wrong too often. We don’t agree with Huffman in all regards, including his support of a balanced budget amendment. Still, to paraphrase gubernatorial candidate Chris Dudley: Do you like how things are going in Washington, D.C.? If so, vote for Wyden.

My Nickel’s Worth Vote for Huffman

Wyden and TARP

Jim Huffman is the former dean of the Lewis & Clark Law School. He is a constitutional expert and has spent the last four decades thinking about public policy and law. He earned his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School. Over his career he has developed a long and distinguished record of books, articles, board memberships and professional affiliations. Over the years, I have watched Sen. Ron Wyden consistently vote for legislation that has dramatically increased the size and power of the federal government and departed from the principles of limited government and individual liberty as laid out in the Constitution. All members of Congress take an oath of office to support and defend the Constitution upon being sworn in to Congress. I believe that Wyden has either broken his oath or certainly bent it very badly and he needs to be retired from the Senate. As a constitutional lawyer, Huffman knows what’s in the Constitution and has the background, knowledge and wisdom to fulfill the duties of a senator. Unlike Wyden, Huffman has pledged to vote for legislation only if it comes within the enumerated powers of Congress and does not violate the constitutional rights of American citizens. He further has pledged to demand transparency in all legislative processes, pledged to refuse to vote on any bill that he has not had the opportunity to read, and pledged to support only judicial nominees committed to constitutional government. Vote for Huffman in November. Nancy Garrett Bend

I wanted to correct the factual record on the letter you published Sept. 24 by Margaret Young. Young wrongly states that Sen. Ron Wyden voted for the $700 billion Wall Street bailouts. In fact, Wyden voted against that proposal — twice. As The Bulletin itself had reported just three days prior to Young’s letter, “Wyden voted against the bill creating TARP in 2008, and against releasing the second half of the TARP fund in early 2009.” The candidate in the U.S. Senate race that supported the Wall Street bailouts is Jim Huffman, who began his campaign in March by attacking Wyden’s opposition to those bailouts (Eugene Register Guard, March 5). The senator looks forward to an active debate as Oregonians make their choice in the upcoming election, but hopes that all parties can agree this discussion should be grounded in fact, not fiction. We appreciate The Bulletin providing us with the space to set the record straight. Jake Weigler campaign manager Wyden for Senate

Naked emperor Regarding the condition the state of Oregon is in — I don’t care who or what got us in this mess, but would someone with common sense and starch in their shorts stand up and do what it takes to lead us out of this downward spiral? All the energy that’s expended in blaming and finger-pointing is useless! We’re here! Everyone seems to think that it’s up to someone else to fix it. It’s not. It’s up

to all of us, and no one is so special as to be exempt from the belt-tightening that has to be done. Millions of dollars are being spent on campaigns to buy a position of power while others are jobless, homeless, ill, hungry, etc. As a country, we are less educated, more obese, we think we’re entitled, we whine and consume more than we produce, and even worse, we lack empathy and we’re lazy — and our priorities are all fouled up. The emperor has no clothes — and it’s going to get chilly this winter! Kathi Miller Bend

Support Kitzhaber The recently televised debate between gubernatorial candidates Chris Dudley and John Kitzhaber presented voters with a very clear choice. Kitzhaber actually answered the questions and did so with demonstrated knowledge of how Oregon government works. He proposed specific plans for creating Oregon jobs for Oregon workers and restoring our reputation as being an innovative, healthy and environmentally responsible state. He proposed clear plans to help small businesses and middle-class Oregonians. Dudley is most likely a nice guy as his TV ads proclaim, and he is backed by a lot of party money from both in and out of state, but with only a few vague talking points in answer to all questions, it was clear he is not ready to lead. Kitzhaber clearly had the facts, the ideas, the vision and the passion. We just have to make sure we vote him into office so he can get to work for us. Alice Elshoff Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Basing taxes on property value isn’t fair to anybody By Daniel Kiesow Bulletin guest columnist

B

ulletin front page, Sept. 22: “Property tax law may be modified.” Why? To end disparities. To bring fairness and uniformity. The article states that due to “Oregon’s arcane property tax system,” and an attempted fix for Measure 50, there is not a uniform relationship between the market value (both past and present) and the amount of tax to be paid by an individual in any given year. Don McIntyre (described as an anti-tax advocate) apparently believes this is “a miscarriage of property tax justice.” Chris Telfer, Oregon state senator (who is running for state treasurer), states that it needs to be changed “so it’s more uniform and more fair.” Let’s back up, way back, and look at the bigger picture. Was (or is) property tax ever fair, not just in the mechanism of assessment, collection and distribution, but rather in the very idea that the value

of someone’s home has any relationship to what the tax supports? What does the value of the home I own have to do with paying for educating children, or, for that matter, supporting a community college? Library? Mental Health? 4-H? Fairgrounds? Thirty-five point three percent of the $277 I pay per month on my primary residence goes for schools, and another 13.7 percent for bonds, which are mostly for school buildings. Only 51 percent of what I pay ends up being spent on government services that (for the most part) actually benefit my property and, therefore, make a case for taxing based on property itself. The fairness issue plays in like this: The value of my property does not relate directly to the amount of government services used or provided. Whether one has invested $100,000 or $1.1 million, they still only require one unit of police, fire, road, sewer, community development department, parks, (and if this is

IN MY VIEW where the support should come from) education, library, recreation programs, health department, etc. For example, I choose to live in a stickbuilt house on a privately owned lot, while my friend chose a mobile home in a park. Our houses are comparable in size and amenities, but he enjoys a pool, recreation room, maintained grounds and has water and sewer paid. We both like to RV and spend some time residing in our units each year. I have an older camper for my truck, while he has a nearly new Beaver motor home. In balance, we both have nearly the same invested in RVs and homes combined, but he pays far less in property taxes than I do (even considering that a portion of his park rent would be property tax). We both use the government services in an equal fashion. Where is the fairness in this?

What about the people who live in a lesser-value house but invest their wealth in the market or municipal bonds, or maybe a sailboat or sports equipment? Our neighbors, whose house cost virtually the same as ours, spent some of their money on a cruise, a Hawaiian vacation, a new car and truck, while we finished our extra space into a family room. Not only did we have to pay for permits, but we will now be penalized for the rest of our lives (in that house) for spending our money to do a home improvement. Fair? If we truly want to make the system fair, let’s consider one same dollar amount to be paid based on each residential dwelling unit, irrespective of value, and use the revenue to pay for only government services related directly to the property. This would not include schools. Commercial property and bare land could be taxed based on a formula of use of services. This would basically change the system to pay for what one consumes, on a per capita basis, rather than for what

others consume just because you chose to invest more in your residence. There are many, much more equitable ways to pay for government services than basing on home value. Think big picture. Remember the existing system punishes you if you own a nice house or if you add value to your property. How does owning a valuable property you bought and paid for when you were earning an income give you the ability (or responsibility) to pay more, and continually year after year, for government services and schools than someone else? And consider what happens if your financial circumstances change and you can no longer pay the tax: The government can come take your home, even if it’s paid for. I pay 22.6 percent of my retirement income for property tax on my own residence. The property tax — fair for whom? Daniel Kiesow lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 C5

O Alta Sylvia Bergen

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N   Alice Mae Mendes, of La Pine June 17, 1945 - Oct. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Graveside Service: Wednesday, 10/20/10 at 3:00 PM at the La Pine Community Cemetery, East end of Reed Road, La Pine, Oregon.

Dorothy Jann Morrow, of La Pine May 22, 1949 - Oct. 6, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A private interment will be held for family at Pilot Butte Cemetery.

Elmer Neale, of Bend Aug. 25, 1918 - Oct. 11, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: A family gathering has been held to celebrate his memory.

Margaret Hall, of Redmond April 20, 1932 - Oct. 10, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Private services will be held Nov. 12th at Golden Gate National Cemetery. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care.

Morris Franklin Laswell, of Bend Oct. 12, 1915 - Oct. 15, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No Services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97702.

Zachary Edward Oelkers, of Bend April 13, 1989 - Oct. 7, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A private memorial service will be held for family and friends. Contributions may be made to:

Organization of your choosing.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Annexation

Sept. 25, 1923 - October 9, 2010 Long-time Culver resident, Alta Sylvia Bergen, died on October 9, 2010,2 at her home. She was 87 years old. Alta was born Sept. 25, 1923, in Casper, Wyoming, to George and Sylvia Mann. She married Lesley Bergen in Rawlins, Wyoming in 1946, and they moved to the home Alta Bergen he had built for them on their farm near Culver. She enjoyed working in her flower and vegetable gardens. Together, Alta and Les were instrumental in the formation of the Culver Church of the Nazarene. Alta was active in all departments of the church, helping out wherever she could. She rarely missed Sunday services. Her faith and her church were integral parts of her daily life. Alta was preceded in death by her husband, in 1989; her parents; and her sister, Odelle Bruce. She is survived by her daughters, Sharon Bergen of Redmond, and Janice Stalker of Bend; her granddaughters, Savannah and Marley of Bend; her brother, Everett Mann of Rawlins, Wyoming; family friend, Lois Jean Schallhorn, who lovingly cared for Alta as her health declined; and her loving dog, Freckles. She will be dearly missed by all who knew her. The funeral will be held on October 22, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Culver Church of the Nazarene. She will be buried beside her husband at the Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park Cemetery in Madras, Oregon. Memorial contributions may be made to the Culver Church of the Nazarene, P.O. Box 57, Culver, Oregon 97734. Autumn Funerals is in charge of the arrangements.

Phyllis ”Tiny” Jean (Sears) Snyder Jan. 20, 1931 - October 15, 2010 Phyllis ”Tiny” Jean (Sears) Snyder of Bend passed away October 15, 2010. She was 79 years old. There will be a memorial service Wednesday, October 20, 2010, at 2:00 PM, at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home Chapel. Phyllis Jean was born January 20, 1931, in Bend, OR, to Fred and Mae Gilbert. Phyllis was a homemaker and greatly enjoyed raising her two sons, Mike and Buzz. She was married Jan. 29, 1988, in Las Vegas, NV, to Robert M. Snyder. Phyllis later moved to California during the cold Oregon winters. She quit going to California about three years ago, for the opportunity to spend the holidays with her family in Bend. Phyllis greatly enjoyed spending time with her family, reading, and traveling. Phyllis especially enjoyed eating Butterfingers and drinking chocolate milkshakes while watching old western movies. Phyllis is survived by her two sons; Michael K. Sears of Bend, OR, and Morgan “Buzz” K. Sears of Kent, Washington; daughter-in-law, Janis M. Sears of Bend, OR, granddaughters, Michelle Weber, Mandy Sears, Mindy Sears all of Bend, OR, Annie Sears, Brandy Sears, Candy Sears all of Beaverton, OR; five great-granddaughters and four great-grandsons; sister, Virginia Laws of Wasilla, AK. Phyllis is preceded in death by her mother and father, Fred and Mae Gilbert; and sister, June “Toby” Jones. Please visit our website at www.niswonger-reynolds.com to sign the electronic guest register for the family. Memorial contributions may be made to Harmony Health Care in lieu of flowers. Niswonger-Reynolds has been entrusted with the final arrangements.

F.N. Kinney via New York Times News Service

Bella Plain is seen in an undated handout photo. Plain, who became a best-selling author at age 59 and whose multigenerational family sagas of Jewish-American life won a loyal readership in the millions, died Tuesday, Oct. 12, at her home in Short Hills, N.J. She was 95.

Novelist Belva Plain dies at 95 By Emma Brown The Washington Post

Belva Plain was a grandmother nearing retirement age when she published her first novel, “Evergreen,” in 1978. She went on to establish herself as a prolific writer and a mainstay of popular fiction whose romantic dramas and intergenerational family sagas, though not always beloved by critics, were embraced by millions of readers. Plain, who wrote 20 bestselling novels in her late-life career, died Oct. 12 at age 95 at her home in Short Hills, N.J. The cause of death was not disclosed. Plain sold her first short story to Cosmopolitan magazine when she was 25. She went on to raise three children and, until the early 1960s, to write

Solar Continued from C1 Munkel declined to say who owns the Jefferson County ranch his group plans to build on. “Solar is the cleanest renewable energy out there,” Munkel said. “It has minimal impact on land that can’t produce anything. The land we’re dealing with is rangeland.” An advisory committee to the Land Conservation and Development Commission consists of representatives of the Bureau of Land Management, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Natural Desert Association, the Oregon Department of Energy and the Oregon Department of Agriculture as well as a farmer from Lake County and a rancher from Harney County. Jefferson County Community Development Director Jon

Kristof Continued from C1 With his wife, journalist Sheryl WuDunn, he’s written three books; the pair won a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for coverage of the democracy movement in China. Kristof won a second Pulitzer in 2006 for his commentary on the genocide in Darfur, Sudan. Kristof’s talk, part of the Central Oregon Community College Foundation’s Nancy R. Chandler Visiting Scholar Program, will focus on his most recent book, “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.” It’s a project Kristof said had been in the works for two decades, particularly in the years Kristof and WuDunn spent living in China. He said it became clear that more people needed to know about the living conditions and the challenges facing women in countries around the world — particularly the women involved in human trafficking, which he compared to 19th century slavery. The book, which was published in September 2009 and remains on The New York Times Best Seller List, tells the

formulaic tales for magazines such as Redbook and Good Housekeeping about wives who contemplate — and ultimately resist — extramarital temptation. It was not until her children were grown and had begun families of their own that Plain produced “Evergreen,” a sprawling 700-page ragsto-riches tale about Anna, a beautiful Jewish immigrant who falls in love with one man only to marry another. “Evergreen,” which remained on the New York Times’ bestseller list for 41 weeks in hardcover and was later made into an NBC miniseries, announced many of what became Plain’s signature devices: strong heroines, forbidden love and torturous secrets complicating multigener-

ational family entanglements. She was particularly interested in countering cliches about Jewish families, she said. “I was tired of the stereotyped Jewish mother whose chicken soup renders her son impotent,” she told People magazine in 1978. “I thought it was time to write about the kind of people I know.” With “Random Winds” (1980), the story of a doctor and the three women who haunt his life, and “Eden Burning” (1982), about a wealthy young woman who endures rape only to become pregnant with her attacker’s child, Plain cemented her reputation as what the Times called “the queen of family-saga writers.” More than 25 million copies of her books have been sold.

Skidmore said the commission may make the final decision as soon as January. Jefferson County officials have persistently encouraged the commission to re-evaluate the rule. In part because of their prodding, the Department of Land Conservation and Development formed the committee.

some or restrictive. At least 20 Jefferson County farmers and ranchers have expressed interest in establishing solar farms. “In the last decade or so, we’ve seen an awful lot of interest in developing energy-generating facilities on rural land,” Jinings said. “It started with the wind farm stuff, and in the last 12 or 18 months, there’s been a surge in solar facilities.” Skidmore said he’s hoping a new rule could be on the books as soon as January. He said the change would help Oregon’s land-use regulations catch up with today’s reality. “When the rules were set up, no one could have anticipated solar farming would be a viable option down the road,” Skidmore said. “We need our land system to catch up with the technology.”

‘Valid resource use’ “Our commissioners really identified this solar farm ability as a valid resource use of marginal resource lands,” Skidmore said. Jon Jinings, community services specialist with the Department of Land Conservation and Development, said there was a change in administrative rules regarding wind farms about two years ago. With solar, he said, the goal is to ensure farmland is protected but also to evaluate if the current rule is overly cumber-

stories of women around the world, from South Africa to Afghanistan, India and China. “We talk about the grim side of the picture, if you will, about human trafficking, reproductive health, violence against women,” Kristof said. “The larger point we make is a positive one: If you educate girls, bring women into the labor force, it has an incredible impact on women, on countries, and it’s the best way of alleviating poverty.” The book has gained the attention of Oprah Winfrey, who promoted its message on two shows. Kristof said it has also sparked the attention of book clubs, charitable organizations and individual readers, including many who have donated money or decided to get involved with efforts to improve the lives of others. “The most powerful response has been from women in their 20s,” he said. “And those have been the ones who moved halfway around the world to do something.” Kristof said he’s looking forward to sharing the stories with people in Bend and checking out how the community has changed since he was growing up in Yamhill.

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Though he’s planning to take a bit of a breather to spend time with his children, ages 18, 16 and 13, Kristof said he’s happy to keep spreading the word about the issues facing women around the globe. “Changing the world is pretty tough,” he said. “But this is actually an area where one can bring about change.” Kristof’s presentation is sold out and has a waiting list, said Karen Aylward of the COCC Foundation. For the 7 p.m. presentation, tickets cost $20 and $25. To get on the waiting list, call 541-317-0700. The Nancy R. Chandler Visit-

Continued from C1 If the annexation passes, neither Redmond nor district residents should notice a change in fire department or ambulance services. Annexation, though, is designed to stabilize the department’s funding. The department would no longer be funded through Redmond’s general fund budget; instead, fire services would have a dedicated tax base. The Terrebonne meeting will be the second town hall meeting concerning the annexation and tax cut in about a week. The previous one was held in Redmond, but not a single voter attended, according to Moor. The fire chief prefers to read that as a good sign. Annexation backers have made door-to-door tours of the city and have given 46 presentations to local clubs and organizations to discuss the move. Moor believes the outreach has been enough to pass the measures. “If people have an issue or concerns, they’ve going to come in and complain,” Moor said.

Distrust of annexation The tax cut measure was created because of concerns over the annexation measure. The city polled residents and discovered distrust that the annexation would be tax-neutral. To alleviate that concern, the council placed the tax cut on the ballot. Redmond currently collects a tax rate of $6.16 per $1,000 of assessed value. If both measures are approved, the fire protection district would collect $1.75 per $1,000 and the city would collect $4.41 per $1,000, leaving the overall rate unchanged. The annexation’s effect on taxes was probably the biggest issue for potential voters, Redmond Fire Capt. Jeff Puller said. But with council’s move to limit the city’s tax rate, that concern went away, said Puller, who has made several door-to-door visits in the city. Puller, who is president of the local firefighters union, is optimistic people understand the measures well enough to pass them. “The feedback we’ve gotten has far outweighed any negative reaction,” Puller said. “We’re positive and very excited.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Fight Continued from C1 While Bend Police were sorting out that fight, several more fights broke out, and police had to call Oregon State Police and Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office for help. The Boondocks brawl ended with two people going to the hospital, two more arrested and one with a citation to appear in court.

ing Scholar Program was established in 1985 by the late Robert W. Chandler, a longtime editor of The Bulletin, and his wife, Nancy. It brings scholars to Central Oregon to present lectures and workshops. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home “Caring People, Caring For You”

Serving Central Oregon Families Since 1911

Visit our website to view obituaries and leave condolence messages. www.niswonger-reynolds.com Jerome Daniel Managing Director

541-382-2471 105 NW Irving Ave, Bend Locally Owned & Operated by the Daniel Family


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 19

WEDNESDAY

Today: Abundant sunshine and mild.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

68

27

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

61/37

61/37

66/33

59/40

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

67/34

64/24

Willowdale  Mitchell

Madras

66/29

64/32

Camp Sherman 64/24 Redmond Prineville 68/27 Cascadia 65/28 67/28 Sisters 66/26 Bend Post 68/27

Oakridge Elk Lake 65/26

56/15

67/24

65/23

Burns 66/25

68/23

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

65/22

63/24

Fort Rock

Vancouver 60/45

Seattle 61/46

62/38

67/23

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear tonight.

60/35

62/33

68/30

80s



50s Idaho Falls Elko

86/46

67/26

Crater Lake

66/35

60s

70s

62/35

Boise

68/27

Redding

Silver Lake

64/21

60/28

Bend

73/37

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula Helena

Grants Pass

Reno 70s 68/41

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

67/54

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

City

50s

Eugene

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:25 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:15 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:13 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:30 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:10 a.m.

69/46

Mostly cloudy, significantly cooler, chance of LOW showers.

HIGH

Moon phases Last

New

First

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Nov. 5

Nov. 13

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 61/36/0.00 . . . . . . 64/44/s. . . . . . 63/45/pc Baker City . . . . . . 62/19/0.00 . . . . . . 67/32/s. . . . . . . 67/33/s Brookings . . . . . . 69/43/0.00 . . . . . . 67/50/s. . . . . . 59/51/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 70/24/0.00 . . . . . . 66/34/s. . . . . . . 68/37/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 62/34/0.00 . . . . . . 62/38/s. . . . . . . 61/41/f Klamath Falls . . . 69/31/0.00 . . . . . . 68/32/s. . . . . . . 69/34/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 66/43/0.00 . . . . . . 68/31/s. . . . . . . 69/31/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 64/19/0.00 . . . . . . 68/23/s. . . . . . . 68/26/s Medford . . . . . . . 72/37/0.00 . . . . . . 74/37/s. . . . . . . 74/39/s Newport . . . . . . . 57/37/0.00 . . . . . . 63/43/s. . . . . . 62/45/pc North Bend . . . . . . 59/37/NA . . . . . . 66/45/s. . . . . . 62/47/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/39/0.00 . . . . . . 66/35/s. . . . . . . 69/37/s Pendleton . . . . . . 61/30/0.00 . . . . . . 63/33/s. . . . . . . 65/35/s Portland . . . . . . . 65/39/0.01 . . . . . . 65/45/s. . . . . . . 65/46/s Prineville . . . . . . . 61/28/0.00 . . . . . . 65/28/s. . . . . . . 67/27/s Redmond. . . . . . . 65/19/0.00 . . . . . . 65/26/s. . . . . . . 68/25/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 67/38/0.00 . . . . . . 68/40/s. . . . . . . 69/44/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 64/35/0.00 . . . . . . 64/38/s. . . . . . . 64/41/f Sisters . . . . . . . . . 63/22/0.00 . . . . . . 66/26/s. . . . . . . 70/25/s The Dalles . . . . . . 69/33/0.00 . . . . . . 66/40/s. . . . . . 69/39/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

3MEDIUM

0

2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63/30 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 in 1974 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 in 1945 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.28” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.01” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.15” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.20 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.22 in 1953 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

59 36

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, cool, breezy, isolated rain LOW showers.

HIGH

62 36

PLANET WATCH

Full

SATURDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:40 a.m. . . . . . .6:20 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .8:57 a.m. . . . . . .6:03 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:54 a.m. . . . . . .7:21 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:02 p.m. . . . . . .4:44 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .5:55 a.m. . . . . . .5:44 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:03 p.m. . . . . . .4:59 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 58/31

67/25

59/17

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 72° Medford • 19° Meacham

LOW

70 32

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear tonight. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

65/45

Brothers

LOW

72 28

NORTHWEST

60/24

64/25

Sunriver

HIGH

FRIDAY Increasing cloud cover and mild.

Patchy fog possible along the coast early; otherwise skies will be partly to mostly sunny today.

Paulina

La Pine



Patchy fog early, then mostly sunny today. Areas of fog tonight. Central

70/33

Abundant sunshine and unseasonably warm.

Tonight: Clear and cool.

HIGH

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,533 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43,766 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,143 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 23,502 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92,769 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39.8 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.2 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . 80.3 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.56 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 60/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 58/31

S

Saskatoon 58/35

Seattle 61/46

S

S

Winnipeg 57/41

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 48/31

Thunder Bay 52/32

Halifax 50/35 P ortland (in the 48 Billings To ronto Portland 57/40 contiguous states): 65/37 54/41 65/45 Boston St. Paul Detroit Boise 59/47 Green Bay Buffalo Rapid City 61/44 59/44 66/35 • 92° New York 56/43 57/41 67/36 61/51 Laredo, Texas Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 65/42 Chicago 62/33 • 17° 61/38 63/48 58/47 Omaha San Francisco Havre, Mont. Washington, D. C. Salt Lake 67/38 67/54 City 66/49 Las Denver • 0.93” Louisville 69/46 Kansas City Vegas 66/41 67/39 Chanute, Kan. 65/45 St. Louis 81/62 Nashville 63/44 73/47 Albuquerque Los Angeles Charlotte Oklahoma City Little Rock 72/47 66/58 82/53 70/50 73/52 Phoenix Birmingham Atlanta 88/65 Honolulu 84/56 81/58 Dallas 85/70 Tijuana 82/59 61/57 New Orleans 83/61 Orlando Houston 84/62 Chihuahua 86/67 84/53 Miami 85/73 Monterrey La Paz 89/67 85/64 Mazatlan Anchorage 86/71 45/34 Juneau 45/34 Bismarck 62/35

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .84/61/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . 80/60/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .56/39/0.00 . 57/38/pc . . 62/45/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . 58/38/pc . . . 61/40/c Albuquerque. . . .74/53/0.00 . 72/47/pc . . . .71/45/t Anchorage . . . . .51/34/0.01 . .45/34/sh . . 42/32/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .80/51/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . 76/48/pc Atlantic City . . . .67/42/0.04 . .61/50/sh . . 64/52/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . 87/62/pc . . 86/61/pc Baltimore . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . .65/47/sh . . 65/46/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . .65/37/s . . . 65/41/s Birmingham . . . .82/49/0.00 . 84/56/pc . . . 78/47/s Bismarck . . . . . . .57/30/0.00 . 62/35/pc . . 63/37/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . . .66/35/s . . . 67/35/s Boston. . . . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . 59/47/pc . . 61/48/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .61/46/0.00 . 58/42/pc . . 62/47/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .54/40/0.00 . . .56/43/c . . . 60/46/c Burlington, VT. . .51/42/0.00 . . .52/37/c . . . 56/38/c Caribou, ME . . . .48/36/0.00 . . .46/33/c . . . 50/35/c Charleston, SC . .80/55/0.00 . . .81/61/s . . 81/58/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .82/53/s . . . 70/45/c Chattanooga. . . .73/44/0.00 . 80/54/pc . . . 73/44/s Cheyenne . . . . . .45/39/0.08 . 62/33/pc . . . 65/37/s Chicago. . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . 58/47/pc . . 67/46/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .74/42/0.00 . 64/40/pc . . 67/43/pc Cleveland . . . . . .53/41/0.09 . . .57/46/c . . . 63/50/c Colorado Springs 59/46/0.00 . 64/39/pc . . . 67/39/s Columbia, MO . .74/50/0.00 . 62/43/pc . . . 71/48/s Columbia, SC . . .84/46/0.00 . . .84/54/s . . 78/50/pc Columbus, GA. . .80/47/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . 83/50/pc Columbus, OH. . .65/42/0.06 . 61/38/pc . . 65/44/pc Concord, NH . . . .58/37/0.00 . 59/32/pc . . . 61/36/c Corpus Christi. . .85/60/0.00 . 84/69/pc . . 84/71/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .86/61/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . . 81/61/s Dayton . . . . . . . .63/41/0.09 . 62/40/pc . . 66/43/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . 66/41/pc . . . 69/45/s Des Moines. . . . .64/46/0.00 . 65/42/pc . . . 71/45/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .57/47/0.00 . . .59/44/c . . . 62/47/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .53/31/0.00 . 53/36/pc . . 57/39/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . 81/55/pc . . 79/52/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .32/27/0.00 . . .33/9/sn . . . 30/10/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . 61/39/pc . . 61/34/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .62/36/0.00 . 62/35/pc . . . .55/33/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .58/47/0.00 . . .59/40/c . . 64/44/pc Green Bay. . . . . .56/42/0.00 . 57/41/pc . . 61/42/pc Greensboro. . . . .80/48/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . 68/46/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .61/42/0.00 . .61/43/sh . . 64/46/pc Hartford, CT . . . .62/43/0.00 . 59/43/pc . . 61/44/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .60/27/0.00 . . .62/35/s . . . 68/36/s Honolulu . . . . . . .85/70/0.00 . . .85/70/s . . . 86/71/s Houston . . . . . . .89/62/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . 87/65/pc Huntsville . . . . . .78/48/0.00 . 80/52/pc . . . 73/46/s Indianapolis . . . .65/48/0.02 . 63/41/pc . . 68/45/pc Jackson, MS . . . .84/52/0.00 . 84/59/pc . . . 80/52/s Madison, WI . . . .60/43/0.00 . 60/39/pc . . 63/39/pc Jacksonville. . . . .80/46/0.00 . . .81/61/s . . 83/62/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/42/0.27 . . .45/34/r . . 44/35/sh Kansas City. . . . .67/48/0.05 . 65/45/pc . . 72/48/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .56/45/0.00 . . .58/39/c . . 63/42/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .77/61/0.05 . 81/62/pc . . . .73/63/t Lexington . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . 65/41/pc . . . 66/42/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . 68/38/pc . . 73/43/pc Little Rock. . . . . .85/52/0.00 . . .73/52/t . . . 75/52/s Los Angeles. . . . .67/62/0.00 . . .66/58/t . . 66/59/sh Louisville . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . 67/39/pc . . 71/48/pc Memphis. . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . .78/55/sh . . . 74/54/s Miami . . . . . . . . .84/71/0.00 . 85/73/pc . . 85/72/sh Milwaukee . . . . .56/49/0.00 . 58/44/pc . . 63/48/pc Minneapolis . . . .56/39/0.00 . 61/44/pc . . 65/42/pc Nashville . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . 73/47/pc . . . 72/44/s New Orleans. . . .81/61/0.00 . 83/61/pc . . 83/64/pc New York . . . . . .60/50/0.00 . .61/51/sh . . 64/51/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .62/45/0.00 . .62/49/sh . . 63/48/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .72/52/0.00 . 72/57/pc . . 66/52/sh Oklahoma City . .85/53/0.00 . .70/50/sh . . . 77/55/s Omaha . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . 67/38/pc . . 73/43/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . 84/62/pc . . 84/62/pc Palm Springs. . . .84/63/0.00 . . .73/59/t . . 70/58/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .62/48/0.00 . 63/42/pc . . . 70/46/s Philadelphia . . . .64/48/0.00 . .63/48/sh . . 64/47/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .87/73/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . . .78/60/t Pittsburgh . . . . . .60/37/0.05 . 58/38/pc . . 61/45/pc Portland, ME. . . .56/36/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . . 59/42/c Providence . . . . .62/44/0.00 . 59/45/pc . . 62/46/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . . 68/46/c

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .60/29/0.00 . . .67/36/s . . . 68/40/s Savannah . . . . . .80/51/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . 82/57/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .67/47/0.00 . . .68/41/s . . 69/42/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .59/42/0.00 . . .61/46/s . . . 62/48/s Richmond . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . 72/54/pc . . 65/47/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .58/34/0.00 . 64/36/pc . . 69/35/pc Rochester, NY . . .53/39/0.00 . . .58/41/c . . . 57/45/c Spokane . . . . . . .58/32/0.00 . . .61/33/s . . . 65/38/s Sacramento. . . . .73/51/0.00 . 81/53/pc . . 77/52/pc Springfield, MO. .79/48/0.00 . .63/42/sh . . . 68/47/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . 63/44/pc . . 72/49/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . 83/67/pc . . 84/66/pc Salt Lake City . . .70/53/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 72/45/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .82/58/0.00 . 83/58/pc . . . .76/55/t San Antonio . . . .84/61/0.00 . 87/65/pc . . 87/63/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .86/53/0.00 . .66/46/sh . . . 75/53/s San Diego . . . . . .69/63/0.04 . . .64/59/t . . 65/62/sh Washington, DC .68/54/0.00 . .66/49/sh . . 66/48/pc San Francisco . . .66/55/0.00 . 67/54/pc . . 62/55/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .79/53/0.00 . 68/44/pc . . 75/51/pc San Jose . . . . . . .69/55/0.00 . 74/54/pc . . 72/56/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .64/30/0.00 . . .63/32/s . . 65/35/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . 69/44/trace . 65/41/pc . . . .63/35/t Yuma. . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .81/58/t . . . .74/61/t

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .55/34/0.07 . .52/44/sh . . 48/40/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .64/62/1.29 . .71/62/sh . . 74/61/sh Auckland. . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . 63/51/pc . . 56/45/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .98/73/0.00 . . .96/71/s . . . 97/72/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .85/76/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .46/43/0.07 . . .62/42/s . . . 61/40/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .87/73/s . . 86/74/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .52/30/0.00 . .47/41/sh . . 46/39/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 64/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . .52/46/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 51/38/sh Buenos Aires. . . .72/41/0.00 . 75/55/pc . . . 77/58/s Cabo San Lucas .91/66/0.00 . . .85/68/s . . . 84/67/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .96/74/s . . . 94/71/s Calgary . . . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . 58/31/pc . . . 56/29/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .86/71/t . . . .85/70/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .51/38/sh . . 48/36/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . .45/38/sh . . 42/37/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . .53/39/sh . . 48/35/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .87/60/s . . 89/63/pc Hong Kong . . . . .88/79/0.00 . 85/75/pc . . . 84/75/c Istanbul. . . . . . . .73/61/0.13 . . .75/60/t . . 68/58/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . .91/63/s . . 89/61/pc Johannesburg . . .75/52/0.00 . 76/55/pc . . . 83/57/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .62/58/sh . . 63/58/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . .75/59/s . . . 73/55/s London . . . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . .51/39/sh . . 44/37/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . . .66/42/s . . . 68/43/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .82/77/t . . . .86/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/82/0.00 . .108/81/s . . 106/80/s Mexico City. . . . .77/46/0.00 . . .80/51/s . . . 80/52/s Montreal. . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 49/31/pc . . 52/41/sh Moscow . . . . . . .43/25/0.00 . . .43/29/s . . 45/39/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .79/59/sh . . 81/59/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .87/77/t New Delhi. . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . .90/67/s . . . 91/68/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . 71/63/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .48/36/0.03 . .46/37/sh . . .37/27/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . 51/34/pc . . 53/41/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . .50/39/sh . . 47/36/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .73/72/0.00 . . .76/65/s . . . 75/64/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . 69/52/pc . . 67/51/pc Santiago . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . 77/49/pc . . . 72/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . . .69/56/s . . . 75/57/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 53/44/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . 67/51/pc . . 65/53/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .74/65/s . . 71/62/pc Singapore . . . . . .91/81/0.07 . . .89/78/t . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .46/34/0.00 . .47/39/sh . . . .43/37/r Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .66/48/s . . . 70/51/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/73/0.00 . . .84/76/t . . . .82/75/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . 93/74/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 71/63/pc . . 68/63/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . .54/41/sh . . 55/45/sh Vancouver. . . . . .54/45/0.00 . 60/45/pc . . . 62/47/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .46/41/0.42 . 52/38/pc . . 49/39/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .39/28/0.00 . 50/36/pc . . . 48/34/c

House on park property not designed by John Yeon, UO says By Katie Wilson The Daily Astorian

Mystery solved? Maybe. Maybe not. The Lewis and Clark National Historical Park acquired 107 acres of coastal property adjacent to Sunset Beach this summer. On the property was a house, and surrounding the house, a mystery. Who had designed the spa-

cious, angled house? Was it the property’s former owner, Norman Yeon, or was it his more famous brother, Oregon architect John Yeon? At first, signs seemed to point to John Yeon. The house looks like something he would create: the use of wood, the placement and shape of the windows. Then, John Goodenberger, Clatsop Community College his-

toric restoration and preservation instructor, and Park Superintendent David Szymanski received a letter from the John Yeon Center for Architectural Studies at the University of Oregon. “We can confirm that John Yeon had no role in designing the house,” the letter stated. But between the different oral accounts and the researchers at the UO, Goodenberger, who

is also the new chairman of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation, doesn’t think they’re any closer to an answer than before. “It’s wonderful,” he said. “We have someone who has the academic side versus someone who has oral knowledge.” The park is now working with CCC and the college’s historic restoration and preservation pro-

gram. Students will be out at the property several times this academic year, attending workshops and studying the site, developing a restoration plan and, in the spring, putting that plan into action. So as far as the Norman/John question goes, Goodenberger says, “Let the students figure it out.” “There’s this wonderful conflicting texture, and I think that’s

exciting, and I’m leaving it for the students,” he said. Goodenberger couldn’t tell you for sure if John or Norman designed the house. “The fingerprint’s certainly there,” he said. It makes sense, for example, “If I had a brother who built bikes and I was going to build a bike, I’d want his input,” Szymanski added.

FURNITURE OUTLET QUALITY FOR LESS!

FALL

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S

World Cup Skiing Inside Bode Miller and Julia Mancuso (left) prepare for the upcoming season, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

MLB Mariners officially select Eric Wedge as new manager SEATTLE — Eric Wedge is returning to baseball after a year away to face the challenge of another rebuilding project. This time, it’s with the Seattle Mariners. Wedge was officially announced on Monday as the Mariners’ seventh manager since 2003. His charge is rebuilding a franchise a decade removed from its last playoff appearance and coming off a second 101-loss campaign in the past three seasons. “Eric brings the energy, passion and leadership that we think is important as we move Eric Wedge forward and he has a track record of winning at the major league and minor league levels,” Seattle general manager Jack Zduriencik said in a statement. Wedge, 42, has gone down the road of rebuilding a struggling franchise before. He was asked to do it twice during his seven seasons as manager in Cleveland, where in 2007 he took the Indians to within one victory of the World Series. But his inability to win the second time the Indians tried an overhaul eventually cost Wedge his job. “I think this is a terrific opportunity and I am excited to be a part of it,” Wedge said. “Seattle is a great city for me and my family. With the fan support, the ballpark, the ownership and management, the Mariners are in a great position to be very successful.” — The Associated Press

Cycling opportunities keep rolling — indoors or out I

know fall has arrived when there is talk of riding inside. And just last week it came: the notice from Rebound Sports Performance Lab in Bend announcing its lineup of upcoming indoor cycling classes. From a fitness standpoint, I can’t complain. These and other bicycling classes in Central Oregon help riders maintain cycling fitness through the long Central Oregon nonsummer (which, sadly, can last from now until next June). While lovely conditions for mountain- and road-

HEATHER CLARK bike riding still exist outside, shorter and most likely cooler days ahead drive many nine-to-five working folk inside. Though according to some local mountain bikers, it needn’t.

The increasingly early onset of darkness and chillier fall temperatures do not send everyone racing for the comfort of an indoor bicycle. The crew from WebCyclery, a bicycle shop in Bend, invites riders to join them on Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. for mountain bike rides starting from Phil’s Trailhead west of town. Participants should be prepared with warm clothing and bike lights for illuminating the trail. See Cycling / D4

Rebound Sports Performance Lab Where: 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend When: 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m., and 6:15 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 6:30 and 8 a.m. on Saturdays beginning Nov. 6 Cost: $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20, $480 for 40; $10 first-time introductory class Contact: 541-585-1500

Cycl’in Where: Private home studio in west Bend When: 5:45 a.m., 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 8:30 a.m. Fridays; 4 p.m. Sundays Cost: $92 to $112 for eight classes (depending on duration); $164-$196 for 16 classes (depending on duration); $14-$17 drop-in fee Contact: Cherie at 541-390-1633

T R I AT H L O N

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Lawyer travels into Everest’s thin air for charities By Michael Buteau Bloomberg News

INSIDE

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Connie Austin, center, jokes with participants in the Learn to Run program while conducting a session recently in Bend.

NFL Suspensions may start for violent hits NFL looking into adding time off for players after Sunday’s rash of dangerous hits, see Page D3

A new run at life Bend-based program helps get wannabe runners off on the right foot By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

MLB P L AYO F F S Monday ALCS (best of seven) Rangers ........................................8 Yankees ........................................0 • Texas leads series, 2-1

Rangers take series lead over Yankees Pitcher Cliff Lee records 13 strikeouts in 8-0 rout, see Page D3

Central Oregon has developed a reputation as a mecca for runners. You see them everywhere, especially in pleasant weather — on the roads and trails or along the river — in their short shorts and fancy running shoes. Training groups and racing opportunities abound. But contrary to appearances, not everyone in these parts runs. Some may not want to. But what about those who do want to run and just don’t know how to get started? As it turns out, if you fall into the latter group, you are in luck. FootZone, a running shoe store in downtown Bend, offers a program called Learn to Run or Fitness Walk that teaches nonrunners how to,

If You Go What: Learn to Run and Fitness Walk Where: FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., downtown Bend When: Workshop held first Monday of every month, 6 p.m.; Six-week program for Dec. 4 Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis starts this Saturday, 9 a.m. Cost: $45 for workshop; $55 for six-week program Contact: Connie Austin, 541-728-7120 or conzaustin@gmail.com well, run. The program was conceived, FootZone owner Teague Hatfield says, because cus-

tomers who did not really consider themselves runners came to the store wanting some instruction. “This all came out of the interest of giving people a very unintimidating kind of nurturing environment where they could get information about running and how to make that work,” says Hatfield, adding that he didn’t take up running himself until college. So he got together with Connie Austin, a local fitness instructor, and they developed a curriculum that emphasizes correct running form, biomechanics and breathing techniques. The program launched in April 2009. Austin recalls thinking that 30 to 40 individuals would sign up. Instead, 139 did. See Run / D4

Charlie Wittmack came to on the asphalt of a Kazakhstan highway earlier this month after being knocked unconscious when a car rear-ended his bicycle at about 40 mph. The 33-year-old bespectacled lawyer at Davis Brown Law Firm in Des Moines, Iowa, said he suffered no serious injuries, just swelling in his right knee, hip and hand. He added the incident to the list of setbacks on his 10,000-mile attempt to complete an intercontinental journey he has dubbed the World Triathlon. In August, he completed a 275mile swim from Cricklade, England, to Cap Gris-Nez, France, during which he was stung by jellyfish and had to be rescued after becoming stranded on mud flats of the Thames Estuary before crossing the English Channel. Wittmack’s latest mishap occurred in the middle of an 8,875-mile bike ride from France to Nepal. “It was a true miracle to walk away from that,” Wittmack said. “I was pretty scared.” Wittmack, who is using the expedition to raise money for educational charities, including Des Moines University’s global health program and Topics Education, said he wants to reach China by this Thursday and complete the scheduled bike leg of his journey by Dec. 1 in India. To get there, he will have to cross snow-covered mountain passes in Kyrgyzstan. Because of political and ethnic violence in the country, Wittmack is currently traveling with armed escorts, paid for by sponsors including MIR Corp., a Seattle-based adventure travel company. See Lawyer / D4

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Today

Maehl delivers for Ducks’ offense

NLCS (best of seven) • Philadelphia at San Francisco (Fox), 1 p.m. • Series tied, 1-1

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

ALCS (best of seven) • Texas at New York (TBS), 5 p.m. • Rangers lead series, 2-1

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 NFL ............................................D3 Skiing ........................................D3 Community Sports ....................D5

D

Dean Hare / The Associated Press

Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, left, is thriving in top-ranked Oregon’s spread-option offense while all the attention goes to the Ducks’ ground game.

Fans call him the MaehlMan. The flashy nickname kind of belies Oregon receiver Jeff Maehl’s low-key demeanor, though. Maehl, a senior who started his career as a safety but transitioned to receiver, is thriving in top-ranked Oregon’s spread-option offense — even though he’s sometimes overlooked while the attention goes to the Ducks’ speedy ground game. He’s also coming into his own when it comes to a leadership role on a team that’s dominated by a sophomore duo putting up big numbers, running back LaMichael James and quarterback Darron Thomas. He admits that he sometimes gets “riled up” during games, but the Ducks are such a special group this year that really no heavy-handed chaperoning is necessary, Maehl said. “I’m a pretty quiet guy out there. I try to lead by

example, with my work ethic, and at practice,” he said. “But we have such a good group right now.” And what make it so good? “We’re one unit, one team, and we all go out and play for each other,” he said. Maehl’s first season with the Ducks was in 2007, when Oregon was skipping its way up the rankings on the shoulders of quarterback and Heisman Trophy contender Dennis Dixon. Oregon was up to No. 2 when disaster struck and Dixon’s knee gave out, sending the team reeling. It wasn’t just Dixon’s injury that wounded the Ducks. Maehl started as a reserve in the secondary, but he got noticed as a special-teams player and was moved to wide receiver in November when injuries to teammates pressed him into duty on the offense. He started at the new position for the final three games of that year. See Maehl / D4

Next up • UCLA at Oregon • When: Thursday, 6 p.m. • TV: ESPN • Radio: KBND-AM 1110


D2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Boys soccer: Crook County at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 4 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 4 p.m.; Burns at Culver, 4 p.m.; Central Christian at Grant Union, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Madras at Gladstone, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Culver at Santiam, 6 p.m.

11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, Arsenal vs. Shaktar Donetsk, FSNW. 8 p.m. — Real Madrid vs. AC Milan, FSNW (same-day tape).

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, Fox. 5 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, TBS.

GOLF 4 p.m. — PGA Grand Slam of Golf, day one (same-day tape), TNT.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Boston Bruins at Washington Capitals, VS. network.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, TBS. 4:30 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, Fox.

GOLF 5 p.m. — PGA Grand Slam of Golf, day two (same-day tape), TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940. 5 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, KICE-AM 940.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, KICE-AM 940. 4:30 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, Philadelphia Phillies at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Lee paces Warriors past Trail Blazers: David Lee had 21 points and 12 rebounds for his fourth double-double of the preseason, Monta Ellis scored 22 points and the Golden State Warriors beat the Portland Trail Blazers 100-78 on Monday night in Oakland, Calif. Stephen Curry added 11 points and had six assists while Andris Biedrins had eight points and 11 rebounds for the Warriors (3-2), who rallied from 11 points down in the first half. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 11 points for Portland, all but two coming in the first half. Andre Miller added 10 points and four assists for the Blazers (2-4).

Football • Eagles WR Jackson likely out vs. Titans: DeSean Jackson can’t remember the vicious collision that left him with a concussion. That’s a typical consequence for anyone who suffers such a violent head injury. So is missing playing time. Jackson, the dynamic Eagles wide receiver, will almost certainly sit out Sunday’s game against Tennessee after he was injured in a nasty head-on collision with Atlanta cornerback Dunta Robinson. Jackson had soreness in his neck and shoulders a day after the blast, but was otherwise in good spirits and receiving treatment Monday in the training room. • Shanahan: Redskins likely won’t deal Haynesworth: The Washington Redskins insist Albert Haynesworth will remain with the team through today’s trade deadline. Coach Mike Shanahan said Monday there’s “a pretty good chance” that Haynesworth won’t be sent elsewhere, even though the two-time All-Pro has missed three of six games and has clashed often with the coach this year. • NFL, union agree to help ex-players with ALS: The NFL and NFL Players Association have agreed to provide financial assistance to former players who have Lou Gehrig’s disease. The disease that attacks the brain and spinal cord, also called ALS, is being added to the “88 Plan,” which was started in 2006 to help ex-players diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. • Seau drives off cliff, hospitalized with injuries: Former NFL star linebacker Junior Seau drove off a cliff and was hospitalized with minor injuries Monday in Carlsbad, Calif., less than nine hours after he was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence. The 12-time Pro Bowler’s white Cadillac SUV was found on the beach about 100 feet below the roadside, said Carlsbad police Lt. Kelly Cain. Cain said it wasn’t a sheer cliff, but was a significant, rough slope. Seau was taken to Scripps La Jolla Hospital in San Diego. • Texas preps adopt new rules for concussions: The governing body for Texas public school sports has approved new rules for concussions that will require athletes to sit out a least a day after sustaining a head injury beginning next year. The University Interscholastic League on Monday unanimously adopted the recommendation of its medical committee. New guidelines will be in place Aug. 1, 2011.

Baseball • La Russa coming back as Cardinals manager: The St. Louis Cardinals have brought back Tony La Russa for a 16th year as manager. The team announced the deal Monday and said it includes a mutual option for the 2012 season. Financial terms were not disclosed. The 66-year-old La Russa has a franchise-record 1,318 wins since joining the team as manager in 1996. He has led the Cardinals to eight division titles, two National League pennants and a World Series title in 2006.

Soccer • De La Torre is new Mexico coach: Jose Manuel De La Torre has been hired as the new coach of Mexico’s national soccer team, less than five years after making his coaching debut. De La Torre’s post was confirmed at a meeting of Mexican club owners Monday. His nomination was almost a formality after the only other contender, Victor Manuel Vucetich, dropped out of the race Saturday for personal reasons. — From wire reports

WEST VIRGINIA 16 ILLINOIS 13 TEXAS 22 S. Carolina 12.5 ARKANSAS NL Ohio U 3 BYU 9.5 BAYLOR 7.5 Texas A&M 14 MISS ST 20 SMU 9 Kent St 1.5 W. Michigan 8.5 N. ILLINOIS 10 Oklahoma 3.5 Nebraska 5.5 ARIZONA 7.5 CALIFORNIA 3 Alabama 17 AUBURN 6 IDAHO 22.5 Hawaii 3.5 UTAH 31 STANFORD 34.5 VIRGINIA 23 Georgia 3.5 C. FLORIDA 21 TOLEDO 12 Texas Tech 1 Frenso St 17 TCU 18.5 UTEP 10.5 San Diego St 23 UL-LAFAYETTE 6 ARKANSAS ST 7 MID TENN ST 11 e-East Rutherford, N.J.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Wednesday Cross country: Bend, Mountain View, Summit, La Pine, Culver at Central Oregon Cross Country Relays at Bend Pine Nursery, TBA; Sisters at Country Fair Classic in Veneta, TBA Thursday Boys soccer: Bend at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Bend 4 p.m.; Summit at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Bend at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 6 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 6:45 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver, 6 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 5 1 0 .833 159 New England 4 1 0 .800 154 Miami 3 2 0 .600 89 Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 South W L T Pct PF Houston 4 2 0 .667 153 Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 163 Tennessee 4 2 0 .667 162 Jacksonville 3 3 0 .500 110 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 4 1 0 .800 114 Baltimore 4 2 0 .667 112 Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 88 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 2 0 .600 108 Oakland 2 4 0 .333 120 Denver 2 4 0 .333 124 San Diego 2 4 0 .333 157 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 134 Philadelphia 4 2 0 .667 153 Washington 3 3 0 .500 113 Dallas 1 4 0 .200 102 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 2 0 .667 130 New Orleans 4 2 0 .667 130 Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 80 Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 2 0 .667 112 Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 139 Minnesota 2 3 0 .400 87 Detroit 1 5 0 .167 146 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 3 2 0 .600 88 Seattle 3 2 0 .600 98 St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 103 San Francisco 1 5 0 .167 93 ——— Monday’s Game Tennessee 30, Jacksonville 3 Sunday, Oct. 24 Buffalo at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Washington at Chicago, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Kansas City, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Carolina, 10 a.m. Arizona at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 1:15 p.m. New England at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 25 N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Open: Indianapolis, N.Y. Jets, Detroit, Houston

BASKETBALL NBA PA 101 116 112 161 PA 167 125 98 167 PA 60 95 102 125 PA 92 151 140 126 PA 118 120 119 111 PA 101 108 111 110 PA 97 112 88 140 PA 138 97 113 139

Monday’s Summary ———

Titans 30, Jaguars 3 Tennessee Jacksonville

14.5 Syracuse 14 Indiana 21 Iowa St 12.5 VANDERBILT NL Mississippi 3 MIAMI-OHIO 10 Wyoming 6.5 Kansas St 13.5 KANSAS 19.5 Uab 8 Houston 2 BOWLING GREEN 7.5 AKRON 9.5 C. Michigan 3 MISSOURI 5.5 OKLAHOMA ST 6.5 Washington 3 Arizona St 16.5 TENNESSEE 6 Lsu 23.5 New Mexico St 3.5 UTAH ST 30.5 Colorado St 34.5 Washington St 24 E. Michigan 3.5 KENTUCKY 21.5 Rice 12 Ball St 2.5 COLORADO 19.5 SAN JOSE ST 18.5 Air Force 10 Tulane 23 NEW MEXICO 6.5 W. Kentucky 8 Fla. Atlantic 11.5 UL-Monroe

7 10 3 10 — 30 0 0 3 0 — 3 First Quarter Ten—Britt 23 pass from Young (Bironas kick), 12:34. Second Quarter Ten—Scaife 2 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 8:22. Ten—FG Bironas 26, 2:09. Third Quarter Ten—FG Bironas 33, 11:25. Jac—FG Scobee 33, 7:05. Fourth Quarter Ten—FG Bironas 36, 14:12. Ten—C.Johnson 35 run (Bironas kick), 1:40. A—63,625. ——— Ten Jac First downs 20 17 Total Net Yards 324 249 Rushes-yards 39-153 25-76 Passing 171 173 Punt Returns 1-9 2-(-2) Kickoff Returns 2-50 7-168 Interceptions Ret. 3-23 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-21-0 21-36-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-16 Punts 2-49.0 3-37.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 8-57 7-55 Time of Possession 32:45 27:15 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tennessee: C.Johnson 26-111, Ringer 10-42, Hall 1-1, Young 1-0, Collins 1-(minus 1).

Jacksonville: Jones-Drew 17-57, Edwards 5-16, Karim 3-3. PASSING—Tennessee: Collins 11-16-0-110, Young 3-5-0-61. Jacksonville: Edwards 14-24-2-140, Garrard 7-12-1-49. RECEIVING—Tennessee: Scaife 4-53, Williams 4-48, Britt 2-33, C.Johnson 2-20, Washington 1-9, Ringer 1-8. Jacksonville: Thomas 8-88, Lewis 4-39, Miller 2-18, Sims-Walker 2-16, Karim 2-9, Jones-Drew 2-8, Underwood 1-11. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Thursday’s Games SOUTH Lambuth at Tenn.-Martin, 4 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff at Alcorn St., 4:30 p.m. FAR WEST UCLA at Oregon, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Cent. Connecticut St. at Albany, N.Y., 4 p.m. MIDWEST South Florida at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Temple at Buffalo, 9 a.m. Notre Dame vs. Navy at East Rutherford, N.J., 9 a.m. Rutgers at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. Syracuse at West Virginia, 9 a.m. Penn at Yale, 9 a.m. Cornell at Brown, 9:30 a.m. Bucknell at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. Maine at Rhode Island, 9:30 a.m. Maryland at Boston College, 10 a.m. Holy Cross at Colgate, 10 a.m. Lafayette at Fordham, 10 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. at Monmouth, N.J., 10 a.m. Harvard at Princeton, 10 a.m. Georgetown, D.C. at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Duquesne at Wagner, 10 a.m. Dartmouth at Columbia, 10:30 a.m. Massachusetts vs. New Hampshire, 12:30 p.m. James Madison at Villanova, 12:30 p.m. SOUTH VMI at Charleston Southern, 8:30 a.m. Marist at Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Duke at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Delaware at William & Mary, 9 a.m. Delaware St. at Morgan St., 10 a.m. Georgia Southern at The Citadel, 10 a.m. Wofford at Elon, 10:30 a.m. Presbyterian at Gardner-Webb, 10:30 a.m. Howard at N. Carolina A&T, 10:30 a.m. Hampton at S. Carolina St., 10:30 a.m. Savannah St. at Alabama St., 11 a.m. Chattanooga at Furman, 11 a.m. Bethune-Cookman at N.C. Central, 11 a.m. Florida A&M at Norfolk St., 11 a.m. Grambling St. at MVSU, noon Appalachian St. at W. Carolina, noon LSU at Auburn, 12:30 p.m. Georgia Tech at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. Connecticut at Louisville, 12:30 p.m. Georgia St. at Old Dominion, 12:30 p.m. Towson at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Rice at UCF, 12:30 p.m. Austin Peay at Jacksonville St., 1 p.m. Marshall at East Carolina, 1:15 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Middle Tennessee, 1:30 p.m. W. Kentucky at Louisiana-Lafayette, 2 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Nicholls St., 2 p.m. Prairie View vs. Southern U. at Shreveport, La., 2 p.m. E. Michigan at Virginia, 3 p.m. UAB at Mississippi St., 4 p.m. McNeese St. at SE Louisiana, 4 p.m. Alabama at Tennessee, 4 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Tennessee St., 4 p.m. South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Stony Brook at Coastal Carolina, 4:30 p.m. Georgia at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. North Carolina at Miami, 4:30 p.m. MIDWEST Indiana at Illinois, 9 a.m. Penn St. at Minnesota, 9 a.m. Michigan St. at Northwestern, 9 a.m. Purdue at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Morehead St. at Butler, 10 a.m. Campbell at Dayton, 10 a.m. Ohio at Miami (Ohio), 10 a.m. Davidson at Drake, 11 a.m. W. Illinois at Missouri St., 11 a.m. E. Kentucky at SE Missouri, 11 a.m. Murray St. at E. Illinois, 11:30 a.m. Youngstown St. at S. Dakota St., noon W. Michigan at Akron, 12:30 p.m.

Kent St. at Bowling Green, 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Iowa, 12:30 p.m. Oklahoma at Missouri, 12:30 or 5 p.m. Indiana St. at N. Dakota St., 1 p.m. Cent. Michigan at N. Illinois, 1 p.m. Illinois St. at N. Iowa, 2:05 p.m. Texas A&M at Kansas, 4 p.m. Ball St. at Toledo, 4 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. at Texas, 9 a.m. Mississippi at Arkansas, 9:21 a.m. Florida Atlantic at Arkansas St., 10 a.m. Jackson St. at Texas Southern, 10 a.m. Sam Houston St. vs. Stephen F.Austin at Houston, noon Kansas St. at Baylor, 12:30 p.m. Houston at SMU, 12:30 p.m. Nebraska at Oklahoma St., 12:30 or 8 p.m. Northwestern St. at Texas St., 1 p.m. Air Force at TCU, 5 p.m. Tulane at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Wyoming at BYU, 11 a.m. N. Arizona at Montana, noon South Dakota at S. Utah, noon N. Colorado at Montana St., 12:05 p.m. Arizona St. at California, 12:30 p.m. Texas Tech at Colorado, 12:30 p.m. Sacramento St. at E. Washington, 1:05 p.m. New Mexico St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Valparaiso at San Diego, 2 p.m. Washington St. at Stanford, 2 p.m. South Alabama at UC Davis, 2 p.m. Hawaii at Utah St., 2 p.m. Portland St. at Weber St., 2 p.m. Colorado St. at Utah, 3 p.m. Fresno St. at San Jose St., 5 p.m. North Dakota at Cal Poly, 6:05 p.m. San Diego St. at New Mexico, 7 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. Ov’ll W L W Oregon 3 0 6 Oregon State 2 1 3 Stanford 2 1 5 Arizona 2 1 5 Washington 2 1 3 USC 2 2 5 California 1 2 3 Arizona State 1 2 3 UCLA 1 2 3 Washington State 0 4 1 Thursday’s Game UCLA at Oregon, 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 Arizona State at California, 12:30 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 2 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 7:15 p.m.

L 0 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 3 6

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Sunday Steelers 3 3 DOLPHINS FALCONS 4.5 4 Bengals CHIEFS NL NL Jaguars TITANS NL NL Eagles BEARS 3 3 Redskins SAINTS 14 13.5 Browns RAVENS 14 13.5 Bills 49ers 3 3 PANTHERS BUCCANEERS 2.5 2.5 Rams SEAHAWKS 4 4.5 Cardinals CHARGERS 3 3 Patriots BRONCOS NL NL Raiders PACKERS 3 3 Vikings Monday COWBOYS 3 3 Giants

CINCINNATI e-Notre Dame Connecticut VIRGINIA TECH MIAMI-FLA CELMSON BOSTON COL E. CAROLINA Temple IOWA Penn St OHIO ST Michigan St PITTSBURGH

Monday’s Results ——— PORTLAND (78) Batum 2-4 0-1 4, Aldridge 4-8 3-4 11, Cunningham 4-7 0-0 8, Miller 0-3 10-10 10, Roy 2-8 1-2 5, Bayless 1-5 6-6 8, Babbitt 3-10 0-1 6, Fernandez 3-6 0-0 8, Johnson 4-7 1-2 9, Sykes 1-3 2-4 4, E.Williams 1-6 0-0 2, Mills 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 26-69 23-30 78. GOLDEN STATE (100) D.Wright 2-11 2-2 7, Lee 7-13 7-8 21, Biedrins 4-7 0-0 8, Curry 4-12 2-4 11, Ellis 9-18 3-7 22, Radmanovic 0-1 0-0 0, Bell 0-2 0-0 0, B.Wright 2-6 3-4 7, Gadzuric 1-1 0-0 2, Carney 4-6 0-1 9, Lin 0-0 5-6 5, Miles 0-1 2-2 2, Adrien 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 36-81 24-34 100. Portland 20 23 16 19 — 78 Golden State 18 24 31 27 — 100 3-Point Goals—Portland 3-14 (Fernandez 2-4, Mills 1-1, Johnson 0-1, E.Williams 0-1, Batum 0-1, Babbitt 03, Bayless 0-3), Golden State 4-19 (Carney 1-3, Curry 1-4, Ellis 1-4, D.Wright 1-5, Radmanovic 0-1, Bell 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 47 (Babbitt 9), Golden State 58 (Lee 12). Assists—Portland 19 (Babbitt 5), Golden State 22 (Curry 6). Total Fouls—Portland 30, Golden State 20. Technicals—Ellis, Golden State defensive three second. A—11,246 (19,596).

TENNIS

Betting Line

OREGON

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Monday’s Games Orlando 102, Atlanta 73 Charlotte 102, Miami 96 Memphis 96, New Orleans 91 Oklahoma City 111, San Antonio 102 Golden State 100, Portland 78 Today’s Games Philadelphia vs. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Washington vs. Detroit at Toldeo, Ohio, 4 p.m. New Jersey at New York, 4:30 p.m. Indiana at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver, 6 p.m. Utah vs. L.A. Lakers at Anaheim, Calif., 7 p.m. Golden State at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

COLLEGE Thursday 21.5 21.5 Ucla Friday 8.5 7.5 S. Florida Saturday 7 7 Navy 1 1.5 LOUISVILLE 26.5 26 Duke 6.5 6.5 N. Carolina 5.5 6 Georgia Tech 5 4.5 Maryland 13 12.5 Marshall 7 7 BUFFALO 5.5 6 Wisconsin 9.5 9.5 MINNESOTA 23 23 Purdue 6.5 6 NORTHWESTERN 12 13 Rutgers

KREMLIN CUP Monday Moscow Singles Men First Round Sergiy Stakhovsky (7), Ukraine, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5. Potito Starace, Italy, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3. Women First Round Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (8), Spain, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-1, 5-7, 6-1. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (4), Russia, 7-6 (5), 2-6, 6-0. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-7 (7), 6-1. Alona Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Daria Gavrilova, Russia, 7-5, 6-1.

WTA Tour Luxembourg Open Monday Luxembourg Singles First Round Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Yulia Putintseva, Russia, 6-3, 6-1. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Kristina Barrois, Germany, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5. Anne Keothavong, Britain, def. Virginie Razzano, France, 6-1, 6-4.

ATP Tour Stockholm Open Monday Stockholm, Sweden Singles First Round Michael Ryderstedt, Sweden, def. Daniel GimenoTraver, Spain, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Stanislas Wawrinka (5), Switzerland, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 6 3 1 2 8 20 17 7 4 3 0 8 23 16 5 2 2 1 5 11 14 4 1 2 1 3 14 16 6 1 4 1 3 10 21 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 5 4 0 1 9 17 11 Montreal 5 3 1 1 7 14 13 Boston 3 2 1 0 4 9 6 Buffalo 6 1 4 1 3 12 18 Ottawa 6 1 4 1 3 12 21 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 5 4 1 0 8 17 18 Washington 5 4 1 0 8 17 11 Atlanta 5 3 2 0 6 17 16 Carolina 4 2 2 0 4 9 12 Florida 4 2 2 0 4 12 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 7 4 2 1 9 23 20 Nashville 4 3 0 1 7 13 9 Detroit 5 3 1 1 7 14 12 St. Louis 5 2 1 2 6 14 12 Columbus 4 2 2 0 4 10 12 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 6 4 2 0 8 19 19 Vancouver 5 2 2 1 5 12 12 Calgary 4 2 2 0 4 8 11 Edmonton 4 2 2 0 4 12 11 Minnesota 4 1 2 1 3 10 11 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 5 4 1 0 8 20 15 Los Angeles 4 3 1 0 6 10 6 Anaheim 6 2 3 1 5 13 23 San Jose 3 1 1 1 3 7 9 Phoenix 4 1 2 1 3 8 10 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Toronto 1, OT Colorado 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Pittsburgh 5, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 5, Dallas 4 Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Today’s Games Boston at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Carolina at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Buffalo at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Columbus, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Chicago, 6 p.m. Carolina at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m N.Y. Islanders Pittsburgh Philadelphia N.Y. Rangers New Jersey

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Game Chivas USA at San Jose, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Game New England at New York, 4:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Houston, 1 p.m. Toronto FC at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 6 p.m. Chicago at Chivas USA, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Philadelphia at Columbus, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 5 p.m

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League SEATTLE MARINERS—Named Eric Wedge manager. National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with manager Tony La Russa on a one-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Dave Roberts firstbase coach and agreed to terms with him on a oneyear contract. Agreed to terms with bench coach Rick Renteria, bullpen coach Darrell Akerfelds, pitching coach Darren Balsley, third-base coach Glenn Hoffman and hitting coach Randy Ready on one-year contract extensions. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE HORNETS—Acquired G Curtis Jerrells from San Antonio for a second-round draft pick. Waiving G Mustafa Shakur and C Darryl Watkins. HOUSTON ROCKETS—Waived G Antonio Anderson, F Mike Harris, F Alexander Johnson and G Jerel McNeal. INDIANA PACERS—Exercised the contract options on G Darren Collison and F Tyler Hansbrough. FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS—Placed WR Matthew Willis on injured reserve. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Placed TE Jermichael Finley on injured reserve. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed CB Chevis Jackson. Traded S Anthony Smith to Green Bay for a conditional seventh-round draft pick. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Terminated the contract of LB Bobby Carpenter. NEW YORK GIANTS—Released K Shayne Graham. Claimed OT Jamon Meredith off waivers from Detroit. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Phoenix F Shane Doan for three games for delivering an illegal check to the head of Anaheim F Dan Sexton in an Oct. 17 game. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Recalled F Nick Spaling from Milwaukee (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Assigned D Alexander Urbom to Albany (AHL). Recalled D Olivier Magnan-Grenier from Albany.

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 480 99 232 55 The Dalles 354 98 694 256 John Day 234 52 848 322 McNary 467 65 1,798 723 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 805,502 91,899 412,944 154,830 The Dalles 540,254 74,855 326,666 119,947 John Day 461,904 68,956 274,660 100,305 McNary 414,372 44,186 251,473 84,997

NHL ROUNDUP

Blackhawks edge Blues in overtime The Associated Press CHICAGO — Marian Hossa scored a pair of goals 2:31 apart late in the third period to erase an early two-goal deficit, then Patrick Sharp connected at 3:50 of overtime to give the Chicago Blackhawks a 32 win over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night. Sharp scored from just to the left of the crease after taking a cross-ice pass from Patrick Kane and whipping a shot past Jaroslav Halak. Sharp’s fifth goal in three games extended Chicago’s winning streak to three. Hossa spoiled a shutout bid by Halak with 6:48 left in the third when he scored a power-play goal by backhanding in a rebound of Brent Seabrook’s shot. Hossa tied it at 2 with 4:17 to go

when he fired in a loose puck, also on a backhand shot, from a scrum in the crease. It was his seventh goal in seven games this season. David Perron scored his first two goals of the season for the Blues, whose losing streak reached three. Halak, who was acquired from Montreal in a trade in June, got solid defensive support during the first 50 minutes. He stopped 30 shots. Chicago’s Marty Turco made 32 saves. The Blackhawks dressed seven defensemen, with 6-foot-7 John Scott moving up to play a handul of shifts on the wing on the fourth line. Turco faced the tougher chances in a scoreless first, including a point-black pad save on Brad Boy-

es’ deflection in the final minute. Perron opened the scoring midway through the second with the only goal of the period. He cut in off right wing and past Seabrook, and then stuffed a backhand shot between Turco’s pads from a sharp angle. Also on Monday: Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PITTSBURGH — Sidney Crosby and Mark Letestu scored powerplay goals in the first period and the Penguins won their third in a row, ruining defenseman Sergei Gonchar’s return to Pittsburgh by beating Ottawa. Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NEW YORK — Chris Stewart scored his second power-play goal

of the game in the third period, and Daniel Winnik extended Colorado’s lead 26 seconds later as the Avalanche ended a five-game road trip with a victory over New York. Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TORONTO — John Tavares scored at 3:26 of overtime to lift New York past Toronto. With Brett Lebda in the penalty box for goaltender interference, Tavares onetimed a shot past Jean-Sebastien Giguere. Giguere finished with 18 saves. Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TAMPA, Fla. — Steven Stamkos had a goal and two assists, Dominic Moore scored two goals, and Tampa Bay beat Dallas.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 D3

MLB: AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

M L B P L AYO F F SCOREBOARD

Lee’s gem leads Rangers over Yankees By Mike Fitzpatrick

Texas Rangers’ Josh Hamilton hits a two run home run off New York Yankees starting pitcher Andy Pettitte in the first inning of Game 3 of baseball’s American League Championship Series Monday in New York.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Cliff Lee stumbled as he stepped up to his seat at the postgame podium. “Booby trap right here,” he said with a grin. That was about his only slipup all night. The ace of October went through the New York Yankees like a buzzsaw again, striking out 13 and pitching the Texas Rangers to an 8-0 victory Monday for a 2-1 lead in the best-ofseven AL championship series. Josh Hamilton hit an early two-run homer off Andy Pettitte and started a six-run outburst in the ninth with a leadoff double. Lee allowed only two singles in eight innings and became the first pitcher to reach double digits in strikeouts three times in one postseason. “I’m not satisfied with that,” he said. “We still have some work to do here. A lot of fun to come into New York and get this first one. Hopefully we can come out here tomorrow and pick up where we left off.” Mr. Automatic improved to 70 with a 1.26 ERA in eight postseason starts. Three of those wins have come against the power-packed Yankees, including two in last year’s World Series for Philadelphia. New York won the other four games against the Phillies to take home its 27th championship, but now faces a tall task if it plans to repeat. The Yankees must win three straight against the resilient Rangers to advance without facing Lee in a decisive Game 7 at Texas. Game 4 is tonight and the Yankees will start struggling right-hander A.J. Burnett, who hasn’t pitched since Oct. 2. Tommy Hunter goes for Texas in his first career start at Yankee Stadium. “I don’t think we’re in trouble,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “We’re down 2-1, we’re not down 3-0. It’s frustrating we’ve lost two games in a row, but we’ve lost two games in a row a lot of times before and come back.” Pettitte, the ol’ pro seeking his 20th postseason win, did his best to match Lee. But the longtime New York left-hander hung a first-inning cutter that Hamilton yanked over the short porch in right for his second homer of the series. “It was just a bad pitch by me,” Pettitte said. “At the time, you don’t think that’s going to win

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

AT A GLANCE MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT Subject to change ——— LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Friday, Oct. 15 New York 6, Texas 5 Saturday, Oct. 16 Texas 7, New York 2 Monday, Oct. 18 Texas 8, New York 0, Texas leads series 2-1 Today, Oct. 19 Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York (Burnett 10-15), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Texas at New York, 1:07 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary National League Saturday, Oct. 16 San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3 Sunday, Oct. 17 Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 1, series tied 1-1 Today, Oct. 19 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San Francisco (Cain 13-11), 1:19 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 12:57 p.m. or 4:57 p.m., if necessary Sunday, Oct. 24 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:57 p.m., if necessary

BOX SCORES Monday’s Game ———

Rangers 8, Yankees 0

the ballgame.” Texas broke it open in the ninth against an ineffective David Robertson, getting RBI singles from Nelson Cruz and Bengie Molina, plus a two-run single by Mitch Moreland. Rangers closer Neftali Feliz flung his 100 mph fastball in the ninth and finished the two-hitter in front of a nearly empty ballpark, adding two strikeouts to increase Texas’ total to 15 — one shy of a postseason record for Yankees’ batters. New York’s two hits matched a postseason low also set in Game 4 of the 1958 World Series and Game 3 of the 2001 division series. Lee nearly landed with the Yankees before Seattle traded him to Texas on July 9. Maybe they should have offered a few of their many All-Stars — Lee doesn’t seem to need much help. Michael Young had three hits for the Rangers, who are 4-0 on the road in these playoffs. Texas won all three games at Tampa Bay in the first round, including a pair of masterful performances by Lee. “Yeah, they’re comparable. I felt good every time,” Lee said. Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez

and the Yankees fared no better. Cutters, curves, sliders — they couldn’t touch Lee, who pumps in one strike after another like a robot programmed to do so. “He’s not just firing the ball down the middle of the plate. He’s throwing quality strike after quality strike and there really is a big difference,” Young said. Lee was so dominant, New York hitters were left shaking their heads in the dugout or questioning calls by plate umpire Jim Reynolds. Robinson Cano showed bunt, Brett Gardner tried another headfirst dive into first base. None of it worked. Gardner singled leading off the sixth and stole second, but Lee never rattled. He struck out Jeter for the second time, then induced routine grounders from Nick Swisher and Mark Teixeira, who is zero for 11 in the series. Lee has been spectacular in the postseason, striking out 67 and walking only seven in 64 1⁄3 innings. Even after throwing a season-high 122 pitches, he was going to pitch the ninth until Texas broke it open. “He was coming back out,” manager Ron Washington said. “We were going to ride him.”

Lee matched a career high for strikeouts, also accomplished July 27 against Oakland. He retired his first 11 batters Monday night, striking out seven, before missing high with a full-count fastball to Teixeira. It was the left-hander’s first walk in 19 2⁄3 innings this postseason, drawing a loud roar and a standing ovation from some in the sellout crowd of 49,840. Rodriguez drove the next pitch to deep left-center, but Cruz reached down for a running catch that ended the fourth. Jorge Posada fisted an opposite-field single into shallow right with two outs in the fifth for New York’s first hit. Young singled on the ninth pitch of his at-bat in the first inning and then Pettitte hung a 2-1 pitch to Hamilton in the middle of the plate. The slugger was a bit off balance on his front foot, but strong enough to pull the pitch about 330 feet to right field, clearing the inviting porch at Yankee Stadium. “Josh hitting that homer in the first made things a lot easier, that’s for sure,” Lee said. Fellow lefty CC Sabathia made a similar mistake on a slider to Hamilton in the first in-

NFL

ning of the series opener and he lined it to right for a three-run homer. Hamilton also drew four walks in Game 2, two of them intentional. Pettitte set down 15 of 16 after the home run, with the only blemish coming on Young’s twoout infield single in the third. He threw 61 pitches through the first three innings, 17 to Young in his first two at-bats. Pettitte, who owns postseason records for wins, innings and starts (42), allowed five hits in seven innings. He struck out five and didn’t walk a batter. A top contender for AL MVP, Hamilton barely missed another two-run shot when his sixth-inning drive was caught at the right-field fence. Gardner hit a bouncer to first in the third and tried to beat the play with a headfirst dive — nearly an exact replica of his infield single that sparked New York’s late comeback in Game 1. This time, Lee was quick to cover and Gardner appeared to miss the bag with his hand, perhaps pulling it away to make sure he wasn’t spiked. First base umpire Angel Hernandez called Gardner out on a close play, and the Yankees didn’t argue.

Texas AB Andrus ss 5 M.Young 3b 5 J.Hamilton cf 5 Guerrero dh 4 1-Borbon pr-dh 0 N.Cruz lf-rf 4 Kinsler 2b 4 Francoeur rf 3 a-Dav.Murphy ph-lf 0 B.Molina c 4 Moreland 1b 4 Totals 38

R H 0 1 1 3 2 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 8 11

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Thames dh Posada c Granderson cf Gardner lf Totals

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 29

BI 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .333 .400 .300 .154 .000 .364 .111 .167 .400 .250 .500

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 15

Avg. .231 .091 .000 .154 .417 .222 .200 .125 .250

Texas 200 000 006 — 8 11 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-was intentionally walked for Francoeur in the 9th. 1-ran for Guerrero in the 9th. LOB—Texas 4, New York 3. 2B—Andrus (1), J.Hamilton (1). HR—J.Hamilton (2), off Pettitte. RBIs—Andrus (1), J.Hamilton 2 (5), N.Cruz (1), B.Molina (2), Moreland 2 (3). SB—Gardner (1). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 1 (J.Hamilton); New York 1 (Teixeira). Runners moved up—Swisher. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee W, 1-0 8 2 0 0 1 13 122 0.00 N.Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pettitte L, 0-1 7 5 2 2 0 5 110 2.57 K.Wood 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 Logan 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 13.50 D.Robertson 1-3 5 5 5 1 1 26 27.00 Mitre 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Robertson 1-1, Mitre 2-1. IBB— off D.Robertson (Dav.Murphy). WP—D.Robertson, Mitre. T—3:18. A—49,840 (50,287).

SKIING: WORLD CUP

Players may see suspensions Miller wants to feed off Olympic success and fines after violent hits By Anderew Dampf

race to another. While Miller enters the season sharply Fresh off a successful Olympics, Bode focused, teammate Ted Ligety could face Miller is back for another World Cup seamore challenges after a complete change son and unlike a year ago he has a full of equipment, having joined Miller with summer of training behind him. Head skis and boots. He’s even lost some weight. Ligety has a new ski man and will also “Bode’s feeling healthy and he’s been have to get accustomed to a new tech training and conditioning much more Bode Miller coach, with Mike Day replacing Rudi than he did last year,” U.S. men’s head Soulard. coach Sasha Rearick said last week after “It’s a challenge but he’s up for it. He’s a 10-day training block almost exclusively keeping things very positive,” Rearick with Miller on Swiss and Austrian glaciers. “He’s said. “When you switch everything it takes a while in pretty good shape.” to dial everything in.” Last year, Miller took the entire summer off Still not a giant slalom specialist, surprise Olymwhile he considered retirement, then rejoined the pic super-G bronze medalist Andrew Weibrecht U.S. Ski Team after racing independently for two won’t open his season until the circuit comes to seasons. Peaking in midseason, he won gold, silver North America with races in Lake Louise, Alberta, and bronze medals at the Vancouver Games in su- and Beaver Creek, Colo., in November and early per-combi, super-G and downhill. December. The 2010-11 season opens this weekend with On the women’s side, Olympic downhill chammen’s and women’s giant slaloms on the Retten- pion Lindsey Vonn wants to break her American bach glacier in Soelden, Austria. single-season record of 11 World Cup wins set last Miller won the overall World Cup in 2004-05 and year and take aim at the all-time record of 14 victo2007-08 but has won just one race on the circuit ries set by Swiss great Vreni Schneider in 1988-89. the past two seasons — a super-combi in Wengen, That would also boost Vonn into the top five on Switzerland, in January, that geared him up for his the career win list, where she currently sits tied for Olympic performance. sixth with Hanni Wenzel with 33 wins each. “Last year was definitely just the Olympics,” “She’s definitely moving up that list, but someRearick said. “This season he wants to be out there thing like that you can’t plan,” said new U.S. womand competitive every day.” en’s head coach Alex Hoedlmoser. “You just go out He has just turned 33 and many would suggest and try to go race by race.” that Miller concentrate solely on speed events — Julia Mancuso, Vonn’s teammate and longtime the downhill and super-G. That’s not a view Miller rival, put two disappointing seasons behind her shares. with two silvers in Vancouver. She also made an “He’s training all events and plans on racing sla- equipment change, keeping her Lange boots but lom, GS, super-G and downhill,” Rearick said. switching from Rossignol to Voelkl skis. While Miller did skip the U.S. team’s second Despite the change, Hoedlmoser believes Mansummer camp in New Zealand, he came into Eu- cuso can be a threat for the overall title for the first rope early to make up for lost time. That’s given time since 2007-08. him an opportunity to work out plans for his per“Her condition is really solid, she’s been training sonal motor home. a lot, and she’s happy,” said Hoedlmoser, an AusWhen Miller left the U.S. team several seasons trian who has been on the U.S. team’s staff since ago the main reason was that the squad saw his 1998. “I really think that she can be strong in a lot motor home as a source of division. Now it’s come of events again.” to the point that the team is going to help him with Having already launched her own lingerie line, logistical arrangements at races. Mancuso recently posed nude in ESPN The Maga“I fully support him doing that,” Rearick said. “A zine’s Body Issue. guy his age being on the road that long, having a “I have always been an advocate to girls and consistent place to sleep and call home while you’re women to have a positive body image,” Mancuso on the road I think is a good thing.” wrote in her online blog. “It’s your choice how much Taking a cue from Miller, the team has a larger time you spend working out, and how motivated mobile kitchen to travel the circuit this season, and you want to be at getting the body you want. I have will also drive a rolling gym from one European nothing to hide! and now the pictures to prove it.” The Associated Press

By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Aiming for the head or leading with the helmet to deliver a blow could soon cost NFL players game time as well as money. The league is considering suspending players for illegal hits in an effort to help prevent serious injuries, NFL executive vice president of football operations Ray Anderson told The Associated Press on Monday, one day after several scary collisions in games. “There’s strong testimonial for looking readily at evaluating discipline, especially in the areas of egregious and elevated dangerous hits,” he said in a phone interview. “Going forward there are certain hits that occurred that will be more susceptible to suspension. There are some that could bring suspensions for what are flagrant and egregious situations.” Anderson, a member of the league’s competition committee and one of its loudest voices on the need for enhanced player safety, said the NFL could make changes in its approach immediately, with Commissioner Roger Goodell having the final say. League officials would consult with the players’ union, but he didn’t expect any opposition. “Obviously suspensions would be a much bigger deal than fining guys,” said Colts center Jeff Saturday, the team’s player representative. “But if guys are headhunting out there to knock a guy out of the game, that’s the only way to take care of it.” There have been occasional suspensions in recent years, including safety Roy Williams,

Titans get easy win over Jaguars JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Tennessee Titans easily won the battle of backup quarterbacks against the Jacksonville Jaguars in a 30-3 victory Monday night that put them in a three-way tie atop the AFC South. Vince Young was knocked out of the game on the second series with a sprained left knee, and Kerry Collins led the Titans (4-2) on five straight scoring drives. The Titans didn’t have to punt over the final 43 minutes of the game. Chris Johnson scored on a 35-yard run with 1:40 left to finish with 111 yards on 26 carries. — The Associated Press

then with Dallas, for one game in 2007 for three horse-collar tackles during that season. Tampa Bay cornerback Elbert Mack and New York Jets safety Eric Smith each drew one-game suspensions for “flagrant violations of player safety rules” by launching themselves into an opponent helmet first. Last season, Carolina defensive back Dante Wesley drew one game for launching himself into a punt returner who had not caught the ball and was in a defenseless position. On Sunday, the Eagles’ DeSean Jackson and the Falcons’ Dunta Robinson were knocked out of their game after a frightening collision in which Robinson launched himself head first. Both sustained concussions.

Ravens tight end Todd Heap took a vicious hit from Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather that Heap called “one of those hits that shouldn’t happen.” The team was in contact with the league about the tackle. “The thing we try to coach our players to do is basically hit in the strike zone,” Ravens coach John Harbaugh said. “Try to make an effort to do that and keep your head out of it. It’s not just the safety of your opponent, it’s safety for yourself. When you throw your head in there like that you put yourself at risk. It’s just not good football.” Steelers linebacker James Harrison sidelined two Browns players with head injuries after jarring hits. An NFL spokesman said one of the tackles, on Joshua Cribbs, was legal. The Browns were more upset about Harrison’s hit on Mohamed Massaquoi, which the league is reviewing. “The one against Mohamed was illegal,” Browns tight end Benjamin Watson said. “I can’t judge his character, I can judge his conduct. It was an illegal hit. He led with his head, he hit Mo right in the head, he dove at his head. Whether he meant to hurt him or not, I can’t comment on that. It was illegal and the league should take care of him with the max, whatever it is.” Harrison defended those hits after the game. “If I get fined for that, it’s going to be a travesty,” Harrison said. “They didn’t call (a penalty) on that. There’s no way I could be fined for that. It was a good, clean legit hit. ... I didn’t hit that hard, to be honest with you. When you get a guy on the ground, it’s a perfect tackle.”


D4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lawyer

Maehl

Cycling

Continued from D1 Once he dismounts his bike, Wittmack plans to run and hike 950 miles from the Bay of Bengal to the top of Mount Everest. The expedition began July 1. Over 11 months, the trial lawyer will cross 13 countries. “This was just something I always wanted to do,” he said in a telephone interview. “I’ve been working on it a long time.” Wittmack’s biggest obstacle may be money. Due to a lack of funds, Wittmack said he biked through Poland and Ukraine alone. The project, including the charitable donations, will cost about $1.2 million, Wittmack said. The university’s global health program will use $600,000 to provide a team of doctors and students to educate girls in Nepal about safe sex, prenatal care and maternal health issues. Mothers in Nepal are 100 times more likely to die during childbirth than women in the U.S., according to the university. About $250,000 is being used by North Carolinabased Topics Education to create an online curriculum tied to the expedition. Educational modules will be used to teach students in various regions about earth science issues such as alternative energy, water quality and climate change. Additional funds will be needed for translators and guides in areas deemed “not safe to go in blindly,” said Brian Triplett, Wittmack’s 26-year-old logistics coordinator and communications director. “We’re still seeking sponsorships,” Triplett said. Wittmack’s wife, Cate, and 2-year-old son have joined him for parts of the journey. Persuading his spouse to go along with his plan became easier when she was diagnosed with thyroid cancer two years ago, he said. She is now cancer free. “It was a pretty scary thing to go through,” he said. “We realized that maybe we shouldn’t be taking the time for granted so much and maybe we shouldn’t put things off.” Wittmack first got the idea for the trip at age 14 when he was a member of his high school swim and cross-country teams, he said. While working at an after-school job in a bike store, he read books about Edmund Hillary, the first man to climb Mount Everest, and Matthew Webb, the first man to swim the English Channel. “It’s just an idea I came up with when I was probably too young to know better,” he said. “As a little boy I just found myself thinking, ‘What could be the world’s toughest triathlon?’ ” In 2003, Wittmack became the first Iowan to reach the summit of Everest, a journey he spent seven years planning. In 2008, he abandoned an attempt to swim the 21-mile English Channel after being pulled out of the water due to freezing temperatures after 15 miles. He wore a wet suit during the swim portion of his current expedition to help withstand the cold. An experienced ocean marathon swimmer, Wittmack two years ago finished first in the annual 12.5-mile Swim Around Key West in Florida. When he completed the trip’s swim leg, Wittmack became the first American to both scale Everest and swim the English Channel. At 5 feet 8 and 145 pounds, Wittmack typically spends his days wearing a suit with a starched collared shirt at his office. “I definitely don’t look the part,” Wittmack said. “But I just keep putting one hand and foot in front of the next.” Wittmack plans to return to the law firm, which allowed him a leave of absence for the expedition. “I’m already missing the office,” he said. “There’s a comfort in life when the days are sort of planned out for you and you can enjoy dinner with your family. These expeditions strip away all of those comforts. That’s why I do it — so I don’t take those simple things for granted. “But I do look forward to getting back to my office someday.”

Continued from D1 Maehl finished last season on a tear, with five of his six touchdown catches in the final month. He finished the year with 53 catches for 696 yards and was a favorite target of then-quarterback Jeremiah Masoli. Masoli got into some much-publicized trouble in the offseason and was kicked off the team, but Maehl picked up where he left off, developing a rapport with Thomas. “I feel like it took me a while moving from safety to receiver my freshman year. It took me my sophomore year to really start learning the position at the college level, then my junior year I was steadily improving all through the year,” he said. “At the end of the year I had a couple of good games and I just tried to carry that into this year.” Maehl has been climbing the Ducks career lists, albeit quietly. At the halfway point of this season he has 31 catches for 423 yards and five touchdowns. He had a career-best 10 catches for 119 yards and a touchdown against Washington State on Oct. 9. That extended his streak of games with at least one reception to 27. With 132 career receptions, Maehl moved past Bobby Moore — now known as Ahmad Rashad — into seventh place on Oregon’s career list. Coach Chip Kelly said he “thinks the world of Jeff.” “He can really run, runs great routes, has a great understanding of what we’re trying to do, is really getting a lot better in run-afterthe-catch, and doing a lot of different things after he catches the ball,” Kelly said. “I think he’s one of the top receivers in this league.” Oregon’s ever-improving passing attack is a dimension the team seemed to be lacking in past seasons. Maehl said some of

Continued from D1 For those who want to test out trail riding in the dark with bike lights before investing in them, riders can demo lights from WebCyclery for $12. For more information, contact Henry at 541-318-6188. For riders who prefer the comfort of a well-lit room, indoor group cycling options are abundant in Central Oregon. What’s more, these spin classes offer something for just about everyone — from elite, competition-minded riders to those who have never ridden a bicycle outdoors. Usually accompanied by catchy, upbeat music, group spin classes at local fitness centers are a good choice for those seeking a sweat-producing, low-impact, calorie-burning workout. Health clubs like Bend’s Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, the Sisters Athletic Club and the Redmond Athletic Club offer multiple indoor cycling classes daily. Participants ride an adjustable spin bike and follow an organized workout led by instructors of varying cycling backgrounds. All in all, it is a great option for the fitnessminded rider looking to boost overall health. And for the timecrunched, fitness centers typically offer a wider array of class times and days than do cyclingonly operations. But in Central Oregon, a la carte options also exist for the more goal-oriented cyclist. Classes at Rebound Sports Performance Lab allow up to eight participants to ride their own bikes, which are affixed to a stationary trainer and connected to a computer-based cycling program that measures a rider’s power output in watts. Workouts are led by Bart Bowen and Brig Brandt, professional cycling coaches. The Rebound classes, offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays, are a welcome alternative for those who prefer to ride their own bike in a smaller group setting and for those who want to track measurable improvement. Former Xterra off-road triathlon national champion and recent Ironman World Championship triathlon finisher Cherie Touchette offers something similar at Cycl’in, a private cycling studio located in her west Bend home. Touchette’s classes, too, feature cycling-specific training workouts aimed at riders who want to measurably improve their fitness on the trail or on the road. Participants can select from up to eight sessions per week, with classes ranging from 60 to 90 minutes in length — important for riders looking to increase their endurance. Touchette’s studio is equipped with 10 spin bikes that display key training measurements: power in watts, cadence (leg speed) and heart rate. She designs her classes in eight-week blocks so that participants are building their cycling fitness with varied workouts. For instance, riders might tackle hills one day and intervals later in the week. “They get a mix in their workout, and it’s planned,” says Touchette, who says she has been teaching indoor cycling classes for 15 years. “At a spin class at a club, on Tuesday you might do the same thing or something different than you do on a Thursday. It’s not planned out.” With intimate, 10-rider classes and only one instructor, Touchette has the luxury of really getting to know her clients — both their cycling abilities and their fitness goals. “I have anywhere from your average fitness person who doesn’t ride outside to people training for Ironman or cyclocross races and road races,” she says. “Since I coach all of them myself, I know what people are capable of and I push them accordingly. You get personalized coaching without paying the cost of it.” At both the Rebound lab and Cycl’in, riders may purchase a package of classes for a discounted price, or pay for classes individually. For those who want to incorporate yoga, swimming, strength training or kickboxing into their fitness regimen without paying an additional membership fee, the cycling-only studio has its limits. But whatever route you choose — the all-inclusive gym or the private, a la carte studio — you will find no shortage of indoor cycling options around here. And knowing your goals — whether health or performance, or both — should help you decide.

Run Continued from D1 “We absolutely were completely floored with how popular it was,” Hatfield says. To date, about 500 people have gone through the program, Austin estimates, including some more than once. Wannabe runners of all ages are welcome: Participants have ranged in age from children who signed up with their parents to a woman in her 70s. And as the full name of the program suggests, walkers are also encouraged, as the program has a designated walking coach in addition to Austin. Austin, 42, has long been a proponent of fitness. She grew up participating in multiple sports — including running, after her dad took it up during the running boom of the 1970s — and has also completed two Ironman triathlon races. “I think of it more of just a health issue — just that people learn to be fit and have a way to do it, and it’s simple,” she says of running and walking. “They don’t have to join a gym. They’ve got the support of other runners and walkers and ways to get out and enjoy Bend. We have such beautiful parks and trails and safe places to run and walk that it makes sense that everybody feels that they know how to do it

Calendar Continued from D5 GOOD FORM CLINIC: Tuesdays at 7 p.m., and Saturdays at 8:30 a.m.; learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; limited to 12 spots, sign up at FootZone; free; 541317-3568; Teague@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN WORKSHOP: First Monday of each month, 6 p.m.; instruction on how to choose the correct running gear, proper running/walking form, goal setting, and creating your own training plan; paid event; $45; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-3568; conzaustin@gmail. com; www.footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN 5K PROGRAM: Next session starts Oct. 23 at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; Saturdays at 9 a.m.; instruction on choosing running gear, proper running/walking form, goal setting and creating a training plan, $55; this session will be training for the Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk for Arthritis (Dec. 4 in Bend); 541317-3568, conzaustin@gmail. com, www.footzonebend.com. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 Galveston Ave.; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; local running standout Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; run up to seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.;

Dean Hare / The Associated Press

Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, left, has caught at least one pass in 27 consecutive games, including 10 receptions for 119 yards against Washington State on Oct. 9. the credit should go to new receivers coach Scott Frost, who is best known for being Nebraska’s quarterback in the late 1990s. “We feel like we can make an impact. It just depends on what teams want to stop. If they want to load up the box and try and stop our running game, then they can give us (the receivers) the ball and we’ll take it,” he said. “I think it’s a kind of pick you poison thing for defenses.” The Ducks (6-0, 3-0 Pac-10) had an open date this past weekend and will face UCLA on Thursday night at Autzen Stadium. While Kelly insisted the rankings don’t make a lot of difference, Maehl said the

players are well aware of what is happening to the team — being No. 1 and the resulting attention. Only they don’t care. In that sense, the Ducks have completely bought into coach Kelly’s ‘Win The Day’ mentality, which is exactly what separates this season’s Ducks from those of years past, Maehl said. “Back in ’07 when we had Dennis, obviously the injury to him really hurt us, and the injuries to everyone else really hurt us,” he said. “I think our mindset is a little more focused this year, on who we’ve got each week, and not looking ahead to what could happen. It’s taking one week at a time.”

and get out there.” Currently, two versions of the Learn to Run or Fitness Walk program are offered. A one-time workshop takes place on the first Monday of every month, or participants can opt for six-week programs that prepare them for specific races in the fall and spring. This Saturday, for instance, a program begins for the annual Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis in Bend, which takes place on Dec. 4. Many of the “target” races, as with the Jingle Bell Run/Walk, do have a charity component, which can be appealing to Learn to Runners. “Just by virtue of them getting out there exercising, they are in turn then helping a cause because they’ve entered an event that unites people for a common good,” Austin observes. To help them get started, participants receive a training manual with reference material, a discount on their first pair of running shoes (purchased at FootZone, naturally), sunglasses, and a technical T-shirt and socks. The race-specific programs also offer brief seminars each week on running-related topics such as nutrition, proper clothing and footwear, and the opportunity to “practice,” as Austin puts it, for the upcoming race. “We give people tools, but they really have to do it on their

own,” she says. “It’s not a quick fix.” At its best, Learn to Run can be both life-affirming and life-changing. Before she enrolled in Learn to Run, Bend’s Lenora James, 46, had no athletic background. She used to be a pack-a-day smoker but kicked the habit about a year ago. By last December, she says, she could run for a block. She signed up for Learn to Run, completed her first five-kilometer run in February and has not stopped racing since. In fact, James frequently completes two races in a single weekend. She has lost 35 pounds since she stopped smoking and took up running, and she completed the Portland Half Marathon on Oct. 10 almost 26 minutes faster than her first half marathon race earlier this year. James plans to run her first marathon, the California International Marathon, in early December in Sacramento. “I feel really healthy and just hugely blessed,” says James, who also notes that running helps her deal with chronic pain. Unlike James, Patti Brown, 56, had been a runner on and off for about four decades. But she always jogged the same distance in about the same time, never progressing. When her 37year marriage broke up, Brown needed a social outlet, she says,

so she signed up for Learn to Run last year after a couple of co-workers had gone through the program. “I was looking for something for me,” Brown says. “I hadn’t done that in a very, very long, long time. And I found that the more I did with (the group), the more I could do on my own, and that the world was going to be OK.” Since beginning the program, Brown has progressed from running a 5K — which was her first race ever — to 10K and half marathon races, and even a sprint triathlon. “It just made me realize there are things I can do,” she says. “I don’t have to wait for other people to do them with me. I can go out and strive on my own. And I think that’s what the biggest thing about Learn to Run has taught me: It’s OK to be myself.” Those are the kinds of transformations Austin loves to witness and draws inspiration from herself. She does not cause the changes in her participants, she says, but rather, “I think I’m an encourager. “It’s the people themselves that do, and they realize they have it within themselves.”

three to five miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injury; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend for up to 18 miles at slower pace; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com.

633-9776; taylor.leach@gmail.com; www.mbsefcycling.blogspot.com. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC FALL DRYLAND TRAINING AND CONDITIONING PROGRAM: For ages 11 through high school age; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Sno-park on Century Drive west of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18 begins Nov. 17; Youth Club for ages 7-11 starts Dec. 4; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SNOW SPORTS BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options from Dec.6-Feb.23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL LADIES PROGRAM: Designed for women of all skill levels who wish to improve their skate and classic skiing; 10 dryland training sessions; registration limited to 13 participants; Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m.; Oct. 19, 26; Nov. 2, 9, 16; $125, includes transportation; at Bend Endurance Academy, 500 S.W. Bond; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. DRYLAND SNOWBOARD CLASS: At Acrovision Sports Center in Bend; Mondays and Wednesdays, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.; instruction by Justin Norman, guest appearances by technique rider Jonah Owen and others; 541-388-5555. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FALL CYCLOCROSS PROGRAM: Enrollement for ages 10 and older; 2:30 p.m.-4 p.m. on school days through October; 541-

SOCCER SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; coed 6-8 p.m., men 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer,

Amanda Miles can be reached 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

SOFTBALL GIRLS FAST-PITCH SOFTBALL TEAM: 10-and-under traveling girls fast-pitch softball team starting up in Redmond; contact Jeremy at 541325-3689 or Hayes at 541-604-6735.

SWIMMING FALL SWIM LESSONS AT JUNIPER: Registration is open; basic strokes and water safety; variety of times and levels offered for children over 6 months of age to adults; www. juniperswimandfitness.com or at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-389-7665. FALL CHILDREN’S SWIM LESSONS: Ages 3 and up; variety of days and times; new session begin Nov. 1; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOUTH SWIM TEAM: Noncompetitive swim team for elementary through high school students; MondaysThursdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. (middle and high school ages), 4:30-5:30 (elementary school ages); $45$85; through Nov. 30; Athletic Club of Bend; Rob at 541-322-5856; rob@athleticclubofbend.com; www.athleticclubofbend.com. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 to 8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; RAPRD, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

VOLLEYBALL YOUTH VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; $5; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ADULT VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-10:30 p.m.; $5 www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183.

Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.


C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

I B Baseball • WOU baseball camp: Bend Little League South is playing host to a baseball camp featuring the coaching staff of the Western Oregon University baseball program. The Wolves have won 10 consecutive conference championships. The camp, which will focus on skills, takes place on Saturday, Dec. 4, at Bend Fieldhouse, 401 S.E. Roosevelt St., adjacent to Vince Genna Stadium. All Central Oregon youths ages 8 to 14 are welcome. Cost is $50 per player. Register online at www.bendelks.com. Registration is limited. For more information, contact Denny Carter at 541-420-4868.

Basketball • Central Oregon Basketball Organization tryouts: COBO is conducting tryouts for girls in grades six through eight who live in the Bend High School attendance area. Sessions will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 9, and Thursday, Nov. 11, from 7-9 p.m. at the High Desert Middle School gym in Bend. Prospective players are encouraged to attend both days. For more information, contact Jerry Cunningham at 503-706-4277 or jerry@sunrivervacations.com.

Sports Fitness • Health and human performance information night: Fleet Feet Sports and Central Oregon Community College are playing host to a health and human performance information night on Thursday, Oct. 28 at 6 p.m. The event will take place at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave. in Bend. Johanna Olson of the COCC Health & Human Performance department and staff from the COCC physiology lab will present information about testing services at the college and will offer on-site performance testing to attendees. Among topics to be addressed will be how fitness testing is conducted and how the results can be used to improve training. For more information, call 541-389-1601 or e-mail marci@fleetfeetbend.com.

Gymnastics • Local youth gymnast qualifies for national competition: Blaine Davis, of Sunriver, advanced to the Future Stars Program national competition with his performance at a Future Stars regional event held at Metro Gymnastics Center in Tigard on Oct. 8. Davis, who trains with Acrovision Sports Center in Bend, earned a total score of 68.1 points, just above the 68.0-point minimum needed to qualify for the national competition, according to Acrovision coach Rich Gustafson. Davis was one of three 10year-olds to qualify out of USA Gymnastics Region II, which for boys includes the states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Alaska. The national event will take place Nov. 4-7 at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. On Nov. 5, Davis will compete against other 10-year-old boys who qualified at similar regional events across the country. The competition will include the six standard men’s events — vault, floor exercise, parallel bars, high bar, rings and pommel horse — as well as events in flexibility, strength and trampoline. The Future Stars Program is run by USA Gymnastics and brings together the top boys ages 10 to 13 from throughout the United States. At the national competition, the top 18 finishers in the 10year-olds division will qualify for the National Development Team, and the top nine finishers will qualify for a Development Team camp.

Martial Arts • Locals fare well in grappling tournament: Two students from High Desert Martial Arts in Bend placed in the top three in their respective divisions on Oct. 9 at the Oregon Open, a gi and no-gi grappling tournament at Liberty High School in Hillsboro. John Piper took third in the men’s gi blue belt division for middleweights (167.6 to 181 pounds). Jade Rickley placed third in the junior gi green belt division for medium-heavyweights and heavyweights (163.3 to 185.5 pounds). Nearly 600 contestants took part in the tournament, competing in divisions based on gender, age, weight and belt color (gi) or experience level (no-gi).

Rugby • Bend Rugby Club loses home match: Bend Rugby Club dropped its match to Oregon Sports Union Rugby Club 22-10 on Saturday at High Desert Middle School in Bend. The Roughriders forged their way to a 10-10 tie at halftime but could not keep pace with their Portland-based opponent after the intermission, as Oregon Sports Union scored

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two tries. For the match, Peter Liddell scored a try for Bend, and Ryan Brown made the conversion and a penalty kick. Bend is now 4-4 overall for the season, and 0-4 in the Pacific Northwest Rugby Football Union DII South Standings. The Roughriders play their final home match of the fall season this Saturday against Chuckanut Bay Rugby of Bellingham, Wash. The match starts at 1 p.m. at High Desert Middle School.

Running • “I Made the Gradeâ€? Run/Walk: Rebound Physical Therapy in Prineville is playing host to the inaugural “I Made the Gradeâ€? Fitness Run and Walk on Saturday, Oct. 30. The 2.25-mile run/walk begins at 9:30 a.m. at Rebound Physical Therapy, 425 N. Main St. in Prineville, and finishes at the viewpoint at Ochoco Wayside State Park, off state Highway 126 west of Prineville. A .75-mile kids’ run/walk starts at 10:15 a.m. at the base of the viewpoint and also finishes at the top of the viewpoint. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Technical T-shirts for adults will be available for $15, and cotton T-shirts for children will be available for $8. All proceeds from the event go to Crook County High School sports programs. Registration is available at all Rebound Physical Therapy locations, FootZone in downtown Bend, Redmond Athletic Club, and Optima Foot & Ankle in Prineville. Day-of-race registration is also available. Prizes will be awarded to the overall and masters male and female winners and for best costume. For more information, contact Rebound Physical Therapy in Prineville at 541-416-7476. • Volunteers sought: Volunteers are still needed on Saturday, Oct. 30, for the Punctual Pumpkin Run, an event in which racers predict their time for either a short course or a long course before the start and run without a watch. Proceeds benefit the Bend Endurance Academy. The event starts at 10 a.m. in the academy parking lot, 500 S.W. Bond St., Suite 142. E-mail punctualpumpkinvolunteer@ gmail.com to volunteer. For more information, contact Brenna at 541-678-3865 or e-mail info@bendenduranceacademy.org.

Skiing • Nordic masters programs: Bend Endurance Academy is accepting registrations for its nordic masters ski programs, which are designed for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities. Participants can select between two options: training group and technique group. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails. Program sessions run from Dec. 6, 2010, to Feb. 23, 2011. Weekday and weekend options are available. Prices vary. See www.bendenduranceacademy.com or call 541-678-3864 for more information.

Track & Field • Central Oregon racewalkers earn silver medals at nationals: Redmond’s Darlene Backlund and her husband, John, recorded second-place finishes in their respective age groups at the 2010 USA five-kilometer racewalking national championship, held Oct. 9 in Kingsport, Tenn. Darlene Backlund finished second in the women’s 65-to-69 age group with a time of 34 minutes, 16 seconds. Jolene Steigerwalt, of San Diego, won the age group in 33:19. John Backlund completed the course, which consisted of one-kilometer loops, in 34:20 to finish as runner-up to Robert Nichols, of St. Louis, in the men’s 70-to-74 age group. Nichols was timed in 33:16. Darlene Backlund said the couple’s next national championship competition will be the 30K distance on Oct. 31 at Rockland Lake State Park in Congers, N.Y.

Volleyball • Room still available in youth program: The Bend Park & Recreation District is still accepting registration for its youth volleyball program. Girls and boys in grades three through five are eligible to sign up. The program runs from Monday, Nov. 1, to Saturday, Dec. 18. Practices will be held on weekdays, and games will be played on Saturdays. The cost is $50 for youths who live inside of the park district and $68 otherwise. For more information, contact Kevin Collier, park district sports program coordinator, at 541-3897275. — Bulletin staff reports

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD BOWLING Lava Lanes, Bend League Standings and High Scores Oct. 4-10 Casino Fun — All in the Family; Ray Camacho, 268/724; Krystal Highsmith, 214/519. Win, Lose or Draw — The Mispins; Dennis Patterson, 210/533; JoAnne Merris, 143/409. His and Hers — Sunriver Realty; Travis Holmes, 258/730; Mary Stratton, 214/562. Greased Lightening — Just A Little Guy; Dave Grimes, 244/677; Janna Hillier, 187/484. Jack and Jill — Denmark Creative Masonry; Dave Jones, 246/688; Shari Hamel; 202/554. Guys and Gals — 4 Locked Films; David Moyer, 236/651; Michelle Smith, 215/555. Early Risers — Golden Girls; Edith Roebuck, 193/573. Rejects — The Wild Bunch; Eric Holmcom, 226/632; Sue Snedden, 190/566. Lava Lanes Classic — Spare Us; Jayme Dahlke, 246/679; Marie Horn, 192/497. Wednesday Inc. — Auntie Em’s Deli; Will Piland, 300/766; Jack Klar, 280/817. Tea Timers — MAA Construction; Connie Hathaway, 238/529. Afternoon Delight — 2 Dawgs & a Hot Bun; John Waltosz, 257/622; Amanda Stevens, 216/549. Latecomers — We’re Rolling Now; Tami Smith, 193/500. Progressive — Full House; Matt Walters, 279/792. Free Breathers — Three of Us; George Turner, 223/653; Sandy Weaver, 192/518. T.G.I.F. — The Young and the Old; Garrett Waltosz; 247/704; Patti Sundita, 198/531. Adult/Junior Bowlopolis — Team 8; Seth Chilcutt, 147/344; Miranda Baglien, 175/428. ——— Rimrock Lanes, Prineville Rimrock League Week 5 Top Scores Team — Scratch series: Turner Home Repair, 3,173. Scratch game: High Desert Glass, 1,072. Handicap series: #3, 3,380. Handicap game: Elite Garage Door, 1,114. Individual — Scratch series: Ryan Waddell, 801. Scratch game: Doug Gray, 280. Handicap series: Jeremy Kirk, 816. Handicap game: Gene Mayers, 307. Grizzly Mountain League Week 6 Top Scores

Team — Scratch series: Rimrock Lanes, 3,086. Scratch game: KBW Engineering, 1,097. Handicap series: Carson Oil, 3,335. Handicap game: Bishops Tire Factory, 1,126. Individual — Scratch series: Grant Benton, 769. Scratch game: Doug Gray 277. Handicap series: Ron Davis. Handicap game: Levi Nichols, 272.

RUNNING All-Comers Cross-Country Series At COCC, Bend Oct. 13 Five Kilometers Men: 1. David Kurtz, 19:10. 2. Andrew Jensen, 19:40. 3. Zack Rowland, 20:10. 4. Samuel Schwarz, 20:36. 5. Tate Metcalf, 21:11. 6. Gunther Klavs, 21:33. 7. Dirk Duryee, 21:45. 8. James Blanchard, 21:53. 9. Joe Madden, 21:59. 10. David Uri, 22:17. 11. Shelby Merrick, 23:07. 12. Tim Marr, 23:11. 13. Scott Abrams, 24:00. 14. Greg Davy, 25:24. Women: 1. Piper McDonald, 21:31. 2. Jane Cleavenger, 25:40. 3. Kellie Calkins, 32:40. 4. Wendy Mahaney, 37:39. 5. Amanda Mahaney, 37:43. 6. Ellen Gallagher, 40:26. FALL RUN At Kah-nee-ta High Desert Resort and Casino Oct. 17 10 Kilometers 1. Ryan Smith, Warm Springs, 43:47. 2. Michael Leecy, Warm Springs, 45:31. 3. Izaya Thompson, Warm Springs, 59:39. 4. Don Hildebrand, Sisters, 1:00:21. 5. Joe Mallon, Gresham, 1:04:12. 6. Margo Arn, Woodland, Wash., 1:06:01. 7. Kris Molitor, Madras, 1:11:52. 8. Rick Molitor, Madras, 1:11:52. 9. Alexis Hintsala, Warm Springs, 1:22:48. Five Kilometers 1. Amail Rhoan, Warm Springs, 27:35. 2. Leah Suppah, Warm Springs, 28:12. 3. Lai Thompson, Warm Springs, 29:33. 4. Gunner Estep, Gresham, 30:50. 5. Jake Frank, Warm Springs, 41:21. 6. Vanessa Culps, Warm Springs, 47:11. One-Mile Run/Walk 1. Hannah Arn, Woodland, Wash., 7:16. 2. Adrianna Switzler, Warm Springs, 9:53. 3. LeBron Thompson, Warm Springs, 11:00. 4. Jayden Davis, Warm Springs, 11:00. 5. Rylan Davis, Warm Springs, 11:00. 6. Amanda Thompson, Warm Springs, 11:10. 7. Jabbar Davis, Warm Springs, 12:15. 8. Karizana Thompson, Warm Springs, 17:03. 9. Aaron Culps Jr., Warm Springs, 17:27. 10. Myrtle Suppah, Warm Springs, 17:31. 11. Lori Switzler, Warm Springs, 17:52. 12. Carl Martinez, Warm Springs, 17:52. 13. Katrina Greene, Warm

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 D5

Springs, 17:52. 14. Kaisha Suppah, Warm Springs, 18:02.

VOLLEYBALL Redmond Volleyball Association Standings as of Oct. 15 (Wins-Losses-Ties) Women’s 1. S.W.A.T., 11-1-0. 2. Hit List, 10-2-0. 2. Just Lucky, 10-2-0. 4. Lady Slammers, 10-3-1. 5. Volley Girls, 7-7-0. 6. Dinkin & Divin, 5-7-0. 7. Pink Panthers, 4-8-0. 8. G N O, 4-9-1. 9. Orphans, 2-12-0. 10. Victorious Secret, 0-12-0. Tuesday Co-Ed 1. Benz Electric, 12-2-0. 2. Trybz, 10-1-3. 3. Penguins, 9-4-1. 4. Marks Auto Body, 8-5-1. 5. Dysfunctionals, 7-9-0. 6. Super Awesomes, 6-8-0. 7. Storm Water Services, 5-8-1. 8. Go Easy, 2-11-1. 9. All Stars, 1-12-1. Thursday Co-Ed 1. Number One, 6-2-0. 1. @lst we Tryd, 6-2-0. 3. All Stars, 5-2-1. 3. Net Results, 5-2-1. 5. LMFAO, 3-5-0. 5. Peak Performance, 3-5-

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BASKETBALL CLUTCH PLAYERS CAMP: On Oct. 30-31; for boys and girls grades 5-12; 8 a.m.-noon (grades 5-8) and 1-5 p.m. (grades 9-12); at Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; $60 for both days or $30 for one day; register at the door; Dusty at dustin. porter@redmond.k12.or.us or 541-923-4800, ext. 2143. REDMOND SELECT BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION TRYOUTS: For boys in grades 5-8 in the Redmond School District; Nov. 1-2; all grades will have two teams of 10 players each; varsity will play 22-26 games and junior varsity will play 12-16 games; 5:30 p.m. both days for grades 5-6 and 6:30 p.m. for grades 7-8; at Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; Dusty at dustin.porter@redmond.k12. or.us or 541-923-4800, ext. 2143. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION GIRLS TRYOUTS: On Nov. 9 and Nov. 11 from 7-9 p.m.; both sessions are at High Desert Middle School, 61111 27th St., Bend; athletes are requested to attend both sessions; for girls in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades in the Bend High School attendance area; Jerry Cunningham; 503-706-4277; jerry@sunrivervacations.com. BEND PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT WINTER BASKETBALL: 5on-5 leagues for men 18 and older, men 35 and older, and women 18 and older; 12 regular season games with year-end single elimination tournament; Sunday afternoons Nov. 7-March 13; walk-in registration only at district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; cost is $595 per team; space limited; Rich at 541-706-6126. SISTERS PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT WINTER BASKETBALL: Men’s adult league for players 16 and older (cannot also be playing for high school team); begins Nov. 7; games at Sisters Middle School, 15200 McKenzie Highway, Sisters; includes eight regular season games and two or three playoff games; cost is $700 per team; Ryan at 541-549-2091 or ryan@sistersrecreation.com. CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION BOYS TRYOUTS: For the Mountain View COBO Cougar Boys basketball program; 5th and 6th grade tryouts on Oct. 27 from 6-7:30 p.m. and on Oct. 31 from noon-2 p.m.; 7th and 8th grade tryouts on Oct. 27 from 7:30-9 p.m. and on Oct. 31 from 2-4 p.m.; all sessions at West Gym at Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; contact Craig Reid at 541-3188014 or creid@bendcable.com.

BIKING INDOOR CYCLING CLASS: Space is limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 8 a.m. Saturdays starting Nov. 6; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes or $480 for 40 classes; $10 intro class for first-time riders; Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.

ReboundSPL.com; 541-585-1500. COG WILD MCKENZIE RIVER TRAIL SHUTTLE: Take the shuttle to the McKenzie River Trail; this Saturday 8 a.m.; $40; call ahead to reserve your seat; 541-385-7002; www.cogwild.com. CROSSAFLIXION CUP CYCLOCROSS SERIES: For youths through masters, and beginners through experienced riders, Nov. 27 at Seventh Mountain Resort; races start at 9 a.m.; registration on race day or at www.signmeup.com; $10-$25 except for kiddie cross race (12-and-under), which is free; contact Gina Miller at 541-318-7388 or gina@FreshAirSports.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Cyclocross programs for 2010 include three- or fiveday options for ages 10-23; riders will be grouped based on age and ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain biking, road biking, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays, times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE DEVELOPMENT CYCLING: Professional coaching in cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; Sept. 20-Dec. 12; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865. CENTRAL OREGON VELO RIDE: Saturdays, 10 a.m.; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675; www.centraloregonvelo.com.

MISCELLANEOUS INCLIMB ROCK N’ TIME: Rock climbing in a controlled indoor environment in the afternoon on a no-school day; Nov. 12 from 1:15-4:15 p.m.; $22; all necessary equipment and belaying provided by InClimb staff, transportation provided from RAPRD Activity Center; liability waiver must be signed by legal guardian prior to activity; www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275. PROJECT HEALING WATERS: Fly fishing and fly tying program for disabled active military service personnel and veterans; meetings held the second Wednesday of each month; 6 p.m.; Orvis Company Store; 320 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; outings begin in the spring; Brad at 541-536-5799; bdemery1@aol.com. BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU SEMINAR: This Friday, 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 23, 9 a.m.-noon. With noted instructor Marcelo Alonso at High Desert Martial Arts, 2535 NE Studio Road, Bend; $50 for one day or $80 for both; family discounts available; Daniel at 541-647-1220.

FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.; free first session; Randall at 541-3894547 or Jeff at 541-419-7087. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play canceled Oct. 20 and Oct. 27; will resume on Nov. 3; every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m. (set-up half an hour before); beginner classes available; cost for beginner classes $96; at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267614-6477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eightball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@comcast. net or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541647-1363; www.foxsbilliards.com.

RUNNING ALL-COMERS CROSS-COUNTRY SERIES: Weekly events at varying distances and locations for participants of all ages and abilities; presented by Fleet Feet Sports Bend and Central Oregon Community College Running Club; all profits will support the COCC Running Club and local high school cross-country programs; Thursday at Juniper Park, 4:30 p.m. start; cost varies for teams and COCC students; 541-389-1601; marci@fleetfeetbend.com; www. fleetfeetbend.com/fall-xc-series. GILCHRIST PUMPKIN RUN: This Saturday, Little Pumpkin 1-Mile Run/ Walk at 10:30 a.m.; 5K run/walk at 11 a.m.; proceeds benefit GHS Booster Club. Races start and finish at Gilchrist School track, 201 Mountain View Dr., Gilchrist. Cost is $6 for Little Pumpkin race (sixth grade and younger free), and $12 for students or $15 for adults for 5K; pumpkinrun@ gmail.com; 541-281-1201. PUNCTUAL PUMPKIN PREDICTION RUN: Saturday, Oct. 30, at 10 a.m.: predict your time on either the short or long course without a watch and win a prize. Proceeds benefit Bend Endurance Academy. Races start and finish at academy parking lot, 500 SW Bond St., Suite 142; $22 adults or $25 day of race, $10 youths 10-18, youths under 10 free with adult registration; sign up at www.bendenduranceacademy.org or www.signmeup.com; 541-6783865; info@bendenduranceacademy. org. Volunteers needed: e-mail punctualpumpkinvolunteer@ gmail.com. LORD’S ACRE RUN/WALK: Saturday, Nov. 6, at 9 a.m. 5K and 10K start and finish at Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 SW Hwy. 126, Powell Butte; $15 with no shirt included (increases to $20 on Oct. 22), $27 w/long-sleeved T-shirt or $35 w/hooded sweatshirt; must register by Oct. 18 to guarantee T-shirt or sweatshirt; Dave at 541-977-3493.

See Calendar / D4


D6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Buy New ... Buy Local ...

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INTRODUCING THE BULLETIN’S HOLIDAY BID-N-BUY ONLINE AUCTION EVENT BRINGING QUALITY PRODUCTS AT LOW-AUCTION PRICES TO CENTRAL OREGON

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CL

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

Complex role Lyndsy Fonseca loves playing Alex on CW’s “Nikita,” Page E2

COMMUNITY LIFE

Home on

HORSE COUNTRY

a better range Equine Outreach to host auction of rescued wild horses

O

ne-hundred horses in need of safe homes will be put up for auction Saturday at Equine Outreach, a nonprofit horse rescue located off Butler Market Road near Bend Municipal Airport. The auction action actually begins sooner, with a daylong viewing beginning at 8 a.m. Friday (see “If you go”). Of the 150 animals now living at the 20acre ranch, 70 were purchased in June at a wild horse auction in Warm Springs. “They were slated to sell them off, and whoever the highest bidder was got them,” explains Brian Waldron, manager at the ranch. “Could’ve been a meat buyer, or rodeo stock contractors. Could have been anybody. We didn’t want to take that risk, so we took them in to find them good homes.” The mission of the facility, which was started by Bend real estate broker Joan Steelhammer, is “to facilitate the rescue, rehabilitation and permanent placement of abused, neglected and unwanted horses and mules.” Horses at Equine Outreach run the gamut from registered, high-dollar quarter horses to thoroughbreds, burros and mules. They range in age from a few weeks old to age 37. “Anything that’s equine-related,” Waldron says. “We have all makes and models.” See Rescue / E6

Courtesy David Johnson

Nancy Cox, of Powell Butte, and her Arabian, Zippo, will compete in the National Mountain Trail Championship in Eugene in November. They get lots of practice on Central Oregon’s many miles of horse trails, she said.

“You just grow accustomed to being with them. In the long run, I just hope, like most people who take them in, to give him a better life than he had.”

YOUR PETS Meet Elmo who loves ... squirrel!

— Neil Browne, a volunteer at Equine Outreach, referring to Suzzy

Say hello to Elmo, a 4-year-old terrier mix. His exact breed is unknown but all guesses combined have resulted in the consensus that he is a Jack Border Schnorkie. He loves Fun Nose Work (a new and rapidly growing sport for dogs), napping in the sun, and peanut butter. Elmo and his people, Jay and Tracy Marsh, moved to Bend recently. His favorite place so far is Shevlin Park — because of the squirrels. To submit a Submitted photo photo for publication, e-mail a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

Submitted photo

SPOTLIGHT

By Linda Weiford Nancy Cox and her husband, Glen, celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary last month, not at a posh hotel with fluffy towels and room service, but tucked in sleeping bags among horses, ponderosa trees and outhouses. The couple spent three days camping and riding dusty trails at Whitefish Horse Camp on Crescent Lake. “I couldn’t have been happier,” said 61year-old Nancy Cox, of Powell Butte. For Cox, trail riding offers a glimpse of heaven, especially in Central Oregon, she said. Since the early ’70s, she estimates that she and her horses have covered 6,000 miles of trails, many in the High Desert but also in Washington, Idaho and California. These days her horse is Zippo, a 15-yearold Arabian who appears to adore trail riding as much as she does. “I’ve never had a horse as smooth and confident as he is out there,” said Cox, stroking Zippo’s neck in the pasture behind her home. No surprise, then, that the two will compete next month at the National Mountain Trail Championship in Eugene. See Trail / E6

The Bulletin

The Eastern Oregon Film Festival will present 20 films Thursday through Saturday at The Granada 3 Theatre in La Grande. In its second year, the festival will screen shorts and feature films including “Exit Through the Gift Shop,” “Open Five,” “Billy Was a Deaf Kid,” “Daddy Longlegs,” “Putty Hill,” “Pool Room, “The Age of Stupid,” “Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo” and “The Taqwacores.”

Woman, steed to saddle up for trail competition For The Bulletin

By David Jasper

Get tickets for Eastern Oregon Film Festival

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

Neil Browne tends to Suzzy in this undated photo. He adopted from Equine Outreach, where he has been volunteering for three years, and is in the process of adopting a second.

E

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Rescued horses stand in their pasture Friday at Equine Outreach, a 20-acre, nonprofit horse rescue in Bend. The nonprofit strives “to facilitate the rescue, rehabilitation and permanent placement of abused, neglected and unwanted horses and mules.”

The festival also includes question-and-answer sessions with filmmakers, a panel discussion and after-parties featuring four regional bands. All-Access Festival passes are $25 and are available for purchase on the festival’s website, www.eofilmfest.com. Individual tickets are $6.50 for matinees and $8.50 for evening screenings and may be purchased at the door of The Granada 3 Theatre. The theater is located at 1311 Adams Ave., La Grande. Contact: 541-963-4617 or www .eofilmfest.com.

WWOLF seeks help on local farm work day Willing Workers on Local Farms (WWOLF) is seeking volunteers for a local farm community work day Saturday in Central Oregon. Participants meet at 8 a.m. at Whole Foods Market in Bend and travel to different farms in the area to assist farmers with projects that they would like to have completed, according to a press release. A rain-or-shine event, volunteers should bring weather-

appropriate clothing, work gloves, a change of clothes, water, snacks, hats and sunscreen. Two meals will be provided. Whole Foods Market is located at 2610 N.E. U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Cost is free. To register, e-mail Jayme Lujan-Exley at j.lujan.exley@ gmail.com with “WWOLF” in the subject line. Registrations must be in by Friday. Contact: 541-604-5156 or visit www.wwolfpack .blogspot.com. — From staff reports

ADOPT ME Enjoy playtime with Squid This is Squid, who is playful, sweet and loves toys. He loves to chase Super Balls to showcase his high jumping skills. Wiggle a stringed toy on a stick and he’s at his happiest. He would be a great mouser. He is neutered, microchipped and has his first set of vaccines. Submitted photo If you’d like to meet Squid or any other animal available for adoption at the Humane Society of Redmond, visit 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Contact: 541-923-0882.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

New mom’s best friend is poaching on her territory Dear Abby: I recently gave birth to a beautiful, perfect baby girl, “Cassie.” I also just returned to work. I would love to stay home, but I cannot afford to financially. I am lucky that my best friend, “Mary Ellen,” doesn’t have to work and has offered to care for my little 8-week-old bundle of joy. My problem is, every day when I go to pick up Cassie, I must wait for Mary Ellen to say goodbye to her. She has started instructing me about how Cassie likes to sleep, be burped and held. While I appreciate her watching and caring for my little one, I am Cassie’s mom and I know what she likes. The time I have with my daughter is precious. I just want to pick her up and go home. How do I tell my friend it upsets me that she feels she should tell me about how to care for my own baby? I feel guilty and sad that I must work, and her comments make it worse. I know she’s only trying to help. I don’t want to hurt her feelings, but what can I do? — Working Mommy in Baltimore Dear Working Mommy: Before your resentment grows any further, set Mary Ellen straight. Tell her you’re grateful she can watch Cassie, but when you come to pick her up you want the baby ready to go. Tell your friend the time you must spend away from your daughter is painful and when she “suggests” how to hold or burp the baby, it makes you feel it’s a reflection on your maternal ability. If Mary Ellen gets it, things will improve. If she doesn’t, make other arrangements for your child. Your friend may be becoming too attached to your baby and confused about her role. Dear Abby: I run a successful restaurant business. One of my key employees, “Zayne,” has Tourette’s syndrome. He has been a loyal and valuable waiter for many years.

DEAR ABBY When customers ask what is wrong with him because he makes noises or hits himself, how should I respond? Most of our regular customers understand his condition and ignore it. However, we do get the occasional socially inept customer who gawks or asks rude questions. I would defend and protect Zayne. He knows people ask about him, and if they question him, he tells them about his condition. What’s the best way to respond politely to people who don’t have a clue? — Zayne’s Boss in the Pacific Northwest Dear Boss: If you are asked about Zayne, tell the questioner, “That’s Zayne. He has been a valued employee here for many years. If you want an answer to your question, ask HIM.” Dear Abby: Every time my son and his wife get into a big argument, she kicks him out of the bedroom and has their 8-yearold daughter sleep with her. This has happened many times in my granddaughter’s life. Should I be concerned for my granddaughter, or mind my own business? — Concerned Grandma in Florida Dear Concerned Grandma: If you’re smart you won’t insert yourself into your son and daughter-in-law’s marital problems. They have enough of them without that. As to your granddaughter being invited to bunk with her mother when her father is in the doghouse — I don’t think it will harm the child. Hearing her parents squabble might, however. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Fonseca shakes it up on ‘Nikita’ By Chuck Barney

‘Nikita’

Contra Costa Times

Since “Nikita,” the CW’s killer reboot, premiered last month, all eyes have been on its fierce and gorgeous leading lady, Maggie Q. But the show’s other buttkicking female is also seizing America’s attention. She’s Lyndsy Fonseca, a 23-yearold Oakland, Calif., native, who launched her acting career at the tender age of 13 on the soap opera “The Young and the Restless.” Fonseca plays Alex, a troubled teen with a violent history who has been recruited by a shadowy government agency called Division. The agency is training Alex for lethal missions, but, unbeknown to its leaders, Alex is secretly serving as the eyes and ears for Nikita, a former Division operative who has vowed to destroy it. Fonseca, who caught the showbiz bug while strutting her stuff with the West Coast Dance Theatre in Alameda, Calif., boasts a number of television credits, including recurring stints on “Desperate Housewives,” “Big Love” and “How I Met Your Mother” (as Ted Mosby’s daughter). She also has a burgeoning film career with appearances in “Hot Tub Time Machine” and “Kick Ass,” and recently wrapped production on John Carpenter’s latest thriller, “The Ward.” During a recent break from shooting “Nikita” in Toronto, the actress fielded some questions via phone:

Q: A:

So, what do you love about playing Alex? I love the fact that she has so many sides to her. In flashbacks, you see the broken child living through some really dark stuff. Then, in the present, you see the determined fighter. There’s a lot

When: 9 p.m. Thursdays Where: CW

camera). We’re usually together in only flashback scenes.

Q: A:

Ben Mark Holzberg via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Lyndsy Fonseca loves both the toughness and vulnerability of Alex, her character on “Nikita.” “I’m never bored with Alex,” she says. of toughness to her, but also a lot of vulnerability. I’m never bored with Alex.

Q:

We know you can’t divulge any big secrets, but, in general, what can you tell us about where your character is headed? You’ll learn a lot more about the relationship between Nikita and Alex as the season unfolds. We’ll fill in the blanks. You’ll see why they have such a strong connection. Alex also climbs higher and higher up the Division totem pole. And we’ve got surprises packed into every episode.

A:

Q:

The show requires you to do a lot of tough, physical work. How are you handling that? It can be very draining. For an episode we recently shot, I get tortured. There was a lot of running involved and electrocution stuff. ... At the end of the week, I just want to collapse into the sofa. ... On the other hand, I love the stunt work. It really gives me a feeling of empowerment. After every episode, Maggie and I compare our bumps and bruises.

A:

Treating all Foot Conditions

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

You started out by working for three years on “The Young and the Restless.” Do you look back fondly on your soap opera days? Oh, that was so long ago. I was so young — just a baby. It really prepared me well, though. It taught me how to learn lines. There would be times when we’d do 80 (script) pages a day, compared to seven to 14 for prime time. It was like a TV boot camp.

Q:

Maggie has had a lot of action-film experience in Hong Kong, and she’s worked with Jackie Chan’s trainers. Did she offer any advice going into the series? Actually, Maggie, on her own, invited me to work out with her for a month before shooting began. We spent three hours every day at the gym, doing a lot of conditioning, circuit training, tumbling. ... It was crazy. One day, after finishing, I got in my car and I could barely hold the steering wheel. I was so shaky and exhausted.

A:

Q: A:

Were you a fan of any action heroines of TV’s past? I certainly loved Jennifer Garner in “Alias,” and there are some similarities between that show and ours, although we’re definitely different. I think it’s cool to have women on TV who are strong and kicking some (butt).

Q: A:

Q: A:

Were you the type of kid who dreamed of being an actress from an early age? No, not at all. I was a dancer. From the moment I could walk, I was at that dance studio. For my first performance, I was still in diapers. It was a “Winniethe-Pooh” or Shirley Temple kind of thing, I think. I never thought about being in TV or the movies. That wasn’t part of my world.

Q:

There are times in “Nikita” that you have to go out on missions in which you have to get all made up and wear fancy dresses. Do you like that part of the role? In real life, I’m very girlie, but I think that when I’m playing Alex, I kind of take on her personality. She doesn’t care about that stuff, so I don’t. Besides, when you’re wearing makeup and you’re in heels and a dress 16 hours (of shooting) a day, it loses its appeal.

A:

Have you and Maggie been able to bond much?

She’s been awesome. Maggie has a confidence that’s really contagious. She’s a great leader for our show. I just wish I could work with her more (on

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TUESDAY PRIME TIME 10/19/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Wolf: Travels This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Yankee Shop PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

No Ordinary Family (N) ‘PG’ Å Dancing With the Stars ’ Å The Biggest Loser Another contestant goes home. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Dead Air (N) ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS: Los Angeles Standoff (N) ‘PG’ No Ordinary Family (N) ‘PG’ Å Dancing With the Stars ’ Å Glee Hairography ’ ‘14’ Å Raising Hope ’ Running Wilde News Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? NOVA Gothic cathedrals. (N) ’ ‘G’ The History Project Greece. ’ ‘G’ The Biggest Loser Another contestant goes home. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å One Tree Hill Not Afraid (N) ’ ‘14’ (9:01) Life Unexpected (N) ’ ‘PG’ Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Art Workshop Joy/Painting NOVA Gothic cathedrals. (N) ’ ‘G’ The History Project Greece. ’ ‘G’

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 (N) ‘14’ Å Parenthood Orange Alert (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Good Wife Cleaning House ‘14’ (10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 (N) ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Frontline Arson conviction. (N) ‘PG’ Parenthood Orange Alert (N) ’ ‘PG’ Married... With Married... With Family Kitchen Mexico Frontline Arson conviction. (N) ‘PG’

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Independent Lens (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Parking Wars (N) Parking Wars Parking Wars Parking Wars 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å › “Friday the 13th Part 3” (1982, Horror) Dana Kimmell, Paul Kratka, Tracie Savage. (10:15) › “Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter” (1984) Kimberly Beck, Peter Barton. (4:00) ›› “Tremors” (1990, Horror) Kevin › “Friday the 13th, Part 2” (1981, Horror) Amy Steel, John Furey, Adrienne King. A 102 40 39 Bacon, Fred Ward. hulking killer stalks counselors at Camp Crystal Lake. Å Killer Jason terrorizes teens and a biker gang. Å Murderous Jason seeks vengeance on campers at Crystal Lake. Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Animals Behaving Badly ‘G’ Å Weird, True Weird, True The Haunted ’ ‘14’ Å Lost Tapes ‘14’ Freak Encounters The Haunted ’ ‘14’ Å 68 50 12 38 Untamed and Uncut Episode 15 ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker (N) ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ 137 44 Trick My Truck: Ultimate Tailgating The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The Singing Bee ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Biography on CNBC American Greed Mad Money Coca-Cola: The Real Story Biography on CNBC Success Zumba Dance 51 36 40 52 Coca-Cola: The Real Story Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Nick Swardson’s South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Nat’l-Christmas Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked Good Morning To Be Announced Outside Presents Outside Film Festival TBA 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck ›› “Under Wraps” (1997) Adam Wylie. ‘G’ Å (9:45) Fish Hooks Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Jonas L.A. ‘G’ 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Dirty Jobs Dirty Chip Maker ’ ‘14’ Dirty Jobs Harvesting walnuts. ‘PG’ Dirty Jobs Exotic Nanny (N) ’ ‘14’ Ghost Lab Dead Will Rise Again ‘14’ Dirty Jobs Harvesting walnuts. ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 (N) NFL’s Greatest Games From Jan. 20, 2008. Å 30 for 30 (N) SportsNation 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight 22 24 21 24 NFL’s Greatest Games From Jan. 5, 2003. (N) Who’s Number 1? Best Boxers Can’t Blame Can’t Blame AWA Wrestling Å NBA From Dec. 12, 2007. (N) 23 25 123 25 College Basketball From Dec. 8, 2009. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey ›› “The Goonies” (1985, Adventure) Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen. Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats I Pie Unwrapped Challenge Horror story cakes. Private Chefs of Beverly Hills (N) Chopped Fright Bites Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Head to Head Bensinger Seahawks Beavers Football UEFA Champions League Soccer Real Madrid vs. AC Milan The Final Score Jay Glazer The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour “Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Cloverfield” (2008) Michael Stahl-David, Mike Vogel. Sons of Anarchy (N) ‘MA’ (11:03) Terriers ‘MA’ 131 Bang, Buck Holmes/Homes Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place House Hunters Real Estate House Hunters Hunters Int’l For Rent ’ ‘G’ For Rent ’ ‘G’ 176 49 33 43 Bang, Buck Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Most Shocking ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å IRT Deadliest Roads ‘PG’ Å Death Road ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Truck Stops ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Wife Swap Schroeder/Wardle ‘PG’ Wife Swap Coste/Ives ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Buried Life The Buried Life The Buried Life Teen Mom See You Later Maci and Ryan battle. ‘PG’ Teen Mom Check Up With Dr. Drew Dr. Drew checks in. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Scream 2010 (N) ’ Scream 2010 ’ 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Stargate Universe Pathogen (N) ’ Caprica Things We Lock Away (N) Stargate Universe Pathogen Å 133 35 133 45 “Odysseus: Voyage to the Underworld” (2008) Arnold Vosloo. ‘14’ Å Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 MLB Postgame The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ American Dad ’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ 16 27 11 28 MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at New York Yankees (Live) Å ›› “Susan and God” (1940) Joan Craw›› “Design for Living” (1933) Fredric March. Two men love the (6:45) ›› “Middle of the Night” (1959, Drama) Kim Novak, Fredric March, Glenda Farrell. A secretary and ››› “The Barretts of Wimpole Street” (1934) Norma Shearer, Fredric March. Eliza101 44 101 29 woman they must live with platonically. her boss plan a May-December marriage. beth Barrett’s father opposes her latest romance. Å (DVS) ford, Fredric March. Å Say Yes, Dress Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count The Little Couple The Little Couple Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Bones The Gamer in the Grease ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Law & Order Fed ‘14’ Å (DVS) Law & Order Boy on Fire ’ ‘14’ CSI: NY Time’s Up ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 (4:00) Golf PGA Grand Slam of Golf, Day One Å Scooby-Doo Scooby-Doo › “Son of the Mask” (2005, Comedy) Jamie Kennedy, Alan Cumming. Tower Prep New Kid ‘PG’ Sym-Bionic Titan Star Wars: Clone King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Most Terrifying Places in America 3 Most Terrifying Places in America 6 Ghost Adventures Stanley Hotel ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford and Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Fantasia for Real La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Full Court Wedding ’ ‘PG’ ›› ATL (2006) 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ›› “Loose Cannons” 1990 (6:05) ›› “My Stepmother Is an Alien” 1988 Dan Aykroyd. ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “The Blues Brothers” 1980 John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:15) ›› “The Great Outdoors” 1988 Dan Aykroyd. ’ ‘PG’ Å (4:30) ›› “Terror on the Beach” ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990 Andrew “Dice” Clay. ‘R’ ›› “Damien: Omen II” 1978, Horror William Holden, Lee Grant. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990 Andrew “Dice” Clay. ‘R’ Ride Open Ride Open Ride Open The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Ellery Out Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Cubed (N) Å The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Ellery Out Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Big Break Dominican Republic Big Break Dominican Republic (N) Being John Daly Being John Daly Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Big Break Dominican Republic Being John Daly Being John Daly Playing Lessons Inside PGA Tour Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “Mystery Woman: Oh Baby” (2006, Mystery) Kellie Martin. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:45) “Sins of My ›› “My Sister’s Keeper” 2009, Drama Cameron Diaz, Abigail Breslin. A girl sues for ›› “The Lovely Bones” 2009, Drama Mark Wahlberg, Rachel Weisz, Susan Sarandon. A young murder Eastbound & Down Eastbound & Down Bored to Death ’ Boardwalk Empire HBO 425 501 425 10 Father” 2009 emancipation from her parents. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å victim watches over her family from heaven. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Whitest Kids Whitest Kids Whitest Kids 360 Sessions Arrested Dev. Whitest Kids Todd Margaret Todd Margaret › “Broken Lizard’s Club Dread” 2004 Bill Paxton. ‘R’ (10:45) “The Razor: The Snare” 1973 Shintarô Katsu. IFC 105 105 (4:05) ›› “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” (5:50) ››› “Public Enemies” 2009 Johnny Depp, Christian Bale. G-man Melvin Purvis (8:15) › “Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li” 2009, Action Kristin Kreuk. Warrior › “Bride of Chucky” 1998, Horror Jennifer Tilly. An evil doll and Lingerie ’ ‘MA’ Å MAX 400 508 7 2009 Matthew McConaughey. vows to nab notorious criminal John Dillinger. ’ ‘R’ Å Chun-Li sets out to stop evil Bison’s grab for power. Å its mate seek human form. ’ ‘R’ Å American Paranormal ‘PG’ Making History Stonehenge (N) Explorer Vampire Forensics ‘14’ American Paranormal ‘PG’ Making History Stonehenge Explorer Vampire Forensics ‘14’ Ultimate Factories Porsche ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Elk Chronicles Truth Hunting Wildlife Bow Madness Steve’s Outdoor Wild Outdoors Lethal OUTD 37 307 43 (5:45) ›› “Tennessee” 2008, Drama Adam Rothenberg, Ethan Peck. iTV. Two broth- ›› “Tenure” 2009, Comedy Luke Wilson. iTV. A professor tries Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Å The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å Dexter Beauty and the Beast Dexter must Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Å The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:05) ››› SHO 500 500 “Lymelife” 2008 ers go in search of their estranged father. ’ ‘R’ Å to derail a rival’s tenure track. ’ ‘R’ Å save a life. ’ ‘MA’ Å Monster Jam Monster Jam Race in 60 (N) Monster Jam Monster Jam Race in 60 NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Zombieland 2009 ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:20) ›› “Jurassic Park III” 2001 Sam Neill. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Astro Boy” 2009 Voices of Freddie Highmore. ’ (10:40) ››› “Zombieland” 2009 Woody Harrelson. STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) › “Disaster Movie” 2008, Comedy (6:05) ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, Mathieu Amalric. James › “Crossing Over” 2009, Drama Harrison Ford, Ray Liotta, Ashley Judd. Immigrants ›› “Pathology” 2008 Milo Ventimiglia. Medical interns amuse “I Hope They Serve TMC 525 525 Matt Lanter. ’ ‘PG-13’ Bond seeks revenge for the death of Vesper Lynd. ’ ‘PG-13’ seek new lives in Los Angeles. ’ ‘R’ Å themselves with games of murder. ’ ‘R’ Beer” (4:30) NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Washington Capitals (Live) Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show The Daily Line (Live) Inside XDL Countdown Whacked Out The T.Ocho Show The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Crimes/Passion Crimes/Passion Crimes/Passion Crimes/Passion Crimes/Passion Crimes/Passion The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Voices ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives of Women ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY SENIOR DAY: Ages 62 and older can visit for free; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “GERMAN RESEARCH VIA SOCIAL NETWORKING�: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Allen Braemer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541-3179553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. JO DEE MESSINA: The award-winning country musician performs, with Lisa C. Pollock; $45 or $55; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LUCY SCHWARTZ: The Los Angeles-based singer songwriter performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: James C. Foster reads from his book “BONG HiTS 4 JESUS: A Perfect Constitutional Storm in Alaska’s Capital�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “REPORTING THE TRUTHS OF THE WORLD�: Nicholas Kristof talks about international issues; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. TAARKA: The Colorado-based jazzy world-folk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmena mins.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs, with Greg Hill; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.bendticket.com.

THURSDAY HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. TENTH AVENUE NORTH: The progressive pop band performs; with Addison Road and Matt Maher; $15 in advance, $20 day of show, $25 VIP; 7 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-389-8241 or www.itickets.com. THE DEFIBULATORS: The Brooklyn, N.Y. based urban honky-tonk sevenpiece outfit plays; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

“DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL�: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S EXPO: Educational seminars, entertainment, cooking demonstrations, vendors, a fashion show and more; with keynote speaker Kathleen Flinn; followed by a bachelor auction, proceeds from which will benefit Grandma’s House; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-385-7988 or www. celebratingeverywoman.info. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Robert Goldstein talks about his book “Riding With Reindeer,� with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “THE ODD COUPLE�: The Crook County High School drama department presents the Neil Simon play about a tidy man and a sloppy man living together; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www .scaremegood.com. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: David Brauner presents “The Fur Trade Era at Champoeg�; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www .cascades theatrical.org. JIGU! THUNDER DRUMS OF CHINA: More than a dozen Chinese drummers perform, with rhythms, traditions and contemporary special effects; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL�: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old

Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. SASSPARILLA: The Portlandbased blues-punk band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; followed by a bazaar; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, BORIS GODUNOV�: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in a presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. SPORTS SALE: Sale of winter clothing and gear; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor National Ski Patrol; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia Ave., Bend; info@mtbachelornsp.org. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. THE GREAT PUMPKIN HUNT: Hunt for and decorate pumpkins and sip apple cider; proceeds benefit the Miller’s Landing project; $5 suggested donation; 10 a.m.noon; Miller’s Landing, Northwest Riverside Boulevard and Northwest Carlon Avenue, Bend; 541-382-2092 or Kristin.Kovalik@tpl.org. CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S EXPO: Educational seminars, entertainment, cooking demonstrations, vendors, a fashion show and more; with keynote speaker Kathleen Flinn; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-385-7988 or www .celebratingevery woman.info. FUR TRADE DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1831; talk to live trappers, see black-powder firearms, authentic cooking and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CULVER MINT & GARLIC FESTIVAL: Featuring presentations from the local agricultural community, recipes, and dishes prepared by Daniel Taylor; free; 1-4 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave.; 541-546-6494 or cityhall@cityofculver.net. “WINTERVENTION�: A screening of the Warren Miller film featuring skiers and snowboarders traveling around the world; $18; 2, 6 and 9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Steve Duno talks about his book “Last Dog on the Hill�; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: Drum circle followed by a bonfire and community sweat; free; 6-8 p.m.; Steve and Teri’s home, 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Robert Goldstein talks about his book “Riding With Reindeer,� with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE�: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 503-928-1428 or www.beattickets.org.

“THE ODD COUPLE�: The Crook County High School drama department presents the Neil Simon play about a tidy man and a sloppy man living together; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www. scaremegood.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL�: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. RITA HOSKING AND COUSIN JACK: The country-folk musicians perform; bring a lawn chair; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Harmony House, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209.

SUNDAY SPORTS SALE: Sale of winter clothing and gear; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor National Ski Patrol; free; 9 a.m.-noon; Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia Ave., Bend; info@mtbachelorn sp.org. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. FUR TRADE DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1831; talk to live trappers, see black-powder firearms, authentic cooking and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE�: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 503-928-1428 or www. beattickets.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL�: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

M  T 

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 12:20, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LET ME IN (R) 12:40, 3:45, 6:25, 9:25 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 MY SOUL TO TAKE 3-D (R) 1:45, 5, 7:35, 10:15 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) Noon, 6:15 RED (PG-13) 12:10, 1:30, 4, 4:50, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20, 10:10 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:30, 4:10, 7, 9:50 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 THE TOWN (R) 12:50, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 YOU AGAIN (PG) 12:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:35 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

For Tuesday, Oct. 19

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

GET LOW (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG13) 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50 LEBANON (R) 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:25, 7:10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) Noon, 2:30, 7:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:40, 6:55 A WOMAN, A GUN AND A NOODLE SHOP (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:45

CASE 39 (R) 3:35, 9:15 EASY A (PG-13) 1:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:05, 4:30, 7:50 JACKASS (R) 12:45, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.)

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 8:45 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

JACKASS (R) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 4, 6:30, 9 RED (PG-13) 5, 7:15, 9:30 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3:45, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

JACK GOES BOATING (R) 7 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 6:45 RED (PG-13) 6:45 SECRETARIAT (PG) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 4, 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

P C GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidencebuilding skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-6336774 or www.desertsageagility.com. BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. YAPPY HOUR: Allyson’s Kitchen offers treats and time to mingle for pets and owners, 5-7 p.m. Wednesdays; 375 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; benefits the Humane Society of Central Oregon; 541-749-9974 or www.hsco.org.

BASIC MANNERS OBEDIENCE: Teaches good manners including sit, stay, heel, come when called and leash walking; $75 for five weeks; starts 1 p.m. Saturday Oct. 23; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541536-2458, diannshappytails@msn. com or www.OregonDogLady.com. DOG SCOOTERING: You and your dog learn how to harness energy for a fun activity; $98 per person with one or two dogs, $25 discount for second family member; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 30; Tumnatki Siberians Kennel, 8066 S.W. George Millican Road, Prineville; pre-register with Karen Yeargain, 541-410-8475 or www.tumnatkisiberians.com. PUPPY PARTIES: Bring your puppy to play, costumes welcome; 3-4 p.m. Oct. 31; Eastside Bend Pet Express, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive,; 541-385-5298.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. COW WORK WITH INSTRUCTION: Develop confidence and cow sense in your horse, while learning to control and move the cow; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-2806622 or Victoria at 541-280-2782. MINI REINING CLINIC: Alternating beginning and advanced sessions focus on refinement of reining maneuvers and skills for showing; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-280-6622 or Victoria at 541-280-2782.

N    N C eline Dion hospitalized as precaution, rep says NEW YORK — Celine Dion has been admitted to a Florida hospital to prevent the early delivery of her twins. A representative for the superstar singer said Monday that Dion is at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. The hospitalization was recommended to make sure she’s near her doctors leading up to the babies’ birth. Dion announced earlier this year that she’s pregnant with two boys. She had tried for years to have more children. She and her husband, Rene Angelil, are the parents of a 9-year-old son, Rene Charles.

Jolie gets Bosnia filming permit back SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Sarajevo authorities have given Angelina Jolie her filming permit back after it was briefly withdrawn last week following protests from an association of women raped during the Bosnian war. Jolie’s Bosnian producer, Edin Sarkic, said he received the written permit Monday and that Jolie and her crew will start filming in Sarajevo in November. The film is a wartime love story between a Bosnian woman and a Serb man, but more details were not known. Rumors spread that the film was about a rape victim who falls in love with her rapist. This outraged an association of raped women in Bosnia who branded the story insulting

and pressed the Sarajevo minister of culture to cancel Jolie’s filming permit. The minister reissued it Monday after Sarkic persuaded him the rumors were not true by letting him read the script.

Hathaway says ex taught her to be wary NEW YORK — Anne Hathaway is now at a point where she can joke about her former boyfriend admitting he was a con artist. The 27-year-old actress opens up about the ordeal in the November issue of Vogue magazine. Asked to name her “deal-breakersâ€? with men, Hathaway replied, “Uh ... fraud?â€? and laughs. Raffaello Follieri pleaded guilty to cheating investors out of millions of dollars by falsely claiming he had Vatican connections that enabled him to buy church property at a discount. He was sentenced to 4½ years in prison in 2008. All joking aside, the actress admits the relationship took its toll. The experience taught her to be “more wary,â€? she said. “It takes a minute for me to let my guard down, but once I do and I get to know someone, I’m very open, very trusting. Some might say too trusting.â€? Shooting the movie “Love and Other Drugsâ€? opposite Jake Gyllenhaal helped Hathaway move forward, she said. Trust is a theme of the film, and it forced Hathaway to confront the issue. “Love and Other Drugsâ€? opens Nov. 24. — From wire reports


E4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010: You often go overboard with spending and other such indulgences. This year, this tendency will be up for change. Look at the long-term ramifications, and self-discipline might be more easily called upon. Your daily life might need more reviving. You are facing a profound transformation in your life. As a result, you will be happier — though the process might not be easy. If you are single, you could meet someone in your daily travels. Take your time dating and getting to know this person. If you are attached, share more of your free time together or develop a new mutual hobby. Smile, and both of you will lighten up. PISCES understands you. Be more open with this person. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You are subject to inspiring thoughts after a meeting. Still, you might decide not to share any more until you have a better grasp on what you think. Consider your options, though others seem very sure of themselves. Tonight: Take some personal time. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Remain upbeat and direct with others. Someone you count on who can be feisty at times could push harder than you might like. Use a meeting as a buffer. Know what you want and expect. Tonight: Where people are.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Stay on top of your responsibilities. A partner presents a challenging opinion. You might want to weigh the pros and cons. A brainstorming session might be just what the doctor ordered. Clear the air quickly, looking to new possibilities. Tonight: Working late. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Keep reaching for new ideas and possibilities. You might not be as satisfied when you hear another person’s point of view. Let your imagination take over. You suddenly see an unusual path. Tonight: Where your mind can roam. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Let your mind wander. Ideas pop and accomplish what you need to happen. Listen to advice you are getting from a partner. Your creativity flows and draws many to you. Revise a project with new understanding. Know what you must do. Tonight: Say “yes.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Defer to others, and don’t worry so much about control or who is right. Creativity will surge in a happier environment, allowing greater give-and-take. How you let someone know that you disagree could make a big difference. Tonight: Sort through invitations. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Allow greater flow into a situation, knowing full well what is going on. You’ll see someone very differently after you negotiate a truce where there has been disagreement. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 -Nov 21) HHHH Open up to new possibilities. Though someone’s idea could strike you as unusual, work with it. Dedicate some quality time to someone you never have enough time for. Tonight: Let the good times roll. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Honor your priorities, but understand that others might not agree. Stay on top of a problem and allow your instincts to play a role. How you deal with someone could define the quality of your relationship. Tonight: At home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Keep reaching out for others. You will understand exactly what is going to happen when an issue is discussed more openly. How much guidance you want to give is your choice. Your fiery ways and style get you far. Tonight: Hang out with friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You understand a lot more than in the past, as others seem ready to reveal more. Maintain a caring and open attitude. A strong stand also might be necessary if you are going to move forward. Tonight: Treat yourself well. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your instincts guide you well, but know that you cannot get past an issue that a key associate presents. He or she might put a lot of logic and thought behind what is being said. You’ll come out on top of a problem because of needed research. Tonight: Whatever puts a smile on your face. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Rescue Continued from E1 One crafty mule, named Pistol, can open gates on the premises and let itself and horses out, so chains are kept on pasture gates. “When you put a halter on a horse to (lead) it out, sometimes the mule will get the rope and walk away with your horse,” says Neil Browne, a volunteer at the facility. Equine Outreach, whose motto is “rescue, rehabilitate, rehome,” usually adopts out its animals. However, adoption is a slower process, says Waldron, a 34-year-old former wild horse specialist for the Bureau of Land Management who began working at the ranch three months ago. In total, the horses eat about three tons per day at the volunteer-run nonprofit, “not to mention all the special feeds and grain that go into the older horses,” Waldron says. “This is probably a $500-a-day operation … just to maintain.” That cost does not factor in additional bills such as utilities, farriers or veterinarian care, he says. The wild horse purchase in June put Equine Outreach under additional strain, he says: “We took a huge risk, and now we need the public’s help.” If all the horses to be auctioned off were to sell, Equine Outreach would be back to operating at a more normal capacity, good news for its older, blind or crippled horses, permanent residents at the ranch. “We’re one of the last few rescues out there; most of them have gone under,” says Waldron. Equine Outreach has a list of about 200 volunteers, but about 30 are core volunteers who spend much of their free time at Equine Outreach. Browne, an Oregon State UniversityCascades Campus associate professor of English, is one of them. He began volunteering at Equine Outreach after visiting three years ago with a group of former students. Now, he’s there as often as he can be, which is almost daily in the summer. He’s adopted one horse, Suzzy.

Trail Continued from E1 High in the saddle, Cox will ride under the watchful eyes of judges armed with score sheets. She’ll encounter much of what she would if riding trails in Central Oregon, only indoors. Under the roof of the 3.4 acre Oregon Horse Center, a manmade geologic maze of rocky ledges, downed trees, dirt embankments and even a waterfall gushing from a gap in the wall will challenge horses and their riders, according to the horse center’s website. To be awarded high points, Zippo must maneuver those obstacles and others while staying calm and poised. Which shouldn’t be a problem, said Cox, who placed third in last year’s 50-plus open division of the competition. Obstacles included everything from live oinking pigs to a swinging suspension bridge. While these would stop many horses in their tracks, Zippo “just cruised,” she said. “He treats obstacle courses as a series of puzzles. You can see it in his eyes that he’s thinking through the technicality of each maneuver.” Zippo’s eyes were intense and focused as Cox led him — or perhaps he led her — through a series of practice obstacles on her ranch on a recent Sunday afternoon. When he stepped all four of his legs onto a log stump only three feet in diameter, he looked statuesque. In another maneuver, Zippo climbed aboard a makeshift teeter-totter while keeping

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Snoopy, a donkey, and Cinder hang out in their corral together Friday at Equine Outreach. The two have formed a close bond and are inseparable, says Brian Waldron.

If you go What: Rescued horse auction at Equine Outreach When: Daylong viewing begins Friday at 8 a.m.; auction at 10 a.m. Saturday Where: Equine Outreach, 63220 Silvis Road, Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-419-4842 or www.equineoutreach.com

Horses hang out at Equine Outreach, the horse rescue facility located near Bend Municipal Airport. The facility has a list of about 200 volunteers, which includes about 30 core volunteers.

He’s in the process of adopting a second, a large brown thoroughbred named Durango. The horse was “cowboyed” roughly by its previous owner, explains Browne, and it bears scars from barbed-wire fences. “Neither one of these horses did I set out to adopt,” he says. “I didn’t start working with them with the idea of adopting. It just sort of happened.” Suzzy was the first animal that he’d trained, albeit with considerable help. “She was a very, very difficult animal. She was very aggressive, or seemed to me, anyway. Seemed mean, anyway; still is at times. “The process of watching her change, and just seeing what some kindness and care can do, was pretty moving for me, and

pretty much the same thing with him,” he says, referring to Durango, who has a mellower disposition than Suzzy. “You just grow attached to them more and more, the more you work with them,” he adds. “I mean, they’re fun to ride, obviously … (but) I didn’t come out here to volunteer so I could ride horses.” Adds Waldron, “We’re not a boarding facility or a riding facility.” “You just grow accustomed to being with them,” Browne says. “In the long run, I just hope, like most people who take them in, to give him a better life than he had.”

the platform balanced about six inches off the ground as Cox, dropping the reins, confidently remained in the saddle. Cox, a native Oregonian, takes none of the credit. “It’s him. It’s all him.” Perhaps Zippo’s up-and-at-em genes have something to do with it. Arabians are the oldest breed of riding horses, according to the website of the Arabian Horse Association based in Aurora, Colo.

Their larger joints and strong lungs enabled them to travel great distances across harsh deserts of the Middle East, it says. Though the High Desert landscape isn’t so harsh, it helps that Zippo has had so much practice on its trails, said Cox, who, when not wearing Wranglers, spurs and a cowboy hat, works as a tax consultant in Redmond. “Not only is the area spectacular on horseback, but it offers adven-

These horses were among the 70 wild horses purchased from Warm Springs in June. They’re part of a 100-horse auction Saturday at Equine Outreach. Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

tures and challenges.” Kim McCarrel, author of the guidebook “Riding Central Oregon Horse Trails,” agreed. “In terms of terrain, we’ve got it all. Volcanic flows, alpine lakes, High Desert, mountain bases and trees big and small,” explained McCarrel, who published a second book on horse camps statewide. “This area is also accommodating. We have 14 horse camps within an hour-and-a-

National Mountain Trail Competition When: Nov. 4-7 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Nov. 4-6; awards ceremony 9 a.m. Nov. 7 Where: Oregon Horse Center, 90751 Prairie Road, Eugene. Cost: Free to the public For more information: Call the Oregon Horse Center at 541-689-9700 or go to its website http://oregonhorsecenter.com. half drive from Bend. How many places can offer that?”

Linda Weiford can be reached at ldweiford@gmail.com.


A H

HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON Shhhhhh! A ‘silencer’ protects your table and keeps the din down, Martha Stewart says, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

HOME

At Home With ... Backporch Coffee’s Beaches

FOOD

By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

What most people probably don’t know about Backporch Coffee Roasters in Bend is that coowner Dave Beach first started roasting his private stash of coffee beans in a popcorn air popper when he was a student at the University of Oregon. His coffee passion and hobby took this psychology major right out to his back porch in Eugene, where he started experimenting with the art of roasting coffee beans. On his porch, he could take coffee roasting to the next level, roasting on a much bigger scale than in his popcorn air popper. The wafting smell of roasting coffee beans soon drew customers, and that led to him selling his beans to neighbors and fellow students. While at UO, Beach started taking business classes as well, where he made a presentation describing the type of business he’d like to run someday. Since he was already roasting on his back porch, the new business he dreamed of would be called Backporch Coffee. “I still have that popcorn air popper in the shop,” says Beach, 28, with a knowing smile. “I can still roast a small sample handful of beans in there.” The second thing people might be surprised to learn about Beach is the fact that he was mentored by the late Alfred Peet, the original gourmet coffee master (several hundred Peet’s Coffee & Tea shops are still in operation throughout the country). See Beaches / F4

Market magic

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Dave and Majell Beach relax in their home with their dog Silas.

GARDEN

Mighty together: bulbs + perennials

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Assorted rice vinegars, mirin and sesame oil at The Produce Patch in Bend. Harissa hummous made by Kebaba at Newport Market in Bend. Vegetables at The Produce Patch. Assorted nut butters and honey at Nature’s General Store in Bend. Old world-style butter at Newport Market.

By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

The conversation on bulbs usually ends something like this: “Oh, I love bulbs but hate the look of dying foliage, so I don’t bother to plant them.” What a lost opportunity for that first burst of spring color. Back in the dark ages of gardening, the foliage of bulbs, after the flowers died, was cut off in a fan shape or bent over and tied with raffia. Then came the dawn of gardening magazines with technical information being shared by university horticultural experts, plant specialists and plant developers. In no time at all, we started to become smart gardeners. Given reasons why we should or shouldn’t continue with old procedures, we learned to change our ways. Now we have an even faster method of exchanging information on the Internet. We just need to be sure that it is reliable. See Combinations / F5

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • RICHEY’S MARKET SATURDAY SPECIAL: PLANKS, F2 • ACORN SQUASH AND CIDER SOUP, F2 • ROASTED EGGPLANT SOUP WITH GOAT CHEESE, F3 • MARINATED EGGPLANT WITH OREGANO, F3 • PERFECT ROB ROY, F3 • CHICKEN STROGANOFF, F6 • CLASSIC SCONES, F6

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Smaller, specialized stores can be culinary treasures By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

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fter 29 years of marriage, we’re down to our last three original dinner plates. Beginning with 12 in 1981, by the turn of the century the count was four. Then a few years ago, one more slipped from my grasp. I observed at the time that it was just the everyday stuff, not the company china. So much less of a tragedy, one would think. But as I stood there holding the crisply broken pieces back in place one last time before placing them in the trash, I realized what a lifetime of family experiences had been layered over the surface of this common pottery. For me, the memories were etched into the fragments as palpably as the delicate crackling in the glaze of my mother’s favorite teapot that gives it such character. Richey’s Market in Corvallis has been this town’s “everyday dishes.” Nothing fancy, but famed for its great produce, meat and service. All presented with the biggest collective smile a business can muster. In those unpretentious surroundings, friendships have been formed, recipes shared and philosophies aired. All while pushing grocery carts up and down the aisles. Last month, after half a century of doing business, Richey’s Market closed. The shopping center where it was located is being remodeled in an extravagantly upscale concept. Opting out of that larger, costlier format, and unable to find a suitable location elsewhere, the Richey family has made the difficult decision to cease operations. If you lived a blessed childhood, there’s a strong chance that you had a similar market in your town. A family-friendly business that you now reflect upon with fondness and appreciation. A culinary touchstone that helps you understand the importance of supporting such treasures in our communities since they’re the most reliable route our regional growers use to get their produce from their farm to your fork. See Markets / F2


F2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Next week: Garlic Not just a vampire repellent.

COVER STORY

Markets Continued from F1 If you continue to be lucky, you still have access to such a specialty, independent market. Jack and Vera Richey opened their first store in downtown Corvallis in 1961. Brothers Leroy and Shi joined the business, allowing for expansion to six stores in two cities by 1971. But by 1981, they had scaled back to one store on Circle Boulevard. Over the years, plenty of second- and third-generation Richeys have earned their retail chops working there. And through it all, Jack continued to be a visible force, even into his 80s, doing plenty behind the scenes, but also roaming the aisles, straightening cans and bottles, and interacting with customers. I’m sure he kept a dust rag hidden in his back pocket. My relationship with Richey’s Market goes back 32 years. In the autumn of 1978, my dad and his pal Frank drove me up here from the San Francisco area to start grad school at Oregon State University. I lucked out by finding an apartment way out on the north edge of town, on Circle Boulevard right across from a modest little strip mall, anchored by an independent supermarket. On that first day in my new digs, I trotted across the street to stock up on groceries. Because my California hurry-up attitude had hitched a ride with me, I have a vivid memory of waiting behind folks at the checkout line who seemed to have all day to chat up cashiers who seemed to have equally abundant time to provide each and every customer with better conversation than you’d find at your average cocktail party. I did a lot of toe-tapping and glaring in those days. But once my outlook mellowed, I discovered what a great resource this market had become for me. I could gauge the prog-

ACORN SQUASH AND CIDER SOUP In honor of Richey’s Market’s philosophy of supporting local farmers, I thought it would be appropriate to provide a recipe from chef Cory Schreiber’s cookbook “Wildwood — Cooking from the Source in the Pacific Northwest.” This recipe breaks with traditional soup-making techniques by calling for the squash to be roasted in the oven before it is added to the soup base. The flesh of the roasted squash is then pureed into the base, infusing it with a robust, smoky squash flavor. I use one of my favorite squashes, the acorn (also known as the Danish squash), and combine it with apple cider to create an autumn soup with slightly sweet overtones and a velvety texture.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A variety of bulk grains, including three types of quinoa and at least nine varieties of rice, at Nature’s General Store in Bend. ress of the seasons by its produce aisle, from the earliest rhubarb and peas that came straight from the Richeys’ own fields, to regional apples and winter squash. One time I asked when to expect pickling cucumbers, and Terry Richey — the son of one of the founding Richeys — was able to tell me the exact day of delivery, plus the entire back story on why the grower was a little slow to deliver (“She’s had a rough summer, Jan. Not her fault, just a little illness in the family to contend with. But boy are those going to be great cukes!”). When I became a food writer, I

Because my California hurry-up attitude had hitched a ride with me, I have a vivid memory of waiting behind folks at the checkout line who seemed to have all day to chat up cashiers who seemed to have equally abundant time to provide each and every customer with better conversation than you’d find at your average cocktail party. found myself calling Richey’s for produce tips so often that I finally put the number in my Rolodex. Terry’s dad, Leroy, made the bulk of the produce runs up through the 1990s, driving hours

on end to produce-rich regions of the Pacific Northwest such as the Yakima Valley, Hood River and Walla Walla. On the lucky occasions when I’d encounter him, with his sparkling eyes and dry wit, we’d stand over whichever load of fruit or vegetable he’d just hauled into the store and share its heritage. He could tell me which apricot varieties would be coming into season and when, where the region’s cherries were the sweetest and most flavorful, and where the store’s melons would be coming from. Richey’s made-to-order deli sandwiches have come along on our sunset hikes up Marys Peak, and their popular “planks” — hot, gooey layerings of cheese, ham and turkey on French bread — were a delightful lunch or dinner treat on the occasional Saturday, which is the only day they’re made. I still use the remaining three plates from my first set of china. They’re a reminder that it’s the

everyday experiences, conducted around those everyday dishes, that build up to make a life. The kind of below-the-radar accumulation that doesn’t even seem precious until you’re looking back, and you realize that it underpins all the “significant” outcomes you thought were taking place around the good china. Sort of like shopping at Richey’s Market, something we’ve all just taken for granted until being forced to reflect on our future without it. That Richey’s is going to be so intensely missed by so many people is one of the reasons I love Corvallis, a community that took a little getting used to for this California girl — until she could appreciate the value of grocery clerks “with so much time on their hands.” That’s when I really arrived. If you have a special, independent market in your town, build a relationship with its proprietors and staff. Learn what they know about regional produce. Ask where they get their apples. It is by cultivating these relationships, after all, that we learn to appreciate what these special markets have to offer. Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@ proaxis.com.

RICHEY’S MARKET SATURDAY SPECIAL: PLANKS This is Richey’s Market’s Saturday deli special. I’m very pleased that the family was willing to share the steps to making it before closing. No arms were twisted for this scoop. Deli staff person Jessica Damewood reviewed its creation for me, all the way down to a play-by-play of how to assemble your very own steaming-hot, ooey-gooey planks. 1 loaf of day-old supermarket French bread (the soft stuff that’s baked fresh every day in most supermarkets) Mayonnaise

4 lbs acorn squash (4 or 5 squash), halved and seeded 3 tsp salt, divided 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper 2 TBS unsalted butter 6 cloves garlic, chopped 4 carrots, peeled and chopped 3 leeks (white part only), washed and chopped 2 yellow onions, chopped 1 bulb fennel, trimmed and chopped into ½-inch pieces 4 C chicken stock or vegetable stock 4 C apple cider ¼ C undiluted orange juice concentrate 2 tsp fennel seeds ¼ tsp ground cloves 1 TBS sherry vinegar (or white wine vinegar) 1 TBS fresh lemon juice ½ tsp cayenne pepper 1 unpeeled red apple, cored and chopped into ¼-inch pieces for garnish Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Season the squash with 1 teaspoon of the salt and the black pepper. Lightly oil a jellyroll pan and place the squash, cutside down, on the pan. Bake for about 45 minutes, or until tender. Let cool completely, scrape out the squash flesh and set aside. In a heavy 3-quart pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the garlic, carrots, leeks, onions, chopped fennel and 1 teaspoon of the salt. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft. Mix in the cooked squash, stock, cider, orange juice concentrate, fennel seeds and cloves. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Add the vinegar, lemon juice, cayenne and remaining 1 teaspoon salt. Let cool completely. In a food processor or blender, puree the soup, in batches if necessary, until smooth. Press through a fine-meshed sieve. Heat the soup, and add more stock if the soup is too thick. To serve, ladle into soup bowls and garnish with the chopped apple. Makes 8 servings. — From “Wildwood — Cooking from the Source in the Pacific Northwest” by Cory Schreiber

Deli-sliced Cheddar cheese Deli-sliced turkey Deli-sliced Black Forest ham Deli-sliced Provolone

To assemble, cut the French bread in half lengthwise. Spread both surfaces with mayonnaise, then layer on each half of bread (in the following order) Cheddar cheese, turkey, another layer of Cheddar cheese, ham and provolone. Bake at 350 degrees until the cheese melts a little bit, then broil it until the top is golden brown. Cut into servings, and serve while hot.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Kraft gets on Greek yogurt bandwagon By Emily Bryson York Chicago Tribune

Greek yogurt has arrived. Heralded in recent years by foodies for its creamy taste and by nutritionists for its high protein content and utility in cutting fat content in mayonnaise-heavy recipes, Greek yogurt has become an “it” ingredient and popular snack. Now, food giant Kraft is getting into it. Marshall Hyzdu, brand manager for Kraft’s Athenos line, cited the doubling of Greek yogurt sales every year for the last five — to more than 100 million

pounds per year. The market’s biggest players in the U.S. include Fage and Chobani. There are also a variety of Greek-style yogurts that imitate the taste and texture but are made differently, Hyzdu said. To stand out, Athenos is making only fat-free Greek yogurt, in tubs of plain and divided, singleserving containers with yogurt on one side, and strawberry, peach, blueberry or honey on the other. The Kraft products also are about half the price of the more established competition. The snack-size containers will retail for $1.50, while the pounds

of plain yogurt are $3.99. A popular but relatively small brand in Kraft’s portfolio, Athenos makes Mediterranean-style foods, including feta cheese, hummus and pita chips. Hyzdu said the brand has been working on Greek yogurt for some time, because it took awhile to get it right. Athenos will begin distribution throughout California this month, in what Hyzdu calls “sort of a reverse manifest destiny.” The yogurt also will be available at Walmart stores, select Jewel grocery stores and Kroger stores in the Midwest. Wider release comes early next year.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 F3

F An everyman’s guide to whiskey By Jason Wilson

PERFECT ROB ROY

Special to The Washington Post

Photos by Deb Lindsey / For The Washington Post

The friendly purple exterior of the eggplant can hide a host of hazards for cooks not experienced with its spongy, neutral flesh.

Beyond Parmesan, eggplant has its issues By Bonnie S. Benwick

MARINATED EGGPLANT WITH OREGANO

The Washington Post

Once you get past the parmigianas, ratatouilles and moussakas of this world, cooking with eggplant becomes an uncertain enterprise. A rich, deeply purple specimen that is lustrous and firm can cause a yawn or a struggle, depending on your particular taste buds. One long, thin Asian variety can have twice the seeds of another that is the same size and weight. Some grill masters always salt the flesh. Some never do. Inconsistent results stump the non-committed eggplant consumer. The flesh itself tastes neutral at best. A sponge. When eggplant lovers defend them, they’ll say, “I just do X and Y and Z,” at length, with a follow-up about olive oil. But why work so hard? American cooks have dealt with the large, elongated globe varieties from the start. They are lovely to behold. They hold up well at the market and can hang around in a fridge for a week or two without signs of decay such as wrinkling and softening. Problem is, the big ones have the highest hit-or-miss tally in the galley. The eggplant nation is just getting acquainted with the charms of Japanese, Chinese, Thai and Indian varieties: slim or small profile, mild flavor, thin skin, easier prep. It has taken us a decade or so, according to Robert Schueller, spokesman for Melissa’s World Variety Produce in Los Angeles. “Think of the globe eggplant as an orange carrot,” he says. “There are all these other varieties, of many colors and sizes. People just don’t see them much or know they’re out there.” The fruit’s seeds are thought to be the epicenter of bitterness, the main drawback for those who are not fans. The seeds are vessels, to some degree. One source of bitterness is certain: phenolic compounds, specifically from chloragenic, or caffeic, acid. Coffee drinkers are accustomed to that level of astringency because the same acid is in coffee beans. As it happens, phenolic compounds are good antioxidants, a magic designation in nutrition circles. Eggplant = Super food! Scientists have found the antioxidants in eggplant fruit and seeds. They also found that there were great differences among varieties and that the eggplants with the most antioxidant values were also the ones with the highest concentrations of bitter compounds. “Our survey was based on the potential health benefits,” says Bruce Whitaker, a horticulturist with the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service Produce Quality and Safety Laboratory in Beltsville, Md., referring to an eggplant study he and John Stommel ran from 1998 to 2003. Whitaker says he doesn’t think removing the seeds from an eggplant would eliminate much of the bitterness, because he found offending-yet-healthful compounds throughout the fruit and especially in the alkaloid skin of dark-purple globes. Nor is salting, a technique firmly rooted in cooking lore to draw moisture out of eggplant’s cell walls, the answer. “Frankly, I don’t see that it’s going to get a substantial amount of the bitterness out,” he says. What does work? “Roasting

Makes 6 servings as hors d’oeuvres.

The sauteed vegetables in this roasted eggplant soup bring out the sweetness of the eggplant.

ROASTED EGGPLANT SOUP WITH GOAT CHEESE Makes about 81⁄2 cups (10 servings). FOR THE SOUP: 6 sm to med eggplants, roasted and peeled (about 5 1⁄2 lbs; see note) 1 ⁄4 C olive oil 3 med carrots, chopped (21⁄2 C) 2 med onions, chopped (2 to 21⁄3 C) 1 med leek, white part only, cleaned and chopped 3 med cloves garlic, minced

2 bay leaves 1 ⁄2 C dry white wine Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 C regular or low-fat milk 2 C heavy whipping cream or half-and-half 2 or 3 sprigs thyme FOR SERVING: 4 ounces soft goat cheese 2 or 3 sprigs thyme

Coarsely chop the eggplants. Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the carrots, onions, leek, garlic and bay leaves; stir to coat evenly. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Add the wine; season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about 6 minutes, until almost all of the wine has evaporated. Reduce the heat to medium. Add the chopped eggplant, milk, cream or half-and-half and the sprigs of thyme. Cover and cook for 1 hour, stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat as needed to make sure the mixture remains below a boil. Adjust the seasoning to taste. Discard the bay leaves and thyme sprigs. Remove from the heat. Use an immersion (stick) blender to puree until smooth. Alternatively, puree the soup in a blender or food processor, making sure to remove the center knob of the blender lid and cover the opening with a clean dish towel so steam can escape. If desired, strain through a fine-mesh strainer. If serving right away, divide among individual soup bowls and garnish with pinches or crumbles of the goat cheese and the thyme, if desired; serve hot. Or cool completely, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Note: Prick the eggplants a few times, then either roast over the direct heat of a 450-degree grill for 20 to 30 minutes or place on a foil-lined baking sheet and roast in a 450-degree oven for 30 to 40 minutes. The skin should be slightly charred, and the interior of the eggplants should be completely soft. Cool slightly before discarding the skins. degrades the compounds, definitely,” he says, confirming the mellowing effect that eggplant cooks know well. Whitaker says the maturity of the eggplant is important; the younger the fruit, the lower its level of bitterness-producing compounds. Salting — and subsequent prolonged pressing — does help extract water from the cell walls, however, creating compact flesh that will not absorb as much oil when you choose to marinate, grill or roast eggplant slices. Those are steps Scott Drewno follows when he cooks eggplant at home. When his executive-chef toque is on at the Source in D.C., he uses Japanese and Chinese varietals that stand up to stir-frying and braising. And those eggplants are not quite as bitter. “I love it,” he says.” The bitter edge is nice. It’s like radicchio to me. When you’re eating a salad, you don’t want all the flavors to be neutral.”

FOR THE EGGPLANT: 3 sm eggplants (about 11⁄2 lbs) Olive oil, for brushing Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper FOR THE MARINADE: 1 sm hot red pepper, stemmed, seeded and minced Leaves from 3 stems cilantro, chopped (2 TBS) Leaves from 2 or 3 stems oregano, chopped (2 TBS), plus a few leaves for garnish 1 med clove garlic, crushed Freshly squeezed juice from 1⁄2 to 1 lemon (3 TBS) 1 ⁄4 C olive oil 2 tsp kosher salt 1 ⁄4 tsp freshly ground black pepper Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil, then spray the foil with nonstick cooking oil spray. Cut the stems from the eggplants, then cut each eggplant in half crosswise. Cut each of those halves in half lengthwise, making 12 pieces; then cut each of those pieces crosswise into 3 equalsize slices, for a total of 36 slices. Arrange the slices in a single layer on the baking sheet. Brush lightly with olive oil, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Roast for 18 to 20 minutes, until the eggplant pieces are lightly browned and the flesh has softened. While the eggplants are roasting, prepare the marinade: Whisk together the minced red pepper, cilantro, chopped oregano, garlic, lemon juice, oil, salt and black pepper in a small bowl. As soon as the eggplant slices are out of the oven, carefully transfer them to a serving platter. Spoon the marinade evenly over them and leave at room temperature for up to 2 hours before serving. To serve, sprinkle the eggplant with oregano leaves.

Think back, all the way back ... to 1998. What were you drinking? Perhaps a Cosmo, because you saw Carrie Bradshaw sip one during the first season of “Sex and the City?” Or maybe you were feeling pretty cool because you told the bartender to make yours a Grey Goose in your vodka “martini”? Or maybe you were loving some other fluorescent concoction with the suffix “-tini”: appletini, chocolatini, cheesecaketini. That particular year doesn’t seem all that long ago, at least to some of us. But it might as well have been the Dark Ages when it comes to spirits. Kids, it may seem strange to you now — with dozens upon dozens of bartender manques mixing and blogging — but there was a day when no one had ever heard of a cocktail blog, or even imagined such a thing. Before faux speak-easies and legal absinthe, we had only a few places to go online for good, reliable information about booze. One of those was Alcohol Reviews.com, still written today by Washington resident Kevin Kosar, along with his fictional reviewing persona F. Sot Fitzgerald. “In 1998, there simply wasn’t a popular conversation about spirits,” Kosar says. What a difference a dozen years makes. Although he covers the entire bar at AlcoholReviews, when it comes to spirits, whiskey is where Kosar’s heart is. “Whiskey is so interesting because there is so much diversity,” he says. “There’s no way a vodka can be as interesting as whiskey. It offers such a great experience. It’s the spirit that’s most similar to wine. You could never hope to taste all the whiskeys out there.” So it’s no surprise that Kosar’s new book is called “Whiskey: A Global History,” part of Reaktion Books’ popular Edible series, and the first drinks title to take its place next to other culinary histories such as “Pizza,” “Pie” and “Cake.” “Whiskey,” at 144 pages, is the perfect primer for the person who wants to quickly learn the basics. “This is not for whiskey snobs who want to sit and read 1,000 pages on the spirit,” Kosar told me in a phone interview. “They know everything anyway.” Instead, his book is for more typical folks, many of whom have difficulty sorting out their single-malt Scotches from their bourbons from their Irish whiskeys. One specific type of confusion I see is between singlemalt Scotch (distilled at a

The Perfect Rob Roy combines both sweet and dry vermouth. Instead of the usual Angostura bitters, this recipe uses the more herbal, spicier Peychaud’s bitters. And although the maraschino cherry garnish is classic, try a twist of lemon. Ice 2 oz blended Scotch 1 ⁄2 oz sweet vermouth 1 ⁄2 oz dry vermouth 2 dashes Peychaud’s bitters Twist of lemon peel, for garnish Fill a mixing glass halfway with ice. Add the Scotch, vermouths and bitters. Stir vigorously, then strain into a chilled cocktail (martini) glass. Garnish with the twist of lemon (or a maraschino cherry, if you must). single distillery in a pot still) and the more popular blended Scotch (a blend of one or more single-malts). In fact, Kosar says, blended Scotch is often a good starting place for newbies entering the world of whiskey, and it’s a lot more affordable than, say, a single malt. A perfectly good blended Scotch such as White Horse (at around $17) or the Famous Grouse (at around $22) looks like a steal next to the $40 to $50 you’d pay for a good-quality single malt. Plus, a fine blended Scotch, such as Dewar’s or Chivas Regal or the less expensive Johnnie Walkers, is perfect for mixing a Rob Roy, which is essentially a Scotch Manhattan.

FLU SHOTS Bend Erickson’s Thriftway 725 NE Greenwood

Sat. October 23 Sat. October 30 Fri. November 5 Sat. November 13 12pm-6pm Flu Shots $30 Medicare part-B, Clear One Medicare, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon accepted

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The Women’s Expo will bring together a wonderful and dynamic community of women to explore, share, educate and enhance the Central Oregon lifestyle.

October 22-23, 2010 Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center Hours: Friday, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Bachelor Auction: Friday, 7 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Attending the Expo is FREE! Tickets to the Bachelor Auction are $25. Proceeds from the auction will benefit Grandma’s House. Brought to you by: U Magazine

For more information: www.centraloregonwomensexpo.com info@specialized-events.com or 541-385-7988.


F4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Next week: Got heat? Tune up your home heat source for winter.

COVER STORY

Beaches Continued from F1 “Alfred Peet had a trained eye; he could visually inspect coffee (beans) and know if they were roasted correctly,” recalls Beach, a native of Bend who graduated from Mountain View High School. “A lot of people don’t know that Alfred Peet actually consulted for Starbucks when they were first starting out, too.” Beach didn’t accomplish his dream coffeehouse alone. His wife and business partner, Majell Beach, 27, has been an integral part of making the business work. Majell, also an MVHS graduate, has lived all over the world and holds a dual citizenship in the U.S. and Brazil, due to her father’s nationality. Majell brings a bright smile to her customers at Backporch, where she shows up for work at 6:15 a.m. after picking up the morning pastries. Dave arrives 15 minutes earlier and fires up the espresso machines. “Knowing the people of Bend, who are so awesome, is great. We have such a varied clientele, so many different types of people,” says an enthusiastic Majell. “This small business definitely has a community feel, and it’s a very special thing. And can I just shout out we have the best employees, too?”

Majell Beach’s favorite painting is a print that her husband, Dave, gave her as a surprise.

This old sign is Dave Beach’s favorite piece of artwork in their home.

Photos by Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Dave and Majell Beach chat in their living room about life and starting their 4-year-old west-side coffee shop. (Backporch), I was 23 years old, and we had two employees. Now we have nine employees, and I think I’ve learned to be a better manager.” The type of business the couple likes to run is exemplified by Majell’s employee-encouragement white board at the shop, where, she explains, “Anyone can write anything good about someone else. At first, I thought everyone would think it’s dorky, but they’re always writing something on it, all the time.” Though the business takes a large part of their daily life, the

Growing business The Beaches still seem a little shocked that their little 4-yearold west-side coffeehouse has done so well, despite the lackluster economy. It has not only survived, it is thriving, and the Beaches expect to be opening another Backporch Coffee on Century Drive later this month. “We’re still growing, and we were just running out of space,” Dave explains. “We’ll be roasting at the new location — there’s a lot more space. When I first started

Beaches say they enjoy working with each other, and they’ve been true to their marriage by carving out time just for themselves. “We do date night every single Wednesday,” says Majell with a smile. “We’ve only had one Wednesday when we weren’t able to do that. It’s great growing a business, but if it’s any way an impediment to our marriage, it’s not worth it.” The final thing you may not know about this business couple is that Dave literally wears his passion on his arm. A tattoo on his upper left arm depicts a color-

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ful coffee bush with coffee cherries on its branches, but the bush is missing several fruits. Those missing tattooed cherries can be found behind Majell’s ears. Majell smiles and shows off her full arm tattoo of flowers and wood doves, which she explains reminds her of her Christian faith, something they both take seriously. Majell was once enrolled in seminary and considered becoming a missionary overseas, something that her grandparents and some aunts, uncles and cousins have done. But after working in soup kitchens in Los Angeles, she realized she could be an example of Christianity no matter where she was located. “I do have ‘oakish’ roots, and I wanted to have a home and a business,” says Majell, who spent much of her life traveling from country to country.

Life at home We caught up with the Beaches recently to learn about how they spend time when they’re not roasting or brewing coffee. Their cozy, small house is within biking distance of their coffee shop, but far enough away to give them some chill time, they say (before they bought their home, they had rented a home near Backporch, where they could look out their window and see the shop). They share their home with a rescue dog, Silas, and their lucky black cat, Tuesday, who adopted the Beaches at their shop on a Tuesday. Dave finds his relaxation at home by puttering around his backyard garden, where he built a small greenhouse for his tomatoes. How long have you lived in Central Oregon? Majell: Dave is a born-and-raised “Bendite,” whereas I have lived here for an accumulative 10 years. What I love about my home is … How cozy it is. My favorite room is … Majell: The “futon room.” It is where I begin and end my days by sitting on the futon with my “son/dog” Silas and read. My favorite possession is … If it counts as a possession, it would be our fur-baby, Silas. He is literally like our son. If I had a Monday off to do anything I wanted to do at home, alone, I’d … Majell: Catch up on all the domestic chores, then cuddle with Silas on the futon and read with some homemade hot chocolate. Preferably it would be cold and broody outside so I felt justified in my indoor endeavors. Otherwise, I would want to be on a bike ride. Dave: Make some coffee, watch a movie, head out on a hike with Silas, and if I’m lucky, locals night at Deschutes (Brewery). Three things you’ll always find in our refrigerator are … Yogurt, raw milk, tons of

veggies and beer. Are you handy around the house? Majell: That would be Dave’s department, and he is quite intuitive when it comes to figuring out how to fix things. Have you had a favorite homeimprovement project or do-ityourself adventure? Dave: I went to Portland to visit a buddy who had started a farm and upon my return immediately made my own personal little greenhouse. It has done swimmingly. Majell: On two different occasions when Dave was out of town, I surprised him by painting an accent wall and an entire room. One time I was so close to the wire that he came home and the paint was still wet. My favorite piece of artwork in the house is … Majell: This beautiful print that I had wanted before we got married but never received, and then Dave surprised me with years later. Dave: An old rustic sign from some lodge that I found one day while doing coffee deliveries. Do you like to cook? Majell: Love it, especially if I’m not too exhausted. Dave: I like to cook, but to be honest the prep and cleanup keep me away from cooking. If so, what do you like to make? Majell: Lots of stir-fry and African-style yams — YUM! Dave: Fish tacos! Do you eat out often? Moderately. We love Zydeco, Pizza

Mondo and Deschutes Brewery for dinner. Super Burrito, Kebaba and Spork for lunch. What’s your idea of the perfect get-together at home? Majell: Small group of close friends over with wine, good cheese, chocolate and quality conversation. Dave: Ditto, but insert beer, too. What do you usually have for breakfast? Majell: Yogurt with whey protein, fruit and steel-cut oats. Dave: Toast and a banana. If you could have a second home anywhere in the world, where would it be? Dave: Central Valley, Costa Rica. I want to have a coffee farm there. Majell: I don’t like the idea of a second home, but if I had to choose it would probably be in Vermont, where I was born. Just a little cottage in the country to relax and enjoy the beauty in. What do you do when you have time to relax and recreate in Central Oregon? Hike the trails, go up to the lakes, ride bikes. Favorite three books/novels you have read? Majell: “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens, “Jane Eyre” by Charlotte Brontë and “What’s So Amazing About Grace?” by Philip Yancey. “David Copperfield” (is) probably the most well-developed novel I’ve ever read. I have never cried and laughed more in any other work of literature. “Jane Eyre” (is) a story of the most resilient, long-suffering and strong woman ever. So admirable and beautifully written. “What’s So Amazing About Grace?” — I try and read this at least every other year, as it never ceases to humble and stretch me. Dave: If I could pay attention long enough, I’d read. Until then, I will continue searching online forums for coffee-related writeups or coffee gadgets. Penny Nakamura can be reached at halpen1@aol.com.

Majell Beach sits in her favorite room in their west-Bend home.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 F5

G

Next week: The boneyard Bend home uses bones in unique garden display.

PEST PROBLEMS

COVER STORY

Combinations Continued from F1 Sally Ferguson, director of the Netherlands Flower Bulb Information Center/North America, e-mailed me a seasonal portfolio of information that included the results of a Cornell University research project. Cornell professor William Miller, director of the university’s Flower Bulb Research Program, worked with a team researching successful bulb and perennial combinations. The project was tested over four seasons and took place at the university’s Ithaca, N.Y., trial gardens, which are in USDA Zone 5. The combination trials were designed to meet four goals: 1. Look at how early bulbs help extend the bloom season in the garden. 2. Explore how perennials might best be used to mask the dying foliage of post-bloom bulbs. 3. Consider leaf texture as a design element. 4. Examine the various roles color plays in creating successful combinations. The experiment list includes 44 pairings. I chose to include here the bulbs and the perennials we would be most familiar with, but may not have considered combining. Research results that worked well included: • Anemone blanda (“White Splendor”) with Rheum palmatum (rhubarb “Atrosanguineum”). Rhubarb would be a good companion to many bulbs because of the large leaves, plus the texture and the stalk color of the emerging plant. • Chionodoxa (“Glory-of-theSnow”) with Siberian bugloss. • Penstemon (“Husker Red”) was recommended as a pleasing combo with hyacinths. The dark purple leaves of the penstemon emerge as the hyacinth is blooming and are slow enough to allow the hyacinths to finish their cycle before they take over to conceal the dying foliage. • Hyacinths were also combined with Lychnis chaledonica (“Maltese Cross”). • Scilla with geranium sanguineum. The geranium would be the perennial variety, not the coastal or Martha Washington types that appear in garden centers in late March. • Narcissus (“Bellsong”) with hosta (“Sum and Substance”). • Narcissus (“February Gold”) with potentilla (“Miss Wilmot”). • Narcissus (“Fortissimo”) with Papaver orientalis (red poppy “Turkenlouis”). The contrast of the leaf texture between the daffodil and the poppy makes for an interesting mix. • Narcissus (“Gigantic Star”) with Achillea millifolium (yarrow “Summer Pastels”). • Narcissus (“Ice Follies”) with Pulsatillia valgaris (pasque flower “Papageno”). This combination shows contrasting foliage texture, and in our climate, we hope, it would bloom simultaneously for the full benefit of the combination. The fuzzy and airy seed heads of the pasque flower will camouflage the dying daffodil flowers. • Narcissus (“Mt. Hood”)

Better together A team at Cornell University has been researching combinations of bulbs and perennials. The project aimed to discover pairings that allowed for early-blooming bulbs and later-blooming perennials to provide cover for one another, as well as combinations with colors and texture that worked well together. Below are three pairings that worked well.

When bugs invade with your houseplants By Nancy O’Donnell Albany Times Union

Photos provided by William Miller, Cornell University

Narcissus (“Salome”) with Phlox paniculata (summer phlox “Bill Baker”).

When I decided to start bringing my houseplants inside the other day, I saw little, fuzzy, white mealybugs staring back at me. So, if you have houseplants ready to make the trip back indoors, beware! Heat and high humidity are favorites of mealybugs, and the weather of August and early September is perfect in their book. Mealies are scalelike insects roughly 1⁄8-inch to 1⁄4-inch in length. They prefer shelter from the elements, so look for them on the undersides of leaves, along the stems and in the nooks where the leaf attaches to the stem. Their bodies are actually a tannish-brown, but what we see is the white, “mealy” wax covering that gives them the look of small blotches of cotton stuck to the plant. The wax protects their tiny bodies from harsh conditions, such as drought or direct sun.

Narcissus (“Gigantic Star”) with Achillea millifolium (yarrow “Summer Pastels”).

Plague of mealies

Anemone blanda (“White Splendor”) with Rheum palmatum (rhubarb “Atrosanguineum”).

with nepeta (catmint “Six Hills Giant”). • Narcissus (“Salome”) with Phlox paniculata (summer phlox “Bill Baker”). This combination would work with many daffodils and probably with tulips. For those able to grow tulips from bulb to bloom without the deer snipping them, the research team offers some interesting combos. Since there is a broader color selection available with tulip varieties than daffodils, more care should be given to the paring of the colors. The goal would be to either choose a bulb and a perennial that would echo each other’s color, or go for a really dramatic effect. Perennial geraniums would be useful if you planned to echo colors, as many varieties have interesting leaf and bloom veining color. A dramatic combo of leaf color and texture would be a purple late-blooming tulip with Stachys byzantinal (“Lamb’s Ear”). If you are interested in viewing the entire research collection, visit www.hort.cornell.edu/ combos.

Paperwhites While perusing the Cornell horticultural site, another re-

search project caught my eye: “Pickled Paperwhites.” Paperwhites are the popular bulb to force for the holiday season. Paperwhites are usually grown in water and pebbles, and are notorious for growing tall and leggy, flopping over just when they are at their peak of bloom. Through an inquiry from a journalist — does alcohol stunt the growth of paperwhites? — a new research project was born. Miller (the bulb researcher) conducted a study and concluded that growing paperwhites in a 4 to 5 percent solution of alcohol is an excellent growth regulation technique. When grown in 5 percent alcohol, plants are about half the height of plants grown in straight water. Given that most liquors are 40 percent alcohol, this is equal to one part booze to seven parts of water. Gin, vodka, whiskey, rum, tequila and schnapps are all equally effective as long as they are given at the same alcohol concentration (realizing that liquors can come in different strengths). Beer and wine are not recommended as they kill the bulbs. I couldn’t help but wonder if this question was the result of a cocktail party and some-

one dumping their drink in the vase of growing paperwhites. However it came to light doesn’t matter; we all benefit from the information. While you are bulb shopping, think about potting some for indoor bloom. Use a potting mix or a bulb planting mix rather than the native soil. Paperwhites are the most popular bulbs to force at the holidays, and they are often forced in water as opposed to soil. There are three narcissus suggested for successful forcing: “Abba,” “Bridal Crown” and “Earlicheer.” Spacing can be closer than in the ground; bulbs can almost touch. Set the container on an outdoor porch or patio. Check regularly for dryness by sticking your finger into the soil up to the second knuckle. If it comes out dry, water. Bring inside after buds form. Starting in October should give you blooms by the holiday season — at least that is what it says in the fine print. This is on my list to try. One advantage over the paperwhites is that the narcissus bulbs can eventually, when the weather allows, be planted to the garden. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Although their description sounds all soft and fuzzy, their behavior is anything but. A mealybug is a sucking insect, like the infamous spider mite and aphid we’ve chatted about before. It inserts its piercing mouthpart called a stylet into the vascular system of the plant like a needle, removing the sugary food produced during photosynthesis. The result is twofold: The infested stem or leaf is weakened, turning yellow and distorted from lack of nutrients, eventually dying if the infestation isn’t controlled. But like any living organism, what goes in must eventually come out. For the mealybug, that means an excretion of a sticky, sweetish substance dubbed “honeydew,” which becomes the perfect home for a black mold called sooty mold. Sadly, once you find one mealy, chances are there will be more. Eggs are laid in clusters either protected in a cocoon or attached to mom in a protective sac stuck to her underside. Hatching occurs one to two weeks after they’re laid. The warmer and more humid the air, the shorter the gestation period and the greater the overall infestation, such as

these past few months. Once hatched, these “crawlers,” as they are referred to, crawl their way to a tasty spot and begin to feed. The mealybug, both male and female, will venture through five molts, maturing more each time; the final molt for the male results in a gnatlike flying insect whose sole purpose now is to mate. The mealybug will attack crop plants, houseplants and ornamentals. Its range is wide. The best defense includes — for new plant purchases — just keeping them isolated for a couple weeks to limit exposure if they are carrying a pest.

Anti-bug tactics If your plant appears to have just a few, dip a Q-tip in alcohol and dab it on each mealy you see. The white covering will be destroyed, and the alcohol will dissolve the body underneath. Check every other day for more, and dab them as you see them. Heavy infestations will require a more drastic approach. An overly infested plant should just be discarded and neighboring plants kept under a watchful eye. Pesticide-wise, the systemic Orthene is highly effective. Once sprayed on the plant, it is taken internally and translocated. When the mealybug feeds wherever it’s located on the plant, it ingests the pesticide and dies. The major benefit to a systemic pesticide over a contact pesticide is when the mealybug feeds, wherever it’s hiding on the plant, it ingests the pesticide and dies; no direct contact is required. Secondly, one application is sufficient nine times out of 10. If you prefer a “greener” solution, insecticidal soap and horticultural oils can be used, but multiple applications will be required, as these are contact controls. Another option is placing your plants in the garage and setting off an insecticidal fogger. Many have pyrethrums as the active ingredient. The fog is able to reach the nooks and suffocate the mealy. Change the soil completely, and thoroughly wash the container, saucer and up under the rim using one part bleach to nine parts water to destroy any eggs.

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Think (and plant) outside the mailbox By Kathy Van Mullekom Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

When you want to improve your home’s curb appeal, think outside the mailbox. There’s nothing attractive about a rusted, paint-peeling mailbox. There is something attractive, however, about a mailbox that’s been decorated for the different seasons. Creative Mailbox Planters made in Missouri help you create mailbox vignettes that will entertain trick-or-treaters and celebrate other special occasions. The planter simply slips over a standard black galvanized steel rural mailbox, which costs about $15 at stores such as Lowe’s, Home Depot, Ace and True Value hardware, and Walmart. The planters are crafted in a high-density polyethylene with

fade-resistant protection and drainage holes for plants. Faux and dried plant material can also be used in the planter; fill the planter with weatherproof plastic foam and insert the stems. Each planter includes a helpful sheet of tips on how to plant and maintain your planter. Suggestions for flowering combinations are also provided. “We do recommend the homeowner give their planter a final finish with a paint of their choosing for each cleaning at the end of the season,” says Teresa Monares, a company spokesperson. “A simple cleaning with a warm solution of mild soap will do the job.” The planters, priced at $79.95 with free shipping, are available at www.creativemailboxplanters .com.

Complete event information & directions to ALL activities and attractions can be found at www.hoodriverfruitloop.com. OTHER ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:

Draper Girls Country Farm Bring the family for a fun illed day of u-pick apples and pears, or visit our pumpkin covered straw maze. Join us for fresh-pressed non-pasteurized apple cider made here on our farm, the only licensed non-pasteurized cider mill on the Fruit Loop. Featuring a variety of ciders, donuts, and our cinnamon and sugar-dried apples. #15 on Map www.drapergirlscountryfarm.com 541-352-6625

Rasmussen Farms Many, many kinds heirloom and popular apple varieties. Pears, fall vegs.- lots of fall deco. 14 Acres u-pick pumpkins! Free admission: Pumpkin Funland, TALL Corn Maze, family activities.

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PACKER ORCHARDS & COOKIE STOP BAKERY The Bakery is overlowing with apple goodies! Cider! Pies! Cinnamon Rolls! Milkshakes & Sundaes! Many Varieties of Heirloom Apples and Pears are here. Come in and Enjoy the Views and Picnic Area! #14 on Map www.packerorchardsandbakery.com 541-354-1140

Apple Valley’s Heirloom Apple Butter Fest

Creative Mailbox Planters via (Newport News) Daily Press

Liven up a mailbox with 4-inch potted mums that you can later plant in your garden. Add some faux leaves, berries and gourds.

Come stir the pot! Apple butter made in huge copper kettles over a ire pit. Fried biscuits served with hot apple butter. Lots of pies, jams, syrups, and desserts. Cherry wood smoked BBQ ribs, pulled pork and chicken sandwiches served with cider baked beans and pear coleslaw. 541-386-1971 2363 Tucker Rd. Hood River, OR #23 on Map

www.AppleValleyStore.com


F6 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A classic stroganoff made with chicken that’s a hit with kids By Julie Rothman

RECIPE FINDER

The Baltimore Sun

Sharon Skarbek, of Bend, was looking for a recipe to make chicken stroganoff. She had misplaced a recipe she had for the dish, which came from a package of frozen chicken breasts from Trader Joe’s. She said she called the market chain but was informed that they no longer had the recipe. Since I did not receive any reader responses to her query, and because I know people are always interested in new and different ways to use chicken, I thought this one was worth investigating. An Internet search turned up a wealth of recipes for making chicken stroganoff. Some could even have been made in a crockpot. In the end, I decided to tweak and combine a couple of recipes I found on various sites. In little time, I came up with a dish that my family, kids included, found to be very pleasing and satisfying. It has all the components of a classic stroganoff minus the beef. It’s a true comfort dish that

I hope is close to what Skarbek had in mind. RECIPE REQUEST Larry Yunker, of St. Augustine, Fla., is looking for a recipe for a Grecian sandwich that he says was similar to a sub, only smaller. When he was in the Army in 1965 stationed at Fort Myer in Arlington, Va., the sandwich was served in the cafeteria at the Pentagon, where he worked at the time.

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Names and cities must accompany recipes for them to be published. Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

CHICKEN STROGANOFF

Joyce Dopkeen / New York Times News Service

For your next dinner party, consider placing a silencer, which is a layer of thick, soft fabric, underneath the tablecloth. It helps protect the tabletop from stains and hot serving dishes, and muffles the sound of clanking dishes and silverware.

Quiet time: Make your own holiday tabletop ‘silencer’

Makes 6 servings. 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts halves Salt and pepper 1 TBS vegetable oil 3 TBS butter 1 med onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced ½ lb fresh button mushrooms, sliced

2 TBS all-purpose flour 1 C low sodium chicken broth 1 ⁄3 C dry white wine 1 TBS Dijon mustard 1 C sour cream (OK to use reduced fat) 1 TBS minced fresh parsley, for garnish

Rinse chicken and pat dry. Trim any visible fat, and season with salt and pepper. Cut into 1-inch chunks. In a large skillet, heat the oil until hot; add the prepared chicken and cook until lightly browned, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Remove from skillet and set aside. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in same skillet; add onion, mushrooms and garlic, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened but not browned, about 6 to 8 minutes. Remove from skillet, and set aside with the reserved chicken. Melt remaining tablespoon of butter in the same skillet. Add flour and stir for 2 minutes. Whisk in broth and wine, and stir vigorously until sauce is thickened and smooth, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat, and stir in sour cream and mustard. Add reserved ingredients along with any accumulated juices to skillet. Heat until warmed through. Serve over cooked rice or noodles. Garnish with parsley.

Scones that speak the king’s English By Mark Bittman New York Times News Service

Most scones in this country are overly sweet and loaded up with some ridiculous combination of raisins, apples, cherries, chocolate chips, almonds, ginger and perhaps a few other ingredients. Traditional English scones are actually barely sweet, although they’re usually eaten with sweet jam and clotted cream, which is not easy to find here. In general, they’re lighter, flakier and tastier than what you buy. And they’re easy to make. They’re not dissimilar to buttermilk biscuits but generally richer, thanks to a not-insignificant amount of butter. I make mine in the food processor, processing the dough very little, so that they stay delicate. You can make these in a bowl if you’re willing to incorporate the butter by hand. I understand that people like doing this, but I’m simply too lazy. I suggest a range for the amount of cream to be used, and

Evan Sung / New York Times News Service

Serve your scones warm with the best jam you can lay your hands on, and a dollop of creme fraiche, mascarpone or, if you’re lucky, clotted cream.

Q:

When my mother used to set the table for holiday meals, she placed a “silence cloth” under the tablecloth. Where can I find one? Also referred to as a “silencer,” this is a thick, soft fabric that mutes the clanking of plates and cutlery, and shields the table’s surface from spills and heat. It’s typically made from double-faced cotton flannel or heavy felt. More broadly, the term applies to any type of padding used between the table and the tablecloth. The covering is usually in a neutral hue, such as white or cream, and often secured with ties to the table legs. Its even surface ensures that a tablecloth lies smoothly and attractively. While cotton flannel or heavy felt will guard against damage from warm plates, it won’t protect against hot serving dishes. For these, trivets are still a good idea. It’s easy to make your own table cover. Silence cloth or similar heavyweight felt can be purchased at specialty fabric stores, and felt won’t fray when you cut it, so there’s no need for hemming. Just measure the size of

A:

What’s that white haze on chocolate? By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

the lack of a specific measurement might make some less-experienced bakers nervous. But it shouldn’t. The ultimate amount depends on ambient temperature and humidity, as well as the kind of flour used and how it’s been stored. You’re looking for a slightly sticky but not messy dough; start with a half cup of cream and see how it goes.

CLASSIC SCONES Makes 8 to 10 scones. 2 C cake flour, more as needed 1 ⁄2 tsp salt 2 tsp baking powder 3 TBS sugar

MARTHA STEWART

5 TBS cold butter, cut in pieces 1 egg 1 ⁄2 to 3⁄4 C heavy cream, more for brushing

Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Put the flour, salt, baking powder and 2 tablespoons of the sugar in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles cornmeal. Add the egg and just enough cream to form a slightly sticky dough. If it’s too sticky, add a little flour but very little; it should still stick a little to your hands. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead once or twice, then press it into a 3⁄4-inch-thick circle and cut into 2-inch rounds with a biscuit cutter or glass. Put the rounds on an ungreased baking sheet. Gently reshape the leftover dough and cut again. Brush the top of each scone with a bit of cream, and sprinkle with a little of the remaining sugar. Bake for 9 to 11 minutes, or until the scones are a beautiful golden brown. Serve immediately.

Q:

I have some semisweet chocolate squares with an expiration date of September 2011, but the chocolate has turned white or pale. Is it OK to use? The white haze is called bloom. It happens when chocolate is stored improperly, usually when it is kept somewhere that is too warm or it is exposed to extreme temperature changes. A couple of things can cause it. Either moisture dissolves some of the sugar in the chocolate, then rises to the surface, leaving sugar crystals behind when the moisture evaporates. Or, more commonly, the fat or cocoa butter in the mixture separates and rises to the surface. If you’re using the chocolate in a recipe where it will be melted, you can still use it. Nibble a little bit first to make sure it doesn’t have an off flavor. Good-quality chocolate is delicate, and it’s certainly expensive, so it’s worth storing it correctly. Keep it well wrapped in a dark place where it doesn’t get too warm or too damp.

A:

Kathleen Purvis answers food questions at www .charlotteobserver.com/food.

your tabletop, and cut the fabric to fit. If you like, attach ties to the corners to secure it to table legs.

Q:

How do I adapt recipes for my new convection oven? My food comes out overcooked or underdone. Convection ovens make home cooks look good — think cookies that are evenly baked and roasts that are browned on the outside, juicy on the inside. What’s more, foods are ready faster, since the appliances heat them more quickly than traditional ovens. But using one may require tinkering with a recipe’s cooking time or temperature, which can make even the most seasoned cook nervous. Two features make convection ovens heat food faster and more evenly than standard ovens. One is a fan in the rear wall, which circulates warm air around the food. The other is an extra heating element, also at the back. (Although some convection models don’t include this additional element, the best ones do; look for a “true convection” oven.) You can adjust recipes in a couple of ways to work with the appliance’s speedier performance. One option is to reduce the cooking temperature by 25 degrees. Or, for dishes that take a long time to cook, such as a holiday turkey, cut the time by 25 to 30 percent.

A:

You’ll also want to dispense with kitchenware and techniques that may block the air’s movement. Use rimless cookie sheets or low-sided baking pans, and avoid covering meat with foil. But don’t stress over the details. “Just plunge right in and start using your new appliance,” says Linda Stephen, author of “The Convection Oven Bible.” In the beginning, stick with your favorite and most familiar meals. “You’ll know when they’re done, based on your knowledge of how they should look and taste,” Stephen says. There’s good news for those tempted to purchase a convection oven. Many new models include a converting option, which allows cooks to type in the standard time and temperature, as well as the type of dish; the oven adjusts the time and temperature automatically, so you can worry less about the math and stay focused on the meal.

Q: A:

I want to avoid chemical food dyes. Can I spot them on ingredient labels? Chemical dyes show up in all kinds of foods, and manufacturers like to use them because they provide vivid, consistent results. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration monitors the production of nine synthetic color additives that the agency has deemed safe.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Despite these precautions, consumer advocacy groups have linked two of these dyes, Red 40 and Yellow 6, to hyperactivity in children. Later this year, the European Union will require products containing these dyes to be labeled: “May have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children.” Some British companies have phased them out voluntarily. The easiest way to reduce your exposure to chemical coloring is to avoid processed foods; make meals with fresh fruits and vegetables. When buying groceries, check the ingredient labels for these FDA-approved dyes: Blue 1, Blue 2, Green 3, Orange B, Citrus Red 2, Red 3, Red 40, Yellow 5 and Yellow 6. The names may be listed two ways: for example, “Red 40” or “FD&C Red No. 40” (FD&C stands for “food, drug and cosmetics”; it means the FDA allows the dye’s use in those types of items). Oddly enough, the term “artificial colors” denotes dyes from plants and minerals, not synthetic sources. Two of these ingredients are caramel, used in cola, and annatto extract, derived from a red tropical seed, found in some cheeses. Questions for Martha Stewart can be e-mailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 G1

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WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., $40 per bale. Also feeder hay, $30 bale. Call Redmond, 541-548-2514

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Premium Orchard Grass, second cutting, no rain, no weeds. Mid-size 800-lb bales, $60 each. Call 541-419-2713

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $150. 541-923-1174. Boxer Mix, smaller female, 1½ years. She’s energetic & playful! $50. 541-536-5538

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne Style, wing back, burgundy plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323.

POODLES AKC Toy, tiny toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Joyful, friendly! 541-475-3889

Golden Retriever AKC puppy, English Cream. Has all his shots, very sweet & calm, 10 wks. Paid $2300. Needs great home quickly. Asking $1100. Have all family paperwork. 541-654-3878 541-318-5566 Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839.

Shepherd Pups, ready 10/15, male & female, black & tan or all blacks, exc. temperament, both parents on site+grandma, sire Chateau De Chiefs, AKSC #02BGG872-IM, Dam Sonja Vom Holtzberg, AKC #DN17285408, $800, 541-815-2888.

Retriever Mix, rescued neutered male, with shots, $100. Call 541-576-3701.

LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Maltese AKC female, 12 wks, silky, non-shed coat. Family raised. $800. 541-610-7905

Couch navy blue and matching chair with ottoman, big pillows, modern, great condition, $500.00 for all 541-389-3868 anytime

Dining Table, unique, oak, 3’x4’, 4 wood chairs, $100, 541-639-2069. Floral couch, Exc. cond., $100 OBO, must sell by Thurs., 541-389-3622.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Shih-tzu/poodle mix,ready to go! 4 males, 2 females. Great with kids! 541-233-8202 Siberian Husky AKC puppies, vet checked, 9 weeks old. Josh @ 541-633-9160

357 Colt Trooper, 6” Barrel, exc. cond., $550; Remington 700 XCR .338 Ultra-Mag, 4.5x14 pwr. Leupold Boone & Crockett scope, like new, $1250, 541-447-7248 or 541-420-1888. Belgium Browning auto rifle, 30.06, Bushnell scope, case, ammo, excellent condition. $585. 541-604-0269. Browning 12 gauge auto shotgun, Belgium made, excellent condition, case, ammo, $575. 541-604-0269 Browning Gold hunter mossy oak 3½" 12 ga. new $850; Browning Belgium light 12 ga. auto 5 $425; Winchester '66 centennial 30-30, $600. Ken 541-410-2829 others for sale.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Charter Arms 22 mag, 3 inch barrel, w/ 100 rounds of ammo. $220. 541-536-9075 COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

Reloading Equip., all new, too much to list, please call 541-728-1036.

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REM Model 270 rifle, 4XWeaver scope, good condition, asking $425. 541-382-4508

Ruger Black Hawk 357 caliber, 6.5 inch barrel blue, w/ 400 Chinese dishes, from Hong Kong, rounds of 38/357 ammo. 99-piece set, everyday patLike new $395. tern, $50 OBO, 541-595-6261 541-536-9075 Furniture

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TV, Stereo and Video

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

TV 52” Samsung, big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $400. 541-480-2652.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677 A Central Oregon Mix Cord. Split, Delivered, Bend, $125 for 1 or $240 for 2. Cash, Check, Visa/MC Accepted. 541-312-4027 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436

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Craftsman portable saw. 10" blade. Table 26"+ x 19-1/2". Extensions left, right, rear. Rip capacity 24" right and left. 3 HP universal motor. On stand with wheels. Like new. $195 cash only. Call 385-0542. Shurflo Extreme Series Smart Sensor 4.0 RV Water Pump. New, in box. Paid $206. Asking $165. 541-390-7726.

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Snow Removal Equipment

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Sales Southeast Bend Older camping and sports gear, misc lawn care and household items inc sewing machines, games, teen boy t-shirts. Fri-Sat 9:30 to 4:30. 1789 SE Karena Ct.

292 DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com

Bonsai pots, 30 medium & large training pots, good cond., $4/ea., 541-385-7416.

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Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

FREE LLAMA MANURE 5 miles east of Bend. You Load! 541-389-5071

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300

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Building Materials

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Farm Market

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Sales Other Areas

Tools

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

Sponsors desperately needed for vet costs for Emma, a rescued, abandoned kitten found blind due to injury & infection. What tissue was left had to be immediately removed & eyes closed up. Kitchen Queen, Hoosier type Emma is only about 8 weeks from 1920’s, reduced $500 to old & very sweet, & needs a $1000 firm. 541-420-7470 loving, safe forever home once she has healed. Donations are tax deductible. To meet Emma at her foster home or for more info, call 541-389-8420; 541-598-5488 Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708, www.craftcats.org

Boxer, rescued purebred neutered male, 2 yrs old. $100. Mini-Dachshunds, males, great 541-576-3701 bloodlines. Reds w/black STILL KITTEN SEASON! Over 3 dozen friendly, altered, shots, markings, $400.541-788-1289 Mini-Dachshund 6-wk-old black ID chip, more! $25/1, $40/2. olesonmd@hotmail & tan male; 1st shots & Adult cats $15 or 2/$25, or wormed, adorable, family Moving must sell. Papered Pofree as mentor cat with kitraised! $300 541-610-7341 meranians assorted ages and ten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 Doberman Pinscher, reg. tail, colors. Approved homes only. PM, other days by appt. dewclaws, shots, black & tan, Small adoption fees. 541-598-5488; 389-8420 map/ $475. 503-550-1705 541-480-3160 photos at www.craftcats.org.

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COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Antiques & Collectibles

King

Golf Balls, exc. cond., $20/100, PRO-V, $50/100, 541-383-2155.

1874 Sharps 45-70, manufactured by Pedersoli. Dies, brass, and lead. Creedmore sites, $1600. 541-385-7446

Purebred Lab Puppies Papered Chocolate, Yellow, and Black, $300 OBO To approved homes only! Ready 11/5, 541-771-9800

Golf Equipment

Computer Desk, with Hutch, $80, very nice, please call 541-382-4477

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Poodle Pom 8 week old female, non-shedding, adorable face. $350. 541-480-3160

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Persian Cross Kittens (6), 7 weeks, wormed, 1st shots, $50-$100, 541-420-1580.

Free (2) Flemish giant male rabbits with extra large 2-story hutch, 541-389-0371

Online scrapbook store going out of business. Hundreds of items at cost! One day only! Scrapbook paper, embellishments, stamp ink, chipboard, adhesive, Stickles glitter glue, Distress Ink and more. Saturday 10/16 from 9 am -5 PM. No early birds, please. CASH ONLY. No holds. 61056 Honkers Lane, Bend OR 97702

China Cabinet, interior lighted, glass doors, $350. Dresser, 6 draws w/ doored shelves in middle, $150. 541-383-3951.

Desk, 1940’s wood office, 3+1 drawers & wood chair, $75, 541-317-5156.

Lab mix, 1½, spayed, shots, dog/ cat friendly,free to good home w/lotsof space. 541-504-2814

AUSSIE Toy/Sheltie mix pups 10 wks, 2 sable colored females, $150. 541-390-8875.

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Parrots -Dbl. Red Factor Congo African Greys,3 babies, nearly weaned, & 3 yearlings, babies are Abundenced weaned & are allowed to glide to floor before wing clipping, snuggly babies, DNA sexing will be completed prior to sale. $500-$700, For more info call Aleta 541-548-4750.

Items for Free

Maple Leaves for your Garden, FREE, you bag and haul, call 541-389-1578.

Crafts and Hobbies

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, exc. champion pedigree, 8 weeks old, ready to go! $2000/ea. 541-306-0372

Pomeranians, Beautiful pups, exceptionally well cared for, $250-$350, 541-367-7766

BUYING WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, Chainsaws, like new! Run exrounds, sterling fltwr. Gold cellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex Husqavarna 395XP, $795! & vintage watches. No col281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! lection too large or small. Bed55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 $295! 541-280-5006

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Papillons, Beutiful puppies, exceptionally well cared for, $300-$400, 541-367-7766

205 FREE organic goat/sheep manure in sacks, ready for compost piles. 541-548-2357

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

English Bulldog. $500 AKC male, intact, 2 yrs, brindle/ white. 541.588.6490

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top European Red Min Pin, 14 mo Male, very beautiful, free to dollar paid, Estate incl. Hongood home. 541-325-3005 est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

210

Furniture & Appliances

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Pomeranian female puppy cream 8 weeks old. Going to be very small, $350. 541-480-3160

9 7 7 0 2

215

Pets and Supplies

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY LAST ONE! FEMALE AKC REGISTERED, CHAMPION LINES. UP TO DATE ON ALL SHOTS & MICROCHIPPED $1750 541 416-0375

O r e g o n

Coins & Stamps

208

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

B e n d

208

Pets and Supplies

Want to Buy or Rent

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $550, 541-536-3108

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Lost and Found Found: Jack Russell Terrier, male, 10/16, North Madras, call to ID, 541-475-3889. Found Wallet: Near Jewell Elementary, 10/9, belongs to lady,call to ID, 541-771-0263 Lost Cat “Tucker” neut male, short hair gray, 10/10 Westward Ho Motel.541-647-7009 LOST Jansport backpack, blue, US Forest Svc Rd 900, 10/17. Need it back! 541-385-6211 LOST Motorola Bluetooth, black with black Bluetooth case, 10/15, Bend. 541-410-3054 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily LOST Wedding & Engagement ring. Reward! Please Call 541-382-3418. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Premium Pasture mix, 3x3, 800lb. bales, 2nd cutting, $40 ea., please call 541-419-2713. Credit Cards Accepted. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

333

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies 3 White Doves, young, great for 4H or FFA project, $20 for all. 541-382-2194

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

ASPC registered Shetland pony gelding. He will make a great kids or 4H project. $300 OBO 541-788-1649,541-548-2887 Free Clydesdale gelding, 17+H; & female mini horse, to good homes only. 541-389-0371

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Brand New L3400 HSD

375 with loader, 34HP, 4x4, Meat & Animal Processing industrial tires.

Was $21,950

NOW $16,700 Cash Price Only! Midstate Power Products

2 home-raised pigs, free-will grain, buy half or whole, $1.85 lb. + cutting and wrapping. 541-318-7555. Grass Fattened All Natural Angus Steer Beef, $2.40/lb hanging weight incl. cut & wrap. No additional processing fees. 541-508-8541.

541-548-6744

Redmond

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713

Find Your Future Home Here! Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


G2 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

A Major Central Oregon Trucking Company

www.midoregonpersonnel.com Must have a current Class A CDL, OTR experience and knowledge of Federal & State trucking regulations. Will supervise and train drivers, and develop and implement a safety program for trucking, warehouse, distribution, and production.

Endoscopy Technician (40 hr. per week) - 4 X 10 hr. shifts per week. Eligible for full benefits. Experienced and Certified GI Technician preferred. Interested persons should obtain job application from www.bendsurgery.com /employment.htm. Please submit resume and application to: Bend Surgery Center, PO Box 6329, Bend OR 97708. Position open until filled.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

OPTICIAN Wanted FT/PT. Salary based on experience. Send resume to eows@msn.com or fax to 541-382-4455

541-617-7825 Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for 2 or 3 overnight shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate. References and experience only. 541-447-5773. CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for Caregivers, FT/PT, in La Pine. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am6pm, Monday.-Friday. Critical Facility Engineer Prineville. McKinstry seeks union technicians to maintain and troubleshoot mechanical and electrical systems in a data center environment. Previous hands on mech and/or elect. exp. is preferred. Apply online at www.mckinstry.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Property Manager, On-site for mobile home park in Prineville, OR. Please e-mail resume to: pmworegon@gmail.com

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

528

630

636

642

648

Loans and Mortgages

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. References. $550+utils. 541-420-7613

573

Mt. Bachelor Motel

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D Hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Houses for Rent General

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-383-0386

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

476

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Home Delivery Advisor

The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer great benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

Job

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's Dishes & Collectibles" Pattern matching china & dish business...very fun! Extensive large inventory all incl. w/storage racks & packing material. Work from home part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email me at patorre@msn.com for more information if you are interested.I am moving to AZ to retire again. $20,000 OBO! Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals 15x44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or online@bendbulletin.com No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, The Bulletin Classiieds W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 631 541-280-7188.

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $675, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath 1/2-off 1st Mo. Rent Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1/2 Off First Full Month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $775+dep. With lease. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

** Pick Your Special ** 605

2 bdrm, 1 bath

Roommate Wanted

$525 & $535 Carports & Heat Pumps. Lease options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

616

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

Loans and Mortgages

P Home Delivery Advisor P ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Business Opportunities

Want To Rent Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

Central location, pleasant studio, $400/mo. Parking/laundry on-site, cable + W/S/G paid. No pets/smoking. Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, 541-598-5829 until 6pm. W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or Autumn Specials 541-389-9867.

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688. Westside Apt. For Rent, 1 bdrm. Washer & Dryer, Quiet neighborhood, 15 min walk to town, $435/mo., 541-388-0182,541-617-8457 WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

640

Are Here!

Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet country home with wood stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Houses for Rent NE Bend

NOTICE:

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend FREE 1st mo. RENT! 2/2 Du1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1 Bedroom Studio Apt. Furnished, laundry facilities, all utilities & TV/Wi-fi included, pet on approval, no smoking. $500/mo. 541-508-6118 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

plex Garage, central heat, dishwasher, W/D hookup. Clean & quiet, small pet, HUD OK, EZ move in. WSG paid. $625/mo. 2031 NW Cedar. 541-815-9848 SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. W/S/G paid; small pet OK. $750/mo. Call 541-480-2233 SW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new flooring & paint, appls incl W&D, no pets/smoking, WS&G owner paid, credit check req’d, discount 1st mo rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. For appt/info: 541-504-6141

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

646

Apt./Multiplex Furnished Furnished 1 bdrm apt. on quiet 5 acre estate, pet on approval. Garden area and hot house avail. $550 mo. util. included. 541-549-3838.

648

Houses for Rent General CRESCENT, OREGON 2 bdrm, fenced yard, 1 car garage, w/d. $500 month. 541-6726359. 541-430-1594.

Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408 Newport Hills, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 level, 3-car garage, A/C, no pets/smoking, $1300 mo.+ dep., incl. yard care, avail. now, 541-382-1470

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

654

687

745

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Homes for Sale

4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced yard, 2 car garage, RV parking, fireplace, close to schools and hospital. $845/mo., 541-948-4531

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

Brand new 3 bdrm 2 bath single level, fenced yard, near Jewell Elementary, $1100/mo, lease. CallJeff Parsons, Taft Dire, LLC, 541-480-7455. Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Old Mill. No smoking/pets. $975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call Rachel 541-604-0620.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 2 Bbdrm, 1 Bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, no pets/smoking. $700 mo. + dep. Call 541-598-6807 or 541-815-2249 3 To 4 bdrm., 2 bath house, very nice, but small, large yard, storage building, heat pump, $890/mo. call 541-310-0058,541-788-1750 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 1 mo. Free! La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, fitness center, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494. 2 Bdrm, 2 bath mfd. home, bonus room,on 1 acre,large dbl. garage w/shop area, $625, $625 dep., pets OK w/dep. Section 8 OK, 541-728-1008. La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

687

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

4 units, ranging from 2,250 to 8,750 sq ft, @ 25¢/sq ft. 3-phase power, fire sprinkler sys. Prime loc., 61510 American Ln, Bend. 530-305-0104

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

750

860

870

875

880

881

Redmond Homes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

541-322-7253

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

755 STICK-BUILT 1 bedroom house on an acre for sale in La Pine. Only $72,5000. 541-536-9221.

762 Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666 Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

800

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 Mill Quarter Area, exc. street exposure, corner office location, great as office or health services, 1600 sq.ft., good parking, call 541-815-2182.

Real Estate For Sale

700

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Motorcycles And Accessories

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

385-5809

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $117,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

Commercial building for 749 sale: $130,000 Southeast Bend Homes The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., sale property at 907 Highliving room w/ wood stove, land Ave, Redmond, through family room w/ pellet stove, a sealed bid process. OPEN dbl. garage, on a big, fenced HOUSE: Oct. 15, 10-2:00 pm. .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Contact Steve Eck, Property Schoning, Broker, Owner, Agent, at 503-986-3638 or John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. visit www.odotproperty.com

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Seaswirl

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, upgraded queen bed, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

880

700 XP Snow Plow, winch, stereo, custom rear seats, front and rear running lights, 2nd battery, windshield. $8000 541.280.6246

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

865

ATVs

Baja Vision 250 2007,

705

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

17’ Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Suzi King Quad 1998, low hrs well cared for $2000 OBO mest see 541-389-3831

The Bulletin Classified ***

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

Allegro HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

2006 Polaris Ranger 860

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809 Spingdale 29’ 2007,slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

Motorhomes

Homes with Acreage

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 771 All real estate advertising in Lots this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise 1.15 Acres RM zoned bare parcel for sale: $65,000 "any preference, limitation or The Oregon Department of discrimination based on race, Transportation is offering for color, religion, sex, handicap, sale, property located near familial status, marital status Maricopa Drive in Bend, or national origin, or an inthrough a sealed bid process. tention to make any such Contact Steve Eck, Property preference, limitation or disAgent, at 503-986-3638 or crimination." Familial status visit www.odotproperty.com. includes children under the age of 18 living with parents 773 or legal custodians, pregnant Acreages women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of knowingly accept any adverroad, power at property line, tising for real estate which is water near by, $250,000 in violation of the law. Our OWC 541-617-0613 readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $17,500. 541-548-3985.

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Boats & RV’s

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, October 19, 2010 G3

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Yamaha YFZ450 2006 , low hrs hard

times $3500 OBO Call 541-306-8321 like new

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875 Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

Boats & Accessories 14’ Fiberglass boat, current license, good trailer w/spare, $250 OBO. 541-382-9012

Watercraft

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350 Sunseeker 31' Class C 2001 33,000 miles, A/C, 1 slide, 2 TVs, ex. cond, non-smoker, $29,900. 541 382 4086

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Travel Trailers

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 HUNTER SPECIAL! 18’ 1972 Kit camp trailer Everything works! $900 OBO. 541-462-3067.

541-385-5809

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Wilderness 2007 26'. Front queen bed, rear bath. Couch & dinette table in slide-out. One owner. $18,000. OBO. 541-419-6215 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm, 1 bath Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495/mo. Includes WSG. •1/2 Off Move-in Rent! Great Spacious Floor Level Apt. with balcony & fireplace. 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Laundry facilities on site. Central Location. $495 includes WST & Basic Cable. •Spacious 2 bdrm/1 bath apartments. Off-street parking. Nice shade trees. On site laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 includes WST •Spacious Apt. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, near Old Mill Dist. $525/mo. Includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 Left! • Great Older Duplex in NW - 2 bdrm, 1 bath on Large lot. Private backyard. New carpets & paint plus. Single garage & W/D hookups. $550 W/S included. • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm, 1 bath + Murphy bed. $550 includes WST/Wireless • Private SE Duplex 2 bdrm/1 bath. W/D included. Sgl. garage. Back deck & yard. Huge corner lot. $575 incl. W/S • Nice Duplex Near Hospital - 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, with utility area and garage. Private courtyard in front. 900 Sq.ft. Small Pets? $610. WS Included. • Mountain View at this NE home. 3 bdrm/2 bath. Quiet cul-de-sac. Sgl. garage. Fenced yard. 1114 sq. ft. $750 mo •Great Midtown Location - Cheerful, spacious, 1239 sq.ft. 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath home on HUGE lot. Gas fireplace. W/D included. Single garage. $775 WS Included. •Tamarack Park - 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2 car garage, fenced back yard with patio. Pet considered. $795 mo. - 3 bdrm, 2 bath on small acreage. Space & Privacy. New paint/carpet. $795 per mo. • LOVELY 1408 sq. ft. Home in Nottingham Square. 2 bdrm/2 bath + office. Lrg. kitchen. Wood stove. End of road in park-like setting. Dbl. garage. Laundry room. $825 mo. • Sun Meadow. 3 bdrm/2.5 bath. With media room downstairs and extra room upstairs. Garage and access to community pool. $1025 mo. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

Debris Removal

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Barns

Domestic Services

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894.

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

House Sitting

I DO THAT!

Exp. couple for executive house sitting. Keep your property safe, avail. 11/1,605-595-2293

Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Irrigation Equipment

Randy, 541-306-7492

Sprinkler Blowouts

CCB#180420

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., dependable, exc. references, Senior discounts available! Call 541-420-0366

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Discounts available. Call Kent for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097• LCB #8451

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Holiday Lighting EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Excavating

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up

Sprinkler Blowouts: Time to Blow out your irrigation system. Call Cutting Edge Lawn Works for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097. LCB# 8451

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993 Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012

If you need assistance cleaning up your property, I have a tractor w/scoop, bush hog and harrow. $40/hr, min 2 hrs. Call Victor 541-383-5085 Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

IRRIGATION SPRINKLER BLOWOUT AND WINTERIZATION, $40. Cedar Creek Landscaping LCB#8499. 541-948-3157

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Bend Landscaping Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Masonry Handymen at affordable prices: sheds to changing a light bulb, hanging a picture, to shovelling a walk, give a call, we do it all! 541-788-1354

541-322-7253

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Where buyers meet sellers.

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling:

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows/doors • Garages/Additions/Remodels www.remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Where buyers meet sellers.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

You know what they say about “one man’s trash”. There’s a whole pile of “treasure” here!

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809


G4 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Fifth Wheels

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C,

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111.

925

Utility Trailers

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Heavy duty pickup bed trailer, will haul 2 cords of wood. $495 OBO. 541-480-8521

929

CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

The Bulletin

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories MICHELIN X-ICE studless snow tires, mounted on 4 Lexus GS300 rims plus extra brand new tire. $325 541-317-4945. Tires, (4), 225/60R16 Studded, great tread & studs, $200, 541-390-6016.

Vans DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Wanderer 27’ with slide, 1998, queen custom mattress, plus sofa sleeps 2, recliner, very good condition, $5300. Call 541-382-2893

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Canopies and Campers Fiberglass canopy, red, for Ford Ranger, w/carpet bedliner & clamps. Some damage to 1 corner, $200. 541-504-7836

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler Cordoba 1982, 29K 1-owner mi, mint cond, loaded. Come take a look! $3195 OBO. 541-330-8969

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

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Airplane Hangars now available for lease at Redmond Municipal Airport. $270/mo. Please contact airport administration, 541-504-3499 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

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Pickups

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $4950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary EdiChrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221 FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

975

Automobiles

CHRYSLER Sebring JX 1998 convertible, V6, AT, ABS, AC, Cruise, PW/PS, dual air bags, 91k milies. Garaged, very good cond. KBB $3720, $3200 OBO. 541-317-0567.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

GRAND AM 2002 with V-6. great shape! $3600, 541-536-9221

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

Ford Conversion Van 1994, 7 pass. van, 117K, rear bed, perfect CarFax. Like new in/ out. $3500. 541-382-7449

Honda Accord EX 2003, 42K orig. mi., 1 owner, clean, $10,800, 541-593-2554.

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 194K highway miles. $7500, 541-410-7586 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5000. 541-593-4016 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Sport Utility Vehicles BMW X5 2002 1 owner 153K, very clean, all records. $9300 541-598-8100

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. CHEVY BLAZER 4x4 LS 1998 good condition, 110k miles, $5,295. For more information 541-382-9411 after 4 p.m.

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto, A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4400. Call 541-429-2966

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1800, 541-815-9939. GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Ford Bronco 1980, extra engine & trans., runs but needs love. $800. 541-546-7001

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

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Autos & Transportation

900

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Tires, 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $350, 541-447-1668 Tires, Studless Snows, Schwab Big Horn, 31x10.5x15, on Ford 5x5.5 Rims, used 1 season, $400, 541-536-3252.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

NEWER 6L 3/4 ton 4WD SUV or king cab short-bed pickup, in exc. cond., 541-389-1913.

931 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto,

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Automotive Wanted TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.:T10-67411-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHAUN M. BENKOVER AND JEANNE S. BENKOVER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of SOUTH VALLEY BANK & TRUST, as Beneficiary, dated 0512-2005, recorded 05-17-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reeI/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-30372 , and Re-recorded on 06-06-2005, Book , Page, Instrument 2005-35046 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200383 LOT EIGHT (8), WOODCREST, PHASE 3 AND 5, IN THE CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3030 NE STONEBROOK DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 06/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,151.71 Monthly Late Charge $44.12 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $181,100.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from 05-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 01-26-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Tim, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97781 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or Ma successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dis-

missed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: September 20, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3753545 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0475295465 T.S. No.: OR-254275-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BLAKE A. RICHARDSON AND RACHAEL E. RICHARDSON, TENANTS IN ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERI TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 8/27/2007, recorded 8/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-47927 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 181985 LOT THIRTY-FOUR (34), BLOCK TWO (2), SUMMERFIELD PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2052 SW 29TH ST. REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $153,497.47; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,069.29 Monthly

Late Charge $42.51 By this reason of said default the be neficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $153,497.47 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# FNMA3691709 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601383880 T.S. No.: OR-254472-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMOTHY DEAN GROVES AND STEPHANIE SERRES GROVES as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 8/3/2005, recorded 8/16/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-54058 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209332 LOT FIFTY-ONE (51), PHEASANT RUN PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61172 KEPLER STREET BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $308,748.59; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,909.15 Monthly Late Charge $75.57 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $308,748.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not

then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3694780 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429007016 T.S. No.: OR-220491-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KURT A. HERZER AND JENIFER R. GOLD, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/8/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-39605 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133059 LOT 2 IN BLOCK 9 OF FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 65182 85TH PLACE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $361,574.31; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,437.14 Monthly Late Charge $111.10 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $361,574.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from 4/1/2010 until

paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/4/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3691392 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031458201 T.S. No.: 10-10596-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RILEY CRANSTON, DEANNA E CRANSTON as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.,, as Beneficiary, recorded on November 8, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-74303 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 180488 LOT 6 IN BLOCK 13 OF AWBREY BUTTE HOMESITES, PHASE SEVENTEEN, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 3033 NW WINSLOW DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,397.43 Monthly Late Charge $119.87 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 641,120.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.37100 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 31, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3774174 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602061174 T.S. No.: OR-254586-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHERRILL SCARLETT-LONGFELLOW AND DANNY F. LONGFELLOW, WIFE AND HUSBAND as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GLOBAL ADVISORY GROUP, INC. DBA MORTGAGE ADVISORY GROUP, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/23/2008, recorded 6/30/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-28096 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 110679 LOT TWENTY-FIVE (25), BLOCK ZZ OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 18882 SHOSHONE RD. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $200,042.39; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,614.26 Monthly Late Charge $51.58 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, towit: The sum of $200,042.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's

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fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By KB Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3695378 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7473354249 T.S. No.: OR-254495-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARTY V. KENT AND TERI L. KENT, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 4/4/2007, recorded 4/11/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-20957 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 208261 LOT SEVENTEEN, CHESTNUT PARK, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20364 SHETLAND LOOP BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735 (3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $169,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,128.79 Monthly Late Charge $45.90 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26140-5 Loan No.: 0144845476 Title No.: 4480649 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Joseph A. Devine and Nancy A. Devine, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/03/2006, recorded 04/06/2006 as Document No. 2006-23604, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot fifty-six (56), Caldera Springs, Phase One, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 252107 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56766 Dancing Rock Loop, Bend, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,730.51 beginning 03/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $267,950.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.750% per annum from 02/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/14/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 7-30-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 202424, 10/19/10, 10/26/10, 11/02/10, 11/09/10)

the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario St., Suite 400 Burbank, CA 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3694898 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601763148 T.S. No.: OR-254283-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, FRANK E. SIMPKINS, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to PACIFIC NORTHWEST COMPANY OF OREGON, INC., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/24/2007, recorded 1/29/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-05538 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 201910 LOT NINTY-SIX OF HAYDEN VIEW PHASE THREE, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES

COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1204 SW 33RD ST. REDMOND, OR 97756-0244 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $154,854.98; plus accrued interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 6/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,019.84 Monthly Late Charge $36.65 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,854.98 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.375% per annum from 5/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/4/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3691966 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7426855813 T.S. No.: OR-253822-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMES B. LARSON AND JAYCI F. LARSON as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/19/2006, recorded 1/20/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-04229 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 129219 LOT TEN (10), BLOCK THREE (3), FIRST ADDITION TO CHAPARRAL ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 6330 SOUTHWEST HARVEST AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of Principal and Interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,475.67 Monthly Late Charge $66.19 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $239,804.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-100177 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JON M. BURT, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as beneficiary, dated 4/5/2007, recorded 4/18/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-22149, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac IMSC Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-AR2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-AR2 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 14, PLEASANT VIEW, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2120 NORTHWEST MAPLE TREE COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of September 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 5 payments at $2,078.53 each $10,392.65 (05-01-10 through 09-24-10) Late Charges: $453.45 Beneficiary Advances: $33.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $10,879.10 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $256,053.39, PLUS interest thereon at 8.5% per annum from 04/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 8.5% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on January 27, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 9/24/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: MELISSA HJORTEN, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3751139 10/05/2010, 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010

includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/10/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3690361 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

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Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359228720 T.S. No.: OR-254471-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LUCAS K. SCOTT AND REBECCA A SCOTT, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELEC-

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TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC. A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 7/7/2005, recorded 7/18/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-45806 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245903 LOT 14 CANAL ROW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20872 DANIEL DUKE WAY BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $196,605.85; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $850.60 Monthly Late Charge $29.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $196,605.85 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.625% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the

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foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3695116 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patricia A. Lynch, Maia L. Thornton and Shad M. Thornton, as grantor, to Hamey County Title Company, as trustee, to secure certain obligations in favor of Pacific Rim Funding, Inc., as beneficiary, dated May 22, 2008, recorded May 30, 2008 in Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2008-23513, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (W' 1/2 S 1/2 S 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4) OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Together with all tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances and all other rights .thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, and the rents, issues and profits thereof and all fixtures now or hereafter attached to or used in connection with the property. Said real property is also identified as Tax Lot Number 16 12 19 00 00401, Tax Account ID No. 149961. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 65519 Cline Falls Road Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee .have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due all principal and interest owing on the note secured by the trust deed which amounts were to be paid in full on or before September 30, 2009. The balance thereof is the sum of $403,209.69 principal, plus unpaid interest accrued thereon through July 16, 2010 in the amount of $37,654.95, plus interest on the unpaid balance at the rate of 18% per annum from July 17, 2010, until paid; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $440,864.64, which includes principal and accrued interest through July 16, 2010, plus additional interest accruing thereafter on the unpaid principal balance at the rate of 18 % per annum beginning July 17, 201.0; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and an}, further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, NOTICE HEREBY IS GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on December 21, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 o'clock A.M., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public .auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with Federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.-753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, -to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753.. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other-person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" .and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest. NOTICE TO TENANTS: IT IS UNLAWFUL FOP ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU, FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224; PO Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935; (503) 620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800) 452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. information about whom to contact for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources maybe found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-teen lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 20, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under Federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. DATED July 28, 2010 at Bend, Oregon. Stephen D. Dixon, OSB #730789 Successor Trustee For further information, please contact: Stephen D. Dixon, Merrill O'Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702; Phone: (541) 389-1770 Fax: (541) 389-1777


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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of HARRIET M. MOUILLESSEAUX, Deceased. CASE NO.: 10 PB 0118 MS NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756, within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose right may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Ronald L. Bryant, Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756. Date first published: October 12, 2010 RALPH MOUILLESSEAUX Co-Personal Representative EDWARD MOUILLESSEAUX Co-Personal Representative

LEGAL NOTICE Mr. Nick Yesterday: Lakeshort R.V. Park is trying to locate this person in regard to his motorhome at Lakeshore R.V. Park. If anyone knows of this person or his phone number, please contact Lakeshore R.V. Park, 541-447-6059. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF EXECUTIVE SESSION The Board of Directors for Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District will meet in executive session under ORS 192.660(2)(f) to consider information or records that are exempt by law from public inspection and ORS 192.660(2)(h) for consultation of legal counsel regarding litigation likely to be filed. This executive session will be held at the District's Office, located at 55841 Swan Road, Bend OR 97707, on Thursday October 21st, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE CITY OF BEND PLANNING COMMISSION PROJECT NUMBER: PZ 10-292 APPLICANT: City of Bend NATURE OF THE APPLICATION: proposed ordinance limiting permitted point-of-service government uses in the Convenience Commercial Zone. APPLICABLE CRITERIA: Bend Development Code Section 4.6 available in City Hall or at the Community Development Department portion of the City's website. PROPERTY LOCATION: Convenience Commercial Zone DATE, TIME, PLACE AND LOCATION OF THE HEARING: Monday, November 8, 2010 at 5:30 pm at 710 NW Wall

Street, Bend, OR, in City Hall Council Chambers. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: The application, and the applicable criteria are available for inspection at City Hall at no cost and will be provided at a reasonable cost. Seven days prior to the hearing a copy of the staff report will be similarly available. CONTACT PERSON: Colin Stephens at (541)693-2119, cstephens@ci.bend.or.us. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713909265 T.S. No.: OR-174341-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, THOMAS J. SMITH and TERESA L. GRAVES, NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT WITH RIGHTS OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/21/2005, recorded 7/22/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-47412 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 243366 LOT TWO HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT (248), FOXBOROUGH PHASE 5, RECORDED APRIL 8, 2004 IN CABINET G PAGE 232 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20674 CHERRY TREE LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-100227 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRAD SEIDEL, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 6/30/2004, recorded 7/2/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-39385, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2004-AR6, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2004-AR6 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated August 1, 2004. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 10, BLOCK 3, VALHALLA HEIGHTS PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2430 NORTHWEST MARKEN STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of September 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2010 2 payments at $1,461.56 each $2,923.12 2 payments at $1,491.44 each $2,982.88 (06-01-10 through 09-24-10) Late Charges: $229.92 Beneficiary Advances: $33.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,168.92 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $227,719.35, PLUS interest thereon at 3.25% per annum from 05/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 3.5% per annum from 08/01/10 to 01/01/11, 3.5% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on January 27, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 9/24/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: MELISSA HJORTEN, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $154,617.67; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $676.45 Monthly Late Charge $33.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,617.67 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 8/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/17/2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3698638 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010

gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 12, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3773994 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010, 11/09/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030207674 T.S. No.: 10-10612-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMES T. PREHODA, DARLENE D. PREHODA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE ESCROW AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as Beneficiary, recorded on April 28, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-24278 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 155707 LOT 10, BLOCK 1, RIVER BLUFF SECTION OF SUNRISE VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 60075 RIVER BLUFF TRAIL, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,974.16 Monthly Late Charge $120.75 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 488,894.58 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.12500 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on February 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com / AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602049773 T.S. No.: OR-253678-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL B. PETERSEN AND LAURIE J. PETERSEN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE EXPRESS, LLC A OREGON LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 4/3/2008, recorded 4/11/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-16052 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 107935 LOT 14 IN BLOCK H OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 59911 NAVAJO RD. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $218,822.93; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,344.49 Monthly Late Charge $67.22 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $218,822.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx8862 T.S. No.: 1260696-09.

charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/9/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3688185 10/05/2010, 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0472726629 T.S. No.: OR-253683-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TERRI J. ALONZO AND JOHN R. ALONZO, AS TENANTS BY ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A DELAWARE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 2/27/2007, recorded 3/6/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-13540 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 108055 LOT 44, BLOCK J, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 59781 CHEYENNE ROAD BEND, Oregon 97702-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $203,367.19; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,185.63 Monthly Late Charge $50.74 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $203,367.19 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.875% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums ad-

vanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/9/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3688568 10/05/2010, 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: ERIK B. BERGSTROM. Trustee: WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: UMPQUA BANK. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Two (2), Block One (1), DEER POINTE VILLAGE PHASE I, recorded February 22, 1990, in Cabinet C, Page 374, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: April 7, 2006. Recording No. 2006-24004 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of

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$2,419.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $272,637.07; plus interest at the rate of 6.8750% per annum from February 1, 2010; plus late charges of $561.66; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 9, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #30057.30390). DATED: July 26, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx5853 T.S. No.: 1233977-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DUSTIN L. WILSON, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS), A DELAWARE CORPORATION, ITS SUCCESSORS OR ASSIGNS, AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST MAGNUS FINANCIAL CORPORATION, AN ARIZONA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 5/4/2006, recorded 5/8/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-31560, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE IN BLOCK TWO OF TAMARACK PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2707 NORTHEAST OCKER DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,191.48 each $ 4,765.92 (07-01-10 through 10-01-10) Late Charges: $ 150.21 Beneficiary Advances: $ 3,459.11 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,375.24 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $226,267.94, PLUS interest thereon at 2.625% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 3, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DSCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rick C. Upham, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Aspen Mortgage Group, as Beneficiary, dated January 27, 2005, recorded February 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-06596 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 39, block 30, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc, Unit 5, Deschutes County Oregon. Commonly known as: 56430 Celestial Drive Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $922.09 Monthly Late Charge $46.10. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $151,988.95 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from June 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 18, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by David T. Grigsby, as Grantor to Chicago Title Company/fidelity National Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated December 19, 2005, recorded January 03, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-00112 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The east 57.85 feet, as measured along the southerly line of lot 14, and all of lot 15, and the south 25 feet of lot 16, all in block 81 of Bend Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 569 SE Edgewater Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 2, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $929.86 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $120,989.49 together with interest thereon at 7.400% per annum from December 02, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 18, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 11, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3762946 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010, 11/02/2010

R-343622 10/12/10, 10/19, 10/26, 11/02

R-343172 10/12, 10/19, 10/26, 11/02

ASAP# 3751145 10/05/2010, 10/12/2010, 10/19/2010, 10/26/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-100959


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

Our Large Jack-o-Lantern Pizza

$

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

PRE-

TOD

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

$17.95

FOR ONLY $14 EACH!

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

ER ORD

6

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of Central Oregon

BW1010

2 Rooms Cleaned

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$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 10/31/10

BW1010

Whole House Special

$ ÂŽ ÂŽ

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner

144

5 Rooms, 1 Hallway Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 10/31/10

Take your lunch and stuff it. Open Late & We Deliver!

BW1010

Buy One – Get One Half Off

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541-550-5555 611 NE PURCELL ACROSS FROM COSTCO

(REG. $79.95)

Check & Adjust Front & Rear Wheel Alignment Check Tire Wear & Pressure Check Steering & Suspension EXPIRES 10/31/10

ALL MAKES & MODELS!

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

Special Oil Change Price!

4

3 pc. Fish & Chips

$ 99

5

$ 99 pers p i k S

We now have

ÂŽ

d About Seafood! Wil

Expires 12/31/10 ÂŽ

Bend 61165 S. Hwy 97

CIAL FINAN

ICES SERV

CARD

(541) 382-7851

in the Wal-Mart parking lot

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

20% OFF

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: October 31, 2010

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

Back Pain Frightening You?

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1552 NE Third Street

FREE Consultation and Exam

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With your donation of a canned good to the Central Oregon Food Bank

ANY LARGE PIZZA Original Crust Only

Call today! (541) 312-4400

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Offer expires 11/30/10 This offer does not apply to Federal Insurance Beneiciaries

Coupon required. Exp. 10-31-10. Offers cannot be combined.

$

10 00

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply

www.bendhealthsourcechiropractor.com

ÂŽ

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

$14.65 each

The cost is only $4395 per tag.

2 pc. Fish & Chips

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT $ 5595

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Special Oil Change Price!

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S. S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N

$

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Coupon expires 10/31/2010.

FORD • CHEVY • CHRYSLER • DODGE • VW • GMC • KIA

3 Rooms Cleaned

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VALID OCT 31, 2010 ONLY Must present coupon to redeem /PUWBMJEXJUIPUIFSPGGFSTĂž1MFBTFOP TVCTUJUVUJPOTĂž##$8

Modern, State of the Art Facility

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

Fall l! p S ecia

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OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/10.

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Fish House

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4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

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It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

Not Scary...

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

M O T O R S

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location.

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

WE PAY YOU!

SAVE $4,000!

See reverse for details

GR A N D R E-OPEN IN GS / 5-YEA R A N N IV ER SA R Y SA LE! Sale on decks, subs, amps, alarms, remote starters, video, and GPS systems. Specializing in all forms of vehicles ... Boats, Cars, RVs, Campers & Hot Rods.

Jason “Owner�

*call for details

FALL CAR CARE SPECIAL

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

NEW LOCATION! 1538 SW INDIAN AVENUE

Free Bleach* with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary

• Coolant Replacement with 1 gallon of coolant • Brake Inspection • Full Safety Inspection Includes inspection of: hoses, belts, tires, fluids, etc.

$

MINIMUM $ SAVINGS OF

*

44.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires October 31, 2010

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

360

Gentle Dentistry Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

( 541 ) 548-5105

BIGGEST TIRE SALE OF THE YEAR Get up to

80

$

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear or Dunlop tires.

Double your Mail-In Rebate up to OR

160

$

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear or Dunlop Credit Card.1 See this ad for more details.2

1. Subject to Credit approval. Offer valid 10/02/10 - 12/04/10. One Mail-In Rebate Check per qualifying

George “Associate�

purchase. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for Rebate Check delivery. See Retailer for complete details.

No Interest If Paid In Full Within 6 Months

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th • Redmond

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

$

250 Minimum Purchase Required. Minimum Payments Required. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189


Tuesday, October 19, 2010

THE BULLETIN

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C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$

65

14

OIL CHANGES!

THE MURRAY & HOLT MOTORS KEY TAGS ARE HERE! 541-382-2222

murrayandholt.com

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

klin in Bend.

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 10/31/2010.

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: October 31, 2010

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

541-382-3173 99

Expires 10/31/10

of Central Oregon

BW1010

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 10/31/10

BW1010

Whole House Special

Call today! (541) 312-4400 www.bendhealthsourcechiropractor.com Offer expires 11/30/10 This offer does not apply to Federal Insurance Beneiciaries

Take your lunch and stuff it. Open Late & We Deliver!

$

The World’s Greenest Carpet CleanerŽŽ

5 Rooms, 1 Hallway Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees BW1010

Buy One – Get One Half Off

1/2 OFF PITA

FALL CAR CARE SPECIAL • Coolant Replacement with 1 gallon of coolant • Brake Inspection • Full Safety Inspection Includes inspection of: hoses, belts, tires, fluids, etc.

Buy any pita and get the second pita of equal or lesser value half off.

WE PAY YOU!

$

*

44.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires October 31, 2010

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

Coupon required. Exp. 10-31-10. Offers cannot be combined.

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

Not Scary...

EXCEPT WHEN IT DISAPPEARS.

SAVE $4,000!

Scream of a Deal!

Our Large Jack-o-Lantern Pizza

6

$

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

DER

OR PRE-

TOD

See reverse for details

99

"7"*-"#-&0/ 0$5 0/-:-*.*5 /0$0610//&$&44"3:Ăž/057"-*%8*5)"/:05)&30''&34

AY

Ăž-BSHF+BDLP-BOUFSO Ăž-BSHF$PXCPZ1J[[B Ăž$IFFTZ#SFBE Ăž5XP-JUFS4PEBT

Halloween Only!

24

$

Halloween ONLY

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through November 1, 2010.

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

144

Expires 10/31/10

ÂŽ

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

$

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees

™

M O T O R S

3 Rooms Cleaned

Fall l! Specia

With your donation of a canned good to the Central Oregon Food Bank

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/10.

ÂŽ

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

Fish House

™

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

FOR ONLY $14 EACH!

Special Oil Change Price!

Facing Drake Park

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

$17.95 With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

FREE Consultation and Exam

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

20% OFF

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

We Can Help

Modern, State of the Art Facility

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

Back Pain Frightening You?

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

$14.65 each

The cost is only $4395 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

ALPINE DENTAL

Special Oil Change Price! Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

99

VALID OCT 31, 2010 ONLY Must present coupon to redeem /PUWBMJEXJUIPUIFSPGGFSTĂž1MFBTFOP TVCTUJUVUJPOTĂž##$8

Free Bleach*

(At Highway 97)

with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary

541-389-2963

*call for details

ANY LARGE PIZZA Original Crust Only

$

10 00

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location.

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

80

$

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear or Dunlop tires.

Gentle Dentistry Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

(541 ) 548-5105

4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT $ 5595

541-550-5555 611 NE PURCELL

(REG. $79.95)

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

Check & Adjust Front & Rear Wheel Alignment Check Tire Wear & Pressure Check Steering & Suspension EXPIRES 10/31/10

ALL MAKES & MODELS!

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

BIGGEST TIRE SALE OF THE YEAR Get up to

360

MINIMUM $ SAVINGS OF

FORD • CHEVY • CHRYSLER • DODGE • VW • GMC • KIA

BEND 1552 NE Third Street

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

Double your Mail-In Rebate up to OR

160

$

GRAND RE-OPENINGS / 5-YEAR ANNIVERSARY SALE!

1. Subject to Credit approval. Offer valid 10/02/10 - 12/04/10. One Mail-In Rebate Check per qualifying purchase. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for Rebate Check delivery. See Retailer for complete details.

No Interest If Paid In Full Within 6 Months

4

Sale on decks, subs, amps, alarms, remote starters, video, and GPS systems. Specializing in all forms of vehicles ... Boats, Cars, RVs, Campers & Hot Rods.

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear or Dunlop Credit Card.1 See this ad for more details.2 Jason “Owner�

NEW LOCATION! 1538 SW INDIAN AVENUE

2 pc. Fish & Chips

George “Associate�

$ 99 pers p i k S

3 pc. Fish & Chips

$ 99

5

We now have

ÂŽ

d About Seafood! l i W

Expires 12/31/10 ÂŽ

$

250 Minimum Purchase Required. Minimum Payments Required. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th • Redmond

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

Bend 61165 S. Hwy 97 in the Wal-Mart parking lot

CIAL FINAN

ICES SERV

(541) 382-7851

CARD


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

)

(

)

(

FREE INSPECTION

)

(

We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

)

(

DIESEL OIL CHANGE $34.65 10/31/10

Loyalty Key Tag $103.96

541-382-2222

murrayandholt.com

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection

klin in Bend.

That’s just $34.65 per Oil Change Retail Value $209.85! Savings $105.89

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Super Catch

2

3

Shrimp & Fish Basket

4

$ 99

w/coupon

$ 99

w/coupon

w/coupon

NEW PATIENTS

SPECIAL $

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

95

49

HWY 20

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

$

fession

al Ct.

21

*

OIL CHANGE

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

FAVORITE TOPPING

$

FREE Side of Wings

3

Any X-Large Pizza

With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price Original Crust Only

2

Any Large Pizza

1

with Purchase of any Reg. Price Large Pizza

Any Medium Pizza

Original Crust Only

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

We Cater to Cowards • Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

541-382-3173

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

off

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

611 NE PURCELL

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

off $

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

of Central Oregon

*Excludes Diesel, 5 Quart Maximum. Expires 10/31/10

Chem-Dry of Bend

off $

Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

95

541-550-5555

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/10.

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

FREE TWISTS

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

Fish House

27th St.

COSTCO

NE Pro

NE Williamson Blvd.

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

d.

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

Offer expires 10/31/10

PURCELL

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

New customers only

nR

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

so

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

Alpine Dental

am

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

FOR ONLY $14 EACH!

(541) 382-2281

illi

Skippers

$17.95 Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

NE Neff Rd.

with this coupon $170 value!

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

2078 NE Professional Ct.

W

Skippers

®

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

ALPINE DENTAL

NE

Skippers

®

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

)

SAVE $120 ®

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

(

Senior Meal Deal

$ 99

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through November 1, 2010.

Got a nasty ache or pain that keeps haunting you and just won’t go away? Do you have trouble getting up from your chair because your back or hips feel stiff and sore? Does leg pain keep you up at night?

Chicken Caesar Combo with 22oz. fountain drink and chips

Open Late & We Deliver!

6.

$

Facing Drake Park

Find out why today! Call 541-312-4400 Donald A. Halcrow, DC

99

® ™

® ™

(541) 312-4400 • 365 NE Greenwood Ave, Suite 2 • Bend

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

• Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection • FREE tire rotation ALL FOR ...

$

*Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

*

24.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires October. 31, 2010

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

Coupon required. Exp. 10-31-10. Offers cannot be combined.

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)*

WITH FREE TIRE ROTATION

www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

Take your lunch and stuff it.

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 11/01/10

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th Redmond

Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 11/01/10

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

SW 17th Street

We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

10% OFF ALL OF NOVEMBER 2010


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

$17.95

FOR ONLY $14 EACH! With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 11/30/10.

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! DIESEL OIL CHANGE $34.65 10/31/10

Fish House

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

541-382-3173

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 11/30/10.

Loyalty Key Tag $103.96

541-382-2222

murrayandholt.com

d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

Bend.

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection That’s just $34.65 per Oil Change Retail Value $209.85! Savings $105.89

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

NEW PATIENTS

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

SPECIAL

Got a nasty ache or pain that keeps haunting you and just won’t go away? Do you have trouble getting up from your chair because your back or hips feel stiff and sore? Does leg pain keep you up at night?

IICRC Certiied Technician

$

ALPINE DENTAL

95

49

2078 NE Professional Ct.

(541) 382-2281

SAVE $120

NE Neff Rd.

illi am

nR

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE

$

www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

24.95

)

(

)

Coupon required. Exp. 10-31-10. Offers cannot be combined.

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)*

)

)

PURCELL

HWY 20

95

21

OIL CHANGE

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

Skippers

®

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

3

$ 99

w/coupon

Skippers

®

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

4

w/coupon

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th Redmond

Skippers

Expires 12/31/10. No cash value. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. One coupon valid for all in your party.

$

Any X-Large Pizza

With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price

Any Large Pizza

Any Medium Pizza

any Reg. Price Large Pizza

Original Crust Only

Original Crust Only

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 10/31/10 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$ 99

®

Side of Wings 3off $2off $1off FREE with Purchase of

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS!

Shrimp & Fish Basket

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

SW 17th Street

2

FAVORITE TOPPING

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

w/coupon

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

Friday Appointments Available

611 NE PURCELL

Senior Meal Deal

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

541-550-5555

$ 99

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through November 1, 2010.

We Cater to Cowards

*Excludes Diesel, 5 Quart Maximum. Expires 10/31/10

Super Catch

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

FREE TWISTS

*

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

$

Chem-Dry of Bend

FREE INSPECTION

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

COSTCO

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

®

*Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

(

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

Downtown Bend 806 NW Brooks St. Suite 110 p (541) 389-PITA f (541) 389-8585

)

(

99

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

®

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

(

al Ct.

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

6.

$

fession

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires October. 31, 2010

(

Combo with 22oz. fountain drink and chips

Facing Drake Park

*

Offer expires 10/31/10

Chicken Caesar

Open Late & We Deliver!

WITH FREE TIRE ROTATION • Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection • FREE tire rotation ALL FOR ...

d.

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

so

(541) 312-4400 • 365 NE Greenwood Ave, Suite 2 • Bend

NE Pro

27th St.

W

New customers only

Take your lunch and stuff it.

Alpine Dental

NE

with this coupon $170 value!

NE Williamson Blvd.

Find out why today! Call 541-312-4400 Donald A. Halcrow, DC

10% OFF ALL OF NOVEMBER 2010

We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

$

99

29

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 11/01/10

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 11/01/10

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

Bulletin Daily Paper 10/19/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday October 19, 2010

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