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Health reform’s effect on local business Candidates Speakers outline pros and cons for STATE TREASURER

detail plans for office By Erin Golden The Bulletin

With many Oregon families and businesses still hurting from the recession and lawmakers making budget cuts, the candidates for state treasurer say the state’s top financial officer needs to be someone with the right kind of plans — and the right experience. But the major-party contenders, Sen. Chris Telfer, a Republican state senator from Bend, and Ted Wheeler, a Democrat who has served as treasurer since March, don’t necessarily agree on what that means. Both candidates say they want to boost Oregon businesses and keep more money in the state. They both want to help create more jobs and put the state’s finances on solid ground. And both candidates say their experience in financial management makes them better suited for the challenges sure to face the next treasurer. Telfer, 60, is a certified public accountant who made the move to state politics after several years on the Bend City Council. She also served on the Bend-La Pine Schools Budget Committee, the Central Oregon Cities Organization and with Economic Development for Central Oregon. See Treasurer / A5

Central Oregon employers at event By David Holley The Bulletin

Certain aspects of health care reform may be a boon to smallbusiness owners who pay portions of employees’ health premiums, earning them as much

as a 35 percent tax credit. But the reform legislation also has a couple of downsides for certain business owners, according to one Bend accountant, such as larger amounts of tax paperwork and an increased tax on

high-income earners. Todd Gerdes, a certified public accountant in Bend, said small-business owners now can access a tax credit through tax year 2013 if they pay more than 50 percent of employees’ health care premiums. As a nonrefundable credit, employers can earn back as much as 35 percent of the amount they pay on the health premiums. The credit lowers as the company gets

larger and pays higher wages. In 2014, the 35 percent credit rises to 50 percent. Tax-exempt organizations can receive a 25 percent credit, which rises to 35 percent in 2014. If a firm has 10 or more fulltime employees, the 35 percent credit lowers for each additional employee, until it is gone at 25 employees. The credit also lowers when employee wages rise above $25,000, disappearing at

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When Central Oregon Community College went out in November 2009 for what became a successful $41.6 million bond campaign to pay for a variety of new buildings on its campus and around the region, it received support from a political action committee called COCC Yes: Friends of the College. That committee received donations from a variety of community members, companies and nonprofits around the region. It also received a $10,000 cash contribution from the Associated Students of Central Oregon Community College (ASCOCC), the college’s student government. Now, with the college and ASCOCC seeking to clarify its ability to hand out student fees and its degree of autonomy, that donation — and whether it was a conflict of interest or even illegal — is the subject of some debate. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

G

iselle Chesney jumps out from her hiding place to scare Jennifer Perry and John Gottfried. Perry and Gottfried were walking through the Dark Intentions Haunted House at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center on Thursday. The fourth annual event features two

haunted houses. Proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation. The haunted houses are open this weekend. More information is available at scaremegood.vpweb.com.

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Student fees used to support COCC bond By Sheila G. Miller

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CHILE: Miners readjust to surface life, cope with celebrity status, Page A3

$50,000. Because it’s a nonrefundable credit, it cannot be used if the business owner owes no income taxes, Gerdes said. Only refundable credits give taxpayers a kickback when they owe no taxes. “It (the nonrefundable credit) is a carry-over credit, so it would go forward to a future year,” he said. See Reform / A5

Peace Corps pioneers look back on service By John Keilman Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — It was well after midnight at the University of Michigan when presidential candidate John F. Kennedy gave a short speech that would, in thousands of small ways, reshape the world. “How many of you who are going to be doctors are willing to spend your days in Ghana?” he asked a crowd of students 50

years ago this week. “Technicians or engineers, how many of you are willing to work in the Foreign Service and spend your lives traveling around the world? “On your willingness to do that, not merely to serve one year or two years in the service, but on your willingness to contribute part of your life to this country, I think will depend the answer

whether a free society can compete.” Thus was born the idea of the Peace Corps, and when Kennedy took office the next year, he swiftly made it a reality. He called for volunteers to spend two years improving the health, education and economic prospects of some of the poorest people on earth. Thousands of Americans stepped forward. One was

Love’s litmus test revisited 28 years later By Lois Romano The Washington Post

My daughter informed me that she recently dumped a guy because, when she asked him the meaning of a word, he said, “Are you serious?” “It’s like a huge test for me. ... It told me he felt intellectually superior to me,” explained Jenna, a college sophomore. “He’s the kind of guy who would try to make me seem stupid in front of our kids.” Whoa ... give the guy a break, I thought. I twitched my mouth disapprovingly.

You ... don’t ... get ... it, she conveyed by rolling her eyes. In fact, I should have gotten it instantly. Twentyeight years ago, my article for The Washington Post, “Love and the Litmus Test,” essentially justified the kind of subjective, quick and seemingly irrational judgment that Jenna had made. I described it as the moment in every relationship when the euphoria of chemistry and promise gives way to the reality of everyday life — and a decision to be made. See Test / A4

Nomenee Robinson, then a young architect and city planner working in Chicago’s Water Department. He had an itch for adventure and a desire to help others. And by the autumn of 1961, he was in India’s Punjab state, assisting with building projects in a country struggling to gain its footing after centuries of colonial rule. See Peace Corps / A5

Government fees The $10,000 donation came from student fees collected by the college, which the student government then divides up among clubs, activities and programs. Students pay a $1.50 ASCOCC student fee for every credit they take each term. The maximum a student can pay is $18 per term. According to ASCOCC’s website, the student government expects to collect about $260,000 in student fees in 2010-11. College Relations Director Ron Paradis confirmed that a $10,000 donation was made to the committee on a COCC check signed by a COCC official. “Last year, members of ASCOCC were actively involved in the COCC Yes campaign. As part of that effort, the campaign asked for their financial support,” Paradis said in a prepared statement Thursday. “The question came to us (before the donation was made) about whether or not ASCOCC providing a contribution would be legal. We checked into it and concluded that it was.” See COCC / A4

Author Lois Romano revisited her rules about romance, outlined in a Washington Post article 28 years ago, with her daughters Jenna, left, and Kristen Holmes, shown in Washington. Bill O’Leary Washington Post


A2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Thor Swift / New York Times News Service

Dr. Abraham Verghese, center, the senior associate chairman for the theory and practice of medicine at Stanford University, teaches a room of his students a physical technique for helping to diagnose various cerebellar disorders, in Palo Alto, Calif. Verghese is on a mission to train his students in the lost art of the physical exam.

The lost art of the physical exam By Denise Grady New York Times News Service

STANFORD, Calif. — For a 55-year-old man with a bad back and a bum knee from too much tennis, Dr. Abraham Verghese was amazingly limber as he showed a roomful of doctorsin-training a twisting, dancelike walk he had spied in the hospital corridor the day before. He challenged them to diagnose it. Hemiplegia? Sensory ataxia? Chorea? Spastic diplegia?

Verghese is the senior associate chairman for the theory and practice of medicine at Stanford University, and he is on a mission to bring back something he considers a lost art: the physical exam. The old-fashioned touching, looking and listening — the once-prized, almost magical skills of the doctor who missed nothing and could swiftly diagnose a peculiar walk, sluggish thyroid or leaky heart valve using just keen eyes, practiced hands and a stethoscope.

Art and medicine may seem disparate worlds, but Verghese insists that for him they are one. He is out to save the physical exam because it seems to be wasting away, he says, in an era of CT, ultrasound, MRI, countless lab tests and doctor visits that whip by like speed dates. Medical schools in the United States have let the exam slide, Verghese says, noting that over time he has encountered more and more interns and residents who do not know how to test a

patient’s reflexes or palpate a spleen. Verghese trained before MRI or CT existed, in Ethiopia and India, where fancy equipment was scarce and good examination skills were a matter of necessity and pride. A proper exam also earns trust, he said, and serves as a ritual that transforms two strangers into doctor and patient. “Patients know in a heartbeat if they’re getting a clumsy exam,” he said.

SCIENCE OF SPORTS

Breaking curveball an illusion, scientists say By Randolph E. Schmid The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — When those curveballs from playoff pitchers like Phillies ace Roy Halladay near the plate, their sudden drop may be a mirage, scientists say. It doesn’t really matter, though, because most people still can’t hit them. That movement is called a “break,” when the ball suddenly seems to drop sharply, usually resulting in the batter swinging above or below it. The ball actually follows a smooth arc from pitcher to catcher but seems to break when it moves from one part of the batter’s vision to another, according to researchers Arthur Shapiro of American University and Zhong-Lin Lu of the University of Southern California. The solution, they agree, has been the mantra of dads and coaches for decades: “Keep your eye on the ball.” And, as batters from Little League to the majors can attest, “Easier said than done.” “The argument been going on forever about whether (curveballs) break or not,” observed Rob Gray, a psychology professor at Arizona State University who was not part of Shapiro and Lu’s research team. Scientists will tell you the ball follows a smooth curve, he said, while baseball players use terms like “falls off the table.” “We tell players to keep their eye on the ball, but you just can’t,” Gray said. “It is physically impossible to follow a major league baseball all the way to the plate.” “The curveball does curve, but the curve has been measured and shown to be gradual,” Shapiro said. “It’s always going to follow a parabolic path. But from a hitter’s point of view, an approaching ball can appear to break, drop or do a whole range of unusual behaviors.” The problem is that how you see the ball differs depending on whether the eye is focused on it or if the peripheral vision at the side of the eye is being used, Lu and Shapiro report in a research paper published online Wednesday in the journal PLoS ONE.

Batters focus on the ball as it leaves the pitcher, Lu explained, but when it’s about 20 feet from home plate they often switch to peripheral vision, then go back to central vision as the ball arrives at the plate. That can cause the ball to appear to break as much as a foot, the researchers said. It also explains the apparent rise of some fastballs, they added. Indeed, in their research they

won a prize for an illusion illustrating their theory demonstrating how an object falling in a straight line can seem to change direction. Lu said he and Shapiro began studying the subject because they realize the “break” of a curve is inconsistent with physics. Since then, he said, sports researchers have approached them for help in finding ways to defeat a curveball.

He said fans watching games on television also say a curveball appears to break when observed from behind home plate. That is a geometric illusion, he said, caused by the fact that for the first part of a pitch, the viewer sees little or no vertical drop. Because the pitcher throws the ball at a slight upward angle, the first part of the pitch appears more or less flat. Then the drop seen near home plate surprises the eye.

LOS ANGELES — Sooner or later, love usually ends up hurting. But in its early, blissful throes, it actually lessens pain — at least of the physical kind. That’s the finding, reported this week, of a study by pain scientists and a psychologist who studies love. The study, published online in the journal PLoS One, sprang from a meeting of minds between Arthur Aron of State University of New York at Stony Brook, a longtime researcher of the science of love, and Dr. Sean Mackey, a pain scientist at Stanford University. They knew that a few earlier studies had suggested that love relieved pain, but they wanted to go further and find out just what was happening in the brain. All 15 subjects were asked to bring in six photos: three of their beloved and three of a comparably attractive person they knew. The researchers heated the palms of the subjects’ left hands to a point that caused either a moderate or high degree of pain, at which point the subjects looked at a photo, either of their beloved or the attractive acquaintance. In a third round of experiments, the researchers tested the effects of mere distraction, which is known to reduce pain, by having the subjects perform mental tasks (such as thinking of all sports that didn’t involve a ball) while their palms were heated. The photo of the beloved and mental distraction appeared to reduce pain by about the same amount: 36 percent to 45 percent for moderate pain, and 12 percent to 13 percent for high pain. (The photo of a pretty peer had no effect.) But when the scientists redid the experiment while scanning subjects’ brains, they saw that the photo and the mentaldistraction task activated very different parts of the brain. The distraction task engaged the higher, thinking parts of the brain. A photo of the beloved, on the other hand, engaged the more primitive, “reptilian” regions — reward centers related to urges and cravings that are also implicated in addictions.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 A3

TS  Challenge to health care law can move forward, judge says

First lady encourages early voting while casting her ballot

By Kevin Sack New York Times News Service

By Oscar Avila Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — First lady Michelle Obama promoted early voting Thursday morning — in words and example — at a time when both political parties are encouraging their supporters not to wait until Election Day. Obama, who is making a Midwestern campaign swing, cast her ballot at the Martin Luther King Community Center, not far from the Kenwood home that she and President Barack Obama rarely get to visit. Clutching a blue folder, Obama presented her credentials to election officials before being led to the polling station. Asked if she was familiar with touch-screen voting, Obama nodded and then spent about 6 minutes casting her ballot. Obama abided by election laws that prohibit electioneering within 100 feet of a polling place. She did pose for pictures and told one voter: “Make sure you get everybody out there voting. This one counts, as much as the other one.” The early voting event was the last public appearance for Obama during a return visit to Chicago that lasted less than 24 hours. She appeared Wednesday at a Wisconsin fundraiser for U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold and then came to Illinois to raise money for Senate nominee Alexi Giannoulias and House candidates Dan Seals and U.S. Reps. Debbie Halvorson and Bill Foster. She was scheduled to continue campaigning in Colorado, Connecticut, New York, Washington state and California for House and Senate candidates.

Jose Manuel de la Maza / Chilean Presidential Press Ofice

In this photo released by the Chilean Presidential Press Office, miner Mario Sepulveda, sitting on the floor, recounts experiences from being trapped in the San Jose mine as fellow miners and Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera, front row fifth from right, look on in the hospital where the miners are undergoing medical checkups in Copiapo, Chile, on Thursday.

Chile miners start new lives, adjust to freedom By Michael Warren The Associated Press

COPIAPO, Chile — The Chilean miners began their unfamiliar new lives as national heroes Thursday and got a taste of what awaits them outside the hospital doors — a swarm of reporters, TV producers, publicity agents and even soccer teams all desperate for a piece of their story. A day after their epic rescue, still wearing the oddly fashionable sunglasses that protected them from the bright light when they were hoisted from 2,000 feet underground, the men posed in hospital bathrobes for a group photo with President Sebastian Pinera. Unity helped the men, known as “los 33,” survive for 69 days

underground, including more than two weeks when no one knew whether they were alive. But the moment they walk out the hospital doors, they’ll go beyond the reach of a government operation that has cared for, fed and protected them in a carefully coordinated campaign to ensure each of them would leave in top condition. “Now they’re going to have to find their equilibrium and take care of themselves,” the hospital chaplain, Luis Lopez, told The Associated Press. Three of the men were discharged from the hospital Thursday evening and others were expected to follow on Friday and over the weekend. Chilean state television

showed the men leaving Copiapo’s regional hospital by a side exit and getting into a white van. Bolivian Carlos Mamani, the only foreigner among the group, and Juan Illanes, also headed to their homes. The government promised six months of psychological treatment, made sure each has a bank account only he can operate, and coached them on dealing with rude questions. The rescue team even asked Guinness World Records to honor all 33 with the record for longest time trapped underground, rather than the last miner out, Luis Urzua. Guinness spokeswoman Jamie Panas said the organization was studying the question.

PENSACOLA, Fla. — In a foreboding ruling for the Obama administration, a federal judge in Florida decreed Thursday that a legal challenge to the new health care law by officials from 20 states could move forward and warned that he would have to be persuaded that its keystone provision — a requirement that most Americans obtain insurance — is constitutional. “At this stage in the litigation, this is not even a close call,” wrote Judge Roger Vinson of U.S. District Court in Pensacola, Fla., before asserting that the insurance mandate was an unprecedented exercise of congressional authority. “Of course, to say that something is ‘novel’ and ‘unprecedented’ does not necessarily mean that it is ‘unconstitutional’ and ‘improper,’” Vinson continued. “There may be a first time for anything. But, at this stage of the case, the plaintiffs have most definitely stated a plausible claim.”

Vinson, a senior judge who was nominated by President Ronald Reagan, indicated last month that he would let the case proceed. In Thursday’s opinion, he formally rejected the federal government’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit, which now proceeds to a full hearing on the constitutional issues on Dec. 16. The Florida case is one of more than 15 legal challenges to the health care law that are aiming for an ultimate hearing before the United States Supreme Court. Last week, a federal judge in Michigan became the first to rule on the merits, deciding that the insurance requirement was constitutional. The case is proceeding on a parallel track with, but slightly behind, a similar case filed in federal court in Richmond by Virginia’s attorney general. The judge in that case plans to hear oral arguments on Monday.

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AFGHANISTAN

U.S. uses attacks to nudge Taliban toward end of war By Dexter Filkins New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Airstrikes on Taliban insurgents have risen sharply here over the past four months, the latest piece in what appears to be a coordinated effort by U.S. commanders to bleed the insurgency and pressure its leaders to negotiate an end to the war. U.S. pilots pounded the Taliban with 2,100 bombs or missiles from June through September, with 700 in September alone, Air Force officers here said Thursday. That is an increase of nearly 50 percent over the same period last year, records show. The stepped-up air campaign is part of what appears to be an intensifying U.S. effort, orchestrated by Gen. David H. Petraeus, to break the military stalemate here as pressure intensifies at home to bring the nine-year-old war to an end. In recent weeks, Petraeus has increased raids by Special Forces

“The Taliban have not rejected peace completely.” — Burhanuddin Rabbani, leader of peace-seeking council units and launched large operations to clear territory of Taliban militants. And it seems increasingly clear that he is partly using the attacks to expand a parallel path to the end of the war: a U.S.-led diplomatic initiative, very much in its infancy but ultimately aimed at persuading the Taliban — or large parts of the movement — to make peace with the Afghan government. In recent weeks, U.S. officials have spoken approvingly in public of new contacts between Taliban leaders and the Afghan government. On Wednesday they acknowledged their active

involvement by helping Taliban leaders travel to Kabul to talk peace. On the diplomatic front, Afghan leaders said Thursday that they were seeing what they believed were the first positive signs from the Taliban. In a news conference in Kabul, Burhanuddin Rabbani, the leader of a council charged with making peace, said that discussions with Taliban leaders — carried out through third parties — were under way. “The Taliban have not rejected peace completely,” said Rabbani, a former Afghan president. They want the talks “to take place,” he added. For all the efforts, U.S. and Afghan officials were quick to play down any suggestion that peace was at hand — or even remotely near. Most of the Taliban leaders, if not the movement’s foot soldiers, have given no sign that they are willing to make any sort of deal.

LIQUOR STORE Saturday Oct. 23, 2010 1:00 - 5:00 pm New owners Cathy & Bill invite you to join them in celebration of the new North Redmond Liquor Store Oneil Junction

French labor dispute threatens fuel supply Bloomberg News PARIS — French labor unrest threatened to trigger fuel shortages as refinery workers Thursday extended their protest against a plan to raise the retirement age, while disruptions in public transport eased. Total, Europe’s biggest oil refiner, started to halt operations at all its French plants. Workers at the company’s Donges refinery near Nantes voted to remain on strike until Monday, according to the CGT union. With the government of President Nicolas Sarkozy maintaining that it won’t back down from plans to raise the minimum retirement age to 62 from 60, unions promised to extend the stalemate.

“He has not budged from his position,” Bernard Thibault, who heads the CGT, or Confederation Generale du Travail, said Wednesday on Canal Plus television. “His point of departure is ‘no negotiations.’ We will continue.”

Enough for a month Eleven of the country’s 12 refineries aren’t supplying service stations, the CGT union said. Transport Minister Dominique Bussereau said on LCI television Thursday that the nation has enough fuel for at least a month, so long as consumers stop “precautionary buying.” Refinery workers are demand-

ing that their jobs be classified as hardship jobs, allowing them to retire at 60. The government says it needs to balance the pension system’s budget by 2018. The pension reform is part of the government’s struggle to reduce the overall deficit. This year the gap will stand at 7.7 percent of gross domestic product and Sarkozy plans to cut it to 6 percent next year. The reform bill has been approved by the lower house of parliament, the National Assembly, while the Senate has approved key planks, such as raising the minimum age for a pension to 62 from 60 and the age for a full pension to 67 from 65.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

COCC

Test

cooks,” Jenna said, “because I can’t.”

Continued from A1 The Bulletin has requested a copy of any correspondence debating the legality of the donation. He said administrators will consider the donation as it discusses the student government’s “roles, responsibilities and relationships.” “As was the case back then, there are a number of opinions on the topic, and there continues to be,” he said. “At this point, we’ve not concluded anything.” The issue has come up now, nearly a year after the successful election, because the ASCOCC this week hired a lawyer and a public relations consultant using student fees. The lawyer, Greg Lynch of Miller Nash LLP, was hired to serve as ASCOCC’s advocate in negotiations with administrators regarding its autonomy and its authority to allocate student fees, and to clarify its relationship with the college. The student fee went into effect in 1993, and student government has existed at the college at least since 1955. But administrators never created policies or regulations relating to the student government and its rights and relationship with the college. Paradis said Wednesday that student government members approached administrators about the way in which the student fee was ratified. That’s when college officials determined the board never approved the fee, it simply approved a budget with the fee included.

Continued from A1 Can I survive one more evening with a guy who spends 10 minutes reviewing the dinner check with his calculator? Am I mature enough to sit on the beach with someone wearing a teenyweeny red stretch bathing suit? Is it unreasonable to ask someone on the third date to get his back hair waxed if he expects a fourth date? Reader reaction, with folks wanting to share their personal litmus tests, was so overwhelming that the story became the basis of a 1984 book, “When to Dump Your Date.” With my daughters Jenna, 20, and Kristen, 24, in their dating prime, the time seemed right to revisit the premise. So herewith we offer views from a couple of millennials, juxtaposed with the opinions of the previous generation. (Of course, these are not necessarily the dating mores of the entire Net Generation.) Our broad generational differences were immediately apparent. A number of their litmus tests revolve around social networking, nonexistent three decades ago. There even seem to be cultural differences between the two of them: Kristen remembers when not everything could be found on the Internet; Jenna does not. On some fronts, their litmus tests are far more progressive than mine. Coming out of the ’60s, my peers considered themselves feminist prototypes who were hell-bent on having careers and families. Yet not a single woman in my original research mentioned cooking as a litmus test for a potential mate. In fact, a guy who wanted to cook you a three-course dinner back then was considered a little too domesticated. For my daughters, ineptitude in the kitchen is almost a deal-breaker. “Cooking is a huge deal,” said Kristen. “It’s such a nice skill, but beyond that it’s a telling quality. ... It says to me independence, confidence, unfazed by gender roles. ...” “I have to have a guy who

Taste in movies

Defining role of student government In an interview Wednesday, ASCOCC marketing and advertising coordinator Brenda Pierce said defining the student government’s relationship with the college is key. She said in some instances, as when it made the donation and worked on the bond measure, the student government was told it is autonomous. Pierce, as well as several other current ASCOCC members, were involved in the bond campaign in 2009 and also served on ASCOCC during the 2009-10 school year. Now college officials and ASCOCC representatives, along with their attorneys, hope to set those policies in place. Jennifer Hertel from the Secretary of State’s elections office said she doesn’t believe the donation was against any campaign finance laws. She said it’s possible other laws, other than those related directly to campaign finance, could say otherwise. “There was no violation of campaign finance law,” she said. “There’s no prohibition as to who can make contributions. As long as they’re reported, they’re OK on that level. No complaint has been filed.” Oregon statute does prohibit public employees from promoting or advocating for a measure’s adoption or a candidate during work hours. Employees are free to express personal political views in their places of work.

“Movies can be a giveaway about the style and taste of a potential soul mate. ... When she prefers Cheech and Chong’s first movie to “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” the time may not be right for a romantic weekend in New York. ...” — “When to Dump Your Date” Jenna: “You put way too much emphasis on classic cultural references. I don’t think they resonate anymore. You have the ‘Casablanca’ Test — you have to have seen it. Look, everyone should know by now certain lines come from the movie, ‘We’ll always have Paris’ and ‘Play it, Sam’ ... but if you haven’t seen the movie, so what? ... For me, a guy has to at least know of ‘The Daily Show’ and ‘The Colbert Report.’ If they don’t, well, they’re really out of it.”

Reading habits “Does he read a lot? Does she know Jung from Jong. ... Books — they bring out the intellectual snob in all of us.” Kristen: “I still have a literature test, but I think I’m a rare case. It’s lame if a guy doesn’t even have a bookshelf. ... My last boyfriend didn’t like to read. We’d be hanging out and I would be reading, and he would be like, ‘What are you doing now? What are you doing now? What are you doing now? I’m bored.’ ... But he could sit and watch golf on TV, pretty much the most boring sport ever, for hours at a time. ... A lot of people don’t read anymore. Everything is so accessible. So guys are getting stupider and stupider.” Jenna: “I just don’t care if guys read books. ... No one looks at (the right kind of literature) anymore. Everything is available on ebrary. A lot of guys now don’t even have bookshelves. Books are a hassle to move.”

Picking up the check “The sluggish check-payer is enough to give any woman a pit

Deal-breakers Washington Post readers share their own deal-breakers via Twitter: • Texting, Facebooking or Tweeting during the first few dates. — DistrictOfAris • When they won’t let you Text, Facebook or Tweet during the first few dates. — chrisatyoursix • When he complains the Applebee’s doesn’t have wifi. — theotypes • When he says, “I’m not a racist, but. ...” — catclo • On the first date, when he leans over, pulls a hair from your head and flosses his teeth with it. It happened. — quotergal • If he drinks a Diet Coke, orders only a salad, or in any other way indicates he is counting calories. — AnnHollingshead • They can’t tell the difference between “your” and “you’re.” — groobie1 • “Remember when we got in that hot tub and ... oh, that wasn’t you?” — gr8scott80 • When his old-fashioned attitude prematurely assumes my first name will be paired with his last. — HoyaSteph • When your date keeps referring to Shakira as Colombia’s second finest export. — captmoaning • When he tries to take home your half-eaten dinner in a to-go box ... for himself. — NatyB • When he highlights Maxim as a favorite thing to read — on his online profile. — gelasticturtle • Usually, the breakup precedes the search for a reason. — rstilskin — The Washington Post

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

BEND

RIVER

PROMENADE,

BEND

Phone etiquette “First Night turn-offs are not confined to the big blunders. ... A sure-fire bad sign: When he starts making very important calls as soon as he walks into your apartment.” (Note: This would have been from a land line!) Kristen: “Phone etiquette is still really important. If a guy ever picks up a phone during a meal, I would never talk to him again. Sometimes we’ll be at dinner, and a guy will pick up his phone and say, ‘Oh. Don’t worry, it’s my mom.’ First of all, I’m not worried. Second of all, I understand that you have this relationship with your mom. I have one with my mom, too, but it’s not like we’re going to be out to dinner for seven hours. I bet she can wait.” Jenna: “I cannot tolerate a guy who, when you’re out to dinner, puts his phone on the table. I want to say, ‘What? Do you have a child who’s allergic to peanuts at a sleepover at a bar?’ What is it exactly that he is afraid of missing that’s more interesting than the date? You’re so insecure that you want to be somewhere else?”

Social networking

in her full stomach.”

“(The perfect woman) ... takes a telephone message from your old girlfriend, gives it to you, and never mentions it again.”

Jenna: “The check shouldn’t even hit the table if you’re out to dinner — he should grab it out of the waitress’s hand. On a first date, if a guy doesn’t reach for the check, if he looks the other way or turns it over and says you owe $7.50 — I’m outta there. But whereas in your generation, it was expected the entire time,

Social media outlets have made the very notion of telephone etiquette seem quaint. If only it were still so simple. Cell phones have supplanted land lines. Texting has replaced talking. BlackBerrys have overtaken phones. And Facebook trumps them all. Kristen: “Facebook is kind of a weird thing — it has many

Do’s and don’ts A packet of information from the Secretary of State’s office to the Oregon School Boards Association detailing election law complaints and violations included a complaint of a water district using public funds and resources to publish material promoting a ballot material. In that case, a violation was found. An OSBA flyer included in that packet details election do’s and don’ts. “School districts, ESDs and community colleges cannot use public resources to advocate a position on a ballot measure. Public resources mean money, staff time during working hours, vehicles or travel allowances, or facilities and equipment.” But the question may be whether student fees are considered public resources. Jim Moore, a political science professor at Pacific University in Forest Grove who teaches courses on politics, believes the contribution was legal. “Student fees are used by student government or clubs at the college, and the student government or clubs can spend money on basically anything they want to as long as it meets the rules set out by the student council and the college itself,” he said. Because COCC didn’t have any policies or regulations of that sort, ASCOCC was free to donate. “I think it’s perfectly within the realms of legality that they did this,” he said. “It’s not directly money spent by the college. “Welcome to campaign finance, where money will find a way no matter what.”

I think for us it’s only a certain amount of time, like in the wooing period. Even if a guy is dirtbroke, I expect him to pick me up on the first date and pay for it. After that I’m fine going Dutch.” Kristen: “I haven’t been on a date in the last six years where a guy didn’t pay on the first date. Not only should they pay, but if you meet them somewhere, they should be there first — and ready.”

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

tests. First, let’s look at poking. We meet, you think I’m cute, I think you’re cute. You friend me on Facebook and a relationship is budding. Then you poke me. I wake up, excited, and poke you back. Then you don’t stop. Why are you poking me every five minutes? Now you’re getting on my nerves. Then I’m unfriending you. Next, status updates. Are you trying to get me interested? Then why would you post ‘The Mexican I had at lunch is making me sick’? No, we will not be making out. Lastly, irrelevant wall posts tells me the guy has too much time on his hands.” Jenna: “The great thing about Facebook is that it can give you some distance — but it is also very invasive. The worst is a guy who is too eager to change his relationship status. By the second date he’s changed his profile to ‘In a Relationship’ and invited you to be in a relationship with him. And by the third date he wants to know why you haven’t changed your status. ... Then he starts writing possessive messages on your wall so the whole world knows you went out. You know, ‘Saturday night was awesome — can’t wait for our next date.’ What next date?” Three decades later, some truths are clearly universal: After adapting for technological advances and generational cultural shifts, there wasn’t all that much difference between us. Buying dinner and holding doors are as important to my daughters as they were to my mother. Texting through dinner is as big a taboo as table-hopping was two decades ago. And a jerk is a jerk in any situation. These young women have a well-honed concept of gender equality, yet they still want a man to step up in a traditional way. Although they are the first generation to view Facebook, Twitter and texting as integral to their social lives, they are part of a generation that still values character and commitment. As for those official surveyors of public opinion, a recent Pew Research Center survey reports that the Millennial Generation rates parenthood and marriage “far above career and financial success.”


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Treasurer

Walter Brown

Continued from A1 As a first-term legislator, she said she’s found that many lawmakers don’t have a good handle on the state’s finances. She said she’s faced an uphill battle getting financial data and thinks the treasurer should play a more hands-on role in keeping legislators up to date and influencing decision-making on money issues. “What I’ve noticed is as a senator, particularly as the only CPA in the Legislature, is that nobody understands finances or budgets, and there’s no leadership in helping us to understand it,” she said. “There’s no long-range planning. We in the Senate and the Legislature operate from one long-range forecast to the next.” Wheeler, 48, is the former chairman and chief executive officer of Multnomah County. The governor appointed him to his current position after the death of Treasurer Ben Westlund. Before getting into politics, Wheeler was a businessman, working in financial management, banking, investments and other roles. He agrees with Telfer that legislators should have access to good financial information, but said he does not believe that the Treasurer’s Office should be responsible for regular reports to the Legislature. That job, he said, is the role of the Department of Administrative Services — a larger department with a different mission. Wheeler said the treasurer’s focus should be on the investments and funds under the office’s direct control.

$65 billion portfolio The Investment Division of the Treasurer’s Office manages a portfolio with a value of about $65 billion. “The treasury has very specific tools available to it when it comes to economic development,” he said. “It issues bonds, which are used for schools and higher education facilities, roads, bridges, airports. The treasury has the capacity to issue bonds in support of infrastructure improvements, direct investments in the Oregon economy.” Wheeler said he’s proud of the work he’s done so far as treasurer, including his efforts to stop the state from issuing any more debt from its general fund. Among the next items on his agenda, he said, are steps that could help push economic development and boost employment. He pointed to the Oregon Growth Account, a fund that’s overseen by the treasury, as an example of effort with a direct impact on businesses. The fund provides money to help businesses in the startup stage — and, he said, provides bigger returns because it can be leveraged with venture capital in the private

Party: Progressive Occupation: Volunteer attorney, retired military Government experience: U.S. Navy judge, Oregon Senate

Michael Marsh Party: Constitution Occupation: Maintenance Government experience: Issue lobbyist of Oregon Legislature

Chris Telfer Party: Republican Occupation: Certified public accountant, state senator Government experience: Oregon Senate, Bend City Council, Central Oregon Cities Organization, Bend-La Pine Schools Budget Committee

Ted Wheeler Party: Democrat Occupation: Oregon state treasurer Government experience: Chairman and chief executive officer of Multnomah County

sector. “There are multiple stages in the growth of a business,” he said. “They need seed capital to get the car out of the garage.” Telfer, meanwhile, said it’s time to rethink where some of the money in treasury-managed funds goes. She said money in the Oregon Growth Account could go farther if it was invested in businesses that are already employing workers and putting money back into the economy. “Right now it’s like an angel fund, used to invest in up-andcoming innovative companies,” she said. “Nothing against that, but they don’t have a proven track record, so it’s very highrisk. A lot of those companies don’t exist in Oregon. I want to take those dollars and, in the short term, invest them in existing Oregon businesses that want to grow.” Telfer said she’d be sorry to leave the state Senate behind if she wins the race but feels she’d be best able to serve Oregonians as treasurer. She pointed to the significant fundraising gap between the two candidates — Telfer had brought in about $108,628 as of Thursday evening, while Wheeler had $571,044 in contributions — as evidence. She said she’s concerned that Wheeler’s significant personal donations to his own campaign indicate that he’s buying the race. Wheeler has loaned himself nearly $270,000. “I’m not a full-time politician,” she said. “We are the people’s Legislature. We work for a living in between sessions. I’m closer to the everyday Oregon voter than

my opponent. I understand what they’re going through in this economy.” Wheeler shook off Telfer’s criticism, noting that the number of individual donors who have contributed to his campaign is much higher and that he’s had support from a wide range of people, organizations and industries. He said the debt his campaign has taken on is only from himself and not any other entity — and that it’s a necessary investment to keep his seat. “The answer is, for me this isn’t a job, it’s a calling,” he said. In addition to Telfer and Wheeler, two other candidates will appear on the ballot.

Walt Brown If elected, Progressive Party candidate Walt Brown said he’d focus on investment in Oregon companies and institutions, like schools and hospitals. Brown, 84, is a former state senator from Lake Oswego who has worked as a volunteer attorney for the Oregon Consumer League for the past two decades. He said he’s interested in taking on the challenges of the Treasurer’s Office and is equipped with a number of good ideas that could boost employment in the state. Among the efforts Brown said he’d lobby for: The establishment of a state bank that would provide profits for businesses and individuals in Oregon and boosting the minimum wage to $10. In many areas, Brown said the treasurer needs to influence legislators to make changes. But he said the state’s chief financial officer can make decisions about where to make investments — and he worries that too much money is currently going out of state. “There is a very unique, discrete area for which the treasurer has some special responsibility,” he said. “And that is investment in Oregon.”

Michael Marsh A fourth candidate, Michael Marsh of the Constitution Party, could not be reached for comment. Marsh, who lives in Salem, works in maintenance for a restaurant and previously was a community television program host and tutor, according to state elections records. Wheeler’s appointment to the office runs through Dec. 31. The winner of the election will finish Westlund’s term, which ends in 2013.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 A5

Peace Corps Continued from A1 Life there was hard. Robinson had to use bricks made of sand and straw and just a dab of cement. He was on constant guard not to offend his hosts with an easygoing joke. And once, while he was building trekking huts in the Himalayas, his pack horses were killed by wild animals. “There was a challenge in understanding how to work with another culture,” he said. “That excited me.” Growing up in Cleveland, Virginia DeLancey was as sheltered as could be. When her friends scattered during college vacation breaks, her parents ordered her home, not wanting her to be out in the world

Reform Continued from A1 Gerdes was one of three speakers who discussed changes to and impacts of health care reform Thursday at the Touchmark at Mount Bachelor Village retirement community. The event was hosted by Opportunity Knocks and Economic Development for Central Oregon. One potential downside of the reform, Gerdes said, begins in 2011 and could trigger additional paperwork and accounting costs. Employers must start including on W-2 forms the total amount they pay in health coverage for each employee. Also, beginning in 2012, businesses will have to send out more 1099-MISC forms for one-time services that cost more than $600, Gerdes said. The form is used to report miscellaneous income to the IRS. Previously, a business owner only had to use the 1099MISC when he or she paid an individual, who is not a part of an incorporated business, more than $600 for a one-time service. But the legislation now requires the same form to be sent to incorporated businesses, too, Gerdes said. There are a few exceptions, however, to the corporate exemption, he said.

unsupervised. Soon after graduation, though, she and her new husband broke away by joining the Peace Corps. They were assigned to Nigeria, a country they knew little about. They wound up in Buguma, a town in the Niger Delta that was a 2½-hour motorized canoe ride from the nearest sizable city. She was assigned a teaching job in a private business school and ended up instructing students in everything from English to sewing to netball, an English version of basketball. The school was, to be polite, minimalist. Its walls and roof were made of corrugated metal, and when rain poured from the sky, the noise was deafening. “We ended up doing a whole lot of shouting while we were teaching,” she said.

“It’s going to be very significant,” he said about the extra work. High-income earners — individuals who make more than $200,000 and joint filers who earn more than $250,000 — will see their Medicare tax rise from 1.45 percent to 2.35 percent in 2013, he said. The higher 2.35 percent rate is only charged on income above $200,000 or $250,000. People who earn those higherlevel salaries also will see a 3.8 percent surtax on passive, unearned income, Gerdes said, such as income from dividends and interest. One change that could impact a broader range of people is a change to the medical expenses deduction people can use if they itemize their taxes. Currently, if a taxpayer has medical bills that aren’t covered by health insurance, he or she can deduct costs that equate to more than 7.5 percent of his or her adjusted gross income. In 2013, that 7.5 percent will rise to 10 percent, Gerdes said. Richard MacDonell, a local physician who runs MyMD Personal Medicine, said health care reform has made positive changes by offering incentives for preven-

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tive care and coordinating care among various health personnel. Other benefits include increasing primary-care reimbursements and patient coverage, and preventing exclusion from insurance because of pre-existing conditions, among other reasons. MacDonell said the legislation offers coverage to people who otherwise may not have it. However, that also could result in a shortage of doctors and too much work for the ones who are available. “What I’m going to have is I’m going to have 40 people outside in my waiting room,” he said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

W OR L D

LEBANON

Ahmadinejad delivers speech near Israel border Iranian president lauds Hezbollah at ‘provocative’ setting By Robert F. Worth New York Times News Service

BINT JBAIL, Lebanon — He never did throw any stones. But the Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, clearly relished the moment as he stood a few miles from the Israeli border and delivered a fiery speech in support of his Hezbollah allies on the second day of his first state visit here. The remarks were familiar, echoing Ahmadinejad’s many previous tirades against Israel, complete with some apocalyptic touches about the coming of the Messiah and the “raising up of the oppressed.” He called for “the Zionists to be wiped out” and praised Hezbollah as a model for Lebanon and the rest of the world. It was the setting that was new. Bint Jbail was almost destroyed by Israeli bombs in the war with Hezbollah in 2006 and has been rebuilt in part with Iranian money. It is a stronghold of Hezbollah, the Shiite militant group backed by Iran, and Ahmadinejad’s appearance here was clearly intended to be “provocative,” as the White House put it Wednesday. Rumors had circulated for days that Ahmadinejad would go all the way to the border and throw stones at Israel, but Hezbollah officials made it clear that would not happen. The Iranian president was treated like a hero, with billboards and signs bearing his face all over Beirut, the capital. Iranian flags lined roads throughout southern Lebanon, where he flew from Beirut by helicopter Thursday afternoon after meetings with Prime Minister Saad Hariri and President Michel

Hassan Ammar / The Associated Press

Lebanese Shiite supporters shake hands with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, right, in the southern village of Qana, Lebanon, on Thursday. Suleiman. After speaking here at an outdoor stadium, he visited nearby Qana, a town devastated by Israeli bombs in 1996 and 2006, and where Hezbollah has built a memorial to the dead.

Israel responds On Thursday evening, the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, responded to Ahmadinejad’s remarks during a visit to Independence Hall in Tel Aviv, the site of the declaration of the establishment of Israel in 1948. “The best answer was given here 62 years ago,” Netanyahu said. He added, “All those people who think that Zionism will disappear — not only is it not disappearing, but it is growing stronger.” For Hezbollah, Ahmadinejad’s visit was a chance to make a flashy show of strength at a time when it is feeling threatened. The international tribunal investigating the 2005 killing of Rafik Hariri, a former Lebanese

prime minister and the father of the current one, is widely expected to indict members of Hezbollah. The group has warned of dangerous consequences if that happens. More broadly, the visit was a moment of pride for many in Lebanon’s Shiite community, which has historically been the country’s most disadvantaged and is now rapidly rising in wealth and numbers. Lebanese Shiites have an ancient connection to Iran through shared faith, and Iran’s financial and military support for Hezbollah has inspired fresh gratitude. In the border town of Marun al Ras, a few miles from Bint Jbail, visitors relaxed in a park built by Iranian money last year and gazed out at Israel. Huge posters of Ahmadinejad adorned the walkways, along with pictures of Iranian ayatollahs and signs thanking Iran for its support. A replica of the Dome of the Rock, the historic mosque in Jerusalem, gleamed in the sun.

Manish Swarup / The Associated Press

Lights are projected skyward over an aerostat as artists perform during the closing ceremony of the Commonwealth Games at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in New Delhi, India, earlier today.

As Commonwealth Games end, Indian officials declare success By Jim Yardley New York Times News Service

NEW DELHI — The Commonwealth Games, which opened 12 days ago with the world bracing for the worst, managed to conclude Thursday without undue embarrassment or disaster. Stadiums did not collapse. Terrorists did not strike. Fears of disease went mostly unrealized. And the closing ceremony was a stirring success. Indeed, some of the same officials who before the games were fighting over who should be blamed are now fighting over who should get credit. The sniping suggested that much of India’s political class, rather than being chastened by the glaring failures in preparations and the huge cost overruns, seemed inclined to declare victory, raising the question of what lessons, if any, they actually absorbed. Even before the opening ceremony, one domestic commentator declared India’s performance as host as “largely acceptable,” and that seemed to equate to good enough. It was not ringing praise, but it did reflect the imperfect if facesaving comeback made by In-

dian officials after a games prelude so disorganized and poorly prepared that several nations threatened not to show up. In the end, every nation came and the events went off relatively smoothly. If minor problems persisted, like flaws with the ticketing system, the public mood seemed to shift from anger at the official folly before the event to excitement over the success of Indian athletes once the competitions were under way.

Bureaucratic failure To many analysts and critics, the self-congratulations were misplaced, and opposite lessons should be drawn, as the Commonwealth Games demonstrated the inability of India’s bureaucracy to efficiently deliver, even on a project intended as a showpiece to the world. Both the prime minister and Sonia Gandhi, president of the governing Indian National Congress Party, have promised full investigations now that the games have ended. Audits have already highlighted immense waste and poor planning, and corruption investigations are

expected against the head of the country’s organizing committee, Suresh Kalmadi, as well as others beneath him. During an otherwise exuberant closing ceremony, where the president of the Commonwealth Games praised India for staging a “truly exceptional event,” a sour note was reserved for Kalmadi. The crowd jeered him. The games did create public interest in new sports in a country where attention is usually fixated on cricket. The Commonwealth Games is a competition among 71 nations and territories affiliated with the Commonwealth. The usual powerhouses, Australia and England, again finished first and second in total medals. But India improved strikingly, topping more than 100 total medals for the first time and finishing second in total gold medals with 38. And it was the personal stories of some of the Indian athletes that captured the churning energy and grass-roots desire for a better life evident in so many pockets of the country. Deepika Kumari, the gold medal archer, grew up as the daughter of an impoverished auto-rickshaw driver in eastern India.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

MARKET REPORT

t

2,435.38 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -5.85 -.24%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Weekly jobless claims jump 13,000 WASHINGTON — The number of people who signed up for state unemployment benefits jumped 13,000 to 462,000 in the latest week, the federal government reported, signaling no improvement in a weak U.S. jobs market. Continuing claims, which reflect workers already receiving unemployment checks, dropped 112,000 to 4.4 million in the week ended Oct. 2. The four-week average of continuing claims decreased 34,000 to 4.49 million. After spiking above 500,000 in midsummer, new applications for unemployment compensation have fallen back to the 450,000 range, a level historically associated with sluggish growth. “The trend level of claims is still hovering around the 450,000 to 460,000 mark and, until that changes, private payroll growth will remain very subdued,” wrote Ian Shepherdson, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics.

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11,094.57 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -1.51 -.01%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.49 treasury CHANGE +2.47%

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age Fuel, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$2.88 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 61160 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . .$2.98 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 • Texaco, 178 S.W. Fourth St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.98 • Pacific Pride, 50882 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine . . . . .$2.83 • Chevron, 2005 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.00 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.02

DIESEL • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitey Road, La Pine . . . . .$3.10 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.40 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

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AGRICULTURE

Young and retired give boost Local food to Bend’s troubled home sales becomes

Low prices bringing homeownership into realm of affordability for new group, professionals say

der $170,000, I’ve written six offers in the last two weeks. “All of a sudden there seems to be a surge. We are ratifying a sale tonight (Thursday) with a young couple who found out they could buy a home for up to $150,000 and their payments would be less than what they were paying in rent,” Greene said. “We found one for $139,000. They are in their 20s, they both have jobs, and Wells Fargo ap-

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Bend real estate professionals say they’re seeing more houses selling as more young people and retirees move on prices many consider to have hit bottom. “From mid-September until now, this is the busiest month I’ve had since 2006,” said Tom Greene, a Bend Realtor and city councilor. “For homes un-

proved their loan. “That is a segment of the population who couldn’t afford a house before because our prices were higher. Now they can,” Greene said. “These kids are ecstatic. They are going to have a 1,928-square-foot home with three bedrooms and 2½ baths for less than they were paying for rent.” A report earlier this week from Bendbased Bratton Appraisal Group showed the number of sales of single-family homes rising from August to September in Bend and Redmond and median sales prices rebounding as well. See Housing / B2

priority at Wal-Mart But advocates of sustainable farming wonder how ‘local’ world’s largest grocer can be By Stephanie Clifford New York Times News Service

The local-and-sustainable food movement has spread to the nation’s largest retailer. Wal-Mart Stores on Thursday announced a program that focuses on sustainable agriculture among its suppliers as the company tries to reduce its overall environmental impact. The program is intended to put more locally grown food in the company’s U.S. stores, invest in training and infrastructure for small and medium-size farmers, particularly in emerging markets, and begin to measure how efficiently large suppliers grow and get their produce into stores. Advocates of environmentally sustainable farming said the announcement was significant because of Wal-Mart’s size and because it would give small farmers a chance at WalMart’s business. But they questioned how “local” a $405 billion company with 2 million employees — more than the populations of Alaska, Wyoming and Vermont combined — could be. Given that Wal-Mart is the world’s largest grocer, with one of the biggest food supply chains, any change it made would have wide implications. See Wal-Mart / B5

Verizon to join AT&T in selling Apple iPad NEW YORK — In a sign of warming relations between the two companies, Verizon Wireless is going to start selling Apple Inc.’s iPad at the end of this month, the companies said Thursday. The news follows published reports that Verizon Wireless will start selling a version of the iPhone early next year. The companies have not confirmed the reports, and Verizon Wireless has downplayed the possibility of an iPhone for its current network. AT&T Inc. is Apple’s exclusive U.S. carrier for the iPhone and the only U.S. carrier that’s compatible with the “3G” version of the iPad, which allows for cellular data access. Verizon Wireless won’t sell the 3G version. Instead, it will sell the Wi-Fi version, with the option of bundling it with a “MiFi” gadget for about $130. MiFi, a battery-powered device the size of a Post-It pad, connects to Verizon’s 3G network and relays the data to the iPad via Wi-Fi. Data plans will start at $20 per month for 1 gigabyte. — From wire reports

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Auto News

Gary Kazanjian/ McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Dr. Stuart Hall of the Lone Oak Large Animal Veterinary Services gets his supplies while checking for pregnant cows at Homestead Dairy in Visalia, Calif., on Oct. 1.

Cats over cows Trouble may lie ahead for farms as more veterinarians are choosing to treat pets By Robert Rodriguez McClatchy -Tribune News Service

tuart Hall doesn’t mind the triple-digit temperatures, the flies or the occasional temperamental cow. “This is a physical job,” said Hall, a Visalia, Calif.based farm veterinarian. “But this is what I love to do.” Agricultural leaders wish there were more like him. The vast majority of veterinarians choose to take care of dogs and cats, not cows, pigs and chickens. The trend has raised concerns among animal-health

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experts who worry that there won’t be enough farm veterinarians to fill the expected vacancies at key federal agencies responsible for protecting the nation’s food supply. Nearly 30 percent of the veterinarians at the federal level, including at the Food Safety and Inspection Agency, are eligible to retire in the next three years. Rural communities also are feeling the squeeze. The American Veterinary Medical Association estimates that more than 1,300 counties in the U.S. don’t have a farm veterinarian.

Ensuring a safe food supply “The demand and need for services is critical,” said Gina Luke, assistant director in the government relations division of the AVMA in Washington, D.C. “We are talking about making sure we have enough people to treat animals, and make sure that our food supply is safe.” See Veterinarian / B5

BofA announces loan program for small businesses By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Bank of America announced Thursday that it is testing a program in the Washington area to improve lending and services for small businesses. The move comes as the White House is calling on the nation’s biggest banks to help shore up Main Street. The program involves hiring 1,000 bankers over the next year to specialize in developing relationships and products for mom-and-pop shops, starting in Washington, Baltimore, Dallas and Los Angeles. The bank also said it is on track to “blow away” its goal of increasing lending to small businesses by $5 billion this year, a pledge it made last year after a meeting between the heads of large banks and President Obama. See Lending / B5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

U.S. trade deficit tops $46B as value of yuan stays low Agency likely to heat up criticism of China’s currency management By Howard Schneider The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The monthly U.S. trade deficit surged in August, fueled by a record gap in trade with China and a weak overall showing for American exports. Along with data released in Beijing earlier this week, the latest international trade report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis is likely to intensify criticism of China’s economic policies, particularly the country’s close management of its currency. China’s central bank reported Wednesday that its holdings of foreign currency had jumped

Trade deficit U.S. exports ANNUAL minus imports, 0 -$265.1 in billions, -$378.6 by month, seasonally -800 adjusted: ’99 ’09 August 0

August

’09

’10

-20 -40 -60 -80

-$46.3 billion

Source: U.S. Census Bureau © 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

by nearly $200 billion from July to September. Analysts said the torrid rate of accumulation was largely the result of the central

bank’s efforts to prevent the local renminbi, or yuan, from rising in value, a policy that helps keep the country’s exports comparatively cheap. By selling renminbi and buying dollars and other currencies, the People’s Bank of China lowers the price of its currency. The bank’s ability to keep up those purchases is closely tied to the country’s large trade surplus with the rest of the world, most notably the United States. The monthly imbalance between the two countries widened in August to a record $28 billion, compared with just less than $26 billion the month before. The gap shows that there’s been meager progress in evening out a trade relationship that is both central to the global economy and a potential source of instability. See Deficit / B2


B2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Housing

in Bend, down from 103 days in August, according to Bratton. Over the past 12 months, Bend sales were strongest in houses sold in the $100,000 to $150,000 Continued from B1 range, at 439, according to Bratton. It mirrored another report this week on Multiple That segment of the housing market, Greene said, Listing Service data, Trend Vision, showing a rise in is a silver lining because it opens the homeownertotal sales and prices in Deschutes County. ship door to young working families and couples Trend Vision shows the median sales price of who previously couldn’t afford a house in Bend. homes sold across Deschutes County hit a low of Greene said he and several other real estate $152,000 in August this year, before rebounding to agents attending Tuesday’s Central Oregon Asso$170,000 in September. ciation of Realtors meeting shared stories of what he While the modest upswing in median housing called “an exciting trend” of young couples making prices is encouraging in Central Oregon’s hard-hit the transition from renting to buying homes in Sepreal estate market, broker Dylan Darling said a rise tember. He attributes that opportunity to the drop in in the number of homes sold countywide indicated housing prices. a new wave of buyers from within and outside CenThe Bratton Report also showed sales over the past tral Oregon believe the region’s housing prices have 12 months of 415 homes in the $150,000 to $200,000 bottomed out, and they’re grabbing some homes at range, 275 homes in the $200,000 to $250,000 range, bargain prices. 159 homes in the $250,000 to $300,000 range, and According to Trend Vision, the low point for num- 139 homes in the $300,000 to $350,000 range. ber of houses sold across Deschutes County was 125 Darling said that trend toward increasing sales of in February 2009, said higher-priced homes Darling, a broker at Prupartly reflects a shrinkdential Northwest Proping supply of homes Median sales price — Bend and Redmond erties real estate in Bend. priced less than $150,000 (measured monthly) By comparison, Darling on the market. However, $400K said 277 home sales he also attributes that Bend were reported in August trend to people from this year, followed by outside Bend who are $300K 350 in September. approaching retirement, $190K have substantial finan$200K cial resources and are Redmond $122K Rated No. 2 in buying second homes to $100K use as vacation homes appreciation O N D J F M AMJ J A S O N D J F M AMJ J A S O N D J F M AMJ J A S until they retire and 2008 2009 2010 ’07 “We’ve had a lot of move here permanently. Median sales price — Sisters, Sunriver, good national publicity He said he has gotten La Pine, Jefferson County and Crook County about the Bend housing hundreds of hits on his market being one of the real estate website from (measured quarterly) best values in the counpeople seeking infor$700K try,” Darling said, refermation on the housing Sunriver ring to a Bloomberg Busimarket, and several of $380K nessweek report over the those contacts resulted $500K Sisters summer that predicted in sales made over the housing prices in the summer. La Pine $215K Bend area would rise “Baby boomers are $300K Crook Co. 33.6 percent over the next seeing an opportunity La Pine $118K, Crook $85K four years. He also cited to catch the bottom of $100K Jefferson Co.* reports in USA Today the market,” Darling Jefferson $61K and other national publisaid. “I’ve sold several Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 cations touting the area’s homes to baby boom2007 2008 2009 2010 bargain-priced housing ers wanting to jump and abundant golfing, in and buy something Number of homes sold — Bend and Redmond skiing and other outdoor while the prices are low (measured monthly) recreation opportunities and there’s still a good as a kind of paradise for selection.” 200 baby boomer retirees In the Redmond area, 150 and those looking ahead the Bratton Report 150 to retirement. showed the median Bend “Bloomberg rates sales price of a single66 100 Bend as No. 2 in the family home reboundnation as far as appreed from $102,000 to 50 ciation in the next four $122,000 from August years,” Darling said. to September, and the Redmond 0 Median sales prices number of sales rose SO N D J F M AMJ J A S O N D J F M AMJ J A S O N D J F M AMJ J A S have fallen dramatically from 47 to 66. 2007 2008 2009 2010 in Bend and Redmond However, median since their peaks in 2007 days on market totaled Number of homes sold — Sisters, Sunriver, and 2006, respectively, 106 in September, up La Pine, Jefferson County and Crook County as the housing bubble from 82 days in August. burst and skyrocketing Over the past 12 (measured quarterly) short sales and foreclomonths , 340 homes 80 sures dragged down sold in Redmond for Crook Co. prices. The number of $100,000 to $150,000 52 60 notices of default filed and 187 homes sold for Sisters Jefferson Co.* in Deschutes County less than $100,000. last year was 82 percent 40 29 higher than in 2008. And 26 Prices drop in through nine months 20 this year, default notices Sunriver 23 were running 12.8 perSunriver cent of the same period In Sunriver, the me13 0 La Pine last year. dian price of homes Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Greene said the Sepdropped from $504,000 2008 2009 2010 2007 tember spike in homes in the second quarter of * Includes Jefferson County and Crooked River Ranch sold may be because of 2010 to $380,000 in the Source: Bratton Appraisal Group an extension in the closthird quarter, while pricing date from June 30 to es rose from a median Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin Sept. 30 for the $8,000 of $189,000 to $215,000 first-time homebuyer federal tax credit. in Sisters, and rose form $102,000 to $118,000 during “That was pretty much expected,” Greene said. the same period in La Pine, according to the Bratton “The tax credit had a major effect on sales,” Green Report. said. “I know I had several sales written in April that In Jefferson County, median home sales prices closed in September.” dropped from $72,000 in the second quarter to The October Bratton Report compiled by Jeremy $61,000 in the third quarter, and in Crook County Cowan, a state-certified general appraiser at Bratton they fell from $99,000 to $85,000 during the same Appraisal Group in Bend, breaks down MLS data on period, according to Bratton. median housing prices and sales numbers by comAs traditionally happens in the Bend and Central munity. It shows which communities logged gains, Oregon housing market, Greene said, he anticipates and where the housing markets are still falling. sales will slow in December, January and February, For the Bend area, the Bratton Report shows a but by spring he expects a rebound spurred by barroller-coaster ride for median sales prices of single- gain prices, low interest rates and pent-up demand. family homes that fell and rose between $226,000 “I have a strong feeling from March on we will see and $180,000 since December 2008. a good uptick in Deschutes County,” Greene said. From August to September, the median price “There’s still doom- and gloom-sayers who think we of homes sold in Bend rose from the low point of will have to suffer through two more down years, $175,000 to $190,000, and the number of homes sold but with interest rates as low as 4 percent and the rose from 123 to 150, according to the Bratton Report. low housing prices, I think next year is going to be a “I believe the bottom was basically this summer,” good year,” Greene said. Darling said. “Usually the bottom hits and people don’t realize it until a few months later.” Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or In September, the median days on market was 84 emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Deficit Continued from B1 U.S. imports of Chinese goods jumped to $35.2 billion from $33.2 billion in July, while U.S. exports to China fell to $7.2 billion from $7.3 billion. The overall U.S. trade deficit was $46.3 billion, up from $42 billion the month before. The state of the U.S. economy is a key issue in the upcoming midterm elections, and data released Thursday highlighted two of the main concerns: continued high unemployment, and a sense that trade shortfalls with China and other countries are undercutting U.S. factories and workers. The most recent figures for weekly jobless claims showed the number rose last week to 462,000, up 13,000. That figure has remained in the same range for several weeks, a sign of weakness in the labor market. In other data, wholesale prices rose

slightly, driven by higher costs for food and fuel. Some analysts cautioned against reading too much into the monthly data. U.S. exports, for example, put in a generally feeble showing in August, increasing by $300 million. But that was largely accounted for by a drop in civilian aircraft sales, a volatile category influenced heavily by the sales and production schedules of a single company, Boeing. Still, the trends show some of the difficulties the Obama administration faces as it tries to boost jobs through increased exports. U.S. sales abroad are up just more than 6 percent for the year, while imports have grown much more quickly. Though the dollar has fallen in value against many other currencies, that has yet to boost exports appreciably. Indeed, it has added to concern that major trading nations are heading toward a potentially corrosive “currency war.”

“As countries fight each other for export growth, the path out of the recession remains unclear,” analysts at Roubini Global Economics wrote in a recent report. The relationship between China and the United States is in many ways at the center of that tension. Today, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is due to release the latest semiannual survey of world currencies, a congressionally mandated study meant to highlight countries that “manipulate” their currencies to gain a trade advantage. While Geithner has been urged by some members of Congress and economic analysts to use the designation as a way to pressure China, he has said publicly he does not regard the currency report as a useful tool. He has, however, stepped up his own criticism of China as part of a broader effort to bring more international pressure against the country’s currency management.

S T OR I ES

Plug-in cars pose a riddle for EPA on fuel economy New York Times News Service DETROIT — About two months before two new plugin cars go on sale in the United States, the federal government is struggling with how to rate the fuel economy of mass-market plug-in vehicles. How the Environmental Protection Agency rates the two cars, the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf, could have a big influence on consumers’ perceptions of vehicles that run on electricity. General Motors, which makes the Volt, and Nissan are anxiously awaiting the agency’s decision as they start production of the cars and com-

plete marketing plans for rollouts in December. Providing the customary city and highway miles-per-gallon information would make little sense for the Volt, which can drive 25 to 50 miles on battery power before its gas engine kicks on, and even less so for the Leaf, which is powered only by a rechargeable battery. Cathy Milbourn, a spokeswoman for the EPA, declined to specify a date when the new ratings might be released, saying only that they would come “shortly.” The Volt and Leaf must be rated by the EPA and have

those ratings shown on window labels before they are sold. Both Nissan and GM are in discussions with the agency about what the fuel economy information on the window stickers of new vehicles will state, company officials said. But they said they were in the dark about the outcome and its timing. “We don’t have an official position on what they should do,” said Brian Brockman, a Nissan spokesman. “We expect there will be some form of ‘equivalency rating,’ like how many miles the Leaf can get per the number of kilowatt hours charged.”

Got, the first cloned fighting bull in Spain, grazes in July on the farm where the bull was born in Palencia, Spain. The European Commission is expected to seek a fiveyear ban on cloning of livestock and on importing live clones. Carlos Lujan International Herald Tribune

European Union to propose ban on cloning farm animals By James Kanter New York Times News Service

BRUSSELS — European Union regulators are preparing to propose rules on cloned livestock that would be stronger than those in the United States with regard to actual clones. But the rules would seek to avoid trade tensions by allowing imports of food produced from the offspring of clones as well as imports of semen and embryos from clones for breeding. The European Commission’s report, which is expected Tuesday, will recommend a ban on the cloning of farm animals in Europe for five years, and on importing live clones, according to a person briefed on the report who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

A growing unease The rules, which would replace the current patchwork of legislation and guidelines in the European Union, are intended to address growing unease in Europe about cloning and food after a handful of breeders in Switzerland, Britain and possibly other countries imported semen and embryos from clones or their progeny from the United States to breed more productive livestock.

Animal welfare advocates contend that cloning leads to suffering, including difficult births. They also say cloned animals can face health problems later. The rules, if approved by the governments of member countries and by the European Parliament, would ban using direct clones in the food supply in Europe. In the United States, the Agriculture Department has taken a different approach, asking farmers to voluntarily keep all direct clones out of the food supply for now so it can manage a “smooth and orderly” transition to market. Relatively little actual cloning is taking place in Europe, partly because it is expensive and the public is wary. But the rapid development of the industry elsewhere concerns Europeans because they buy imported dairy products and meat derived from cloning in countries like the United States, Canada and Argentina. Even so, the European Commission has decided against banning food derived from the offspring of clones, or banning the use of genetic material from clones to impregnate other animals, because it would be too difficult to trace and could disrupt trade relations, the person briefed on the proposal said. The commission was, how-

ever, expected to recommend ways to improve the tracking of imported genetic materials. Animal welfare advocates rejected those arguments.

Research exempt The ban would not affect cloning for research purposes or in cases where it was used to help prevent species from becoming extinct. But depending on how the rules were applied, they could have an effect on some breeders in Europe who already have used cloning to produce fighting bulls and who plan to apply it to other high-value animals like horses. In another sign of the difficulties in Europe with biotechnology, governments threatened Thursday to throw out a separate commission plan that would let individual countries ban the cultivation of genetically modified crops, saying that might splinter trade policy. The attack on the draft law was led by France and Germany, which said it could violate World Trade Organization rules.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 B3

U S I N ESS

A N Hyundai moves up with top-shelf styling By Nick Bunkley

The 2011 Hyundai Equus is a new challenger to luxury cars built by companies such as BMW and Mercedes.

New York Times News Service

John Harmon used to drive high-end models by BMW, Cadillac, Mercedes and Jaguar. Now the Harmons are a Hyundai family. They already own two — a 2008 Santa Fe sport utility vehicle and a 2005 Elantra — and Harmon, a Chicago-area electrical contractor who owns several construction companies, has his eye on the Equus, a nearly $60,000 sedan that arrives in November. “This will go head-to-head with the BMWs and Mercedes,” Harmon said. “If you test-drive all of them with your eyes closed, you’re going to pick the Hyundai.” The idea that Hyundai could compete with luxury automakers would have seemed absurd two decades ago, when its low-quality cars made the South Korean company a laughingstock in the United States. These days, rivals know not to underestimate Hyundai and its affiliate, Kia, which have been posting record sales during one of the auto industry’s most diffi-

New York Times News Service

cult periods. “The challenge for the Korean companies is just to keep this winning streak going,” said James Bell, executive market analyst with the automotive information firm Kelley Blue Book. “In a lot of ways, they followed the Japanese model of how to succeed in the marketplace.” But while Toyota and Honda built their empires largely on reli-

ability and fuel economy, Hyundai and Kia have taken that formula a step further with a focus on making their vehicles attractive. “You didn’t really buy a Toyota Tercel because it was a beautiful car,” Bell said. “The factor that the Koreans have added to that mix is styling.” As a result, Hyundai and Kia are becoming a serious threat to the Japanese dominance of most

passenger car segments. Hyundai’s midsize car, the Sonata, was the most researched vehicle in the country in May, according to Compete, a Boston research firm. Sales of the Sonata, which accounts for one-third of Hyundai’s total volume, are up about 50 percent this year, while demand for the Toyota Camry and the Honda Accord is down slightly. Even though the Camry and

Accord remain tops in their segment, Hyundai has been closing the gap quickly. Overall, Hyundai’s market share in the United States has increased to nearly 5 percent, from 3 percent in 2008. Kia’s share has grown to more than 3 percent, from 2.1 percent in 2008. Together the two companies, which operate independently from each other in the United States but share some operations, now outsell the Japanese carmaker Nissan. In the second quarter, Hyundai was the fifthmost-considered brand in the country, bumping Nissan to sixth place, according to a Kelley Blue Book study. Hyundai, Kia and Subaru of Japan were the only three automakers whose sales here increased in 2009. Hyundai expects its U.S. sales to top 500,000 for the first time ever this year, as its rivals grapple with sales that are far below the level of several years ago, before the recession. In fact, the recession has been a big reason behind the success

that Hyundai and Kia have enjoyed in recent years. Their models are priced lower than most of the competition, but in better times many shoppers still might not have researched Hyundai or Kia enough to see what the vehicles offered. “It gave us an opportunity to really reach some people who might not have looked at us before — people who would have defaulted into an Accord or Camry,” said John Krafcik, the chief executive of Hyundai Motors America. “Times like these that force people to go deeper into the purchase analysis definitely favor us.” David Champion, the director of automotive testing for Consumer Reports, said shoppers who had not checked out Korean cars lately would probably be surprised. “You’re not getting a bargainbasement car,” Champion said. “You’re getting a very wellequipped car with good reliability. Every new Kia and Hyundai that we’ve tried has been so much better than the previous model and really, really competitive.”


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B4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATC Tech ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Acergy AcmePkt h AcordaTh ActivIden ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdvClayCv AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aegon 7.25 AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlancoT rs AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AldIrish 10 AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmPubEd AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Anglgld 13 AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntheraP n Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEnt wt AsiaInfoL AspenIns AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr gn AtlTele AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g

8.03 -.10 21.64 -.67 0.48 22.54 +.15 1.28 59.74 +.05 12.66 -.03 12.28 -.24 1.20 54.83 +.01 41.76 -.82 1.08 9.98 +.20 1.76 38.71 -.02 0.20 14.25 -.37 20.50 -.08 1.12 26.90 -.30 5.14 -.10 6.27 -.04 24.95 -.17 5.87 +.11 0.27 32.42 +.27 1.68 28.50 +.03 24.91 +.02 15.79 +.26 15.75 -.09 10.05 +.14 1.91 +.03 0.18 13.75 +.03 7.00 +.09 0.05 17.67 -.04 1.44 -.04 1.76 53.21 +.03 0.70 44.66 +.10 0.42 7.04 +.04 2.89 -.04 .89 -.01 0.72 19.69 -.33 0.90 45.43 +.18 5.97 -.19 0.23 20.13 +.40 36.79 -.16 29.24 +.84 3.23 -.01 1.59 +.05 0.15 11.48 +.18 0.04 23.40 -.31 5.44 +.05 0.52 49.11 -.61 17.74 +.13 27.49 -.22 0.36 32.64 -.73 0.25 4.91 +.05 0.24 59.79 -.19 3.98 +.05 14.72 +.58 7.14 -.08 0.06 4.08 6.50 -.11 1.13 18.20 -.05 25.35 -.21 0.04 17.18 -.10 6.40 +.02 1.81 24.85 -.07 12.50 +.01 27.09 +.18 1.27 -.03 0.04 31.58 -.09 85.42 -.84 5.00 -.22 4.49 -.02 2.92 -.10 34.23 -.08 0.18 73.21 -.96 1.94 +.04 0.11 86.33 -.48 1.96 82.10 -.81 6.80 +.03 6.05 +.02 0.40 8.69 -.16 1.00 69.65 -.16 7.37 -.01 0.18 32.62 +.84 46.06 +.13 .55 -.04 4.40 +.11 1.67 +.31 47.38 -.16 0.86 10.09 +.14 0.56 48.52 -.30 0.34 37.75 +.04 3.67 -.01 0.12 13.13 -.24 3.95 169.42 -.76 31.71 +.45 1.40 73.43 +.75 6.29 -.27 67.48 +.28 1.33 -.02 20.68 +.18 14.96 -.59 0.60 24.40 -.15 0.72 48.57 -.45 0.75 40.81 +.31 0.20 68.26 -.25 68.75 +.50 4.56 +.17 0.48 8.39 +.01 2.06 26.80 -.42 1.58 35.92 +.02 1.24 -.05 76.00 -.18 25.64 -.33 4.63 +.13 4.51 +.09 6.84 +.29 18.72 +.12 0.80 32.67 -.27 2.85 -.12 46.77 -.37 2.58 +.23 0.40 7.12 +.06 0.66 5.74 -.02 15.80 -.05 .62 -.03 0.24 29.51 -.15 0.48 20.98 +.23 1.52 24.80 +.18 26.19 -.25 2.26 +.01 4.23 140.11 +.40 3.09 +.05 155.53 +.36 .95 +.15 29.61 +.04 26.49 -.55 1.54 28.77 -.13 42.95 -.51 1.31 56.16 -.24 8.95 -.22 1.35 31.61 -.21 5.60 27.65 -.13 6.27 -.05 0.44 16.70 -.31 1.68 35.79 -.04 0.08 10.77 -.07 0.72 39.44 +.18 0.65 31.11 -.03 0.56 20.16 +.06 41.94 -.77 20.39 +.13 8.57 -.10 2.69 -.06 31.81 -2.16 6.79 +.08 37.48 -.61 51.38 +.62 0.84 23.52 +.05 0.72 50.24 +.11 0.32 32.31 -.06 0.24 49.20 -.58 54.86 -.63 6.84 -.03 0.06 49.44 -.43 18.51 +.85 21.17 +.03 0.36 57.23 -1.21 5.96 +.01 0.88 31.42 3.00 54.45 -.55 0.18 47.45 -.67 0.49 63.38 -.32 3.25 53.79 +.59 21.51 -.22 2.60 17.92 -.08 1.53 +.04 45.09 -.41 6.14 +.28 1.02 -.03 0.92 7.09 +.03 0.60 39.49 +.03 9.01 -.36 0.60 103.23 -.06 3.00 59.26 -.10 0.40 22.75 -.14 38.00-11.50 1.12 10.42 -.09 302.31 +2.17 0.28 11.91 -.06 9.62 -.37 0.62 20.57 -.04 5.33 +.19 0.75 35.30 +.20 84.41 -.05 0.40 26.92 -.01 0.60 33.28 +.06 43.46 +.01 1.76 -.03 1.40 16.06 +.02 3.94 +.03 19.30 +.17 0.12 24.99 -.18 0.12 18.75 +.48 41.86 -.59 9.86 -.21 27.47 -.08 .97 -.06 4.29 -.09 20.74 +.09 16.49 -.41 14.61 -.09 5.01 -.21 10.05 -.18 0.60 52.44 -1.11 .21 -.01 20.59 +.09 0.60 31.21 +.51 0.04 13.17 -.29 0.68 14.05 -.04 0.64 40.88 -.29 0.18 21.87 +1.80 0.52 13.10 -.04 2.41 53.26 +.37 33.53 +.34 27.10 +.14 1.09 13.48 -.02 0.88 52.48 -.80 31.83 +.29 19.49 -.34 8.26 -.38 1.34 29.18 -.05 32.22 +.04 4.12 +.03

Nm Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AVEO Ph n AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BncpBnk BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkAm pfB BkAm pfV BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR B iPInvVIX Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BioTime n BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDvAch BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueChp BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl BobEvans Boeing Boise Inc BonTon Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive Cal-Maine CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calavo Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapellaEd CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapitolBcp CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese

D 7.23 +.20 2.23 +.14 23.37 +.30 33.35 -.11 1.40 69.54 +.40 1.36 42.47 +.01 233.00 +.45 27.23 +.74 22.42 +.42 3.57 109.87 -.93 3.23 +.02 15.35 -.13 0.80 38.15 -.27 4.61 +.28 11.16 -.46 27.63 -.13 0.88 34.88 -.61 1.95 -.03 0.84 33.82 -.48 0.68 11.34 -.03 0.60 22.88 -.50 1.83 33.68 -.11 32.98 +.06 0.42 6.70 -.17 1.74 82.74 +.74 1.74 70.24 +.36 44.00 +.11 44.14 +.47 41.02 -.39 3.33 -.01 1.50 42.90 -.26 0.10 15.28 +.06 3.80 -.18 22.10 -.85 98.20 -1.75 0.60 44.85 -.41 0.68 42.36 +.17 0.40 61.74 -.23 35.33 -.20 1.34 66.18 -1.14 0.57 13.70 -.12 0.51 22.04 -.22 0.80 13.18 +.02 0.33 15.01 -.34 7.94 +.23 0.88 14.14 -.10 0.04 12.60 -.69 2.05 25.49 -.47 6.67 -.33 2.28 -.15 2.16 26.27 -.39 1.56 23.80 -.39 1.75 24.82 -.33 1.80 45.12 -.84 1.04 3.54 -.12 2.80 60.05 +.03 0.36 26.11 -.52 1.96 54.20 -.19 0.04 1.77 -.08 2.82 -.17 44.42 +.11 23.60 -.09 50.70 -.26 79.51 -.69 29.07 -.40 0.22 17.90 -.68 80.56 +1.22 14.70 +.50 0.72 83.62 +.04 1.00 15.61 -.43 0.32 17.58 -.17 0.48 48.74 -.51 10.78 +.18 1.16 49.47 +.08 2.16 37.89 -.36 .31 +.01 14.59 -.23 4.39 +.02 1.00 6.71 -.03 0.72 48.53 -.57 1.48 76.08 +.06 43.23 -.26 6.56 +.12 0.92 33.60 -.30 0.28 27.68 +.23 83.61 -.05 0.30 34.81 +.23 0.60 40.98 -.05 32.94 +.01 38.34 -.62 4.41 +.10 2.62 -.15 56.98 -.21 21.85 -.12 0.68 18.83 +.15 1.68 -.01 5.93 +.07 5.84 -.02 1.28 12.63 +.07 39.10 -.73 4.00 177.75 -1.49 0.65 9.88 +.04 0.98 8.67 +.07 2.28 18.87 -.22 1.36 10.66 -.24 0.40 13.50 -.13 0.60 12.31 -1.38 3.50 -.02 24.73 +.11 43.97 -.14 2.04 34.03 -.17 0.80 29.43 -.08 1.68 71.36 -.11 6.70 -.12 12.51 -.29 1.47 +.01 53.75 -.32 0.04 6.86 -.28 2.00 87.17 +.34 6.16 -.05 0.22 11.41 +.02 8.02 -.29 0.60 12.12 -.13 21.93 -.47 1.53 19.38 -.30 14.61 -2.53 0.44 18.97 -.08 20.94 -.24 1.73 -.07 0.56 19.62 -.21 0.40 23.89 1.28 27.51 +.17 38.21 +.74 3.24 77.59 +.26 0.32 37.25 -.10 0.60 20.86 -.17 2.20 -.02 5.88 +.05 16.86 -.37 0.52 29.87 0.56 17.19 +.07 0.34 9.94 -.19 6.99 -.09 0.31 20.61 -.08 0.28 12.62 +.08 14.92 -.16 0.05 16.17 -.43 0.80 30.67 +.51 0.10 74.12 -.45 0.42 51.05 +.17 49.54 +.78 0.92 61.04 -.61 0.25 23.96 -.01 0.16 22.00 +.08 19.53 -.39 0.80 14.44 +.05 0.40 22.63 +.42 0.20 17.53 -.33 0.40 116.81 -1.58 1.00 72.06 +.56 0.04 35.95 -.24 41.64 -.01 5.10 -.20 1.00 30.68 +.03 4.60 264.93 +1.16 0.84 18.75 +.22 41.96 -1.15 5.49 -.06 5.28 213.34 +6.09 0.26 24.76 +.60 1.04 59.93 +.27 0.26 23.40 -.85 0.34 7.98 -.17 9.44 -.19 0.35 31.25 -.39 19.01 +.21 0.50 26.52 -.26 0.72 33.83 -.30 0.12 30.71 -.46 9.63 -.03 8.17 +.20 5.43 -.10 0.95 27.30 +.30 1.14 13.05 +.06 0.63 9.00 -.01 0.50 21.48 -.04 15.27 0.04 7.19 -.04 5.18 +.01 12.43 -.15 3.35 -.11 1.80 49.45 -.10 0.28 30.45 -.14 42.75 -.83 1.10 36.55 -.05 12.51 1.08 66.69 -.39 0.30 37.50 -.20 1.08 65.73 -.18 16.66 -.19 .46 -.02 47.76 +.36 67.39-11.76 4.64 -.04 0.20 39.89 -.54 0.90 8.76 -.10 0.04 6.01 +.09 1.13 -.07 1.66 11.04 +.01 .77 -.03 0.80 79.48 -.30 0.78 33.31 +.13 .51 -.01 16.11 +.42 24.75 -.21 17.17 -3.01 0.68 31.67 +.03 29.46 0.40 39.65 -.54 0.72 37.70 +.53 25.09 -.59 27.03 -1.14 0.54 42.54 +.30 0.14 34.89 +1.34 4.83 -.17 39.43 +.66 1.76 79.91 -.38 0.04 12.82 -.14 28.71 -.07 .70 -.04 0.20 33.93 -.39

Nm CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh CelluTiss n Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChiCbl rsh ChinaDigtl ChinaEd ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChIntLtg n CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaRitar ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaTel ChinaUni ChiValve n ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmR pfBcld ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CtrySCkg n Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold CrwnMedia Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurJpn CurtisWrt CushTRet Cyclacel CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet DCT Indl DG FastCh DJSP Ent DPL DR Horton DTE Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DayStar rs DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply

D 5.82 +.08 8.59 -.32 57.95 -.28 .45 +.06 4.63 +.19 11.90 0.43 8.08 -.07 0.86 17.57 -.03 0.80 29.97 -.08 0.78 15.96 -.03 1.56 15.37 +.15 23.71 -.30 0.01 17.98 +.31 10.95 +.04 14.40 +.23 2.90 40.02 +.13 5.31 -.12 63.33 -.25 19.63 -.29 87.28 +.64 3.78 -.15 30.42 -.55 32.77 +.13 3.41 -.94 33.00 +.50 39.29 -.45 27.65 +.24 5.19 -.17 2.87 -.03 0.30 22.96 -.28 2.88 83.90 +.23 25.77 -.20 0.16 10.54 -.39 53.46 -1.11 0.69 4.09 +.04 12.22 -.39 4.39 +.42 17.02 -.72 2.12 -.03 11.55 +.11 .61 -.12 7.77 +.80 5.51 +.29 10.04 -.24 2.32 -.09 .14 -.15 6.66 +.49 7.99 -.38 2.71 -.05 17.81 +.03 1.54 67.15 +.54 27.07 +.67 6.25 +.39 14.02 +.75 0.55 11.65 -.08 11.08 +.07 1.85 53.46 +.18 19.40 +1.51 7.95 +.28 2.79 95.40 +.23 4.15 +.36 6.06 -.14 4.80 +.05 3.93 +.06 1.10 54.64 -.70 0.23 14.73 +.06 8.00 +.01 27.17 +.19 181.27 +.29 14.34 -.15 0.24 6.82 -.19 1.48 57.45 +.32 1.27 23.08 +.06 3.30 +.02 14.90 -.24 0.32 73.58 -.26 2.65 +.01 1.60 29.91 +.03 0.72 17.32 +.05 0.48 27.30 -.33 16.34 -.09 23.07 -.11 2.13 26.58 -.16 1.97 25.88 -.25 4.06 -.19 7.50 121.15 -3.68 .93 -.03 58.92 +.21 0.40 52.42 -2.14 3.58 -.01 1.56 -.01 14.42 +.12 0.35 20.73 -.12 7.02 -.19 6.25 -.06 0.56 68.20 -.55 2.20 68.50 -.20 19.07 +.14 0.60 44.20 -.03 9.42 -.18 23.89 +.85 1.76 59.91 -.03 20.81 +.20 10.49 64.99 -.42 0.96 16.58 -.03 0.72 8.25 -.03 44.61 -.04 5.48 -.31 2.12 75.84 +.11 17.07 +.08 0.60 17.43 +.01 0.72 58.00 -2.08 0.38 18.38 +.24 0.38 17.38 +.22 0.20 38.60 +.13 0.94 36.63 -1.14 0.48 14.50 -.21 2.00 26.29 -.21 2.19 25.38 22.53 -.86 31.82 -.57 27.32 +.49 0.69 76.85 -.84 1.56 78.36 -1.40 18.29 +.09 23.70 +.10 0.60 46.98 -.60 8.83 -.02 23.92 +.07 1.00 29.87 -.13 0.40 31.85 -.35 0.92 22.61 +.03 69.15 -.61 49.03 -.22 1.76 -.01 2.20 60.32 +.19 0.40 40.10 -.03 2.38 48.45 +.25 19.02 -.06 0.96 32.80 +.07 47.74 +.10 11.35 -.07 .55 +.01 0.06 50.78 +.20 1.08 50.57 -.03 0.42 20.55 +.08 1.09 48.60 +.03 2.30 29.64 +.04 34.18 -.09 1.09 24.70 -.44 18.13 -.22 4.79 -1.23 0.56 39.42 -.20 0.20 18.39 -.31 0.44 30.97 +.38 1.65 37.63 -.11 25.31 -.28 12.80 -.10 0.82 63.18 -.18 7.55 -.20 32.99 +3.24 1.75 23.85 -.69 0.16 7.05 -.12 47.43 -.52 1.50 15.81 -.21 23.09 -.02 0.80 40.61 -.19 7.59 +.20 1.70 126.40 -.03 1.85 44.60 -.40 0.32 2.92 -.03 55.86 +1.24 13.84 -.50 .23 -.01 13.75 +.01 42.88 +.43 29.69 +.47 3.44 -.28 .39 48.27 -.25 25.05 +.45 1.80 53.39 -.63 1.05 93.76 +.94 1.43 -.04 140.22 +1.18 2.88 99.58 +.43 98.86 -.11 121.47 +.44 0.32 31.42 +.21 0.90 9.10 +.06 1.64 -.06 4.02 +.01 13.25 -.23 2.40 13.41 -.12 .92 +.06 0.05 59.37 -.87 2.43 -.03 0.28 4.96 22.06 -.18 1.87 -.39 1.21 27.26 -.04 0.15 10.67 -.11 2.24 46.88 -.21 0.10 10.71 +.18 13.44 -.02 0.08 41.84 -.19 13.94 +1.23 1.28 44.83 +.70 9.87 -.11 71.64 +.82 2.46 -.54 0.20 42.06 -8.51 10.40 53.55 +.15 11.47 +.26 1.20 75.09 -.19 .34 +.03 0.36 14.72 +.50 8.83 +.16 14.27 +.14 0.44 27.46 +.09 11.45 -.13 .82 -.03 1.00 20.53 -.17 10.62 +.14 18.12 +.01 37.56 -.90 2.02 +.14 3.23 +.02 0.20 31.90 +.01

Nm

D

Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DeutBk pf DeutBkX pf DB Cap pf DeutBCT2 pf DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DimeCBc Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DufPUC DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.93 1.66 1.59 1.84 1.90 1.64 2.01 0.08 0.64 2.38 0.18 0.50 0.03 1.08 2.12 0.16 0.56 6.26 5.68 0.20 0.01

7.35 4.97 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.84 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 4.88 +.07 57.49 -.22 24.69 +.03 24.06 +.09 26.07 -.05 26.99 -.17 25.15 +.04 27.19 -.18 40.58 +.38 8.47 -.10 12.39 -.16 67.52 -.08 14.20 -.09 72.61 +.43 43.08 +1.46 71.71 +.77 10.88 +.13 13.97 -.02 29.13 -.02 32.21 -.01 60.56 -.06 35.43 -1.25 32.88 -.07 26.56 -.23 14.25 -.25 18.92 +.36 42.89 +.44 36.64 -.04 39.37 -.16 31.03 22.56 +.07 20.63 +.11 36.62 +.06 32.48 -.27 23.36 +.09 12.58 +.47 22.44 -.95 37.35 +1.59 44.77 -2.14 54.00 -.28 53.49 -.05 11.33 +.12 57.40 -.54 38.35 -.04 17.66 -.02 43.19 -.76 38.00 -.64 .22 +.01 19.16 -.11 34.85 -.06 36.68 +.59 60.76 +.51 29.00 -.24 48.70 +.05 49.64 -.95 44.63 +.08 14.56 +.01 69.21 -.52 18.11 -.01 1.58 -.04 1.78 +.13 18.28 +.22 54.04 -.65 29.31 -.51 35.03 -.31 7.96 +.06 32.74 -.86 24.81 -.30 38.23 -.42 4.53 +.01 66.40 -.61 1.83 -.05 4.60 -.13 46.49 -.39 23.77 -.99 12.45 -.11 17.58 +.02 12.05 -.06 75.27 -.02 13.31 -.38 2.86 +.05 2.40 -.02 10.89 1.92 +.01 4.88 -.08

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0.25 18.61 +.08 14.83 -.23 25.28 +.41 0.27 22.25 +.18 21.21 +.91 25.25 -.48 2.51 45.40 +.33 0.62 99.01 +.26 0.88 37.91 -.17 5.26 -.04 0.40 23.75 +.12 0.10 6.83 -.04 0.64 8.66 -.08 0.04 16.69 -.26 1.76 78.07 -.60 4.13 -.08 2.32 83.64 -.45 0.64 29.51 -.34 1.40 13.20 -.01 1.80 14.06 -.24 0.43 7.07 +.17 1.29 16.35 +.01 1.23 14.34 +.10 1.62 11.70 -.25 1.53 11.07 -.22 1.56 12.56 -.21 24.14 +.21 0.62 51.95 -.35 1.34 46.67 -.60 1.26 35.51 -.01 10.22 -3.05 67.21 +.16 2.23 -.03 0.04 13.25 -.06 24.58 -.05 1.60 33.16 +.14 6.03 -.03 0.05 18.56 -.15 11.87 +.66 16.52 -.24 14.57 +.20 0.38 27.45 -.88 1.11 +.01 12.60 -.40 54.90 +.02 1.34 53.90 -.01 10.35 -.01 0.80 30.49 -.22 1.39 -.01 4.99 +.24 35.35 -.16 1.00 40.82 +.41 4.39 +.13 29.99 +.72 0.52 45.87 -.37 74.65 +.50 5.13 +.11 3.58 49.52 -.07 24.34 -1.03 4.81 +.13 2.16 26.94 -.11 0.68 23.81 -.19 1.40 47.50 +.08 5.03 +.16 8.39 -.38 1.44 24.68 -.12 3.32 77.00 -.30 2.33 41.62 +.07 .36 +.02 2.60 46.44 -.11 2.94 +.02 8.84 -.21 9.92 -.01 0.16 31.89 -.09 73.54 -.74 0.88 18.25 +.35 1.35 49.76 -.19 0.28 10.97 -.09 0.55 66.50 -.03 24.49 +.56 11.14 +.26 1.92 84.76 +.79 1.24 -.02 1.03 -.06 8.91 +.52 6.60 +.18 5.81 -.07 0.16 15.57 -.08 4.45 +.06 2.10 43.02 -.17 6.07 -.10 5.48 +.04 0.28 27.70 -.59 0.40 49.05 +.41 47.41 -.64 2.38 +.04 25.06 -.08 0.33 16.28 -.10 3.25 +.04 1.76 65.30 +.26 21.40 +.07 95.66 -1.08 3.49 +.06 25.54 -.02 0.50 70.37 -.63 72.04 -.80 0.48 9.09 -.08 2.97 -.05 34.98 -.11 4.88 -.12 0.92 86.09 -.10 0.08 24.91 +.07 10.20 +.75 0.62 45.71 -.35 0.84 52.71 -.04 0.48 89.39 -.36 0.20 13.27 +.19 2.68 82.11 -.18 0.24 5.67 +.08 0.96 23.64 -.16 5.47 -.02 13.34 -.20 17.35 -.19 0.72 14.67 -.15 0.20 27.88 -.01 1.34 19.63 +.16 1.26 11.52 +.02 0.04 12.34 -.36 44.38 -1.69 20.92 +.11 0.16 15.09 -.22 0.24 14.61 -.30 .32 +.04 0.04 5.71 0.40 17.08 -.12 0.72 10.89 -.40 6.01 -.06 0.04 12.52 -.20 0.56 11.69 -.04 142.27 +5.34 0.08 17.19 -.04 2.20 38.65 -.24 0.64 18.19 -.69 54.52 +.19

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D 5.76 -.01 2.58 -.06 0.16 10.24 +.06 6.13 -.09 1.70 -.10 0.80 24.64 +.06 1.16 113.66 -.71 0.50 52.48 -.11 24.07 -.73 0.32 54.74 +.05 0.60 15.86 +.21 5.46 +.09 13.91 +.27 5.61 +.21 3.25 49.65 +.36 13.70 -.21 33.20 -.06 32.31 +.03 9.19 +.16 25.28 +.26 4.04 +.04 0.76 56.24 +.33 54.33 +1.27 25.01 -.51 1.77 23.15 +.62 0.88 116.19 -.79 1.20 98.99 -.09 .04 +.01 7.53 -.04 0.75 8.86 +.24 13.79 -.07 1.90 28.01 -.61 41.24 +.38 1.19 +.01 0.28 20.63 -.20 0.12 9.62 7.90 +.04 9.65 -.13 1.12 31.06 -.11 0.20 4.84 -.09 4.34 -.02 3.40 -.09 24.30 -.15 8.95 -.02 4.34 +.62 30.66 +.15 0.84 14.40 +.10 0.48 5.18 -.03 1.68 17.92 +.07 0.72 6.66 +.48 0.14 17.91 -.28 1.28 26.93 +.21 18.82 -.43 7.35 0.16 14.09 +.03 0.40 19.06 +.07 1.50 31.49 +.09 31.28 +.01 .36 +.01 31.95 -.25 47.08 -.95 16.39 -.27 5.14 +.03 26.41 +.24 1.68 63.17 -.89 0.48 17.16 -.12 1.50 26.19 +.06 16.13 +.23 0.04 4.11 -.32 1.12 37.25 -.23 4.13 +.03 3.06 +.04 .40 -.05 44.99 -.62 13.96 -.05 0.18 18.50 +.25 0.44 21.00 -.06 23.69 -.17 1.64 45.54 -.15 .58 -.01 13.07 +.11 72.43 -.17 25.14 +.23 19.07 -1.01 0.21 13.28 -.13 5.76 -.28 1.94 -.03 28.36 -.74 36.79 +.11 0.52 14.89 -.12 1.98 41.65 -.21 1.95 +.07 0.40 6.69 -.02 3.99 -.08 6.01 +.12 0.08 38.59 -.17 3.04 +.32 20.29 +.21 1.75 +.06 0.15 15.11 -.43 1.61 +.06 0.40 18.16 -.16 0.68 13.50 +.10 0.16 15.89 -.27 0.09 23.28 -1.12 0.18 45.01 -.23 21.79 -.83 5.28 +.04 1.40 151.59 -3.14 1.16 77.52 -.17 14.56 -.30 11.72 -.16 540.93 -2.37 29.54 -.25 0.80 33.76 +.50 16.79 -.09 2.16 121.64 -3.67 2.73 -.09 7.65 -.14 20.04 -2.91 0.92 23.92 +.03 3.27 -.03 2.77 -.10 0.07 6.24 +.02 0.83 18.90 -.11 29.89 +.35 12.17 +.26 18.90 +.61 1.80 76.30 -1.36 33.28 +.01 1.32 -.01 9.98 -.32 0.52 22.31 +.03 0.64 42.76 +.51 0.03 31.36 -.12 9.16 +.20 8.29 -.05 1.02 65.00 -.02 0.58 26.79 +.04 1.86 36.34 -.38 1.70 53.05 +.19 27.74 -.05 30.14 -.75 24.87 +.90 0.36 35.08 -.55 8.06 -.21 1.49 19.83 -.28 1.35 17.27 -.17 27.55 +.25 1.27 1.00 46.23 -.14 1.92 -.03 50.73 +2.21 23.20 -.21 0.40 31.98 -.37 35.43 +.01 7.01 -.07 0.07 11.39 -.03 1.00 43.97 -.29 0.82 24.93 +.22 0.20 24.34 -.17 15.87 -.12 1.81 24.98 +.20 11.65 -.10 1.00 45.97 -.15 4.60 29.33 -.08 1.24 22.65 +.12 6.32 -.07 3.60 -.09 2.76 49.46 +.13 0.93 24.62 -.19 7.28 -.27 1.20 23.86 +.13 27.36 +.14 18.59 -.37 26.52 -.08 0.08 15.37 -.12 4.12 +.09 7.06 +.13 1.80 49.09 11.97 -.11 0.24 44.14 +.28 .53 -.01 1.00 65.34 +.49 2.53 -.03

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D 0.20 6.16 +.14 1.28 50.86 +.10 10.12 -.41 0.40 62.75 -.62 0.32 42.13 -.08 19.00 +.02 23.46 -.25 25.94 +.07 1.70 33.93 -.15 0.41 36.00 -.23 27.70 +1.33 49.95 -.01 3.07 +.10 0.60 33.20 +.77 16.15 +.13 0.95 30.81 -.19 53.66 +.51 2.32 54.50 -.48 33.15 -.11 36.81 +.46 1.21 46.17 -.24 0.32 18.52 +.10 0.84 45.08 +.29 20.42 -.02 10.98 +.08 57.92 +.52 1.80 22.82 -.26 0.04 15.99 +.04 0.28 6.19 +.14 3.80 -.05 29.20 +.24 0.60 11.79 -.19 1.35 20.46 -.30 27.06 -.31 54.31 +.51 0.48 35.51 -.43 0.04 5.73 -.16 0.40 12.20 -.09 4.10 -.14 40.99 -.51 6.31 -.11 3.51 +.21

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25.59 -.29 0.06 17.92 -.28 0.53 51.65 -.91 18.06 +.62 0.26 18.38 +.05 0.54 7.68 1.20 11.55 +.04 11.18 +.21 0.32 5.70 +.05 5.14 -.05 21.59 +.09 13.50 +.07 31.32 -.05 0.81 24.89 +.21 0.76 21.42 +.26 2.58 80.53 -.39 0.42 29.27 -.13 0.30 23.54 +.33 0.48 19.08 -.08 0.16 10.22 +.08 0.39 55.41 +.42 0.25 14.04 -.10 0.75 56.07 -.20 0.38 13.80 +.02 1.37 46.44 +.24 1.36 70.15 -.24 0.21 13.59 +.11 0.44 17.17 +.08 1.20 64.15 -.57 0.68 74.89 -.11 1.22 76.10 -1.22 24.03 +.54 1.08 53.10 -.18 1.69 48.18 -.06 2.65 112.22 +.35 0.87 63.19 +.01 0.68 45.88 +.14 1.01 84.90 -.49 2.34 117.98 -.30 3.75 108.24 -.40 0.59 46.78 -.08 5.35 112.07 -.91 5.64 113.01 -.59 1.13 61.31 -.06 1.22 52.55 -.20 1.24 55.70 -.33 3.75 106.26 -.12 3.82 101.51 -1.54 3.77 99.22 -.57 1.10 84.37 -.04 1.38 57.72 +.40 0.83 41.72 -.24 0.52 50.83 -.31 1.42 92.83 -.43 0.99 81.87 -.30 7.98 89.61 -.43 0.44 48.20 -.12 88.12 -.26 1.85 64.60 -.13 1.28 60.64 -.33 0.57 89.78 -.45 0.72 53.03 -.02 1.11 65.02 -.20 1.06 64.92 -.01 3.26 104.94 -.17 0.47 78.00 -.10 0.79 70.53 -.05 2.91 39.71 -.09 0.67 21.93 -.10 1.88 55.08 -.17 0.08 11.82 -.09 0.59 53.07 -.75 0.15 26.04 -.17 0.58 61.92 +.05 0.91 68.41 -.59 1.02 40.00 +.24 1.06 59.56 +.35 3.22 +.06 1.34 61.40 -.56 1.00 47.72 -.17 56.44 -9.48 1.36 52.52 -.87 21.29 +.37 17.95 +.06 1.20 36.05 -.10 0.60 36.83 +.13 1.24 -.04 1.36 48.99 +.23 48.54 -.95 17.49 +.24 17.22 +.14 7.53 +.46 3.64 +.02 21.34 -.52 16.96 +.14 1.25 40.86 -.33 2.82 41.37 +.17 11.89 -.18 37.39 -.26 .02 +.00 0.54 71.01 -.19 0.28 38.80 -.27 17.59 -.07 1.82 +.06 0.57 8.64 -.06 1.22 26.12 +.01 6.52 +.25 6.04 -.05 9.05 -.16 2.72 52.62 +.17 0.63 19.32 +.08 17.19 +.04 112.95 +.01 29.79 -.20 12.34 -.03 14.50 -.35 4.89 +.15 2.60 141.50 +1.13 6.01 -.04 1.08 49.70 -.37 0.24 14.73 -.31 0.50 23.11 -.05 21.74 +.15 0.16 22.63 -.21 6.69 +.05 69.93 +1.11 10.56 -.17 0.48 11.75 -.10 2.06 +.04 18.50 +.46 30.95 -.16 47.31 -.26 274.18 -1.53 0.54 5.93 -.03 0.44 22.94 +.07 3.57 21.60 +.11 0.29 4.65 -.01 14.36 +.12 0.69 8.61 -.01 8.47 -.21 1.52 -.08

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Nm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia IxysCp JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap JpnSmCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KandiTech KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Keithley Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kingtone n Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT Knoll Inc Knot Inc h KodiakO g Kohls KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LRAD LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Lance Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg Liquidity LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A LyonBas B

D 0.25 21.37 +.12 27.22 +.59 8.82 +.39 4.47 -.10 0.59 25.56 -.49 62.50 -.05 2.32 -.04 25.04 -.28 13.77 -.01 10.11 -.26 35.58 +.14 9.85 +.29 22.56 -.37 12.38 -.11 0.20 38.72 -1.12 12.40 -.62 1.80 34.82 -.32 1.80 27.00 -.21 1.68 25.55 -.19 0.28 14.72 -.30 0.38 26.36 +.03 22.86 +.79 1.05 -.03 39.92 -.60 7.41 +.06 19.35 -.30 2.60 +.11 17.22 -.10 0.04 11.49 -.14 0.05 8.50 +.24 0.33 32.78 -.15 11.55 +.60 0.30 22.37 -.35 6.58 -.02 30.82 +.41 43.12 +1.03 1.98 -.16 2.16 63.74 +.16 0.52 32.60 +.31 0.20 20.46 -.12 0.20 86.45 -2.06 1.28 -.05 46.37 +.04 0.70 72.60 -.22 31.30 -.34 0.25 11.19 +.08 0.20 25.26 -.12 12.35 -.30 0.08 11.20 -.16 0.48 9.01 -.01 1.00 34.96 21.65 -.02 5.62 -.17 41.27 -.23 0.76 36.54 +.76 1.92 26.35 -.08 0.15 21.58 +.07 1.62 50.37 -.44 0.48 32.84 +.04 5.25 -.22 10.33 +.01 0.04 8.18 -.11 1.40 33.56 -.11 1.20 +.20 2.64 66.44 -.38 0.64 16.74 -.22 4.36 70.84 +.09 4.36 62.14 -.29 13.55 -.33 37.82 -.24 14.15 -.01 3.71 +.36 0.10 19.31 -.35 40.15 -1.11 0.24 4.76 +.06 13.06 +.02 0.24 19.20 -.28 1.20 20.32 +.35 0.08 16.48 -.59 9.41 -.14 3.98 -.02 52.33 -.68 13.95 -.07 16.90 +.10 1.16 31.80 +.31 30.75 -.51 5.19 +.01 0.42 22.15 +.14 5.88 +.06 8.72 11.81 -.01 1.60 70.96 -.26 0.46 30.99 -.13 12.65 +.30 17.82 +.28 4.87 -.01 21.53 -.07 2.08 -.04 4.66 -.03 6.11 -.07 8.64 -.21 1.09 +.03 78.98 -1.42 1.29 +.09 41.26 +.01 33.62 -.45 0.64 22.71 -.15 0.20 37.50 -1.42 39.12 +.18 0.44 25.04 -.21 4.70 -.21 8.83 -.14 0.50 34.98 -.91 11.48 -.66 85.52 +.64 2.08 25.99 -.52 0.16 31.23 -.45 1.08 23.79 -.29 0.40 26.96 -1.09 0.16 16.00 +.15 0.60 43.16 -.43 25.03 -.30 .88 -.01 1.69 +.03 0.40 7.63 -.03 45.09 -.04 10.52 +.03 0.29 4.53 -.01 32.50 +.18 32.24 +.22 14.12 -.12 56.72 +.39 66.27 +.17 1.90 32.86 -.25 46.53 -.93 41.12 -1.45 35.38 -.32 1.66 -.01 9.13 +.06 1.96 37.42 +.02 6.13 -.05 0.60 29.18 -.17 0.80 27.49 +.24 12.28 -1.51 0.04 25.27 -.16 0.92 30.43 -.37 2.52 33.34 +.08 5.05 -.07 17.00 +.16 9.33 -.19 8.63 -.10 6.96 +.20 1.45 4.49 -.10 4.36 -.15 3.00 70.20 -.92 2.61 -.01 0.25 39.80 -.07 18.79 +.14 36.24 -1.06 40.13 +.43 2.90 -.09 4.50 81.90 -.15 7.78 -.09 0.44 21.68 -.21 1.44 112.87 -.14 0.50 49.47 -.04 46.73 +1.14 26.08 -.43 27.02 +.05 27.07 +.12

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel

2.80 75.66 -1.12 8.27 +.12 13.00 +1.81 0.24 6.24 -.10 1.00 26.96 -.02 0.63 20.70 +.04 7.09 +.15 13.54 -.05 7.70 -.04 0.90 7.60 -.09 0.58 6.97 +.05 10.51 +.48 11.56 -.54 0.60 14.63 +.53

Nm MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc MVC Cap Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVIndSC MktVJrGld MktVChina MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MdwGold g Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMuf Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap3 MS Cap4 Mosaic Motorola Motricity n MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTch NetSuite NBRESec NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm

D 9.41 -.15 19.59 -.10 2.92 +.04 35.45 -.19 0.48 12.99 2.00 43.50 -1.02 1.80 32.73 -.04 17.05 -.26 0.20 24.04 -.30 47.75 -.10 2.93 53.00 -.47 4.03 -.01 1.20 86.99 -1.51 4.83 -.07 0.08 11.37 -.20 6.50 -.17 0.74 54.42 -.85 0.52 12.33 -.07 1.00 35.51 -.18 25.30 +.06 0.11 58.19 -.40 0.08 34.24 -.15 23.21 -.05 36.34 -.01 45.70 0.42 50.01 +.06 0.45 61.35 -.60 2.56 38.05 -.35 0.16 35.93 -.07 0.84 24.00 -.09 0.04 7.12 -.17 4.74 -.07 1.60 78.75 +.37 17.15 -.16 0.30 11.34 -.37 2.00 28.46 -.64 0.24 35.56 -.67 11.57 +.06 0.60 232.66 +1.77 0.75 24.00 -.29 2.77 +.08 0.84 18.40 -.39 3.85 -.11 1.04 42.57 +.07 15.36 -.39 2.44 77.04 +1.29 0.94 35.37 +.03 0.72 61.99 -.44 18.58 -.15 47.25 +.04 0.90 57.77 -.47 0.92 24.86 -.33 24.81 -.45 52.84 -.33 0.80 10.76 +.04 14.36 +.11 0.24 30.03 -.76 20.77 +.39 26.38 -.60 12.34 +.09 56.53 -.88 0.90 33.27 -.28 5.66 -.13 20.11 -.10 0.36 25.06 -.48 10.73 -.07 64.56 -.35 1.52 37.15 -.01 0.92 34.62 -.25 3.12 19.19 +.04 4.42 -.16 0.62 27.29 +.38 0.74 39.64 -.12 10.41 -.62 0.14 10.47 +.09 1.37 30.46 -.01 7.59 -.06 43.79 +.01 20.00 -.16 0.64 25.23 -.11 2.89 -.01 2.09 -.02 .63 -.01 7.24 100.62 -.14 0.20 29.94 -1.16 8.21 +.25 9.43 -.05 10.50 -.22 4.82 -.05 2.97 +.01 23.07 -.06 13.46 -.06 55.38 -.47 0.61 21.71 -.02 0.61 17.98 +.12 1.12 48.78 -.07 28.55 +.79 14.30 +.01 2.47 -.07 16.08 -.53 0.36 48.56 +.86 1.12 54.12 -.57 13.30 +.10 0.36 17.95 +.14 0.42 26.66 -1.22 0.20 25.44 -.50 1.56 24.03 1.56 24.36 -.10 0.20 66.55 -1.51 7.96 -.16 17.18 -2.82 0.07 3.13 -.11 1.10 65.05 -.40 18.94 +.01 19.80 -.14 14.22 -.07 28.06 +.10 0.60 15.96 -.10 .71 -.00 37.76 -5.27 2.41 +.11 6.87 +.06 20.90 -.32 0.44 13.09 +.08 1.20 29.33 +.16 19.24 -.16 0.14 26.32 -.24 13.92 -.34 19.96 -.16 0.29 2.55 -.09 0.72 18.30 -.09 13.97 +.17 1.38 54.76 -.10 7.17 46.17 +.21 0.40 48.14 -.01 0.04 6.52 -.09 1.52 26.58 -.15 0.40 13.09 +.10 1.84 40.47 -.08 0.24 6.03 -.03 1.68 18.29 +.01 48.86 -.67 15.43 -.02 11.89 +.21 13.65 -.07 27.18 +.14 50.39 +.77 37.94 -.15 26.93 -.02 152.78 -1.83 3.66 +.25 1.89 21.69 -.05 0.24 3.80 +.02 .54 -.01 7.52 +.08 24.69 +.27 14.12 -.13 5.71 +.02 .04 -.00 .11 -.01 7.29 -.07 90.85 -.23 1.00 16.65 +.07 8.49 -.08 0.28 12.69 +.01 4.08 +.07 0.20 18.14 59.75 -.09 0.60 62.54 -.64 8.61 -.14 0.15 14.08 -.09 0.15 15.86 -.02 0.20 22.05 -.27 2.00 55.34 -.13 0.92 17.82 +.12 1.86 47.92 -.18 1.08 81.77 -.25 15.37 -.11 0.20 35.65 +.20 0.72 77.45 -.49 0.56 10.96 -.29 5.48 +.18 1.55 26.67 -.43 0.80 38.17 -.26

NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt OmegaP Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd OncoGenex ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable Oracle OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg OrionMar Oritani s OrsusXel Orthfx OshkoshCp Osteotech OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordRs n Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PainTher PallCorp PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo Peregrne rs PerfectWld PerkElm Prmian Perrigo PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica Phazar PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd Plexus PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Pool Corp Popular PortGE PortglTel PostPrp Potash PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PwShCurH PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSClnEn PwShHiYD PSFinPf PSETecLd PSBldABd PSHYCpBd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav PranaBio Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K

D 1.44 61.78 -.43 8.97 +.19 4.58 -.06 1.03 30.44 -.01 9.09 +.04 18.75 +.02 1.12 49.30 -.18 2.93 -.01 1.88 61.83 -.36 0.40 4.25 +.12 0.40 11.35 9.56 -.03 1.99 59.29 -.16 10.45 +.62 2.37 -.09 6.14 +.09 26.95 -.06 1.60 39.11 +.05 0.50 31.38 -.40 33.62 -.59 15.08 -.06 1.44 39.64 -.51 0.75 8.58 +.04 0.75 8.92 +.01 0.66 8.54 -.08 11.16 -.18 21.11 -.54 1.45 43.18 +.48 33.01 +.10 53.26 +.42 22.06 -.36 1.52 84.91 +.62 54.80 -.90 .95 17.07 +.02 9.11 -.09 1.91 +.07 4.94 -.16 15.21 -.82 2.66 119.11 -.30 49.01 -.62 .47 -.02 25.82 -.19 0.28 10.02 +.08 0.69 13.85 -.02 0.80 21.16 +.02 1.48 23.09 +.14 5.97 0.13 22.46 -.39 0.80 41.29 +.33 24.66 -.07 6.99 -.04 18.52 -.30 1.84 48.87 +.07 26.84 +.03 47.83 +.23 64.42 -.68 0.20 28.33 -.27 15.33 -.03 6.35 -.14 11.87 -.27 9.16 -.19 14.01 -.23 0.30 10.28 +.08 .18 -.05 29.56 -.27 31.16 +.33 6.52 +.04 1.75 33.54 -1.00 0.71 28.17 -.05 26.86 -.89 27.48 +.25 21.33 +.42 .27 -.00 1.00 5.56 -.02 0.42 47.32 +.70 1.82 46.69 +.23 20.00 -1.01 7.20 -.12 4.21 +.22 0.40 51.75 -1.17 0.50 11.73 +.08 1.43 111.64 -1.46 2.20 76.33 +.09 1.40 27.57 -.15 21.79 -.03 0.48 50.16 -.42 .78 -.06 1.08 -.02 5.98 -.02 0.60 23.90 +.10 33.08 -.03 4.24 +.01 7.29 -.05 0.64 43.70 -.52 0.05 30.85 -.06 0.11 14.84 +.33 91.74 +.90 33.73 +.16 0.20 3.93 -.03 20.16 +.16 1.80 20.96 -.24 4.45 +.01 1.08 71.17 -.62 2.00 81.11 -.03 13.38 -.20 0.40 28.35 -.06 0.20 18.50 +.29 1.24 27.60 -.03 0.28 51.53 -.24 0.12 26.63 -.48 0.84 11.46 -.05 31.04 -.56 0.23 15.33 -.57 1.80 22.43 -.09 1.04 11.07 +.02 0.80 33.10 -.36 0.60 12.84 -.08 13.99 +.23 0.76 34.70 -.22 0.62 13.19 -.08 0.12 11.23 +.26 1.08 19.24 +.10 1.92 66.64 +.24 1.62 28.71 -1.28 0.28 23.30 -.22 1.27 21.19 +.03 0.25 65.66 -.90 3.97 128.18 -1.28 17.67 -.02 1.18 32.10 +.54 1.18 34.88 +.14 31.64 +.36 6.18 +.06 0.50 36.00 -.11 0.72 17.66 -.07 1.98 +.31 0.60 24.18 -.17 7.48 -.21 9.53 -.02 5.13 +.18 2.56 57.75 +.39 0.95 33.90 +.25 0.15 63.45 +.48 2.27 6.43 +.38 1.12 29.39 -.01 1.26 18.27 -.54 7.91 -.14 5.63 +.03 1.46 12.95 -.03 11.59 -.24 2.10 41.35 +.10 6.50 -.10 0.08 72.91 -.96 1.46 21.77 -.53 3.80 63.56 -.82 28.55 +.23 0.20 35.89 +.31 2.06 -.11 0.32 43.99 +.59 31.95 -.07 .48 +.03 1.68 37.13 -.11 1.60 67.31 -.13 0.40 94.07 -.33 27.83 -.50 1.67 -.32 13.37 +.23 0.52 20.77 +.26 2.89 +.07 1.04 20.64 +.07 0.77 14.12 -.04 0.80 30.28 +.18 0.40 147.17 -1.20 0.20 33.28 +.44 10.41 -.55 63.89 +.52 25.22 -.04 23.46 28.80 +.11 25.90 -.13 22.80 -.10 22.21 -.15 27.72 +.16 10.42 +.08 0.35 8.56 1.30 18.36 -.10 0.11 18.04 -.02 1.12 26.38 -.21 1.56 18.47 -.09 1.02 14.46 -.07 1.64 28.44 -.01 0.12 26.19 -.29 0.33 50.42 -.10 1.76 -.07 1.41 +.22 1.80 90.71 -1.19 0.12 130.44 -1.42 7.20 -.01 .46 -.03 10.39 +.03 1.08 52.52 -.51 349.06 +8.02 31.80 -.02 0.50 26.67 -.35 0.04 12.20 +.23 46.73 -.02 37.78 +.09 47.43 +.16 27.85 +.20 0.40 49.75 +.02 23.05 -.03 69.92 -.27 13.83 +.06 0.43 41.71 -.26 33.34 +.95 27.97 -.20 34.48 +.06 19.68 +.11 50.81 25.55 +.39 0.41 48.36 -.26 19.05 +.51 0.09 56.60 -1.61 40.66 +.25 0.23 34.80 -.03 0.10 39.62 -.73 36.18 +.02

Nm

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ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUltGold ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProceraNt ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PPrIT

15.95 +.02 0.01 34.73 +.03 41.64 +.64 24.70 +.23 0.48 166.89 -1.11 10.78 -.06 67.56 +.65 30.24 -.32 17.28 -.88 12.46 +.07 105.00 +4.70 15.87 -.11 18.56 -.33 .56 +.04 1.93 62.80 +.17 2.48 44.26 -.06 0.16 20.88 -.44 0.60 12.51 -.21 1.21 9.86 0.62 32.58 -.48 9.02 -.02 0.56 22.30 -.74 0.72 7.72 -.04 0.44 12.88 +.05 0.70 54.18 -.22 0.61 19.78 -.04 33.61 -.02 1.37 33.11 -.28 3.20 102.16 +.87 8.86 -.05 8.08 -.10 0.71 6.95 +.02

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0.02 30.53 +.04 18.45 -.30 23.45 -.40 17.30 -.44 0.76 45.04 -.28 0.16 18.12 -.36 20.16 -.26 2.71 +.28 .58 -.03 0.40 49.97 -.65 24.90 +.12 0.56 17.21 -.29 9.82 -.08 5.98 +.35 12.67 -.21 12.35 -.03 4.32 +.03 14.26 -1.86 0.32 6.39 +.04 2.03 +.02 6.58 -.31 0.24 23.25 -.08 0.84 20.65 -.16 3.72 -.08 8.19 +.04 30.36 +.06 23.80 -.74 0.01 8.91 +.57 19.41 +.06 .61 -.01 0.25 21.74 -.23 10.18 -.07 59.60 +.24 19.80 -.06 0.17 105.12 +1.71 0.16 37.31 +.60 7.87 -.25 .29 +.01 0.44 27.75 -.01 2.00 50.02 +.22 1.50 45.52 -.36 3.33 +.09 1.73 34.28 -.38 39.67 +.26 21.91 -.36 4.98 +.19 1.00 14.89 -.23 0.68 58.02 +.11 0.72 14.13 -.14 1.85 41.92 -.26 1.78 24.75 -.17 28.25 +.11 0.58 73.89 -1.91 0.04 7.17 -.13 0.16 19.79 +.36 0.48 48.55 -.09 0.40 43.12 -.24 1.00 60.40 -.55 14.55 +.15 0.24 23.25 +.38 1.08 .37 +.00 1.15 27.88 +.12 8.68 -.08 0.80 31.05 -.82 13.78 -.05 49.12 -.89 31.68 -.03 1.00 6.38 -.11 1.68 98.67 -.50 12.86 -.81 1.13 -.03 3.60 59.97 +.21 8.46 +.04 24.76 +.02 16.36 +.51 0.90 65.89 +1.83 0.42 20.90 -.27 .89 46.52 +.04 0.17 28.38 +.37 0.52 26.99 -.23 1.40 62.03 -.88 0.96 60.22 -.19 34.85 -.54 28.21 +.55 1.28 39.86 -.08 0.38 66.80 -.53 24.27 -.47 0.64 55.96 +.18 49.23 -.62 32.36 +.57 2.00 54.82 -.27 14.47 -.56 19.27 -.09 17.75 +.27 17.73 +.20 17.91 +.16 34.55 -.39 3.36 62.15 +.41 3.36 63.65 +.43 0.36 50.31 -.19 12.76 -.01 3.94 -.19 19.80 +1.06 12.22 +.17 2.29 32.03 -.12 1.08 45.44 -.38 0.62 43.62 -.23 0.12 16.48 15.91 0.67 53.40 +.65 40.54 -.39 1.90 40.82 -.10 0.20 21.00 -.04 7.44 -.11 18.96 +.18 0.40 69.30 +.85 11.35 +.07 0.10 41.53 -.27 2.55 111.07 +.01 134.75 +.68 0.87 57.04 -.04 0.42 29.33 +.24 1.54 148.89 -.57 2.31 117.46 -.46 1.68 51.63 -.03 0.12 15.75 -.17 0.11 23.04 -.62 0.26 33.97 -.25 0.43 41.01 +.20 1.93 39.95 +.37 4.30 40.13 -.26 0.45 24.30 +.08 45.86 +.01 0.30 23.42 -.30 0.57 43.55 -.16 0.20 44.73 -.09 0.35 56.71 -.54 1.00 67.73 -1.70 19.49 +.49 14.68 +.38 0.28 7.88 +.02 25.47 +.95 44.84 -.70 0.36 6.78 -.66 37.66 -.77 1.30 49.87 -.01 0.48 21.66 +.34 19.74 -2.42 39.72 +.24 9.89 -.08 107.36 +.05 39.24 +.20 11.50 -.34 1.23 -.01 0.60 40.90 +.72 38.70 -1.24 5.48 -.17 12.60 -.51 1.63 34.89 +.03 3.01 -.08 0.35 12.10 -.15 0.44 14.81 +.01 1.46 46.38 -.36 4.10 -.10 22.30 -.38 20.02 +.35 0.84 64.26 -.36 0.07 50.22 -.23 0.30 29.64 +.06 28.33 -.05 0.24 14.09 +.02 9.39 -.17 1.00 52.70 -.22 0.30 48.28 -.28 8.55 2.31 30.72 +.55 12.69 -.06 10.21 -.06 0.52 23.41 +.02 73.79 -.04 16.99 -.18 6.85 -.23 7.52 -.02 0.60 28.21 -.06 1.56 53.20 -.27 20.63 -.05 .28 +.00 1.48 24.08 +.02 7.22 +.17 0.16 8.70 -.05 20.03 +.69 0.80 12.36 +.58 6.49 -.08 4.50 -1.37 33.20 -.83

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D 6.06 +.09 1.44 73.11 -.14 1.40 20.05 -.03 0.34 71.36 +.95 5.23 +.03 9.19 +.15 0.58 17.60 -.12 2.41 113.13 +2.25 0.24 10.96 -1.94 2.33 +.08 12.84 +.37 11.56 +.53 0.64 60.62 -.61 38.94 -.29 32.42 -.54 0.42 33.80 +.03 4.84 -.01 37.51 +.14 5.71 +.21 0.41 5.45 +.04 23.98 +.34 27.84 +.36 0.08 9.42 +.52 2.40 96.74 -.40 52.55 -.59 8.39 -.03 1.40 36.81 -.29 24.50 -.61 21.32 +.07 3.74 -.01 7.40 +.11 12.31 7.04 -.01 3.75 -.06 11.96 +1.35 16.58 +.44 1.60 62.97 +.14 21.95 +.33 0.62 50.88 +.17 58.45 -.79 2.40 21.85 +.18 11.67 +.02 17.70 0.30 43.99 +.28 17.77 +.04 3.73 -.06 9.26 -.04 11.40 -.83 1.12 34.51 -.29 3.33 -.12 0.28 32.22 +.27 0.20 37.73 -.96 76.66 +6.93 27.90 -.04 1.82 37.55 +.04 1.43 41.33 +1.03 0.60 24.91 -.05 0.02 12.86 -.11 34.49 -.18 .84 -.01 17.07 +.02 0.20 16.42 +1.22 8.66 -.06 1.00 23.51 -.12 .92 -.07 21.51 -.24 12.93 +.86 4.56 -.07 12.10 +.08 1.05 34.49 -.33 0.58 31.02 -.06 0.77 28.54 +.01 0.43 34.46 -.04 1.00 59.05 -.09 0.16 14.60 -.26 0.60 32.43 -.19 0.31 23.69 +.01 1.27 31.80 -.05 3.86 -.03 1.36 62.99 -.78 0.36 20.74 -.04 1.92 -.05 0.52 27.43 +.17 0.20 55.37 -.26 1.32 20.23 -.06 0.04 39.84 -.32 1.02 22.12 +.08 0.30 14.43 -.33 0.16 8.60 +.05 .88 -.04 3.95 -.17 0.60 34.54 +.17 0.06 5.64 -.03 0.08 16.38 -.18 0.12 5.47 -.13 46.33 +.35 17.51 -.43 16.75 +.10 4.76 -.08 3.00 135.99-21.06 0.60 48.83 -.46 0.35 15.27 -.12 25.81 -.03 .48 +.11 8.12 +.34 8.47 -.22 1.44 26.54 -.23 0.40 34.52 -.63 .31 -.00 0.60 39.75 -.08 5.92 -.05 14.52 +.28 14.00 +.24 10.36 +.04 10.02 +.30 0.04 25.58 -1.13 2.15 -.05 26.79 -.07 9.00 -.69 0.35 12.14 +.01 4.91 +.24 0.04 8.74 -.15 9.45 +.09 8.33 -.01 32.60 -.31 33.79 +.48 15.56 -.04 0.20 10.61 +.11 25.85 +.30 1.13 57.25 +2.22 23.72 +.11 28.76 -.10 25.22 -.16 0.04 2.69 -.02 1.00 29.09 +.19 32.81 +.32 1.40 24.51 -.06 0.92 25.49 +.55 0.20 15.41 -.15 16.28 -.05 0.82 17.45 -.08 8.78 -.15 4.07 -.03 0.71 33.45 0.60 44.53 +.09 43.07 +.34 9.97 -.14 17.92 +.12 0.47 10.37 -.06 10.83 -.07 10.80 +.10 23.94 +.14 0.25 18.08 -.21 1.55 47.60 -.40 7.40 +.01 2.15 28.66 -.81 1.00 54.07 -.35 6.20 -.69 4.15 -.01 0.32 27.81 -.04 1.66 47.96 -.36 41.94 0.10 4.57 +.06 0.40 46.25 +.53 1.27 27.30 +.15 1.90 24.85 -.13 1.12 12.04 -.11 13.27 -.23 5.60 +.07 1.65 15.19 +.06 0.90 22.51 +.37 0.85 7.96 +.13 0.68 15.02 +.36 1.36 57.39 -.76 4.78 82.05 +1.44 1.35 14.86 -.17 0.45 33.68 -.24 0.08 7.57 -.15 0.44 19.67 -.37 1.00 17.32 -.04 0.54 10.66 -.07 32.84 +.52 0.68 42.01 +.20 4.43 -.13 31.58 +.39 38.33 -.13 11.15 -.21 23.94 -.12 7.97 -.10 10.35 -.02 .43 20.75 +.21 14.25 -.12 18.70 -.09 21.90 -.03 10.10 -.25 0.72 53.95 -.11 0.30 34.70 -.24 0.52 28.31 +.19 15.38 +.06 0.08 21.33 -.31 0.10 2.89 +.01 22.52 -.09 48.32 -1.04 44.65 +.58 11.68 +.12 1.16 38.50 -.11 0.40 32.02 -1.63 34.32 +.75 2.10 89.07 -.07 18.35 +.19 1.00 45.43 -.16 1.00 49.44 -.46 1.35 +.10 1.60 56.18 -.03 0.85 31.41 -.08 0.52 40.53 -.16 0.02 14.81 -.23 20.38 -.41 10.15 -.16 18.56 +.02 3.94 +.29 0.64 54.60 -.29 14.50 +.10 2.44 74.44 -.15 3.23 54.69 +.74 0.28 15.76 +.12 0.50 24.03 -.05 1.47 72.37 +2.07

Nm

D

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0.28 39.71 6.24 0.84 50.99 3.23 10.82 66.68 1.44 53.46 2.21 34.80 30.62 0.32 23.69 9.27 22.74 0.60 13.28 5.37 1.00 49.41 0.66 19.02 1.34 9.23 0.64 30.68 0.85 37.94 0.16 15.31

-.06 -.46 +.01 -.13 +.40 -.15 +.05 +.08 -.41 -.11 -.60 -.05 -.32 -.56 -.03 -.48 -.25 -.01 +.13 +.29 +.24

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Gold USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp UnivDisp UnivFor UnvHlth s UnivTInst UnivTravel UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis ValeCap12P Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus N m

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8.63 +.04 18.11 -.22 0.74 21.74 -.13 1.00 29.16 -.10 1.73 28.68 -.04 2.60 -.09 39.33 -.06 9.78 -.02 5.36 +.01 5.27 -.03 12.35 -.59 0.06 17.88 +.46 2.56 +.09 30.42 -.46 42.23 +.03 .10 0.20 11.20 -.11 46.28 -.51 1.22 30.17 +.17 1.22 29.36 +.37 1.32 86.13 -.70 29.88 -.33 38.80 +.01 2.56 +.04 25.83 -.86 0.08 2.76 -.01 0.40 5.98 -.10 1.88 69.40 +.74 16.46 +.02 0.20 22.57 -.29 5.84 -.02 36.00 -.16 0.20 43.86 -1.03 1.70 74.15 -.03 55.73 -.13 0.50 35.78 +.46 26.18 +.68 0.40 30.09 -1.47 0.20 37.70 -.76 1.50 18.03 -.13 4.57 +.25 0.37 22.52 -.03 1.18 +.06 1.73 -.01 3.85 +.07 1.43 +.01 31.27 -.52 21.19 -.06 2.40 85.94 +1.30 6.03 +.45 39.61 -.92 36.86 -.13 3.38 95.89 +.95 0.76 32.76 -.04 0.76 29.23 +.12 0.38 27.29 -.57 1.32 +.09 0.20 18.16 -.10 0.88


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Wal-Mart

farmers (which it defines as farmers with fewer than 20 hectares, about 50 acres). It will also provide training for the farmers and their laborers on how to choose crops that are in demand and on the proper application of water and pesticides. Both in the United States and globally, Wal-Mart will invest more than $1 billion to improve its supply chain for perishable food. Wal-Mart said it planned to reduce food waste in emergingmarket stores by 15 percent and in other stores by 10 percent. Michelle Mauthe Harvey of the Environmental Defense Fund, who worked with WalMart on the goals, said this was significant. “As we’ve moved to reliance on key locations like California and Florida,” she said, “we’ve made it very difficult for local farmers to actually get their food to market.”

Continued from B1 Wal-Mart’s decision five years ago to set sustainability goals that, among other things, increased its reliance on renewable energy and reduced packaging waste among its suppliers sent broad ripples through product manufacturers. Large companies like Procter & Gamble redesigned packages that are now carried by other retailers, while Wal-Mart’s measurements of the environmental efficiency of its suppliers helped define how they needed to change. “No other retailer has the ability to make more of a difference than Wal-Mart,” the retailer’s president and chief executive, Michael Duke, said in remarks prepared for a meeting Thursday. “Grocery is more than half of Wal-Mart’s business. Yet only four of our 39 public sustainability goals address food.” Wal-Mart said that it expected it would meet the goals by the end of 2015. In the United States, Wal-Mart plans to double the percentage of locally grown produce it sells to 9 percent. Wal-Mart defines local produce as that grown and sold in the same state. Still, the program is far less ambitious than in some other countries — in Canada, for instance, Wal-Mart expects to buy 30 percent of its produce locally by the end of 2013, and, when local produce is available, increase that to 100 percent. “Our food business in Canada is brand-new, so there’s a lot they can do,” said Andrea Thomas, senior vice president of sustainability, at a news conference. She said the program allowed each country to set its own specific goals. In emerging markets, WalMart has pledged to sell $1 billion of food from small and medium

As Wal-Mart is doing with consumer products, it will begin asking agricultural producers questions about water, fertilizer and chemical use. The eventual goal is to include that information in a sustainability index. Customers would see sustainability ratings, so they could decide whether to choose one avocado over another based on how efficiently it was grown and shipped. Wal-Mart could use index information when it decided from whom to buy. Finally, the company announced specific guidelines for the sources of its products, including a requirement that palm oil from sustainable sources be used in all its private-label products (the Wal-Mart house brands) and that any beef it sold not have contributed to the deforestation of the Amazon region because of cattle ranch expansion. While the overall goals include

Sam’s Club, the warehouse store wing of Wal-Mart, that division has other goals that include a 15 percent increase in fair trade or Rainforest Alliance-certified flowers and produce. Some local food supporters said that while the environmental goals were positive, Wal-Mart could not provide some benefits that other buy-local movements did. For instance, said Linda Berlin, director of the Center for Sustainable Agriculture at the University of Vermont, farmers markets help return money to the local economy. “The local-food movement has been, certainly, about taste and quality of food, about providing good incomes for farmers, and also about other things that have to do with building smaller economies so we as a society aren’t dominated by the more industrial complexes,” she said. “This initiative doesn’t necessarily address that.” Other environmental and agricultural specialists said it would have a big impact. “It’s very impressive,” said Margaret Mellon, director of the food and environment program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Still, she said she was disappointed that goals around organic food were not included and surprised that Wal-Mart did not address genetically modified seeds and produce. The agricultural sustainability index was particularly noteworthy, said one academic who worked with Wal-Mart on the goals. “The index represents a real number that will mean improvement on the ground: improving ecosystem health, soil health and food quality,” said Marty Matlock, a professor of ecological engineering at the University of Arkansas, which “will move agricultural producers en masse.”

growth over the past 15 years. But many small businesses have been hamstrung by the tightening of credit in the wake of the financial crisis. Lending to small firms dropped 1.8 percent during the most recent quarter compared with a year ago, even as banks swung to a profit of $21.6 billion after losing $4.4 billion the previous year, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Congress has tried to address the issue and passed a bill last month — which has been signed into law — that aims to make it easier for small firms to access credit and includes incentives for hiring new workers. Other big banks have also pledged to in-

crease their lending to mom-andpop shops, including a boost of $4 billion by JPMorgan Chase. Still, some small-business owners say that they have no need for credit or new employees while consumer demand remains sluggish. In addition, an SBA analysis this year found that about 40 percent of small businesses did not use credit from banks at all. Bank of America said that its new program is not focused only on lending but includes helping businesses with accounting, cash management and even retirement planning. The bank has about 4 million small-business customers, about 12 percent of the market.

Sustainability ratings

Lending Continued from B1 “Anything that any of us can do to create more economic certainty should have a positive effect,” Bank of America Chief Executive Brian Moynihan said Thursday during a meeting with other business leaders in Boston. The Obama administration has repeatedly called for extending aid to small businesses as a way to boost the economic recovery and reduce unemployment. According to the Small Business Administration, those firms account for half of private-sector jobs and drove 64 percent of employment

THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 B5

Veterinarian Continued from B1 For years, interest in becoming a large-animal veterinarian has gradually been waning. Veterinary schools are seeing fewer students with farm backgrounds. At the same time, the pet industry has exploded. An estimated $3.4 billion was spent on pet services last year, including trips to the vet.

Money, quality of life The lure of having a staff and working in an air-conditioned office has become a strong attraction for students, as does the prospect of an income that will help pay for their education — a cost that can be more than $100,000. The average salary for smallanimal vets is $64,744, compared to $57,745 for large-animal vets, according to a 2008 survey by the American Veterinary Medical Association. “As vets, the small-animal practice looks pretty attractive from a quality-of-life point of view,” said Hall, who works for Lone Oak Veterinary Clinic in Visalia. From 1998 to 2009, the number of companion-animal vets has climbed to 47,118 from 30,255, while the number of farm-animal vets has dropped to 5,040 from 5,553, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. Complicating the issue is the graying population of farm-animal vets. Half are older than 50. Only 4.4 percent are younger than 30. “There are folks who are looking to retire or sell their practice and they are finding it challenging to hire someone to take their place,” said David Kirkpatrick, spokesman for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Young veterinarians are more likely to take a job in a city and not in the rural areas where they often drive long distances to see their clients. Many of those rural areas are underserved, say veterinary industry officials. About 500 counties in the nation with large-animal populations have no veterinarian. Industry officials, congressional leaders and veterinary schools are responding to the need for more animal doctors with legislative remedies and outreach programs. At the University of California-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, vet school applicants interested in becoming farmanimal vets have an admissions edge. And the school has

Gary Kazanjian/ McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Dr. Stuart Hall of the Lone Oak Large Animal Veterinary Services prepares a vaccine for pregnant cows at Homestead Dairy in Visalia, Calif., on Oct. 1. reached out to high schools in rural areas with educational programs aimed at boosting the numbers of students.

Selling the program “We have some undergrads who have not been to a farm or even seen a large farm animal,” said Terry Lehenbauer, an associate director at UC-Davis’ Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare, Calif. “So we are having to do a better job of selling our program.” To help boost the number of farm animal vets, federal legislators have introduced several bills, including the Veterinary Services Investment Act, which is aimed at recruiting veterinarians, helping vets expand their practice and providing nontuition financial assistance for

students. The bill has passed the House of Representatives and is awaiting approval in the Senate. If approved, it would complement an existing federal loanrepayment program that provides students up to $75,000 in exchange for agreeing to work in an underserved area for three years. Lehenbauer, who was on the program’s selection panel, said helping students defray some of the cost of their education is an important factor in attracting more veterinarians. This year, more than 500 students applied for the repayment program, and between 60 and 80 students will receive funding, Lehenbauer said. “Money can be a real magnet,” Lehenbauer said. “And we are already seeing lots of interest in this.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

9 14 84 29 56 ... ... 29 22 54 17 11 34 10 ... ... 19 ... 15 ... 7

47.38 -.16 +37.1 21.57 -.01 -.1 12.60 -.69 -16.3 16.14 -.06 +31.3 71.36 -.11 +31.8 .54 +.01 -20.7 35.52 -.65 +29.2 58.00 -2.08 +48.6 63.18 -.18 +6.8 6.50 +.14 +170.8 25.54 -.02 -22.0 42.13 -.08 -18.2 12.40 +.06 -6.8 19.32 +.08 -5.3 8.18 -.11 +47.4 22.15 +.14 +7.9 4.70 -.21 +74.1 7.78 -.09 +11.5 20.70 +.04 -12.3 10.73 -.07 +21.5 25.23 -.11 -17.2

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1377.00 $1376.70 $24.417

Pvs Day $1370.00 $1369.50 $23.914

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 16 18 27 80 ... 37 20 ... 24 18 9 26 21 ... 16 85 10 ... ...

81.77 -.25 +23.8 38.17 -.26 +1.6 50.34 +.04 +11.8 15.21 -.82 +19.9 50.16 -.42 +38.3 2.21 +.07 -21.5 37.13 -.11 -1.7 130.44 -1.42 +18.2 21.66 +.34 +1.7 50.22 -.23 +5.3 73.11 -.14 +18.6 39.09 -.28 -2.3 27.43 +.17 +18.9 9.27 -.05 +54.5 11.20 -.11 -16.5 22.57 -.29 +.3 15.21 -.07 -21.4 24.72 -1.09 -8.4 2.53 +.04 +20.5 15.76 -.25 -.5

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl WellsFargo

9474619 4945228 1934809 1640162 1155740

Last Chg 4.06 12.60 117.46 14.60 24.72

-.19 -.69 -.46 -.26 -1.09

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MBIA GlbShipLs ChinaDigtl QntmDSS CtrySCkg n

Last

Chg %Chg

13.00 +1.81 +16.2 3.04 +.32 +11.8 7.77 +.80 +11.5 2.71 +.28 +11.5 32.99 +3.24 +10.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name DeVry BridgptEd ITT Ed BkADjia6-15 StJoe

Last 42.06 14.61 56.44 10.04 19.74

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Taseko NthgtM g GoldStr g PolyMet g PhrmAth

231856 47022 38886 38150 35543

ChiArmM SagaComm LGL Grp NTS Rlty CKX Lands

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

6.20 2.93 5.28 1.67 1.98

Yahoo Intel PwShs QQQ Microsoft SiriusXM

1030114 577931 533408 504355 433009

15.93 19.32 50.42 25.23 1.40

-.69 -.01 +.04 -.32 +.31

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

+.68 +.08 -.10 -.11 ...

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.39 +.42 +10.6 22.95 +2.08 +10.0 29.53 +2.43 +9.0 3.78 +.30 +8.6 11.90 +.90 +8.2

Name

Last

Zagg n GTSI RoylBcPA USA Tc pf SmithMicro

Chg %Chg

7.29 +2.17 +42.4 4.34 +.62 +16.7 2.04 +.28 +15.9 15.49 +1.79 +13.1 11.96 +1.35 +12.7

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-16.8 -14.8 -14.4 -10.9 -10.9

Taseko CagleA HeraldNB InvCapHld Banro g

6.20 5.88 2.39 3.98 2.82

-.69 -10.0 -.57 -8.8 -.20 -7.7 -.29 -6.8 -.17 -5.7

ApolloGrp EducMgmt ChrmSh CorinthC FstBkshs

1,201 1,817 125 3,143 234 8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -8.51 -2.53 -9.48 -1.23 -2.42

Nasdaq

Last

Diary

Chg %Chg

38.00 -11.50 10.22 -3.05 3.41 -.94 4.79 -1.23 6.00 -1.25

-23.2 -23.0 -21.6 -20.4 -17.2

Diary 213 260 48 521 38 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,198 1,435 139 2,772 153 23

11,258.01 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,115.45 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,094.57 4,705.17 405.17 7,546.59 2,105.24 2,435.38 1,173.81 12,376.08 704.69

-1.51 -26.27 -.52 -14.91 -5.31 -5.85 -4.29 -46.30 -1.78

YTD %Chg %Chg -.01 -.56 -.13 -.20 -.25 -.24 -.36 -.37 -.25

52-wk %Chg

+6.39 +14.77 +1.80 +5.03 +15.36 +7.33 +5.26 +7.16 +12.68

+10.25 +16.66 +6.30 +4.75 +13.17 +12.06 +7.04 +8.99 +13.05

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.33 2,662.91 3,819.17 5,727.21 6,455.27 23,852.17 34,836.50 21,094.86 3,262.60 9,583.51 1,899.76 3,195.02 4,765.90 5,725.95

-.11 t -.28 t -.24 t -.35 t +.32 s +1.68 s +.11 s -.24 t +.95 s +1.91 s +1.26 s -.22 t +1.59 s -.12 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9911 1.5987 .9930 .002087 .1502 1.4057 .1289 .012281 .080535 .0332 .000901 .1521 1.0494 .0325

.9919 1.5893 .9963 .002092 .1499 1.3965 .1288 .012230 .080828 .0332 .000884 .1508 1.0420 .0323

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.57 -0.07 +7.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.90 -0.02 +7.4 GrowthI 23.70 -0.05 +7.5 Ultra 20.75 -0.03 +6.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.33 -0.08 +4.9 AMutlA p 24.23 -0.06 +6.6 BalA p 17.23 -0.05 +8.1 BondA p 12.51 -0.03 +9.3 CapWA p 21.47 +0.05 +9.9 CapIBA p 50.05 +0.09 +7.5 CapWGA p 35.44 +0.09 +6.3 EupacA p 41.50 +0.24 +8.2 FdInvA p 34.55 -0.05 +6.7 GovtA p 14.74 -0.03 +7.6 GwthA p 28.67 -0.08 +4.9 HI TrA p 11.29 -0.01 +12.8 IncoA p 16.39 +9.2 IntBdA p 13.69 -0.02 +6.3 ICAA p 26.79 -0.06 +4.8 NEcoA p 24.24 -0.04 +7.8 N PerA p 27.62 +0.11 +7.7 NwWrldA 54.98 +0.14 +16.5 SmCpA p 37.09 -0.02 +17.6 TxExA p 12.49 +6.9 WshA p 25.88 -0.03 +6.9 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.00 +0.18 +6.2 IntlEqA 29.23 +0.17 +6.0 IntEqII I r 12.42 +0.07 +5.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.78 +0.11 +5.4 MidCap 30.00 -0.02 +17.4 MidCapVal 19.25 -0.07 +7.1 Baron Funds: Growth 45.05 -0.58 +9.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.20 -0.04 +10.6 DivMu 14.74 -0.01 +4.9 TxMgdIntl 15.96 +0.11 +4.5 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.74 -0.03 +6.7 GlAlA r 19.07 +0.01 +6.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.79 +0.01 +6.3 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.78 -0.03 +6.9 GlbAlloc r 19.16 +0.01 +7.2 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.41 -0.10 +8.9 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.31 -0.05 +6.8 DivrBd 5.10 -0.01 +9.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.73 -0.13 +12.5 AcornIntZ 39.38 +0.11 +17.1 ValRestr 45.62 -0.16 +7.7 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.91 +0.07 +9.6 USCorEq2 10.01 -0.05 +10.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.29 -0.10 +4.2 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.68 -0.10 +4.4 NYVen C 31.06 -0.10 +3.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.78 -0.02 +9.0 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.60 +0.04 +19.9 EmMktV 36.74 +0.06 +18.0 IntSmVa 16.37 +0.10 +9.6 LargeCo 9.27 -0.03 +7.0 USLgVa 18.50 -0.12 +9.9 US SmVa 22.67 -0.02 +15.7 IntlSmCo 16.26 +0.10 +15.8 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 18.07 +0.11 +8.1 Glb5FxInc 11.67 -0.02 +7.6 2YGlFxd 10.23 -0.01 +1.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.46 -0.28 +5.7 Income 13.42 -0.03 +7.4 IntlStk 35.51 +0.19 +11.5 Stock 99.75 -0.50 +4.8 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.02 -0.10 +2.5

NatlMunInc 10.03 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.34 LgCapVal 17.07 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.82 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.96 FPACres 26.31 Fairholme 33.24 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.29 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.72 StrInA 12.98 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.92 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.42 FF2015 11.19 FF2020 13.50 FF2020K 12.89 FF2025 11.19 FF2030 13.33 FF2035 11.02 FF2040 7.70 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.25 AMgr50 14.95 Balanc 17.59 BlueChGr 41.09 Canada 54.59 CapAp 23.58 CpInc r 9.30 Contra 63.66 ContraK 63.70 DisEq 21.58 DivIntl 29.69 DivrsIntK r 29.72 DivGth 25.84 EmrMk 25.99 Eq Inc 41.12 EQII 16.95 Fidel 29.40 FltRateHi r 9.72

+9.8 -0.01 +4.4 -0.10 +2.8 -0.03 +4.8 +3.0 +7.6 -0.34 +10.5 -0.03 +13.5 -0.01 +8.8 -0.02 +10.6 -0.02 +9.0 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02

+8.0 +8.1 +8.3 +8.4 +8.4 +8.3 +8.0 +8.2

-0.05 +7.1 -0.02 +9.4 -0.05 +8.6 -0.12 +8.3 -0.34 +12.6 -0.22 +10.0 -0.03 +13.0 -0.05 +9.4 -0.05 +9.5 -0.10 +2.7 +0.15 +6.0 +0.16 +6.2 -0.13 +9.8 +0.16 +14.9 -0.33 +6.4 -0.14 +4.9 -0.13 +4.3 +5.8

GNMA 11.74 GovtInc 10.79 GroCo 75.87 GroInc 16.76 GrowthCoK 75.92 HighInc r 8.98 Indepn 21.86 IntBd 10.80 IntmMu 10.43 IntlDisc 32.55 InvGrBd 11.99 InvGB 7.51 LgCapVal 11.73 LatAm 57.87 LevCoStk 24.75 LowP r 35.86 LowPriK r 35.85 Magelln 66.41 MidCap 26.00 MuniInc 12.94 NwMkt r 16.58 OTC 49.21 100Index 8.31 Ovrsea 31.85 Puritn 17.19 SCmdtyStrt 11.45 StIntMu 10.78 STBF 8.51 SmllCpS r 17.61 StratInc 11.58 StrReRt r 9.36 TotalBd 11.14 USBI 11.67 Value 63.76 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 55.25 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.58 IntlInxInv 35.53 TotMktInv 34.08 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.58 TotMktAd r 34.08 First Eagle:

-0.02 +8.0 -0.03 +7.2 -0.01 +10.0 -0.09 +4.8 -0.01 +10.1 +11.9 -0.16 +9.7 -0.03 +9.3 +5.5 +0.17 +7.2 -0.03 +8.9 -0.02 +9.5 -0.08 +4.3 -0.28 +13.2 -0.21 +8.2 +0.03 +12.5 +0.03 +12.6 -0.21 +3.4 -0.15 +11.3 +7.2 -0.03 +15.1 -0.31 +7.6 -0.03 +4.8 +0.18 +3.0 -0.06 +8.2 +5.0 +3.1 -0.01 +4.0 -0.05 +10.5 -0.02 +10.9 +0.01 +10.5 -0.02 +9.6 -0.03 +8.1 -0.42 +12.0 -0.06 +30.1 -0.16 +6.9 +0.32 +6.3 -0.12 +8.3 -0.16 +6.9 -0.12 +8.3

GlblA 44.61 +0.25 +11.6 OverseasA 22.18 +0.19 +14.0 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.11 +6.7 FoundAl p 10.28 -0.02 +6.4 HYTFA p 10.38 +9.5 IncomA p 2.14 +9.6 USGovA p 6.87 +6.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +13.0 IncmeAd 2.12 -0.01 +9.3 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +9.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.95 -0.08 +5.7 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.95 +0.06 +6.1 GlBd A p 13.89 +0.03 +12.8 GrwthA p 17.54 +0.05 +4.3 WorldA p 14.53 +0.03 +4.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.91 +0.03 +12.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.76 -0.27 +2.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.54 -0.01 +2.0 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.84 +0.16 +6.5 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.27 +0.04 +16.4 IntlCorEq 28.84 +0.23 +7.9 Quality 19.54 -0.01 +2.1 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.28 -0.01 +11.5 HYMuni 8.85 +0.01 +12.7 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.16 -0.03 +10.1 CapApInst 33.84 -0.03 +2.6 IntlInv t 59.21 +0.32 +8.9 Intl r 59.90 +0.32 +9.2 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.96 -0.09 +4.2 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.95 -0.08 +4.4 Hartford HLS IA :

CapApp 39.01 -0.14 +6.7 Div&Gr 18.58 -0.05 +6.0 Advisers 18.61 -0.05 +6.6 TotRetBd 11.47 -0.03 +8.9 HussmnStrGr 13.13 +0.03 +2.7 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.19 -0.07 +1.1 CmstkA 14.63 -0.04 +7.1 EqIncA 8.13 -0.02 +5.8 GrIncA p 17.79 -0.05 +4.0 HYMuA 9.66 +10.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.95 +0.04 +5.4 AssetStA p 23.62 +0.04 +6.0 AssetStrI r 23.82 +0.04 +6.2 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.71 -0.03 +8.3 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.71 -0.02 +8.5 HighYld 8.18 +12.4 IntmTFBd 11.14 +4.7 ShtDurBd 11.05 -0.01 +3.2 USLCCrPls 19.23 -0.08 +5.8 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.88 +0.01 +17.4 PrkMCVal T 21.14 -0.09 +6.8 Twenty T 62.77 +0.03 +1.9 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.68 -0.02 +9.2 LSGrwth 12.48 -0.02 +9.0 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.00 -0.11 +11.0 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.81 -0.04 +21.5 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.16 -0.04 +21.2 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.13 +0.03 +5.8 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.73 -0.01 +11.0 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.46 -0.03 +13.3 StrInc C 15.04 -0.02 +12.5 LSBondR 14.41 -0.02 +13.1 StrIncA 14.96 -0.03 +13.1

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.70 -0.02 +12.8 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.55 -0.09 +3.9 BdDebA p 7.77 +10.9 ShDurIncA p 4.67 -0.01 +6.4 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.70 -0.06 +6.3 ValueA 21.49 -0.10 +4.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.59 -0.10 +4.7 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.91 +10.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.68 +0.03 +7.5 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 18.30 +0.11 +17.4 PacTiger 23.66 +0.11 +23.0 MergerFd 15.96 +2.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.75 -0.02 +12.6 TotRtBdI 10.75 -0.02 +12.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.86 -0.07 +8.0 GlbDiscZ 29.25 -0.08 +8.2 QuestZ 18.17 -0.03 +5.5 SharesZ 20.15 -0.07 +6.0 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.19 -0.20 +9.1 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.72 -0.20 +8.8 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.32 -0.01 +12.0 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.55 -0.05 +4.0 Intl I r 18.95 +0.14 +12.5 Oakmark r 39.46 -0.15 +6.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.98 +0.01 +12.9 GlbSMdCap 14.80 +0.01 +15.9 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.42 -0.19 +1.2 DvMktA p 34.91 +0.08 +21.4 GlobA p 58.38 +0.08 +10.1 GblStrIncA 4.40 +17.4

IntBdA p 7.02 +0.02 +13.3 MnStFdA 30.39 -0.15 +8.0 RisingDivA 14.52 -0.05 +5.4 S&MdCpVl 29.20 -0.12 +9.9 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.18 -0.04 +4.7 S&MdCpVl 25.09 -0.11 +9.2 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.14 -0.04 +4.8 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 +10.4 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.60 +0.08 +21.7 IntlBdY 7.02 +0.02 +13.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.69 -0.04 +10.6 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.29 -0.02 +13.2 AllAsset 12.71 -0.02 +14.4 ComodRR 8.80 +0.01 +15.1 HiYld 9.37 +13.3 InvGrCp 11.94 -0.06 +14.1 LowDu 10.72 -0.01 +5.7 RealRtnI 11.89 +0.02 +12.2 ShortT 9.94 +2.0 TotRt 11.69 -0.04 +10.9 TR II 11.25 -0.03 +9.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.72 -0.01 +5.4 RealRtA p 11.89 +0.02 +11.8 TotRtA 11.69 -0.04 +10.5 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.69 -0.04 +9.8 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.69 -0.04 +10.6 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.69 -0.04 +10.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.23 +0.02 +14.4 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.77 -0.08 NE Price Funds: BlChip 35.03 -0.11 +6.9 CapApp 19.43 -0.08 +7.0 EmMktS 34.90 +0.05 +16.0

EqInc 22.00 EqIndex 31.64 Growth 29.62 HlthSci 28.36 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.63 IntlStk 14.08 MidCap 54.21 MCapVal 22.26 N Asia 19.63 New Era 46.31 N Horiz 29.90 N Inc 9.77 R2010 15.18 R2015 11.63 R2020 15.92 R2025 11.57 R2030 16.49 R2040 16.50 ShtBd 4.89 SmCpStk 31.76 SmCapVal 33.15 SpecIn 12.50 Value 21.79 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.56 VoyA p 22.10 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.54 PremierI r 18.28 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.44 S&P Sel 18.54 Scout Funds: Intl 31.57 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.10 AmShS p 39.04 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.44 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.91 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.35 IntValue I 27.95

-0.13 +6.4 -0.12 +6.7 -0.08 +7.7 -0.06 +8.4 -0.01 +12.4 +0.06 +9.8 +0.04 +11.7 -0.33 +14.2 -0.18 +7.4 +0.03 +21.6 -0.15 +6.1 -0.19 +16.9 -0.03 +8.6 -0.02 +8.8 -0.02 +9.0 -0.04 +9.0 -0.03 +9.0 -0.04 +9.1 -0.05 +8.9 -0.01 +3.4 -0.01 +17.9 -0.10 +12.4 -0.02 +9.5 -0.20 +6.4 -0.08 +5.5 -0.08 +12.0 -0.03 +11.5 -0.12 +12.1 -0.14 +7.5 -0.07 +6.9 +0.14 +9.3 -0.11 +5.0 -0.10 +4.7 +0.14 +6.2 +0.26 +9.9 +0.25 +10.9 +0.26 +11.3

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.08 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.26 CpOpAdl 69.84 EMAdmr r 39.40 Energy 113.69 500Adml 108.14 GNMA Ad 11.11 HlthCr 52.45 HiYldCp 5.76 InfProAd 26.81 ITsryAdml 11.99 IntGrAdm 61.12 ITAdml 13.90 ITGrAdm 10.43 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 9.65 LT Adml 11.32 MuHYAdm 10.73 PrmCap r 64.50 STsyAdml 10.92 ShtTrAd 15.96 STIGrAd 10.89 TtlBAdml 10.89 TStkAdm 29.28 WellslAdm 52.78 WelltnAdm 52.16 Windsor 41.93 WdsrIIAd 43.01 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.60 CapOpp 30.22 DivdGro 13.74 Energy 60.52 EqInc 19.32 Explr 65.46 GNMA 11.11 GlobEq 17.46 HYCorp 5.76 HlthCre 124.26 InflaPro 13.65 IntlGr 19.20 IntlVal 32.46

+0.08 +8.9 +7.1 -0.30 +0.6 +0.10 +15.7 -0.15 +1.4 -0.39 +6.9 -0.01 +7.6 +0.02 +4.5 -0.01 +11.9 +0.04 +10.1 -0.05 +11.0 +0.36 +13.1 +6.2 -0.04 +13.1 +3.0 -0.13 +13.1 +6.7 +8.0 -0.21 +4.6 -0.01 +3.4 +1.4 -0.01 +5.7 -0.03 +8.2 -0.10 +8.2 -0.17 +10.0 -0.16 +7.1 -0.19 +5.0 -0.24 +3.5 -0.11 +10.6 -0.14 +0.6 -0.02 +5.4 -0.09 +1.4 -0.03 +8.1 -0.31 +14.2 -0.01 +7.5 +0.04 +11.4 -0.01 +11.8 +0.05 +4.4 +0.02 +10.0 +0.12 +13.0 +0.21 +6.0

ITIGrade 10.43 LifeCon 16.15 LifeGro 21.20 LifeMod 19.16 LTIGrade 9.65 Morg 16.48 MuInt 13.90 MuLtd 11.16 PrecMtls r 25.45 PrmcpCor 12.86 Prmcp r 62.14 SelValu r 17.61 STAR 18.70 STIGrade 10.89 StratEq 16.91 TgtRetInc 11.32 TgRe2010 22.31 TgtRe2015 12.29 TgRe2020 21.66 TgtRe2025 12.28 TgRe2030 20.94 TgtRe2035 12.60 TgtRe2040 20.64 TgtRe2045 13.03 USGro 16.73 Wellsly 21.78 Welltn 30.20 Wndsr 12.43 WndsII 24.23 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 108.13 Balanced 20.60 EMkt 29.93 Europe 27.41 Extend 37.24 Growth 29.14 ITBnd 11.77 MidCap 18.54 Pacific 10.57 REIT r 18.08 SmCap 31.53 SmlCpGth 19.48 SmlCpVl 14.85 STBnd 10.73

-0.04 +12.9 -0.04 +8.6 -0.05 +9.1 -0.05 +9.2 -0.13 +13.0 -0.04 +7.9 +6.2 +2.9 +0.20 +24.6 -0.06 +6.2 -0.20 +4.5 -0.08 +10.4 -0.04 +7.7 -0.01 +5.6 -0.06 +10.7 -0.02 +8.6 -0.05 +8.7 -0.03 +8.7 -0.05 +8.5 -0.03 +8.5 -0.04 +8.4 -0.02 +8.4 -0.04 +8.3 -0.03 +8.4 -0.02 +1.6 -0.07 +9.9 -0.09 +7.0 -0.05 +5.0 -0.14 +3.4 -0.39 +6.8 -0.07 +8.4 +0.08 +15.6 +0.20 +5.7 -0.15 +14.0 -0.05 +7.5 -0.06 +13.3 -0.11 +13.3 +0.12 +9.2 -0.06 +24.9 -0.10 +14.7 -0.06 +15.7 -0.04 +13.8 -0.01 +4.8

TotBnd

10.89 -0.03 +8.1

TotlIntl

15.68 +0.11 +8.8

TotStk

29.27 -0.11 +8.0

Value

19.52 -0.12 +6.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.11 +0.09

EmMkInst

29.99 +0.07 +15.7

NS

ExtIn

37.29 -0.15 +14.1

FTAllWldI r

93.70 +0.55 +9.3

GrwthIst

29.14 -0.05 +7.7

InfProInst

10.92 +0.02 +10.2

InstIdx

107.43 -0.39 +6.9

InsPl

107.44 -0.39 +6.9

InsTStPlus

26.46 -0.10 +8.2

MidCpIst

18.61 -0.11 +13.5

SCInst

31.59 -0.09 +14.9

TBIst

10.89 -0.03 +8.2

TSInst

29.28 -0.11 +8.1

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

89.33 -0.32 +6.9

STBdIdx

10.73 -0.01 +4.9

TotBdSgl

10.89 -0.03 +8.2

TotStkSgl

28.26 -0.10 +8.1

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.62 +0.01 +5.3

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.00 -0.02 +12.8


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Rumors of takeover put new pressure on Yahoo By Mike Swift San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Persistent reports that AOL and several private equity firms are preparing a bid to buy Yahoo and take it private may indicate that the independence of one of Silicon Valley’s most famous brands is in question once again, although experts said there are doubts about how workable such a deal might be. The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that Silver Lake Partners and Blackstone Group are among a group of private equity firms that have expressed interest in either teaming up with AOL to buy Yahoo or trying to take it private on their own. Two years after Yahoo rebuffed a takeover bid of $33 a share from Microsoft, the rumors come with Yahoo’s stock price stagnant during the past year, trading at less than half what Microsoft offered in 2008. Responding to those rumors, experts questioned whether combining AOL with Yahoo would create a company with significantly stronger technological and advertising assets than the two companies have alone, and said they doubted Yahoo would accept a takeover in a price range that private equity would be willing to bid. “Yahoo is going to fight this

Google’s 3rd-quarter earnings up 32 percent The Associated Press

The Associated Press ile photo

A sign for Yahoo! is displayed in New York. Rumors of a bid by AOL and other firms to buy Yahoo may be indicators the famous Internet brand needs to improve its competitive performance. tooth and nail,” said Rick Munarriz, a senior analyst at the Motley Fool. “It’s just, how would you pull it off? Yahoo won’t come cheap,” especially since AOL is a much smaller company. Yahoo’s market capitalization of $20.6 billion is nearly eight times greater than AOL’s $2.7 billion value. But the persistent rumors, Munarriz and other observers said, are an indicator of the intense pressure on CEO Carol Bartz to improve Yahoo’s execution, as the Sunnyvale, Calif., Internet portal

rushes to complete its high-stakes search alliance with Microsoft and to parry Google’s thrust into Internet display advertising — Yahoo’s bread and butter. The rumors “certainly are signs to the marketplace that, ‘Hey, you guys need help,’ ” said Laxmi Poruri, an analyst with Primary Global Research. “It’s obviously not happening internally. There needs to be some sort of major change. … They haven’t executed on their main business.”

SEATTLE — Google Inc.’s third-quarter earnings climbed 32 percent to beat Wall Street’s expectations as companies spent more to advertise to Web surfers. The Web search leader clocked an impressive performance despite adding 1,500 workers in the quarter, for a total of 3,500 new employees so far this year. Google also spent more than four times as much on data centers and other equipment than it did a year ago. Investors sent shares of Google jumping more than 9 percent, to $590.60, in extended trading after the release of results Thursday. For July through September, the Web search leader’s net income rose to $2.2 billion, or $6.72 per share, from $1.6 billion, or $5.13 per share, a year earlier. Excluding certain expenses, Google earned $7.64, topping the $6.69 analysts expected. Revenue rose 23 percent to $7.3 billion from $5.9 billion a year earlier.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY CENTRAL OREGON FALL HOME AND LIVING GREEN EXPO: Nearly 200 exhibitors will address issues from buying your first home to sustainable housing options. Experts from many fields will be on hand to provide information and answer questions about your projects. This event is owned and produced by the Central Oregon Builders Association. Class listings available online; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.coba.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; American Legion Post #44, 708 S.W. Eighth St.; 541-548-2551. INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS: Learn about pages, images, multimedia and writing effectively for a Web audience; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. INTRO TO GOOGLE ANALYTICS: Learn the basics of Google Analytics and how this tool can help measure a website’s effectiveness; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704. CANDIDATES LUNCH FORUM: Sponsored by Redmond Chamber of Commerce and CVB, meet mayoral candidates Tory Allman, Margie Dawson, Ed Onimus, Jay Patrick and George Endicott. Reservations required; $13; 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-9235191 or Karen@visitredmondoregon. com. THE FRESH WEB: A short review of Web news for the week ending Oct. 15; free; noon-12:30 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON FALL HOME AND LIVING GREEN EXPO: Nearly 200 exhibitors will address issues from buying your first home to sustainable housing options. Experts from many fields will be on hand to provide information and answer questions about your projects. This event is owned and produced by the Central Oregon Builders Association. Class listings available online; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.coba.org. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor

Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION: Learn to create animations in Flash that can be incorporated into Web pages. Class continues Oct. 23; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON FALL HOME AND LIVING GREEN EXPO: Nearly 200 exhibitors will address issues from buying your first home to sustainable housing options. Experts from many fields will be on hand to provide information and answer questions about your projects. This event is owned and produced by the Central Oregon Builders Association. Class listings available online; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.coba.org.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO SELL YOUR HOME IN AN OVERLEVERAGED MARKET: Presented by Christine Browning and her team from GoBend Realty. Attorneys Kyle Schmid and Christian Malone, CPA Dan Parr and credit specialist Victoria Malendoski also will be presenting. Topics to be covered include why to avoid foreclosure and bankruptcy, tax implications, how to save your credit and the ins and outs of short selling a home. Call for additional information; 6 p.m.; Deschutes County Title Co., 397 Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541585-1047 ext. 13. MS OFFICE FOR MAC: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department, this three-evening class will teach participants to operate Microsoft Office on the Macintosh operating system. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION

TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; ; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu. WEB DESIGN WRITING THAT SELLS: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu.

WEDNESDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. CRITICAL TAX PLANNING IDEAS AND STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS: Live broadcast for tax practitioners. Program is eligible for CPE/CFP/EA credit. Register online at www. allstarttax.com Lunch provided; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. SAVING AND INVESTING: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn strategies to reduce spending and increase income, resources to aid saving, savings tools and challenges, and the differences between saving and investing. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients;

D I SPATC H E S The Frugal Boutique & Consignment has moved to a new location at 206 N.W. Oregon Ave., Suite 1, from its previous location on Bond Street. Frugal Boutique is now below Silverado, next to Bend Alterations. Hours of operation are 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, closed Sunday and Monday. Elure Marketing Group, a full-

service marketing and public relations firm, has moved its Bend office to 701 N.W. Hill St. In addition, Elure announced its recent partnership with Webprodigy, creating a team for expanded PR 2.0, Web and social media capabilities. Taft Dire Real Estate Resources, a full-service real estate marketing and sales company, has

moved its Bend office to the recently remodeled building at 431 N.W. Franklin Ave. A public open house is planned there Nov. 5. The office was previously located in NorthWest Crossing. Taft Dire will occupy the entire first floor of the nearly 3,000-square-foot building. The new space allows Taft Dire to continue to grow and add agents.

$995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS JOB MATCH CERTIFICATION: Learn about PREP’s business focused personality reports; $795, or $595 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. BARRAN LIEBMAN LLP EMPLOYMENT LAW SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS, THE SLIPPERY SLOPE: Designed for employers, human resource professionals, and in-house counsel, this seminar will cover current state and federal legislation affecting employee and independent contractor classifications. Fee includes program, printed materials and breakfast. Registration required; $15; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 503-228-0500 or clientservices@barran.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE “NETWORKING SOCIAL”: Hosted by Laurie Kanehl and staff. You do not have to be a chamber member or own a business to attend; 5:30 p.m.; Desert Oasis Salon and Spa, 5105 Clubhouse Road; 541-923-2679. ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK & TWITTER: Second in the Online Marketing Series offered by Central Oregon Community College. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu.

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday


L

Inside

OREGON Medford airport uses unmanned balloon to break fog, see Page C3. Eugene teachers, staff warned of layoffs in dispute, see Page C3. Jacksonville Museum’s Peter Britt exhibit to close, see Page C2.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

C OUG A R

C

K I LLS

2

GOAT S

Marijuana measure clarified Panelists discuss details of Measure 74, which would permit private shops to sell pot to medical cardholders By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A supportive crowd of about 50 people turned out at Bend’s Community Center Thursday evening for a question-and-answer session on Measure 74, the upcoming ballot measure that would permit privately owned shops where medical marijuana cardholders would be able to purchase marijuana. Sarah Duff, assistant clinical director for Oregon Green Free Services and one of the panelists Thursday, said more than half of the state’s cardholders are believed to have a difficult time securing a regular supply of marijuana. About half of the prospective cardholders she meets through her Portland clinic have no idea where they’ll get marijuana, and about a quarter plan on trying to grow their own — a process that is more difficult than it might appear. “It’s three to six months for patients to get their first crop, and that’s if they’re growing correctly,” Duff said. “Most patients are growing for the first time, and there are crop failures.” Jeremy Kwit said even those cardholders who are supplied by state-certified growers often don’t have a steady supply, as experienced growers are also subject to crop failure and rarely have consistent harvests throughout the year. The event was sponsored by High Desert Patients Group, a nonprofit started in August by Kwit, who is looking to open a medical marijuana dispensary in Bend if the measure passes. If approved by voters, Measure 74 would build on Oregon’s original 1998 medical marijuana act by authorizing nonprofit dispensaries and a new class of producers, who would be permitted to keep up to 24 mature marijuana plants and six pounds of marijuana for sale to licensed dispensaries. See Marijuana / C2

ELECTION

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Wildlife specialist Jack Spencer sits up after examining the wounds on two goats killed outside a La Pine home on Thursday. He identified the wounds around the neck and head of each goat as likely caused by a young cougar. The goats had been tied to trees. Evidence of the struggle was visible in the grass around each leash.

Wildlife specialist identifies bite, claw marks on carcasses outside home north of La Pine By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

W

hen Melissa Sullivan turned into the driveway of her house north of La Pine on Wednesday evening, the quietness in the

yard alerted her that something was wrong.

She had taken her horse out for a ride around the neighborhood just before 6 p.m., and when she got back 45 minutes later, there were no noises from the corner where she had tethered her two pet goats. She had bottle-fed one from two weeks old. The other she had bought that day. A young cougar had killed them, a wildlife official later confirmed, leaving telltale bite and claw patterns in the pygmy goats. And Wednesday, another resident reported that he had seen a cougar a couple of blocks away in the neighborhood north of State Park Road and west of the Little Deschutes.

“There have been cougar sightings down there in the past,” said Sgt. Vance Lawrence of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. “It is a heavily wooded wildlife area.” But with a recent attack, he reminded people in the area to be careful walking at night in the early mornings, and keep an eye on children, pets and small animals. “Little kids ought to be supervised in those areas, especially when there’s been a suspected cougar attack nearby,” Lawrence said. Sullivan said she was surprised that a cougar attacked animals in her yard, in the daylight, with cars and people nearby.

A neighbor had heard screams, she said, but thought it was a young girl yelling. After she found the goats, she immediately took her miniature horse to a neighbor’s, shut her rabbits up in a pen and kept her cats and dogs inside — fortunately, she had left them in when she went out for the ride. And Thursday, she was already considering how to prevent future attacks on her animals. “I can’t lose any more; they’re my babies,” Sullivan said. She’s wary of going outside early in the morning, and concerned that the animal will come back. Bears and coyotes have wandered into her yard before, she said, but she’s now is planning to install motionactivated lights and improve the fence. Wildlife specialist Jack Spencer, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services agency, was at the site Thursday to confirm the cougar kills. There was part of a paw print near where the goats had been teth-

If you see a cougar Wildlife officials say ifsomeone sees a cougar they should: — Notrun — Walk away slowly — Keep the animalin view

ered to trees. The carcasses had been left behind, probably because the cat was startled off. Each goat had a checkmarkshaped gash on its face — consistent with wounds left by a big cat’s fifth claw. And they were bitten on the back of the neck, which is also a sign of a cougar attack. Dogs are messier, and bears will bite an animal’s back, he said. “This is real typical of a cougar,” Spencer said, likening the style of attack to that of a house cat pouncing on a mouse. Wildlife specialists look at the spacing and location of the bites, scratches and puncture marks to determine what killed an animal, as well as examining the surrounding area, said Mike Slater, with Wildlife Services. “It becomes an investigation,” he said. “You’ve got to piece everything together.” See Cougar / C5

DISTRICT 53

Democrat Huddle faces uphill climb The first-time challenger has raised only a fraction of the funds as 3-term state Rep. Whisnant By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

SISTERS

PRINEVILLE

2 residents question hiring New wastewater plant of development director could include wetland City Council selected Mac Hay 2 weeks ago, but some say process was not transparent By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

SISTERS — Two Sisters residents called Thursday night on the Sisters City Council to reveal details about the recent hiring of an economic development director for the city. The city’s attorney, though, said at the council’s meeting that Sisters can only reveal so much. Hiring an economic development director continues the council’s push for more formal economic development efforts. Mayor Lon Kellstrom and City Councilors Pat Thompson and Jerry Bogart promised such a push when they won seats in the 2008 election.

The city budgeted $30,000 for a part-time economic development director, a first for Sisters. During the summer, Eco“I believe it nomic Dewas a clear velopment Central violation of for Oregon inte r v i e we d (the city’s) candidates charter.” and even— Mike Morgan, tually recSisters resident ommended Mac Hay for the position. Hay was already a member of the Sisters Business Attraction and Retention Team, a local volunteer group that tries to bring companies to the city. The process has worried some in the city, who argue it was not transparent. Still, the council voted two weeks ago to hire Hay with only Councilor Sharlene Weed voting against the move. See Sisters / C5

The proposed treatment facility would cost about $12M and serve 36,000 By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

When Prineville’s new wastewater treatment plant is complete, City Engineer Eric Klann believes it will not only treat the city’s waste but also help attract new businesses to the area and serve as a recreational destination for people from around the region. About five years ago, when Crook County was the fastest-growing county in the state, Prineville officials started making plans for a mechanical treatment and disposal plant that would cost about $57.4 million. It would treat waste using a chemical process and require construction of a plant. But once the economy slowed, officials had a moment to take a step back and rethink how they would serve their population in the next 30 years. Their idea: create a wetland.

Klann, who was hired post-boom, started looking for alternatives. He’s hoping the wetland will cost citizens less money, help put cold water back into the Crooked River during the summer months — and treat the city’s sewer. The Prineville City Council will discuss the treatment plant at its Oct. 26 meeting. The city owns 560 acres northwest of the city and hopes to turn 280 of those into the wetland. The city could use its existing lagoons, and the wetlands would further treat the matter. It’s believed the project would have enough capacity to serve about 36,000 people, or serve the city for 30 more years. It would cost an estimated $12.4 million and would be funded through system development charges and grants. Klann said he’s hoping the city will break ground by 2012. “The good thing is, we’re not under the gun. We have more time if we need it,” he said. The wetland project also would lower the city’s system development charges, fees that developers pay for new construction. See Wastewater / C5

Democrat John Huddle, the candidate challenging Republican State Rep. Gene Whisnant in the race for House District 53 acknowledges he’s got an uphill climb ahead of him with less than three weeks to go until the election. He hates raising money — state records show Huddle has collected just $2,254 this year, compared to Whisnant’s $59,822 — and is running his first race against an opponent who’s comfortably won election three times in a reliably Republican area of Deschutes County. “I wouldn’t have run if I thought my opponent was doing the job he should do,” Huddle said. “I think he’s a good guy, I think he tries, but I think he just isn’t able to get it through.” Huddle, 61, of La Pine, has Gene worked as a school psychologist Whisnant and an advocate for parents of special education children, and served nearly 14 years in the active-duty Army and the U.S. Army Reserves. He became active in politics when he moved to Oregon in 2001, volunteering for multiple campaigns and working as an informal lobbyist for the state association of school John Huddle psychologists. Whisnant, 66, is a Sunriver resident and a retired Air Force colonel. He was serving as the chairman of the Deschutes County Republican party when he was appointed to his seat in 2003, when then state Rep. Ben Westlund was appointed to take over Bev Clarno’s seat in the state Senate. Whisnant was reelected in 2004, 2006 and 2008. See District 53 / C5

ELECTION


C2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:05 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 1400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A license plate was reported stolen at 6:28 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 1200 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:56 p.m. Oct. 13, in the area of Northwest Fifth Street and Northwest Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:59 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 200 block of Southwest 12th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:11 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 800 block of Northwest Seventh Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:08 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 2900 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:21 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:34 a.m. Oct. 13, in the 2000 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:33 a.m. Oct. 13, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:10 a.m. Oct. 13, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Michael Alan Regan, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:39 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 2600 block of Northeast Division Street in Bend.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:42 p.m. Oct. 13, in the area of Burgess Road and Rease Drive in La Pine. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 7:03 p.m. Oct. 13, in the area of China Hat Road and Forest Service Road 1814. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:57 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 22500 block of Rickard Road. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and recovered at 4:51 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 52600 block of Meadow Lane in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:39 p.m. Oct. 13, in the 19500 block of Apache Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:11 a.m. Oct. 13, in the 3500 block of Northwest Orchard Drive in Terrebonne.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 19 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador Retriever — Adult male, brown; found near Northeast Upas Avenue. Boxer — Adult female, brindle; found near Lone Pine. Jack Russell Terrier mix — Adult male, white and tan; found near Summer Creek.

Peter Britt exhibit to close By Damian Mann Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — Peter Britt, the iconic naturalist and photographer of Jacksonville, is getting a going-away party next week from the town he called home. The Peter Britt exhibit in the Jacksonville Museum is being pulled out, a victim of budget cuts and changes in the Southern Oregon Historical Society. The newly formed Jacksonville Heritage Society will kick its fundraising efforts into high gear by holding a farewell party for the Peter Britt exhibit at the Jacksonville Museum. Carolyn Kingsnorth, president of the heritage society board, said it will be sad to see the Britt exhibit leave, though the museum has been closed since last year anyway. “The artifacts will go into storage, and it will take a lot of work to get them out,” she said. The artifacts will be cared for by SOHS, which has pulled out of Jacksonville as the organization concentrates its efforts on archives and the history museum in Medford. Kingsnorth’s group has agreed to take over the Jacksonville properties formerly run by SOHS but owned by Jackson County. While the heritage society works to build up its budget, Kingsnorth said it also needs to cut costs where it can. By taking the Britt exhibit out, the temperature

BANK BOMBING TRIAL

Friend says suspect called in 1995 threat, often conspired By The Associated Press SALEM — A longtime friend of a man accused in a fatal 2008 bank bombing plot testified Thursday he believed the suspect previously called in a separate bank bomb threat years earlier and the man often talked about robbing banks. Ronald Laughlin Jr. told jurors in the murder trial of Joshua Turnidge and his father, Bruce, that he was with the two at a Woodburn construction site in 1995 when Joshua Turnidge said he had called in a bomb threat to a bank across the street and told them to deliver $50,000 to a portable toilet in the parking lot. Laughlin said he thought Joshua Turnidge was joking, but when Laughlin saw police cars arrive, he “felt like I wanted to leave.” Bruce and Joshua Turnidge

face aggravated murder charges in a 2008 Woodburn bank bombing that killed two police officers, critically injured the Woodburn police chief and injured a bank employee. They are accused of building and planting the remote-controlled bomb, which authorities believe was inadvertently triggered by a nearby trucker using a CB radio. After the deadly bank bombing, Laughlin called a police tip line and subsequently told investigators about his past dealings with the Turnidges. He said he was a former high school classmate, friend and business partner of Joshua Turnidge. In his testimony, Laughlin also said the Turnidges repeatedly criticized the government and discussed how they would use a bomb threat in a bank robbery. He said he heard Joshua

Turnidge talk about robbing banks “50 times, maybe 100 times” over the years. Some of the testimony, which followed another witness who said Joshua Turnidge made angry statements about the government and police, which triggered objections by defense attorneys. Steven Krasik, an attorney for Joshua Turnidge, argued that prosecutors were trying to convict the two men for their political statements that are not directly related to the prosecution’s argument that they were motivated by money. Krasik, joined by John Storkel, an attorney for Bruce Turnidge, asked the court to strike the testimony, consider granting a mistrial and splitting the case into separate trials. Marion County Circuit Judge Thomas Hart denied the requests.

Balloon hoax captivates nation in 2009 -By The Associated Press Today is Friday, Oct. 15, the 288th day of 2010. There are 77 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 15, 1860, 11-year-old Grace Bedell of Westfield, N.Y., wrote a letter to presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln, suggesting he could improve his appearance by growing a beard. (The rest, as they say, is history.) ON THIS DATE In 1858, the seventh and final debate between senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Alton, Ill. In 1917, Dutch dancer Mata Hari, convicted of spying for the Germans, was executed by a French firing squad outside Paris. In 1928, the German dirigible Graf Zeppelin landed in Lakehurst, N.J., completing its first commercial flight across the Atlantic. In 1940, Charles Chaplin’s first all-talking comedy, “The Great Dictator,” a lampoon of Adolf Hitler, opened in New York. In 1945, the former premier of Vichy France, Pierre Laval, was executed for treason. In 1946, Nazi war criminal Hermann Goering fatally poisoned himself hours before he was to have been executed. In 1964, it was announced that

T O D AY IN HISTORY Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev had been removed from office. In 1969, peace demonstrators staged activities across the country as part of a “moratorium” against the Vietnam War. In 1976, in the first debate of its kind between vice-presidential nominees, Democrat Walter F. Mondale and Republican Bob Dole faced off in Houston. In 1990, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev was named the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton left Washington for emergency talks in Egypt with Israeli and Arab leaders. New York Times movie and drama critic Vincent Canby died at age 76. FIVE YEARS AGO Iraqis voted to approve a constitution. A crowd that had gathered to protest a neo-Nazi march in Toledo, Ohio, turned violent, prompting the mayor to declare a state of emergency. ONE YEAR AGO A report of a 6-year-old Colorado boy trapped inside a runaway helium balloon captivated the nation before the boy, Falcon Heene, was found safe at home in what turned out to be a hoax.

(Falcon’s parents served up to a month in jail.) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former auto executive Lee Iacocca is 86. Jazz musician Freddy Cole is 79. Singer Barry McGuire is 75. Actress Linda Lavin is 73. Actress-director Penny Marshall is 68. Rock musician Don Stevenson (Moby Grape) is 68. Baseball Hall of Famer Jim Palmer is 65. Singer-musician Richard Carpenter is 64. Actor Victor Banerjee is 64. Tennis player Roscoe Tanner is 59. Singer Tito Jackson is 57. Actor-comedian Larry Miller is 57. Actor Jere Burns is 56. Actress Tanya Roberts is 55. Movie director Mira Nair is 53. Britain’s Duchess of York, Sarah Ferguson, is 51. Chef Emeril Lagasse is 51. Rock musician Mark Reznice is 48. Actress Vanessa Marcil is 42. Singer-actress-TV host Paige Davis is 41. Actor Dominic West is 41. Singer Eric Benet is 40. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ginuwine is 40. Actor Chris Olivero is 31. Christian singer-actress Jaci Velasquez is 31. Rhythm-and-blues singer Keyshia Cole is 29. Tennis player Elena Dementieva is 29. Actor Vincent Martella (“Everybody Hates Chris”) is 18. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “If you love someone, let them go. If they return to you, it was meant to be. If they don’t, their love was never yours to begin with.” — Anonymous.

in the Jacksonville courthouse can be dropped to save energy costs. The temperature had to be maintained to preserve valuable artifacts. The old ballroom in the top of the building already has been cleared out, revealing a spacious room. Kingsnorth now has the keys to the courthouse after a deal was reached among the Jacksonville Heritage Society, the Southern Oregon Historical Society and Jackson County. Other buildings the heritage society will oversee in Jacksonville include the jail, the Catholic rectory and the Beekman House and bank. The deal between the two societies marks the culmination of an effort to free the historical society from the financial responsibility of the buildings and to enable more local control of Jacksonville’s legacy. SOHS shut down its Jackson-

Marijuana Continued from C1 The dispensaries would not be permitted within residential neighborhoods or within 1,000 feet of a school, and growers and dispensary employees would be subject to criminal background checks. Both dispensaries and producers would be subject to a 10 percent tax on their sales, which could generate up to $20 million for the state, according to a financial impact statement prepared by state officials. A portion of the tax would be diverted to fund research into medical marijuana and help low-income cardholders purchase marijuana. Formal opposition to Measure 74 has largely come from law enforcement, and has suggested the measure fails to deal with problems in the current law. Statements appearing in Oregon’s voters’ pamphlet suggest cards are being issued to patients who should not qualify under the current law, and that Measure 74 will complicate efforts to crack down on the illegal marijuana trade. Kwit said the measure is a step in the right direction that will create a clear distinction between medical and illegal marijuana. “I think this is the measure that clears that up, because it creates a safe, regulated, zoned supply system that doesn’t exist today,” Kwit said. Audience members at Thursday’s forum also discussed the steps involved in

Carolyn King, president of the Jacksonville Heritage Society board, walks past a Peter Britt photo in the courthouse museum on Wednesday. Bob Pennell Mail Tribune

ville operations in the summer of 2009 after it faced financial problems. About $750,000 is needed to upgrade the courthouse with an elevator and bathrooms in the upstairs and downstairs to make the building more available to the public. Kingsnorth said one of the proposals is to create a performing arts center in the second story. So far, founders of the heritage society have contributed about

$20,000, Kingsnorth said. Another fundraiser at South Stage Cellars also brought in additional money. The heritage society hopes to rent out space in the courthouse to offset costs. Ultimately, the goal is to make the buildings and the history as accessible to the public as possible. “It’s important to preserve it and make it a vital part of the community,” Kingsnorth said.

obtaining a producers license, the state’s role in monitoring the quality of the medical marijuana supply, and the tax obligations of a producer or dispensary organized as a nonprofit. Bend City Council candidate Ron Boozell, who was at the meeting, endorsed Measure 74 as an opportunity to create jobs. He challenged other local candidates to do the same. Approximately 36,000 Oregonians have been authorized to use marijuana under the state’s existing medical marijuana program. Measure 74 would not change eligibility guidelines for the program. Kwit said Measure 74 will allow medical marijuana to be

treated in the same fashion as other consumer products. “We don’t grow our own food. If you need pain relief you don’t grow a poppy plant in your front yard so you can extract your own Oxycontin in your kitchen sink,” he said. “This is no different.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Questions About Meth? www.methaction.org


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 C3

O Airport to dissipate fog using unmanned balloon Medford facility staff developed seeding process to protect pilots By Greg Stiles Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — The longtime practice of cloud seeding over the Medford airport, which came to an abrupt halt last December because of safety concerns, is set for a return engagement this winter. Cloud seeding was pioneered in the Rogue Valley during the 1950s with small planes dropping dry ice pellets to clear fog above the airport. The practice was scrubbed, however, when new Federal Aviation Administration requirements potentially would put pilots at risk. In the months since, airport personnel put their heads together and developed a new approach, replacing pilots and pellet feeders. The new unmanned CASPER balloon system was unveiled Wednesday morning at a demonstration for the media. “We like to tinker,” said Airport Director Bern Case. CASPER (Cable Attached System Providing Effective Release) was developed for $10,000, the largest cost being the 18-foot helium-filled balloon. It would hoist a 75-pound dispersal cylinder containing enough ice pellets to be released for 30 minutes, the dispersal device and a battery. Instead of a plane flying a three-mile swath at an altitude of about 1,000 feet, an airport pickup truck will pull a balloon 500 feet above a three-eighthsmile section of the 2-mile-long runway. Although the distance traveled is much less, the hole in the fog is expected to be about the same. The longer distance flown by the plane was needed to accommodate turning radius. Because staff at the airport will handle the duties, arrangements to seed the fog can be handled in short order. “This should be so much faster, because we don’t have to wake up a pilot,” Case said. “We

O  B

Bob Pennell / Mail Tribune

The new unmanned CASPER balloon system is unveiled at a demonstration for the media Wednesday at Rogue Valley International Airport in Medford. The tethered, dry ice dispersion balloon passes in front of the sun as it descends from 500 feet over the Medford airport. should be able to reload in 5 to 10 minutes instead of 45 minutes.” The $7,500 Kingfisher balloon, made by Aerial Products of Deland, Fla., accounted for threequarters of the airport’s investment, which should be recouped long before it has to be replaced through fees paid by airlines when they land. “Cancellations from fog cost them (airlines) thousands,” Case said. In the past, on-call contracts for cloud seeding cost the airport and airlines whether they were used or not; that cost will largely be eliminated with use of the airport’s own operations staff. “I would estimate a fog event

I-5 stations to install fast chargers for electric cars Electric-vehicle drivers could PORTLAND — Some BP and plug into the slower chargers Arco stations in Portland, Eu- “if they wanted to top off a batgene, Salem and Corvallis will tery,” Cieslik-Miskimen said, have fast char“or just get a little gers installed for bit of extra juice electric vehicles. so they can get Project manag- “This is just home.” ers said Wednes- the beginning “We’ll make day about two of new, private sure downtown dozen fast charPortland has a lot gers would be in- investments of chargers that stalled by July to because of our are accessible,” ease the anxiety she said. of drivers near- commitment to Oregon will get ing the end of moving the entire at least 23 of the their range on the fast chargers. Pacific Northwest I-5 corridor. The slower Fast chargers away from fossilchargers may be can recharge a desirable for recar in 15 to 30 fuel vehicles.” tail businesses minutes. that want cus— Gov. Ted Kulongoski Most of 1,100 tomers to stick charging stations around and shop being installed in a while, said Dathe state will take from 45 min- vid Mayfield, ECOtality area utes to three hours to recharge manager for stakeholder sera car, The Oregonian reported vices in Oregon. Thursday. In a separate announcement San Francisco-based ECOtal- Wednesday, another company, ity is the project manager for a Eaton Corp., will modify and $230 million installation initia- integrate electric-vehicle quick tive, about half of which is fund- chargers at its Wilsonville ed by the U.S. Energy Depart- plant. ment using stimulus money. The “This is just the beginning EV Project includes 16 states and of new, private investments major metropolitan areas, in- because of our commitment to stalling more than 15,000 charg- moving the entire Pacific Northing stations over three years. west away from fossil-fuel vehiOregon cities, government cles,” said Gov. Ted Kulongoski. agencies, utilities and other Eaton plans to work on a entities have helped ECOtality quick charger for the North develop maps identifying high- American market capable of priority areas for chargers. recharging an electric vehicle Only about 310 charging sta- to 80 percent of battery capactions in the 16 states will be ity in 15 to 30 minutes. Eaton, fast chargers, said Caitlin Cies- a Cleveland-based power-manlik-Miskimen, an ECOtality agement company, employs 85 spokeswoman. at Wilsonville.

By The Associated Press

Pharmacy board bans synthetic pot PORTLAND — The Oregon Board of Pharmacy is making it illegal to sell or possess synthetic marijuana as of today. The Oregonian reports the products are sold as incense under names including Spice, K2 and Yucatan Fire. These substances have flown under the radar of law enforcement until recently. Smoking the incense has sent dozens of people to hospitals nationwide. Tests of the incense by the Drug Enforcement Agency have detected small amounts of chemicals similar to the active ingredients in marijuana.

Former UO runner accused of assaults EUGENE — A former University of Oregon distance runner is accused of assaulting a woman and sexually abusing two children. Police said Wednesday that 34-year-old Michael Kasahun of Eugene was being held in the Lane County Jail on assault and sexual abuse charges. The Register-Guard reports the investigation began two weeks ago. Kasahun is a native of Ethiopia who ran cross-country for UO in 1999 and 2000. He recently worked for a sports apparel company. — From wire reports

would cost $2,000 to $3,000 before,” Case said. “I think we can do it for under $500 now.” The former practice of seeding by airplane was ended when the FAA required pilots to make a longer loop when returning to the airport to land, in order to ensure they were not near incoming planes. But that presented the potential for the hole in the fog to close up before the seeding plane could return, meaning pilots would have to seek out another airport to land. Airport Deputy Director of Operations Robert Russell said the dispenser on CASPER works under the same premise as a lawn

feeder, with a wheel rotating and spreading seed. It’s powered by a 12-volt battery and operated by a remote control picked up at Al’s Cycle & Hobby shop. “We went through some trial and error, getting enough battery life and a shaft to dispense the ice,” he said. “We’ve tested in the shop and run the battery for hours. But we’ll probably change it out every two or three hours.” The balloon is capable of handling a 200-pound payload, but won’t carry more than 100 pounds, including its own weight. Commercial airlines serving the valley will pay for the seeding, which generally is used when temperatures are between 29 and 32 degrees. The balloon is tethered to a 700-foot, quarter-inch-thick line rated at 3,000 pounds. Wind shouldn’t be a worry, because wind strong enough to create issues for the balloon would first push the fog away, making use of the balloon unnecessary. “We have to check it out after each operation,” Case said. “If the balloon broke loose, we’d have to notify the FAA and NASA.” The balloon will remain inflated throughout the winter and stored in a hangar formerly used by the Civil Air Patrol. Russell said he could get a crew assembled within an hour of the typical 4 a.m. call for help. “We can be ready to go within an hour and a half,” he said. Seeding from airplanes usually produced fallout beyond the airport and made nearby roads slippery. The lower-level treatment should eliminate most of the spillover, but Russell said the airport will still notify Oregon Department of Transportation and broadcasters when it seeds.

124 Eugene teachers, staff warned of layoffs By The Associated Press EUGENE — The Eugene School District sent layoff notices to 82 teachers and 42 support staff, warning they could lose their jobs in December in a dispute with unions over contract days. The dispute is over five of the paid days the employee unions agreed to give up to help the district balance its budget, The Register-Guard reported Thursday. The Eugene Education Association says the days should be added back because of new federal funding. The school district says there isn’t any more money because of state cutbacks. “We are not planning to add back days in a year when there isn’t any more money,” district spokeswoman Kerry Delf said. The layoffs could take effect if the union files a grievance to restore the workdays. “Everybody’s pretty shocked,” said Madison Middle School Principal Rick Gaultney, who handed out

notices to five teachers and one classified employee. “When I heard about it at first, it caught me off guard. These first-year teachers are just superstars, you know. As a principal, it really makes you sick.” The layoffs would amount to the loss of 63 full-time positions, as some of the 124 employees are part-time. Should the layoffs be carried out, no school would escape upheaval, as seniority rights would trigger transfers. Education Association President Dayna Mitchell said she heard from many teachers Wednesday, stunned by the layoff notices. Some teachers told her they’d rather give up contract days than their jobs or those of co-workers, she said, “but they very clearly see that this is some type of a ploy to force the union’s hand.”

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C4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Pick Dudley for governor

G

ubernatorial candidates John Kitzhaber and Chris Dudley differ in a lot of ways, from their party affiliations to their government experience — or lack thereof.

But their most salient difference is this: Dudley believes more strongly than Kitzhaber in the private sector’s power to provide jobs and revenue and elevate Oregonians’ quality of life. His policies follow from that belief. Kitzhaber believes more strongly than Dudley in the power of government to do much of the same, and many of his policies follow from that. Hence his short-term job-creation plan, which would pay people with borrowed money to insulate public schools. Kitzhaber, an experienced lawmaker and two-term governor, is as qualified to hold the state’s highest elective office (again) as anyone ever has been. But experience doesn’t guarantee success, as Dudley’s quick to point out. Kitzhaber was a policy whiz well before his first stint as governor, and his successor, Ted Kulongoski, had toured every other branch of state government before his first term. Yet here we are. Inexperience doesn’t guarantee success, either. But Kitzhaber’s vast experience culminated in a veto-plagued impasse with lawmakers that earned him the nickname “Dr. No,” followed by a declaration that Oregon is “ungovernable.” Kitzhaber may have figured some things out during the past eight years, but his shortcoming as governor wasn’t a failure to understand policies. His weakness, rather, was his inability to lead effectively. He can point to the fact that he, a Democrat, had to work with an uncooperative Republican Legislature, which is true enough. But no governor is guaranteed a peaceful workplace filled with like-minded colleagues. In the coming years, Oregon will need a governor who won’t fold up his arms and say “no” when things don’t go his way. History suggests that guy isn’t John Kitzhaber. Moreover, we believe Chris Dudley is committed more deeply than Kitzhaber to the kinds of changes Oregon needs right now. These include educational policy, spending reform and tax and regulatory policies that encourage job creation. Kitzhaber’s plan for education focuses largely on the way the state budgets, creating a unified process for all schools, kindergarten through college, and emphasizing predictability from year to year. This is interesting and well worth considering. But Kitzhaber’s enthusiasm for the kinds of reform supported by President Obama’s Race to the Top competition seems lukewarm, at best. He does mention the need to use student progress in teacher evaluations. But he’s quick to emphasize that “such data ... should not be tied to increased or decreased pay.” Dudley is, without a doubt, the candidate of educational change, supporting merit pay for teachers, school choice for parents (including charter schools and virtual schools), statewide or regional collective bargaining and laws that encourage midcareer professionals to become teachers. He even proposes to give high-level high school students full scholarships to any Oregon public university, though we have no idea how he’d pay for such a thing. As for private-sector job creation, Kitzhaber is open to some reduction in Oregon’s famously high capital gains taxes. Nonetheless, his other proposals read like something produced by

a guy who’s spent his life in government. Short-term initiatives are heavy on incentives such as the Business Energy Tax Credit, designed to steer job creation toward green, renewable or otherwise “good” ends. He even uses his “economic prosperity” plan as an opportunity to call for stricter building codes designed to enhance energy efficiency. His long-term plan is more of the same, with added, if nebulous, emphasis on retaining and attracting businesses that sell their products outside of the state. All in all, Kitzhaber’s economic plan reads like Kulongoski 2.0. Dudley’s plan is far more straightforward, and it emphasizes the fact that taxes matter, including Measures 66 and 67, which “have created investor uncertainty, reduced business owner confidence and ... further tarnished Oregon’s reputation as a place to do business.” To restore Oregon’s business environment, Dudley would like to reduce capital gains taxes by nearly 75 percent, freeing up money for investment. He’d like to align the state and federal tax codes, which, among other things, would lower the cost and hassle of compliance. He also supports some targeted tax cuts for small businesses. Dudley also promises to change the demeanor of government toward business, pursuing “policy and personnel changes to demonstrate” an eagerness “for both existing and new businesses to invest here and grow here.” Helping the private sector succeed is the core of Dudley’s candidacy. For Kitzhaber, on the other hand, it seems to be an obligation indifferently pursued by someone whose real interest is the function of government itself. Both candidates recognize the need to control compensation costs for public employees, and both mention some of the problems described by Gov. Kulongoski’s Reset Cabinet, including the “6 percent pickup.” But here, too, Kitzhaber tries mightily to shift the focus away from the Democratic Party’s traditional base, arguing that “the political narrative that wages and benefits for public employees are the chief cause of our budget shortfall is simply not true.” Regardless of what combination of factors caused Oregon’s budget problems, however, the state must cut its expenses dramatically in the near future, and the unrealistic compensation of public employees is the obvious place to start. John Kitzhaber is a public policy expert who, if elected, will be able to call upon years of government experience. But the same was true of Ted Kulongoski eight years ago. Kitzhaber maintains that, in addition to experience, he also brings new ideas — more, presumably, than Chris Dudley. With all due respect, however, this race isn’t about new ideas. It’s about a new commitment to try out — at long last — some old ideas, including tax policies and regulatory changes designed to encourage private job creation, educational reform of the sort encouraged by Obama, and government spending reform along the lines of Gov. Kulongoski’s Reset Cabinet. The candidate who’s eager to make this new commitment is clearly Chris Dudley, not John Kitzhaber, who practically embodies the political culture that got us where we are today.

My Nickel’s Worth Vote for Conger I think it is very interesting that state Rep. Judy Stiegler is running away from her liberal self, trying to portray herself as being fiscally conservative in her race against Jason Conger to represent District 54. She never has been a conservative and never will be. Why is she not proud of her record as a liberal who supports every social program that comes along and every tax that accompanies it? By her own admission, she voted for 38 of 40 budget increases for state agencies. Her claim to fame as a business supporter and tax fighter is that she stopped a beer tax that she personally did not stop. The tax was so stupid that it never came to the floor for a vote. The beer tax was a suggestion for a 20fold increase that no one in their right mind would vote for, yet she indicated that she would support a lesser beer tax increase. She went along with the Salem and Portland machines on Measures 66 and 67 to institute the largest tax increase in Oregon history at a time when we can least afford it. Her support for 66 and 67 really hurt business and is retroactive, which is probably illegal. She claims to have saved Oregon State University-Cascades campus when the threats of its demise were just the same old hollow threats we always hear. Why doesn’t Stiegler tout her support for the social programs she has supported over the years and her support for tax increases to grow government at the expense of the private sector? The private sector in our area that is actually 30 percent unemployed (public sector is at about 0 percent unemployment while the private sector at 30 percent unemployment equals 15 percent overall unemployment).

We need a state legislator who reflects the majority of the people of Central Oregon. We need Conger as our representative to explain our needs to our state Legislature. He is a fine young man, honest, educated and truly conservative. He will fight the continual government growth that is leading to financial ruin in Oregon. Cary Robles Bend

Ashby is well-qualified I am writing this letter to offer my full support for Wells B. Ashby as a Deschutes County Circuit Court judge. I have been a practicing trial attorney in this state for 38 years. During that time, I have appeared in nearly every county. This gives me the unique opportunity to become acquainted with many judges, prosecutors and defense attorneys. I have had the pleasure of working with Ashby on several occasions. When I first met him, I was immediately impressed by his professionalism. He possesses all the qualities that would make him ideally suited for a judicial position. He is fair, intelligent, patient and all-around highly qualified. I am certain he would make an outstanding judge, and I unequivocally recommend him as eminently qualified far this position. I urge all voters to give their full support and vote in the upcoming election. Larry R. Rotoff Eugene

Support fair elections bill Big business expects to buy the upcoming elections with a wave of corporate cash, and now sees America emerging as a government and nation of, by and for the corporations as a result of the Supreme Court’s deci-

sion allowing unlimited amounts of corporate money to be “invested” on elections. Another discouraging event was the party-line vote by Republicans not to allow the proposed DISCLOSE Act to even come to a floor vote in the Senate. To preserve our Democratic foundation and nation “for and by” the common man, support must be given to passage of the Fair Elections Now Act (H.R. 1826). This bipartisan bill would break the stranglehold corporate and wealthy special-interest money has over Congress by enabling candidates to run viable campaigns without bigmoney contributions as well as other long-overdue crucial reforms. Time magazine recently published that for every dollar spent by big business lobbyists, employers averaged a thousand in return, often at taxpayer and worker expense. Powerless? A congressman recently disclosed that special interests will always take a back seat when enough people protest; that every contact letter was considered equal to more than 10,000 constituents; and that leadership will respond from fear of not being re-elected. There’s no longer time to delay or leave it to someone else. The nation’s future and yours is up to you. Contact your congressmen in support of the Fair Elections Now Act: www.wyden. senate.gov/contact, senator@merkley. senate.gov, www.walden.house.gov. Brad Kalita Chiloquin

Let someone new run state Why is it when the politicians serve their full term they want to run again? That’s not fair. They didn’t do anything in the eight years they had. They should get out and let someone new run our state. Elizabeth Dzienis Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Measure 75 would create jobs, generate money for counties, schools By Bruce Studer

T

he Bulletin’s editorial on Measure 75 (Oct. 6) got a few things right. Measure 75 is an economic development project that would create thousands of jobs and generate money for schools. The state is already dependent on gaming to fund services, but the lottery run by the state isn’t enough. And the biggest opposition to Measure 75 comes from the Spirit Mountain Casino, which doesn’t want the competition to its tax-free gaming profits. This is an example of a group of investors who want to create jobs in Oregon. The measure mandates an initial $250

million dollar investment that would instantly create thousands of construction jobs. The total project could easily reach $500 million, making it one of the biggest economic development opportunities in the state’s history, the waves of which would be felt even in Central Oregon. If the project is approved, an entertainment center at the old dog racing track in Wood Village would attract tourists to Oregon for a fun family experience that would include water parks, 3-D movies, concerts and, yes, gaming. Most importantly for Central Oregon residents, this facility would give money to your school districts and your counties, and you don’t

IN MY VIEW have to do anything except vote yes. Every school district and county and the largest 10 cities would receive dedicated funding. Based on an economic study conducted by Johnson Reid, a respected Oregon firm, the revenues Central Oregon would receive are: Bend: $974,450 Deschutes County: $974,450 Crook County: $313,200 Jefferson County: $261,900 Bend-La Pine Schools: $1,419,500 Redmond School District: $778,100

Sisters School District: $81,600 Crook School District: $373,750 Jefferson School District: $551,800 The concerns about the competition to the lottery are not founded. Most states see a significant increase in lottery funds immediately following the opening of similar casino operations. In the worst case, some states have seen modest decreases in lottery revenues, while total gaming activity and revenues to the state increased significantly. There is no precedent to believe the impacts would be severe. The example from Oregon: Despite the introduction of nine tribal casinos, Oregon’s lottery revenue continued to

grow, with little impact from the casinos. The argument that this measure hurts the lottery was started by the Spirit Mountain Casino to disguise its true motive: protecting its tax-free profits from competition. The Spirit Mountain Casino is pouring millions into defeating it because it doesn’t think a casino should help pay for schools and services. Your yes vote would create thousands of jobs and provide dedicated monthly revenue to your county and your school district. Learn more about the benefits at www.goodfororegon.org. Bruce Studer lives in Lake Oswego.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 C5

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N   Elizabeth Alvina Crippen, of La Pine Dec. 15, 1920 - Oct. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Graveside Service: Saturday, 10/16/10 at 4:00 PM at the La Pine Community Cemetery, East end of Reed Road, La Pine, Oregon.

Mary L. Offutt, of The Dalles (former Bend resident) Aug. 5, 1918 - Oct. 11, 2 010 Arrangements: Spencer, Libby and Powell Funeral Home, 1-541-296-3234 Services: No services will be held.

Robert Gary Nevel, of Prineville Dec. 5, 1946 - Oct. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, OR. 541-416-9733. Services: A private graveside service was held 1:30 P.M., October 14, 2010 at Juniper Haven Cemetery, Prineville. Contributions may be made to:

PMH Hospice, 1201 N.E. Elm Street, Prineville, OR 97754.

William "Lanny" Mower, of Prineville Oct. 25, 1940 - Oct. 10, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Memorial Services will be held on Saturday October 16, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. at Prineville Funeral Home. Reception will follow at Prineville Funeral Home Fellowship room. Contributions may be made to:

American Diabetes Association, 380 SE Spokane St. Suite 110, Portland, OR 97202.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

District 53 Continued from C1 Covering nearly all of Deschutes County aside from Bend and Deschutes River Woods, District 53 is unique among the state’s 60 legislative districts in that it completely encircles another district — District 54, the Bend seat where Democratic State Rep. Judy Stiegler is fending off challenges from Republican Jason Conger and unaffiliated candidate Mike Kozak. Whisnant said he’s proud of the record he’s assembled in a little over three terms in Salem, particularly a bill passed in 2009 to create the website www.oregon.gov/transparency, detailing where state funds are spent, and the rainy day fund established by the Legislature in 2007. Whisnant was one of four chief sponsors, two Republicans and two Democrats, for the transparency bill, but did not play a major role in the development of the rainy day fund. On budgetary issues, Whisnant and Huddle take a similar approach, with both candidates pledging to eliminate unnecessary levels of management in the various state agencies as a way of addressing the forecasted gap between state revenues and the cost of providing state services. Whisnant said he’d like to trim agency budgets by giving agencies 90 days to fill vacant positions, or forfeit the funding budgeted for the position to the state’s general fund. “We have to have people providing the services, the caseworkers, but how many people do you need between the managers and the people providing services?” Whisnant said. Whisnant said benefits for state employees are complicating the state’s ability to provide services. While the state has little ability to modify the contracts concerning how the Public Employees Retirement System works for current employees, the Legislature should look at a lessexpensive alternative for new hires, and see that all state employees pay some portion of the cost of their health insurance. Huddle said the state needs to determine which agencies are providing services that are duplicated or nearly duplicated by other agencies — he cited the Oregon Department of Education and Department of Human Ser-

Wastewater Continued from C1 Currently, sewer SDCs cost a developer about $7,457 per single dwelling. When the wastewater treatment plant is built and operational, it would lower the cost of SDCs to about $4,000. City officials are hoping the move will help entice developers to the area. “It makes us competitive with our neighbors at that rate,” Klann said.

Sisters Continued from C1 Ed Protas, of Sisters, told councilors that he believed all details of the search, now that it is completed, should be open to the public. Not releasing the information put a “cloud” over the process, he said. “It gives the very appearance that there’s something to hide,” Protas said. Speaking after Protas, Mike Morgan, also of Sisters, said May-

Janice Louise Coffman-Strain

Cougar

Janice Louise CoffmanStrain, age 70, of Terrebonne, OR, passed away on Oct. 9, 2010. Janice is survived by her husband Keith, three daughters: Shawn, Trini and Bobbi; one son, Darren; 13 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her father and three of her brothers. A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, Oct. 23, at 3:00 p.m. at the Gilchrist Restaurant and Lounge banquet room in Gilchrist, Oregon.

Continued from C1 He oversees the Central and Eastern Oregon region, and every week he gets reports about cougar activity — although frequently it doesn’t turn out to be a cougar. It’s more common for wildlife specialists to deal with coyotes or raccoons, he said. But the big cats do cause problems, either by attacking livestock or coming too close for comfort to people. “For our geographic area, it’s not an uncommon thing at all,” Slater said. As Spencer was leaving Sullivan’s house Thursday, after con-

vices as examples — and eliminating that duplication could cut the cost to the state. “I believe they’re redundant, because we’ve got agencies that are overlapping,” Huddle said. “They’re not overlapping because anybody’s done anything wrong, they’ve just gotten fuzzy over time.” The state should also look at reorganizing the state’s smaller school districts and Education Service Districts, Huddle said, as they often have significant administrative expenses relative to the number of students served. Both candidates said they would entertain discussions about eliminating or modifying the state’s “kicker law,” which refunds income taxes to individuals and corporations when state revenues exceed projections by more than 2 percent, though they acknowledged it could be difficult to alter a law set in the state constitution. Whisnant said he’d like the see the state shift set aside a small portion of the budget each year to build up a reserve fund, a system that wouldn’t necessarily alter the kicker law. Huddle said he’d be open to changes, where the kicker might kick in when surpluses are more than 5 percent over projections, with the difference placed in a reserve fund. The economy is the top issue going into the next legislative session, Whisnant said, both for District 53 and the state as a whole. He’s planning on introducing a bill to attempt to spur job creation by eliminating the state’s capital gains tax for five years, and said the Legislature should consider additional business tax incentives like an accelerated depreciation schedule for capital improvements. “If we don’t get people back to work, we’re not going to have the funds to provide services for education, for public safety, for human services, for our veterans,” he said. “We’ve got to get people back to work.” Another Whisnant proposal under consideration for the next session would direct the Oregon University System to address the transferability of classes between the state’s universities, colleges and community colleges. A better-organized system would make it easier for a student who began their education at a two-year school like Central Oregon Community College to

Now, the city’s wastewater is treated in two lagoons and used to irrigate the city’s golf course and city-owned pastures in the summer. The hard part with the wastewater is finding enough places to dispose of it. With the wetland, the water would travel through the existing lagoons, where it’s treated, and then hit the wetlands. From there, about 2 million gallons a day of cold water would seep into the Crooked River, which officials believe will help the steelhead. Klann said he got the idea from

or Lon Kellstrom had approved the search process without receiving approval from the entire council. Morgan backed Protas’ call for more details on the search. “I believe it was a clear violation of (the city’s) charter,” Morgan said. Steve Bryant, the city’s attorney, said the process was legal and followed the charter. Sisters never had a contract with EDCO and the council could have rejected the organization’s recommendation at any point. Sisters can only release information in its

firming that a cougar had killed the goats, neighbor Ron Forsht stopped to ask if Spencer had seen a small dog. He had last seen the dog about an hour previously — with a cougar nearby. When Forsht approached the dog, the dog ran one way and the cougar ran another, he said. So Spencer followed Forsht a couple of blocks away, and started scouring the ground in a wooded area between houses for prints. Large paws had disturbed the pine needles and dirt in one place, and there was a print near a wire fence. But after driving around for a while and checking up in trees as well as in the pines and brush, he found no cougar.

finish within four years, Whisnant said, improving graduation rates. Beyond the budget, Huddle said he would like to tackle veterans issues if elected. With an estimated 24,000 veterans in Central Oregon, the region’s legislators should be working to land one of the proposed nursing homes operated by the Oregon Department or Veterans’ Affairs. Huddle said one such home has been operating in The Dalles since 1997, with two more proposed in Lebanon and Roseburg. Huddle would also like to see the state take on a more robust role auditing city and county governments. He said he’s been concerned with the way Deschutes County has handled some issues, particularly the groundwater issues in and around La Pine. Letting he Secretary of State’s audit division inspect local governments’ finances and adherence to the law would help restore confidence in government, Huddle said. “I think we’re getting dangerously close to people just being apathetic because they believe it’s impossible to do anything,” he said. Whisnant said he prides himself on providing excellent service to his constituents, and has developed solid relationships with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle over more than three terms. A rookie legislator without those relationships will have a tough time being effective, he said. “I know how the system works,” Whisnant said. “It takes you a long time to learn where the skeletons are, and where the closets are.” Huddle said he’s not convinced Whisnant has been an effective representative, suggesting most of the legislation he’s advanced has been of little significance. Whisnant is a “nice guy,” Huddle said, but he reliably sides with the Republican leadership in the House, and has not been a major player in addressing large issues like the state’s budget shortfall. “We’ve got to get these things under control and it’s going to take somebody who can think outside the box, work with others and be effective,” Huddle said. “And I’ve done those things.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

the city of La Grande’s Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area. Several Prineville city councilors visited La Grande’s wetland areas and were impressed, according to Councilor Betty Roppe. La Grande Public Works Director Norm Paullus said in an earlier interview that La Grande’s 720acre wetland project has garnered awards and drawn visitors from as far away as Saudi Arabia. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

possession and EDCO’s records are not with the city, Bryant said. The city requested details of the search from EDCO, but the organization denied the request. Weed asked that the city try again to get more information from EDCO. “I would like to be able to stand up to citizens and say, ‘You know what? It was a good process,’ ” Weed said. “At this point, I can’t.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

The plan, Slater said, was to wait and see what happened. Trapping the animal in such a dense residential area is hard, because pets might wander in accidently. But if the cougar continues to cause a problem, officials could warn neighbors to keep their pets inside and then track or trap the animal before killing it. “The cougar may just leave the area,” Slater said. “If the cougar continues to come back ... then we can set some other strategies in motion, working with the local community.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.


W

C6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E AT H ER

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 15 Today: Mostly sunny and significantly cooler.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western 63/36

62/35

58/25

61/38

58/36



53/32

Warm Springs

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Marion Forks

Willowdale

Morning clouds, then partly cloudy today. Partly cloudy tonight. Central

64/34

Mitchell

Madras

60/30

59/33

Camp Sherman 59/25 Redmond Prineville 62/28 Cascadia 59/29 Paulina 61/29 54/25 Sisters 61/27  Bend Post  62/28 58/26 Oakridge Elk Lake 59/27

59/25

59/24

60/24

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

61/23

57/25

Fort Rock

BEND ALMANAC

Vancouver 55/42

 Chemult 58/22

56/28

Seattle

56/29

 Bend

Helena 62/32

Boise

62/28

68/41

Idaho Falls 72/39

Elko

85/52

77/38

65/27

Reno

79/46

San Francisco Partly to mostly sunny 71/54 skies today. Clear to partly  cloudy tonight.



53/32



Salt Lake City 76/49

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Abundant sunshine and remaining cool. HIGH

LOW

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Nov. 5

Nov. 13

Astoria . . . . . . . . 55/42/0.03 . . . . . 58/43/pc. . . . . . . 62/43/s Baker City . . . . . . 70/26/0.00 . . . . . . 60/33/s. . . . . . 63/37/pc Brookings . . . . . . 66/49/0.00 . . . . . 60/53/pc. . . . . . 59/46/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 75/28/0.00 . . . . . 64/41/pc. . . . . . 69/40/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 72/38/0.00 . . . . . 63/35/pc. . . . . . 61/35/pc Klamath Falls . . . 78/32/0.00 . . . . . 68/34/pc. . . . . . 66/30/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 77/27/0.00 . . . . . 70/38/pc. . . . . . 66/37/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 76/26/0.00 . . . . . . 60/24/s. . . . . . 58/20/pc Medford . . . . . . . 83/42/0.00 . . . . . 70/44/pc. . . . . . 69/42/pc Newport . . . . . . . 55/39/0.00 . . . . . 59/45/pc. . . . . . . 61/45/s North Bend . . . . . . 61/41/NA . . . . . 61/44/pc. . . . . . 62/43/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/31/0.00 . . . . . 69/39/pc. . . . . . 66/46/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 70/37/0.00 . . . . . . 63/33/s. . . . . . 61/32/pc Portland . . . . . . . 67/44/0.02 . . . . . 63/41/pc. . . . . . 63/41/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 76/35/0.00 . . . . . . 59/29/s. . . . . . 60/26/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 79/30/0.00 . . . . . . 63/27/s. . . . . . . 60/26/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 77/45/0.00 . . . . . 63/42/pc. . . . . . 64/41/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 71/39/0.00 . . . . . 63/37/pc. . . . . . . 64/37/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 76/30/0.00 . . . . . 61/27/pc. . . . . . 60/24/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 75/38/0.00 . . . . . . 67/35/s. . . . . . . 62/37/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

3MEDIUM

0

2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 in 1976 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 in 1969 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.20” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.01” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.07” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . . . .21 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.18 in 2009 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

62 23

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Abundant sunshine and cool. HIGH

60 24

PLANET WATCH

Friday Hi/Lo/W

TUESDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:19 a.m. . . . . . .6:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:23 a.m. . . . . . .6:21 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:54 a.m. . . . . . .7:28 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:18 p.m. . . . . . .5:01 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:08 a.m. . . . . . .5:59 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:19 p.m. . . . . . .5:15 a.m.

OREGON CITIES City

Missoula

Redding

Silver Lake 63/29



56/43

Christmas Valley

Crater Lake

Calgary

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:20 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:21 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:20 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:00 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:03 a.m.

LOW

61 24

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

61/26

53/18

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Eugene Partly to mostly sunny 63/35 skies today. Clear to partly Grants Pass cloudy tonight. 67/42 Eastern

65/26

LOW

Coastal areas will see some cloudiness, while plenty of sunshine will be seen inland.

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 83° Medford • 26° Baker City

MONDAY Mostly sunny and cool.

62 25

63/41

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

50/16

LOW

28

STATE

SUNDAY Mostly sunny and unseasonably cool.

Tonight: Mostly clear and cooler.

62

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

SATURDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,779 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,805 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,180 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 23,579 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93,131 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.8 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . 68.0 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.09 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 55/42

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Calgary 56/28

Portland 63/41

Rapid City 80/40

Thermal, Calif.

San Francisco 71/54

Elizabeth City, N.C.

Las Vegas 89/66

Salt Lake City 76/49

Denver 82/49 Albuquerque 76/48

Los Angeles 69/59 Phoenix 93/70

S

Chihuahua 81/51

La Paz 90/65 Juneau 45/37

Mazatlan 90/74

FRONTS

S

S

S

S

Bismarck 72/41 St. Paul 64/45

To ronto 52/38

Green Bay 58/41

Kansas City 71/50 Oklahoma City 85/53

Houston 85/53

Boston 53/43 New York 58/48 Philadelphia 62/49 Washington, D. C. 68/47

52/46

Columbus 61/41

Charlotte 72/40

Nashville 72/39 Birmingham 78/45

New Orleans 80/60

Atlanta 75/45

Orlando 82/57 Miami 85/69

Monterrey 85/60

Halifax 59/51

Portland 54/40

Buffalo

Detroit 62/43

Louisville 67/44

St. Louis 68/42 Little Rock 80/49

S S

Quebec 44/39

Winnipeg 69/41 Thunder Bay 56/34

Dallas 85/55

Tijuana 76/56

Anchorage 42/35

S

Des Moines 66/44 Chicago 58/50 Omaha 72/44

Cheyenne 75/42

• 20°

Honolulu 86/71

Saskatoon 64/31

Billings 75/37

Boise 68/41

• 102°

• 1.65”

S

Seattle 56/43

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Stanley, Idaho

S

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .77/43/0.00 . . .85/53/s . . . 86/55/s Akron . . . . . . . . .58/48/0.02 . 58/40/pc . . . 60/39/s Albany. . . . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . . .50/40/r . . 55/37/pc Albuquerque. . . .76/49/0.00 . . .76/48/s . . . 78/48/s Anchorage . . . . .38/21/0.00 . 42/35/pc . . 44/33/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . .75/45/s . . . 72/43/s Atlantic City . . . .62/40/0.40 . .63/45/sh . . . 64/51/s Austin . . . . . . . . .80/56/0.00 . . .86/49/s . . . 86/57/s Baltimore . . . . . .56/44/0.86 . 66/48/pc . . . 65/46/s Billings. . . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . 75/37/pc . . 58/41/pc Birmingham . . . .76/59/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . . 76/43/s Bismarck . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . .72/41/s . . . 58/36/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . 68/41/pc . . 70/44/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .60/46/0.00 . .53/43/sh . . 58/46/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .64/44/0.08 . .54/45/sh . . . 56/43/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .51/48/0.14 . .52/46/sh . . . 53/42/s Burlington, VT. . .64/37/0.00 . . .48/39/r . . 47/38/pc Caribou, ME . . . .56/28/0.00 . . .47/44/r . . 51/41/sh Charleston, SC . .84/66/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 74/52/s Charlotte. . . . . . .74/60/0.09 . . .72/40/s . . . 71/40/s Chattanooga. . . .72/59/0.00 . . .74/42/s . . . 73/39/s Cheyenne . . . . . .75/36/0.00 . . .75/42/s . . 63/41/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . 58/50/pc . . . 70/50/s Cincinnati . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 66/39/pc . . . 67/41/s Cleveland . . . . . .58/50/0.31 . 59/45/pc . . . 59/44/s Colorado Springs 73/38/0.00 . . .79/42/s . . . 70/42/s Columbia, MO . .71/42/0.00 . . .69/43/s . . . 76/50/s Columbia, SC . . .79/58/0.01 . . .75/44/s . . . 74/41/s Columbus, GA. . .81/59/0.00 . . .78/47/s . . . 75/45/s Columbus, OH. . .63/51/0.01 . 61/41/pc . . . 63/42/s Concord, NH . . . .60/30/0.00 . . .50/36/r . . 58/35/pc Corpus Christi. . .82/62/0.00 . . .83/64/s . . . 82/68/s Dallas Ft Worth. .75/51/0.00 . . .85/55/s . . . 88/60/s Dayton . . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . 61/41/pc . . . 65/42/s Denver. . . . . . . . .77/43/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 72/51/s Des Moines. . . . .76/41/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 74/46/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .63/44/0.04 . 62/43/pc . . . 63/46/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .62/39/0.00 . . .54/41/s . . 59/37/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . 83/53/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .31/18/0.00 . . .25/8/pc . . . 29/13/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . .63/46/s . . 60/37/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .70/35/0.00 . . .72/35/s . . . 70/37/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .64/40/0.00 . 60/40/pc . . . 65/43/s Rapid City . . . . . .76/40/0.00 . . .80/40/s . . 62/37/pc Savannah . . . . . 86/64/trace . . .77/50/s . . . 75/50/s Green Bay. . . . . .60/36/0.00 . 58/41/pc . . 66/37/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . . .79/46/s . . . 77/48/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .60/47/0.01 . 56/43/pc . . 58/43/pc Greensboro. . . . .72/57/0.52 . . .68/43/s . . . 69/40/s Richmond . . . . . .65/57/0.67 . 70/46/pc . . . 70/43/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .67/36/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 65/40/s Harrisburg. . . . . .52/41/0.33 . .60/45/sh . . . 63/44/s Rochester, NY . . .52/45/0.10 . . .54/43/r . . . 53/41/s Spokane . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . .54/35/s . . . 57/33/s Hartford, CT . . . .64/38/0.00 . .50/42/sh . . 59/40/pc Sacramento. . . . .94/56/0.00 . . .85/53/s . . . 81/52/s Springfield, MO. .69/38/0.00 . . .73/46/s . . . 76/52/s Helena. . . . . . . . .74/31/0.00 . . .62/32/s . . . 55/41/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 79/52/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .82/60/s . . . 83/61/s Honolulu . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .86/71/s . . . 86/71/s Salt Lake City . . .73/41/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 76/53/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . 91/62/pc . . 89/62/pc Houston . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .85/53/s . . . 85/59/s San Antonio . . . .80/54/0.00 . . .85/51/s . . . 85/58/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .77/41/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . . 85/53/s Huntsville . . . . . .71/55/0.00 . . .76/39/s . . . 74/38/s San Diego . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . 72/63/pc . . . 72/62/s Washington, DC .61/55/1.26 . 68/47/pc . . . 67/48/s Indianapolis . . . .66/42/0.00 . 63/41/pc . . . 71/45/s San Francisco . . .84/66/0.00 . . .71/54/s . . . 63/52/s Wichita . . . . . . . .79/42/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 87/53/s Jackson, MS . . . .78/59/0.00 . . .82/46/s . . . 82/49/s San Jose . . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 75/54/s Yakima . . . . . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .64/29/s . . 61/34/pc Madison, WI . . . .66/36/0.00 . . .61/40/s . . 68/41/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .74/40/0.00 . 73/38/pc . . 74/40/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .99/79/0.00 . 95/69/pc . . 94/68/pc Jacksonville. . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .78/50/s . . . 77/50/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .45/41/0.29 . . .45/37/r . . . .45/38/r Kansas City. . . . .75/37/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . . 82/53/s Amsterdam. . . . .55/43/0.00 . .51/45/sh . . 48/36/sh Mecca . . . . . . . .100/86/0.00 . .104/79/s . . 101/77/s Lansing . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . 60/39/pc . . . 63/41/s Athens. . . . . . . . .75/60/0.05 . .74/64/sh . . 75/64/sh Mexico City. . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 76/48/s Las Vegas . . . . . .88/65/0.00 . . .89/66/s . . . 89/67/s Auckland. . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .67/49/s . . . 67/48/s Montreal. . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .45/39/r . . 47/31/sh Lexington . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 67/42/s Baghdad . . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . . .91/67/s . . . 95/69/s Moscow . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . . 38/32/rs . . 37/25/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .78/34/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 75/45/s Bangkok . . . . . . .86/75/0.16 . . .86/77/t . . . .87/77/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . . 83/57/s Little Rock. . . . . .76/51/0.00 . . .80/49/s . . . 83/53/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . . 68/45/s Nassau . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .85/75/t Los Angeles. . . . .69/62/0.00 . 69/59/pc . . . 69/57/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 89/78/pc . . 90/78/pc New Delhi. . . . . .91/69/0.00 . . .94/70/s . . . 95/71/s Louisville . . . . . . .70/49/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . . 72/49/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.00 . .50/42/sh . . 47/38/sh Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . 73/60/pc . . . 70/57/s Memphis. . . . . . .75/51/0.00 . . .77/47/s . . . 79/50/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .65/51/sh . . 63/49/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . .42/35/sh . . . 40/25/s Miami . . . . . . . . .81/75/0.01 . . .85/69/s . . . 84/70/s Budapest. . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . . 54/38/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .55/46/0.09 . . .45/37/r . . 48/31/sh Milwaukee . . . . .64/47/0.00 . 60/43/pc . . 68/47/pc Buenos Aires. . . .64/57/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 66/50/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . 51/37/sh Minneapolis . . . .69/45/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . 68/43/pc Cabo San Lucas .93/68/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . . 89/69/s Rio de Janeiro. . .84/70/0.00 . . .84/71/t . . . .83/72/t Nashville . . . . . . .70/51/0.00 . . .72/39/s . . . 73/42/s Cairo . . . . . . . . .102/73/0.00 . . .97/72/s . . 95/71/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.14 . .69/56/sh . . 66/55/sh New Orleans. . . .81/66/0.00 . . .80/60/s . . . 80/59/s Calgary . . . . . . . .72/32/0.00 . .56/28/sh . . . 48/29/s Santiago . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .67/50/sh . . . 72/51/s New York . . . . . .63/50/0.26 . .58/48/sh . . . 63/45/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/72/1.25 . . .83/69/s . . . 85/69/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .82/69/t . . . .81/68/t Newark, NJ . . . . .64/45/0.17 . .57/46/sh . . 63/45/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .52/48/0.00 . . .57/43/c . . 56/41/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .54/52/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . . 58/44/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .67/59/0.36 . 73/48/pc . . . 70/48/s Edinburgh . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .50/43/sh . . . 51/37/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .60/47/s . . . 65/46/s Oklahoma City . .75/40/0.00 . . .85/53/s . . . 86/53/s Geneva . . . . . . . .54/48/0.00 . 59/44/pc . . 54/43/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .64/63/0.01 . . .73/61/s . . . 75/62/s Omaha . . . . . . . .77/41/0.00 . . .72/44/s . . . 70/48/s Harare . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 93/63/pc . . 91/60/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.01 . 91/76/pc . . . .90/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . 81/59/s Hong Kong . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . 85/76/sh Stockholm. . . . . .48/36/0.00 . . 40/32/rs . . 41/27/pc Palm Springs. . .102/79/0.00 . 98/68/pc . . 96/65/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .64/61/2.54 . .67/59/sh . . 66/58/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .67/55/r . . . 57/44/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .67/41/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . . 72/47/s Jerusalem . . . . . .92/67/0.00 . . .94/68/s . . 96/68/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . .85/75/sh . . 83/74/sh Philadelphia . . . .59/47/0.66 . .62/49/sh . . . 63/46/s Johannesburg . . .70/57/0.00 . .72/52/sh . . 74/53/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . .100/70/0.00 . . .91/71/s . . 93/74/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .100/75/0.00 . 93/70/pc . . 93/69/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . 65/58/pc . . 64/58/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . .73/63/sh . . . 74/62/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . 56/39/pc . . . 60/41/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . .71/57/s . . . 71/55/s Toronto . . . . . . . .52/46/0.59 . .52/38/sh . . . 55/39/s Portland, ME. . . .59/34/0.00 . . .54/40/r . . 58/38/sh London . . . . . . . .52/50/0.00 . . .56/45/c . . . 54/42/s Vancouver. . . . . .55/46/0.02 . 55/42/pc . . 56/40/pc Providence . . . . .63/42/0.00 . .54/43/sh . . 59/42/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . . 65/42/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/32/0.00 . 55/36/pc . . 50/42/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .71/61/1.11 . . .70/44/s . . . 70/42/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .90/79/t . . . .89/79/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . 45/35/sh

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NFL Inside Teams that don’t have a solid backup QB have problems in today’s NFL, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

L O C A L LY UO baseball in Bend Saturday for game, youth clinic The University of Oregon baseball team is scheduled to be in Central Oregon this Saturday to play an intrasquad game and conduct a free youth baseball clinic, all at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend. The Ducks’ fall appearance in Bend, hosted by the Bend Elks Baseball Club, will be the second in as many years for the team and its head coach, George Horton. Gates at Genna Stadium are to open at 11 a.m. for Saturday’s scrimmage, which is set to start at noon and is to be followed by a youth clinic at 3 p.m. General admission to the game is free; reserved seats are $7.50. Concessions will be available, as will big-screen TVs showing the day’s televised college football games. An autograph session with UO players and coaches is planned for after the game, before the start of the youth clinic. No advance registration is being held for the free youth clinic, which is expected to last approximately one hour. Oregon State University had planned a similar scrimmage and clinic event last weekend, but a forecast for rain prompted the Beavers to cancel their annual trip to Bend for this fall. For more information, visit www.bendelks.com. Bulletin staff report

PREP BOYS SOCCER

PREP VOLLEYBALL

Cougs win fourth straight Sisters nears Sky-Em title with victory over Elmira

By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

After another slow start at the beginning of the boys soccer season, Mountain View appears to be hitting its stride. The Cougars won their fourth consecutive game Thursday, blowing out crosstown rival Bend High 8-0 at Mountain View. Last year, Mountain View, which did not post a victory until its eighth game of the season, rebounded to play in the Class 5A state title match. This year, the Cougars didn’t win a match until their sixth contest of the season. Cam Riemhofer scored three times and Kylor Snook added two goals in his first game back from a groin injury to lead the Cougars, who are now 3-0 in Class 5A Intermountain Conference play and 4-2-3 overall. “Last year was a huge help,” said Riemhofer, who scored twice in the first half to help Mountain View take a 4-0 lead into halftime. See Cougs / D4

Bulletin staff report

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Kylor Snook, right, scores a goal in front of Bend’s Nate Uriz Thursday at Mountain View High School in Bend.

ELMIRA — Sisters continued its volleyball mastery of the Sky-Em League on Thursday, defeating host Elmira 25-14, 27-25, 23-25, 25-12 to improve to 7-0 in league play this year. The Outlaws, who have won a least a share of the Sky-Em championship each of the last three seasons, can clinch a fourth consecutive title with a win over La Pine on Tuesday. Sophomores Kristina Sparkling and Megan Minke led a balanced Outlaw offense against the Falcons, each posting seven kills. Sydney Stone-

back paced the defense with 15 digs while Kaity Douglass dished out 34 assists. With Thursday’s win, Sisters now has a two-game lead over Sweet Home, which is 5-2. Both of Sweet Home’s league defeats were to Sisters. The Outlaws conclude their 10-game league schedule next week with two road matches and one home contest. If Sisters can hold on to the Sky-Em’s top spot, the Outlaws would play the Oregon West Conference’s No. 4 seed in the first round of play-in games before the 4A state postseason.

ADVENTURE SPORTS

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Winter sports swap slated for Saturday The annual Skyliners Winter Sports Swap is scheduled for this Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Bend’s Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, located at 115 S.W. Columbia St. Sellers can check in gear at the bus barn today from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Gear pickup is Sunday from 9 a.m. to noon. The event is a fundraiser for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which will take a 25 percent commission on sold items. Admission to Saturday’s swap is $3 for individuals and $6 for families. For more information, call 541-388-0002 or visit www. mbsef.org. Bulletin staff report

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INSIDE MLB P L AYO F F S ALCS • Game 1, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, today, 5 p.m. (TBS).

NLCS • Game 1, San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies, Saturday, 4:57 p.m. (Fox)

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A rock climber makes his way up a crack route at Smith Rock State Park near Terrebonne on Tuesday.

Vertical view Climbing at Smith Rock is an adventure for beginners, who must learn to overcome their fear and build trust TERREBONNE — he climbing is the easy part. Leaning back into thin air some 200 feet above the ground, trusting your gear as well as your partner standing far below — that’s the hard part. David Potter, owner of Smith Rock Climbing Guides, considers rock climbing a team sport. “One of the hallmarks of climbing is it’s a partnership, and you rely on the other person for your life,” Potter says. “The gear is so advanced nowadays that it’s not that difficult to figure out. You’re using equipment that does the work for you — you just have to

T

MARK MORICAL

follow the basic safety principles.” I had just finished a technically easy pitch to the top of the Cinnamon Slab wall at Smith Rock State Park, where I soaked in the views and relished the accomplishment. As a beginner, I was challenged by the climb physically. But that challenge was nothing compared with the mental — and emotional — challenge of rappelling. Alone against the sheer rock wall, with Potter controlling the rope 100 feet below, I had to sit back into midair, trusting Potter, as well as the rope, the harness, and every single bit of gear we were using. See Climbing / D6

Sport climbing at Smith Rock Most of the climbing done at world-renowned Smith Rock is sport climbing, in which the climber uses bolts that have been permanently placed in the rock and attaches his or her climbing rope to these bolts on the way up. First a climber lead climbs, clipping rope into the bolts of the route with quick draws and suspending the rope through an anchor at the top of the route. Following climbers will then top rope, climbing with the protection of the pre-established rope. A belayer controls the rope, keeping it taut and allowing the climber to hang safely in his or her harness when off the rock face without a significant loss of altitude. (BEGINNERS SHOULD ALWAYS GO WITH A GUIDE OR EXPERIENCED CLIMBERS.)

RAT ING SYSTEM The grade scale for climbing ranges from 5.0 to 5.15, with 5.0 being the easiest climb and 5.15 being the most difficult. Each level from 5.10 to 5.15 is also classified by letters: a, b, c or d. Most beginners start at about 5.4 to 5.6, while only a select few among elite climbers can conquer climbs rated 5.12 or above. Smith Rock offers climbs of nearly every level, often on the same rock face.

C.J. Wilson will start Game 1 of the ALCS for Texas.

ALCS and NLCS coverage, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 Golf ........................................... D4 NHL .......................................... D4 Auto racing ................................D5 Adventure Sports.............. D5, D6

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Oregon’s rise and USC’s fall reshape Pac-10 By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — The tremors started last season. Southern Cal, the longtime undisputed king of the Pac10, had its national title hopes dashed with an early loss to Washington, then fell three more times. Oregon, meanwhile, put together a team-on-the-rise season, losing just twice on the way to the Rose Bowl.

This season, USC, saddled with sanctions and little depth, was out of the Top 25 with a tough climb back after Reggie Bush’s Heisman Trophy giveback. The fast-and-furious Ducks have raced up the polls, just below the top spot and in position for a nationalchampionship run. See Pac-10 / D5

Southern California has struggled to return to its days of dominance in the Pac10 under new head coach Lane Kiffin. The Associated Press


D2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Portugal Masters, second round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, second round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, CVS/Pharmacy LPGA Challenge, second round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, qualifying, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, practice, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Cincinnati at Louisville, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school, Grant at Redmond, COTV.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, TBS.

SOCCER 8 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Chivas USA at Seattle Sounders, ESPN.

SATURDAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Portugal Masters, third round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, third round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, CVS/Pharmacy LPGA Challenge, third round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 6:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Manchester United at West Bromwich, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Boston College at Florida State, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Minnesota at Purdue, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, Arkansas State at Indiana, ESPNU. 9 a.m. — College, Missouri at Texas A&M, FSNW. 11:30 a.m. — College, Western Michigan at Notre Dame, NBC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Iowa at Michigan, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, Texas at Nebraska, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Arkansas at Auburn, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, Cal at USC, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — College, Wake Forest at Virginia Tech, ESPNU. 1 p.m. — College, BYU at TCU, VS. network. 3 p.m. — College, South Carolina at Kentucky, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — College, Ohio State at Wisconsin, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College, Mississippi State at Florida, ESPNU. 4 p.m. — College, Iowa State at Oklahoma, FSNW. 4:30 p.m. — College, Arizona at Washington State, VS. network. 6 p.m. — College, Mississippi at Alabama, ESPN2. 7:15 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Washington, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — College, New Mexico State at Fresno State, ESPNU.

HORSE RACING 1 p.m. — Breeders’ Cup Challenge, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, TBS. 4:30 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies, Fox.

AUTO RACING 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, ABC.

VOLLEYBALL 7:30 p.m. — College, Washington at Stanford, FSNW (taped).

SUNDAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Portugal Masters, final round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, final round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, CVS/Pharmacy LPGA Challenge, final round, Golf Channel.

VOLLEYBALL 10 a.m. — College, Minnesota at Penn State, ESPN2 (taped).

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Chicago Bears, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, New York Jets at Denver Broncos, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Dallas Cowboys at Minnesota Vikings, Fox. 5 p.m. — NFL, Indianapolis Colts at Washington Redskins, NBC.

RODEO Noon — PRCA Kitsap County Xtreme Bulls, ESPN2 (taped). 2 p.m. — PRCA Justin Boots Playoffs, ESPN2 (taped). 3 p.m. — PRCA Justin Boots Championships, ESPN2 (taped).

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies, Fox.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Mountain View at Summit, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m. — High school, Estacada at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9.

SATURDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, KICE-AM 940.

FOOTBALL 7:15 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Washington, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Chicago Bears, KBNW-FM 96.5.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, National League Championship Series, San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Football: Grant at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Lincoln at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7 p.m.; Marshall at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 7 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 2:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 5:30 p.m.; Prospect at Trinity Lutheran, 5 p.m.

I N THE BLEACHERS

Saturday Cross country: Redmond at State of Jefferson Invitational in Ashland, 11:30 a.m.; Bend, Summit, Crook County at Concordia/PUMA Classic in Portland, noon; Madras at Bristow Rock n River Invitational in Pleasant Hill, 9:30 a.m. Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at Clearwater Classic in Bend, TBA; Gilchrist at Hosanna, 1 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Triad, 2 p.m. Boys soccer: Riverside at Culver, 1 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour FRYS.COM OPEN Thursday At CordeValle Golf Club Course San Martin, Calif. Purse: $3.6 million Yardage: 7,199; Par: 72 (36-36) Partial First Round Rocco Mediate 29-35—64 Ryuji Imada 32-33—65 Bo Van Pelt 33-32—65 Paul Goydos 30-35—65 John Mallinger 32-34—66 Michael Letzig 32-34—66 Will MacKenzie 34-32—66 Shaun Micheel 33-33—66 Tom Pernice, Jr. 32-35—67 Chris Riley 33-34—67 Chris DiMarco 34-33—67 Tim Herron 31-36—67 Henrik Stenson 32-35—67 David Duval 31-37—68 Robert Garrigus 33-35—68 Todd Hamilton 35-33—68 Tim Clark 33-35—68 Derek Lamely 35-33—68 Chad Campbell 35-33—68 Brett Quigley 34-34—68 Tom Lehman 33-35—68 Graham DeLaet 35-33—68 Jamie Lovemark 34-34—68 Rickie Fowler 32-37—69 Justin Leonard 33-36—69 Jeev Milkha Singh 35-34—69 George McNeill 33-36—69 Josh Teater 35-34—69 Alex Prugh 35-34—69 Dean Wilson 35-34—69 Woody Austin 34-35—69 Steve Wheatcroft 32-37—69 Chris Stroud 36-34—70 Alex Cejka 34-36—70 Tim Petrovic 34-36—70 J.B. Holmes 35-35—70 Jerry Kelly 38-32—70 Richard S. Johnson 35-35—70 Omar Uresti 35-35—70 John Daly 31-39—70 Aaron Baddeley 35-35—70 Ricky Barnes 35-35—70 Chris Tidland 34-36—70 John Ellis 32-38—70 Scott Piercy 35-35—70 Charlie Wi 35-35—70 Fredrik Jacobson 33-37—70 Stuart Appleby 35-35—70 Joe Durant 33-38—71 Webb Simpson 32-39—71 Kevin Stadler 34-37—71 Brian Davis 36-35—71 Troy Merritt 34-37—71 Rory Sabbatini 38-33—71 Scott McCarron 34-37—71 Jeff Quinney 37-34—71 Jay Williamson 35-36—71 Chris Wilson 33-38—71 Kevin Chappell 34-37—71 Kevin Sutherland 32-39—71 Jonathan Byrd 38-33—71 Lee Janzen 35-36—71 Andres Romero 35-36—71 Bill Lunde 35-36—71 Ben Curtis 36-35—71 Charles Warren 34-37—71 Nicholas Thompson 36-36—72 Briny Baird 36-36—72 Troy Matteson 33-39—72 Jeff Maggert 38-34—72 Vance Veazey 35-37—72 D.A. Points 36-36—72 James Driscoll 37-35—72 Mathew Goggin 36-36—72 Jimmy Walker 37-35—72 Johnson Wagner 36-36—72 Daniel Chopra 36-36—72 Aron Price 38-34—72 Spencer Levin 36-36—72 Kevin Streelman 37-35—72 David Lutterus 34-38—72 Erick Justesen 35-37—72 Rod Pampling 35-38—73 Billy Mayfair 40-33—73 Bob Estes 37-36—73 Pat Perez 34-39—73 Cliff Kresge 37-36—73 Justin Bolli 37-36—73 Brian Stuard 36-37—73 Jeff Gove 36-37—73 Mark Brooks 36-37—73 Mathias Gronberg 39-34—73 Stephen Ames 38-35—73 Joe Ogilvie 35-38—73 Greg Owen 36-37—73 Michael Allen 35-38—73 J.P. Hayes 37-37—74 Brent Delahoussaye 39-35—74 Cameron Tringale 33-41—74 Martin Flores 37-37—74 Brenden Pappas 39-35—74 John Merrick 37-37—74 Nathan Green 35-39—74 Matt Bettencourt 36-38—74 Parker McLachlin 41-33—74 Paul Stankowski 37-37—74 Michael Connell 36-38—74 Cameron Percy 37-37—74 Andrew McLardy 34-40—74 Joseph Bramlett 37-37—74 Bryce Molder 37-38—75 Trevor Immelman 40-35—75 Skip Kendall 39-36—75 Cameron Beckman 38-37—75 Henrik Bjornstad 36-39—75 Roger Tambellini 35-40—75 Chris Marin 39-36—75 Roland Thatcher 37-39—76 James Nitties 38-38—76 Ted Purdy 37-39—76 Kevin Johnson 35-41—76 Greg Kraft 38-39—77 Mark Wilson 39-39—78 Aaron Goldberg 38-40—78 Isaac Weintraub 41-38—79 Greg Chalmers 36-44—80 Jason Schmuhl 42-41—83 Brett Wetterich DNS Did Not Finish Rich Barcelo Jarrod Lyle Danny Wax

LPGA Tour CVS/PHARMACY LPGA CHALLENGE Thursday At Blackhawk Country Club Course Danville, Calif. Purse: $1.1 million Yardage: 6,185; Par: 72 (37-35) First Round Brittany Lincicome 31-30—61 Wendy Ward 35-30—65 Moira Dunn 34-32—66 Jin Young Pak 33-34—67 Michele Redman 33-34—67 Amy Hung 35-32—67 Katherine Hull 33-34—67 Beatriz Recari 36-32—68 Candie Kung 36-32—68 Hee-Won Han 34-34—68 Laura Davies 35-33—68 Gwladys Nocera 35-33—68 Allison Hanna 36-33—69 Jimin Kang 36-33—69 Lindsey Wright 35-34—69 Stacy Lewis 34-35—69 Natalie Gulbis 36-33—69 Karrie Webb 35-34—69

M.J. Hur Leta Lindley Sarah Lee Ilhee Lee Sarah Jane Smith Dorothy Delasin Louise Stahle Stacy Prammanasudh Ji Young Oh Morgan Pressel Seon Hwa Lee Karine Icher Kristy McPherson Lorie Kane Anna Rawson Carling Coffing Sandra Gal Jennifer Rosales Jane Park Samantha Richdale Gloria Park Alison Walshe Beth Bader Kris Tamulis Taylor Leon Maria Hernandez Mikaela Parmlid Sarah Kemp Heather Bowie Young Na On Min Libby Smith Janice Moodie Becky Morgan Aree Song Karin Sjodin Mina Harigae Sophie Gustafson Vicky Hurst Meena Lee Sherri Steinhauer Maria Hjorth Irene Cho Nicole Jeray Silvia Cavalleri Lisa Meldrum Jean Reynolds Angela Stanford Cristie Kerr Pat Hurst Haeji Kang Amanda Blumenherst Christina Kim Azahara Munoz Paula Creamer Giulia Sergas Leah Wigger Chella Choi Mariajo Uribe Tania Elosegui Paige Mackenzie Katie Kempter Nicole Hage Ilmi Chung Mi Hyun Kim Shanshan Feng Brittany Lang Laura Diaz Louise Friberg Kelli Kuehne Jimin Jeong Mindy Kim Minea Blomqvist Julieta Granada Pernilla Lindberg Brandie Burton Juli Inkster Jill McGill Cindy Lacrosse Misun Cho Karen Stupples Alena Sharp Katie Futcher Reilley Rankin Liz Janangelo Yoo Kyeong Kim Allison Fouch Marianne Skarpnord Meaghan Francella Liselotte Neumann Angela Park

35-34—69 36-33—69 37-32—69 38-31—69 37-33—70 34-36—70 36-34—70 37-33—70 38-32—70 37-33—70 36-34—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 39-31—70 37-33—70 36-34—70 37-33—70 36-34—70 37-33—70 38-32—70 36-35—71 38-33—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 38-33—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 38-33—71 37-34—71 36-35—71 38-33—71 36-35—71 37-34—71 35-37—72 36-36—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 37-36—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 37-36—73 34-39—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 39-34—73 35-38—73 38-35—73 40-33—73 42-32—74 37-37—74 38-36—74 39-35—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 38-36—74 38-36—74 39-35—74 36-38—74 39-35—74 38-37—75 41-34—75 38-37—75 40-35—75 38-37—75 39-36—75 36-39—75 40-36—76 40-36—76 39-37—76 38-38—76 39-37—76 39-37—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 41-36—77 41-36—77 40-37—77 45-39—84

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT Subject to change ——— LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Today, Oct. 15 New York (Sabathia 21-7) at Texas (Wilson 15-8), 5:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16 New York (Hughes 18-8) at Texas (Lewis 12-13), 1:07 p.m. Monday, Oct. 18 Texas (Lee 12-9) at New York (Pettitte 11-3), 5:07 p.m Tuesday, Oct. 19 Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York (Burnett 10-15), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Texas at New York, 1:07 p.m., if necessary Friday, Oct. 22 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary National League Saturday, Oct. 16 San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10) at Philadelphia (Halladay 21-10), 4:57 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 5:19 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San Francisco (Cain 1311), 1:19 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 12:57 p.m. or 4:57 p.m., if necessary Sunday, Oct. 24 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:57 p.m., if necessary

TENNIS WTA Tour GENERALI LADIES LINZ Thursday Linz, Austria Singles Second Round Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Petra Kvitova (5), Czech

Republic, 6-2, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic (7), Serbia, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def. Sybille Bammer, Austria, 6-1, 7-6 (2). Daniela Hantuchova (2), Slovakia, def. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Klara Zakopalova (8), Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-0. HP OPEN Thursday Osaka, Japan Singles Second Round Jill Craybas, United States, def. Olga Savchuk, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-1. Shahar Peer (3), Israel, def. Ryoko Fuda, Japan, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3. Iveta Benesova (7), Czech Republic, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-1, 7-5. Kimiko Date Krumm (6), Japan, def. Aiko Nakamura, Japan, 6-2, 6-0.

ATP Tour SHANGHAI MASTERS Thursday Shanghai Singles Third Round Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Jeremy Chardy, France, 6-3, 6-4. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Richard Gasquet, France, 6-1, 6-1. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 7-5, 6-3. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. David Ferrer (11), Spain, 7-5, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer (13), Austria, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-0, 6-2.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 4 1 0 .800 135 New England 3 1 0 .750 131 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 2 0 .600 118 Jacksonville 3 2 0 .600 107 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 132 Indianapolis 3 2 0 .600 136 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 92 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 Cleveland 1 4 0 .200 78 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 1 0 .750 77 Oakland 2 3 0 .400 111 Denver 2 3 0 .400 104 San Diego 2 3 0 .400 140 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Washington 3 2 0 .600 89 N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 106 Philadelphia 3 2 0 .600 122 Dallas 1 3 0 .250 81 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 1 0 .800 113 Tampa Bay 3 1 0 .750 74 New Orleans 3 2 0 .600 99 Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 1 0 .800 92 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 119 Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 63 Detroit 1 4 0 .200 126 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 3 2 0 .600 88 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 75 St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 83 San Francisco 0 5 0 .000 76 ——— Sunday’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. Miami at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Houston, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. San Diego at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Detroit at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Baltimore at New England, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Washington, 5:20 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona, Carolina Monday’s Game Tennessee at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m.

PA 81 96 92 161 PA 136 137 95 101 PA 72 50 102 97 PA 57 134 116 106 PA 92 98 103 87 PA 70 80 102 110 PA 74 89 67 112 PA 138 77 96 130

NFL INJURY REPORT NEW YORK— The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT - Definitely will not play; DNP - Did not practice; LIMITED - Limited participation in practice; FULL - Full participation in practice): SUNDAY ATLANTA FALCONS at PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — FALCONS: DNP: LB Sean Weatherspoon (knee). LIMITED: DE John Abraham (back), LB Curtis Lofton (knee), TE Justin Peelle (groin). FULL: WR Brian Finneran (knee). EAGLES: DNP: DT Brodrick Bunkley (elbow), G Todd Herremans (knee), RB LeSean McCoy (rib), T Jason Peters (knee), QB Michael Vick (rib). LIMITED: WR Riley Cooper (concussion). FULL: TE Brent Celek (wrist), G Nick Cole (knee), DE Trent Cole (hamstring), T Austin Howard (back), CB Dimitri Patterson (back). CLEVELAND BROWNS at PITTSBURGH STEELERS — BROWNS: DNP: DE Kenyon Coleman (knee), QB Jake Delhomme (ankle), RB Peyton Hillis (thigh), C Alex Mack (shoulder), DT Shaun Rogers (elbow), TE Robert Royal (shoulder), DE Robaire Smith (back), S Nick Sorensen (calf), T John St. Clair (ankle), QB Seneca Wallace (ankle), G Floyd Womack (knee). LIMITED: WR Joshua Cribbs (ankle), S Abram Elam (knee), T Joe Thomas (shin). STEELERS: LIMITED: G Trai Essex (ankle). SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at CHICAGO BEARS — SEAHAWKS: DNP: TE John Carlson (not injury related),

DE Dexter Davis (hamstring), CB Marcus Trufant (ankle). BEARS: DNP: LB Lance Briggs (ankle), G Roberto Garza (knee), CB Charles Tillman (calf), S Major Wright (hamstring). LIMITED: LB Brian Urlacher (groin). FULL: QB Jay Cutler (head), T Chris Williams (hamstring). MIAMI DOLPHINS at GREEN BAY PACKERS — DOLPHINS: LIMITED: T Jake Long (knee), DT Jared Odrick (ankle). FULL: LB Channing Crowder (ankle). PACKERS: OUT: LB Nick Barnett (wrist), TE Jermichael Finley (knee). DNP: TE Donald Lee (chest), LB Clay Matthews (hamstring), DE Ryan Pickett (ankle), QB Aaron Rodgers (concussion), T Mark Tauscher (shoulder). LIMITED: LB Brandon Chillar (shoulder), T Chad Clifton (knee), S Nick Collins (knee), DE Cullen Jenkins (hamstring, hand). FULL: RB Quinn Johnson (glute), CB Sam Shields (calf). DETROIT LIONS at NEW YORK GIANTS — LIONS: DNP: RB Jahvid Best (toe), TE Spencer Havner (hamstring), LB Landon Johnson (concussion), LB DeAndre Levy (ankle, groin), DE Turk McBride (ankle), QB Matthew Stafford (right shoulder), CB Nathan Vasher (nose, biceps). LIMITED: WR Nate Burleson (ankle), S Louis Delmas (groin), WR Calvin Johnson (shoulder, knee), WR Stefan Logan (foot). GIANTS: OUT: T William Beatty (foot). DNP: WR Victor Cruz (hamstring), RB Madison Hedgecock (hamstring), CB Brian Jackson (neck), DE Mathias Kiwanuka (neck), DE Osi Umenyiora (knee), RB Danny Ware (groin). LIMITED: LB Keith Bulluck (toe), C Shaun O’Hara (ankle, Achilles), S Kenny Phillips (knee). NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — SAINTS: DNP: RB Reggie Bush (fibula), CB Randall Gay (head), S Roman Harper (hamstring), CB Tracy Porter (knee), RB Pierre Thomas (ankle). LIMITED: DE Will Smith (groin). FULL: LB Stanley Arnoux (ankle), QB Drew Brees (knee), DE Jeff Charleston (neck), WR Marques Colston (rib), TE Jimmy Graham (ankle), RB Christopher Ivory (knee), T Jon Stinchcomb (shoulder), T Zach Strief (knee), CB Leigh Torrence (toe), LB Anthony Waters (hamstring), DE Jimmy Wilkerson (knee), S Usama Young (quadriceps). BUCCANEERS: OUT: C Jeff Faine (quadriceps). DNP: S Sean Jones (back), CB Elbert Mack (foot), DE Kyle Moore (shoulder), TE Kellen Winslow (knee). LIMITED: WR Mike Williams (foot). FULL: LB Niko Koutouvides (ankle). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at ST. LOUIS RAMS — CHARGERS: OUT: LB Larry English (foot). DNP: WR Buster Davis (ribs), RB Ryan Mathews (ankle), WR Legedu Naanee (hamstring), LB Brandon Siler (foot). RAMS: DNP: LB Chris Chamberlain (toe). LIMITED: TE Billy Bajema (knee), CB Ron Bartell (calf), G Jacob Bell (head), RB Kenneth Darby (ribs), CB Kevin Dockery (hamstring), DT Darell Scott (ankle), LB David Vobora (hamstring). FULL: DT Gary Gibson (shoulder), WR Mardy Gilyard (thigh), TE Michael Hoomanawanui (ankle), CB Justin King (calf), S Darian Stewart (hamstring). KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at HOUSTON TEXANS — CHIEFS: DNP: P Dustin Colquitt (illness), S Reshard Langford (ankle). FULL: DE Tyson Jackson (knee), T Ryan O’Callaghan (groin). TEXANS: OUT: DE Jesse Nading (knee). DNP: LB Kevin Bentley (knee), G Mike Brisiel (knee), LB Brian Cushing (knee), WR Dorin Dickerson (knee), WR Jacoby Jones (calf), CB Sherrick McManis (hamstring), LB DeMeco Ryans (groin), DE Mario Williams (shoulder). LIMITED: LB Xavier Adibi (hamstring), S Dominique Barber (ribs), WR Andre Johnson (ankle), RB Derrick Ward (ribs). FULL: RB Arian Foster (knee), S Bernard Pollard (neck), LB Darryl Sharpton (ankle). BALTIMORE RAVENS at NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — RAVENS: OUT: T Jared Gaither (back), LB Tavares Gooden (shoulder), WR Donte’ Stallworth (foot). DNP: DE Paul Kruger (knee), RB Le’Ron McClain (shoulder, knee), DT Haloti Ngata (knee), RB Ray Rice (knee), CB Josh Wilson (thigh). LIMITED: LB Edgar Jones (thigh), LB Jameel McClain (knee). PATRIOTS: DNP: RB Fred Taylor (toe). FULL: QB Tom Brady (right shoulder), CB Terrence Wheatley (foot). OAKLAND RAIDERS at SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — RAIDERS: DNP: RB Michael Bennett (hamstring), LB Travis Goethel (back), DT John Henderson (foot), LB Thomas Howard (knee), WR Chaz Schilens (knee). LIMITED: G Robert Gallery (hamstring), LB Quentin Groves (hamstring), WR Johnnie Lee Higgins (knee), RB Darren McFadden (hamstring), CB Jeremy Ware (ankle). 49ERS: DNP: S Curtis Taylor (quadriceps), TE Delanie Walker (ankle). LIMITED: T Joe Staley (shoulder). NEW YORK JETS at DENVER BRONCOS — JETS: DNP: LB Calvin Pace (foot), CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring). FULL: S Jim Leonhard (biceps), C Nick Mangold (shoulder), G Brandon Moore (hamstring), LB Jamaal Westerman (ankle). BRONCOS: DNP: LB Robert Ayers (foot), RB Andre Brown (illness), S Brian Dawkins (knee), CB Andre’ Goodman (quadriceps), S Darcel McBath (ankle), RB Knowshon Moreno (hamstring), WR Demaryius Thomas (concussion), LB Wesley Woodyard (hamstring). LIMITED: LB Mario Haggan (neck), RB Spencer Larsen (ankle). DALLAS COWBOYS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS — COWBOYS: DNP: CB Alan Ball (shoulder), WR Dez Bryant (ribs, ankle), LB Bradie James (knee), DE Igor Olshansky (knee). LIMITED: TE Martellus Bennett (ankle). FULL: RB Chris Gronkowski (groin). VIKINGS: DNP: G Chris DeGeare (ankle), QB Brett Favre (ankle, right elbow), S Jamarca Sanford (back), C John Sullivan (calf). LIMITED: CB Chris Cook (knee), DE Brian Robison (ankle), TE Visanthe Shiancoe (hamstring), S Madieu Williams (shoulder). INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at WASHINGTON REDSKINS — COLTS: DNP: LB Gary Brackett (groin), RB Donald Brown (hamstring), WR Austin Collie (foot), LB Kavell Conner (foot), DE Dwight Freeney (not injury related), WR Pierre Garcon (hamstring), CB Jacob Lacey (foot), S Bob Sanders (biceps). LIMITED: RB Joseph Addai (neck), WR Anthony Gonzalez (ankle). FULL: S Antoine Bethea (hamstring), T Charlie Johnson (foot), CB Jerraud Powers (foot). REDSKINS: OUT: RB Clinton Portis (groin). DNP: DT Albert Haynesworth (not injury related), LB Rocky McIntosh (head), T Trent Williams (toe, knee). FULL: T Jammal Brown (knee), S LaRon Landry (wrist), QB Donovan McNabb (thigh), S Kareem Moore (knee).

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Thursday’s Games EAST West Virginia 20, South Florida 6 MIDWEST Kansas St. 59, Kansas 7 ——— Friday’s Game SOUTH Cincinnati at Louisville, 5 p.m.

Titans

W 6 3 5 4 3 2 4 3 3 1

Ov’ll

L 0 2 1 1 2 3 2 3 3 5

Cincinnati Miami-Fla. SYRACUSE e-RUTGERS C. MICHIGAN CLEMSON MICHIGAN ST PURDUE NC State GEORGIA S. Carolina FLORIDA ALABAMA OKLAHOMA TEMPLE BALL ST OHIO U

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday 8.5 8.5 RAMS 5 4 Chiefs 3 2.5 Ravens 4.5 4 BUCCANEERS 1 3 Falcons 9.5 10 Lions 7 6.5 Seahawks NL NL Dolphins 11.5 13 Browns 3 3 BRONCOS 6.5 6.5 Raiders 1.5 1.5 Cowboys 3 3 REDSKINS Monday 3 3 REDSKINS COLLEGE Today 3 3 Saturday 19 19.5 2.5 (P) PK 6.5 7 11 13 14.5 14 7.5 7 5 5.5 7.5 7 16.5 14.5 6 5 8 7.5 20.5 20.5 23 23.5 16.5 20 13 14 16.5 17

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Thursday’s Games Orlando 86, Charlotte 73 Milwaukee 96, Washington 88 Cleveland 106, San Antonio 80 Utah 108, Phoenix 97 Denver 100, L.A. Clippers 95 Today’s Games New Orleans at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Detroit vs. Minnesota at Syracuse, N.Y., 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 5 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 4 2 1 1 5 10 9 N.Y. Islanders 3 1 1 1 3 11 11 New Jersey 4 1 2 1 3 7 14 N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 0 2 10 9 Pittsburgh 4 1 3 0 2 10 11 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 12 6 Montreal 3 1 1 1 3 8 9 Buffalo 4 1 2 1 3 8 12 Ottawa 4 1 2 1 3 7 12 Boston 2 1 1 0 2 5 5 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 3 3 0 0 6 12 8 Washington 4 3 1 0 6 14 9 Carolina 3 2 1 0 4 8 7 Atlanta 3 1 2 0 2 8 10 Florida 3 1 2 0 2 6 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Nashville 3 3 0 0 6 11 6 Detroit 4 2 1 1 5 12 11 St. Louis 3 2 1 0 4 10 6 Chicago 4 1 2 1 3 11 13 Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 5 5 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 3 2 1 0 4 11 11 Edmonton 3 2 1 0 4 9 6 Minnesota 3 1 1 1 3 8 8 Vancouver 3 1 1 1 3 6 7 Calgary 3 1 2 0 2 3 8 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 3 3 0 0 6 13 8 Los Angeles 3 2 1 0 4 6 5 San Jose 2 1 0 1 3 5 5 Phoenix 2 1 1 0 2 5 5 Anaheim 4 1 3 0 2 6 16 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 2 Ottawa 3, Carolina 2 Nashville 4, St. Louis 3 Minnesota 4, Edmonton 2 Dallas 4, Detroit 1 Florida 3, Calgary 0 Today’s Games Colorado at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 4 p.m. Montreal at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 8 p.m.

Betting Line

Chargers TEXANS PATRIOTS Saints EAGLES GIANTS BEARS PACKERS STEELERS Jets 49ERS VIKINGS Colts

BASKETBALL NBA

SOCCER MLS

PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. W L Oregon 3 0 Oregon State 2 0 Stanford 2 1 Arizona 1 1 California 1 1 Washington 1 1 USC 1 2 UCLA 1 2 Arizona State 1 2 Washington State 0 3 Saturday’s Games California at USC, 12:30 p.m. Arizona at Washington State, 4:30 p.m. Oregon State at Washington, 7:15 p.m.

Favorite

Baylor 1 PK COLORADO COLORADO ST 3 3 Unlv NOTRE DAME 22 24 W. Michigan N. ILLINOIS 14.5 14.5 Buffalo N. Carolina 6.5 6.5 VIRGINIA NAVY 2 1.5 Smu USC 2.5 2.5 California NEBRASKA 8.5 9.5 Texas FLORIDA ST 21.5 22 Boston College Iowa 4 3.5 MICHIGAN WASHINGTON 2.5 (O) 1.5 Oregon St VIRGINIA TECH 22.5 22.5 Wake Forest Idaho 2 (L) 1.5 LA TECH TCU 29.5 29 Byu UAB 2 2.5 Utep Arizona 24 23.5 WASHINGTON ST Utah 19.5 20 WYOMING TOLEDO 2 2.5 Kent St TEXAS TECH 3.5 3 Oklahoma St TEXAS A&M 3 3 Missouri Southern Miss 15 14.5 MEMPHIS Houston 9.5 9.5 RICE TULSA 18.5 18.5 Tulane Ohio St 6 4 WISCONSIN AUBURN 3 4 Arkansas Boise St 39.5 40 SAN JOSE ST Air Force 3.5 1 SAN DIEGO ST FRESNO ST 30 31 New Mexico St Nevada 7.5 7 HAWAII INDIANA 14 11.5 Arkansas St GEORGIA TECH 19 19 Mid Tenn St W. KENTUCKY PK 2 UL-Monroe TROY 17.5 19 UL-Lafayette Florida Int’l 4 5.5 NORTH TEXAS e-East Rutherford, N.J. L-Louisiana Tech opened as favorite. O-Oregon State opened as favorite

LOUISVILLE DUKE Pittsburgh Army Miami-Ohio Maryland Illinois Minnesota E. CAROLINA Vanderbilt KENTUCKY Mississippi St Mississippi Iowa St Bowling Green E. Michigan Akron

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with C Jarrod Saltalamacchia on a one-year contract. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Sent C Brian Esposito, INF Anderson Hernandez and INF Wladimir Sutil outright to Oklahoma City (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Detroit WR Nate Burleson $15,000 for two rule violations, for kicking the football into the stands and displaying an unauthorized shirt with a personal message written on it in an Oct. 10 game against St. Louis. DALLAS COWBOYS—Signed OT Jermey Parnell from the New Orleans practice squad. DETROIT LIONS—Signed LB Vinny Ciurciu. Waivedinjured LB Spencer Havner. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended Toronto Joey Dorsey one game for swinging his arm at the head of the Chicago Brian Scalabrine in an Oct. 12 game. DENVER NUGGETS—Named Pete D’Alessandro advisor to the executive vice president of basketball operations. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Reassigned D Brett Festerling to Syracuse (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Recalled D Matt Corrente, C Tim Sestito and C Jacob Josefson from Albany (AHL). Placed F Brian Rolston on long-term injured reserve. COLLEGE NORTH CAROLINA—Announced RB Ryan Houston has been cleared to play this weekend at Virginia.

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 717 132 378 126 The Dalles 733 121 1,492 490 John Day 885 180 2,741 1,169 McNary 562 119 1,047 301 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 803,620 91,510 412,003 154,562 The Dalles 538,444 74,421 323,304 118,835 John Day 459,738 68,498 266,202 96,600 McNary 411,519 43,745 244,370 162,208


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 D3

S  B

Football • Jaguars players vote to decertify union if needed: Jacksonville Jaguars players have voted to give the NFL Players Association their backing to decertify the union in the event of a labor lockout next year. The Jaguars are the 15th group of players to vote to decertify if necessary. Each of the 32 teams is voting whether to give the union the right to decertify if teams lock out players next year. It’s a procedural matter. Decertification would give the union a chance to sue under antitrust laws if there is a lockout. Without decertification, the union would have to wait six months to file a suit after the CBA expired. • No. 25 West Virginia wins: Geno Smith threw two touchdown passes and No. 25 West Virginia held South Florida to a season-low for yards in a 20-6 home victory over the Bulls on Thursday night. The Mountaineers (5-1, 1-0 Big East) made the most out of their limited scoring opportunities in a game where neither offense thrived. The nation’s seventh-best defense held South Florida (3-3, 0-2) without an offensive touchdown for the second straight game. Quarterback B.J. Daniels found no room to roam and the Bulls were outgained 298-202. • Mexican TV reporter wants out of locker rooms: A Mexican television reporter who said she felt uncomfortable in the New York Jets locker room last month is returning to work and plans to conduct her interviews anywhere but there. Ines Sainz, of TV Azteca, will be back on the job next week and said she suggested to the NFL that, from now on, she talk to players on the field or on the sideline. “I’m not going into the locker rooms anymore,” she said Thursday at a news conference near Universal Studios. “It’s not a good place right now for me. I don’t want to be in there.” A few Jets players made catcalls as Sainz waited with two male co-workers to interview quarterback Mark Sanchez, who is of Mexican descent. An assistant coach also seemed to deliberately throw footballs to players near where Sainz was standing on the sideline during practice.

Baseball • Yanks refuse permission on Steinbrenner letters: The Yankees are blocking a 77-year-old woman from publishing letters written to her from a college-age George Steinbrenner more than a half-century ago. Mary Jane Elster wanted to use the letters in a book about her friendship with Steinbrenner. The New York Yankees owner died in July, and The New York Times published one letter a few days later. Michael Shriner, her son, told the paper that Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost “could not have been more of a bully” in refusing permission.

Basketball • LeBron named to Fortune’s ‘40 Under 40’ list: LeBron James is the only athlete named on Fortune’s list of this year’s “40 Under 40” stars in the business world. The Miami Heat forward and two-time reigning NBA MVP was ranked No. 20 on the list, which took into account both his earning power on and off the floor (an estimated $42.4 million this year) and the attention he generated during the free agency process this summer. James was not on the inaugural version of the list last year. James is also the youngest person on the list; at 25, he’s one year younger than Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who held the No. 2 spot in the rankings. Tiger Woods, who ranked No. 6 a year ago, fell out of this year’s rankings entirely.

M L B P L AYO F F S

NBA

Yankees won’t face Lee first, Blazers’ set to take on Wilson in ALCS Przybilla is

progressing in return from injury

New York dodges the ace of Texas’ pitching staff until Game 3, but it will have to face his understudy in Game 1

By Anne M. Peterson

By Stephen Hawkins

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Center Joel Przybilla is making surprising progress in his return from injury but his recovery couldn’t come fast enough for the Trail Blazers, who have been cursed at his position. The latest to fall was Jeff Pendergraph, who was hurt last week in a preseason game and will have knee surgery. The 6foot-9 second-year forward was backing up Marcus Camby at center while Przybilla and Greg Oden recover from their knee injuries. But even as the Blazers were lament- Joel Przybilla ing Pender- is recovering graph’s mis- from a knee fortune, Przy- injury billa was making strides in practice. Coach Nate McMillan said this week he was encouraged and suggested Przybilla could be back in early November. “I think the good thing is, each day, he seems to be getting better,” McMillan said. “We haven’t seen any setbacks in the sense of Joel practicing and the next day he’s too sore to do anything. It’s a good sign.” Although some would argue the Blazers’ woes at center began with the injuries that hit both Sam Bowie and Bill Walton, the team was beset everywhere last season. Oden was arguably having the best season of his injuryprone career when he broke his right kneecap during a game last December against the Houston Rockets. He was averaging 11.7 points, 8.8 rebounds and 2.4 blocks as a starter, but more than that, he was playing with an authority that had previously eluded him. The Blazers selected the 7footer with the top pick in the 2007 draft, choosing him over Kevin Durant. But injuries — including knee surgery that postponed his rookie season for a year — brought endless comparisons to Bowie, the frequently injured big man who the Blazers infamously selected ahead of Michael Jordan in the 1984 draft. It was expected that Oden would be ready for the season opener, but he said at the start of fall practice that he wasn’t that close. He wouldn’t put a target date on his return, and neither would McMillan. Przybilla is by far closer to coming back. The 7-foot-1 veteran ruptured his right patella tendon and required surgery twice last season — once after the initial injury in late December, then again in March when he re-injured the knee after a fall in his shower. But Przybilla dedicated himself in the offseason to getting back on the court, and appears way ahead of schedule — considering there were some who predicted he might not return this season until Christmas at the earliest. When fall practice opened, Przybilla would not rule out a return by opening night. He had his first contact practice this past Sunday. As a precaution and for practice purposes the Blazers this week signed 7-foot center Steven Hill, who has played for parts of the last two seasons in the NBA’s development league. The Trail Blazers went 50-32 last season but were ousted in the first round of the playoffs for the second straight year. In all, Portland players missed a combined 311 regular-season games because of injury, second only to the Golden State Warriors. Only two players, Andre Miller and forward Martell Webster, were healthy for all 82 games. The Blazers open this season on Oct. 26 when they host the Phoenix Suns at the Rose Garden.

ARLINGTON, Texas — The New York Yankees avoid Cliff Lee until Game 3 of the AL championship series. In the opener, they instead face another Texas Rangers left-hander who has been greatly influenced by the postseason ace in their short time together. “Before he was here, I was actually a right-handed second baseman,” C.J. Wilson joked Thursday. Because Lee had to pitch a deciding Game 5 in the division series against Tampa Bay, Wilson starts Game 1 against New York tonight at Rangers Ballpark. Wilson already was making an impressive transition from reliever in his long-desired chance to be a Rangers starter again before Texas acquired Lee on July 9. But Wilson immediately began watching his new teammate and asking questions. “The thing with Cliff is that he keeps his process the same no matter what is going on around him,” Wilson said. “As I’ve gotten more comfortable in my role as a starting pitcher, I’ve had to thicken those walls in my bubble to keep everything else out and stay in my little zone and stay with what is making me successful, and that’s the thing he and I talk about all the time.” Wilson won 15 games in the regular season, then followed Lee’s spectacular Game 1 start in the first round with a gem of his own, allowing two hits in 6 1 ⁄3 scoreless innings. But after the Rangers won those two games at Tampa Bay, they lost both at home and had to go back to Florida for the deciding game with Lee back on the mound Tuesday night. Now that the Rangers have finally won a postseason series for the first time, they get to play New York, which has won 27 World Series titles and 40 pennants. The Yankees, who haven’t played since wrapping up a three-game sweep over Minnesota on Saturday night, have a nine-game postseason winning streak against Texas. New York knocked the Rangers out of the playoffs in their only three previous appearances between 1996 and ’99. This is the first time the Rangers open a postseason series at home. They still have never won a playoff game at Rangers Ballpark, going 0-6 including the two losses last weekend to the Rays. Lee won both of his World Series starts for Philadelphia last year, including a six-hitter at Yankee Stadium when he struck out 10 and gave up only an unearned run. The Yankees won the other four games. New York avoids facing Lee twice

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Texas Rangers starting pitcher C.J. Wilson jokes with Colby Lewis during practice for the American League championship series Thursday in Arlington, Texas. Wilson is scheduled to start Game 1 against the New York Yankees tonight.

N ext up: ALCS • American League Championship Series, Game 1; New York Yankees at Texas Rangers • W h en:Today, 5 p.m. • TV: TBS

only if this series ends in less than seven games. Lee is 6-1 his last eight starts against them, postseason included, going 4-0 with a 1.16 ERA and two complete games in his past four starts in New York. For Game 1 of this series, Lee’s biggest impact will be his influence on Wilson. “I’m not a guy that pushes a bunch of information on anybody, but he’s definitely a guy that knows how to pitch,” Lee said. “We’ve shared information, ideas on how to pitch guys, what to do with certain things. Definitely, it’s not very often you see a guy go from the bullpen to the starting rotation and do the things he has. A lot of credit goes to his talents and just his stuff. He knows how to pitch.” Wilson was primarily a starter in the minor leagues and missed all of 2004 recovering from ligament transplant surgery. After being called up by the Rangers for the first time in 2005, he was 0-5 with a 12.05 ERA in six starts. But in 18

appearances out of the bullpen his rookie season, he had a 2.73 ERA and Texas continued to utilize him as a reliever, beginning the 2008 season with him as the closer. The crafty and insightful left-hander always wanted the chance to be a starter again, and the Rangers gave it to him during spring training this season. “What he’s done this year is really impressive,” teammate Michael Young said. Wilson pitched 204 innings and his 15 wins were the most on the staff. He held left-handed batters to a major leaguelow .176 slugging percentage. While Wilson’s record and ERA were virtually identically in 17 starts before and 16 after Lee arrived, his strikeouts increased, his walks decreased and, more importantly, the former reliever didn’t fade down the stretch as the innings piled up. He hadn’t thrown more than 73 2-3 innings in a season since 2002 in the minors when he was a starter. “What Cliff has done for C.J. is make him understand if you have good stuff, throw it in the strike zone and good things will happen more often than not,” manager Ron Washington said. “Recently, he’s starting to throw more pitches over the plate, he’s starting to trust himself more and he’s starting to get quicker outs than he has in the past.”

Tennis

NLCS

• Nadal upset by Melzer in Shanghai: Weary in body and mind, Rafael Nadal knows there are days when his game simply fails to rise to the moment. Nadal, winner of three Grand Slam tournament titles this year, lost to Austria’s Jurgen Melzer 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 Thursday in the third round of the Shanghai Masters. It was the first time this year the top-ranked Spaniard failed to reach the quarterfinals. “This isn’t a surprise for me. I didn’t play well,” Nadal said. “I felt slow on court and I made more mistakes than usual. In general, I am a little bit more tired than usual, physically and mentally. Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray all fared better Thursday in winning thirdround matches. Nadal had not dropped a set to Melzer in three previous meetings and recently beat him in this year’s French Open semifinals en route to the title.

Phillies playing role of favorites for first time

Colleges • Ole Miss finally gets new mascot: After all that, it’s a bear. It has been more than a decade since the University of Mississippi began stripping away its images of the Old South. Confederate battle flags — the “Stars and Bars” — were first to go. Next was mascot “Colonel Reb,” the goateed Southern planter who cheered on the Rebels from the sidelines since 1979. After seven years and plenty of bickering, his successor was named Thursday: “Rebel Black Bear” won 62 percent of the vote in a final poll and will become the new face of the school’s athletic programs. Picking a replacement became a matter of statewide import and the subject of online pranks, like the suggestion of a “rebel” from the Star Wars movies, Admiral Ackbar. In the end, the smiling black bear inspired in part by longtime Oxford resident William Faulkner won out, defeating two other nominees: the “Rebel Land Shark,” based on the “fins up” hand motion started by late Rebel football player Tony Fein; and the “Hotty Toddy,” a gray human-like character that aimed to personify a school cheer. — From wire reports

By Rob Maaddi The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — The Philadelphia Phillies find themselves in a new role this postseason. The two-time defending NL champions are no strangers to big games, having advanced this far in three straight years. The only difference between now and the last two trips to the league championship series is the Phillies are the favorites to win it all this time, thanks in large part to the three proven aces in their pitching rotation. It’s World Series or bust in Philadelphia. Nothing less is acceptable in a city that’s become spoiled by its baseball team’s success. Who would’ve thought the losingest franchise in pro sports would reach the point where it’s the one other teams hope to emulate? The Phillies are trying to become the first NL club in 66 years to win three consecutive pennants, and they’re going for their second World Series title in three years. Oddsmakers have made them an overwhelming favorite to beat the San Francisco Giants in the NLCS, and also give them an edge over the New York Yankees or Texas Rangers in the World Series. “It’s a good challenge for you. Expectations should bring out the best in someone,” manager Charlie Manuel said on a rainy Thursday. “At the same time, I like players to have expectations of themselves. That’s even better. I like everything about our players and we think we can play and we think we can play in big, tough games. Last year when we got beat in the World Series, I said I want to go back and play the New York Yankees. That’s what I was talking

Matt Rourke / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins, left, chats with manager Charlie Manuel during practice in Philadelphia on Tuesday.

Next up: NLCS • National League Championship Series, Game 1; San Francisco Giants at Philadelphia Phillies • When: Saturday, 4:57 p.m. • TV: Fox

about.” For some, higher expectations increase pressure. But the Phillies are a loose, close-knit group that has plenty of experience playing important games in October. They expected to reach this point, even when they trailed Atlanta by seven games in the NL East in late July. “When you get to talking favorites and what’s expected of you, that goes beyond the realm of what you can control,” left fielder Raul Ibanez said. “We don’t focus as a club on what’s expected of us. We focus on what’s expected of ourselves. We have high expectations of

ourselves as a team, regardless of what’s being said outside the locker room. “It’s a confident team, not an arrogant team. It’s a team that’s going to grind it out and fight. I think the only expectations that are important are the ones we place on ourselves. It’s a great environment to come work every day. We never feel like we’re out of a game. Nobody ever quits. You never hear a negative word or a snide comment. Never. It’s a bunch of guys that have tenacity, a passion for the game and really a passion for winning.” Game 1 against San Francisco is Saturday night at Citizens Bank Park. It’ll be a marquee matchup featuring Roy Halladay and Tim Lincecum going head-to-head on the mound. The Giants are newcomers to the postseason. They clinched the NL West on the last day of the regular season to snap a six-year playoff drought, and eliminated the injury-depleted Braves in four one-run games to advance past the first round. Now that they’re here, the Giants won’t be satisfied unless they win. They appreciate how good the Phillies are, but refuse to be intimidated. “You don’t really fear any team,” right fielder Cody Ross said. “As a player you always feel like you’re better than teams and you have to have that sort of mentality that you can go in there and beat them two out of three during the season, but knowing in the back of your mind that they’re a really good team. They’ve had their struggles, though. They had a tough time scoring runs throughout the year at one point. It’s going to be a dog fight. Both teams have really good pitching staffs and both teams have guys who can really swing the bat. I think it’s going to be an amazing series.”


D4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF ROUNDUP

Lincicome shoots 61 on LPGA Tour The Associated Press DANVILLE, Calif. — Brittany Lincicome shot an 11-under 61 on Thursday, recording the tour’s best round of the season on the first day of the CVS/ pharmacy LPGA Challenge. Lincicome had 11 birdies at the 6,185-yard Blackhawk Country Club, posting the second-lowest score in relation to par in tour history. The 61 also was a career best for Lincicome, who entered the week 62nd on the money list. Wendy Ward was four shots back after a bogey-free 65. Moira Dunn had a 66 and Jin Young Pak, Michele Redman, Amy Hung and Katherine Hull were at 5 under following the first round. Lincicome used her power off the tees and a soft touch around the greens to avoid trouble all afternoon, finishing with just 24 putts. Her lone mistake came on the par-5 No. 5, when she pushed her tee shot right into the rough and had to scramble to save par. Lincicome set the course record and came within two shots of matching Annika Sorenstam’s LPGA Tour-record 13-under 59 at the Standard Register PING in 2001. “The only time I looked at the scorecard was when we made the turn,” said Lincicome, who started her round on the back nine. “I was making everything. It was pretty crazy, even more myself. I was making 30-footers, 5-footers. Just one of those days where everything was going my way and I couldn’t do anything wrong.” It’s been an up-and-down season for Lincicome, a threetime winner on tour. In her first four tournaments of the year, Lincicome placed outside the top 20 three times and missed the cut in the other. After finishing second at the Bell Micro Classic two months later, she tied for 14th at the LPGA Championship and tied for 25th at the U.S. Open. She seems to be rounding into form once again. After a runner-up finish at last week’s Navistar Classic in Alabama by one shot to Katherine Hull, Lincicome began Thursday with five birdies over her first nine holes. Then the 25-year-old, who shot a stellar 65 in the final round of the Navistar, really warmed up. After her par on No. 5, Lincicome birdied her

final four holes, including on the par-5, 505-yard No. 9. Her approach shot sailed past the green and onto a backside hill of rough but she chipped to within 12 feet and made her birdie putt to cap her big day. Ward had five birdies over her first nine holes, then added two more on the back to stay close. She made a 40-foot putt on the par-4 No. 12, offsetting two short missed putts on Nos. 6 and 9. “The pace of the greens is really good,” said Ward, who recently changed putters. “I’ve just been fine-tuning my stroke, and seeing putts go in the hole always leads to confidence.” Cristie Kerr shot a 1-over 73. Kerr likely needs to place in the top five to overtake Ai Miyazato for the No. 1 ranking. Also on Thursday: Mediate leads Frys.com Open SAN MARTIN, Calif. — Rocco Mediate had a hole-in-one on the par-3 third hole and shot a bogey-free 7-under 64 to top the leaderboard in the first round of the Frys.com Open. Paul Goydos, Bo Van Felt and Ryuji Imada opened with 65s, and John Mallinger, Michael Letzig, Will MacKenzie and Shaun Micheel had 66s. U.S. Ryder Cup player Rickie Fowler shot a 69. Swedes in front in Portugal VILAMOURA, Portugal — Robert Karlsson and Johan Edfors of Sweden and Maarten Lafeber of Netherlands led the Portugal Masters after shooting 64s in the first round. Karlsson and Edfors had bogey-free rounds, while Maarten had six birdies over his last nine holes to help atone for an earlier double bogey. Alexander Noren of Sweden was one shot back in fourth, tied with Mikko Ilonen. The Finn was the only afternoon starter among the top five. European Ryder Cup team member Edoardo Molinari, another late starter, shot a 4under 68. Harrington fires 64 in Malaysia JOHOR BAHRU, Malaysia — Padraig Harrington of Ireland had two eagles on the last three holes to shoot an 8-under 64 and take the first-round lead at the Iskandar Johor Open. Harrington opened his round with three straight birdies. He finished with eagles on the 16th and 18th to tie Marcus Both of Australia and Kiradech Aphibarnrat of Thailand at the Asian Tour event.

NHL ROUNDUP

Top line leads Stars past Red Wings, Modano, 4-1 The Associated Press DALLAS — Mike Modano was able to kept his emotions in check. Beating his former team was a tougher assignment. The top line of Brad Richards, Loui Eriksson and James Neal had goals, Kari Lehtonen made 25 saves and Dallas beat the Detroit Red Wings 4-1 on Thursday night in Stars career scoring leader Modano’s first game in Texas as a visiting player. “There was just a world of emotions and memories,” said Modano, who had two of his shots blocked and another that missed the net. “A lot of special things have gone on here. I was involved in the game from the ground floor, and helping to promote the game of hockey here in Texas. It was fun to play here.” Brenden Morrow added his fourth goal in three games, and Richards and Mike Ribeiro had two assists each for the Stars (3-0) in their home opener. But Modano’s much-anticipated return was as big a story for Stars fans as the performance by Dallas’ No. 1 line. In 20 seasons as the face of the Stars/North Stars franchise, Modano had 557 goals and 1,359 points, most by a U.S.-born player in NHL history. The 40-year-old Modano was a free agent over the summer and, when the Stars didn’t offer him a contract, he signed a oneyear deal Aug. 5 with the Red Wings, his hometown team. Also on Thursday:

Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 PHILADELPHIA — Steven Stamkos, Dominic Moore and Paval Kubina scored goals to help Tampa Bay beat Philadelphia in an emotional return for Simon Gagne. Gagne, a playoff hero last season in the Flyers’ run to the Stanley Cup finals, spent the first 10 seasons of his career with Philadelphia before being dealt to Tampa Bay during the summer to clear salary cap space. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Steve Sullivan scored two goals and Nashville beat St. Louis to improve to 3-0 for the second time in franchise history. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Mikko Koivu scored two of Minnesota’s four power-play goals and the Wild beat Edmonton at home for the 14th straight time. Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 CALGARY, Alberta — Radek Dvorak scored twice in a 3:05 span of the first period and fellow Czech star Tomas Vokoun made 27 saves for his 39th career shutout in Florida’s victory over Calgary. Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 OTTAWA — Mike Fisher scored his second goal of the game on a power play 14:03 into the third and Ottawa recovered for its first victory in four games this season.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Cam Riemhofer, middle, gets a step on Bend defender Nick Petrich, left, during the second half of Thursday’s match.

Cougs Continued from D1 “When we started out kind of bad this season, we knew it wasn’t that big of a deal. It’s all about putting it together at the right time.” Since tying Redmond 3-3 on Sept. 22, the Cougars have been on a roll, outscoring their opponents 23-1 while going 4-0. “We’re finally starting to get healthy and fit,” said first-year Mountain View coach Chris Rogers. The Cougars have also employed a more aggressive offense the last two games — Mountain View defeated Summit 5-1 on Tuesday — a change that seems to be a natural fit for the Riemhofer-

led squad. “(The switch) gives more freedom to our midfielders on offense, where they don’t have any defensive responsibilities,” Rogers said about his new offense, which has as many as six midfielders pressing the goal. “It really gets guys going forward and allows them to be creative.” Mountain View did not have any problems scoring against the Lava Bears (0-3 IMC, 2-7 overall), going ahead 1-0 in the third minute when Riemhofer converted a one-on-one opportunity created by a pass from Brandon Hargous. Logan Riemhofer struck next, beating Bend’s keeper in the eighth minute to give the Cougars a 2-0 lead. Mountain View midfielder Miguel Molina and Cam

Riemhofer added goals in the 17th and 19th minutes, and the rout was on. “It was a pretty solid thrashing,” said Bend High coach Nils Eriksson. “(Cam) Riemhofer is as good as any of the best players to come out of this league, if not better.” Snook scored both his goals within the first five minutes of the second half, and Cam Riemhofer and Austin Kihs piled on goals seven and eight for Mountain View in the 48th and 72nd minutes. While Bend High boasted few highlights Thursday, freshman goalkeeper Tony Watters recorded several memorable saves while trying to stop a barrage of Cougar shots on goal. In addition to giving up eight goals, the Bears

again struggled on offense, getting shut out for the fourth consecutive game. Bend has a chance to break its scoring drought on Tuesday, when the Lava Bears host IMC rival Summit. Mountain View hosts Crook County on Tuesday in an Intermountain Hybrid contest before the Cougars end the regular season with an IMC match at Summit next Thursday. “Mountain View played a lot better than the first time we play them,” Eriksson said, referring to the Cougars’ 2-0 victory over Bend on Sept. 28. “They’re close to their potential.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

Sisters girls soccer improves to 11-0 Bulletin staff report LA PINE — Jodie Reoch is not the only reason Sisters High is unbeaten and untied after eleven girls soccer matches this season, but she certainly has provided the majority of her team’s offense this week. After scoring five times in a win over Cottage Grove on Tuesday, Reoch did one better in a Sky-Em League victory at La Pine, posting six goals in an 8-0 shutout over the Hawks on Thursday. Four of Reoch’s goals came in the second half and three of those were unassisted. It was the eighth clean sheet of the year for the Outlaw defense. Lauren Chauncey and Harley Bowler scored the two other goals Sisters for (8-0 Sky-Em, 11-0 overall), which can clinch the league title outright with a win next Thursday at Sweet Home. The Hawks (0-5-2 Sky-Em, 0-7-2) play at Cottage Grove on Tuesday night. In other prep events Thursday: GIRLS SOCCER Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 In the 10th minute of the Class 5A Intermountain Conference matchup at Bend’s 15th Street Field, Maddy Booster gave Mountain View an early advantage after carrying the ball half the field, then beating Bend’s goalkeeper in a oneon-one situation. Torie Morris added another first-half goal for the Cougars (2-1 IMC, 9-1 overall), scoring off of McKayla Madison’s corner kick less than 10 minutes later. Mountain View goalkeeper Amy Clason-Messina preserved the shutout with a diving save to the right post, denying Delaney Crook’s penalty shot. Both teams return to action Tuesday with Bend (1-2 IMC, 4-3-2 overall) travelling across town to meet Summit while the Cougars are on the road at Crook County. La Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MADRAS — Down 1-0 at halftime, Madras was still in the Tri-Valley Conference game, but the Falcons put the match away in the second half with three unanswered goals. White Buffaloes goalie Rosie Suppah provided a bright spot for the struggling Madras squad, saving a penalty kick that was placed near the upper-left corner of the goal. Kristin Jasa accounted for two of Madras’ three shots on goal, but the White Buffaloes (0-6 Tri-Valley League, 0-8-1 overall) were unable to find the back of the net. Madras is at Gladstone on Tuesday.

PREP ROUNDUP Roosevelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PORTLAND — The Cowgirls finished play in the new Class 4A Special District 1 without a win, falling to Roosevelt in a physical match played at Delta Park. The Roughriders scored twice in each half to hand Crook County its third loss in district play. The two teams tied 3-3 in Prineville last month. Crook County (0-3-1 Special District 1, 1-9-1 overall) will host Mountain View next Tuesday. BOYS SOCCER Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 La Salle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MILWAUKIE — The White Buffaloes rallied back from an early 1-0 deficit to improve to 51 in Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference play and 8-1 overall. Derrick Pacheco posted the equalizer in the 42nd minute, but the Falcons went up 2-1 in the 43rd. Eduardo Lopez tied the game 2-2 off a Carlos Garcia assist in the 54th minute before Garcia recorded the game-winning score in the 58th off a Lopez assist. Midfielder Edward Zacarias also had a strong game, according to Madras coach Clark Jones. The White Buffaloes continue league play on Tuesday with a home match against Gladstone. Roosevelt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PORTLAND — The winless Cowboys have just two chances left to post a victory this season after losing in unlucky fashion against Roosevelt at Delta Park in a Class 4A Special District 1 match. With the match scoreless and less than 15 minutes to play, a low shot on an uneven grass surface took a high hop over Crook County goalkeeper Brad Slater and found the back of the net. “I was on one knee ready to scoop it up and it hit a little pothole and bounced right over me,” recalled a frustrated Slater. “It was the worst field we’ve played on all season.” The Cowboys finished Special District play against the Roughriders and Marshall 0-2-2. Crook County (0-8-2 overall) travels to Mountain View on Tuesday. VOLLEYBALL Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-25-25 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24-15-17 The visiting Lava Bears were competitive against last year’s Intermountain Conference cochampions, but fell in consecutive games after making, “one too many errors,” according to Bend High coach Kristen Cooper. Lava Bear sophomore middle blocker

Molly Maloney registered six kills and two blocks to highlight the play of Bend (0-3 league) in the IMC match. Senior Becca Williams paced the Bears’ defense with five digs. For the Storm (3-0 IMC), Nicole Ruttke went 15 for 15 from the service line with three aces, while Andie Kenneally was 12 of 13 with two aces. Gabby Crowell led Summit with 12 kills and Laney Hayes added eight kills and three blocks. Brenna Crecraft directed the Storm offense with 32 assists. Both teams are at the Clearwater Classic in Bend on Saturday. Madras . . . . . . . . . .25-25-20-13-15 La Salle. . . . . . . . . . 16-23-25-25-9 MILWAUKIE — It was a good week for the White Buffaloes, who won a pair of closely contested Tri-Valley Conference matches on the road. After beating North Marion in four games on Tuesday, Madras followed that victory by going the distance at La Salle and winning in five. Hannah Mikkelson posted 19 kills and 25 digs, Maycee Abendschein went 24 of 25 from the ser-

October is Pumpkin Pickin’ Time!

vice line with four aces and setter Rachel Simmons recorded 36 assists. Madras improved to 4-2 in the Tri-Valley with the win and pulled even with the Falcons for second place in the conference standings. The White Buffaloes host Gladstone on Tuesday and then travel to undefeated Estacada next Thursday. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Western Mennonite . . . . . .9-18-15 CULVER — The Bulldogs clinched third place in the TriRiver League with a three-game sweep at home. Kelsi Stafford led Culver’s winning effort with nine kills and four aces. Kymber Wofford recorded a team-high 10 digs in what was Culver’s third consecutive league win. The Bulldogs return to conference play Tuesday at Santiam.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 D5

N F L C O M M E N TA RY

A S   B 

Teams need to have QB depth to succeed By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

M

ax Who? Caleb What? Jimmy Clausen and Colt McCoy. Todd Collins and Charlie Batch. Ryan Fitzpatrick and Bruce Gradkowski. NFL teams have learned that going deep now refers to more than Andre Johnson running fly patterns. The days of carrying two quarterbacks on a roster are just about gone. Sure, there are still the Peyton Mannings and Drew Brees and Philip Rivers who are in for just about every play — when the games mean something, at least. But given the rate of injury, carrying only two quarterbacks is a luxury that has lost its luster. And sensibility. Hey, even Brett Favre is talking about possibly missing a start because of elbow tendinitis, and the last time that happened was, like, never. Although the number of starters for the 32 teams a month into the season has barely risen — from 40 in 2009 to 41 — that will change when Ben Roethlisberger comes off his four-game suspension and takes snaps for Pittsburgh on Sunday against Cleveland. Plus, the Browns likely will start McCoy, the rookie from Texas who is third on the depth chart behind Jake Delhomme and Seneca Wallace, but first on the health chart. If Jay Cutler has a recurrence of concussion symptoms, his replacement might not be journeyman Collins, who threw four interceptions in a win at Carolina as Cutler recovered, but Caleb Hanie. Yep, Hanie, now in his third season from Colorado State who has thrown all of 14 passes in his NFL career. Through five weeks, 11 teams have put backup quarterbacks on the field for significant action. Two of those, Jacksonville and Tennessee, were temporary, with David Garrard and Vince Young reclaiming their starting roles and apparently prospering from a brief stint on the sideline. Four teams — Arizona, Oakland, Carolina and Buffalo — went to second-stringers after the No. 1 QB flopped. Indeed, the Bills not only benched Trent Edwards for Fitzpatrick, they then cut Edwards and he wound up as Garrard’s caddie in Jacksonville. Oakland made such a big deal about acquiring Jason Campbell on draft day from Washington, yet he got yanked after two starts for Gradkowski. Then Gradkowski damaged his right shoulder and Campbell was back behind center. “It’s been a long year already for me,” Campbell said. “It started back from the time I was traded. Starting the season off, I was putting too much pressure

CONCORD, N.C. — Jeff Gordon’s long winless streak is well documented. His season-long drought without a pole drew less attention. Gordon never thought after a poor practice session Thursday that later that night he’d snap out of his qualifying funk. But after recovering with a speedy lap of 191.544 mph at Charlotte Motor Speedway put him up front for Saturday’s race, Gordon is setting his sights high. How about his first victory since early last season to get into real contention for a fifth points championship? “If we can get that confidence back, that’s what’s going to help us win this championship,” Gordon said “A pole is definitely that little step. A win would be a huge step for us.” Gordon, in fourth place in the points standings, barely held off Carl Edwards, who will start second after a lap of 191.455 mph. AJ Allmendinger qualified third, followed by Mark Martin, Paul Menard and Kyle Busch. Jimmie Johnson, the points leader who’s seeking a fifth

Local BMX riders shine at Oregon State Finals More than 30 BMX riders from Central Oregon competed last month in Grants Pass in the Oregon State Finals, which included a field of about 200 riders from across the state. Riders who took part in at least three previous state-quali-

CYCLING BMX Oregon State Finals At Grants Pass, Sept. 26 (Central Oregon rider results) Boys 12 cruiser — 3, Zakkary Campbell. Boys 14 cruiser — 1, Taylor Stephens. Boys 17 cruiser — 1, Dustin Robertson. 2, Ryan Armstrong. Men 26 cruiser — 2, Derek Camacho. Men 31 cruiser — 1, Jonathan Norton. Girls 6 class — 1, Jaidyn Camacho. Girls 9 class — 1, Margie Beeler. Girls 10 class — 1, Olivia

Matt York / The Associated Press

Arizona Cardinals quarterback Max Hall throws during the first quarter of a victory against the New Orleans Saints on Sunday. Hall got the starting job after Matt Leinart was waived and Derek Anderson struggled. on myself to make all the plays because of the high hopes for me this season instead of just relaxing and playing the game and let the game come to you. I tried to force the game. That’s one of the things I learned over the weeks when I was sitting out and doing the self-evaluation on myself and getting to learn the offense a little better.” Max, as in Max Hall, is an undrafted rookie from Brigham Young who actually is the Cardinals’ third try at replacing the retired Kurt Warner. Matt Leinart didn’t make it out of training camp and now is a third-stringer in Houston. Derek Anderson failed, and the fiery Hall now has the job. He’s 1-0 as a starter. Another rookie, Clausen, is in charge of an 0-5 team, which should feel familiar. As a freshman at Notre Dame, his team had the same record. He took over in Charlotte for Matt Moore after the first two defeats. “The biggest thing I took from that is just keep battling, keep grinding, keep going out there and having a smile on your face,” Clausen said. “That’s going to turn over to the rest of the team. And even though you guys aren’t winning, it’s just a matter of time until you get to that point where everything starts clicking.” Perhaps he’s right. It hap-

pened in Philadelphia, where Michael Vick was sensational after Kevin Kolb sustained a concussion in the opener. Kolb was back in two weeks ago when Vick hurt his ribs, and the Eagles are tied atop the NFC East at 3-2 despite being the only division team playing roulette at quarterback. Things also have clicked offensively for the Lions, even though they are 1-4. Veteran Shaun Hill, one of the league’s top backups entering the season — along with Vick, Chad Pennington in Miami and Kerry Collins in Tennessee — ably replaced Matt Stafford, but when Stafford’s recovered from a separated right shoulder, he’ll play. Roethlisberger will play the rest of the way if he stays upright. And if he doesn’t, the Steelers might not mind riding this carousel. They went 3-1 with original third-stringer Dennis Dixon and No. 4 Batch at quarterback. So maybe that’s the secret these days in a league where, despite all kind of rules protecting this precious commodity, so many quarterbacks keep getting hurt. Make sure you have four of them. Then again, if they perform as poorly as Edwards and Anderson and Moore, how much use are they?

Gordon on pole at Charlotte; Johnson starts in 10th position The Associated Press

Bend’s Big Fat Tour mountain biking event is set for today through Sunday in Central Oregon. Registration is full for today’s 34-mile loop in the Ochoco Mountains, but registration remains open for rides on Saturday and Sunday. Riders on Saturday will be treated to new route options on the newly constructed trails in the Wanoga Trail Complex. Participants can choose from 70-, 55- and 42-mile ride options, all of which start at Dutchman Flat Sno-park near Mount Bachelor and finish at Phil’s Trailhead just west of Bend. On Sunday, Bend’s Big Fat Tour wraps up with the classic 22-mile Cache Mountain ride

near Sisters. Cost for Saturday and Sunday rides is $109. Registration for the Big Fat Tour is available at www. bendsbigfattour.com. Local riders can also register today from noon to 7 p.m. at Hutch’s Bicycles, 725 N.W. Columbia Ave., Bend. The Big Fat Tour is a benefit for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon, and Bend’s Community BikeShed.

fier races were eligible for a state award in their age group. Their placings in the state finals race were combined with their previous placings. Central Oregon riders — who race regularly at Smith Rock BMX in Redmond and High Desert BMX in Bend — captured 12 state championships: Taylor Stephens (boys 14 cruiser and class), Dustin Robertson (boys 17 cruiser and class), Jonathan Norton (men 31 cruiser), Jaidyn Camacho (girls 6 class), Margie Beeler (girls 9 class), Olivia Armstrong (girls 10 class), Denise Ortiz-Campbell (women 28 class), Margie Beeler (girls 10 cruiser), Kelli Norton (women 36-40 cruiser), and Sunny Harmeson (women 40-44 cruiser). For complete Central Oregon results, see Adventure Sports Scoreboard. —From staff reports

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD

AUTO RACING: NASCAR SPRINT CUP

By Mike Cranston

Big Fat Tour set to start, continues through Sunday

straight Sprint Cup title, will start 10th in the fifth of 10 races in the Chase for the championship. Johnson’s closest competition will be farther back. Denny Hamlin, who enters the weekend in second place and 36 points behind Johnson, qualified 23rd. Kevin Harvick, 54 points back, will start 24th. Gordon had a miserable afternoon practice session in which he posted the 33rd fastest time. But that was in the sunlight, and when dusk fell and the track cooled, Gordon’s fortunes changed as he went out 23rd out of 49 cars. He still wasn’t impressed until he said his No. 24 Chevrolet “flew” through the final two turns to earn his 69th career pole and his first at Charlotte in 10 years. “A huge shock,” said Gordon, who trails Johnson by 85 points. “We have just not qualified good this year. ... I felt like there was a time like we were the pole king, like Ryan Newman, when it comes to Charlotte. “Today, the way it was going, I didn’t think we had a shot at this pole.” He was able to beat Newman, who won the pole here for the

spring race but qualified 11th Thursday. Now can Gordon win for the first time since Texas in 2009? “The thing I’m most proud about this team is while we haven’t won in quite a while, we haven’t been fighting with one another,” Gordon said. “We’re not second-guessing one another.” Edwards, in seventh place and 162 points back, took advantage of extra time spent on preparing his car for qualifying. Reed Sorenson qualified seventh, followed by Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Elliott Sadler.

Armstrong. Girls 12 class — 3, Bailey Wild. Girls 13 class — 2, Jaydra Kinsey. Girls 16 class — 2, Cheyanne Campbell. Women 28 class — 1, Denise Ortiz-Campbell. Girls 10 class — 1, Margie Beeler. Women 36-40 cruiser — 1, Kelli Norton. Women 40-45 cruiser — 1, Sunny Harmeson. 2, Denise Ortiz-Campbell. Boys 5 and under class — 2, Elliot Henson. Boys 6 class — 7, Isaiah Phillips. Boys 7 class — 3, Tyler Helie. Boys 8 class — 5, Jacob Cook. Boys 9 class — 6, Jason Taylor. Boys 10 class — 6, Conner Buck. 9, Jaxson Norton. Boys 12 class — 4, River Stredwick. 7, Christian Phillips. 8, Zakkary Campbell. Boys 13 class — 2, Colton Slavey. 3, Treavor Matthews. 4, Andrew Herrera. 5, Sage Green. 7, Tucker Monroe. Boys 14 class — 1, Taylor Stephens. Boys 17 class — 1, Dustin Robertson. 3, B.J. Wild. 4, Randy Chisholm. 8, Tim Buck. Men 36 class — 3, Jim Campbell.

Pac-10 Continued from D1 And the rest of the conference, except perhaps one team, has become a tightly packed beat anyone, anytime bunch. Once so stable for so long, the Pac-10 is the midst of what may be a massive power shift. “The conference is definitely deeper now than it was,” USC coach Lane Kiffin said. “The other schools are doing a great job and it’s our job to make it like it was before.” Before was USC on top, everyone else fighting for recognition away from the West Coast. The Trojans were the Pac-10’s dominant team for the better part of a decade, a run filled with national championships, Heisman Trophy winners and conference titles. Now, the Trojans are falling back to the pack as the Ducks appear to be separating themselves. Oregon coach Chip Kelly has set the foundation of a program seemingly built for the long run, a 10-win season and a trip to the Rose Bowl followed by this year’s climb to No. 2 in the polls. The Ducks have overflowing talent and speed on both sides of the ball, plenty of depth and a catand-canary ability to allow even good teams to think they have a chance just before delivering a crushing blow. The recent run has turned Oregon, not USC, into the team with the national-title aspirations, the one everyone — even outside the conference — is talking about. Kelly closed practice this week with all the hubbub flying around, though he insisted it was only because it was what his team “needed.” “We don’t run this football program based on outside influences,” Kelly said. “People saying you’re this or that, whether you’re good or bad. I don’t think you can do that. We don’t as a coaching staff talk about it. We as a group don’t talk about it. Our players, when I listen to them talk, they don’t talk about it either.” At USC, they’re talking about how tough a season it’s been. It actually started in the offseason, when the school was hit with sanctions after Bush was ruled to have received improper benefits. The two-year bowl ban and loss of scholarships were tough, exacerbated by a ruling that allowed upperclassmen to transfer without the usual restrictions. The exodus has left the Trojans with virtually no depth — 52 scholarship players boarded the plane for Stanford last week — and looking across the line at former or once-potential teammates seemingly every week. Injury problems like they have now

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Oregon fans celebrate with Ducks quarterback Darron Thomas after Oregon defeated Stanford 52-31 earlier this month in Eugene. Oregon has become the class of the Pac-10 over the last two seasons, while USC has fallen on hard times. or poor play from certain players and the Trojans don’t have many options. “The reality of it is, it’s hard to bench someone when there’s no one to put in,” Kiffin said. “We’ve just got to make the best of it and improve.” The power shift isn’t just at the top. The other eight teams are jockeying for position, all but Washington State — despite its clear improvement — on relatively equal talent footing. Stanford crushed UCLA, lost to Oregon, edged USC. The Bruins followed the loss to the Cardinal with a decisive win over Texas, backed up with last week’s frustrating setback against California. Oregon State rallied from two top-10 losses with wins against Arizona State and Arizona. The Wildcats bumped off No. 9 Iowa, lost to Oregon.

Washington has wins over USC and Arizona State, an embarrassment against Nebraska at home ... you get the idea. “There’s just no gimmes out there and so much parity,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. “To look at all the scores and seen how this thing has all shaken out, who’s played who and you’re looking at a team gets back-to-back weeks and wins a big ballgame the next week, it’s just exciting and frightening at the same time.” Better get used to it; the Pac-10 is in the midst of a seismic shift, and it may be a little while before the pieces settle.

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A D V EN T

D6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

U RE

SP O R T S

Climbing Continued from D1 It’s these thoughts and fears that cause even usually bold outdoor enthusiasts to shy away from rock climbing. “The gear is so overbuilt that it’s trustworthy for sure, but in your mind you think about all these things that could happen,” says Potter, who has been guiding for 11 years. “It’s not realistic, but those are the thoughts that go through people’s minds. You have to separate what’s really dangerous from perceived danger. Your mind will tell you, ‘I’m 200 feet off the ground, and if I fall, I’m going to die.’ But your logical side needs to be able to say, ‘Hey, I’m not going to fall because the gear is totally solid.’” Finally, I put my faith in Potter and the gear and leaned back into my harness, pushing off the rock face with my feet as I made my way down. Back on terra firma, I told myself I did not want to experience that same fear ever again. But Potter somehow talked me into another climb, and this time, I was more confident, making the climbing — but especially the rappelling — easier. A kaleidoscope of beige, gray and red, Smith Rock in the fall is intoxicating, even if you are just hiking the trail along the Crooked River. Put yourself up against a rock face, and the intoxication level rises. Rock climbing can keep you coming back for more, offering the rush of overcoming fear and the reward of building trust. Climbers flock to Smith Rock in autumn, when the Central Oregon weather typically is mild but the sun still warms the craggy, vertical rock faces. “It’s probably the best time of year,” Potter says. “The park isn’t super crowded and the weather’s good. Even if it’s cold, you can climb in the sun, and it’s perfect.” Potter, 34, does most of his guiding business during the summer, but he prefers to climb in the fall. As a guide, he works with the fears of beginner climbers and tries not to pressure them, but he often offers a helpful nudge to get them past the mental blocks that come with hanging from a rope hundreds of feet up a cliff. Certified by the American Mountain Guides Association, Potter has achieved numerous ascents of the renowned El Capitan and Half Dome in California’s Yosemite National Park. New climbers should always learn from a guide or an experienced climber, Potter says, as they must be able to put full trust in their mentor or instructor. While Potter prides himself on safety, he says he often sees climbers putting themselves, and others, in danger. “I see people on a daily ba-

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BIKING

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Rock climbers, including Bulletin reporter Mark Morical, right, climb at Smith Rock State Park Tuesday. David Potter, of Smith Rock Climbing guides, pauses on a ledge during a recent climb at Smith Rock State Park. Mark Morical / The Bulletin

sis that are doing dangerous things,” Potter notes. “It’s just some people, when they learned to climb, the person that taught them didn’t really know exactly what they were doing, and they picked up those bad habits. “If you do learn from somebody who knows what they’re doing, it’s really easy to get into (climbing). It’s a really simple sport. The basic fundamentals are really easy to learn.” Potter says inexperienced climbers sometimes will not even recognize when they are in a dangerous situation. One

example of this at Smith Rock is on those less-traveled routes on which the rock at times becomes crumbly. “There’s routes where the rock might not be very good, but not common routes,” Potter explains. “If you just climb along and don’t notice that the rock is crumbly, you might just keep climbing along. An experienced climber would say, ‘OK the rock’s getting bad, either I can climb on or I can back off.’” Safety concerns aside, Smith Rock is a unique place because of the vast variety of climbing

routes. With 1,800 established routes at Smith Rock, beginner climbers can try the sport right alongside some of the best climbers in the world. “It’s probably one of the coolest places as far as that goes,” Potter says. “You can be climbing a super-easy climb that a 5-year-old would climb, and 10 feet away there could be a world-class climber from Italy doing one of the hardest routes in the world. “There’s some really hard projects at Smith that climbers are looking at now that have been bolted for years. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the hardest route in the world be at Smith Rock within the next couple years.” Potter says many routes at Smith Rock foil some of the best climbers because of the technical aspect of the rock, which requires supreme balance. I found this out as I climbed Cinnamon Slab, a 5.4-rated climb (see information box) with enough ledges and big holds to

make it doable for me. But at certain spots along the way I had to pause to determine just where to put my feet and hands. On a couple of moves, I was convinced I would slip right off the rock and fall back against the rope. But, surprisingly, I was able to stick to the rock in those locations and maintain the climb. The ascent included two pitches of 5.4 and took us about 190 feet up to the top of the Dihedrals area of Smith Rock. After finishing the climb and looking back down, it was hard to believe anybody could climb something so steep — but the gear makes it possible. And some become addicted to the rush of verticality that offers a whole new perspective. “It’s just like being on another planet, sometimes, just being on a cliff like that,” Potter says. “It’s just a different plane of reality.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

REBOUND SPORTS PERFORMANCE OUTDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instructed by professional cyclists Brig Brandt and Bart Bowen, these outdoor cycling classes will develop aerobic fitness as well as focus on riding skill and tactics; classes will meet every Wednesday at noon and every Thursday at 5:30 p.m.; info@ reboundspl.com or 541-585-1500. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, TuesdaysSundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23. Riders will be grouped based on age and ability; through Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY MASTERS CYCLOCROSS: Instructed by Marcel Russenberger, local cycling icon and professional Swiss cyclist from 1982-1990; adults with novice to intermediate cycling abilities are welcome and participants can use a ’cross bike or a mountain bike; Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m., through Oct. 19; at Bend’s McKay Park; $75; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346.

PADDLING BASIC SKILLS KAYAK CLASSES: Saturdays through Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2-6 p.m.; four hour class will teach new paddlers basic skills through short lawn session discussing gear and safety, followed by three hours in the Deschutes River; $65; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407.

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Family Calendar

5 COMMON MISTAKES

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Bulletin hosts costume contest The Bulletin’s Family section is hosting a Halloween costume contest. The winners’ pictures will be featured in the Oct. 29 Family section. The costumes will be judged on creativity and craftsmanship in three age categories: birth-4; 5-12; and 13 and older. Homemade costumes will be favored. All costumes must be family-friendly. The winners in each age category will receive 20 Downtown Dollars — gift certificates good at any business in downtown Bend. One grand prize winner will receive 40 Downtown Dollars. The winners must be able to come to The Bulletin in costume for a photo shoot at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26. To enter, visit www.bendbulletin .com/costume or e-mail Alandra Johnson at ajohnson@bend bulletin.com. Attach a photo and include the following information: Full name, age, city of residence, costume description and phone number. Feel free to include any relevant information about the costume. Entries must be received by noon Friday, Oct. 22. Winners will be notified Monday, Oct. 25. Contact: 541-617-7860.

Juniper offers fitness classes for kids Kids ages 4-11 can take one of several fitness classes at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center. The classes include yoga and movement, Niatastic and Zumbatomic. Niatastic is a blend of dance, martial arts and rhythm. Zumbatomic is a dance-based fitness class. Those with a youth fitness pass or family fitness pass can take the classes for free; others can pay $4.50 for any one class. All classes are drop-in and do not require registration. For information about times, contact 541-389-7665. Juniper is located at 800 N.E. sixth St., Bend. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

Butterflies exhibit Families can check out more than 100 species of live butterflies at this new exhibit at the High Desert Museum. The exhibit opens Saturday.

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IN THE RIGHT SLOTS.

The harness slots used for infants should be at or below shoulder level. For older children, the harness slots used should be at or above shoulder level.

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Local car seat expert shares simple fixes for installation mistakes By Alandra Johnson

C

hances are good that the child car seat you are using isn’t installed correctly. Judi Wentz, the child passenger safety coordinator for Central Oregon, says 88 percent of the car seats examined during car seat clinics have something amiss. And that’s the official number. Wentz personally would put the portion of incorrectly installed car seats well over 90 percent. Part of the problem is that car seats are confusing. The seats and regulations change all the time. And each car seat and car is different. So what worked in your sedan won’t necessarily work in the new minivan. But the importance of proper installation cannot be overstated, Wentz said. “Every time I work with a family, I am potentially saving a child’s life.” Car crashes are the top killer of children ages 3-14 in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Car seats and child restraints make a huge difference. According to a 2008 report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, car seats used in cars reduce infant deaths by 71 percent and toddler deaths by 54 percent. Nationwide, of the 297 children ages 4 and younger who were killed in car crashes in 2008, 32 percent were not restrained in any way. The agency estimates that 244 lives of children ages 4 and younger were saved through the use of child restraints in 2008. Wentz is a nationally certified car seat technician through the Safe Kids organization. She offered the following advice based on her training and years of experience.

THE HARNESS ISN’T TIGHT ENOUGH.

THE RETAINER CLIP ISN’T IN THE RIGHT SPOT.

The retainer clip, which goes across the infant’s chest and holds the harness straps in place, needs to be at armpit level. If it is much lower, the harness can open up and the child can flop forward.

INSTALLATION

THE HARNESS IS NOT

INSIDE

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

FOR INSTALLATION TIPS FOR REAR-, FORWARD-FACING SEATS, PAGE E6 KNOW BEFORE YOU INSTALL: • Always refer to the car seat manufacturer’s information and the vehicle’s owner’s manual. Both will contain vital and specific information tailored to a particular car and car seat. Each is different and may have specific requirements. • Car seats can be secured using either seat belts or the LATCH system, which stands for Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children. Never use both.

• OTHER CAR SEAT SAFETY TIPS • FREE CAR SEAT CLINICS IN CENTRAL OREGON, PAGE E6

REAR-FACING SEAT’S NOT AT A 45-DEGREE ANGLE.

The rear-facing car seat should be at a 45-degree angle to the ground. Car seats typically come with a little leveler to help parents make sure the seat is at the proper angle. But Wentz still sees many seats at an improper angle, which she says is problematic because infants can tilt their heads forward and cut off their air supply. The angle can be altered by adjusting a foot in the back of the car seat. If that is not enough, parents can also cut off part of a swimming noodle or roll up an old towel and bind it tightly with rubber bands and place one of those under the foot of the seat.

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THE CAR SEAT IS TOO LOOSE.

Car seat expert Judi Wentz performs this test: Grab the car seat with your hand close to where the seat is anchored. Give it a good firm shake. It should move a little bit (some give is good), but if it moves an inch or more, that is too loose and it must be tightened.

ON A BUDGET? USED CAR SEATS: Parents do not have to purchase new car seats, but when considering a used one, Wentz suggests these guidelines: • Know whom the car seat came from and whether or not it has been in a car crash. Do not use a car seat that has been in a crash. • How old is the seat? If it is more than six years old, it is considered too old due to wear and tear and advances in technology. • Check to make sure the seat has not been recalled. To do this, you will need the model number and date of manufacture, which should be on a sticker on the car seat. Do not use a car seat for which you do not know the model number and date of manufacture. • Make sure the car seat padding and fabric has been laundered correctly. Most of it should only be wiped off with a damp cloth. Some straps and harnesses can be damaged if they have gone through a washer or dryer or the flame retardant can be damaged. If the harness was improperly laundered, parents can order a new one.

Bend’s Karin Collins mixes joyful spirit with endless drive

Oregon Pet Expo

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a new series called Standout Students, which will run every other week in The Bulletin. The stories will highlight outstanding teenagers in Central Oregon. To suggest a student for consideration, e-mail Alandra Johnson at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

There will be a ton of pet-related booths at this event at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center on Saturday.

Northwest Crossing Halloween Party Celebrate Halloween a bit early at this party in Bend’s Northwest Crossing neighborhood Saturday. The event includes crafts for kids and pumpkin painting. Costumes are encouraged.

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The Bulletin

The straps need to be snug with no slack. Child passenger seat coordinator Judi Wentz says a good guideline is for parents to place a thumb and finger on top of the harness material and then try to pinch the fabric. They should not be able to pinch any extra material.

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• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend High School senior Karin Collins smiles at her friends in the commons area at school Tuesday. Collins is student body president, a talented violinist and much more.

Can you be a bubbly neurologist? Absolutely. Assuming Karin Collins loses none of her charming pep, crazy smarts or utter dedication, she’s going to be just that. Karin is a senior at Bend High School, consumed — like most high-achieving seniors — with filling out college applications and ap-

plying for scholarships. The 17-year-old takes her studies seriously and has a 4.08 grade point average. Karin hopes to get into Yale, Johns Hopkins or MIT, where she plans to begin her path of becoming a neurologist. But she still tries to have plenty of fun. One of Karin’s favorite pastimes is dressing up in as much blue and gold as she can and cheering on the Bend High School football team with a group of other dedicated seniors. She even has a blue wig made of tinsel. She was sporting the sparkling blue hair when she was recently crowned as a homecoming princess. That mix of joyfulness and drive is what makes her stand out. See Karin Collins / E6

S TANDOUT STUDENTS Karin Collins Age: 17 School: Bend High School senior Future plans: Aiming for Yale, Johns Hopkins or MIT; wants to be a neurologist Activities: Plays violin, sings, serves as student body president, participates in her church’s youth group and an on-campus ministry, plays tennis and swims Fun fact: Loves Amanda Bynes and her movie “She’s the Man” Favorite quote: She discovered this in a fortune cookie: “One of the greatest pleasures in life is doing what others say you can’t.”


T EL EV IS ION

E2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Nu rtu ring godmother should step back from caregiver role Dear Abby: I’m a 23-year-old woman who has been helping to raise my three adorable godchildren over the last few years. Their mother is also 23. She became pregnant with her oldest when she was 15. She’s a young single mother, unprepared for the full responsibility, so I have stepped in. When they were babies, we would take turns rocking them all night. I take them to the doctor’s when they are sick — with or without their mom. I helped select which schools they attend. Through the years I have been there every day, waking them in the morning, taking them to school, putting them to bed, etc. I am now being married and have slightly reduced my dayto-day role, although I am still in many ways the “other parent.” I get criticized for this all the time. I am constantly being told, “They are not your children. You shouldn’t be doing this.” Even my future in-laws have said it. I don’t know how to respond. I love the children very much, as if they were my own. I can’t let them suffer for their mother’s numerous mistakes. I’d appreciate any advice you can give me. — Godmother of Three in New England Dear Godmother: May I begin by asking, “Where is their MOTHER?” Where are the grandparents? Three children, no father(s) — who is supporting them? You are a caring angel to have stepped in to the extent that you have, but why isn’t their mother around to put them to bed at night, wake them in the morning, and see that they get to the doctor when they are so sick they need one? Something is seriously out of kilter. In the not-too-distant future you will have children of your own to care for. Husbands need a certain amount of care and nurturing, too. It will be impossible for you to continue to be as involved as you have been in

D E A R ABBY your godchildren’s lives. You are doing the right thing by transitioning away, and you must continue to do so. Much as you love them, your godchildren are their mother’s responsibility, and you have already done more than you should have been expected (or asked) to do. Dear Abby: My husband and I had a troubled marriage. He was a good father and provider, and I respected him for that. But he did not respect me. He constantly blamed and criticized me for his many emotional problems. After I told him I was leaving him, he committed suicide. My problem is, our adult children blame me for his death. I don’t want to bad-mouth their father or tell them the unpleasant details of our marriage, but they don’t know the whole story. I have had lots of professional counseling and my kids have had some, but they refuse to attend any more sessions. Should I just continue to do the best I can and hope they can be more forgiving as they mature, or should I tell them my side of the story? — Doing the Best I Can Dear Doing: Your children should have been told the whole story while you were together in counseling. If you allow them to continue in their belief that you caused their father’s death, their anger will only continue to grow. If possible, that important conversation should be held with the help of a mediator. Because they refuse to see a therapist, I’m recommending your religious adviser. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘School Pride’ skips politics to help schools By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

One of the hottest topics of any election is education, with nearly every politician promising that if elected he or she will do something about the sad state of public schools. The producers and cast of the new NBC reality series “School Pride” aren’t waiting for help. The show follows a unique team — interior designer Susie Castillo, SWAT Commander Tom Stroup, comedian Kym Whitley and journalist Jacob Sobroff — as they lead students, teachers and parents through a rebuild of their own schools over a 10day period. “School Pride” is the last new show in the NBC 2010-11 schedule. NBC has ordered seven episodes of the show. The seven schools featured in this first round include three in Los Angeles along with one in Needles, Calif.; Baton Rouge, La.; Nashville, Tenn.; and Detroit. “The whole idea of ‘School Pride’ is to bring the community together, to empower the community to make changes in the school,” says executive producer Cheryl Hines. “We’re not going in and changing the infrastructure of schools. We’re going in and saying to that school, ‘Reach out to your community, to local businesses. Work together and show the kids that you care about their school.’ ” Schools were selected through videotapes made by teachers and students, which included a tour of their school and details of what was needed. “We looked for schools that were in bad shape, terrible shape, and had no place else to go, had sort of run out of their funding options and didn’t know where else they were going to get the money

Carlos Osorio / The Associated Press

A film crew from NBC’s “School Pride” films students in June at the Communication & Media Arts High School in Detroit as they run through the hallways. The school is featured in the new reality TV show premiering tonight on NBC.

‘School Pride’ When: 8 tonight Where: NBC

to do this renovation,” executive producer Denise Cramsey explains. What surprised Castillo the most was how much work the schools needed. “When the schools were built, they were fantastic, but there have been no renovations since then,” she says. “We didn’t realize that we would have to get into things like plumbing issues.” Students at one school told Castillo there were so few working toilets at their school, many students went all day without a bathroom break.

“I can’t believe this is happening in American schools. I felt like I was in a Third World country: no working bathrooms, no working water fountains. I believe when people watch ‘School Pride’ they are going to be shocked,” Castillo says. Work on the schools was done according to local building and school codes. Castillo talked with students, teachers and administration to get their input on everything from color to furniture. Her plan was to create deigns that made students feel positive energy. In many cases, Castillo met with parents who wanted to help improve their children’s schools but felt helpless because it was either too big a job or they were stalled by bureaucratic red tape. “I had one teacher in Baton Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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Rouge tell me she just wanted to paint her room but the request had not been approved. I told her if I had to, I would go to Home Depot and buy the paint myself,” Castillo says. Castillo hopes that no matter how long the series airs, it’ll be an inspiration for communities to make changes in their schools. “Don’t sit around,” Castillo says. “Pick up the phone and call local business and tell them what you’re going to do. There are a lot of people out there who want to help. All they need is a chance.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 10/15/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Rudy Maxa Steves’ Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Expeditions Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Rudy Maxa Expeditions Nightly Business

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7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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No Ordinary Family ’ ‘PG’ Å School Pride Soaring Eagles! ‘PG’ Medium How to Kill a Good Guy ‘14’ No Ordinary Family ’ ‘PG’ Å House Baggage ’ ‘14’ Å News Washington W’k BBC Newsnight School Pride Soaring Eagles! ‘PG’ Smallville Homecoming (N) ’ ‘PG’ Moment-Luxury Paint Paper Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

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20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å 20/20 (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A lawyer’s wife is murdered in her home. (N) ’ Å CSI: NY Sangre Por Sangre (N) ‘14’ Blue Bloods Officer Down (N) ’ ‘14’ 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å 20/20 (N) ’ Å The Good Guys Dan on the Run ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A lawyer’s wife is murdered in her home. (N) ’ Å Supernatural (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Sewing-Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å

11:00

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KATU News at 11 High School Blitz News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Austin City Limits Spoon (N) ’ ‘PG’ News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Austin City Limits Spoon (N) ’ ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

American Justice ’ ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Haunted ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Reckoner ‘14’ Å Teach: Tony Danza (N) ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Limelight ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 Amer. Justice (5:15) ››› “The Mummy” (1999, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, John Hannah. A mummy seeks revenge for a 3,000- ›› “Deep Blue Sea” (1999, Science Fiction) Thomas Jane, Saffron Burrows, Samuel L. Jackson. Premiere. › “Ghost Ship” (2002, Horror) Julianna Margulies. Salvagers are 102 40 39 year-old curse. Å Smart sharks turn a research lab’s staff into fish food. trapped aboard a haunted oceanliner. Å Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Haunted Demon Attack ’ ‘PG’ Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ 137 44 Cribs ’ Cribs ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders World’s Strictest Parents (N) ’ Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ CNBC Titans George Foreman American Greed Funny Money Mad Money The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å CNBC Titans George Foreman Zumba Dance 21st Century 51 36 40 52 The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Jim Gaffigan: King Baby ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Comedy Central Conchords Comedy Central Comedy Central Nick Swardson’s 135 53 135 47 National Lamp. Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Primal Quest To Be Announced Outside Film Festival TBA 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab: Dark Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Swamp Loggers ’ ‘PG’ Å Swamp Loggers ’ ‘PG’ Å Swamp Loggers Split Tracks ‘PG’ Beyond Survival With Les Stroud (N) Swamp Loggers ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter Å 21 23 22 23 College Football Cincinnati at Louisville (Live) MLS Soccer Club Deportivo Chivas USA at Seattle Sounders FC (Live) NFL Live (N) Baseball Tonight NASCAR Racing 22 24 21 24 NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Dollar General 300 From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (Live) Boxing: 2004 Candelo vs. Sanchez Boxing: 2005 Lujan vs. Margarito Bull Riding AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: 2003 Diaz vs. Juarez Boxing: 2003 Diaz vs. Lorenzo 23 25 123 25 (4:00) College Basketball SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club Amazing Stories ‘G’ 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped Chopped Spouting Off Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Meat- Potatoes Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Wintervention Football Preview Runnin’ With PAC Beavers Football Cougars Access Huskies Beavers Pro Football Seahawks The Final Score Huskies The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour (4:00) ›› “Cruel Intentions” (1999) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Big Momma’s House” (2000, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long. › “Big Momma’s House 2” (2006, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long. Sons of Anarchy The Push ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Holmes on Homes Falling Flat ‘G’ Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place Yard Crashers House Crashers House Hunters Hunters Int’l Urban Oasis Giveaway 2010 (N) ‘G’ 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Distilleries ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels Whiskey ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ’80s Tech ‘PG’ Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History ‘PG’ Å Gangland Skinhead Assault ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Distilleries 2 ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba Go Far ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Return to Corcoran Lockup Lockup Inside Holman Lockup Inside Brushy Mountain Lockup: Raw Inmate violence. 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control That ’70s Show That ’70s Show When I Was 17 Before the Shore Jersey Shore Roommates move in to their summer share. ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob BrainSurge ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Big Time Rush Big Time Rush George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage Pie ’ ‘MA’ Å 132 31 34 46 Star Trek: Voyager Cold Fire ‘PG’ “Carny” (2009, Horror) Lou Diamond Phillips, Alan C. Peterson. ‘14’ Å WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Sanctuary Kali (N) Å The Event Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Chupacabra: Dark Seas” ‘14’ Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 MLB Postgame Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Texas Rangers American League Championship Series, Game 1. (Live) Å (6:45) ›› “The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb” (1964, Horror) (8:15) › “The Mummy’s Shroud” (1967, Horror) Andre Morell, John Phillips. A mummi- ›› “Blood From the Mummy’s Tomb” (1972, Horror) Andrew (11:45) ›› “Repo ›› “The Mummy” (1959) Peter Cushing. Archaeologists are 101 44 101 29 stalked by a 3,000-year-old monstrosity. Å Terence Morgan, Ronald Howard. Å fied slave returns to life to punish tomb-desecrators. Keir, Valerie Leon, James Villiers. Man” Say Yes: Bliss Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bliss Law & Order Love Eternal ’ ‘14’ Bones Block party. ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “The Holiday” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Cameron Diaz, Kate Winslet, Jude Law. Å ›› “Two Weeks Notice” (2002) Sandra Bullock. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Corner Office ’ ‘14’ Hole in the Wall “Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword” (2009, Comedy) Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Sym-Bionic Titan Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone Sym-Bionic Titan King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Most Terrifying Places in America 3 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Most Terrifying Places in America 6 Ghost Adventures Stanley Hotel ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures Stanley Hotel ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Most Terrifying Places in America 4 All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons House Selfish ’ ‘14’ Å House ’ ‘PG’ Å House Instant Karma ’ ‘14’ Å House Brave Heart ’ ‘14’ Å House Severely swollen appendages. ›› “Die Another Day” (2002) Å 15 30 23 30 House Unfaithful ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Behind the Music Usher ‘PG’ Å La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Wed Radio 1s Wknd I Love Money ’ 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:50) ›› “Eight Days a Week” 1997 ’ ‘R’ Å › “Corky Romano” 2001 Chris Kattan. ‘PG-13’ Å › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:35) › “The Hot Chick” 2002, Comedy Rob Schneider. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› Candyman (5:11) ››› “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing” 1955 Jennifer Jones. (7:11) ››› “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing” 1955 Jennifer Jones. (9:11) ››› “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing” 1955 Jennifer Jones. ›› “Project X” 1987 ‘PG’ Å Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons Green Label The Daily Habit Cubed (N) Å The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Dirt Demons Green Label The Daily Habit LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Frys.com Open, Second Round From San Martin, Calif. Golf Central LPGA Tour Golf CVS/pharmacy LPGA Challenge, Second Round Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Mad Hungry Mad Hungry Whatever With Alexis & Jennifer The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ››› “Spider-Man 2” 2004 Tobey (6:15) › “Max Payne” 2008, Action Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis, Beau Bridges. A cop ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” 2009 Ben Stiller. Exhibits come Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 Maguire. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å hunts those who killed his family. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å to life at one of the world’s largest museums. ’ ‘PG’ Hope Springs ›› “Office Space” 1999, Comedy Ron Livingston. ‘R’ Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. Freaks-Geeks (8:45) Food Party ››› “Near Dark” 1987, Horror Adrian Pasdar. ‘R’ Todd Margaret Todd Margaret Arrested Dev. IFC 105 105 ›› “Watchmen” 2009, Action Billy Crudup, Malin Akerman, Jackie Earle Haley. A masked vigilante probes the murder of a fellow (8:15) ›› “Ninja Assassin” 2009, Action Rain, Naomie Harris, Ben Miles. A rogue as- ›› “Kindergarten Cop” 1990, Comedy Arnold Schwarzenegger. A two-fisted L.A. cop MAX 400 508 7 superhero. ’ ‘R’ Å sassin saves the life of a Europol agent. ’ ‘R’ Å poses as a kindergarten teacher. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Dog Whisperer (N) ‘PG’ My Child Is a Monkey ‘PG’ The Real Bonnie and Clyde ‘14’ Dog Whisperer ‘PG’ My Child Is a Monkey ‘PG’ The Real Bonnie and Clyde ‘14’ Outlaw Bikers Angels Go Global ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel in, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Savage Wild Hunting, Country On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å Bridging the Gap: A Middle East Com- Weeds Gentle Pup- The Big C Happy › “Punisher: War Zone” 2008, Action Ray Stevenson, Dominic West. iTV. A disfigured Boxing Nagy Aguilera vs. Antonio Tarver SHO 500 500 Birthday, Cancer (iTV) 2008 Javier Bardem. ‘PG-13’ edy Conference ‘MA’ Å pies ’ ‘MA’ mobster seeks revenge against Frank Castle. ’ ‘R’ Gearz ‘PG’ Gearz ‘PG’ Gearz Gearz Gearz Gearz ‘PG’ Trackside At... (N) NASCAR Hall of Fame Intersections ‘G’ Intersections ‘G’ Intersections ‘G’ Intersections SPEED 35 303 125 (4:10) Serendipity (5:45) ›› “Righteous Kill” 2008 Robert De Niro, Al Pacino. ’ ‘R’ Å › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:22) ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. ‘PG-13’ Å Martin Lawrence Martin Lawrence STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) ››› “Father Goose” 1965, Comedy ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009 Clive Owen. A grieving widower (7:45) ›› “Enemy at the Gates” 2001, War Joseph Fiennes, Jude Law, Rachel Weisz. Two snipers face off ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent. Jewish-American TMC 525 525 Cary Grant. ‘NR’ Å struggles to raise his two sons alone. Å during the Battle of Stalingrad. ’ ‘R’ soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ Buck Stops Bucks Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. The Daily Line (N) Gun It w/Spies Elk Fever Tred Barta Whitetail Rev. The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 ››› “Pretty in Pink” 1986, Romance-Comedy Molly Ringwald. ‘PG-13’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE Lives Cut Short ‘14’ ››› “Pretty in Pink” 1986, Romance-Comedy Molly Ringwald. ‘PG-13’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

P  ’ G  M 

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scareme good.com.

Courtesy Frank Masi / Summit Entertainment

John Malkovich, from left, Morgan Freeman and Bruce Willis star in the humorous CIA thriller “RED.� See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘RED’

SATURDAY “BUTTERFLIES� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features 100 species of live butterflies; exhibit runs through Feb. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. OREGON PET EXPO: Featuring seminars, a vaccine clinic and a variety of pet booths; $5, $4 ages 55 and older and free ages 16 and younger; 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-815-2639. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. NORTHWEST CROSSING HALLOWEEN PARTY: Activities and crafts for children, pumpkin painting, cupcake decorating and more; costumes encouraged; $5; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www. northwestcrossing.com. CORN-BAG TOSS CHALLENGE: Toss corn bags through a board in teams of two; with a barbecue lunch; registration required to play; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $50 per team, free for spectators; 11 a.m.; Baldy’s BBQ, 235 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-6171010 or www.bendsnip.org. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. BOWLOPOLIS FAMILY FUN NIGHT: Bowling and children’s activities; proceeds benefit Girls on the Run of Deschutes County; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; Lava Lanes Bowling Center, 1555 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; info@ deschutescountygotr.org or www. deschutescountygotr.org. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www. scaremegood.com.

SUNDAY BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS OKTOBERFEST: The sixth annual event features live music, food and more; $15, $5 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 1-6 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2078 or www. stedwardsisters.org.

MONDAY “PEACEABLE KINGDOM�: Film screens in honor of Vegetarian

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Lincoln Werhane, 5, smiles as newly released painted lady butterflies surround him on Wednesday in the new butterfly exhibit at the High Desert Museum. The exhibit opens to the public Saturday. See the full story on the exhibit in Saturday’s Community Life.

Story times, library youth events for Oct. 15-21 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. • SPARK BOOK CLUB: Grades 6-8; Focuses on the Oregon Battle of the Books for middle school; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday. • ZINES 101: Laura Walker and Rachel Lee-Carman talk about the art and craft of these handmade publications; registration is encouraged; ages 12 and older; supplies provided; 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday; Contact: 541-617-7079. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 Awareness Month; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

TUESDAY SENIOR DAY: Ages 62 and older can visit for free; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JO DEE MESSINA: The awardwinning country musician performs,

months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. • TEEN THURSDAYS: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. • SPARK BOOK CLUB: Grades 6-8; Focuses on the Oregon Battle of the Books for middle school; 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. • PAJAMA STORY TIME: Ages 3-6; 6:30 p.m. Thursday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday. • PAJAMA PARTY: Kids wear their favorite pajamas; 7 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. • DIA DE LOS MUERTOS: Celebrate the Day of the Dead; grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) changes in fall • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 2 p.m. Tuesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

with Lisa C. Pollock; $45 or $55; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY No family event listings.

THURSDAY HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event

Pumpkin patches CENTRAL OREGON PUMPKIN CO. PUMPKIN PATCH AND CORN MAZE When: Through Oct. 31 • Pumpkin patch: Noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays • Corn maze: 3 to 7 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays Where: 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne Cost: Admission and market are free; maze costs $7.50 ages 12 and older, $5.50 ages 6-11, free ages 5 and younger; other activities are available on weekends, including zoo train, pumpkin cannon, petting zoo and pony rides; prices vary. Contact: 541-504-1414 or www.pumpkinco.org

DD RANCH PUMPKIN PATCH When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Oct. 31 (hay and pony rides, and cafe available on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays) Where: 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne Cost: Admission is free; pony rides cost $5; admission to the Kid s’ Korral costs $3.50; hay rides cost $3 Contact: 541-548-1432 or www.ddranch.net

PUMPKIN PATCH AND HARVEST FESTIVAL When: Oct. 16-31 • Pumpkin patch: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays to Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sundays (open Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to noon) • Harvest festival: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 23 and Oct. 30.; 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 24; 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 31 Where: Holy Redeemer Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine Cost: Admission is free Contact: 541-536-3571 features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com.

F DVD  W

A fabulous ‘Dragon’ tale available on DVD By Jen Chaney The Washington Post

With the summer movie season behind us, the family entertainment offerings have hit a temporary lull. Thankfully the

release of “How to Train Your Dragon� arrives today. “Dragon� follows a gangly Viking-in-training named Hiccup (voice of Jay Baruchel) who is desperate to win his dragon-slaying

dad’s approval and equally desperate to maintain his new friendship with a formidable fire-breather. The double-disc DVD and DVD/Blu-ray combo come with well-done extras and behind-

the-scenes featurettes. In other words “How to Train Your Dragon� provides plenty of material to occupy the time of kids and parents until the lull subsides.

R a ting: PG-13 for intense sequences of action violence and brief strong language. What it’s about: Somebody is trying to hunt down and kill retired CIA assassins. The kid attractor factor: Bruce Willis, Mary-Louise Parker, John Malkovich and lots of silliness in between shooting sprees. Good lessons/bad lessons: Flirt with the wrong guy by phone or e-mail and you could end up kidnapped. Violence: Shootouts and brawls. Language: Profanity, some of it “strong.� Sex: Flirting, mostly. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: The violence and subject matter make this a PG-13 in which the “13� should be taken seriously.

‘Secretariat’ Rating: PG for brief mild language. What it’s about: In the early ’70s, a woman breaks into the elite ranks of America’s horse breeders with that one-in-a-million thoroughbred, Secretariat. The kid attractor factor: Horses, horse racing and that wacky John Malkovich Good lessons/bad lessons: “Run your race.� Violence: None Language: Disney clean/ Sex: None Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: Not as sentimental, sweet or funny as “Seabiscuit� but still family-friendly and suitable for all ages.

‘Life As We Know It’ Rating: PG-13 for sexual material, language and some drug content What it’s about: A couple of mismatched friends of the family are forced to raise an infant — and get along as they do it. The kid attractor factor: Diaper jokes, inept parenting gags Good lessons/bad lessons: “Having somebody help you doesn’t mean you failed.� Violence: Pratfalls. Language: Some profanity. Sex: Approached, considered,

discussed. Drugs: Pot brownies, for those who like to bake and be baked. Parents’ advisory: Probably over the heads of 10-and-olders, the language and pot gags make it a 13-and-over romantic comedy.

‘You Again’ Rating: PG for brief mild language and rude behavior. What it’s about: A once-bullied woman tries to stop her brother from marrying her tormentor in this comedy. The kid attractor factor: Lots of high-school bullying comedy, in flashback scenes, slapstick. Good lessons/bad lessons: Mistakes are part of being human, “it’s how you correct them that counts.� Violence: A shove in a pool here, a bowl of dip dumped on the head there. Language: Pretty much profanity-free. Sex: Dirty dancing and sexy wardrobe choices. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: Lots of positive messages about how people change, the lingering effects of bullying. Suitable for 10 and older.

‘Legend of the Guardians: The Owls Of Ga’hoole Rating: PG for some sequences of scary action. What it’s about: Heroic owls are summoned to save victim owls from the predations of evil, enslaving owls. The kid attractor factor: It’s based on a popular series of novels about cute but fearsome birds that battle for the soul of the owl worlds. Good lessons/bad lessons: Jealousy and resentment cloud your ability to see right from wrong. Violence: Owl fights, owl brainwashing. Language: Profanity-free Australian accents. Sex: Not a hint. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: This dense children’s fantasy may test the patience of very young moviegoers. Suitable for 8 and older.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Oct. 15, 2010: This year, many opportunities evolve, pointing to a new direction. This transformation could involve your daily life. You have many interests; you might decide to make one of them a business. You have a tendency to overeat and go to extremes. Take good care of yourself. If you are single, several people could light up your life. Get to know each person better before deciding that anyone is right! If you are attached, the two of you could share a new pastime or interest, drawing you closer. AQUARIUS always whips up the fun. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Whether it is the knowledge that the weekend is heading in or a change in the planets, you don’t care. You feel empowered. Dot your i’s and cross your t’s before you leave work. Gather with others and christen this weekend. Tonight: Let the fun begin. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You certainly will need to focus on the here and now. Others want your remedies and solutions. Please share them, as they do make a difference. Tonight: Not feeling as carefree as you might like. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Pull back in order to gain a complete perspective.

Not everyone thinks in terms like you. The broader your outlook and the more empathy you express the more likely you will find an agreement. Tonight: Opt for the unusual. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You might want to relate to a key associate directly but can’t. Work on the basic issues. Be a better listener, and absorb new information with care. Listen to what is being shared. Tonight: One-on-one time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Be an efficiency expert and get as much done as possible early on. You will want to be more innovative and dynamic in your choices. Positively greet a partner’s sometimes odd ideas. Clear out as much work as possible. Tonight: Let your hair down. It has been a very wild week. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Others challenge you but might not intend to upset you. Use their input more positively than in the past. You’ll see a matter very differently if you do, and allow for an unusual resolution. Tonight: Relax in your favorite manner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could feel swamped by an overwhelming amount of requests. You might not want to handle a personal matter as you have in the past. Let go and flow. Lose your judgments for a day. Tonight: Finally, time to be yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Accomplishment

demands unusual creativity and answers. You come up with many ideas, which head in from out of left field. Be willing to test them out on others. A new love interest or child could be overwhelming. Tonight: Head on home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You know what others need. The choice is just how much you want or need to help them. Be aware of what is going on here. A family member can be quite alluring, but do you want to get involved? Tonight: Others are happy to find you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You smile and come out ahead of the game. You know what is needed. Though you can be quite assertive and direct, you also are capable of a mini-revolution if need be. In your head, you justify this behavior with “you gotta do what you gotta do.” Tonight: On top of your game. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Rest assured that there are many different approaches to a money matter. The smart move is to weigh the pros and cons. Could you be too optimistic about one set of options? Tonight: You will know exactly what to do. Have fun! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You could be slightly overwhelmed by an opportunity. You could try to push someone to do something your way. Know what you want before creating a lot of uproar. You are all smiles during the day. Tonight: Do only what you want. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Karin Collins

INSTALLATION

Continued from E1 A few months back, Karin found her favorite quote from a fortune cookie. It read: “One of the greatest pleasures in life is doing what others say you can’t.” Karin, who has big dreams and goals for herself, says, “I don’t take it to heart much when people say I can’t.”

LATCH SYSTEM SEAT BELT SYSTEM Figure out which kind of seat belt the vehicle has. Pull out the seat belt all the way. Some will stay loose; others click and tighten. The ones that tighten are called Emergency Locking Retractor. The ELR is ideal. Parents should weave the seat belt through the openings on the base of the car seat. Be careful not to twist the belt. Once in place, pull the seat belt out slowly until you hear a click. It is locked. Let the belt retract slowly. Judi Wentz presses her weight onto the car seat while the belt is retracting to make sure the seat belt is as tight as possible. There is a locking clip on the back of some car seats that can be used with a seat belt. Wentz says this is only to be used with seat belts that are not ELR. The clip helps provide some locking, but will interfere with an ELR belt.

This anchorage system in cars went into effect in 2002 and should be available in cars after that year. Wentz says LATCH is not better than seat belts, but it is designed to be easier for parents to use. The latch is a strap that is connected to the car seat, typically one on each side of the car seat. At the end of the strap is a hook. Parents should attach those hooks to little bar loops located at the base of the seats in the vehicle. Many new cars have small indicators showing the locations for the latch loops. The hooks should face down when placed over the bars. The strap should then be tightened. If placing the car seat in the center position, some cars allow parents to use one bar loop on each side of the seat, some cars do not. Check the manual to be sure.

REAR-FACING (INFANT SEATS) INSTALLATION: • The car seat can touch the back of one of the seats in the front row, but cannot be wedged or jammed. • Look for a five-point harness, rather than a three-point harness. • The ideal position for the car seat handle varies depending on the model; check the manual for information. • Tethering is more of an issue for forward-facing seats (see “forwardfacing installation”), but it does come up with some rear-facing car seats. Tethering refers to a strap attached to the car seat — usually near the top of the seat — that is then anchored

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

down to part of the car. Most rearfacing brands do not have tethering, but a few do. Wentz says tethering is always better if available because it helps stabilize the seat.

FORWARD-FACING INSTALLATION: • All use tethering. Cars manufactured after 2002 are required to have tethering anchors in the car. This means a strap from the back of the car seat is attached to a part of the car and greatly reduces the forward motion of the car seat. • Take the excess tether material and roll it up with a rubber band.

OTHER POINTS TO KEEP IN MIND • Avoid flying projectiles in a car. Wentz recommends parents not carry any loose items in the car because they can fly and injure people in an accident. • The center seat is the ideal spot for car seats because it is protected on all sides. In some cars, this is not available, so parents should check the vehicle’s manual. • Do not remove the sticker, which shows the model number and date of manufacture. This information will help identify whether a seat has been recalled and will also ensure the owner can order a replacement manual from the manufacturer. If the label is not there, Wentz recommends against using the seat. • Do not buy or use anything that does not come with the seat. These items are not regulated and are therefore not tested for safety standards. There are two exceptions. Parents can roll up a towel or blanket like a snake and place one on each side of the infant so the baby is more secure in the seat. Parents can also wad up a wash cloth and place it between the

baby and the crotch strap if there is a lot of space. This will help prevent the infant from sliding down too far in the seat and slumping. • To change the harness straps, flip the car seat over and adjust. • Children should be rearfacing as long as possible. Wentz says the minimum for turning them around is 20 pounds or 1 year old. Some parents see this as a recommendation rather than a minimum requirement. She suggests waiting until 35 pounds or age 2 if possible. She often hears from parents who worry their child has grown too big to be rear-facing because the infant’s feet touch the back of the seat and the child has to keep his or her knees bent. The parents worry that in a crash the infant’s legs will be damaged. Wentz says leg damage is a possibility in a crash, but says “legs can be fixed far easier than spines and necks,” which are far better protected in a rear-facing seat. • Avoid dressing the infant in bulky clothing because it can interfere with the way the harness straps fit, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Free car seat clinic information Contact: 541-706-3799

MONTHLY CLINICS:

Active Karin is the student body president. She helped with a recent blood drive and is excited about upcoming plans to host Mr. BHS, which is a fun pageant for guys that raises funds for the Ronald McDonald House. Music is a big passion for Karin. She’s been playing the violin since she was in fourth grade. In addition to being the first-chair violin and concert master for the school’s chamber orchestra, she also takes private lessons. As she has progressed, she has found more joy in playing. “When you get good, you like it more,” said Karin. She plans to continue to play violin in college, although she doesn’t want to be a music major. Karin says her favorite kind of music to play on the violin are pieces that incorporate a mix of slow and fast because she likes the “drawn out low part of the violin and the fast fiddley part.” She is also an alto in the choir. Karin has always loved to sing, although she didn’t join the choir until sophomore year. Choir director Luke MacSween is impressed by how Karin has so many things going on at once. “She’s a phenomenal string player, super intelligent, super social and really articulate.” He calls her bubbly, encouraging, wonderful, supportive, never cocky and “really passionate about the stuff she does without being pushy.” “She’s got huge aspirations and … she’s going to meet them all,” said MacSween. Karin is also a member of OnTrack, a Christian group that meets every Thursday during lunch. Each week the group holds a discussion on a different topic, and members try to “build each other up.” Karin and her family are members of the New Hope Church. She says faith is “central to our family.” When she’s not busy at school, Karin works as a lifeguard. She’s also a member of the swim team and the tennis team. She and a

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Karin Collins, right, shares a laugh with Bend High School blood drive volunteer Kara Ross, left, while Collins was resting after giving blood in the Bend High School’s gymnasium Tuesday. friend joined the swim team last year for the first time and she ended up loving it. She likes getting “our butts kicked in practice” to keep her in shape. As for tennis, she says, “It’s not something I am super good at; we’re doing it for fun. But we do like to win.”

Family and fun Karin is the baby of the family, with three older siblings in their 20s. Her dad, Don, is a jour-

neyman plumber, and her mom, Linda, is a receptionist at a real estate office. Two of her older siblings are enrolled at Central Oregon Community College; the other is earning a master’s degree. Karin says her parents are “very, very encouraging.” “They know I have big goals.” According to Karin, her mom named her Karin (pronounced Karen) with an “i” to stand for independent individual. According to Karin,

this “completely worked.” She first became interested in neuroscience after answering a few career questions for the ACT test during her sophomore year. One of the questions asked about looking at graphs and information about the brain. Karin loved this idea and it has stuck with her. Karin enjoys science and experiments as well as psychology. One of her favorite books is “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” in part because of the psychology behind the story. Karin isn’t sure where her drive comes from. She credits her faith for keeping her going. “You can do anything when you put your mind to it.” She likes to hang with her friends and members of the church youth group. Her favorite movie is “She’s the Man” with Amanda Bynes, which she says she quotes a lot. She likes floating the river during the summer and playing ultimate frisbee. Karin smiles and laughs a lot. If the stress of being a high achiever is getting to her, it certainly doesn’t show. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Supported by:

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EVERY-OTHER MONTH:

(October, December, February, Redmond Fire Department: April, June, August) First Thursday of each month, La Pine Fire Department: First 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday of the month, 1 to 3 p.m. Contact: 541-504-5000 Contact: 541-536-2935 Prineville Fire Department: Third Wednesday of each BY APPOINTMENT: month, 3 to 6 p.m. Redmond Fire Department: Contact: 541-447-5011 Third Thursday of the month, Madras Fire Department: 4 to 6 p.m. Third Thursday of each month, Contact: 541-504-5000 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. St. Charles Bend: Contact: 541-475-3274 Monday to Friday. Bend Fire Department: Contact: 541-848-3998 Fourth Wednesday of each month, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact: 541-322-6200 Contact: Judi Wentz, Safe Kids Central Oregon Child Passenger Safety Coordinator at 541-848-3998.

Holiday

RETAILERS INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN THE AUCTION CALL 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 F1

C LASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

General Merchandise

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Pets and Supplies

Antiques & Collectibles

TV, Stereo and Video

Heating and Stoves

Moving must sell. Papered PoToshiba 32” TV, purchased in meranians assorted ages and The Bulletin reserves the right 2006, not a flat screen, great colors. Approved homes only. picture. $50. 541-383-1517. to publish all ads from The Small adoption fees. Bulletin newspaper onto The TV 52” Samsung, big screen, 541-480-3160 Bulletin Internet website. works great, exc. cond. AskPapillons, Beutiful puppies, ing $400. 541-480-2652. exceptionally well cared for, $300-$400, 541-367-7766 202 Want to Buy or Rent Parrots -Dbl. Red Factor Congo 215 African Greys,3 babies, nearly Coins & Stamps Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., weaned, & 3 yearlings, bapower, secure, central locabies are Abundenced weaned WANTED TO BUY tion in Bend. 541-350-8917. & are allowed to glide to floor before wing clipping, US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & WANTED: Cars, Trucks, MoCurrency collect, accum. Pre snuggly babies, DNA sexing torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, 1964 silver coins, bars, will be completed prior to ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold sale. $500-$700, For more 541-280-7959. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & info call Aleta 541-548-4750. 255 dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for Persian Cross Kittens (6), 7 Computers No col& vintage watches. old vintage costume, scrap, weeks, wormed, 1st shots, lection too large or small. Bedsilver & gold Jewelry. Top $50-$100, 541-420-1580. rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 THE BULLETIN requires comdollar paid, Estate incl. Honputer advertisers with mulest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Pomeranian female puppy tiple ad schedules or those 240 cream 8 weeks old. Going to selling multiple systems/ Crafts and Hobbies be very small, $350. software, to disclose the 541-480-3160 name of the business or the Crafters Wanted: Final Jury term "dealer" in their ads. Pomeranians, Beautiful pups, Oct. 23rd, 9:30 a.m, Private party advertisers are exceptionally well cared for, Highland Baptist Church, defined as those who sell one $250-$350, 541-367-7766 Redmond, Tina , 541-447-1640 computer. www.snowflakeboutique.org Poodle Pom 8 week old female, non-shedding, adorable face. Online scrapbook store going 260 $350. 541-480-3160 out of business. Hundreds of Misc. Items items at cost! One day only! POODLES AKC Toy, tiny Scrapbook paper, embellishtoy. Also Pom-a-Poos, ChiBedrock Gold & Silver ments, stamp ink, chipboard, poos. Joyful! 541-475-3889 BUYING DIAMONDS & adhesive, Stickles glitter R O L E X ’ S For Cash glue, Distress Ink and more. 541-549-1592 POODLES Standard; two Saturday 10/16 from 9 am -5 6-year-old sisters, indoor WANTED: RV water heater, Buying Diamonds PM. No early birds, please. dogs, must be together, diround aluminum-type, CASH ONLY. No holds. 61056 /Gold for Cash vorce forces sale, they need gas/electric. 541-475-9371. Honkers Lane, Bend OR SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS to go to a good home. $150 97702 for both. 541-848-3525 541-389 - 6 6 5 5 Wanted washers and dryers,

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working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

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Golf Equipment

205

Golf Balls, exc. cond., $20/100, PRO-V, $50/100, 541-383-2155.

Items for Free Free Moving Boxes, assorted sizes, some U-Haul. Call 541-923-5044 (CRR) FREE! Older model RCA console TV and VHS player, Call 541-598-6804 FREE World Book full set, 1973 Edition. Excellent condition. Call 541-593-1598 Plant Bulbs: Great Hyacinth, Paper Whites, & small white flowers, FREE, 541-548-3853

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix 4-wk-old pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $250. 541-923-1174.

Shih-tzu/poodle mix, ready to go! 4 males, 2 females. Great with kids! 541-233-8202 Siberian Husky AKC puppies, vet checked, 9 weeks old. Josh @ 541-633-9160 STILL KITTEN SEASON! We have over 3 dozen, friendly, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Just $25/1, $40/2. Adult cats $15 or 2/$25, or free as mentor cat with kitten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt. 598-5488, 389-8420, photos/map at www.craftcats.org.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 12 ga Stevens single shot $125. 22 bolt Stevens 84C, $125. 22 Model 77 Winchester, $150. 303 British Endfield, $225. All nice! 541-815-0149 357 Colt Trooper, 6” Barrel, exc. cond., $550; Remington 700 XCR .338 Ultra-Mag, 4.5x14 pwr. Leupold Boone & Crockett scope, like new, $1250, 541-447-7248 or 541-420-1888.

YORKIE, MALE 1.5 years old gold and white, 8lbs real sweet dog, divorce forces sale. $250 541-848-3525

Belguim Browning auto rifle, 3006, Bushnell scope, case, ammo, excellent condition. $585. 541-604-0269.

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Benelli 12 Gauge Shotgun Semi Auto/Camo 2¾”-3” $800. 541-480-9181

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. CHIHUAHUA BABIES! 6 weeks, 1st shots. Ready for their new families! Set appointment, 541-419-6445.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Browning 12 gauge auto shotgun, Belguim made, excellent condition, case, ammo, $575. 541-604-0269

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Over- Browning Gold hunter mossy oak 3½" 12 ga. new $850; stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Browning Belgium light 12 Maytag, 541-385-5418 ga. auto 5 $425; Winchester Mini-Dachshund 6-wk-old black & tan male; 1st shots & wormed, adorable, family raised! $300 541-610-7341

Bar Stools (3), swivel, light oak, 29,5 inches high to the seat, $60, call 541-923-0442.

'66 centennial 30-30, $600. Ken 541-410-2829 others for sale.

Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne Bushmaster AR-15 16" barrel, A2 sights, collapsible stock, Style, wing back, burgundy two 30rd mags w/ammo. plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323. $800; Compact 1911 .45acp . China Cabinet, interior lighted, DOXIE PUPPIES: 2 MINI BOYS, $400 541-771-9072 glass doors, $350. Dresser, 6 $250; 1 GIRL LEFT, $275 draws w/ doored shelves in CASH!! PRINEVILLE- 360-607-0604 middle, $150. 541-383-3951. For Guns, Ammo & Reloading English Bulldog. $500 AKC Supplies. 541-408-6900. male, intact, 2 yrs, brindle/ Couch navy blue COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. white. 541.588.6490 and matching chair with otRange finders! Chainsaw! toman, big pillows, modern, English Bulldog puppies, AKC, $199. ALL LIKE NEW! great condition, $500.00 for exc. champion pedigree, 8 541-280-5006 all 541-389-3868 anytime weeks old, ready to go! GUNS Desk, 1940’s wood office, 3+1 $2000/ea. 541-306-0372 Buy, Sell, Trade drawers & wood chair, $75, ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY 541-728-1036. 541-317-5156. LAST ONE! FEMALE AKC REGISTERED, CHAMPION LINES. Dining Table, unique, oak, Older Savage 7mm mag, Model 110, left hand. Walnut stock. 3’x4’, 4 wood chairs, $100, UP TO DATE ON ALL SHOTS 3x9 Simmons 8pt scope. Mint 541-639-2069. & MICROCHIPPED cond. Cancer forces sale. $1750 541 416-0375 Entertainment Center, pine, $300 firm. 541-604-5220 cell Bork Holder, Amish crafted, European Red Min Pin, 14 mo $175, call 541-617-1858 Male, very beautiful, free to good home. 541-325-3005 Fridge, 1/2 height, $50, Portable Dishwasher w/butcher Golden Retriever AKC English block, $50, 541-617-5787. Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready 10/8. Females $900, GENERATE SOME excitement in males $850. 541-852-2991. your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to Golden Retriever Pups, 2 left, advertise in classified! 12 weeks, Males, purebred, 385-5809. to approved homes only. $300 Call 541-788-2005 Patio table, med. sized, square shaped, glass top with lrg. Golden Retriever Pups, AKC umbrella. $50. 541-923-2740 reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839. Range, Kitchenaid, elec., w/ convection oven, black, ceKing Shepherd Pups, ramic top, self-cleaning $500 Oregon's Largest ready 10/15, male & female, Firm, 541-617-1858 black & tan or all blacks, exc. 3 Day ROCKER/GLIDER temperament, both parents Gun & Knife Show great shape. $30. on site+grandma, sire ChaOctober 15-16-17 541-647-2685 541-633-5629 teau De Chiefs, AKSC Portland Expo Center #02BGG872-IM, Dam Sonja Vom Holtzberg, AKC I-5 exit 306B The Bulletin #DN17285408, $800, recommends extra caution Featuring the New 541-815-2888. when purchasing products Elite Truck Traveling or services from out of the Showcase area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may Fri. 12-6 Sat. 9-5 be subjected to F R A U D . and Sun 10-4 For more information about Adm. $9 includes an advertiser, you may call Showcase Tour the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer 1(800)659-3440 Protection hotline at www.collectorswest.com 1-877-877-9392. Doberman Pinscher, reg. tail, dewclaws, shots, black & tan, $475. 503-550-1705

Reloading Equip., all new, too much to list, please call 541-728-1036. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959. Lab mix, 1½, spayed, shots, dog/ cat friendly,free to good home 212 w/lotsof space. 541-504-2814

Antiques & Collectibles

REM Model 271 rifle, 4XWeaver scope, appraised @ $500, asking $425. 541-382-4508 Shotgun, Browning 12 ga., like brand new, Gold Finger, Invector+ Field Model 28, $500 firm, 541-419-5911.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006 Dish Set, 50+ pieces, Moose/ Sponge Pattern, lots of extras, $95, 541-617-5787. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the fed308 eral Environmental ProtecFarm Equipment tion Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission stanand Machinery dards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certi- 1998 New Holland Model fication label, which is per"1725" Tractor. $14,500. manently attached to the Very good condition. Origistove. The Bulletin will not nal owner. 3 cylinder diesel. knowingly accept advertising 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO for the sale of uncertified never used. Backhoe and box woodstoves. scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. PROPANE Heatilator fireplace, with all exhaust pipes, $450 325 or best offer. 541-323-1872

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

Employment

300 400

Hay, Grain and Feed

1st, 2nd, & 3rd cuttings of Alfalfa, Orchard Grass, & Blue grass, all small bales, 2-tie, Madras, 541-325-6317 or 541-325-6316.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677 A Central Oregon Mix Cord. Split, Delivered, Bend, $125 for 1 or $240 for 2. Cash, Check, Visa/MC Accepted. 541-312-4027 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

541-322-7253

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb bales, $140-$160/ton Qty Discount! Patterson Ranch in Sisters - Call 541-549-3831 Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., $40 per bale. Also feeder hay, $30 bale. Call Redmond, 541-548-2514

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 GREEN GRASS HAY, small bales, $100/ton, $4/bale, Madras area, 541-490-5440.

Premium Orchard Grass, second cutting, no rain, no weeds. Mid-size 800-lb bales, $60 each. Call 541-419-2713 Premium Pasture mix, 3x3, 800lb. bales, 2nd cutting, $40 ea., please call 541-419-2713. Credit Cards Accepted.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Medical Equipment MobilAire III by Invacare Mdl. IRC301 oxygen concentrator, like new $375 541-390-7726

263

Tools Craftsman portable saw. 10" blade. Table 26"+ x 19-1/2". Extensions left, right, rear. Rip capacity 24" right and left. 3 HP universal motor. On stand with wheels. Like new. $195 cash only. Call 385-0542. Powermatic Tilt Table Mortiser, w/stand, never used, $800; Jet 8” joiner, long bed, like new, $950; Jet 1200 CFM dust collector, w/floor sweep, $200, 541-306-4582.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Chinese dishes, from Hong Kong, 99-piece set, everyday pattern, $50 OBO, 541-595-6261

Hot Tubs and Spas

Garage Door, 6’ x 6’ roll up, $25, please call 541-923-0442.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Complete LORD OF THE RINGS postage stamps from New Zealand. $40. 541-389-9377

Hot Tub, exc. cond., all chemicals incl., $2500 OBO, Please call 541-408-6191.

KOHLER TOILET, 1.6 gallons, great shape. $25. 541-647-2685 541-633-5629

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436

Lodgepole, Year

End Special $130 a cord split & delivered, $100 a cord for rounds 541-610-6713.

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found Ice Chest: 10/9, Arnold Market Lp/Horse Butte,words painted on it, 541-389-2420. FOUND silver pocket watch in NW Bend, 10/9/10. Call to describe, 541-382-7706. Found Wallet: Near Jewell Elementary, 10/9, belongs to lady,call to ID, 541-771-0263 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Rained-on Orchard Grass Put up dry, barn-stored. Exc. feeder hay. $105. 541-383-0494 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Hart 2-horse aluminum slant load, bumper pull w/rear tack & front dressing rooms. $5000 firm. 541-617-9034 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Saddle: English Triumph Triple Crown, pad, stirrups & girth, $200. 541-330-9070 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

345

Livestock & Equipment

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Medical Wallowa Memorial Hospital, located in Enterprise, OR currently has a full-time position available for a Laboratory MT/MLT with outstanding benefits package. If interested please contact Linda Childers, Human Resource Director at (541) 426-5313, or visit our website at www.wchcd.org. EOE

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799. Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for 2 or 3 overnight shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate. References and experience only. 541-447-5773. CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for Caregivers, FT/PT, in La Pine. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am6pm, Monday.-Friday. Critical Facility Engineer Prineville. McKinstry seeks union technicians to maintain and troubleshoot mechanical and electrical systems in a data center environment. Previous hands on mech and/or elect. exp. is preferred. Apply online at www.mckinstry.com

Driver Dedicated route west coast, home 3 nights a week, refrigerated. Call 541-815-9404.

ELECTRONIC TEST & ASSEMBLY TECH: Full-time position OPTICIAN with a local high-tech manu- Wanted FT/PT. Salary based on experience. Send resume facturer. 2 yr. electronics to eows@msn.com or fax to degree or equivalent exp.; 541-382-4756 Read schematics, soldering & PCBA exp., use of test equipment. Competitive salary + benefits. Resume to: ATTENTION: jobs@DENTInstruments.com Experienced National Freight Brokers Satellite Transportation is seeking Experienced National Freight Brokers. Must know all aspects of the industry. Willing to train those with moderate background. Please email resume to: jeff@satellitetrans.com

Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Food service SUBWAY Sandwich Artist wanted! Must be 16 or older. Part-time, full time, days, nights. Apply in person at Riverwoods Country Store, Remember.... 19745 Baker Rd., Bend. Add your web address to your ad and readers on General The Bulletin's web site will DO YOU NEED A be able to click through auGREAT EMPLOYEE tomatically to your site. RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to Remodel Sales/ publish the next day! Estimator 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449. Masonry Hod Carrier Needed Valid ODL req. Wage DOE. Apply 8 am-2 pm, MonFri, 63026 NE Lower Meadow Dr., Suite #200, Bend

Candidates should have 3-5 years recent experience estimating and selling large high-end remodel jobs, such as whole house remodels. Must have building code & construction knowledge, be computer literate, and have experience using local subs. Qualified candidates should e-mail resume & cover letter to joyce.luckman@sforest.com EOE

Independent Contractors - Sales

START EARNING MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS !! Crews now forming for sales reps to sell local newspaper in Central Oregon. No experience neccesary. We Train. Earn daily Cash bonus' along with a weekly paycheck. Great for students and active adults.

Earn up to $10-$30 per hr. CALLOREGON NEWSPAPER SALES GROUP 541-861-8166 Home Delivery Advisor

P

Home Delivery Advisor P

The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer great benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

Job

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or online@bendbulletin.com No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Female Pig, FFA backup. $1.85/lb. hanging weight plus cut and wrap. Leave message 617-1757

358

Farmers Column

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant LOST 10/5/10 approx. 6 PM new/older fields, haying serSpiral notebook last seen on vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher bumper prior to leaving control. 541-419-4516 Home Depot. Please call 541-977-7771 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at Lost Cat “Tucker” neut male, no extra cost. short hair gray, 10/10 WestBulletin Classifieds ward Ho Motel.541-647-7009 Get Results! Lost Rifle, west of La Pine Sun. Call 385-5809 or place Oct. 3 Cascade Lakes Hwy & your ad on-line at S. Century Dr. 541-929-5812 bendbulletin.com Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. 375 Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Employment Opportunities

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541-617-7825 Flag Pole, 20’, Steel, (5) 4’ sections, $25, please call 541-923-1369.

476

Employment Opportunities

Schools and Training

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Ad must include price of item

LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

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Farm Market

Find Classifieds at

Meat & Animal Processing

Grass Fattened All Natural Angus Steer Beef, $2.40/lb hanging weight incl. cut & wrap. No additional processing fees. 541-508-8541.

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


F2 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Spa Receptionist: Part-time, incl. weekends. Must be proficient with computers and phone, able to multi task & excel at customer service. Apply in person, 125 Wall St., Mon. between 10am-4pm.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Twilight Taxi of Bend now hiring professional drivers for its Ride & Win Trivia Cab Service. Hrs Flexible, Call for info. 541-410-5140 www.twilightcab.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

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Real Estate Contracts

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Business Opportunities

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Furnished, laundry facilities, all utilities & TV/Wi-fi included, pet on approval, no smoking. $500/mo. 541-508-6118

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's Dishes & Collectibles" Pattern matching china & dish business...very fun! Extensive large inventory all incl. w/storage racks & packing material. Work from home part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email me at patorre@msn.com for more information if you are interested.I am moving to AZ to retire again. $20,000 OBO!

528 WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

600 604

Storage Rentals 15x44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Loans and Mortgages

Rentals

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

605

Roommate Wanted STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

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Want To Rent Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

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Rooms for Rent Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365 Room w/private bath, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, garage,hot tub, tons storage, wi-fi+ cable. $500 mo util. incl, No dogs/ drugs 541-410-4384 Lori

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Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $675, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath 1/2-off 1st Mo. Rent Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

* FALL SPECIAL * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

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Estate Sales Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802 282

Sales Northwest Bend 3234 NW Fairway Heights. Sat. 1-4, Sun. 10-2, lots of girls age 3-10 toys, books, games, some furniture, misc. household &garage. Free stuffed animal w/purchase.

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend AWBREY BUTTE, Quality outdoor clothing/gear, household, small refrig, camper jacks, misc. Sat. 8-2 1396 NW City View Drive. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Family Moving Sale, Fri-Sun, 9-2. Furniture, toys, tools, something for everyone! 2590 NW Skyline Ranch Rd.

284

Sales Southwest Bend

MOVING-Good

stuff cheap, cheap stuff cheaper: SHOP Tools, Lawn/Garden, Living room, Bedroom, Kitchen, Snowboard, Bikes. Sat/Sun 10/9-10, 8 a.m. 541-420-3422 19449 Apache Rd, DRW Bend

Yard Sale: 19746 Buck Canyon Rd., Sat. & Sun. 9-5, furniture, dresser & bed, exercise equip., & much more!

CRAFT FAIR ~CRAFT FAIR ~ CRAFT FAIR

~ CRAFT FAIR

d d d d d d d d d d “ Fox Hollow Craft Fair ” & Open House See All Fox Hollow Has to Offer Tours available

Estate / Garage Sale Sat-Sun, 9-5, 1413 NE 7th Post WW2 radio/recorder/ record player, radios, canning jars, 89 T-Bird, TVs, tools, retro 40s dinette set, belt & table top sanders, wood lathe, camping items, fishing reels, etc. Car products, paint/stain, wood & hobby items, books, women’s & men’s clothing/shoes & purses, blonde bdrm set/ pieces, household & garage items. Cash only. Estate Sale! Sat., 8-5, Bend Masonic Center, 1036 NE 8th St., Hwy. 20 & NE 8th St.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

2599 NE Studio Road (corner of Butler Market and Studio Rd., Bend)

Saturday, October 16 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Beautiful handcrafted gifts for the holidays! Jewelry, bags, scarves, blankets, hats, holiday treats, shawls, holiday cards, scrapbooking gifts, etc .... gifts for all ages! Bring the whole family! CRAFT FAIR~ CRAFT FAIR~ CRAFT FAIR ~ CRAFT FAIR

Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-3, 3334 NE Stonebrook Lp, clothes, hunting & camping gear, golf, furniture, TV’s, linens housewares, all in exc. cond!

HANDBAG

SALE:

Dooney & Bourke, Coach, Tignanello, Guess Saturday, Oct. 16, 8:30 2937 Red Oak Drive

Huge Garage Sale; Christmas Decorations, Clothing, Furniture & More. Everything goes! Fri & Sat 9 am - 4 pm 705 NE Providence Drive (off of Neff Rd) (541) 678-3004 MAKE OFFER Garage Sale Tools, man’s bike, basketball hoop, golf equipment and much more. Sat. only, 9-2. 62750 Stenkamp Rd, follow signs from Neff Rd. & Powell Butte Hwy Moving Sale All Must Go! Sat. 9-4. 432 NE Quimby, 4th & Revere. Futon, area rugs, full mattress set, small electrics, vacuum - all only 4 mo. old! Also tables, shelves, chests, school/office, Weber BabyQ, kitchen & more. Moving Sale - Downsizing for retirement. Antique round oak table & chairs, signed “Verly” Bowl, art glass vase, Carnival Glass Dish, 3’ Alabaster Statue, 2 old tins, old .22 rifle, bookcase, dresser, desk, storage cabinet +lots of other items. Friday 9:30-5, cash only. 644 NE Caldwell Ct Moving Sale! Fri-Sat 8-3, 1442 NE Tucson #D, 1 block East of 27th off Neff. Cash only. Everything must go! NEW gas stove top, gazebo, Xmas indoor/outdoor decorations, kitchen items, more. Sat only, 8-3, 1188 NE 27th #119 (Snowberry Village)

ROBOTICS

TEAM

Huge Sale: Oct 16; 9am - 3pm. Saturday, Mountain View High School cafeteria, 2755 NE 27th St. Quality donations accepted, call Kim 541-389-7904. See in Community Calendar.

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Sales Southeast Bend Barn Sale Sat. 9am-5pm. 61640 Ward Rd. Anvil, trailer hitch w/spring bars, tools, pole bed frame, spurs, misc items.

Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun., 10- 2, lots of reloading equip., all new, a little bit of this & that, 20603 Hummingbird Ln. off Brosterhous.

Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun. 8:00-3, 61270 Victory Lp., lots of great stuff! HUGE Estate Sale, tools, furniture, kitchen & bath, Sat., 7:30 am-5pm, Sun., 9-4 105 SE Bridgeford Blvd off Wilson HUGE Moving Sale, every room in house & garage, Sat. 8-5. 21885 Rastovich Rd., off Ward Rd. 541-617-1888

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Sales Other Areas

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

ESTATE SALE in Mitchell!

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

Lots of antiques, Hoosier, old cupboards, crocks, churns, enamelware, old kitchenware, oil lamps, primitives, stoves, lots of yard art, iron beds, antique jar collection, 100 pieces vintage Pyrex, and much more! 207 SW Sasser, go to Mitchell & watch for signs Friday & Saturday 9-4 Crowd control numbers Friday 8:00 a.m. Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 for pix & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

Mission Fund Raising Sale Barn/Shop/Garage Sale Indoors, everything under the sun! Fri & Sat, 9-4, Celebra- Power tools, misc auto, guns, saddles & tack - English & tion Church, 1245 SE 3rd St. Western. Christmas items, ONCE IN 42 YRS S A L E Hummels, hunting & campOne day SATURDAY, OCT. 16 ing. Fri-Sat., 9-3, rain or 61345 Ward Rd. 9am-4pm shine! 67500 Harrington Absolutely NO early sales Loop, behind rodeo grounds. Sale - Furniture, ‘60-’80 Chevy pickup parts, ‘78 Cutlass, everything else! Fri-Sat, 8-2, corner Pettigrew/Bear Creek.

290

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D Hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Sales Redmond Area BIG SALE! Thur-Sun, 7:30-5:00. 1952 NW Oak Ave. Native Garage Sale, E of Sisters off American, tools, collector Hwy 20. Furn, dbl stroller & knives, lapidary, tons of obmore. 66510 Ponderosa sidian, garden statuary, Loop. 7am-2pm 318-8389 movies, clothes. Cash please.

Indoor Swap Meet

Garage Sale Fri-Sat., 8am-5pm. Household items, pictures, electronics, DVDs & games, misc. 1961 NW Elm Ave.

Every Sat., 9-4, 401 NE 2nd St., Bend (old St. Vincent dePaul bldg, next to Bimart) 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847

Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-5, 2447 SW Mariposa Lp., Elec. Wheel Chair, 1998 ATV 4X4 good shape, misc. shop tools, household & yard decor,more

Multiple Family Sale-Piano, furniture, clothes & other items. Saturday, Oct 16th, 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. 70325 Club Rd, Sisters Oregon.

Terrebonne SaleFri-Sat-Sun 9-3 DU decoys/paintings, guns, coins, tools, furn, 10100 Crooked River Dr. #10 (Smith Rock State Park exit)

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin

River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688. Westside Apt. For Rent, 1 bdrm. Washer & Dryer, Quiet neighborhood, 15 min walk to town, $435/mo., 541-388-0182,541-617-8457 WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1 Bdrm quiet, private home, carport, new stainless appl., jet tub, elec., internet, & cable incl., W/D, $785, 1st. & last, 541-408-5460.

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

1 Bedroom Studio Apt.

1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com Central location, pleasant studio, $400/mo. Parking/laundry on-site, cable + W/S/G paid. No pets/smoking. 541-598-5829 until 6pm.

Autumn Specials Are Here!

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend $1750 4 Brdm.+office, 3.5 bath, huge family room, 2 master suites, 3400 sq.ft, on west side, for lease, small dog OK, no smoking. Call Dick, 541-350-1495.

Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardon-site laundry rooms, storwood, attached carport, age units available. Close to fenced yard, dog okay, schools, pools, skateboard $925/mo. 541-389-5408 park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet Newport Hills, 3 bdrm., 2 friendly with new large dog bath, 1 level, 3-car garage, run, some large breeds okay A/C, no pets/smoking, $1300 with mgr. approval. mo.+ dep., incl. yard care, avail. now, 541-382-1470 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 654 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com Houses for Rent

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

FREE 1st mo. RENT! 2/2 Duplex Garage, central heat, dishwasher, W/D hookup. Clean & quiet, small pet, HUD OK, no smoking. WSG paid. $625/mo. 2031 NW Cedar. 541-815-9848 SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. W/S/G paid; small pet OK. $750/mo. Call 541-480-2233

SE Bend 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced yard, 2 car garage, RV parking, fireplace, close to schools and hospital. $845/mo., 541-948-4531

Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Old Mill. No smoking/pets. $975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call Rachel 541-604-0620.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

2 Bbdrm, 1 Bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, no pets/smokSW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath ing. $700 mo. + dep. 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new Call 541-598-6807 or flooring & paint, appls incl 541-815-2249 W&D, no pets/smoking, WS&G owner paid, credit 3 To 4 bdrm., 2 bath house, check req’d, discount 1st mo very nice, but small, large rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. yard, storage building, heat For appt/info: 541-504-6141 pump, $890/mo. call 541-310-0058,541-788-1750 646 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 Apt./Multiplex Furnished bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliFurnished 1 bdrm apt. on quiet ances, includes gardener. 5 acre estate, pet on ap$795 mo. 541-408-0877. proval. Garden area and hot house avail. $550 mo. util. 660 included. 541-549-3838.

648

Houses for Rent General Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, all appl. incl. W/D, near Lodge $775, 541-617-5787

CRESCENT, OREGON 2 bdrm, fenced yard, 1 car garage, w/d. $500 month. 541-6726359. 541-430-1594. Lease option, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, furnished, near Lodge $235,000. 541-617-5787 Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet country home with wood stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

1 Bdrm, living room, kitchen, nice deck, private yard area, on dry canyon, newly remodeled, $550/mo., owner pays W/S/G, 541-480-9883.

3 Bdrm., 2 bath house 1200 sq.ft., single level, 21354 Starling Dr., $925/mo., no pets or smoking, Ed, 503-789-0104.

642

Alfalfa Area Farm House on 2 acres, 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, clean, fenced, pets negotiable. $750/mo., $500 dep. Refs req’d. 541-383-9074 eves Newer Pahlisch 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1406 sq.ft., vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace, fenced yard, dbl. garage w/opener, $1095 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Houses for Rent La Pine

2 Bdrm, 2 bath mfd. home, bonus room,on 1 acre,large dbl. garage w/shop area, $625, $625 dep., pets OK w/dep. Section 8 OK, 541-728-1008. La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041 4 units, ranging from 2,250 to 8,750 sq ft, @ 25¢/sq ft. 3-phase power, fire sprinkler sys. Prime loc., 61510 American Ln, Bend. 530-305-0104

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717


THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 F3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 687

745

860

870

880

882

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

***

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 Mill Quarter Area, exc. street exposure, corner office location, great as office or health services, 1600 sq.ft., good parking, call 541-815-2182.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $117,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Real Estate For Sale

700

750

Redmond Homes

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Commercial building for sale: $130,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale property at 907 Highland Ave, Redmond, through a sealed bid process. OPEN HOUSE: Oct. 15, 10-2:00 pm. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

762

Homes with Acreage Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666 Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

The Bulletin

Boats & RV’s

800 860

Motorcycles And Accessories

865

ATVs 2006 Polaris Ranger

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

700 XP Snow Plow, winch, stereo, custom rear seats, front and rear running lights, 2nd battery, windshield. $8000 541.280.6246

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283. CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

771

745

Lots 1.15 Acres RM zoned bare parcel for sale: $65,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale, property located near Maricopa Drive in Bend, through a sealed bid process. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com.

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the 773 age of 18 living with parents Acreages or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of This newspaper will not road, power at property line, knowingly accept any adverwater near by, $250,000 tising for real estate which is OWC 541-617-0613 in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

Boats & Accessories Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

Sunseeker 31' Class C 2001 33,000 miles, A/C, 1 slide, 2 TVs, ex. cond, non-smoker, $29,900. 541 382 4086

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

14’ Fiberglass boat, current license, good trailer w/spare, $250 OBO. 541-382-9012 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $17,500. 541-548-3985.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, upgraded queen bed, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

881

Travel Trailers

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Keystone Springdale 26 ft. 2005 travel trailer with tip-out and awning. Great condition. Priced at what is owed at $11,800. Call (541) 948-1733 or (503) 881-5396.

HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Wilderness 2007 26'. Front queen bed, rear bath. Couch & dinette table in slide-out. One owner. $18,000. OBO. 541-419-6215

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Super Beetle 1974 International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

933 ***

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Heavy duty pickup bed trailer, will haul 2 cords of wood. $495 OBO. 541-480-8521

929

Automotive Wanted

Wanderer 27’ with slide, 1998, queen custom mattress, plus sofa sleeps 2, recliner, very good condition, $5300. Call 541-382-2893

885

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Pickups CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537 CHEVY 1500 Z71 SWB 4x4 1993. V-8. Auto. A/C. Silverado. 1 owner. Exc. cond. Black. $5495. VIN 140664. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

NEWER 6L 3/4 ton 4WD SUV or king cab short-bed pickup, in exc. cond., 541-389-1913.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 4 Toyota 6-hole 16x7JJ alloys w/P265-70R16 studded tires, exc cond! $500. 541-504-4666 Engine Stand, 3 legged, $50, please call 541-389-9905 for more info.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

925

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Utility Trailers

Spingdale 29’ 2007,slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Chrysler Cordoba 1982, 29K 1-owner mi, mint cond, loaded. Come take a look! $3195 OBO. 541-330-8969

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, TWO HANGARS at Roberts original owner, V8, autoField, Redmond, OR. Spots matic, great shape, $9000 for 5 airplanes. Fully leased, OBO. 530-515-8199 income producing. $536 an380SL 1983, nual lease. $195,000 both Mercedes Convertible, blue color, new Will consider all offers. For tires, cloth top & fuel pump, details, 541-815-6085. call for details 541-536-3962

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

880

Allegro

900

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

916

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Antique and Classic Autos

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Motorhomes

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

17’ 60664 Golf Villlage Loop 3 bdrms., 2.5 baths, 2122 sq. ft., 14 yrs. old, Completely Updated. 2-car garage. Widgi Creek Golf Course. $543,210. Sunday 1-4, Open House 541-740-8642, jerry_west66@yahoo.com

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

744

Open Houses

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

932

Autos & Transportation

Tires, (4), 225/60R16 Studded, great tread & studs, $200, 541-390-6016.

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, Tires, 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non seasons, $350, 541-447-1668 smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

Debris Removal

Handyman

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

JUNK BE GONE

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894. Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353

Excavating

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Handyman

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Sprinkler Blowouts: Contractors Law (ORS 671) Time to Blow out your irrigarequires all businesses that tion system. Call Cutting advertise to perform Land Edge Lawn Works for your scape Construction which in irrigation needs: cludes: planting, decks, 541-815-4097. LCB# 8451 fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair Yard Doctor for landscaping of irrigation systems to be li needs. Sprinkler system censed with the Landscape blow-outs, rock walls, sod, Contractors Board. This hydroseeding & more. 4-digit number is to be in Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012 cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business If you need assistance cleanhas a bond, insurance and ing up your property, I have workers compensation for a tractor w/scoop, bush hog their employees. For your and harrow. $40/hr, min 2 protection call 503-378-5909 hrs. Call Victor 541-383-5085 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check Fall Maintenance! license status before con Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., tracting with the business. Weeding, Raking. Persons doing landscape 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 maintenance do not require a www.bblandscape.com LCB license.

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

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F4 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE All ARC deposits made with Brooks Resources for the Awbrey Butte Owners Association (ABOA) ARC prior to December 1, 2008 are now subject to forfeiture if construction has not been completed to the ARC and design guideline standards or final inspection has not been completed. All ARC deposits made December 1, 2008 and after are subject to a 24 month expiration. If construction and final inspection was not completed within this time, your deposit is subject to forfeiture. If you made a deposit prior to December 1, 2008 and did not receive a refund, please contact Aperion Property Management at 541-389-3172. LEGAL NOTICE Mr. Nick Yesterday: Lakeshort R.V. Park is trying to locate this person in regard to his motorhome at Lakeshore R.V. Park. If anyone knows of this person or his phone number, please contact Lakeshore R.V. Park, 541-447-6059. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Brian M. Manselle and Teri L. Manselle, Grantor(s), to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 10-04-2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2006-67011, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 22, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11448, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 242804; Lot 3 of Pine Tree Meadows Phase I, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 936 NW Spruce Tree Pl., Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,361.86 beginning on 12/01/2009; plus late charges of $524.96; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $207,455.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 12/01/2009 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 01/18/2011 at the hour of am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the At the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any

reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATED: September 10, 2010 By: Katrina E. Glogowski, 2505 Third Ave. Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0046268843 T.S. No.: WC-248699-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JESUS J. TORRES, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 6/7/2007, recorded 6/11/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-32692 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 240342 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR (124), OBSIDIAN ESTATES NO. 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2845 SW PERIDOT ST. REDMOND, OR 97756-7774 AKA 2845 SW PERIDOT AVE REDMOND OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $154,831.67; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $858.27 Monthly Late Charge $39.19 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,831.67 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/13/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/22/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3666284 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7436292528 T.S. No.: OR-253056-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STACEY STEINER as Grantor to ASPEN TITLE &ESCROW INC., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/23/2003, recorded 7/29/2003, in official records of Klamath County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. M03 at page No. 53699, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. DEED OF PARTIAL RECONVEYANCE RECORDED 3/19/2007 AS INSTRUMENT #2007-004722 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: R136212 PARCEL 3, LAND PARTITION LP-85-05 AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE KLAMATH COUNTY SURVEYOR'S

OFFICE, JUNE 21, 2006, SURVEY MAP #7239. SAID PARCEL LOCATED IN THE SOUTH ½ OF THE SOUTHEAST ¼ OF THE SOUTHEAST ¼ OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 23 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, KLAMATH COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 148909 KURTZ ROAD LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $155,214.03; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,168.49 Monthly Late Charge $48.04 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $155,214.03 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/16/2010 at the hour of 10:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at On the front steps of the Circuit Court, 316 Main St., in the City of Klamath Falls, County of Klamath, Oregon County of Klamath, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/26/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3670386 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0045089760 T.S. No.: WC-241824-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JERRY D. WILLIAMS AND TERRI L. WILLIAMS, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 1/26/2007, recorded 1/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-06414 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133102 LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), BLOCK FOUR (4), FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, RECORDED APRIL 12, 1968, IN CABINET A, PAGE 157, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20910 89TH ST. BEND, Oregon 97701-8466 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $357,355.33; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/15/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,365.59 Monthly Late Charge $68.28 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said

deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $357,355.33 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.14% per annum from 5/15/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/8/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/27/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3672416 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7442094629 T.S. No.: OR-253443-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JERRY A. JONES as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 9/13/2006, recorded 9/18/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-63235 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 138523 LOT 11, BLOCK 4, REVISED PLAT OF MEADOW VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17745 WOODLAND LANE SUNRIVER, Oregon 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $494,303.93; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 1/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,718.65 Monthly Late Charge $161.84 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $494,303.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.585% per annum from 12/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/22/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the

date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/3/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3681096 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010, 10/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031443013 T.S. No.: 10-10322-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RAFAEL V. MARTINEZ AND ALBA B. MARTINEZ as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 8, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-80649 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 15 13 03CA03400 LOT SIXTY-FOUR (64). NI-LAH-SHA-PHASE 2 AND 3, RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 1999, IN CABINET E, PAGE 342, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2344 NE 5TH ST., REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,330.92 Monthly Late Charge $54.93 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 348,164.50 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.32100 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 19, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the

right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 1, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3760840 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010, 10/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0686092441 T.S. No.: OR-216751-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CASSIDY MOONEY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC , as Beneficiary, dated 6/1/2007, recorded 6/21/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-34909 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 106491 LOT FOUR (4), BLOCK SEVEN (7), CLEAR SKY ESTATES, RECORDED APRIL 7, 1977, IN CABINET B-225, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 837 SOUTHEAST 6TH STREET BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $146,568.05; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,075.63 Monthly Late Charge $45.87 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $146,568.05 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary

pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/7/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/26/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3670374 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0043259076 T.S. No.: WC-251947-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, EMILIANO ANGUIANO, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 7/6/2006, recorded 7/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-47437 LOAN MODIFICATION RECORDED 3/16/2007 AS INSTRUMENT #2007-15738 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209228 ALL THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES STATE OF OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT FOUR (4), TERRANGO GLEN SOUTH,

DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 62977 MARSH ORCHID DR. BEND, OR 97701-8799 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $331,622.03; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/3/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $809.09 Monthly Late Charge $32.88 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $331,622.03 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.08% per annum from 10/3/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/20/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3660797 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1414 T.S. No.: 1220211-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7756 T.S. No.: 1289984-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lane B. Lehrke, Kelli J. Lehrke, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit., A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated May 25, 2007, recorded May 31, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-30785 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel 1, partition plat no. 1994-35, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 23965 Rickard Road Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,486.26 Monthly Late Charge $124.31. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $593,334.74 together with interest thereon at 7.975% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 5, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Daniel G. Morales and Barbara A. Sanger-morales Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Co, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 19, 2007, recorded October 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-56995 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot one of Awbrey Glen Homesites, Phase One, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2910 NW Underhill Pl. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,076.23 Monthly Late Charge $160.25. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $569,790.14 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 5, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-339761 09/24/10, 10/01, 10/08, 10/15

R-339889 09/24, 10/01, 10/08, 10/15


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, October 15, 2010 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031346265 T.S. No.: 10-10320-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PETER P. PHILLIPS as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.,, as Beneficiary, recorded on September 27, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-65184 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17 11 36BA 10300 LOT TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE (229), NORTHWEST CROSSING, PHASE 5, RECORDED APRIL 13, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 238, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1505 NW LEWIS ST., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,024.15 Monthly Late Charge $88.35 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 384,428.63 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.33100 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 19, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â 508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fideiityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL

714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 24, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3753527 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601717249 T.S. No.: OR-252734-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEVEN EARL MOFFET AND LONI LEE MOFFET, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/5/2006, recorded 7/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-47542 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 110345 LOT TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK SEVEN (7) OF BRIGHTENWOOD ESTATES III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20541 WHITEHAVEN LANE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $257,056.91; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,976.18 Monthly Late Charge $88.02 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $257,056.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI

TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/21/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3661878 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010

ated in the above-mentioned county and state, to-wit: Lots One Hundred Twenty-Four (124) and One Hundred Twenty-Five (125), CROSSROADS SECOND ADDITION, recorded May 9, 1973, in Cabinet B-31, Deschutes County, Oregon. (The title company advises the property address is 14770 Bluegrass Loop, Sisters, Oregon.) Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments due May 2010 through July 2010, for a total of $3,377.64, plus late charges of $112.65, plus that portion of real property taxes now due for 2009-10. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the ollowing, to wit: As of May 18, 2010, the principal sum of $146,707.61 plus interest; plus any sums advanced by the beneficiary or beneficiary's successor in interest for the protection of the above described property, plus attorney and trustee's fees incurred by reason of said default. Wherefore, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 17, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at inside main lobby of Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an

obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act requires we state: This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. DATED August 5, 2010. Paul S. Cosgrove, Esq., Trustee. Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler, LLP, 220 NW Skyline Blvd., Portland, OR 97210. For additional information call (503) 291-6700 or (503) 956-8139. Sale #66025-238. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0022310163 T.S. No.: 10-10387-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOE WOOD AND SHERI L. WOOD as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, recorded on September 29, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-66101 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 14 13 15 00 00700 THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NS1/4SW1/4) OF SECTION FIFTEEN (15), TOWNSHIP FOURTEEN (14) SOUTH, RANGE THIRTEEN (13), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPT THAT PORTION LYING WITHIN LAMBERT ROAD Commonly known as: 8450 NE 1ST ST., TERREBONNE, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,008.82 Monthly Late Charge $100.44 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 353,079.83 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 24, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said

trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 1, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3761016 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010, 10/22/2010, 10/29/2010

Garage Sales

ing to discuss the options with the neighborhoods potentially affected will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 21 at Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend, Oregon. A formal public hearing on the proposal will be held by the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 4 at 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond. A final decision on this proposal will be made on November 4th. Any route change will likely be effec-

tive in January 2011. All persons wishing to be heard on these issues are invited to attend the information meeting, public hearing and/or mail written comments to 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond or email hornelas@bendareatransit.c om or snance@coic.org. Written testimony must be received no later than Monday, October 25, 2010 for presentation to the COIC Board of Directors. The

meeting

location

physically accessible to persons with disabilities. Communication or other accommodations for other people with disabilities will be made upon advance request. Such request can be made to Sharon Nance at 541-548-9537. Providing at least 48 hours notice will help ensure availability. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-367758-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mark R. Allison and Lisa E. Allison, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated January 18, 2006, recorded January 19, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-03843 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 12, block 2, Tamarack Park East Phase VIII, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1852 NE Yellowstone Ln. Bend OR 97701-6580. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,034.54 Monthly Late Charge $50.74. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $193,045.75 together with interest thereon at 5.250% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Michael J. Easterbrooks and Mary Melissa Easterbrooks, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Capitol Commerce Mortgage Co., A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 11, 2003, recorded July 25, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-49991 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY SITUATED IN REDMOND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON, TO WIT: THAT PORTION OF LOT TWO (2), BLOCK NINE (9), RANCHWAY ACRES FIRST ADDITION, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2. BLOCK 9, RANCHWAY ACRES FIRST ADDITION, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY' OREGON; THENCE NORTH 00°33'10" EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 2 A DISTANCE OF 148.97 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE NORTH 89°40' 50" WEST A DISTANCE OF OF 50.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00° 33' 32" WEST A DISTANCE OF 148.96 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE SOUTH 89° 41' 05" EAST A DISTANCE OF 150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL ID: 162683 Commonly known as: 1775 SW 26th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $849.74 Monthly Late Charge $29.34. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $114,801.02 together with interest thereon at 3.250% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 15, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 22, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MATT MACDOWALL as Grantor to WEST COAST TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR M & T BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 11/6/2007, recorded 11/7/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2007-58726, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 257746 LOT 31 OF RIMROCK RIDERS SUBDIVISION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20171 ROPER LANE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 3/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,276.23 Monthly Late Charge $113.81 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $331,891.05 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1250 per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 11/4/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 10/5/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Date: 6/28/2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. This office is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

R-341578 10/01, 10/08, 10/15, 10/22

R-344077 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/05

ASAP# 3633264 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010, 10/15/2010

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Justin C. Myrick and Rhonda L. Myrick, husband and wife, as grantor, to Paul S. Cosgrove, Esq., as trustee, in favor of Budget Finance Company, as beneficiary, dated March 22, 2007, recorded April 18, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2007-22145, the beneficial interest thereafter being assigned to Budget Funding I, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, by instrument recorded May 1, 2007, as No. 2007-24899, covering the following described real property situ-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2978 T.S. No.: 1296400-09.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 PUBLIC NOTICE Potential Change to Route 2 of Bend Area Transit Community Meeting and Public Hearing Announcement Proposal - To eliminate stops 216, 217 and 232 on Pinebrook and alter the route to continue South on Brookswood. Please be aware that this route must be altered prior to the Murphy Road overcrossing project expected in 3 years. There are 2 current route alternatives, but BAT will solicit other alternatives from the community. Maps for the proposed route re-design alternatives to extend Route 2 on Brookswood to Goldenpod or a loop using Poplar and Lodgepole are available by calling 541-322-5875 or online at www.bendareatransit.com and www.coic.org. A public information meet-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6532 T.S. No.: 1298958-09.


F6 Friday, October 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

933

935

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C,

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Subaru Outback 2003 Limited Wagon ~ Too many features to list, always garaged, 48,650 miles. 541-390-1017 for details. $12,450 OBO

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 1990, 4 Cyl., 5-spd., low miles, full set new studded tires, reduced to $1295 Firm, 541-475-6794

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

Subaru Outback 2004 Limited Wagon $12,995 DLR 0225

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CL AS S I F I E DS

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Vans Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

The Bulletin

Reach thousands of readers!

VIN#-#604795

541-598-3750

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

leather - moon - 5 speed,

940 International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

Chevrolet Suburban 3/4 Ton 4WD 1988. Silverado, A/C, 8 Passenger, Tow, Snow Tires, MUST SEE! $2850. 541-480-3265 DLR. CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. CHEVY BLAZER 4x4 LS 1998 good condition, 110k miles, $5,295. For more information 541-382-9411 after 4 p.m. Ford Bronco 1980, extra engine & trans., runs but needs love. $800. 541-546-7001 Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

975

Automobiles

Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi Cabriolet 1998, Loaded, Auto, Custom Wheels, Newer top, tires, brakes & struts. $4600. 541-350-7214

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $4950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Buick Park Avenue 2004, ultra super charged V-6, loaded, white diamond, exc. cond. Vin #148993, $11,500 541-480-3265 • Dlr #8308 Cadillac DeVille 1992, Blue/Blue, 136K miles, run's & Looks very nice, Loaded. $1900 FIRM. 541-350-7214 ***

CHECK YOUR AD

GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

GRAND Cherokee Limited, 2006, 47,900 mi., Hemi V-8, 5.7L, loaded, perfect cond., silver, plenty of power! New struts, shocks, Michelins, Original owner/records. Never “off road’’ $21,900. (541) 593-3214, Sunriver.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2006 Leather-36,000 miles,

$17995 VIN#234708.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

2006 AUDI A3 4DR, HB, 2.0T Auto, DSG

2007 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER Utility, Blue

1996 FORD MUSTANG 2DR, Convertible GT

2008 BUICK LUCERNE 4DR, Sedan, V6, CXL

2007 DODGE CHARGER 4DR, Sedan, 4-Spd Auto

2007 HONDA ACCORD Sedan, 4DR, V6, LX

2001 HONDA CIVIC 4DR, Sedan, LX, Auto

2003 BUICK LESABRE 4DR, Sedan

2004 FORD Supercab, Flareside

1998 FORD RANGER 4x4, EX Cab, Red

1998 FORD TAURUS 4DR, Sedan, SE, White

2005 GMC YUKON XL, 4DR, 1500, AWD

2007 DODGE CHARGER 4DR, Sedan, 5-Spd Auto

2009 MAZDA MAZDA5 4DR, Wagon, Auto, Sport

2002 CADILLAC ESCALADE 4DR, AWD, Champagne

2009 CHRYSLER JOURNEY Silver

2008 NISSAN 4DR, Gray

ALTIMA

2007 CHRYSLER SEBRING Sedan, 4DR, Silver

2008 CHEVY COLORADO 2DR, Regular Cab

2009 NISSAN CUBE 5DR, Wagon, I4, CVT 1.8S

2009 FORD FOCUS 4DR, Sedan, SES, Black

2000 CHEVY BLAZER 2DR, 4WD, LS, Black

2006 HONDA 4WD, EXL

PILOT

2001 FORD RANGER 2x4, ST Cab, White

2005 FORD TAURUS 4DR, Sedan, SE, Silver

2001 HONDA 2DR, EX, Manual

2010 TOYOTA COROLLA 4DR, Sedan, Auto, LE

2004 FORD Supercrew, Lariat

F150

2003 FORD SUPER DUTY Regular Cab, XLT

2006 SCION 4DR, HB, Auto, White

2006 HYUNDAI SONATA 4DR, Sedan, V6, Auto

2004 CHEVY SILVERADO Extended Cab

2004 CHEVY TAHOE 4DR, 1500, 4WD, Z71, Gold

1997 DODGE DAKOTA Club Cab, 4WD

2006 VW NEW BEETLE 2DR, 2.5L Manual

1995 FORD HD, Regular Cab

F150

2002 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4DR, 4WD, LTZ, Blue

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Y L N O S Y A D 3

2003 ACURA MDX 4DR, SUV, Touring Pk 2009 HYUNDAI TUCSON Red 2008 CHRYSLER ASPEN AWD, 4DR, Limited, Blue S40

2003 VW PASSAT 4DR, Sedan, GLS, Auto

ay Frid r 15 obe Oct - 6pm 9am

2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 4DR, Wagon, Limited 2009 NISSAN SENTRA 4DR, Sedan, I4, CVT 2.0 2005 CHRYSLER 300 4DR, Sedan, 300 Touring 2008 DODGE CALIBER 4DR, HB, R/T, FWD

2008 DODGE DURANGO UTL, Charcoal

VOLVO

MIATA XC60

2003 TOYOTA 4RUNNER 4DR, Limited, V8

150 OVER LES C VEHI ED TO IFIC SACR UBLIC! P THE

2009 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 4DR, Wagon, SE 1999 DODGE NEON 4DR, Sedan, Highline Green 2004 DODGE NEON 4DR, Sedan, SE, Silver

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

2006 Black

NISSAN

S

2004 DODGE RAM 1500 2DR, Regular Cab

2010 JEEP WRANGLER Green

2007 DODGE RAM 1500 Quad Cab

2010 FORD FLEX 4DR, SEL, AWD, Gray

2005 DODGE RAM 3500 4DR, Quad Cab

2004 SUZUKI XL7 4DR, Auto, 4WD, LX, White

2006 FORD SUPER DUTY Crew Cab

2005 FORD EXPEDITION White

2007 FORD FOCUS 4DR, Sedan, SES, Red

2006 DODGE RAM 2500 4DR, Quad Cab

2006 FORD EXPLORER Gray

2009 Black

1999 FORD SUPER DUTY Crew Cab

FUSION

$

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2005 SUBARU LEGACY Sedan, Outback, 3.0 2008 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE Black 2007 NISSAN PATHFINDER 4WD, 4DR, SE, Off-Road 2002 JEEP LIBERTY 4DR, Sport, 4WD, Silver

TER T REGIS

O

WIN

FLAT

2009 NISSAN ROGUE Black 2009 JEEP WRANGLER 4WD, 2DR, X, Silver 2005 CHEVY EQUINOX 4DR, AWD, LT, Blue 2006 KAWASAKI Motorcycle, Green

650

2004 KIA SPECTRA 4DR, Sedan, Base, Auto 2007 Gray

VOLVO

XC90

2006 Silver

NISSAN

TITAN

2010 MAZDA MAZDA3 4DR, Sedan, Touring 2005 FORD EXPLORER 4DR, 4.0L

L PANE

TV

2006 DODGE DAKOTA 4DR, Quad Cab, 4WD

$8 OVER N O I L L MI RS TO DOLLA THIS LOAN ND! E WEEK

ALTIMA

FORD

ING T ART

G6

2005 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE 4DR, Limited, 4WD

S TRUCKEconomy , s 4x4 o’s, SUVs, iesels, Rep D , , s s n Car Retur Lease e Vehicles, t on ra Corpo mos, Aucti ds i e r D b y d e nH Us s, eve ELLEY e l c i h K Ve ELOW ALL B UE BOOK! BL

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2002 DODGE RAM 1500 4DR, Quad Cab CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

2009 PONTIAC 4DR, Sedan, GT

y rda 6 u m t Sa ber 1 10a o Oct - 6pm 9am

ASH ZERO C N DOW S! R DELIVE

2009 CHEVY IMPALA Black

2010 Silver

2005 DODGE DURANGO Blue

INTERE ST RATES A S y LOW A da Sun er 17 FOR QUSA 3.69% LIFIED ob Oct - 5pm BUYERS

2009 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 4DR, Wagon, Touring

2004 MAZDA Burgundy

1998 JEEP CHEROKEE 4DR, Classic, 4WD

! T N E

V E S E L A S

2008 TOYOTA MATRIX 5DR, Wagon, Auto

2006 HYUNDAI TUCSON SUV, Blue

R OU

H 72

2004 NISSAN ARMADA UT, Gray

VOLVO

XA

CIVIC

2008 JEEP LIBERTY 4WD, 4DR, Limited

F250

2000 JEEP CHEROKEE 4DR, Classic, 4WD

2009 Silver

DLR 0225

package, Good condition, $1800, 541-815-9939.

The Bulletin Classifieds

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5000. 541-593-4016

4 STORES! 1 L O C AT I O N ! 3 D AY S !

2003 CHEVY TAHOE 4DR, 1500, 4WD, LS, Gold

541-598-3750

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

2008 FORD RANGER 2WD, 2DR, Supercab

VIN#B29136

A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4400. Call 541-429-2966

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

SUBARUS!!!

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

DLR 0225

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/ Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 190K hwy. mi., $7500, 541-410-7586.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

VIN#165212

541-598-3750

CENTRAL OREGON’S LARGEST USED SELECTION! Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 28,000 miles-loaded $26,995

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto,

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Buick LeSabre 2004, FORD EXPEDITION 1999 4x4, 118,000 miles, new paint and trans, exc. cond., garaged. $6000 OBO. (541) 549-4834, (541) 588-0068

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

$16,995 Subaru Forester 2001, white, very clean, new tires, reg. maint. Call for more details. $6500. 541-549-9960

cond., low mi., maint. up-todate, $9500, 541-548-4044.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary EdiToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $10,800. 541-420-2715

4 door sedan 18,000 miles

Mercedes 300SD 1981, Nissan Versa 2008, great

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Toyota Camry LE 2009

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

2009 CHEVY SILVERADO Red 1999 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA 2DR, Conv., Touring

$$

E $$ V A S NDS A S U THO

2009 MITSUBISHI GALANT 4DR, Sedan, ES, Red 2009 FORD TAURUS Black 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 4DR, Sedan, I4, CVT 2.5 2006 DODGE RAM 1500 4DR, Quad Cab 1999 NISSAN MURANO 4DR, SL, AWD, V6, Silver

1999 NISSAN MAXIMA 4DR, Sedan, SE, Auto

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

CHRYSLER Sebring JX 1998 convertible, V6, AT, ABS, AC, Cruise, PW/PS, dual air bags, 91k milies. Garaged, very good cond. KBB $3720, $3200 OBO. 541-317-0567.

2010 FORD EXPLORER 4DR, 4WD, XLT, White 1990 FORD Styleside, 4WD

F150

2005 CHEVY CLASSIC 4DR, Sedan, White 2002 FORD F150 Regular Cab, Flareside

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

2002 FORD F150 Supercrew, XLT, 4WD Ford Conversion Van 1994, 7 pass. van, 117K, rear bed, perfect CarFax. Like new in/ out. $3500. 541-382-7449

2002 FORD F150 Supercrew, XLT, 4WD

SMOLICH CERTIFIED Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car

1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend

105 Point Vehicle Inspection

ACROSS FROM PILOT BUTTE

7 Day Exchange Program 12,000 Mile/12 Month Powertrain Warranty

www.smolichmotors.com All sale prices after any dealer discounts, factory rebates & applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufactures rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 10/17/10. Chrysler and Jeep are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation. *Must finance with Chrysler Financial to receive CFC bonus.


M U S I C : Country music star Jo Dee Messina is in town, PAGE 3 M O V I E S : ’RED’ and three others open, PAGE 25

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN OCTOBER 15, 2010

Jekyll Mr.Hyde

Dr.

CTC puts a modern twist on a classic, PAGE 12


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Cover photo by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Brad Ruder plays Dr. Jekyll in the CTC play “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• Take a look at recent releases

• Make your plans for later on

RESTAURANTS • 10

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 19

• A review of Bourbon Street Sea & Soul Food

FINE ARTS • 12 MUSIC • 3 • Jo Dee Messina plays the Tower Theatre • Matt Hopper’s at the Moon • Capture the Flag is in town • Lucy Schwartz is at Silver Moon • Return of The White Buffalo • Dirty country music hits Mountain’s Edge • Luckyiam brings smart hip-hop to town • The Defibulators: honky-tonk from the city • Blackstrap plays the Moon • Chris Chabot says farewell • Cork hosts Reynolds, Yager • Hard rockin’ at Mountain’s Edge

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

• COVER STORY: “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” hits the local stage • Sunriver group seeks artists • Prineville store hosts event tonight • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• Learn something new

OUT OF TOWN • 20 • Oregon Symphony plays “Psycho” soundtrack • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 23 • Reviews of “NBA 2K11” and “Professor Layton and the Unwound Future” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16

• “RED,” “A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop,” “Lebanon” and “Jackass 3-D” open in Central Oregon • “How to Train Your Dragon,” “I am Love,” “Jonah Hex” and “Leaves of Grass” are out on video and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

• A week full of Central Oregon events

COMING NEXT WEEK JIGU! Thunder Drums of China at the Tower


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 3

music

Simple conversations Submitted photo

In 1996, Jo Dee Messina’s self-titled debut album spawned the hit “Heads Carolina, Tails California.”

Jo Dee Messina brings her Music Room Tour to Bend’s Tower Theatre By David Jasper The Bulletin

‘I

f someone yells, ‘Free Bird’ one more time, I think my head is going to explode.” So says country artist Jo Dee Messina, speaking by phone about her Music Room Tour, bringing her to the Tower Theatre on Tuesday (see “If you go”). As the tour’s name suggests, the set is decorated and furnished to resemble the music room at her Nashville home, and during the shows, Messina

says, she jokes, banters and takes requests from her audience. If she’s half as candid and funny as she is just doing a phone interview, there are going to be some happy souls at the Tower that night. (Hint: Ask her to do her impressions of her toddler imitating the leaf blower and electric drill.) “It really is like the audience is coming to visit me for the night. We play really small venues, so that I can hear people in the back of the room, and they can hear me more than just yapping. Mostly it’s important to hear them; I have a microphone.”

(She also has an 18-month-old son burbling in the background. “I’m following him around, because he’s climbing the stairs, so I don’t think the sound is going to go anywhere.”) The tour was originally conceived as a storyteller series, and Messina certainly has plenty of stories from which to draw. A native of Massachusetts, she learned to play guitar and was singing in clubs as a teenager. At just 19, she moved to Nashville, debuting with a self-titled album in 1996. Continued Page 5

If you go What: Jo Dee Messina When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $45-$55 Contact: 541-3170700 or www .towertheatre.org


P A G E 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

music

Across the country

Submitted photo

Capture the Flag’s The Ended Summer Tour will kick off tonight.

Submitted photo

M a t t H o p p e r & T h e R o m a n Candles will perform tonight at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom.

A touch of swagger Matt Hopper struts his stuff on ‘Jersey Finger’

G

reat rock ’n’ roll should come with buckets of swagger. Swagger comes in different shades: The Rolling Stones’ hip-shaking riffs. Velvet Underground’s detached cool. The Clash’s defiant sneer. But all those bands are decades old, and if you think about today’s stars, it’s tough to name one that really rocks with style. Maroon 5? Train? Gimme a break. Matt Hopper (www.matthopper.com) is hardly a household name, but the talented singer-songwriter — raised in Alaska, now based in Boise, Idaho — has a natural swagger, especially in a live setting. And after several releases that leaned toward folk-rock and bedroom pop, his new album, “Jersey Finger,” truly captures Hopper’s energy. “Jersey Finger” was produced in Cottage Grove by enigmatic musician/producer Richard Swift, and it’s packed with the kind of hook-heavy songs that make Hopper one

of the Northwest’s best-kept secrets. It’s all here: airy, earworm melodies, slinky guitar lines and oppressive guitar fuzz, indispensable ooh/ahh background vocals, and the occasional horn interjection. The common thread is Hopper’s raspy voice, a road-weary, whiskey-soaked thing made for singing rock ’n’ roll. Taken as a whole, “Jersey Finger” paints Hopper as a guy who has a vision for his music, knows his strengths, and is confident his work deserves to be heard. It also proves he has the skills and the strut to make you want to pay attention. And those, ladies and gents, are the basic ingredients of bona fide swagger. M att Hopper & The Roman Candles, with Bryan Free; 9 tonight ; $5;Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com. — Ben Salmon

Capture the Flag kicks off Ended Summer tour tonight

B

end-based punk-pop band Capture the Flag was nearing the end of its short summer tour when the idea came up. “It went well and we had a lot of fun, and we were all like, ‘Let’s do a full U.S. tour. Let’s go all the way to Florida and back,’” said guitarist John Davis, who also runs a booking/management company called Red Light Artist Agency. “It was kind of a joke at first, but the guys were like, ‘No, dude. Let’s do a tour.’” So Davis started booking shows, and tonight, Capture the Flag will kick off The Ended Summer Tour, which will take them south to Phoenix, east through Texas and into Florida, then north into Ohio and back west, ending in Portland in early December. Currently, the run includes 35ish shows in 51 days, though Davis isn’t done booking yet. “I went back to them and showed them the schedule,” he said with a laugh. “They were like, ‘Oh.’” Two months on the road is a long time for any band, but Capture the Flag is more like a group of brothers. The guys — Davis, singer Zach Nance, bassist Matt Feffer, guitarist Tyler Dominy and drummer Mikee Snyder — have known each other for years; they grew up together, playing in

punk and hardcore bands. Their latest project might have the most potential for success. Capture the Flag plays likeable pop-punk in the vein of Blink182 and Green Day, to pick a few huge names. For deeper diggers, it’s really more like the stuff you’d hear on labels such as Fat Wreck Chords, Vagrant and Epitaph. “We wanted to play something that all of us were having fun with,” Davis said. “The best part when you write a song and you show it to somebody is when you catch them humming along.” The band has been together for less than a year, but already released a digital EP, with hopes of recording more after their epic journey across the country. “This really just started out on an acoustic guitar, and it’s been fun to watch it progressively grow and mold and change over the last several months,” Davis said. “We’re really excited about it, and we’re ready to … give it our best shot.” Capture the Flag, with Broadway Calls, Mascot, Icarus the Owl and A Love Like Winter; 7:30 tonight, doors open 7 p.m.; $10; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 redlightartistagency@ gmail.com or www.myspace .com/capturetheflagpop. — Ben Salmon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

PAGE 5

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From Page 3 That album spawned the hit “Heads Carolina, Tails California.” More chart success followed on the strength of singles such as “I’m Alright,” “That’s the Way,” “Burn” and others. In 2005, her album “Delicious Surprise” spawned the song “My Give a Damn’s Busted,” another No. 1 hit for Messina. A planned follow-up album, “Unmistakable,” had been pushed back repeatedly by her label. Instead, it’s being released as a series of extended play albums, or EPs in music parlance. The first, “Unmistakable: Love” is available now; the other two, “Drive” and “Inspiration,” will be released digitally, available through iTunes and her website (www.jodeemessina.com). “It’s a cheap way for the label to release the record,” she says. (Told you she was candid.) “They put so much money into making that record because it took them seven years. “It didn’t take me seven years; that thing was done in six months. But then, they kept putting it off and putting it off, so the more they put it off the more I’d (record). We ended up with 24 songs, which is why we have the three-EP set. It’s a lot of songs. And that’s a lot of money.” Her label, Curb Records, is releasing the songs to the public, but is not marketing or promoting the material. Last year, she wrote a song called “That’s God,” “one of the most moving songs that I have ever written,” she says. “They put off the launch … till January. It was out one week, and then they decided not to work it anymore. It was the saddest moment of my career, when they decided to pull that song. It’s devastating.” She’s writing new songs with “some heavy-hitter” songwriters from Nashville for a new project. Messina laughs when we tell her we knew a bit about that situation with Curb because we’d read it on Wikipedia. When we ask her what it was like to have her first child when she was in her late 30s, she is adamant that

“Never do you have two shows that are the same. Sometimes, all night long, people ask for ballads. Or weird songs, album cuts … or they just want to hear the hits.”

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— Jo Dee Messina she was in her mid-30s. Oops. “Oh, Wikipedia! That’s so funny. No, don’t believe that!” says Messina, a marathoner. “My running coach just asked me today, she’s like, ‘Did you just have your 40th birthday?’ I’m like, ‘I don’t write that crap!’ I’m like seven different ages on the Internet.” Which one is correct, we’re not asking — especially after she cracks, “Don’t ask me what I weigh or I’ll climb through this phone, and I will whoop your butt over there.” (Told you she was funny.) During her storytelling shows, “Fans would raise their hand and say something like, ‘“I’m Alright” helped me get through my divorce, it helped me get out of bed everyday,’” Messina says. “So, boom, we’d do ‘I’m Alright.’ Then someone would say, ‘My mother was going through breast cancer treatment, and “Bring on the Rain” just really gave her strength to get through it.’” Very early on, Messina says, the storytelling angle was scrapped in favor of these more impromptu, interactive shows and their possibilities for a magical, memorable evening for all involved. “You just hear how your music affects other people, and it’s so weird, because when I was a kid, or even now, music affects me. And certain songs, I’m just like, ‘Man, I really needed that.’ And to be the deliverer of one of those songs for someone else is — it’s kind of weird.” (That’s weird in a good way.)

Expires 10/31/10

Now, the Music Room Tour consists primarily of Messina going “back and forth with … the audience,” she explains. “We don’t have a set list. We come out, do a couple of songs, and then I say, ‘Hey, does anybody have any questions they want to ask, or any songs that they want to request?’” “Never do you have two shows that are the same. Sometimes, all night long, people ask for ballads. Or weird songs, album cuts … or they just want to hear the hits.” Consistently, people ask her what it’s like for her to do a tour with such a heavy emphasis on audience participation. “I’m like, ‘It’s a blast.’ Because really, we get a chance to visit with the audience, and everyone’s in on the joke,” she says. “You have to be ready for anything,” she says. Including requests for “Free Bird,” a Lynyrd Skynyrd classic (classic in certain circles, that is) and the go-to song unfunny people like to request at live music performances. Because, you know, it’s funny to make an ironic request to irritate a performer whose show you’ve paid money to see. “There’s always a guy, and nine times out of 10, he’s been drinking all night long,” Messina says, sounding a bit like Jerry Seinfeld doing observational stand-up. We laugh, to which she replies in another funny tone, “You think it’s funny because it’s not you.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

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Bend


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

music Schwartz, The White Buffalo visit the Moon Live music doesn’t just happen on the weekends, you know. Next week, in fact, Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom will hold down Tuesday and Wednesday with gusto, hosting two shows by two very different musicians who both seem destined for big things. Tuesday will bring an appearance by Lucy Schwartz, a Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter who has had her tunes featured in several TV shows and movies, most notably “Shrek Forever After.” (That movie’s love theme, “Darling I Do,” is hers.) It’s easy to see why Hollywood types like her tunes; Schwartz crafts breezy, effortless songs that pull folk, jazz and indie influences into her polished pop sound. Sample her wares at www.lucyschwartzmusic.com, and then check her out Tuesday at 8 p.m., with Anastacia Beth Scott opening. Cover is $7. Then, on Wednesday, it’s the return of strapping, shaggy folk troubadour The White Buffalo. Local shows by the Buffalo (aka Jake Smith) have become increasingly frequent and well-attended, a testament to the man’s

Upcoming Concerts

Lucy Schwartz Submitted photo

memorable, moving songs and commanding performances. I know I say this a lot, but this time I mean it: You really should head to www.thewhitebuffalo. com and listen to Smith’s songs and vocal prowess. They’ll be even more impressive when he plays live at 9 p.m. Wednesday,

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Big Jugs brings dirty country to Bend There was a time, oh, about a half-dozen years ago, when Matt Sayles lived in Bend and played world-weary Americana music that drew comparisons to Son Volt’s Jay Farrar. But those days are in the rearview mirror, and they are not closer than they appear. In fact, you can’t stay in the roots-music tree and get much farther from Sayles’ old style than the band he’s currently touring the West with, the dubiously named Big Jugs. The music of Big Jugs is one part old-time country and bluegrass, one part whiskey-fueled fun and one part knee-slapping comedy routine. Bake that cake and sprinkle it with more profanities than a 2 Live Crew

concert and what HBO called “strong sexual content” back when I was a youngster who paid attention to such things. As Sayles puts it: “We’re not too subtle in the delivery of our dirty tunes, but the live show is a riot.” In other words, you go see this band not for the lovingly crafted mini-masterpieces, but to drink and laugh and drink some more and laugh some more. At their show tonight at Mountain’s Edge, there’ll be cheap drinks and a wet T-shirt contest. Hoo boy, things may get rowdy. No matter the aim, Big Jugs is good at what they do. They’ve opened for Bend faves The Devil Makes Three, Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band and Trainwreck, and they’re currently touring in support of their raucous new EP “It’s OK.” Check out some of their (not-safe-for-work) tunes at www.myspace.com/bigjugs music. (“Influences: bar fights, table dances, whiskey, beer, public intoxications….”) Big Jugs; 9 tonight; free; Mountain’s Edge, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-8178. Continued next page

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1835 S. HWY 97 • REDMOND • 541-548-2138

SE Bridgeford Ave.

10072, VIN# A71765

with opener Greg Hill. Tickets are $10 plus fees in advance at www.bendticket.com and $13 at the door, but this one could sell out, so act accordingly. Silver Moon is at 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., in Bend. More info: 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

SE Armour Rd

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541-306-3200 • 380 Bridgeford Blvd., Bend, OR 97701 (Suite c/ off Wilson or 9th Street)

Oct. 22 — JIGU! Thunder Drums of China (drum troupe), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 22 — Sassparilla Jug Band (punk-grass), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Oct. 23 — Rita Hosking and Cousin Jack (folk), Harmony House concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209. Oct. 27 — Laura Veirs and Weinland (indie folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. pdxchangeprogram.com. Oct. 27 — Acorn Project (jam-band), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Oct. 28 — Super Adventure Club (experimental pop), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Oct. 28 — Miriams Well (rock/soul), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Nov. 2 — Billy Bragg (activist rock), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Nov. 4 — Yard Dogs Road Show (alt-cabaret), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Nov. 5 — Chicago Afrobeat Project (world funk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Nov. 6 — Great American Taxi (Americana), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Nov. 9 — Kelli Scarr (indie folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com Nov. 10 — Built to Spill (indierock), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Nov. 10 — 18 Switchbacks (Americana), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Nov. 10 — Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers (rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www.randompresents.com. Nov. 11 — A Simon & Garfunkel Retrospective (fake-rock), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Nov. 13 — Head for the Hills (bluegrass), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 7

music From previous page

Also: Luckyiam, The Defibulators A couple other things worth checking out this week! • When I hear the term “urban honky-tonk” I think of that commercial where the one cowboy says the salsa was made in New York City and the other cowboy is like “Get a rope!” Get it? City folk don’t know how to make good salsa! But they could, perhaps, make fine countrypunkabilly music if they’re in The Defibulators, a seven-piece outfit from Brooklyn that fits the urban honky-tonk bill. “CBGBmeets-Grand Ole Opry,” says Crawdaddy! Magazine. Crawdaddy! is right. See The Defibulators for free at 7 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School (700 N.W. Bond St., Bend). • Last week, MadHappy Lounge (850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend) hosted a performance by Portland MC Sapient, aka one half of hip-hop superduo The Prime. This weekend, the other half drops in. Luckyiam is better known, of course, as a found-

ing member of highly respected, Cali-based crew Living Legends, longtime creators of organic, intelligent, head-knockin’ hip-hop. On his own, Lucky shares that aethetic, as evidenced by “In My Room,” a relentless, soul-sample-driven track you can hear at www.myspace.com/luckyiam . See him for free at 9:30 p.m. Saturday. Mestizo and Cadalack Ron will open.

A look at where the locals are playing Local bands are out and about this weekend, as usual. Let’s take a look at a few ways you can support local music: • Lightning-fast and long-running, the Blackstrap bluegrass boys like their string-band music to lean toward the traditional, but they spice it up with some contemporary flair. On Saturday night at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend), they’re sure to play some tunes from their most recent album “Tales from the American Roadside.” 9 p.m., $5. • Chris Chabot spent the past few years playing his introspective folk-pop tunes at por-

The Defibulators Submitted photo

tello winecafe and other places around town. Now, he’s moving away from Bend before the end

of the year and hopes to release his new album (a follow-up to his fine “Outer Space” record) before

he leaves. He’ll also play one last time at portello (2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend) on Saturday night. 7 p.m. Free. • Americana sweethearts Deb Yager and Bo Reynolds are two of the hardest working folks on the local music scene, playing here, there and everywhere just about every weekend. Plus, Yager found time among the gigs to put together her new CD, “Six Song Austin Demo,” which features her winning twang-pop style. See ’em Saturday at Cork Cellars (161 Elm St., Sisters). 7 p.m. Free. • Enough with the mellow music, right? You want to rock! Well, rock you shall on Saturday at Mountain’s Edge (61303 U.S. Highway 97, Bend) when local bands StillFear and Shovelbelt crank up the amps. Both take a progressive angle at hard rock, keeping things murkier and edgier than much of the thrash-andburn sludge-metal you’ll hear in the bars. 8 p.m. Free. — Ben Salmon

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

Brother Jon’s Public House 1227 N.W. Galveston Ave., 541-306-3321

Domino Room 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

Deadly Duos and more, 9 pm h

Mark Ransom, 9 pm r/p Luckyiam, 9:30 pm h (P. 7)

Blues Jam, 8 pm, signups 7:30 pm b

WEDNESDAY

Big Jugs, 9 pm c (P. 6)

portello winecafe 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777

Matt Hopper/Roman Candles, 9 pm, $5 r/p (P. 4)

Chris Chabot, 7 pm f (P. 7) Blackstrap, 9 pm, $5 a (P. 7)

Lucy Schwartz, 8 pm, $7 r/p (P. 6)

Defibulators, 7 pm r/p (P. 7)

Open mic with Dan Chavers, 6-8 pm

6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

917 N.W. Wall St., 541-330-0774

THURSDAY

The White Buffalo, 9 pm, $10-$13 r/p (P. 6)

Strictly Organic Coffee Co.

Taj Palace

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Ladies Night w/Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj

25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

r/p

Stillfear & Shovelbelt, 8 pm m (P. 7)

Players Bar & Grill

The Summit Saloon & Stage

Metal Punk

Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

Taarka, 7 pm j

700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174

24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

p

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

McMenamins Old St. Francis

Silver Moon Brewing Co.

m

Denny & Dave, 9 pm r/p

102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-389-1410

61303 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend, 541-388-8178

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Lyible, Il Marzo, 9 pm r/p

M&J Tavern

Mountain’s Edge Bar

h

The Quons, 7-9 pm r/p

JC’s Madhappy Lounge

c

Blues Country

Capture the Flag, 7:30 pm, $10 p (P. 4)

939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

Jackson’s Corner

MONDAY

b

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Allan Byer 9 pm a

Grover’s Pub

845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

SUNDAY

MUSIC TYPE:

Rick Karvasales band, 9 pm r/p

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar Bo Restobar

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Gypsy Fire Bellydance, 7 pm

Third Street Pub 314 S.E. Third St., 541-306-3017

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

Open mic, 8 pm

H.D. Hooligans, Alley Brewed, 8 pm p

Jam night, 7 pm

Ladies Night, 9 pm

REDMOND Robin Jackson 6 pm j Lindy Gravelle, 5:30 pm c

Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Cafe Alfresco 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., 541-923-2599

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c Bellavia, 6 pm j

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Lindy Gravelle, 6-9 pm c Brad Jones, 7 pm r/p Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

Cross Creek Cafe 507 S.W. Eighth St., 541-548-2883

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Twins J.J. 535 S.W. Sixth St., 541-504-2575

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 1 pm DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

SISTERS Cork Cellars Wine Bar 161 Elm St., 541-549-2675

Scoots Bar and Grill 175 Larch St., 541-549-1588

Soji Station 425 W. U.S. Highway 20, 541-549-8499

Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p Jammin at the Station, 7-10 pm Anastacia, 8 pm, $5 r/p

Deb Yager & Bo Reynolds, 7 pm f (P. 7) Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p

Matt Miller, 6-8 pm f

Greg Botsford, 8 pm, $5 r/p

Jesse Meade, 7 pm, $5 c

SUNRIVER Owl’s Nest 1 Center Drive, 541-593-3730

JP & the Soul Searchers, 9 pm r/p

JP & the Soul Searchers, 9 pm r/p

TERREBONNE Pump House Bar & Grill 8320 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-548-4990

Rough String Band, 7 pm c


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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PAGE 9

music releases

Grinderman GRINDERMAN 2 ANTI- Records Nick Cave fans love the singer-songwriter for his unhinged music, his pervertedly anachronistic lyrics, his unkempt live shows. And while Grinderman is a very different project than his other outlet, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, all of Cave’s uniquely dirge-rock characteristics are present in Grinder-

man’s second effort. “Grinderman 2” is an album that is both violent and dirty, and that won’t come as a surprise to fans. What comes as an unexpected gift is this record’s ability to meld melody and pop sensibility with the digging-inthe-soil nature of Cave’s songwriting. There are moments during “When My Baby Comes” and “Mickey Mouse and the Goodbye Man” that Grinderman sounds like a modern-day Nine Inch Nails — what with their ability to warp potentially offensive sounds into an accessible cacophony to be digested by the masses. Granted you won’t find Grinderman on modern rock radio anytime soon, but if you’re a fringe fan who is interested in witnessing Cave’s magic, “Grinderman 2” is a navigable entry point. — Ricardo Baca, The Denver Post

Here and there Nov. 1 — With Billy Bragg; McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com.

Mavis Staples YOU ARE NOT ALONE ANTI- Records With a series of fine albums and stirring live performances, Mavis Staples is enjoying one of the great late-career renaissances of recent times. Her 2007 album, “We’ll Never Turn Back,” reconnected with her storied past, as it updated the freedom-march songs that she sang with the Staple Sing-ers at the height of the civil rights movement. With “You Are Not Alone,” Staples brings that spirit forward with a mix of gospel standards and newer songs, including two written specifically for her by producer Jeff Tweedy. The Wilco songwriter astutely put Staples in the studio with her current road band, which came on board after “We’ll Never Turn Back” was recorded: guitarist Rick Holmstrom, bassist Jeff Turmes and drummer Stephen Hodges. They let the arrangements simmer and give Staples plenty of space to move; Holmstrom inserts terse commentary with his precision guitar fills, and

the rhythm section swings just behind the beat in the fashion of the Muscle Shoals, Ala., pros who backed the Staple Singers on their greatest recordings. She sounds at home in this space, digging into the funky hosannas of the Rev. Gary Davis’ “I Belong to the Band” and her late father Pops Staples’ “You Don’t Knock.” Heat shimmers off the surface of “I’m on My Way to Heaven,” determination busts through the bluesy seams of “We’re Gonna Make It.” These restatements of strength would be enough to qualify “You Are Not Alone” as a fine album, a solid introduction to what has made Staples an American musical cornerstone since the ’50s. But the real ear-openers are a renewed appreciation of Staples as a ballad singer, one who doesn’t have to shout to make an impact. — Greg Kot, Chicago Tribune

Of Montreal FALSE PRIEST Polyvinyl Records It’s easy to argue that Athens, Ga., indie band Of Montreal has been on a slow decline since the back-to-back masterpieces of 2005’s “Sunlandic Twins” and 2007’s “Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer?” The former found head songwriter/resident nutjob Kevin Barnes inching away from his Brian Wilson obsessions in favor of a more insular, electronic approach to indie pop, while “Fauna” laid bare Barnes’ selfloathing and deft way with melodies between driving beats and appealingly twisted

Linkin Park A THOUSAND SUNS Warner Bros. Records Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda says the band’s new “A Thousand Suns” is influenced by Public Enemy, and it shows. Sure, there are the obvious links — the twisting of PE’s “Bring the Noise,” lyrically and musically, into “Wretches and Kings,” as well as the namechecking of Chuck D in “When They Come for Me” and parts of Rick Rubin’s production. But it goes deeper than that. Like Public Enemy, Linkin Park is trying to use popular music to get their message across. They are trying to make the most of their multiplatinum pulpit while still growing as artists. It’s a tall or-

Here and there Oct. 28 — Roseland Theater, Portland; 800-992-8499 or www.ticketswest.com.

synthesizers. “False Priest,” however, is another weak effort on par with 2008’s “Skeletal Lamping.” The album is so overstuffed with messy ideas and faux-funk preening that Barnes actually sounds egotistical proclaiming

otherwise grateful lines such as, “I know it, girlfriend, I got so lucky with you.” Jon Brion’s shiny, occasionally gimmicky production and guest artists from the R&B world (Janelle Monáe, Solange Knowles) do little to mitigate the feeling that Barnes has lost his grip on two things that made his late-2000s output so satisfying: humility and focus. — John Wenzel, The Denver Post

der, and Shinoda, Chester Bennington and the boys come up short at times. But it works on the current rock smash “The Catalyst,” the hard-charging chant of the downtrodden that has shifted the sound of rock radio and subtly injected Rage Against the Machine politics into a more easily digestible shout-along. “Iridescent” takes it a step further, invading the pop territory of OneRepublic and The Fray with an irresistible ode to esteem-building and hope, culminating in chiming guitars and a gang vocal of “Remember all the sadness and frustration and let it go.” “A Thousand Suns” is the middle ground between Linkin Park’s more raucous, raw be-

ginnings and the polished, pretty “Minutes to Midnight” ballads, and they walk it well — balancing hip-hop, pop gloss, workers’ rights rallies, Martin Luther King speeches and, of course, Bennington’s screams. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

That year is 2009, which saw the death of one of his mentors, Slum Village rapper Baatin, as well as the death of his aunt and the stroke of his manager, Hex Murda.

That lends the album some heavy themes, but Milk’s organic, ground-up production — all off-kilter samples and hard-knocking drums — shines through. While his beats still exceed his abilities behind the microphone, he’s a better than competent rapper, keeping pace with noted lyrical beast Royce da 5’9” on “Deadly Medley.” But in an especially strong year for music, “Album of the Year” has plenty of competition for that particular title. If it gets people talking, however, then his mission is accomplished. — Adam Graham, The Detroit News

Black Milk ALBUM OF THE YEAR Fat Beats Records Black Milk has never been an in-your-face kind of guy. The Detroit hip-hop producer has been content staying underground, his soulful production work quietly earning comparisons to the late J Dilla. But Milk, 27, puts himself out there like never before with “Album of the Year.” Chiefly, there’s that title, but what sounds like blatant boasting is actually a clever turn of phrase, as the album — his fourth — chronicles one especially tumultuous year in Milk’s life.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

restaurants

Good times at Bourbon Street

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bourbon Street Sea & Soul Food’s main dining room in Bend.

New Orleans-style cuisine finds a home in Bend By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

C

entral Oregonians with a taste for New Orleans-style cuisine no longer have to trek as far as to Portland to indulge their fancy. Bourbon Street Sea & Soul Food has them covered. Restaurateur Gavin McMichael’s French Quarter dining palace — in the former Staccato space at the Old Bend Firehall — re-creates a corner of North America where McMichael developed some of his fondest childhood memories. “My grandparents lived in Mandeville, just across Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans,” recalled the Dallas, Texas, born-and-bred chef. “I spent a lot of time there growing up. I learned to love New Orleans cuisine early on.” Bourbon Street, which opened in late July, has the

food and decor to make aficionados of Cajun and Creole cuisine feel right at home. The three-meals-a-day menu features everything from fried okra to peeland-eat crawfish, hush puppies to gumbos, oysters to muffalettas. The gas lamp ambience, accented by zydeco and Delta blues music, feels authentic. Even the servers adorn themselves in Mardi Gras beads and colorful feathers, and their T-shirts are emblazoned with the restaurant’s slogan, “Laissez les bon temps rouler”: “Let the good times roll.”

Family friendly When Staccato closed in June, announcing that the Italian restaurant had been unable to negotiate a new lease, McMichael said he saw a golden opportunity. “The building seemed like a natural (for Cajun-Cre-

ole cuisine),” he said. “Bend needed a family-friendly restaurant at an affordable price point. There were not a lot of seafood options in Bend, and this style of food covers that. The breadth of the cuisine is large, and it’s very accessible to lots of people: It can be hearty and a little spicy, but it can also have a lighter side.” Jeff Schon, previously head chef at the Pine Tavern, took over the Bourbon Street kitchen. After an initial period of adjustment — during which he studied Louisiana-style cooking and worked with McMichael to refine his approach — he has become something of an expert in the cuisine. “What a wonderful combination of textures and flavors!” my dining companion exclaimed after one recent meal. Certainly, from the time of my earliest meals at Bourbon Street, just after it had opened, to a series of review visits in the past couple of weeks, I have seen a marked improvement in both the quality of the food and in lunch and dinnertime service. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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restaurants From previous page

Crawfish and gumbo We began a dinner with an artichoke-crawfish dip. Heavy with the small freshwater crustaceans, the thick and cheesy dip was baked to a golden-brown in a brick oven. We spread the dip upon lightly roasted slices of crostini bread with a dash of garlic butter. A house green salad was very fresh. Spring greens, shaved carrots and red onions, chopped tomatoes and black-eyed peas were tossed with a tangy Creole ranch dressing. The gumbo du jour — this traditional stew varies from day to day — was thick and spicy. It’s one of my favorites. Always made with red beans, rice and okra, this hodgepodge also included peppery chorizo sausage, chunks of chicken, chopped peppers, sun-dried tomatoes, green onions and collard greens. As an entree, my companion requested a saute of crab cakes and green beans. A generous amount of crab meat, supplemented with onions and peppers, was shaped into three thick cakes that were lightly breaded with panko and seasoned with tarragon, lemon and garlic. The cakes were topped with a half-dozen long beans and served on a bed of chowder with clams, potatoes, onions, bacon, corn, black-eyed peas and a bit of chili oil. My friend found it wonderful. I wasn’t nearly as thrilled with my blackened redfish, which I found overcooked. The presentation, however, was delicious: It was served on a salad of blackeyed peas with corn, bacon, crab, tomatoes, basil and red onion, and topped with a handful of greens. For dessert, we had a couple of bites each of a beignet sundae. Classic Louisiana beignets are a light pastry dusted with powdered sugar. Here, the beignets were filled with vanilla-bean ice cream, topped with chocolate sauce and whipped cream, and served with peach slices and cherries jubilee. The flavor was wonderful, but we found the dessert too rich after our full meal.

Muffaletta time When we returned at midday, I considered ordering an “express lunch platter,” priced at $9.95. Several meals — shrimp or crawfish (as an étouffée or Creole-style), jambalaya, a shrimp po’ boy or a muffaletta — are served on old-fashioned TV trays with green salad, hush puppies and a dessert such as

wiches made with house-made sausages, smoked turkey and ham. Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. 913 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-383-1694, www.taylor sausage.com.

Bourbon Street Sea & Soul Food Location: 5 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Hours: 8 a.m. to midnight every day Price range: Breakfast $5.25 to $11.25; lunch $7.95 to $16.95; dinner appetizers $7.95 to $13.25, entrees $8 to $21 Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Salads are the best options Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: Yes Reservations: Recommended Contact: 541-323-2833 or www.bourbonstreetbend.com

Scorecard OVERALL: AFood: B+. Hearty, savory meals are true to the Southern palate, despite some inconsistency. Service: A-. With the exception of one short-staffed meal, servers have been outstanding. Atmosphere: A. From gas lamps to Delta blues, the casual decor is authentic New Orleans. Value: A. A moderate price point makes Bourbon Street one of Bend’s better values.

peach cobbler. The platter, however, only has half sandwiches. For the same price, my companion was in the mood for a full-size muffaletta without the hush puppies or the dessert. On her sandwich, three different cold meats (capicola, salami and mortadella) were layered with a slice of Provolone cheese and a thick spread of black-olive tapenade. Dressed with lettuce and tomato, the muffaletta was served in a fresh hamburger bun and presented with sweet-potato fries. I ordered a bowl of shrimp Creole. As much as I enjoyed the flavor, I was disappointed in the size of the portion. Five large prawns were served on white rice in a tomato-based stew with onions, peppers and a sprinkle of parsley. Hearty and spicy, it would make a good meal on a cold autumn day. At both dinner and lunch, our servers were excellent. There was a minor mix-up at dinner, when our coffee-with-dessert order was overlooked and we had to make a second request; otherwise, the server was wonderful. Our midday server, meanwhile, was so knowledgeable about New Orleans cuisine,

RECENT REVIEWS

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jambalaya is a featured dish at Bourbon Street Sea & Soul Food. she took time to explain to us the nuances between different dishes — shrimp jambalaya and shrimp étouffée, for instance. Jambalaya, she said, is a Creole dish of French-Spanish origin, similar to a paella. Étouffée is a one-pot Cajun dish similar to gumbo, made with a thick roux base.

Next week: Mazatlan Mexican Restaurant Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

Breakfast falters Although New Orleans is a great breakfast city, Bourbon Street hasn’t quite nailed the morning meal yet. On an earlier visit, we had particularly enjoyed eggs Benedict, available in several varieties at a moderate price. The Creole Q Shrimp Benny was an eye-opener with bacon-wrapped shrimp and barbeque sauce. The Andouille and Crab Benny got the day started with spicy sausage and seafood. But our return visit suffered by comparison. One problem was the service; due to an injury and an illness, the restaurant was understaffed, and the sole morning manager was trying to be all things to all people. His efficiency suffered. My jambalaya omelet came with chicken, shrimp, Andouille sausage, onions and peppers. A heavy slice of mozzarella cheese was only partially melted, and a saute of potatoes was mediocre. My companion’s Bird’s Nest had two fried eggs in soft brioche toast, with fried sage, tomato and two slices of bacon. “It’s fine,” she said, “but it’s nothing memorable.” McMichael, who also owns The Blacksmith steakhouse and Marz Planetary Bistro, said he plans to adjust Bourbon Street’s winter menu with the addition of more gumbos, soups and sandwiches. I expect this restaurant to keep getting better, in the same way that a good jambalaya embraces

more flavors and spices the longer it stews. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITE The Decoy Bar & Grill has a new owner. Phoenix, Ariz., businessman Fran Nardella has purchased the handsome pub at Bond Street and Greenwood Avenue; his son, Chris Nardella, took over as general manager on Oct. 1. The younger Nardella said he would wait until November before making major changes, adding, “We’re going to try to find our own niche.” Open 11 a.m. to close Monday to Saturday. 1051 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-318-4833, www.decoybarandgrill.com. Taylor’s Sausage has opened a deli and pub in Bend, in the former location of Cheerleaders Bar and Grill. Based in Cave Junction, near Grants Pass, the 86-year-old company has stores from Seattle to Oakland, Calif. It specializes in gourmet sand-

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The New Lodge Restaurant (A): Blending and contrasting the textures and flavors of Northwest cuisine, executive sous chief Adam Kapela is a rising star of the region’s finedining scene. His canvas is the renovated lodge restaurant at Black Butte Ranch, eight miles west of Sisters. Service and ambience are equally superb. Open Wednesday to Sunday, 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. to close. 13653 Hawksbeard Road, Black Butte Ranch; 541-5951260, www.blackbutteranch .com. Tart Bistro (B+): Serving French-inspired global cuisine at a moderate price, Tart has taken over the downtown Bend corner once occupied by 28 and Barcelona. Preparation can be inconsistent, but mesclun salad and duck make a great meal, and service is highly reliable. Open 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. 920 N.W. Bond St. (St. Clair Place), Bend; 541-385-0828, http://tart bistro.com.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

fine arts

Multiple personalities ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ comes to life at CTC By Eleanor Pierce The Bulletin

‘S

trange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was first published by Robert Louis Stevenson in 1886. It tells the story of the doctor and the mysterious, violent Mr. Hyde through the eyes of a London lawyer, a longtime friend of Dr. Jekyll. Over the years, the names Jekyll and Hyde

have become part of our cultural lexicon — an easy way to reference a person with a dual nature, a dark side. Cascades Theatrical Company will present “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” a 2008 adaptation of the macabre story, tonight through Oct. 31 at the Greenwood Playhouse (see “If you go”). The story is told in an unusual way. One

actor, Brad Ruder, plays Henry Jekyll, a respectable scientist who at first blush appears beyond moral reproach. Another actor, Zelia Horrell, plays Elizabeth, a chamber maid at a London hotel. Horrell also appears briefly in one scene as an old woman. The remaining four actors in the play, Jared Rasic, Liam O’Sruitheain, Will Futterman and Kat Christiansen, play more than a dozen roles. The four actors take turns at playing Edward Hyde. Continued next page

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

Zelia Horrell, center, as Elizabeth, is surrounded by several actors playing the part of Hyde in “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” at CTC. From left are Liam O’Sruitheain, Jared Rasic, Kat Christiansen and Will Futterman.

If you go What: “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” by Cascades Theatrical Company When: 7:30 tonight and every Wednesday through Saturday, 2 p.m. Sundays; through Oct. 31 Where: Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $20 adult, $15 seniors 60 and older, $12 students Contact: 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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fine arts Jared Rasic, playing Mr. Hyde, rehearses a scene with Liam O’Sruitheain, in the role of Richard Enfield. A modern adaptation of the classic “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” opens tonight at Cascades Theatrical Company’s Greenwood Playhouse. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Square Dot Saddlery at 429 N. Main St., Prineville, will host a Fall Art Sale and meetand-greet with artists from 3 to 6 tonight. Artwork in the show will include pencil works by Sharon Blaisdell and oil and cartoon works by Fred Martin, both of Prineville, and metal art by Denise Pinkerton, of Redmond. The show will also feature Western watercolor and oil paintings by the late Joelle Smith, who lived in Alfalfa. Smith’s work had been featured on the cover of Western Horseman magazine. Contact: denisesironart@ yahoo.com or 541-419-3674. — Eleanor Pierce

Denise Pinkerton made this metal sculpture image of Mount Rainier without the aid of computers. Her work will be on display at the Fall Art Sale and artist meet-and-greet today at Square Dot Saddlery in Prineville.

Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

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said. “Within those there are classics and adaptations, and this was an interesting, modern, chilling adaptation.” Because of some violence and adult themes, she warned that it’s probably not best for younger children. “We’re kind of thinking it’s a PG-13,” she said. The ending of the play, which comes as Jekyll and Hyde battle for control of the body they share, has a surprising twist. She didn’t want to give it away, but Shane said, “It sort of makes you want to go back and watch the whole thing over again.”

Meet and greet artists in Prineville

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funds available on the account, Hyde produces a note from the esteemed Dr. Jekyll that guarantees the funds. One aspect of the incident struck Enfield as odd. “The fact that he called me Enfield,” he says. “Well, that is your name,” replies Utterson. “Yes, but I didn’t tell it to him,” Enfield says. Another piece of evidence in the investigation is notes from a surgical student at the College of London Hospital. Sir Danvers Carew, the school’s chief surgeon (O’Sruitheain), is giving a lecture to his students and demonstrates with a cadaver, a prostitute who has recently been found dead. “The brain, as you can see gentlemen, is small, albeit distended and deformed, emblematic of the woman’s moral decay and sensual rapaciousness,” he says. The presentation is lurid, and Carew gives grisly details about the woman’s body. He prepares to show the students, claiming her line of work led to her demise. Just then, Jekyll enters, and declares the lecture “rot.” “Rot, bad science and evil mindedness,” he declares. Jekyll then publicly discounts Carew’s theories on the state of the corpse. Carew is incensed. Later, when Carew is the victim of a vicious attack, the authorities suspect Jekyll. Director Shane said the play was an opportunity to present a classic done in a modern way. “We want to select genres that appeal to different people,” she

Artists of all mediums — including oil, watercolor and acrylic painters, sculptors, glassworkers and jewelers — are invited to join a new artist co-op in Sunriver. The group has obtained a soon-to-be renovated gallery space in the Sunriver Village Mall. Artists who join the co-op will share the costs of running and staffing the gallery. There will be two levels of membership available: a core member group that pays a monthly fee and low commissions on work sold, and a secondary member group that pays no regular fees but higher commissions. At this point, the group is mainly seeking core participants. Details about the specific plans will be determined among artists wishing to join. The six artists who have currently signed on for the project are hoping to pull together a group of 10 to 20 core artists by

mid-November. If interested, contact: sunriver sister@chamberscable.com or Midge at midge.gene@ yahoo.com.

Sc

From previous page Since most of us by now are familiar with the general arc of the play, it gives little away to acknowledge that Mr. Hyde is the alter ego of Dr. Jekyll. Through Jekyll’s experiments in his laboratory, where he makes mysterious tinctures, he’s discovered a second personality, Hyde. He’s so dark and depraved that even his physical appearance is unrecognizable, even to Jekyll’s best friends. The considerably talented cast, under the direction of Lana Shane, indicate changes in character through the use of accents, subtle costume changes and occasional props. For instance, Hyde carries a black cane with a silver handle; as one actor passes the cane to the next, the next actor takes on the role of Hyde. The unusual casting is paired with a stark set, dramatic lighting and moody fog. The story is told as an investigation into the crimes of Mr. Hyde. First, from the diary of Gabriel Utterson (Rasic), a lawyer who recalls a story he heard from a friend, Richard Enfield (O’Sruitheain). Enfield was out walking one evening and took a wrong turn, ending up in front of a door. Just as he was about to pass the door, he saw a young girl coming down the street, when a man, Hyde, turned the corner and collided with the girl. As she fell to the ground, Hyde raised his cane as if to hit her, but stopped short. When the people on the street who witness the encounter question Hyde, he gruffly answers, “It was not intentional. I was too much in haste to reach my door.” Enfield tells Hyde that there are damages to be paid for, and Hyde agrees to write a check. When questioned about the

Sunriver group calling out to artists


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS ART ADVENTURE GALLERY: Featuring “Synergy,” abstract paintings by Jeanie Smith; through October; 185 S.E. Fifth St., Madras; 541-475-7701. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-6337488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Some Like It Hot”; through Nov. 1; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BLUE STAR SALON: Featuring “Native American Portraits; In A New Light,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through November; 1001 N.W. Wall St., #103, Bend; 541-306-4845. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” mixed-media, abstract paintings by D.L. Watson; through October; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring artwork by Central Oregon Community College faculty members; through Oct. 22; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W.

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“Growth Through All Seasons,” by Natasha Bacca, will be on display at the Gallery at the Pinckney Center at Central Oregon Community College through Oct. 22. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT FRAMEWORKS!: Featuring “Small Greetings,” greeting cards and small works by several artists; through October; 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertframeworks.com. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “Streamside,” works by Kathy Deggendorfer; through October; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF SISTERS: Featuring works by Kimry Jelen and Kay Baker; through October; 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape,” paintings and prints of the American West; through Jan. 3; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN

WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Rubies and Garnets ... Oh My!,” paintings by Karen Bandy; through Oct. 30; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring paintings by Karen Lyn Manning; through Dec. 2; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300.

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Where our quality and customer service is number one. 834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

541-382-5884

MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Ancient Arts II,” works by four artists influenced by Western and Native American culture; through October; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. OREGON YERBA MATE: Featuring mixed-media collage and fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; through November; 528 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-504-8870. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. PAVE FINE JEWELRY: Featuring “Geisha Series,” works by Jane Marie Lauren; through November; 101 Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-322-0500. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. QUILTWORKS: Featuring works by Ann Richardson and a group show, “Starry, Starry Night”; through October; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0527. RANCH RECORDS: Featuring “iPoddery,” pottery with iPod pieces,

541.383.3668

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

www.optimafootandankle.com 1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

Bend | Redmond | Prineville

by Vania Setti; through October; 831 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-389-6116. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring works by member artists; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the High Desert Society of the Arts; through Oct. 30; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring “The Life of Art / The Art of Life,” paintings and drawings by Sarkis Antikajian; through Nov. 4; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www.riverbendfineartgallery.com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “High Desert Palette,” works by members of the High Desert Art League; through November; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring works by the painting group Art Deli; through October; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring mixedmedia paintings by Sally Smith; through Oct. 30; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the “97707 Art Exhibit,” works by property owners and residents of the 97707 ZIP code; through Oct. 29; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring works by Deborah DeWit, Greg Wilbur and Alice Van Leunen; through Sunday; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TECHSPACE BEND: Featuring works by Pat Cross; through October; 906 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; info@techspacebend.com. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Moment, Place and Interaction,” oil paintings by Lisa Copenhagen Wachs; through October; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TRES CHIC: Featuring miniature custom-framed works by Nicole Samples; through October; 3129 N.E. Monte Vista Drive, Bend; 541-480-5740. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Layered Worlds,” works by Dorothy Freudenberg and Lindy Gruger Hanson; through October; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Soda Creek Trail

La Pine State Park and Fall River Loop

T

If you go

he Cascade Lakes High-

Getting there: Take Cascade Lakes Highway about 27 miles from Bend. Look for the Green Lakes Trailhead on the right hand side. Park in the lot. The Soda Creek Trail is on east side of the parking lot. Difficulty: Easy Cost: $5 fee, or Northwest Forest Pass Contact: 541-3835300

way leads to plenty of lovely

hikes, but this one, accessible from the Green Lakes Trailhead, offers beauty without the crowds. The trail leads to a tranquil meadow and a bubbling brook and is a good option to explore before the Cascade Lakes Highway closes for the season. — Bulletin staff

THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS

T

Devils Lake

here’s plenty of exploring to be

Fall River

Fall River Falls

or hit one of the many te chu De s

views of the pristine Fall River. — Bulletin staff

S ine

ta

a ec r e te R

tion

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

If you go Getting there: From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 south toward La Pine. After milepost 160, turn right at the sign to La Pine State Park. The park is about 5.5 miles down the road. Follow signs to the right

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Rd.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

for Big Tree, or stay straight toward the campground, cross the river and turn right at the signs for the McGregor Memorial Viewpoint. Cost: Free, no passes required Contact: 541-536-2071

46

Mount Bachelor

La Pine

La P

a 4.75-mile loop will take you to some great

LaPine La Pine State State Recreation Rd. Rd. Recreation

ver s Ri

Dutchman Flat

DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

Big Tree

trails in the area. Viewpoint,

Todd Lake

To Bend

La Pine State Recreation Area

Fall River Trail (4.75 miles)

McGregor Memorial Viewpoint (trailhead)

in the state, Big Tree,

Memorial

Soda Creek Trail

Cascade Lakes Highway

Sparks Lake

Sunriver

La Pine State Park

largest ponderosa pine

From the McGregor

46

Bend

done at La Pine State Park. Check out the

Todd Lake Trail So da Cre ek

Green Lakes Trailhead

El eanor Pierce / The Bulletin ile photo

The Fall River Falls flow into a wide pool that begs to be visited again come summer.

Green Lakes Trail

cPh

s Turf, Inc.

RYn” E S R R w U NU N ly g ro

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W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

oc al

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

541-546-9081 2019 SW Park Lane • Culver


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER THE 15, BULLETIN 2010 • FRID

this w LITERARY HARVEST

HALLOWEEN EVENTS

TODAY

TODAY, SATURDAY & THURSDAY What: NorthWest Crossing Halloween Party and Haunt at Juniper Hollow and Dark Intentions haunted houses; see

What: The seventh annual event features keynote speaker Elizabeth Lyon; the winners of the Literary Harvest Contest will present their work. Bob Stark presents his winning poem, “The Transformation of Me,” at last year’s event. When: 6:30-8:30 p.m.

individual listings for details. Children play at the NorthWest Crossing Halloween Party last year.

‘BUTTERFLIES’ EXHIBIT OPE

Where: Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend Cost: $10, $5 for Central Oregon Writers Guild members Contact: 541-408-6306 or www.entraloregonwriters guild.com

SATURDAY What: New exhibit features 100 species of live butterflies; exhibit runs through Feb. 6. When: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Where: High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend

Courtesy Stacie Muller

TODAY LITERARY HARVEST: The seventh annual event features keynote speaker Elizabeth Lyon; the winners of the Literary Harvest Contest will present their work; $10, $5 for Central Oregon Writers Guild members; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-408-6306 or www.centraloregonwritersguild.com. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: Dennis L. Jenkins presents “Oregon’s Earliest Inhabitants: Archaeological Investigations at the Paisley Caves”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; with a champagne and dessert reception;

$20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. (Story, Page 12) “THE LAST STATION”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BROADWAY CALLS: Pop-punk show, with Capture the Flag, Mascot and Icarus the Owl; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.myspace.com/ capturetheflagpop. (Story, Page 4) “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. BIG JUGS: The country-bluegrass band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178. (Story, Page 6)

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES: The Boise, Idaho-based indie rock band performs, with Bryan Free; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 4)

SATURDAY Oct. 16 ESTATE SALE: Proceeds benefit Bend Nile Club; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; dnelson995@aol.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-385-0750. “BUTTERFLIES” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features 100 species of live butterflies; exhibit runs through Feb. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds

benefit the High Desert Droids robotics team; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-7904. NONDENOMINATIONAL WOMEN’S CONFERENCE: With gospel singers, speakers and testimonials; free; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Agape Harvest Fellowship, 52460 Skidgel Road, La Pine; 541-536-5858. OREGON PET EXPO: Featuring seminars, a vaccine clinic and a variety of pet booths; $5, $4 ages 55 and older and free ages 16 and younger; 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-815-2639. “A CAREGIVER’S JOURNEY”: Author Karen Twitchell talks about the concerns of caregivers; proceeds benefit the Alyce Hatch Center; $15; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-282-1980 or bendnative@aol.com. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. NORTHWEST CROSSING HALLOWEEN PARTY: Activities and crafts for children, pumpkin painting, cupcake decorating and more; costumes encouraged; $5; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www.northwestcrossing.com. SHREDDING EVENT: Safely destroy personal documents; for residential shredding only; donations of quality of life items requested, to be sent

to overseas troops; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Steve Scott Realtors, 685 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-410-2487. CORN-BAG TOSS CHALLENGE: Toss corn bags through a board in teams of two; with a barbecue lunch; registration required to play; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $50 per team, free for spectators; 11 a.m.; Baldy’s BBQ, 235 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-617-1010 or www.bendsnip.org. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. BOWLOPOLIS FAMILY FUN NIGHT: Bowling and children’s activities; proceeds benefit Girls on the Run of Deschutes County; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; Lava Lanes Bowling Center, 1555 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; info@deschutescountygotr.org or www.deschutescountygotr.org. “SUDS N SUDS”: A presentation of Take Two Productions’ musical about two sisters overcoming debt and frustrations; with a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Bend Future Farmers of America; $20; 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-318-5778. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK

C a a C m


AY, OCTOBER THE BULLETIN 15, 2010• FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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week

PAGE 17

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES

SATURDAY

CORN-BAG TOSS CHALLENGE

SATURDAY

NS

Cost: Included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger Contact: 541-382-4754 or www.highdesert museum.org

What: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players. When: 1 p.m. at Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 4 p.m. at Bend Public Library, 601

INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-3822390 or www.scaremegood.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. LUCKYIAM: Performance by the Living Legend, with Mestizo and Cadalack Ron; free; 9:30 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868. (Story, Page 7)

antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS OKTOBERFEST: The sixth annual event features live music, food and more; $15, $5 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 1-6 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2078 or www.stedwardsisters.org. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SUNDAY

“PEACEABLE KINGDOM”: Film screens in honor of Vegetarian Awareness Month; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

Oct. 17 BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce,

MONDAY Oct. 18

N.W. Wall St. Cost: Free Contact: 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com

TUESDAY Oct. 19 SENIOR DAY: Ages 62 and older can visit for free; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “GERMAN RESEARCH VIA SOCIAL NETWORKING”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Allen Braemer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-8978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. JO DEE MESSINA: The award-winning country musician performs, with Lisa C. Pollock; $45 or $55; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 3) LUCY SCHWARTZ: The Los Angelesbased singer songwriter performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 6)

WEDNESDAY Oct. 20 AUTHOR PRESENTATION: James C. Foster reads from his book “BONG

What: Toss corn bags through a board in teams of two; with a barbecue lunch; registration required to play; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project. Pictured are cornbag toss boards. When: 11 a.m.

HiTS 4 JESUS: A Perfect Constitutional Storm in Alaska’s Capital”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “REPORTING THE TRUTHS OF THE WORLD”: Nicholas Kristof talks about international issues; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. TAARKA: The Colorado-based jazzy world-folk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs, with Greg Hill; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. bendticket.com. (Story, Page 6)

THURSDAY Oct. 21 HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted

Where: Baldy’s BBQ, 235 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Cost: $50 per team, free for spectators Contact: 541-617-1010 or www.bendsnip.org

houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-3822390 or www.scaremegood.com. TENTH AVENUE NORTH: The progressive pop band performs; with Addison Road and Matt Maher; $15 in advance, $20 day of show, $25 VIP; 7 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-389-8241 or www.itickets.com. THE DEFIBULATORS: The Brooklyn, N.Y.based urban honky-tonk seven-piece outfit plays; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. (Story, Page 7) “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

planning ahead Right Around the Corner OCT. 22-23 — CENTRAL OREGON WOMEN’S EXPO: Educational seminars, entertainment, cooking demonstrations, vendors, a fashion show and more; with keynote speaker Kathleen Flinn; with a bachelor auction Oct. 22; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-385-7988 or www.celebratingeverywoman.info. OCT. 22-23, 27-28 — HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. OCT. 22-23 — “THE ODD COUPLE”: The Crook County High School drama department presents the Neil Simon play about a tidy man and a sloppy man living together; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. OCT. 22-24, 27-28 — “DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Oct. 22-23 and Oct. 27-28, 2 p.m. Oct. 24; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. OCT. 22-24, 28 — “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m. Oct. 22-23 and Oct. 28, 5 p.m. Oct. 24; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. OCT. 22 — OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: David Brauner presents “The Fur Trade Era at Champoeg”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. OCT. 22 — JIGU! THUNDER DRUMS OF CHINA: More than a dozen Chinese drummers perform, with rhythms, traditions and contemporary special effects; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. OCT. 22 — CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. OCT. 22 — SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based blues-punk band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon

Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. OCT. 23-24 — BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. OCT. 23-24 — FUR TRADE DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1831; talk to live trappers, see black-powder firearms, authentic cooking and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. OCT. 23-24, 28 — “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE”: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m. Oct. 23 and Oct. 28, 2 p.m. Oct. 24; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3223300 or www.beattickets.org. OCT. 23 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: BORIS GODUNOV”: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in a presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. OCT. 23 — THE GREAT PUMPKIN HUNT: Hunt for and decorate pumpkins and sip apple cider; proceeds benefit the Miller’s Landing project; $5 suggested donation; 10 a.m.noon; Miller’s Landing, Northwest Riverside Boulevard and Northwest Carlon Avenue, Bend; 541-3822092 or Kristin.Kovalik@tpl.org. OCT. 23 — “WINTERVENTION”: A screening of the Warren Miller film featuring skiers and snowboarders traveling around the world; $18; 2, 6 and 9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. OCT. 23 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Steve Duno talks about his book “Last Dog on the Hill”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. OCT. 26 — THE CAPITOL STEPS: A parody, with music, of contemporary politics; VIP tickets benefit the Tower Theatre Foundation; $40 or $45, $52 VIP; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. OCT. 27 — “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. OCT. 27 — ED EDMO — ONE MAN THEATER: A performance by the poet, performer, storyteller and lecturer on Northwest tribal culture; free; 4

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Acorn Project wi ll perform Oct. 27 at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782. OCT. 27 — VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients and hear Janet Russell talk about things to do with applesauce; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. OCT. 27 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DAS RHEINGOLD”: Starring Bryn Terfel in an encore presentation of the masterpiece directed by Robert Lepage; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. OCT. 27 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “People of the Book” by Geraldine Brooks; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1072 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. OCT. 27 — LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. OCT. 27 — ACORN PROJECT: The Bellingham, Wash.-based jam band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. OCT. 27 — LAURA VEIRS AND WEINLAND: The Portland-based indie rock groups perform; $15 plus fees; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

OCT. 28 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Larry Crompton talks about his book “Sudden Terror,” and about writers rejections and self publishing; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-923-0896 or www. centraloregonwritersguild.com. OCT. 28 — CRAIG CHAQUICO: The Grammy-winning jazz guitarist performs, with Rich Taelor, Andy Armer and Mike Chubick; proceeds benefit House of Hope; $33; 7-9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. OCT. 28 — EXHIBIT WALK: Explore the “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape” exhibit with Thompson; $5, free museum members; 7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. OCT. 28 — MIRIAMS WELL: The indiecountry band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. OCT. 28 — SUPER ADVENTURE CLUB: The San Francisco-based experimental pop duo performs, with Greg Botsford; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

Farther Down the Road OCT. 29-30 — “THE DROWSY CHAPERONE”: The Summit High School drama department presents the musical comedy about a Broadway starlet who wants to

give up show business; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m. both days, and 2 p.m. Oct. 30; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3223300 or www.beattickets.org. OCT. 29-31 — HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays, Saturdays and Oct. 31: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. OCT. 29-31 — “DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. Oct. 29-30, 2 p.m. Oct. 31; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. OCT. 29-30 — “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m. Oct. 29, 7 p.m. and midnight Oct. 30; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. OCT. 29-31 — AN EVENING WITH EDGAR ALLAN POE: Alastair Jacques performs a reading and discussion of Poe’s works; proceeds benefit the Des Chutes Historical Museum; $10 in advance, $12 day of show; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. OCT. 29 — PAULA POUNDSTONE: The sharp-witted and spontaneous comedian performs; $40 in advance, $45 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. OCT. 30 — TALES OF HALLOW’S EVE: Dramatic readings, puppet shows, harvest fun and more; $5, free museum members; 4-6:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. OCT. 30 — “THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW”: Showing of the 1975 R-rated film starring Susan Sarandon and Tim Curry; with a costume contest and more; $10; 9:30 p.m. costume contest, 10 p.m. screening; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. NOV. 4 — THE NATURE OF WORDS: Featuring a lecture by Jimmy Santiago Baca; $35; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-6472233, info@thenatureofwords.org or www.thenatureofwords.org.


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talks, classes, museums & libraries Education SOUP’S ON: John Nelson leads a class on making great soups; $30, includes dinner; 6 tonight; The Blue Olive Restaurant, Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 541-526-6862. THE POWER OF REVISION WORKSHOPS: Author Elizabeth Lyon speaks; register on website; $70 Saturday, $30 Sunday; fiction workshop 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday; nonfiction workshop 1-4 p.m. Sunday; Central Oregon Community College, Pioneer Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-357-4181, elyon123@comcast.net or http:// centraloregonwriters.blogspot.com. HAVE YOU HAD A SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE?: Discuss out-of-body experiences, dreams and more; free; 2 p.m. Saturday; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-7286476 or www.eckankar.org. ZINES 101: Learn about crafting underground, handmade publications; registration requested; free; 2 p.m. Saturday; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7079 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. WAVE AFTER WAVE: Charley Thweatt performs, with an interactive spirit workshop; $20 suggested donation; noon-2:30 p.m. Sunday; High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend; 541-420-2815. OATH PRESENTATION: Nita Belles talks about modern-day slavery, especially in Oregon and India, and how to respond to it; free; 6:30 p.m. Sunday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. THE HEART OF A COURSE IN MIRACLES: Charley Thweatt performs, with an introduction to the course; $20 suggested donation; 7-9:30 p.m. Monday; High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend; 541-420-2815. ORIGINS AND INNOVATIONS IN ART: Learn about Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel ceiling; free; 2 p.m. Wednesday; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 800-824-2714, ctrinfo@uoregon. edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. HEALTHY AND ECONOMICAL COOKING: Learn to stock your kitchen with grains, beans and seasonal vegetables for healthy meals; $79; 6-9 p.m. Wednesday and Oct. 27; Central Oregon Community College, Grandview Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BEYOND YOUR INNER CHILD: A men-only discussion of men’s issues, and introduction of the new warrior training adventure; free; 6:30-9 p.m. Wednesday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-420-3519. QUEEN SCHOLARSHIP CLINIC: Learn about becoming a rodeo queen; applications available via website; $50, $10 for visitors; 10 a.m. Oct. 23; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-604-

0994, pamorita_@hotmail.com or www.crookedriverroundup.com. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541-383-7270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www.dpls.us or 541-312-1020. KINDERMUSIK: www.kidsmovewith music.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic .com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http://teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS: loriew@partnersbend.org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www.pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www.spiritual awarenesscommunity.com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco.org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec.org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www.raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation.com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation SKYLINE FOREST HIKE: Leslie Olson leads a three- to five -mile hike through the forest to explore the land; registration required; free; 9 a.m.-noon Saturday; Skyline Forest, near Bend; 541-330-0017 or www.deschuteslandtrust.org. DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust.org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www

.envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www .paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@ silverstriders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www.sunrivernaturecenter.org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours.com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts INNOVATION IN WAX: Learn about making encaustic baskets and masks; free art talk at 7:30 tonight, followed by a two-day workshop 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; free today, $120 plus $35 studio fee Saturday and Sunday; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. PHOTOGRAPHY 201: Bring your digital camera and learn to take better photos; experience or Photography 101 completion required; $75; 9 a.m.noon Saturday, 6-9 p.m. Tuesday; La Pine Park and Recreation District, 16405 First St.; 541-536-2223 or www.lapineparks.org to register. BEGINNING WEAVING II: Learn weaver-controlled weaves, fast warping and more; $150; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday through Oct. 22; The Woodside Weaver, 60443 Woodside Loop, Bend; 541-389-6473. NUTS & BOLTS: Learn the basics of photography, including digital photography terms; registration via website required by Tuesday; $39; 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday; Studio 3, 558 Ninth St., Suite 5, Bend; 541-3160330 or www.studio3bend.com. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains.com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon .org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000.com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio.com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE

WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www .MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend.com or 541-617-0900.

Performing Arts DANCE OPEN HOUSE: Learn about Fish Hawk Wing | Modern Dance, view demonstrations and more; free; 8-9 p.m. Wednesday and 8:15-9:15 p.m. Thursday; Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541788-0725, fish.hawk.wing@gmail. com or www.fishhawkwing.net. ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-4107894 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: 541-678-1379. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective.org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM:

Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www.bowmanmuseum.org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.deschuteshistory. org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era; $1; Fort Rock; www.fortrockmuseum. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the “Year of the Forest: Human Connections” exhibit; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www. museumatwarmsprings.org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (COCC), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

‘PSYCHO’

Oregon Symphony performs iconic film’s score By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

P

unctuated by shrieking strings, the infamous shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 thriller “Psycho” is one of the most iconic scenes in film history. Composed by Bernard Herrmann, the film’s music enhances suspense, drama and terror while using only the string section of the orchestra. In celebration of the film’s 50th anniversary, the Oregon Symphony will provide live music to a screening of “Psycho” on Oct. 31 at the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland. According to Steven Smith on The Bernard Herrmann Estate’s website, Herrmann was “a master at evoking psychological nuance and dramatic tension through music, often using unheard-of instrumental combinations

to suit the dramatic needs of a film.” Herrmann collaborated with Hitchcock on nine films, including “Vertigo” and “North by Northwest.” He also composed music for “Citizen Kane,” “Fahrenheit 451,” “The Day the Earth Stood Still” and “Taxi Driver.” The American Film Institute named “Psycho” the fourth best film score in its “100 Years of Film Scores” list, after “Star Wars,” “Gone with the Wind” and “Lawrence of Arabia.” For one performance only, the film will be projected above a live orchestra, conducted by Gregory Vajda. The film screens at 4 p.m. Ticket prices range from $14 to $78, depending on seat location. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact 800-2287343 or visit www.orsymphony.org. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-3830350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

J a n et Leigh, right, stars as Marion Crane in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 thriller “Psycho.” In celebration of the film’s 50th anniversary, the Oregon Symphony will provide live accompaniment to a screening of “Psycho” on Oct. 31 at the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland.

Photos courtesy Paramount Pictures / Photofest

Concer t s Oct. 15 — Gaither Homecoming Tour 2010, Rose Garden, Portland; 877789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Oct. 15 — Murder City Devils, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 15 — One Eskimo, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 15 — The Script, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 15 — Superchunk/Teenage Fanclub, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 16 — Broken Social Scene, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 16 — BROTHER, Unitarian Fellowship, Ashland; 541-5353562 or www.stclairevents.com. Oct. 16 — Suicidal Tendencies, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 17 — Cyril Pahinui Hawaiian Band, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 17 — Floater (acoustic) with Lucy Schwartz, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 17 — Gogol Bordello, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 17 — Matt Costa, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TW* Oct. 18 — Minus the Bear, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 19 — Batusis, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 19 — Belle and Sebastian, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 19 — Gogol Bordello, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 19 — Jimmy Buffett, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Oct. 19 — Mishka/The White Buffalo, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 19 — Recoil/Alan Wilder, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 19 — Terri Clark, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 19 — The Weepies, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Oct. 20 — Motion City Soundtrack, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 20 — Never Shout Never, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 20 — Tenth Avenue North, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Oct. 20 — The Weepies, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 21 — Blue Scholars, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 21 — Deer Tick, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 21 — EOTO, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 21 — Raiatea Helm, The

Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Oct. 22 — Atreyu, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 22 — Mumford & Sons, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Oct. 22 — Roky Erickson, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 22 — She & Him, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 23 — Avishai Cohen, Dolores Winningstad Theatre, Portland; TM* Oct. 23 — Blue Scholars, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 23 — Indubious, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 24 — Boulder Acoustic Society, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 24 — The Brothers Young, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TW* Oct. 24 —The Vaselines, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 25 — Asleep at the Wheel, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 25 — August Burns Red, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 26 — Lady Antebellum, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 26 — Mad Sin, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 26 — Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Oct. 27 — DJ Shadow, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 27 — Isobel Campbell & Mark Lanegan, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TW* Oct. 27 — Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-8845483 or www.rrtheater.org. Oct. 28 — Best Coast, Holocene, Portland; 503-239-7639 or www.holocene.org. Oct. 28 — Deerhunter, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 28 — Gov’t Mule, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 28 — Of Montreal, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 28, Oct. 31 — The Emerald City Jazz Kings, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org. Oct. 29 — Celtic Thunder, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Oct. 29 — Joan Osborne Acoustic Duo, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 29 — K’Naan, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 29 — The Nautics Present Hawaii Five-O Featuring Nokie Edwards, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-7793000 or www.craterian.com. Oct. 29 — Nellie McKay, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-434-


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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out of town

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, 800745-3000, www.ticketmaster.com • TW — TicketsWest, 800992-8499, www.ticketswest.com 7000 or www.theshedd.org. Oct. 29 — Sufjan Stevens, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 30 — Hot Rize, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 30 — Ingrid Michaelson, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Oct. 30 — Lotus, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Oct. 30 — Orgone/Reeble Jar, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 31 — Charlie Musselwhite, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 31 — Dr. Dog/Good Old War, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Oct. 31 — KT Tunstall, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Nov. 1 — Celtic Thunder, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Nov. 1 — Gary Numan, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Nov. 1 — “The Hope, Love & Justice Tour”: Featuring Mavis Staples and Billy Bragg; McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM*

Lectures & Comedy Oct. 15 — Kathy Griffin, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 15, 22, 29 — Archaeology Lecture Series, Knight Law Center, University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-346-3024. Oct. 16 — Jo Koy, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 16 — “What Will Winter Be Like”: Lecture; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 503-797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Oct. 16 — Whose Live Anyway?: Improvisational comedy; Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Oct. 17 — “Whose Live Anyway?”: Improvisational comedy; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-779-3000. Oct. 18 — Leslie Marmon Silko and Molly Gloss, Lincoln Performance Hall, Portland State University, Portland; TM* Oct. 19 — “Spectator at the Feast: Christian Views of Muslim Food Traditions in the Middle Ages and Renaissance”: Lecture by Olivia Remie Constable; LaSells Stewart Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis; 541-737-0561. Oct. 21 — “Beyond the Bubble — Current Trends in Japanese Architecture,” Lecture by Botond Bognar; Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-223-1321 or www.japanesegarden.com. Oct. 21 — Last Comic Standing, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Oct. 21 — Natasha Tretheway, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 503-

227-2583 or www.literary-arts.org. Oct. 22 — Last Comic Standing, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 23 — Mike Birbiglia, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Oct. 27 — “Stories of Change”: Featuring Myrlie Evers-Williams; Portland Art Museum, Portland; 503937-7594 or www.calderaarts.org. Oct. 27 — Trailer Park Boys, Aladdin Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Nov. 2 — Tim & Eric Awesome Tour, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Nov. 4 — Rodney Carrington, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Symphony & Opera Oct. 16-17 — “A Night at the Cotton Club”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Oct. 21 — “Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto”: Presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Oct. 24 — “Pirates!”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Oct. 24 — Trio con Brio Copenhagen, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; 541-884-5483 or www.rrtheater.org. Oct. 30 — Portland Youth Philharmonic in Concert: In celebration of the centennial of the Sagebrush Symphony Orchestra; Burns High School, Burns; 541-573-2427 or www. harneyartsfoundation.cfsites.org. Oct. 30, Nov. 1 — “Tchaikovsky’s ‘Winter Dreams’”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-2287343 or www.orsymphony.org. Oct. 31 — “Hitchcock’s Psycho”: A screening of the classic Hitchcock thriller with the Oregon Symphony providing live music; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; 800-228-7343 or www.orsymphony.org. Nov. 5, 7, 11, 13 — “Hansel and Gretel”: Presented by the Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

Theater & Dance Through Oct. 16 — Cirque Dreams, Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; 888-244-6665 or www.chinookwindscasino.com. Through Oct. 16 — Gallim Dance, Lincoln Hall, Portland State University, Portland; 503-7253307 or www.whitebird.org. Through Oct. 16 — “The Sleeping Beauty”: Presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Through Oct. 17 — “Sunset Boulevard,” Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; 503445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Through Oct. 30 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: The following plays are in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre: “Hamlet”

(through Oct. 30), “She Loves Me” (through Oct. 30), “Throne of Blood” (through Oct. 31) and “Pride and Prejudice” (through Oct. 31). “Ruined” (through Oct. 31) and “American Night: The Ballad of Juan José” (through Oct. 31) are playing

at the New Theatre; Ashland; 800219-8161 or www.osfashland.org. Through Nov. 21 — “An Iliad”: Presented by Portland Center Stage; Ellyn Bye Studio, Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland;

503-445-3700 or www.pcs.org. Oct. 16-17 — “Cinderella”: Presented by the Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org.

Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

out of town From previous page Oct. 19-24 — “In the Heights”: Musical by Lin-Manuel Miranda; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Oct. 21-23, 28-30 — “BloodyVox”: BodyVox celebrates Halloween; The BodyVox Dance Center,

Portland; 503-229-0627 or www.bodyvox.com. Oct. 23 — “Howlin’ Halloween”: Presented by the Teen Musical Theater of Oregon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541779-3000 or www.craterian.org.

Oct. 23 — “That’s My Word!”: Presented by the Phenomenon Hip Hop Company, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.org. Oct. 23-25 — “Pinocchio Returns” and “Poems Tossed on the Water”: Two original plays by

Bob Wilson; Westridge School, Westfir; 541-782-5701. Oct. 25 — The Capitol Steps, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Oct. 29-Nov. 27 — “Hedda Gabler”: Play by Henrik Ibsen; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; 541-4651506 or www.lordleebrick.com.

Exhibits Through Oct. 17 —Kiku Matsuri (the Chrysanthemum Viewing Festival), Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-223-1321 or www.japanesegarden.com. Through Oct. 17 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Mark Grotjahn” (through Oct. 17), “The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States” (through Jan. 2) and “Lee Kelly” (through Jan. 9; Portland; 503-226-2811 or www.portlandartmuseum.org. Through Oct. 30 — “Face the Public”: Group show; Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; 503-5813229 or www.zeekgallery.com. Through Oct. 30 — Fay Jones and Rae Mahaffey, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; 503-226-2754 or www.laurarusso.com. Through Oct. 30 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Ai Weiwei: Dropping the Urn” (through Oct. 30) and “Collateral Matters: Selections by Kate Bingaman-Burt and Clifton Burt” (through Jan. 8); Portland; 503-223-2654 or www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org. Through Oct. 31 — “Childhood Remembered”: Featuring 12 artists; Columbia Art Gallery, Hood River; 541387-8877 or www.columbiaarts.org. Through Oct. 31 — JM Brodrick and Susan Faust, Lawrence Gallery, Sheridan; 503-843-3633 or www.lawrencegallery.net. Through Oct. 31 — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Solitude in Absolute Form — Photographs by Jon Christopher Meyers” (through Oct. 31) and “PaleoLab — Oregon’s Past Revealed: Horses and Grasslands” (through Dec. 19); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541-346-3024 or natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Nov. 15 — “Comics at the Crossroads: Art of the Graphic Novel”: Featuring 30 Northwest artists; Maryhill Art Museum, Goldendale, Wash.; 509-773-3733 or www.maryhillmuseum.org. Through Nov. 20 — “George Johanson: Seven Decades of Painting,” Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland; 503-226-4391 or www.pnca.edu. Through Dec. 5— Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Christophe Goodstein: Inferno” (through Dec. 5), “Giuseppe Vasi’s Rome: Lasting Impressions from the Age of the Grand Tour” (through Jan. 2) and “Excessive Obsession” (through July 31, 2011); University of Oregon, Eugene; 541346-3027 or jsma.uoregon.edu. Through Dec. 31 — “Jews@Work: Law and Medicine”: The exhibition

focuses on the challenges Jews faced in their career choices; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; 503-226-3600 or www.ojm.org. Through Jan. 20 — “Outreach to Space”: Traveling exhibit exploring space and space travel; Science Factory, Eugene; 541-682-7888 or www.sciencefactory.org. Through Jan. 23 — “Tinkertoy: Build Your Imagination,” Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; 503223-6500 or www.portlandcm.org. Through Feb. 6 — “Identity: An Exhibition of You,” Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 503-797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Oct. 23 — Glass Float Gala, The Inn at Spanish Head, Lincoln City; 800452-2151 or www.oregoncoast.org. Oct. 23 — Science and Engineering Festival, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 503-797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Oct. 23-May 30 — “Design Zone: Behind the Scenes,” Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; 503-797-4000 or www.omsi.edu. Oct. 30 — Harvest ZOObilee Celebration, Wildlife Safari, Winston; 541-679-6761 or www.wildlifesafari.net. Oct. 30-Nov. 28 — “Shihoko Fukumoto: Indigo is the Color of My Dreams,” Portland Japanese Garden, Portland; 503-223-1321 or www.japanesegarden.com.

Miscellany Through Oct. 17 — Harvest Fest, Hood River; 800-3663530 or www.hoodriver.org. Through Oct. 17, 20-24, 2731 — FrightTown, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Through Nov. 4 — “Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film,” Whitsell Auditiorium, Portland Art Museum, Portland; 503-2211156 or www.nwfilm.org. Through Nov. 11 — Pumpkin Funland, Rasmussen Farms, Hood River; 800-548-2243 or www.rasmussenfarms.com. Oct. 16-17 — Gorge Fruit & Craft Fair, Hood River County Fairgrounds, Odell; 541-354-2865 or www.hoodriverfair.com. Oct. 23-24 — Great American Distillers Festival, Tiffany Center, Portland; 503-510-5603 or www.distillersfestival.com. Oct. 23-24 — Heirloom Apple Celebration, Hood River; 541-3867697 or www.hoodriverfruitloop.com. Oct. 24 — Cello Day, Multnomah Arts Center, Portland; 503-5059611 or www.oregoncello.org. Oct. 28-31 — “Disney On Ice presents Let’s Celebrate!,” Rose Garden, Portland; 877-789-7673 or www.rosequarter.com. Oct. 31 — Mount Pisgah Mushroom Festival, Mount Pisgah Arboretum, Eugene; 541-747-3817. Nov. 1 — “Babette’s Feast”: Film; Whitsell Auditorium, Portland Art Museum, Portland; 503-2211156 or www.nwfilm.org.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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gaming

‘NBA 2K11’ scores big

TOP 10

By Matt Bertz

2. “Halo: Reach” (X360)

Game Informer Magazine

3. “Dead Rising 2” (PS3, X360)

D

evelopers of sports games do an admirable job of capturing the essence and excitement of the modern leagues, but few tap the deep well of history in service of the sport. This is often chalked up to logistics since the players from bygone eras no longer are serviced by player unions, the developers must sign each individual athlete to craft a historical recreation. Visual Concepts toyed with this concept with “All Pro Football 2K8,” but with no league license the experience rang hollow. In doing the groundwork to retell the storied past of basketball’s most decorated legend, Michael Jordan, 2K Sports has proven the results are worth the effort. The Jordan Challenge is my favorite new sports game mode of the year. Visual Concepts painstakingly re-created 10 memorable events from the career of His Airness, signing all the players from the era, animating them with signature shots, and even providing historical commentary to give gamers the context of Jordan’s achievements. The attention to detail paid to Jordan himself is remarkable. 2K nailed the jump shot, crossover, ball fake, signature dunks, tongue wagging, and even the competitive stare of its cover athlete. This is a mode every hard-core basketball fan should experience, and other developers should follow suit in re-creating classic moments of other sports with this level of dedication. This attention to craft is also apparent in the Association mode, which for years has stood as the best franchise experience in the sporting realm. With

ACROSS THE BOARD The editors of Game Informer rank the top 10 games for October: 1. “Civilization V” (PC)

4. “NHL 11” (PS3, X360) 5. “Castlevania: Lords of Shadow” (PS3, X360) 6. “NBA 2K11” (PS3, X360) 7. “FIFA 11” (PS3, X360) 8. “F1 2010” (PS3, X360) 9. “Mafia II” (PS3, X360, PC) 10. “Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions” (PS3, X360) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Mini review ‘PROFESSOR LAYTON AND THE UNWOUND FUTURE’ McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Re-create the biggest momen ts from Michael Jordan’s career in the Jordan Challenge game mode of “NBA 2K11.” many of the finer details already in place, this year the mode received a subtle makeover in several areas. The new trade finder is helpful in finding willing suitors to unload a troubled player or unwanted contract. The draft day features more trade activity than ever before. The AI-controlled teams are more aware of when they should be starting a fire sale, collecting young players for rebuilding, or grabbing a veteran player to make a title run. Last year 2K unveiled its My Player mode, a stunted attempt at putting you in the shoes of a young player trying to make an NBA roster. The mode is more enjoyable this year thanks to an experience system that results in better rewards for good perfor-

EW RE V I

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Oct. 10 • “Medal of Honor” (X360, PS3, PC) • “Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode 1” (X360, PS3, Wii) • “Ninjabee Critic’s Choice Collection” (X360) • “Pinball FX 2” (X360)

‘NBA 2K11’ 8.75 (out of 10) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 2K Sports, Visual Concepts ESRB rating: E for Everyone mances. The reward logic is still touchy; you get knocked an absurd amount of points for letting your man score and you hardly receive any bump for draining shots yourself. The skewed system also over-rewards you for playing out of position for instance, point guards get an uncharacteristically high bump for grabbing rebounds under the hoop. But once you get the hang of the grading system you should start stringing together

• “Dragon’s Lair Trilogy” (Wii) • “Borderlands: Game of the Year Edition” (PS3, PC, X360) • “Alan Wake: The Writer” (X360) • “Just Dance 2” (Wii) • “Disney Sing It: Party Hits” (PS3, Wii) • “Lucha Libre AAA: Heroes of the Ring” (DS, PSP, PS3, X360)

strong performances. One carryover complaint from last year: The mode still starts you out with too low a rating. A 40-rated player would never get drafted in the first round, so if you’re going to let me get selected this high, shouldn’t I have a commensurate rating? On the court, 2K delivers many subtle changes that should please hard-core hoops fans. The off-the-ball defense is drastically improved; players more actively police passing lanes and rotate properly. “NBA 2K11” keeps refining its game and opens a new door to the sports genre with the mustplay Jordan Challenge mode. With solid presentation, a great franchise mode, and strong gameplay, “NBA 2K11” is an impressive package.

• “ZhuZhu Pets 2: Featuring The Wild Bunch” (DS) • “Who’s That Flying?!” (PS3) • “Invizimals” (PSP) • “Arcania: Gothic 4” (X360, PC) • “Dragon Age: Origins — Ultimate Edition” (X360, PS3, PC) • “Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes” (Wii)

Platform: Nintendo DS Price: $29.99 Age rating: 10 and older “Professor Layton and the Unwound Future,” the third installment in the “Layton” series of puzzle games, carries on its predecessors’ combination of engaging characters, hand-drawn animation and clever puzzles. This time, the professor and his assistant, Luke, are seemingly propelled several years ahead in time after receiving a letter from Luke’s future self. The pair must journey through a bizarrely unfamiliar London in search of the truth behind what has happened, solving dozens of puzzles (time-related and otherwise) along the way. Several mini-games and various other challenges await puzzle addicts, as well. — Justin Hoeger, McClatchyTribune News Service

• “Lufia: Curse of the Sinistrals” (DS) • “The Shoot” (PS3) • “Super Scribblenauts” (DS) • “Casper’s Scare School: Spooky Sports Day” (Wii) • “Deal or No Deal: Special Edition” (DS) — Gamespot.com


PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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movies

Courtesy Frank Masi / Summit Entertainment

John Malkovich, from left, Morgan Freeman and Bruce Willis star in the humorous CIA thriller “RED.”

It could’ve been better

‘RED’ has the actors but lacks pizazz

T

his would have been a hell of a cast when we were all younger. “RED” plays like a movie made for my Aunt Mary, who was always complaining, “Honey, I don’t like the pictures anymore because I don’t know who any of the actors are.” If the name Ernest Borgnine sounds familiar, here’s the movie for you. Borgnine at 93 is still active and has a project “in development,” I learn from IMDb, even if it’s ominously titled “Death Keeps Coming.” Says here it’s a supernatural West-

ern being produced by Tarantino. Borgnine himself is a heck of a guy. I flew out of Cartagena with him one morning with a terrible hangover, and we got stranded in some forgotten Colombian airport where he fed me aspirin crushed in milk. An actor like that is a role model. Bruce Willis stars in the title role of “RED,” which refers to his alert level (“retired: extremely dangerous) and not his hair. He’s a former CIA agent who discovers bad guys want to kill him. So he summons the mem-

bers of his old killing squad and they prepare a defense. The team includes Joe Matheson (Morgan Freeman), Marvin Boggs (John Malkovich), Victoria (Helen Mirren) and Ivan (Brian Cox). Notes: Victoria requires no second name because she is a woman in a thriller; Ivan is a Russian because the Russian in every thriller is named Ivan; Malkovich may have taken the role because he is never considered for characters named Boggs; and Freeman reveals early that he is dying of liver cancer. We know that as the black member of the team he must die first, “because that’s how he would have wanted it.” Continued next page

ROGER EBERT

“RED” 110 minutes PG-13, for intense sequences of action violence and brief strong language


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

movies

Too much comedy here Chinese remake of Hollywood classic falls short of its possibilities

I

n “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop,” the esteemed Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou, best known in the United States for such eye-popping epics as “House of Flying Daggers,” “Hero” and “Curse of the Golden Flower,” casts his eye toward a smaller, more intimate tale — specifically, and curiously, a remake of “Blood Simple,” the merciless 1984 film that marked the debut of brothers Joel and Ethan Coen. Instead of the Texas badlands, the story now unfolds in a remote desert valley in ancient feudal China. The basic story line remains the same: A cuckolded husband (Ni Dahong) hires a detective (Sun Honglei) to murder his cheating wife (Yan Ni) and her lover (Xiao Shenyang). But the tone of Zhang’s version of the tale is radically different from the Coens’. The movie begins as a broad, clownish comedy, peppered with bits of the director’s signature flourishes (a stunning scene in which the noodle-shop employees knead dough in an acrobatic manner is as magical as the action sequences from “Hero” or “Flying Daggers”). The personalities of the characters have changed, too: The wife is loud and vivacious, her lover meek and cowardly (he’s always dressed in pink), and the detective taciturn and even

From previous page So once again poor Morgan Freeman is hung out to dry. He’d rather play the villain. As he once explained to me: “The villain is usually the most interesting character in the movie, and one thing you KNOW is, he’ll still be around for the last scene.” In addition to his old comrades, Bruce takes along Sarah Ross (Mary-Louise Parker), a telephone operator for his retirement plan. He’s fallen in love with her voice. He explains she has to go on the

Courtesy Bai Xiaoyan / Sony Pictures Classics

Xiao Shenyang, from left, Yan Ni and Sun Hunglei star in the Chinese film “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop.” more Machiavellian than M. Emmet Walsh’s slimy P.I. from the original. There are long stretches without dialogue or music, and Zhang cleverly recreates the most memorable set pieces of “Blood Simple” — the corpse that won’t stay dead, the pinned hand, the beams of light that burst through a wall like bullets — while giving several of them a fresh twist. But, as a whole, “A Woman,

a Gun and a Noodle Shop” doesn’t hang together. “Blood Simple” was a dark exercise in film “noir,” one of the quintessential genres invented in Hollywood (along with the Western and the musical). Zhang’s film, despite having a higher body count and moments of striking visual beauty, feels like a mishmash of moods — a whimsical but fizzled experiment. Except for the ruthless and stoic detective — who is worthy of his

“RED” is neither a good movie nor a bad one. It features actors we like doing things we wish were more interesting. I guess the movie’s moral is, these old people are still tougher than the young ones. run with him because her life is in danger. Like any federal employee, she finds this reasonable. Her life will be much safer with a man who is the target of thousands of rounds of automatic

weapon fire. The bad guys are in the upper reaches of the CIA, and the conspiracy reaches all the way to a vice president with connections to a huge private defense contrac-

own film — none of the characters can be taken seriously, and the suspense for which the movie strives so strenuously in the last half hour never materializes. “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop” proves that American filmmakers aren’t the only ones who can bungle remakes of foreign movies. Rene Rodriguez is a film critic for The Miami Herald.

tor. This man is played by Richard Dreyfuss, who subtly signals to us, “You only THINK this is my Dick Cheney imitation, but if the studio let me loose, I could nail this role.” Are sinister Dick Cheney roles growing uncommonly frequent? Hollywood is always fearful of running out of villains and, having run through Russians, Chinese, Nazis and Mongols, seems to have fallen upon poor Cheney with relief. “RED” is neither a good movie nor a bad one. It features actors

RENE RODRIGUEZ “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop” 91 minutes R, for violence

we like doing things we wish were more interesting. I guess the movie’s moral is, these old people are still tougher than the young ones. You want tough? I’ll show you tough. In one scene, Helen Mirren is gut-shot and a blood stain spreads on her white dress. In a closing scene not a day later, she’s perfectly chipper and has had time to send the dress out to the cleaners. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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PAGE 27

movies ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 30.

HEADS UP

Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Fares Hananya, left, and Ashraf Barhom star in the Israeli film “Lebanon.”

‘Lebanon’ keeps heroism hidden E

xcept for a few brief scenes, this forceful drama takes place entirely inside an Israeli tank on the first day of that nation’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon. It’s a nonheroic vision of warfare focusing on the claustrophobia, confusion, fear and other emotions experienced by four soldiers who are far from battle-hardened. Writer-director Samuel Maoz, who based the film on his experiences as an Israeli conscript, conveys an intensely visceral sense of the men’s moment-to-moment experiences in the grimy sweatbox of the tank’s interior. As the young soldiers’ vulnerability becomes clear, the vehicle comes to seem more like a prison than a weapon of war. The director permits us no distance or breathing room, essentially making the viewer into the fifth crew member. The main characters are the tank’s commander (Itay Tiran), the driver (Michael Moshonov), the loader (Oshri Cohen) and the gunner (Yoav Donat). As is common in war pictures, each has one overriding characteristic. They receive their orders via radio and during in-person visits from a tough commander (Zohar Strauss) who occasionally lowers himself into the hellish tank interior. (A few other outsiders also

WALTER ADDIEGO

“Paranormal Activity 2” — Writerdirector Oren Peli, who made last year’s “Paranormal Activity” for around $10,000 and watched the film go on to gross more than $150 million, only served as producer for this sequel. The plot details and even the premise have been kept under tight wraps. Let’s just hope they come up with a decent ending this time. Catch a late night screening Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. 91 minutes. (R) “A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor Live” — Garrison Keillor returns to the silver screen with an all-new special live performance of “A Prairie Home Companion.” The show features special guests Sara Watkins, Old Crow Medicine Show, Joe Ely and Andra Suchy as well as regulars Sue Scott, Tim Russell, Tom Keith, Fred Newman and the “Guy’s AllStar Shoe Band.” “A Prairie Home Companion” will screen at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Cost is $22. 135 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from National CineMedia

WHAT’S NEW “Jackass 3-D” — Johnny Knoxville and his crew are back for still

more daredevil comic antics. With Knoxville, Bam Margera, Steve-O and Chris Pontius. Directed by Jeff Tremaine. This film was not screened in advance for critics. 93 minutes. (R) “Lebanon” — Except for a few brief scenes, this forceful drama takes place entirely inside an Israeli tank on the first day of that nation’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon. It’s a nonheroic vision of warfare focusing on the claustrophobia, confusion, fear and other emotions experienced by four soldiers who are far from battlehardened. Writer-director Samuel Maoz, who based the film on his experiences as an Israeli conscript, conveys an intensely visceral sense of the men’s moment-to-moment experiences in the grimy sweatbox of the tank’s interior. Rating: Three stars. 93 minutes. (R)

— Walter Addiego, San Francisco Chronicle “RED” — Bruce Willis is a retired CIA assassin, but now is a target. So he reassembles his old team: Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren and Brian Cox. And a telephone operator played by Mary-Louise Parker. Comic thriller, neither good nor bad, featuring actors we like doing things we wish were more interesting. Rating: Two stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13) “A Woman, A Gun and a Noodle Shop” — In “A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop,” the esteemed Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou, best known in the United States for such eyepopping epics as “House of Flying Daggers,” “Hero” and “Curse of the Golden Flower,” casts his eye toward a smaller, more intimate tale — specifically, and curiously, a remake of “Blood Simple,” the merciless 1984 film that marked the debut

of brothers Joel and Ethan Coen. Instead of the Texas badlands, the story now unfolds in a remote desert valley in ancient feudal China. The basic story line remains the same: A cuckolded husband (Ni Dahong) hires a detective (Sun Honglei) to murder his cheating wife (Yan Ni) and her lover (Xiao Shenyang). Rating: Two stars. 91 minutes. (R)

— Rene Rodriguez, The Miami Herald

STILL SHOWING “Case 39” — The evil-child movie has been with us at least as long as “The Bad Seed” (1956, gloriously funny) and “Village of the Damned” (1960, effectively chilling), and “Case 39” adds little to the diminutive-demon genre. Radiating a distinctly retro vibe, this throwaway thriller from German director Christian Alvart tosses a bone to Renee Zellweger, who chews it to a nub as Emily Jenkins, a harried social worker. Driven by her own childhood traumas, Emily makes the unwise decision to foster the 10-year-old Lillith (an exceptional Jodelle Ferland) when she discovers the child’s parents (Callum Keith Rennie and Kerry O’Malley) frantically stuffing her into a gas oven. This early scene is extremely effective, raising hopes of a torqued take on familiar material, but by the time the killings start, it’s clear that Ray Wright’s screenplay is more interested in following formula than in breaking new ground. This film was not given a star rating. 109 minutes. (R)

— Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times Continued next page

“Lebanon” 93 minutes R, for violence enter the soldiers’ world, including a sinister Phalangist, played by Ashraf Barhom, who deposits a Syrian prisoner.) We occasionally see the outside world through the tank’s gunsight, eerie visions that intensify the nightmarishness of the situation. The film also makes exceptionally good use of sound — the tank’s clangings and screechings and the deafening noise of shells exploding and gunfire outside contribute strongly to the sense of chaos, which has overtones of absurdist drama. As good as the film is in conveying the feeling of the walls closing in, it has to be said that the script won’t win any prizes for subtlety — the director seems to relish ham-fisted ironies. Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Walter Addiego is a film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Jon Hamm, left, stars as Detective Frawley and Ben Affleck stars as Doug MacRay in the drama “The Town.”


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

movies From previous page “Easy A” — Funny, star-making role for Emma Stone, as a high school girl nobody notices until she’s too embarrassed to admit she spent the weekend home alone and claims she had sex with a college boy. When word gets around, she uses her undeserved notoriety to play the role to the hilt, even wearing a Scarlet Letter. And she’s able to boost the reps of some of her pals by making up reports of their prowess. Sounds crass. Isn’t. Rating: Three and a half stars. 93 minutes. (PG-13) “Eat Pray Love” — Julia Roberts stars as a New York writer, rebounding from a ditched marriage and a failed love affair, who embarks on a year’s quest in Italy, India and Bali seeking balance of body, mind and spirit. During this journey, great-looking men are platooned at her, she meets only nice people, and she eats Pavarottian plates of pasta. Like the meeting of a Harlequin romance and a mystic travelogue, but the 80 percent female audience I saw it with seemed to eat it up. Rating: Two stars. 141 minutes. (PG-13) “The Expendables” — Here they are, “the REAL A-Team,” the pride and joy of big, bloody ’80s action movies, back for a last roundup. “The Expendables,” Sylvester Stallone’s all-star mercenary movie, is a deliriously retro ride into Reagan-era blockbusters. The brawn and testosterone (among other bulk-inducing substances) drip off the screen as Sly, Dolph Lundgren, Jet Li, Jason Statham, Terry Crews and Randy Couture go out rootin’, tootin’ and shootin’ black-and-brown people in various Godforsaken parts of the world. The shootouts are epic, but the stuff leading up to them is lame. But novelty aside, with “Losers” already on DVD and “The A-Team” on

The Associated Press

Hiccup, voiced by Jay Baruchel, rides the dragon Toothless in the film “How to Train Your Dragon.”

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES The following movies were released Oct. 12.

“How to Train Your Dragon” — Young Hiccup, whose Viking village has long been beset by dragons, befriends a young one and tames it. Thus the elders discover there can be good dragons and bad ones, and that leads to an aerial battle sequence obviously yearning to become a video game. The new DreamWorks animated feature is bright, good-looking and has high energy. Kids above the easily scared age will probably like the movie the younger they are. DVD Extras: Two

featurettes and audio commentary; Blu-ray Extras: Additional featurettes, pop-up trivia, deleted scenes, animated short, games and build your own 3-D dragons. Rating: Three stars. 98 minutes. (PG) “I am Love” — A sensuous and fascinating story about a modern family of Italian aristocrats. Tilda Swinton plays a Russian who has married the oldest son, learns her husband and their son will take over the family textile business, then suddenly finds herself in the middle of an unexpected affair. Masterfully directed by Luca Guadagnino. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Interviews, audio commentary and featurette. Rating: Four stars. 120 minutes. (R) “Jonah Hex” — Josh Brolin plays the hero, who vows vengeance against the evil Quentin Turnbull (John Malkovich), a Confederate who burned his family alive. The film

takes place in a dusty Western town named Stunk Crick, although its climax involves Hex trying to save the U.S. Capitol building from Turnbull’s terrorist super weapon. Megan Fox plays (are you ready for this?) a hooker who lives up over the saloon and loves Hex, even though his face was branded by Turnbull. Oh, and Hex can speak with the dead. DVD Extras: Deleted scenes; Blu-ray Extras: Two additional featurettes. Rating: Two stars. 80 minutes. (PG-13) ALSO OUT THIS WEEK: “Leaves of Grass.” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Oct. 19 include “Predators” and “Please Give.” Check with local video stores for availability.

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

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The Associated Press

Leonardo DiCaprio stars in the thriller “Inception.” its way there, “The Expendables” feels, well, disposable — a movie whose nostalgia isn’t enough to make this 50.-caliber trip down Memory Lane worth the fake napalm. Rating: Two stars. 98 minutes. (R)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Get Low” — Robert Duvall plays a backwoods hermit who figures his time is coming, and enlists the local undertaker (Bill Murray) in planning a big funeral send-off that he will pay for himself and enjoy while he’s still alive. Melodrama, human comedy, and a sweet reunion with an old squeeze (Sissy Spacek). Nice work by Lucas Black as the undertaker’s assistant. Rating: Three stars. 102 minutes. (PG-13) “Inception” — An astonishingly original and inventive thriller starring Leonardo DiCaprio as a man who infiltrates the minds of others to steal secrets. Now he’s hired to IMPLANT one. Ken Watanabe is a billionaire who wants to place an idea in the mind of his rival (Cillian Murphy). DiCaprio assembles a team (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tom Hardy, Ellen Page) to assist him, in a dazzling achievement that rises above the thriller level and enters the realm of mind control — in the plot and in the audience. Written and directed by Christopher Nolan (“Memento,” “The Dark Knight”). Rating: Four stars. 148 minutes. (PG-13) “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” — “It’s Kind of a Funny Story” really isn’t so funny. Cute, bordering on cutesy, yes. Light and shallow and inconsequential in a lot of ways. But funny? Rarely. Based on a Ned Vizzini novel about a 16-year-old who checks himself into an adult mental ward and discovers something about himself and the troubled souls around him, it stumbles pleasantly and predictably down that fine line between “sweetly sensitive” and “trite.” Starring Keir Gilchrist, Zach Galifianakis and Emma Roberts. Rating: 2 stars. 98 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 29

movies From previous page “Jack Goes Boating” — Philip Seymour Hoffman directs and stars in a fourhander involving a painfully shy man (Hoffman) and a timid, wounded woman (Amy Ryan) who are brought together by a matchmaking married couple (John Ortiz and Daphne Rubin-Vega). During the course of a dinner party, a delicate romantic evening collapses into an emotional melee. Based on Bob Glaudini’s play, made special by the vulnerability projected by the actors. Rating: Three stars. 91 minutes. (R) “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” — In the “Guardians of Ga’Hoole” novels of Kathryn Lasky, owls have mastered fire and metallurgy and have been known to play the lute as they sing their epic poems about epic battles from days of yore. And in the film about them, they all speak with Aussie accents. Zack Snyder’s film “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” is a gorgeous and occasionally exciting movie that loses some of its heart and forward momentum in clutter, laborious title included. Still, this variation on a theme by Tolkien is pretty daring, more demanding than your typical film for kids. In an

age of “let’s all get along” pabulum, there’s much to like in a cartoon not afraid to show its talons. Rating: Two and a half stars. 85 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Let Me In” — A well-made retelling of the Swedish “Let the Right One In,” which doesn’t cheapen the original but respects it and adds some useful events. Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee) is a bullied, neglected boy, and Abby (Chloe Grace Moretz, of “Kick Ass”) is the girl who moves into the next apartment and has “been 12 for a very long time.” The same cold, dark atmosphere of foreboding, in a doom-laden vampire drama. Not for Team Edward. Rating: Three and a half stars. 115 minutes. (R) “Life as We Know It” — When their best friends are killed in a crash, Holly and Messer (Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel) are appointed as joint custodians of their 1-year-old, Sophie. Also, they have to move into Sophie’s mansion. But Holly and Messer can’t stand each other. So what happens when they start trying to raise Sophie? You’ll never guess in a million years. Or maybe you will. Rating: Two stars. 113 minutes. (PG-13) “My Soul To Take” — In 2005, the

entertaining terror-in-the-skies thriller “Red Eye” indicated that Wes Craven still had his horror mojo, a decade or two or three after “Scream,” “A Nightmare on Elm Street” and “The Hills Have Eyes.” He seems to have misplaced it in the intervening five years: “My Soul to Take,” his first feature since, is a thoroughly dreary, by-thenumbers exercise. Maybe he was preoccupied by “Scream 4,” due out next spring. The relevant number in “Soul” is seven, which, after a labored, overly long set-up, is the quota of teenagers that a longdead schizophrenic psycho killer is scheduled to carve up before the movie can end. Craven follows his usual recipe of comic pop-culture references and dreamy shocks, but his heart doesn’t seem to be in either. This film was not given

a star rating. 106 minutes. (R)

— Mike Hale, The New York Times “The Other Guys” — “The Other Guys,” the new Will Ferrell cop comedy, is good. But it would have been great without Ferrell. His untethered performance beats the comedy life out of most of his scenes. Ferrell plays Allen Gamble, a numbers-crunching New York detective content to sit at his desk. Terry Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg), who’s been partnered with Gamble as a punishment for shooting a sports legend, desperately wants to get into the streets and stop some real criminals. He gets his chance to be a hero when a routine case turns into a major crime. Adam McKay and Chris Henchy have written a script that takes some very funny jabs at the buddy-cop genre. That it provides plenty of laughs despite Ferrell’s

rants shows just how good it is. But the best script can’t overcome a bad performance. This film was not given a star rating. 107 minutes. (PG-13)

— Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee “Secretariat” — A great film about greatness, the story of the horse and the no less brave woman who had faith in him. Diane Lane stars as Penny Chenery, who fell in love with Secretariat when he was born, and battled the all-male racing fraternity and her own family to back her faith in the champion. A lovingly crafted film, knowledgeable about racing, with great uplift. Also with John Malkovich, Scott Glenn, James Cromwell, Nelsan Ellis, Dylan Walsh. One of the year’s best. Rating: Four stars. 122 minutes. (PG)

Continued next page

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PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

movies

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN! Coming to Video on Demand

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Oct. 15

From previous page

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6

OCTOBER Prince of Persia – Oct 14

Predators – Oct 19

Sex and the City 2 – Oct 26

How to Train Your Dragon – Oct 29

Karate Kid – Nov 4

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

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GET LOW (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20 Sun-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:15 Sun-Thu: 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50 LEBANON (R) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:25, 6:40, 9:05 Sun-Thu: 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:25, 7:10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) Fri-Sat: Noon, 2:30, 6:10, 9 Sun-Thu: Noon, 2:30, 7:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:35 a.m., 2:40, 6:20, 9:10 Sun-Thu: 11:35 a.m., 2:40, 6:55 A WOMAN, A GUN AND A NOODLE SHOP (R) Fri-Sat: 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:30, 8:55 Sun-Thu: 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:45

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

CASE 39 (R) Fri-Wed: 3:35, 9:15 Thu: 3:35 EASY A (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:05, 4:30, 7:50 JACKASS (R) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 JACKASS 3-D (R) Fri-Thu: 1:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:20, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LET ME IN (R) Fri-Thu: 12:40, 3:45, 6:25, 9:25 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) Fri, Mon: 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 Sat: 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 Sun: 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 Tue-Thu: 1:15, 4:35, 7:20, 10 MY SOUL TO TAKE 3-D (R) Fri-Thu: 1:45, 5, 7:35, 10:15 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) Fri-Wed: Noon, 6:15 Thu: Noon PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION WITH GARRISON KEILLOR LIVE (no MPAA rating) Thu: 8 RED (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:10, 1:30, 4, 4:50, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20, 10:10 SECRETARIAT (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 4:10, 7, 9:50 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40

The Associated Press

Jason Statham, from left, Sylvester Stallone and Randy Couture star in “The Expendables.”

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. • There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

Tue, Thu: 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 Wed: 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 THE TOWN (R) Fri-Thu: 12:50, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:55 a.m., 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 YOU AGAIN (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:35

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) Fri, Sun, Tue-Wed: 8:45 THE EXPENDABLES (R) Fri, Sun, Tue-Wed: 6 TOY STORY 3 (G) Sat: 11 a.m., 1:30, 3:45 Sun: 1:30, 3 Wed: 3 EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown on Monday. The Oregon State University football game will screen at 7 p.m. Saturday (doors open at 6 p.m.). The University of Oregon football game will screen at 6 p.m Thursday (doors open at 5 p.m.).

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JACK GOES BOATING (R) Fri: 5 Sat: 3, 5 Sun: 2, 4 Mon-Thu: 7 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) Fri: 5:15, 7:45 Sat: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 Sun: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 6:45 RED (PG-13) Fri: 5:15, 7:45 Sat: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 Sun: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 6:45 SECRETARIAT (PG) Fri: 5, 7:30 Sat: 2:30, 5, 7:30 Sun: 1:30, 4, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 6:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 7:15 Sun: 6:15

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WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) Fri: 4, 7, 9:30 Sat: 1, 4, 7, 9:30 Sun: 1, 4, 7 Mon-Thu: 4, 7

“The Social Network” —The life and times of Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), who created Facebook, became a billionaire in his early 20s, and now has 500 million members on the site he created. A fascinating portrait of a brilliant social misfit who intuited a way to involve humankind in the Kevin Bacon game. Everybody likes Facebook — it’s the site that’s all about YOU. With Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker, the Napster founder who introduced Zuckerberg to the Silicon Valley fast lane, Andrew Garfield as the best friend who gets dumped, and Armie Hammer as the Winklevoss twins, who sued Zuckerberg for stealing their idea. One of the year’s best films. Rating: Four stars. 120 minutes. (PG-13) “The Town” — Effective thriller about career bank robbers, directed by and starring Ben Affleck. Jeremy Renner is loopy and scary as the flywheel on an otherwise disciplined criminal team. Could have been better if it followed the characters more than the buried plot structure. But worth seeing. Rating: Three stars. 124 minutes. (R) “Toy Story 3” — Young Andy has grown to college age, and has to decide what to do with his once-beloved toys when he goes off to school. This leads to threats of abandonment for the toys, and harrowing adventures at a day care center and a garbage dump. Lacking the humanity that infused the earlier “Toy Story” sagas, and happier with action and jokes than with characters and emotions, but I expect its target audience will love it. Rating: Three stars. 102 minutes. (G) “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” — Gordon Gekko is back, and he may still be a little greedy, in Oliver Stone’s sequel to his 1987 hit. Michael Douglas reprises his iconic role, and Shia LaBeouf is the hungry young trader who wants to marry his daughter (Carey Mulligan). Josh Brolin is a Wall Street predator who spreads rumors that destroy the firm of LeBeouf’s mentor (Frank Langella). Entertaining story about ambition, romance and predatory trading practices, but it seems more fascinated than angry. Have we grown used to greed? Rating: Three stars. 130 minutes. (R) “You Again” — When Kristen Bell finds out her brother (Jimmy Wolk) is engaged to marry Odette Yustman, who picked on her in high school, a series of predictable obligatory scenes breaks out. A promising cast gives scant pleasure, although Jamie Lee Curtis and Sigourney Weaver do a terrific cheerleading act together. Betty White plays the heroine’s grandmother. Rating: Two stars. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (unless otherwise noted)


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 31


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

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52596 N. Hwy 97 600 W. Hood Ave.

BEND COOLEY RD. 63590 Hunnell Rd.

541-382-3551 541-385-4702 541-548-4011 541-447-5686 541-475-3834 541-536-3009 541-549-1560 541-318-0281

Bulletin Daily Paper 10/15/10  
Bulletin Daily Paper 10/15/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday October 15, 2010