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Bend nears decision on $73M water overhaul

GOVERNOR’S RACE

2 budget plans: lots of targets, few cuts

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend City Councilors are poised to make a decision on whether to continue pursuing a $73 million overhaul of the Bridge Creek water system within the next several weeks. On Wednesday, councilors heard new financial information that showed upgrading the “I think Bridge Creek infrastructure we do our community would save be$372 mila disservice tween lion and $454 for the next million over the next 50 years 50 to 100 years if we when compared to switching to abandon an all-well sysour surface tem that would water.” pump groundwater to meet — Oran Bend’s water Teater, Bend demands. city councilor They were also given information about complex water rights issues that could threaten the city’s chances of being able to pump more groundwater if it gave up its surface water system. These issues made some councilors, in particular Mark Capell and Oran Teater, act as if upgrading the Bridge Creek system was the only option. “This is significantly more clear for me,” Councilor Oran Teater said after the more than an hour long presentation. “I think we do our community a disservice for the next 50 to 100 years if we abandon our surface water.” An upgrade to the Bridge Creek system has several components, including replacing 10 miles of aging pipelines and adding a high-tech filtration system that would protect against future wildfires and treat for dangerous bacteria and microorganisms, like Cryptosporidium. City officials also want to add a hydropower plant that would take advantage of Bridge Creek’s higher elevation and use gravity to generate electricity. When first proposed, the cost of the project was estimated at $71 million, and expected to generate $1.7 million in hydropower revenues in the first year of operation. See Bend / A5

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Central Oregon Emergency Response Team members prepare to move into position during a Sept. 27 standoff at the Greenwood Manor apartment complex in northeast Bend. During the four-hour incident, negotiators spoke by phone with a man who had barricaded himself inside his apartment and was making threats about using guns and bombs.

BEND POLICE NEGOTIATORS

Fighting crime with words Following last week’s standoff, officers discuss aspects of job By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A

fter a Bend man made threats about violence and barricaded himself inside his northeast Bend apartment last week, dozens of police turned out to help get the situation under control. Curious onlookers who gathered along the sidewalks near the Greenwood Manor apartment complex watched as police cars and armored vehicles pulled up and SWAT team members put on their gear and surrounded the building. They saw officers monitoring the situation from a command center in a nearby parking lot. What they couldn’t see, however, was one of the most important parts of the entire operation: The police negotiators who spent nearly four hours talking to the man on the phone, trying to figure out what he planned to do and keep him from hurting himself or anyone else. The incident ended without any injuries when officers fired a Taser through a broken window and then took 52-year-old Mark Hipple into custody. Police had believed Hipple was armed with a rifle, but later found that he had no weapons in his apartment. See Negotiators / A4

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Officer Kecia Weaver and Sgt. Dan Ritchie of the Bend Police Department stand inside the mobile command unit where negotiations are conducted during standoffs involving the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team. Weaver and Ritchie are two of the seven negotiators who work with the team.

“They’re trained and have the ability to talk to somebody, to make sense of the things that aren’t making sense.” — Lt. Paul Kansky, Bend Police Department

Stem cell case spells uncertainty for scientists By Amy Harmon New York Times News Service

CINCINNATI — Rushing to work at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center one recent morning, Dr. Jason Spence, 33, grabbed a moment during breakfast to type “stem cells” into Google and click for the last 24 hours of news. It is a routine he has performed daily in the six weeks since a U.S. District Court ruling put the future of his research in jeopardy. “It’s always at the front of my brain when I wake up,”

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said Spence, who has spent four years training to turn stem cells derived from human embryos into pancreatic tissue in the hope of helping diabetes patients. “You have this career plan to do all of this research, and the thought that they could just shut it off is pretty nerve-racking.” Perhaps more than any other field of science, the study of embryonic stem cells has been subject to ethical objections and shaped by political opinion. See Stem cells / A4

Dr. Ali Brivanlou, second from left, in his lab with colleagues who do research on stem cells at The Rockefeller University in New York. Jennifer S. Altman New York Times News Service

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 280, 46 pages, 7 sections

SALEM — Oregon’s next governor will inherit a projected hole of more than $3 billion in the 2011-13 two-year general fund budget. And whoever wins that job — Republican Chris Dudley or Democrat John Kitzhaber — won’t find it an easy task. While the governor is able to propose a budget, it’s the Legislature that approves it. And though the governor is tasked with negotiating labor contracts, the Legislature can influence that as well. Not only that, but there is a slew of entrenched interests, many with lobbyists, ready to do battle over state spending. “Every spending category has its own interest group, so I don’t think any of it’s easy money,” said Chuck Sheketoff of the Oregon Center for Public Policy, which tracks state spending. The likelihood of another large Chris Dudley stimulus boost from the federal government? “At the moment, close to zero,” says Bill Lunch, chairman of the Oregon State University political science department and an OPB commentator. So which gubernatorial candidate is better poised to tackle the next budget, and who has the John better plan? Kitzhaber First, the plans. Dudley, a former NBA player turned investment adviser, has proposed a budget plan that makes going after labor and pension costs of state employees a priority. For instance, he wants state employees to contribute one-sixth of their health care costs, and to reverse the state’s decision to pay for employees’ retirement contributions, which amount to 6 percent of payroll. He wants to undertake a variety of initiatives that create better budgeting, privatize state operations and look for waste in government. See Budget / A5

ELECTION

HEALTH CARE

Waivers used to counter dropped coverage in U.S. By Reed Abelson New York Times News Service

As Obama administration officials put into place the first major wave of changes under the health care legislation, they have tried to defuse stiffening resistance — from companies like McDonald’s and some insurers — by granting dozens of waivers to maintain even minimal coverage far below the new law’s standards. The waivers have been issued in the past several weeks as part of a broader strategic effort to stave off threats by some health insurers to abandon markets, drop out of the business altogether or refuse to sell certain policies. Among those that administration officials hoped to mollify with waivers were some big insurers, some smaller employers and McDonald’s, which went so far as to warn that the regulations could force it to strip workers of existing coverage. See Waivers / A5

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TOP NEWS INSIDE SUPREME COURT: Church’s right to protest under scrutiny, Page A3


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Obama hails NEA spending $15M on campaign ads community colleges at summit MIDTERM ELECTIONS

By Nick Anderson

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The nation’s largest teachers union is jumping into the midterm congressional elections, mostly on behalf of Democrats, with what it describes as a $15 million advertising fund “to elect education champions.” The National Education Association’s foray into dozens of battleground races comes despite President Obama’s advocacy of school-improvement policies that rankle many union activists, such as teacher performance pay and staff shake-ups at low-performing schools. Karen White, the NEA’s political director, said the 3.2 million-member union is in sync with Obama more often than not. As an example, she

pointed to his support for a $10 billion education funding bill that the Democratic-led Congress passed in August over Republican opposition. “That education jobs bill got so many of our members engaged,” White said. “It was a turning point for us.”

‘Bumps in the road’

She played down controversy over Obama’s school reform agenda as “bumps in the road,” adding, “we share the same goals as this administration.” Critics of the union say that it stands for the status quo in education and against innovation, which the NEA disputes. The next Congress is likely to debate revisions to the 2002 No Child Left Behind law, a key issue for

the union. The NEA said its first round of television ads began airing this week in Arizona, where the union is supporting Rep. Harry Mitchell (D), and in Ohio, where it is backing Rep. Betty Sutton (D). Overall, White said, the union plans $40 million in political spending this election cycle. In dozens of targeted races, most of the union’s recommended candidates are Democrats. But NEA officials said they are backing selected Republicans who have supported their causes, including Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) and Reps. Anh “Joseph” Cao (La.) and Judy Biggert (Ill.). The American Federation of Teachers, with 1.5 million members, declined to discuss its political spending.

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Chatari Jones, 12, left, and her mother, Deborah McFadden-Jones, of Sanford, Fla., speaks during a news conference at Spirit of Truth Worship Ministries in Lake Mary, Fla., on Tuesday.

Bullied girl grateful for chance to defend others By Walter Pacheco The Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel

LAKE MARY, Fla. — The disabled girl who was bullied on a Florida school bus turned the tables on her tormentors Tuesday by thanking them for empowering her to defend other disabled children. “Thank you so much for bullying me because it taught me a lesson about disabled kids,” said Chatari Jones, 12, who suffers from cerebral palsy. “We are disabled for a reason.” Cerebral palsy is a disorder that affects communication, posture and other motor skills. Although her parents said she does not show many outward signs of the disorder, it has affected her speech and walk. James Willie Jones and Deborah McFadden-Jones joined their daughter and attorney Natalie Jackson as

they addressed the media Tuesday at their church, Spirit of Truth Ministries in Lake Mary, Fla. Her father said Chatari’s ordeal at the hands of bullies who spit in her hair and called her names, often sparked by her disability, has given her the courage to speak nationally and publicly about the taunts children under similar circumstances suffer at school. Julie Hertzog, director of PACER’s National Center for Bullying Prevention in Minnesota, also was on hand to express her gratitude to Chatari. “We have a number of kids with disabilities who are being bullied,” Hertzog said. “Hopefully, (Chatari’s) courage and bravery will spare others.” The family has been holding new conferences in hopes of drawing attention to the problems of bullying.

October is National Bullying Prevention Month. A security video shot from inside a Seminole County school bus in September catapulted James Jones into the media spotlight because it showed him boarding the bus at a stop and threatening students for allegedly bullying his daughter. Seminole County Sheriff’s Office deputies a few days later arrested Jones on charges of disorderly conduct and disturbing a school function. He faces misdemeanor charges and is out on bond. Jones apologized for his violent reaction on national television, as well as during a September press conference at the family’s church. He said he did not want parents to act out as he had done, especially when children are concerned.

By Kevin G. Hall McClatchy -Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama used a special White House conference Tuesday to tout the nation’s community colleges as offering a path to the American dream for underprivileged citizens and as essential centers for training the 21st-century work force. He glossed over, however, the serious funding challenges that these institutions face. Calling community “Community colleges the “unsung colleges are heroes” of the U.S. educational system, uniquely Obama said that they American, places “provide a gateway to millions of Americans where anyone to good jobs and a bet- who walks ter life.” Jill Biden, the wife through the door of Vice President Joe is one step closer Biden, introduced to the American Obama during the first White House meeting dream.” on community colleges. She has been ��� Jill Biden, wife of a community college Vice President Joe professor for the past Biden 17 years and a tireless advocate for the twoyear schools. She spearheaded the daylong event, which brought together educators from across the nation for brainstorming. “Community colleges are uniquely American, places where anyone who walks through the door is one step closer to the American dream,” Jill Biden said during an opening ceremony that featured the unveiling of a $35 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. That donation will set up a grant program for five years whose goal will be to reverse a trend in which roughly half of community college students fail to achieve certificates or associate’s degrees. The White House also announced a new publicprivate partnership to foster closer links between community colleges and corporate America, labor unions and government agencies. This effort will try to standardize what has worked best at various schools, particularly in creating certified skills that can be recognized across the nation. The National Association of Manufacturers has pioneered the concept of national recognition and so-called stackable skills for a modern work force. Its Manufacturing Institute already is engaged in three national pilot projects, including one in Winston-Salem, N.C., that recently helped convince Caterpillar Inc. to locate a plant there. Yet the National Association of Manufacturers, which has been critical of the Obama administration on tax matters, was conspicuously absent from the list of invitees. Association officials confirmed the snub but declined to comment. “I’d say they’ve been trailblazers,” said David Baime, the senior vice president for government relations at the American Association of Community Colleges. His association nonetheless was thrilled to be in the spotlight. “The event is going to be a red-letter day for community colleges. We have felt for some time that our contributions have not been recognized,” Baime said. “Policymakers are still surprised to learn that over 45 percent of all students in higher education attend community colleges in this country.” Obama challenged the educators to help him meet his goal of having the United States recoup by 2020 its position as the nation with the highest percentage of college graduates.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

14 26 37 41 46 24 Power Play: 5. The next estimated jackpot is $20 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

8 13 15 42 45 47 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $3.6 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Americans scaling back college fund deposits By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — American families are scaling back plans to pay for their children’s college education as the stunted economic recovery continues to weigh on household budgets, according to a survey commissioned by college lender Sallie Mae. The study, which was conducted by Gallup, found that the percentage of families who planned to make little or no contribution to tuition increased, while the percentage who expected to cover more than half of expenses decreased. The trends were particularly pronounced in Hispanic families, where the number who thought they could only pay a little jumped from 12 percent to 35 percent. In addition, the percentage of families who said the reason they are not socking away money for college is that they cannot afford it rose from 62 percent last year to 68 percent this year. “They’re adjusting their expectations to the economic con-

ditions, both generally and what they may be experiencing on the individual level,” said Bill Diggins, Gallup’s lead researcher on the survey. Still, the study found that even though families are financially stressed, saving for college remained a priority. About onefifth of families reported it as a top financial goal — up from 14 percent last year and on par with those who rank saving for retirement as the priority.

Flash point in D.C. The rising cost of college education has become a flash point in Washington as the recession hampered families’ ability to foot the bill. According to a survey by the nonprofit College Board, which administers standardized tests, the cost of attending a private university has risen 2.6 percent a year over the past decade, while public college jumped nearly 5 percent annually. On average, families have saved about $28,000 to pay for

college. About 12 percent of that money is in 529 plans, while 14 percent comes from general savings accounts or certificates of deposit. Another 21 percent comes from investments, but the largest portion of that money — 23 percent — is in retirement savings.

A ‘bit disturbing’ Sallie Mae Senior Vice President Sarah Ducich said the finding that families are relying heavily on retirement accounts “is a little bit disturbing.” Financial experts say that raiding retirement accounts to pay for children’s college can be risky. There are tax penalties and other fees if money is withdrawn from the accounts early, and loans against a retirement plan come with restrictions on how quickly they must be paid off and the amount that can be borrowed. “The education and the retirement are two different buckets. We would never put them together,” said Marcia Tillotson, senior

vice president of investments for Wells Fargo Advisors. “You can borrow for college. You cannot borrow for retirement.” The study also found that although low-income families saved less money than wealthy households, they still put away an average of $1,788 annually toward college. For families making less than $35,000, that represents about 8 percent of their budget — the largest percentage of any income level. Families making more than $100,000, for example, saved 2.6 percent of

their income. Ducich said the finding underscores the value of college education to poor families, many of whom may not have had similar opportunities. “For these families, that’s the ticket out,” she said.

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T S U.S. issues apology for Pakistani deaths in airstrike By Jonathan S. Landay McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — The U.S. apologized Wednesday for the deaths of two Pakistani paramilitary troops and the wounding of four others in a cross-border airstrike by U.S. helicopters that prompted Islamabad to close two vital supply routes used by the U.S.led force in Afghanistan. The latest flare-up comes as the Obama administration steps up public and private Related pressure on • Gunmen Pakistan continue to crack strikes on down on supply the Afghan convoys, Ta l iba n and allied Page A6 groups. A new White House report to Congress says bluntly that Pakistan’s civilian and military leaders have been unwilling to attack al-Qaida and other terrorist groups, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday. Officials in Washington said that intensified strikes inside Pakistan by manned and pilotless aircraft — and reportedly also by Afghan fighters — are an effort to pressure Pakistan to move against the Haqqani network, an insurgent group based in Pakistan’s North Waziristan tribal area. “The message is clear: ‘If you won’t act, we will,’ ” said one U.S. official in Washington, who wasn’t authorized to talk about the issue. Wednesday’s apology by the U.S. ambassador to Pakistan, Anne Patterson, came after the U.S.-led force in Afghanistan announced that a joint investigation into the Sept. 30 incident conducted with the Pakistani military found that the U.S. helicopters mistook the paramilitary troops for insurgents.

U.S. SUPREME COURT

Justices hear funeral-protest case By Adam Liptak

Challenge to background checks falters before court

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a highly charged case involving protesters objecting to homosexuality who picketed a military funeral. The father of a fallen Marine sued members of a Kansas church who had used his son’s funeral to spread their message that God is punishing the United States for its tolerance of homosexuality by killing its soldiers. “We’re talking about a funeral,” Sean Summers, a lawyer for the father, Albert Snyder, told the justices. “Mr. Snyder simply wanted to bury his son in a private, dignified manner.” The lawyer on the other side, Margie Phelps, said the First Amendment protected the protest, where seven pickets at some distance from the funeral carried signs with messages like “Thank God for dead soldiers” and “God hates you.” Phelps is a daughter of the pastor of the church, Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, Kan. Her argument alternated between smooth exposition of First Amendment doctrine and support for the church’s message. “Nation, hear this little church,” she said. “If you want them to stop dying, stop sinning.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg noted that state and local governments had enacted laws creating content-neutral buffer zones around funerals. She suggested that those sorts of laws were a better societal response to protests than allowing private-injury suits. Justice Samuel Alito Jr. said the existence of a buffer zone imposed by law did not necessarily pre-empt other remedies. Snyder won an $11 million jury verdict against the pastor, Fred Phelps Sr., and his church, for intentional infliction of emotional distress, which required proof of outrageous conduct, and for invasion of privacy. But a federal appeals court overturned the verdict on First Amendment grounds. The argument Wednesday featured disputes about the facts and a parade of hypothetical alternatives. Summers said that some of the signs made the fallen Marine, Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder, and

WASHINGTON — Scientists at a California research facility appeared likely to lose their challenge to background checks required by a Bush administration anti-terrorism initiative, judging from the justices’ questions on Tuesday during arguments at the Supreme Court. Starting in 2005, the government required federal contractors to conduct background checks of their employees using standard forms. The scientists objected to inquiries about drug counseling and wide-ranging questioning of their acquaintances. The issue in the case was whether making the scientists submit to the checks as a condition of employment violated a constitutional right to privacy. In two decisions in 1977, the Supreme Court said there might be a constitutional right to “informational privacy,” but the court was not clear about its possible scope. Neal Katyal, the acting solicitor general, argued the case for the government. He urged the court to take only a small step toward bringing clarity to the topic by ruling that the background checks at issue did not violate whatever right existed. Katyal argued that when the government acted as an employer, he said, it should be able to ask about potentially relevant matters just as private employers would do. — New York Times News Service

Drew Angerer / New York Times News Service

Margie Phelps, right, and Shirley Phelps-Roper of the Westboro Baptist Church, of Tokepa, Kan., speak to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday. In a test for freespeech and the First Amendment versus privacy, the Supreme Court heard arguments as to whether the church has a protected right to hold anti-gay protests at U.S. military funerals. his family their targets, including one that said, “You’re going to hell.” Ginsburg noted that the church used those signs at many protests. “It sounds like the ‘you’ was the whole society, the whole rotten society in their view,” she said.

Intrusion out of case Summers then made a concession that some justices seemed to view as problematic, saying that his client would have had no case if the signs were purely political protests against, say, the war in Iraq. “So the intrusion upon the privacy of the funeral is out of the case,” Justice Antonin Scalia mused. Summers tried to distinguish his case from the leading decision in this area, Hustler Magazine v. Falwell in 1988, which overturned a jury award in favor of the Rev. Jerry Falwell for intentional infliction of emotional distress. That case involved a public figure, Summers said, while Snyder was a private one.

Justice Elena Kagan responded with a quotation from the Falwell decision. “ ‘Outrageousness’ in the area of political and social discourse has an inherent subjectiveness about it which would allow a jury to impose liability on the basis of the jurors’ tastes or views, or perhaps on the basis of their dislike of a particular expression,” she said, quoting Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s majority opinion. “How is that sentence less implicated,” Kagan asked, “in a case about a private figure than a case about a public figure?” Summers said private grief raised different issues.

Other methods Kagan and Alito asked Phelps questions about other sorts of potentially hurtful conduct, like following a wounded soldier around or accosting a grandmother after a visit to a soldier’s grave. Phelps for the most part parried the questions, saying that antistalking laws and the “fighting words” exception to the First

Amendment could address those situations. The church’s conduct was different, she said. “Seven picketers,” she said. “A thousand feet away. Out of sight. Out of sound.” They were, she added, “standing where the police said to stand.” The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and 21 news organizations, including The New York Times Co., filed a brief supporting the Kansas church. It said the First Amendment protects even hateful speech on matters of public concern. Before the argument in the case, Snyder v. Phelps, No. 09751, members of the church protested outside the Supreme Court. Abigail Phelps, another one of the pastor’s daughters, carried a sign that said “America is doomed.” Phelps said she expected the court to rule in favor of the church. “They’re going to uphold the law of the land that you may express a contrary view in a public forum without being sued,” she said.

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AFGHANISTAN

Taliban, government in talks, sources say By Karen DeYoung, Peter Finn and Craig Whitlock The Washington Post

Taliban representatives and the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai have begun secret, high-level talks over a negotiated end to the war, according to Afghan and Arab sources. The talks follow inconclusive meetings, hosted by Saudi Arabia, that ended more than a year ago. While emphasizing the preliminary nature of the current discussions, the sources said that for the first time they believe that Taliban representatives are fully authorized to speak for the Quetta Shura, the Afghan Taliban organization based in Pakistan, and its leader, Mohammad Omar. “They are very, very serious about finding a way out,” one source close to the talks said of the Taliban. Although Omar’s representatives have long publicly insisted that negotiations were impossible until all foreign troops withdraw, a position seemingly buoyed by the Taliban’s resilience on the battlefield, sources said the Quetta Shura has begun to talk about a comprehensive agreement that would include participation of some Taliban figures in the government and the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO troops on an agreed timeline. The leadership knows “that they are going to be sidelined,” the source said. “They know that more radical elements are being promoted within their rank and file outside their control. . . . All these things are making them absolutely sure that, regardless of ‘their success in’ the war, they are not in a winning position.” A half-dozen sources directly involved in or on the margins of

the talks agreed to discuss them on the condition of anonymity. All emphasized the preliminary nature of the talks, even as they differed on how specific they have been. All expressed concern that any public description of the meetings would undercut them. “If you talk about it while you’re doing it, it’s not going to work,” said one European official whose country has troops in Afghanistan. Several sources said the discussions with the Quetta Shura do not include representatives of the Haqqani group, a separately led faction that U.S. intelligence considers particularly brutal and that has been the target of recently escalated U.S. drone attacks in northwestern Pakistan.

Ties to Pakistan The Haqqani group is seen as more closely tied to the Pakistani intelligence service than the Quetta Shura, based in the southwestern Pakistani province of Baluchistan. But one Afghan source, reflecting tension between the two governments, said Pakistan’s insistence on a central role in any negotiations has made talks difficult even with the Quetta group. “They try to keep very tight control,” this source said of the Pakistanis. Reports of the talks come amid what Afghan, Arab and European sources said they see as a distinct change of heart by the Obama administration toward full backing of negotiations. Although President Barack Obama and his national security team have long said the war would not be won by military means alone, sources said the administration only recently appeared open to

talks rather than resisting them. “We did not have consensus, and there were some who thought they could do it militarily,” said a second European official. The Europeans said the American shift began in the summer, as combat intensified with smaller-than-expected NATO gains despite the arrival of the full complement of new U.S. troops, amid rising U.S. public opposition to the war. The United States’ European partners in Afghanistan, with different histories and under far stronger domestic pressure to withdraw their troops, have always been more amenable to a negotiated settlement. “What it really boils down to is the Americans both supporting and in some cases maybe even participating in talking with the enemy,” the first European official said. “If you strip everything away, that’s the deal here. For so long, politically, it’s been a deal breaker in the United States, and with some people it still is.”

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Equipment tracks asteroids, communicates with rovers and probes in the final frontier By Kurt Streeter Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Frequented more by packs of stray burros than by cars, the road is a lonely one. Thirty-five miles north of Barstow, Calif., 30 minutes from the nearest highway, it ambles through parched desert before dropping into a low valley. Here, where the pavement ends, the great antenna rises. “Only this isn’t just any ordinary antenna,” said Peter Hames, an engineer who oversees the massive structure for La Canada Flintridge’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories. “It doesn’t get much fanfare, but this is one of the main contributors to our understanding of the solar system.” Deep Space Station 14 — informally dubbed the Mars antenna

Negotiators Continued from A1 Though the standoff required a significant response, Bend Police Sgt. Dan Ritchie, one of the two negotiators who talked with Hipple, said it wasn’t an entirely unusual situation.

Dozen incidents a year On average, the negotiators who work with the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team — the tri-county SWAT team — are called to about a dozen incidents a year. Many involve people who are armed and threatening to harm themselves or refusing to come out of a building or a car without a struggle. In a few cases, a suspect is holding someone hostage. Frequently, the situation is fueled by drugs or alcohol, and may be complicated by mental illness. Bend Police Lt. Paul Kansky, who oversees the SWAT team, said the seven negotiators who respond to calls — five from the Bend Police Department and two from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office — are a vital part of any SWAT incident. “They’re trained and have the ability to talk to somebody, to make sense of the things that aren’t making sense,” Kansky said. “Most of the time, if they’re not able to gain complete compliance, then they are able to make a real volatile situation more safe than it was.” Officers who want to become negotiators have to go through a selection process and intensive training. Ritchie said it’s rare that there’s a spot on the team, as negotiators

Stem cells

Big and versatile Despite its heft, it easily tilts and twists as it tracks asteroids, rovers on distant planets, and probes rocketing as far as 11 billion miles away. Tucked inside a federally owned swath of the Mojave known as Goldstone, the antenna is little known outside JPL and NASA’s Washington, D.C., headquarters.

No match None can match Deep Space Station 14 for its combination of communications power and historical significance, said Cornell astronomy professor Steven Squyres, lead scientific investigator for the Mars Rover project. The focus of the $5.6 million repair project, led by JPL and paid for by NASA, has been on the guts of the structure, an 80-foot-wide ring of steel and cement known as the hydrostatic bearing. It provides a foundation for the dish, allowing it to spin on a horizontal plane. Like a puck on slippery ice, the dish rotates by sliding on a thin coat of oil constantly pumped

tend to stick with the job for years. But when there is an opening, supervisors look for officers who have shown a particular tal- Sgt. Scott ent for interact- Herrmann ing with people on the street. “A lot of times we hear people, but we don’t really listen,” he said. Before they can start taking calls, negotiators attend an intensive class organized by the FBI. Back home, they participate in regular training sessions with the SWAT team and meet frequently with each other to review previous incidents and prepare for future situations. The current team includes a patrol supervisor, school resource officers, a detective, jail staff and a member of the tricounty drug enforcement team. Like the rest of the SWAT team, the negotiators are on call 24 hours a day. And each time, things are a bit different. In some cases, there’s time to get background on the person making threats and the negotiator can begin the conversation with the basics: Who the person is, where they live, if they suffer from mental illness, if they’ve been in jail. Other times, it’s completely up to the negotiator to quickly assess the situation, develop a rapport with the person, and figure out what triggered the crisis. Sgt. Scott Herrmann, who works as a negotiator and at the Deschutes County jail, said it’s usually more about listening than talking, especially at first.

“You basically try to become their friend for a few minutes,” he said. “At first they kind of believe a lot of times that you’re there just to beat them up, that the guys outside in black are going to take them down and hurt them, stuff like that. You have to get them to trust you.” When the subject of the call is inside a building, the negotiator usually tries to reach them on their phone. If there’s no phone available, the SWAT team tosses in a phone attached to a long cord. On major SWAT calls negotiators work in a vehicle where they’re not distracted by everything else going on at the scene. But it’s not always that simple. Ritchie said he’s had to negotiate by bullhorn when he couldn’t hear the person he was talking to. He’s talked to people in their cars, people in their homes and in one case, stood next to a man trying to jump off a highway overpass. Sometimes, things settle down after a few minutes. Other situations, like the one at Greenwood Manor, can go on for hours.

of injury or death,” and he issued an injunction blocking federal money for the research. Since then, the field’s fate has appeared to shift almost weekly as the lawsuit wends its way through the courts. Last week, the government won the right from an appeals court to continue financing the contested research while it appeals the ruling. But there is no telling how the appeals court will ultimately rule, and Lamberth could issue a revised injunction. Many of the nation’s leading stem cell researchers do not know whether they will receive grants they won years earlier through the standard competition or whether new projects will even be considered. Junior scientists like Spence, poised to start their own laboratories, are caught in limbo. Senior scientists like Wells are torn between pursuing research they believe in and protecting students from staking their job prospects on projects they may never be able to complete.

The government can, however, support subsequent research on the cell lines created by that process. Last year, two scientists filed the lawsuit, arguing that the distinction is a false one and that the guidelines on public financing violated the Dickey-Wicker amendment, first passed in 1996 and renewed by Congress every year since. Moreover, they said, it siphons limited government resources from research on different types of stem cells, which they and other scientists who share a discomfort with embryonic stem cells view as ethically and scientifically superior. For all the hope vested in them, human embryonic stem cells have yet to yield tangible results for patients. In his ruling, Lamberth agreed the guidelines violated the 1996 amendment and “threaten the very livelihood” of the plaintiffs. Embryonic stem cell researchers who stand to lose their federal grants as a result argue that other types of stem cells do not have the same properties, and that all need to be studied regardless to determine which work best. They bristle at the intrusion of judges and politicians into decisions usually addressed by the peer review process, in which experts in a field comment on the merit of an idea and the best get financed. Yet even some who believe there is a compelling scientific rationale for their research agree that the legal basis for federal financing may be weak. “I was astonished that Congress hadn’t dealt with this,” said Dr. Stephen Duncan, a stem cell researcher at the Medical College of Wisconsin, who stands to lose several million dollars in federal grants depending on the

Productivity reduced The legal roller coaster is raising stress levels and reducing productivity, researchers say. Instead of tending to their test tubes, they find themselves guessing how each member of the Supreme Court might vote on the case. They are also watching the midterm congressional elections with new interest — and with some dismay, since many believe that new legislation will be required for their work to continue. Under guidelines authorized by both the Bush and Obama administrations, work that leads directly to destroying the embryos cannot be federally financed.

Not as ‘action-packed’ as the movies Bend Police Officer Kecia Weaver, who serves as a school resource officer at Mountain View High School and a negotiator, said the actual work of negotiating is a little different than people might imagine. Though she said the tension can be very real — especially when there’s a hostage involved or a clear threat to officers — negotiating often means hours of quiet conversation with little progress. “It’s not quite as action-packed as in the movies,” she said.

on the bearing’s surface. The remodel began with workers separating the dish from its foundation, raising it and then dropping it down onto three temporary, 40-foot-tall support legs. That allowed crews on narrow catwalks to take apart the bearing. Then they painstakingly poured flatter, more durable cement and created a new metallic surface for the oil. NASA needs the antenna to be operational by Nov. 1, in time to communicate with an orbiter during its flyby of the comet Hartley 2, which will be between Earth and Mars. “The accuracy we’re having to work with out here, that’s really the biggest challenge,” Hames said as he scaled a scaffolding while performing an inspection. Because the dish’s radio signals are programmed to come from a fixed point on Earth, the repairs can’t alter the antenna’s size or location in any significant way.

Typically, one negotiator serves as the key contact during the entire incident while a second listens in on the conversation. The two exchange notes and ideas about what to do or say next. But sometimes, when things aren’t working out between a negotiator and the person on the other end of the phone, someone else steps in. Though many of the people they’re dealing with aren’t behaving rationally, negotiators said they’re usually able to get things under control by reminding them of the people in their lives who would miss them if they died — and remind them that they have the ability to end the situation before things get worse. Since it was formed in the early 1980s, the tri-county SWAT team has never killed a person involved in a standoff. But negotiation doesn’t always work. Ritchie recalled one particularly tough call in 2008, when a 17-year-old wanted on a warrant for drug possession shot at police and later shot himself as officers watched. Cases like that, he said, are tough to deal with. But he said the satisfaction of knowing that he’s helped to resolve a dangerous situation without violence is well worth it. “I got in this business to help people,” Ritchie said. “When you get someone to walk out of there and go to the hospital and then you sit down with your cup of coffee, waiting for the doctor to tell you how they are. ... That’s what this is about.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

dispensation of the case. “It’s like being a little pregnant. You’re either breaking the law or you���re not.” Bush, who in 2001 limited federally financed researchers to working on roughly two dozen stem cell lines already in existence, twice vetoed legislation that would have explicitly expressed support for financing the contested research. No such legislation has been introduced under President Barack Obama, but the administration expanded the number of stem cell lines researchers could study.

Missed opportunity Advocates of the research now see this as a missed opportunity. Efforts to rally congressional support since Lamberth’s ruling have failed to gain momentum among Democrats and moderate Republicans heading into the November elections. For many, the most recent intrusion of politics into the vaunted scientific meritocracy came as a particular shock because the Obama administration’s new guidelines had only months earlier fallen into place. “The painful thing is that we are being stopped at a time when the velocity of this field of research, thanks to the new administration, was finally going at maximum speed,” said Ali Brivanlou, a professor at Rockefeller University. Over the past few weeks, embryonic stem cell scientists have sought alternative financing from private foundations, university administrations and state programs. But the National Institutes of Health, which has a $26 billion budget, is by far the source with the deepest pockets for academic scientists.

Group’s ‘incumbent-friendly’ policy leaves some gun-friendly Republicans frustrated By Ben Pershing The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The National Rifle Association has endorsed incumbent Democrats in several crucial congressional races this year, frustrating Republicans who believe the group is hurting its cause — and the party’s chances in November. Although the NRA’s agenda usually aligns with that of the GOP, the powerful group also adheres to what it calls “an incumbent-friendly” policy: If an incumbent and a challenger candidate have equally strong records protecting gun rights, the incumbent gets the endorsement, regardless of party. The result: Of the 20 most endangered incumbent House Democrats in the country — based on race ratings by The Washington Post’s “The Fix” — 14 have received the endorsement of the NRA’s Political Victory Fund. The NRA’s bipartisan strategy has existed for several years. But the stakes appear higher this cycle, as control of the House is in play and Democrats’ red-state gains in 2006 and 2008 mean the party has a huge number of incumbents running for reelection in conservative-leaning districts. In South Dakota, Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D) got the NRA’s endorsement even though her opponent, Kristi Noem (R), has made her fondness for hunting a prominent part of her campaign.

Pelosi under fire Noem campaign manager Joshua Shields complained that regardless of Herseth Sandlin’s individual record on gun issues, she would ultimately support Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., “one of the most anti-gun speakers Congress has ever had,” “We made that argument to the NRA,” Shields said. “Obviously it didn’t work.” At a gathering of volunteers for Robert Hurt’s (R) campaign in Charlottesville last week, a concerned Hurt supporter asked the candidate why the NRA nod went to his opponent, endangered freshman Rep. Tom Perriello, D-Va. Hurt admitted he was unhappy with the group’s decision. “There is no more anti-Second Amendment vote than a vote for Nancy Pelosi for Speaker,” Hurt said. Perriello and Herseth Sandlin both got “A” ratings from the NRA but Pelosi got an “F,” as did House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C. Pushing those leaders out

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of power could be seen as in the NRA’s interest. Yet the NRA has endorsed three of the four potentially vulnerable Democrats in Virginia, backing Reps. Richard Boucher and Glenn Nye as well as Perriello. (Rep. Gerald Connolly, who represents a moderate district based in Fairfax and Prince William counties, got an “F” from the group.) Rep. Betsy Markey (D) secured the NRA nod in Colorado, as did Rep. Harry Teague (D) in neighboring New Mexico. Endangered Democratic Reps. Chet Edwards (Tex.), Allen Boyd (Fla.), Earl Pomeroy (N.D.), Debbie Halvorson (Ill.), Paul Kanjorski (Pa.) and John Boccieri (Ohio) also earned the group’s seal of approval.

Non-partisan NRA spokesman Andrew Arulanandam said that as a nonpartisan organization, his group simply does not take party affiliation — or votes for speaker of the House — into account. In most of these contests, he noted, the seat ultimately will be held by a gun-rights supporter regardless of whether the incumbent or the challenger wins in November. “We are, frankly, in a very good and enviable position,” Arulanandam said. Having clout with the majority party has been useful for the NRA. In early 2009, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder made news by suggesting the Obama administration might try to reinstitute a ban on the sale of assault weapons. Backed by the NRA, several dozen House Democrats quickly sent Holder a letter emphasizing their opposition to such a move, and the idea never resurfaced. “If it hadn’t been for those 60 House Democrats ... things would have turned out very differently,” Arulanandam said. Overall, the NRA still has endorsed many more House Republican incumbents than Democrats, and the cash has followed. The group’s political action committee has doled out $350,000 so far this cycle to Republicans and $170,000 to Democrats, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. On the legislative front, Republican leaders have already learned this year that their agenda and that of the NRA don’t always match. In June, Democrats revised a high-profile campaign finance bill — the Disclose Act — to carve out an exemption for the NRA after the gun-rights group protested against the legislation’s requirement that it disclose information about its donors.

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Continued from A1 Only a year after the Obama administration lifted some of the limits imposed by President George W. Bush, a lawsuit challenging the use of public money for the research and a conservative shift in Congress could leave the field more sharply restricted than it has been since its inception a decade ago. At stake are about 1,300 jobs, as well as grants from the National Institutes of Health that this year total more than $200 million and support more than 200 projects. The turn of events has introduced what researchers say is an unprecedented uncertainty to a realm of academic science normally governed by the laws of nature and the rules of peer review. “We’re used people telling us, ‘That was a stupid idea, we’re not going to fund it,’ and we turn around and think of a better one,” said Dr. James Wells, who heads the laboratory where Spence has a postdoctoral position. “But there’s nothing we can do about this.” The stem cells, which are thought to have curative potential for many diseases because they can be turned into any kind of tissue in the human body, can be obtained only by destroying a human embryo, which many Americans believe is the equivalent of a life. In August, Chief Judge Royce Lamberth of the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., found that the Obama administration’s policy violates a law barring federal financing for “research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded or knowingly subjected to risk

because its initial task, in 1966, was to track a spacecraft after it flew past Mars — spreads from the ground like a looming, 10-story poppy. Its most eye-catching element is its parabolic dish, which stretches nearly the length of a football field and weighs — struts and radio equipment included — nearly 2,000 tons.

Yet there are few larger antennas in the world, and those that have more size, said Hames, have less ability: Either they are fixed in the ground and unable to rotate fully, or they can’t both send and receive data.

NRA is throwing support behind Dems in key races

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A4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Budget Continued from A1 Dudley’s plan won’t merely cut the budget hole. In some areas, it could add to it. Dudley wants to cut the state’s capital gains tax from 11 percent to 3 percent for two years, then 5 percent. The change will cost the state more than $400 million over the next two years, but Dudley says it is necessary to spur business for the long term. He also hopes to provide scholarships to state universities and partial scholarships to private universities for all Oregon high school graduates who achieve certain grades, though the plan doesn’t yet have a price tag. Kitzhaber, the former emergency room physician and governor, also wants to tackle state employee health care and retirement costs, though he is less specific about how much he wants to cut. Like Dudley, he plans to look at how the state crafts its budgets; he also wants to look at ways to consolidate government and curb costs. He wants cut prison sentences for some convicts to reduce prison spending. Like Dudley, however, some of Kitzhaber’s ideas have a price tag rather than making cuts. For instance, he wants to create jobs by issuing bonds to pay for weatherization projects, bonds that would be paid back through energy savings. The plan would cost an estimated $100,000 per job, though Kitzhaber has not said how much he would spend on it.

No specific cuts Neither Dudley nor Kitzhaber’s plans offer specific cuts that will close more than a fraction of the $3 billion hole in the state’s projected general fund budget. The general fund is that portion of the state budget that is most easily modified by the governor and lawmakers; it is based on personal and corporate income taxes rather than fees or federal funds. Jody Wiser, of the group Tax Fairness Oregon, says that’s not surprising, since the more that candidates talk specifics, the easier it is for them to be attacked. “I think that in the best of all worlds candidates would talk specific issues but that’s not the way candidates run for office,” she said. Lunch has another reason for the lack of specifics: “You can put an audience to sleep very quickly trying to talk about the details of public finance.” Besides the lack of details, Lunch said that neither candidate has fully grappled with the reality that nearly half the state’s general fund budget goes to fund

Waivers Continued from A1 At a time when the midterm elections are looming and Republicans have been vocal in campaigning against the law, reaction to the rollout has been closely watched. To date, the administration has given about 30 insurers, employers and union plans, responsible for covering about 1 million people, one-year waivers on the new rules that phase out annual limits on coverage for limited-benefit plans, also known as “mini-meds.” Applicants said their premiums would increase significantly, in some cases doubling or more. These early exemptions offer the first signs of how the administration may tackle an even more difficult hurdle: the resistance from insurers and others against proposed regulations that will determine how much insurers spend on consumers’ health care versus administrative overhead, a major cornerstone of the law.

Child coverage Several leading insurers, including WellPoint, Aetna and Cigna, have also objected to new rules requiring them to cover even those children who are seriously ill, warning that they will stop selling new policies in some states because the rules do not protect them from having to cover too many sick children. “The hardest part of health reform is always going to be the transition,” said Peter Harbage, a former state health official who is a policy consultant in Sacramento, Calif. He predicts more insurers and employers will lean on the government to delay or weaken the new regulations. “I think this pressure just increases until we get to 2014,” he said, referring to the year that the law will fully go into effect. The waivers issued so far include the policies offered by

K-12 schools whose spending and employee contracts are under the control of locally elected school boards. While Dudley says he’s open to the idea of statewide collective bargaining for teachers, he isn’t actively pursuing it. Kitzhaber, for his part, says he’ll try to benchmark local school district contracts to the state budget, but says statewide collective bargaining isn’t necessary. By not more aggressively talking about the need to exert more control over school spending, “Both Dudley and Kitzhaber and the people who are speaking for them are to greater or lesser degrees blowing smoke on these issues,” Lunch said.

Negotiating position A second major question comes down to whether Dudley or Kitzhaber would be in a better position to negotiate for concessions from public employee unions to help balance the budget. Dudley supporters make the argument that because his opponent is supported by public employee unions — for instance, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees has given Kitzhaber $100,000 for his campaign — Kitzhaber is less likely to take a hard line with those same unions. Kitzhaber, meanwhile, argues that because he has better relations with the unions than Dudley does, the Democrat is in a better position to work together to tackle the state’s budget woes. He notes that he is the only candidate in the race who has had state employees strike against him, and notes that he signed legislation opposed by unions that changed the collective bargaining process. Ed Hershey, a spokesman for the Service Employees International Union, which is supporting Kitzhaber, says his union won’t roll over for anybody. “No matter who is on the other side of the table ... we’re going to try to do the best we can.” However, he said that his members would look more kindly on a governor who is not “singling them out” for disproportionate cuts, and “our members feel that notwithstanding his protestations, Dudley has put a target on our backs very unfairly and unwisely.” History shows that taking on unions can bring a political price. In 2008, SEIU gave John Kroger more than $300,000 in the Democratic primary for Attorney General, a move widely seen as payback to Kroger’s opponent, former Rep. Greg Macpherson, D-Lake Oswego, for shepherding through PERS reforms in the 2003 Legislature.

McDonald’s to its fast-food workers, typically capped at just a few thousand dollars, sold by a profitmaking company owned by Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans. As a result of the administration’s efforts, McDonald’s says it is “confident that we’ll continue to provide health care coverage for our 30,000 hourly restaurant employees.” Aetna and Cigna have also received waivers to continue selling limited-benefit policies, according to the list released by the Department of Health and Human Services, as have small employers like Sanderson Plumbing Products and Guy Lee Manufacturing. HealthMarkets, which offers policies through MEGA Life and Health and other insurers, says it also plans to apply for a waiver for some of its plans.

Some seek more federal authority Some states, like Iowa and Maine, have already said they might seek additional authority from federal officials to exempt some insurers, at least for a time, because of the potential disruption if carriers leave the market over the new standards on medical spending. “We have some very small carriers in the state,” said Susan Voss, the Iowa insurance commissioner, who said she favored letting state regulators decide whether some carriers should be given more leeway. The state has already lost some carriers, including the Principal Financial Group, which announced its decision last week. The struggle to stop insurers from dropping child-only coverage illustrates the limited power that the administration, and some states, may have to pressure companies to participate. While federal officials have tried to address the concerns by insurers that the rules allow parents to wait until their children are sick to sign up, some insurers have remained reluctant to commit to the market.

Despite that, Dudley supporters acknowledge that Kitzhaber’s argument makes a certain amount of sense. Rep. Dennis Richardson, RCentral Point, said, “It’s his best argument, because there are times when a Democrat would be able to get something through that a Republican would have a difficult time getting through.” Richardson nevertheless said he is supporting a Dudley administration, in part because Kitzhaber didn’t do enough to cut the budget in his earlier stint. On the question of taxes, both candidates are similar in saying they won’t seek to repeal Measures 66 and 67, the corporate and personal income tax increases approved by voters in January. Both say they will seek to make changes to deal with the most business-unfriendly aspects of the tax hikes, and incorporate those changes with broader tax reform. Tim Duy, a University of Oregon economist who tracks the Central Oregon economy, says the question he has of Dudley and Kitzhaber is “to what degree they’re willing to embrace as Governor (Ted) Kulongoski describes it, a ‘reset’ of the budget in its entirety.”

‘Reset Cabinet’ Duy refers to the report issued by Kulongoski’s “Reset Cabinet” over the summer. It called for reorganizing state government and tackling employee compensation issues. Dudley had said he supports many of the recommendations– particularly ones that involve restricting employee compensation and benefits — and would consider others, though not the sentencing modifications that Kulongoski says are crucial. Kitzhaber also agrees with or echoes many of the recommendations — including long-term budgeting, consolidating government and saving money on prison costs by modifying the state’s sentencing laws. But he doesn’t agree with Kulongoski that statewide collective bargaining for teachers is crucial. Duy says he hasn’t seen enough details from either candidate about how they will close the more than $3 billion budget hole. “Within the context of that deficit, there is not much room, or any room, for new spending, new programs, or tax cuts,” he said. “I see this issue as critical, and I’m not sure either candidate has provided me with enough information. That’s what I’ve been looking for.” Nick Budnick can be reached at or at nbudnick@bendbulletin. com.

While states like California can force their hands by passing legislation requiring any insurer who plans to sell policies in the new exchanges to also sell child-only policies, other states have little recourse other than to try to persuade insurers to stay.

Child-only policies In Washington state, for example, Regence BlueShield, a major insurer, has announced it plans to no longer sell child-only policies, and Mike Kreidler, the insurance commissioner, is trying to persuade the other major insurers to stay. He cannot force them, he said, under current state law. “I couldn’t do anything other than use the bully pulpit,” said Kreidler, who was optimistic he had succeeded. And politics surrounding the health care law may intrude. In Minnesota, Gov. Tim Pawlenty, a Republican and a potential 2012 presidential candidate who has long opposed the law, has become the target of accusations that he is stonewalling discussions over certain types of coverage. (He has already refused federal money for rate reviews and to set up the 2014 exchanges.) “We are seriously disappointed that we appear to have hit a wall,” said Julie Brunner, executive director of the Minnesota Council of Health Plans, which represents the state’s insurers. The insurers had been meeting with regulators to hash out the child-only coverage policies. Pawlenty’s office, however, said it had no knowledge that negotiations over children’s insurance had been halted, and a spokesman, Bruce Gordon, denied that the governor had played any role in ending the talks. He said, however, the request by the insurers for a standardized period in which parents can buy coverage was unwarranted: “The insurance companies’ request for an exemption,” he said, “is yet another example of the failings of Obamacare.”

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 A5

Obama awards fallen soldier By Martha Quillin McClatchy-Tribune News Service

RALEIGH, N.C. — Staff Sgt. Robert Miller, the Fort Bragg, N.C.-based Special Forces soldier who posthumously received the Medal of Honor on Wednesday, really enjoyed going to Afghanistan. Of the photos from Miller’s deployments to the country, the most telling may be the one of him in casual clothes, wearing an Afghan scarf and an Army cap, riding a villager’s white horse. He is smiling, at ease in the saddle and at the intersection of two worlds. “He liked the people there, and he loved the countryside,” his father, Phil Miller, said in an interview. “He marveled at what a great ski resort they could have

Bend Continued from A1 It also had the chance of getting up to $25 million in green energy tax credits, loans and grants to help offset the cost. But in August all that changed with a new financial analysis. The cost increased to $73 million. The $1.7 million in revenue dropped to $700,000. And the green energy incentives all but disappeared. This spurred Councilor Jeff Eager to ask in August for a re-evaluation of the cost of switching to an all-groundwater system to see if it would be cheaper for ratepayers, and to see if it would be feasible to accomplish under current water rights law. Bend gets about half of its annual water supply from groundwater. A study released Friday by HDR Engineering Inc., which is the company the city hired to work on the Bridge Creek project, found that if the city wanted to make the switch to groundwater it would cost hundreds of millions of dollars more over a 50-year period due in large part to energy costs. It also found the groundwater option would

up in the mountains if people would just stop shooting at each other.” Miller didn’t live to see whether the country will achieve peace; he was killed Jan. 25, 2008. His actions that day helped save his fellow Green Berets and 15 Afghan National Army soldiers. On Wednesday, Miller received the nation’s highest military award. President Barack Obama presented the Medal of Honor to Miller’s family at a ceremony at the White House. Miller was leading Afghan security forces and other coalition soldiers on a patrol near the Pakistan border when they were attacked by Taliban insurgents. A teammate called for an air attack, and a bomb dropped on the hideout halted fighting on

have an initial cost of nearly $60 million just to drill more wells and upgrade other components of the city’s infrastructure. Getting water rights to pump more groundwater could also prove difficult for the city. According to a water rights attorney the city hired to study the issue, there are a number of tricky scenarios for doing so, including having to get some changes in state law. “The bottom line is it is trading certainty ... for uncertainty, in the fact that the regulatory environment for getting new groundwater rights is very dicey,” said Rick Glick, of Davis, Wright, Tremaine LLP, of Portland. “Trying to get to an all-groundwater system is pretty speculative and involves a lot of risks.” City Manager Eric King said during Wednesday’s presentation that he wants councilors to decide at a Nov. 3 meeting if they want to continue pursuing an upgrade to the Bridge Creek system or switch to all ground-

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the ground. But as the patrol approached to check for survivors, insurgents opened fire. Miller’s team captain was wounded. Miller went forward and provided cover fire with a machine gun and grenades, calling out enemy positions while the injured captain was moved to safety. There were 100 or more insurgents, the Army says, and Miller’s teammates had to scramble. After they reached cover and returned fire, Miller tried to join them but got hit. He kept firing and calling out enemy positions. He fought for another 25 to 30 minutes after he went down, Army officials say. When his teammates got to him, Miller was dead. He was still holding his weapon.

water. If councilors choose to reinvest in the Bridge Creek system they will have several options for how to do so, each one with a different impact on ratepayers. These options include picking a water treatment method to comply with federal clean-water mandates that require municipalities to treat for harmful bacteria and microorganisms like Cryptosporidium, and choosing whether to add a $13 million hydropower plant at the outset of the project. Depending on which options councilors choose, Bend water customers could see rate increases of between 37.5 and 45.5 percent over the next five years. King said a decision on the treatment option is scheduled for Nov. 17, and the choice of whether to move ahead with a hydropower plant would be Dec. 1. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Reports fault White House on oil spill response By John M. Broder New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration failed to act upon or fully inform the public of its own worstcase estimates of the amount of oil gushing from the blown-out BP well, according to preliminary reports from the staff of the presidential commission investigating the accident. The government underestimated how much oil was flowing into the Gulf of Mexico and how much was left after the well was capped in July, leading to a loss of faith in the government’s ability to handle the spill and a continuing breach between the federal authorities and state and local officials, the commission staff members found in a series of four reports issued Wednesday. The White House responded to the assertions on Wednesday, saying it never concealed its most dire estimates of the spill and quickly threw everything the government had at the problem. The four reports, from the staff of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, make clear that the president-appointed panel does not intend to spare the administration as it prepares a final report on the accident to be delivered to the White House early next year. It has not yet completed its work on the causes of the well explosion or the efforts to contain the oil, but the tenor of Wednesday’s reports indicates that White House, Cabinet officers, Coast Guard commanders and senior government scientists will shoulder a fair amount of blame for the response to the accident.

Judge bars key U.S. witness in terror trial By Benjamin Weiser New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — A federal judge has barred prosecutors from using a crucial witness in the first trial of a former Guantanamo detainee, reigniting a fierce debate over whether the government can successfully prosecute terrorist detainees in civilian court. The trial of Ahmed Khalfan

Ghailani, who faces charges in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa, has been seen as a test of President Barack Obama’s goal of moving many other detainees, like Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, into federal court and, ultimately, closing Guantanamo. In the months since Ghailani was brought to New York from

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Judge Lewis Kaplan of U.S. District Court in Manhattan has rejected defense requests to dismiss the case because of violations of Ghailani’s right to a speedy trial and because of accusations he was tortured. But just as the trial was to begin Wednesday, Kaplan ruled that he would not allow the wit-

ness to testify. He noted that the government had acknowledged that it had identified and located the witness through interrogation of Ghailani when he was earlier held in a secret overseas jail run by the CIA. His lawyers have said he was tortured there. Kaplan said he was “acutely aware of the perilous nature of the world in which we live.”

Hungarian towns begin cleanup of toxic red sludge

GUNMEN TORCH TANKER TRUCKS IN PAKISTAN

By Elisabeth Rosenthal New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

Three scientists shared this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing techniques to synthesize complex carbon molecules that have had an enormous impact on the manufacture of medicines and other products, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Wednesday. The winners are Richard Heck, 79, a retired University of Delaware professor now living in the Philippines; Ei-ichi Negishi, 75, a chemistry professor at Purdue University; and Akira Suzuki, 80, a professor at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. In the 1960s and 1970s, the three scientists, who will split

KOLONTAR, Hungary — Just before he raced for refuge in the attic of his family’s home here Monday at lunchtime, Krisztian Holczer called his mother at her job at a school near here. A wave of caustic red sludge had just poured in over the back fence and was descending rapidly over the backyard. Holczer, 34, escaped with burns on his feet from the dangerous muck. The origin of the liquid was a nearby sludge reservoir holding the leftovers of the process that converts bauxite to aluminum. Just after noon Monday, a corner of the sludge reservoir broke. Residents here are still waiting for officials to release their analysis of the sludge’s chemical content. A dangerous pollutant at best because of its corrosive nature, red mud from the aluminum production process can contain heavy metals and low-level radioactivity, ingredients that can cause health problems like cancer, and it in the long-term it can contaminate the environment. The sludge poured into local streams and is moving downstream at about 1 mph. It is headed for the Raba River, which empties into the Danube. It has already killed all the life in the local rivers and streams but now threatens a broad international environmental disaster if high concentrations of the sludge get downstream. So far the damage is limited to Hungary, which has not asked the European Union for assistance in responding to the catastrophe. The broken wall of the sludge pond has been repaired, but the cleanup has just started. Hungary’s top investigative agency is looking into the spill. A case has been opened to consider possible criminal negligence.

Mohammad Sajjad / The Associated Press

Dozens of tanker trucks carrying fuel to Afghanistan for NATO troops were torched near Quetta in western Pakistan on Wednesday, the third major attack on supplies since Pakistan closed a border crossing to Afghanistan a week ago and the first at the only checkpoint that remained open. At least one person was killed in the Quetta torchings after three carloads of gunmen fired at the tankers and then burned them, the police said. “According to eyewitnesses and initial reports some terrorists came on vehicles a few minutes before morning prayer and started firing and then burned some of the tankers,” said Hamid Shakeel, the deputy inspector

general of the Quetta police. About 40 tanker trucks were at the terminal, and about half were saved from the attack, Shakeel said. Hours after the attack on the trucks at Quetta, Taliban militants claimed responsibility, according to reports on Pakistani television channels. In a sign that the government was continuing to distance itself from the attacks, the police chief in Quetta, Malik Muhammad Iqbal, said it was not the responsibility of the government to provide security for the convoys. In the past few days, senior police officers have said the safety of the trucks lay with the fleet owners who had signed contracts with NATO.

3 earn Nobel for work on carbon catalyst By Kenneth Chang

“But the Constitution is the rock upon which our nation rests,” he went on. “We must follow it not only when it is convenient, but when fear and danger beckon in a different direction. To do less would diminish us and undermine the foundation upon which we stand.” The judge delayed the trial’s opening until Tuesday.

the $1.4 million prize, each independently made advances in using the metal palladium as a catalyst to link together carbon molecules into larger, more complicated structures.

Anti-cancer drug The academy highlighted discodermolide, a substance isolated from a marine sponge in the Caribbean that shows promise as an anti-cancer drug. It would be impossible to harvest large quantities of discodermolide. But with the help of the palladium techniques, scientists are now able to make it from scratch, enough to start clinical testing. The reactions are also used to

produce compounds used in fungicides, sunscreen and organic light-emitting diodes. “They are used almost continually by every major pharmaceutical company on a daily basis, from drug discovery through manufacturing,” said Stephen L. Buchwald, a professor of chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “They basically revolutionized the industry.” The reactions are not only versatile, but “they also accomplish bond formations that are very difficult to do using any traditional methods,” Buchwald said. Drugs, plastics and many other industrial chemicals consist of large carbon-based molecules. However, getting one carbon

atom to bind to another is often not an easy task. Nearly a century ago, a French chemist named Victor Grignard found that coupling a magnesium atom to a carbon atom pushed additional electrons to the carbon atom, making it easier to bond with another carbon atom. That method worked but not always perfectly, sometimes producing too many unwanted byproducts. In 1968, Heck, working at Hercules Inc. in Wilmington, Del., reported new chemical reactions that used palladium as the key ingredient for shepherding carbons together, but drawbacks included the need for an expensive palladium salt.

BILL CLINTON VISITS HAITI

Ramon Espinosa / The Associated Press

Former President Bill Clinton, U.N. special envoy to Haiti, arrives in Haiti on Wednesday to visit people who were displaced by the earthquake at the Petionville Golf Club that is being used as a camp for the displaced in Port-au-Prince.

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Personal Finance When the job offer is good but the housing market is bad, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,380.66 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -19.17 -.80%

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CLOSE 10,967.65 DOW JONES CHANGE +22.93 +.21%

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1,159.97 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -.78 -.07%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.40 treasury CHANGE -2.83%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Local tourism sector up again in August Bend and unincorporated Deschutes County reported higher room-tax collections in August, according to a report Wednesday from Visit Bend, the city’s tourism-promotion agency. For Bend, the 15.4 percent gain in collections over August 2009 was the ninth straight month of higher year-over-year numbers. The county’s 0.3 percent uptick in August was the third straight month of improvement. Since the fiscal year started July 1, collections are up 13.7 percent in Bend and 4 percent in the county. “The impressive (year-overyear) increase in August (roomtax) collections was the result of multiple contributing factors,” Visit Bend President and CEO Doug La Placa wrote in an email. “In addition to rebounding occupancy with both leisure and business travelers, we are seeing a gradual strengthening of rate integrity across multiple lodging segments. This is very good news.” Room-tax collections are considered a key measure of activity in the tourism industry.

Bend WineStyles closing doors Oct. 15 The owners of Bend’s WineStyles, which offered wine tastings and sold bottled wines, are closing the store Oct. 15 because the recession slowed business. Jerry and Peggy West moved the store to a small building on Northwest Galveston Avenue during the summer from a location near Central Oregon Community College in hopes of boosting sales. “We’ve seen a lot of new business, just not enough to keep us open,” Jerry West said Wednesday. The store will be open 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday through Oct. 15. Wine Club members have until then to pick up outstanding wine from October or previous months.

Facebook launches ‘Groups’ feature

FORECLOSURE

Notices of default up from last year Deschutes has 3,031 so far this year; there were 221 in all of ’06 crease over the first nine months of 2009, when 2,687 notices were filed. But much of the year-to-date growth took place in the beginning of this year. Filings in January and February increased by about 55 percent and 33 percent, respectively, over the same months in 2009. The number of notices filed in July decreased about 6 percent from filings in July 2009, and August default filings increased

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

For the first nine months of the year, the number of initial foreclosure notices filed in Deschutes County continued to outpace 2009, although filings have leveled off in recent months. From January through September, 3,031 notices of default were filed with the Deschutes County Clerk’s Office, according to its electronic recordings system. That’s a 12.8 percent in-

less than 1 percent over the number filed in August 2009. However, default filings last month increased about 15 percent over September 2009. Deschutes County property owners have suffered immensely with the collapse of the real estate market, driving foreclosures to record levels. In 2006, Deschutes County recorded 221 notices of default — for the entire year. See Default / B5

Deschutes County notices of default: 2007-10 By month

2007

2008

2009

2010

402

400

362

318

326

347

356

314

308

298

300

320 261

100

0 February

March

April

May

June

July

August

By quarter

September October November December

By year

$1346.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$7.50

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$23.020 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.306

Bend startup secures $1.2M in investments Clear Catheter, the 2006 winner of the Bend Venture Conference, will use funding for clinical launch By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

A Bend company’s innovative catheter designed not to clog after heart and lung surgery is a step closer to reaching hospitals and patients with $1.2 million in equity financing from the Oregon Angel Fund and other investors. Ed Boyle, a Bend surgeon and CEO of Clear Catheter Systems, said the $1.2 million will support the clinical launch of the company’s PleuraFlow Active Tube Clearance System. The device, inserted in the thoracic cavity after heart and lung surgery to drain fluids and materials, has a mechanism to keep it from clogging. Ruth Lindley, marketing manager at Economic Development for Central Oregon and the Bend Venture Conference, said Boyle, inventor of the technology and co-founder of Clear Catheter, won the conference in 2006 and, as has been the case with all conference winners, the prize money helped the company go on to win larger investments. See Catheter / B5

Company made false tax relief claims, FTC says By Edward Wyatt

1,200

1,090 1,000

952

New York Times News Service

3,507 978

3,031

827

800

623

600

1,925

400

320 235

200

589

88 0 Q1 Q2

Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3

2008

2009

2010

2007 Source: Deschutes County Clerk’s Office

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Facebook on Wednesday introduced a feature that allows users to interact with small groups of people, like their family, high school friends or colleagues. The move is an effort to address a longstanding problem: Facebook friends often span a broad range of relationships that include relatives, classmates, casual professional acquaintances or jogging partners — and not everyone wants all of them to see his or her information. With the new feature, called Groups, Facebook hopes to encourage users to upload more photos, videos and other information to the site while giving them new ways to control who sees what. — From staff and wire reports

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239

200

January

B

2007

2008

2009

2010 (through September)

WASHINGTON — Who would not like to settle with the Internal Revenue Service for pennies on the dollar? In recent years, some 20,000 people have turned to American Tax Relief of Beverly Hills, Calif., to do just that after seeing the company’s advertisements on television, the Internet or in print, where actors portraying clients say the company reduced their back taxes to say, $2,000 from $24,000 or $40,000 from $200,000. But the Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday that despite collecting $60 million to $100 million in upfront fees from often-desperate clients in recent years, American Tax Relief rarely, if ever, delivered on its promises. It did, however, according to the FTC, deliver $30 million in customers’ funds to the accounts of the company’s owners or their relatives. See Tax relief / B5

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Oregon mostly unaffected by spate of foreclosure documentation reviews By David Holley The Bulletin

As officials in other parts of the country investigate whether lenders made misstatements about home foreclosures, Oregon remains mostly unaffected because home loan foreclosures here are primarily filed outside the court system. But there still could be errors in nonjudicial home foreclosure documentation in Oregon. If homeowners facing foreclosure find the errors — technical viola-

tions like the bank not publishing public notices on time or printing inaccurate numbers — lenders likely would have to fix the errors and restart the foreclosure process, thus giving homeowners more time to try to avoid default, local attorneys said. Bend attorney Laura Cooper, who drafts loan documents and represents borrowers seeking loan modifications, said she hasn’t seen many homeowners make claims about technical violations by lenders.

But a rush could still come, she said. “I’m wondering if it’s the other shoe that has yet to fall,” said Cooper, who is with Ball Janik LLP. News broke last month that large lenders, such as GMAC Mortgage and JPMorgan Chase, have begun halting foreclosures and evictions in 23 states where concerns have risen that the banks potentially filed faulty foreclosure documents in court. See Documents / B5

A.J. Mast / New York Times News Service

At Hi-Grade Egg Farm in North Manchester, Ind., precautions are taken to ensure that hens and eggs are free of salmonella.

Tidy henhouses help thwart disease

Manufacturing

By William Neuman

Purchasing Managers’ Index readings of greater than 50 indicate growth in the manufacturing economy:

NORTH MANCHESTER, Ind. — The stuff doesn’t even smell that bad. In Henhouse No.1 at the Hi-Grade Egg Farm here, the droppings from 381,000 chickens are carried off along a zig-zagging system of stacked conveyor belts with powerful fans blowing across them. The excrement takes three days to travel more than a mile back and forth, and when it is finally deposited on a gray, 20-foot high mountain of manure, it has been thoroughly dried out, making it of little interest to the flies and rodents that can spread diseases like salmonella poisoning. Controlling manure and keeping henhouses clean is essential to combating the toxic strain of salmonella that sickened thousands of people this year and prompted the recall of more than half a billion eggs produced by two companies in Iowa. See Farm / B2

New York Times News Service

60

Shocking phone bills add to scrutiny of cell phone carriers’ billing practices

50

By Amy Thomson

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54.4

Bloomberg News

40 30 2009

2010

Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

WASHINGTON — Liz Szalay said she was shocked when she saw her 14-year-old son’s phone bill. Because he didn’t have a $30 data plan as part of his Verizon Wireless contract, he’d run up charges of $2,000 over two months for downloading songs.

“I would never have allowed my son to accrue such charges, if I had known,” said Szalay, a secretary in Niles, Mich., who said she withdrew money from her 401(k) retirement plan to cover the expense. “What I did to prevent this from happening in the future was have his Internet access completely blocked by Verizon, but not before they made off

with a boatload of money.” The Federal Communications Commission may make it mandatory for carriers to warn customers before they get hit with high bills. Next week, the agency will consider requiring companies to alert customers when they approach limits on their contracts. See Bills / B5


C OV ER S T ORY

B2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Owners of msnbc.com may alter FTC seeks to tighten name to distance it from channel rules for ‘green’ labeling By Tanza Vega By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

NBC Universal and Microsoft, the parents of msnbc.com, are holding high-level talks about changing its name, an unusual and potentially risky endeavor for the third-most popular news website in the United States. The two parents have not yet agreed on what to call the site. But according to internal memorandums obtained by The New York Times this week, the parents have concluded that the brand known as msnbc.com, a strictly objective news site, is widely confused with MSNBC, the cable television channel that has taken a strongly liberal bent in recent years. Charlie Tillinghast, the president of msnbc.com, wrote in one of the memos, “Both strategies

NBC in the past. “And those two brands, each strong in their respective areas, are increasingly standing for different things.” Corporations change their names from time to time (Andersen Consulting became Accenture, Philip Morris became Altria, Blackwater became Xe) but giving up a Web address as popular as msnbc.com is highly unusual. It is akin to a business closing a bustling storefront and posting a sign that asks customers to visit its new location. For a website, at least, the new location is only a click away. “You can quickly redirect people who might be confused,” Heyward said. Nonetheless, msnbc.com risks sacrificing years of brand loyalty by coining a new Web address.

“Both strategies are fine, but naming them the same thing is brand insanity.” — From a memo written by Charlie Tillinghast, president of msnbc.com are fine, but naming them the same thing is brand insanity.” The channel and website are already separate companies. Under the current plan, the msnbc.com Web address would become a site exclusively for the cable channel, fulfilling the channel’s desire to have an independent site to promote its TV programs. The existing news site, called the “blue site” internally, would move to a new and as-yet-undetermined Web address. There is a subsection on msnbc.com for the cable channel.

The websites under the msnbc.com umbrella are visited by almost 50 million Internet users each month, according to the measurement firm comScore. Only two news brands, Yahoo and CNN.com, are bigger. Andrew Heyward, a former CBS News president and an adviser to media companies on digital strategy, said the renaming idea had merit. “It’s incredibly important in this media cacophony for brands to be consistent, for brands to stand for something,” said Heyward, who has advised

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Manufacturers of products that claim to be environmentally friendly will face tighter rules on how they are advertised to consumers under changes proposed Wednesday by the Federal Trade Commission. The commission’s revised “Green Guides,” last updated in 1998, warn marketers against using labels that make broad claims that cannot be substantiated, like “eco-friendly.” Marketers must qualify their claims on the product packaging and limit them to a specific benefit, such as how much of the product is recycled. “This is really about trying to cut through the confusion that consumers have when they are buying a product and that businesses have when they are sell-

ing a product,” said Jon Leibowitz, chairman of the commission. The revisions come at a time when green marketing is on the rise. According to a new study by the TerraChoice Group, now part of the Underwriters Laboratories, the number of advertisements with green messages in mainstream magazines has risen since 1987, and peaked in 2008 at 10.4 percent. In 2009, the number of ads dropped to 9 percent. But while the number of advertisements may have dipped, there has been a “proliferation” of eco-labeling, according to Scott McDougall, the president of TerraChoice. The new rules call on seals and certifications that connote general environmental claims to be more specific. A company would have to use a label like “Green Smart, Recyclable Certified” instead of just “Green Smart,” for example.

Farm Continued from B1 The Hi-Grade facility appeared very different from the descriptions released by federal investigators of the Iowa farms that produced the recalled eggs. Those farms, most of them owned by Austin DeCoster, one of the country’s largest egg producers, were portrayed as filthy and badly maintained, with manure piles teeming with maggots and overflowing from pits beneath henhouses. Those are not the images the egg industry wants to stick in consumer’s minds — nor are they necessarily representative of most egg farms, federal regulators and industry officials agree. The farms owned by Midwest Poultry Services were not associated with the recall, and a tour of one of them here in northern Indiana shows that much is being done in the egg industry to fight salmonella. “We’ve had to completely change the way we look at things,” said Robert Krouse, the president of Midwest Poultry Services, who is also chairman of the United Egg Producers, an industry association. “Thirty years ago, farms had flies and farms had mice, everything was exposed to everything else. They just all happily lived together. You can’t work that way anymore.”

Controlling pests Today the hens on Krouse’s farms come from hatcheries certified to provide chicks free of salmonella. The young birds are vaccinated to create resistance to the bacteria. And then steps are taken to keep them from being exposed to it, primarily by controlling mice and flies that may carry salmonella or spread it around.

Eggs pass over a light as they are checked for defects at the HiGrade Egg Farm.

Photos by A.J. Mast / New York Times News Service

At the Hi-Grade Egg Farm, buildings are surrounded by a perimeter of stone and gravel, and the grass between buildings is cut short, to eliminate rodent habitats That is where the manure drying comes in, although it has other benefits, like preventing bad smells that can bother neighbors. Many of the henhouses have been built or refurbished in recent years. Henhouse No. 1 is three years old. On the newer henhouses, the bottom 2 feet of the outer walls are concrete, to make it more difficult for mice to get inside. The buildings are surrounded by a perimeter of stone and gravel, and the grass between buildings is cut short, to eliminate rodent habitats. The doors seal tightly, like doors in a modern home rather than old-style barn doors. Bait containers and traps are placed along the walls, and the number of trapped mice is tracked closely to spot any increase in activity.

Visitors are made to dress in head-to-toe white coveralls made of a disposable material — evoking images of workers on the sterile floor of a semiconductor factory, only here there are downy feathers in the air and the racket made by hundreds of thousands of birds in cages stacked to the ceiling. The suits are meant to keep out germs that visitors may track in from off the farm. They may protect against salmonella, but they are mostly aimed at pathogens that can ravage flocks with diseases like avian influenza and could be tracked in from other farms or places like golf courses that are home to wild geese. The long, gray, tin-sided henhouses, about two football fields long, have no windows. Sur-

rounded by fields of corn and soybeans, they hum softly with the sound of giant fans.

Not all modern But everything here is not as modern as the manure-drying contraption in Henhouse No. 1. Nearby is a 12-year-old building, Henhouse No. 6. Here more than 200,000 birds live on the house’s second floor, in cages stacked in an A-frame configuration, with an opening at the center that allows the droppings to fall into a cavernous groundfloor space below. Krouse said that just a few years ago this design was considered the most advanced, and it is still prevalent throughout the egg industry, including the henhouses

at the Iowa farms involved in the recall. At the farms in Iowa, inspectors found manure piles 8 feet deep in some barns, with the manure overflowing and bursting through doors. Escaped chickens were seen loose in the manure, and there were flies and maggots, according to the Food and Drug Administration inspection reports. Once again, the picture was very different here. At the HiGrade barn, the manure was only about 6 inches deep, lying in five mounds, about 4 feet wide and 600 feet long, on the floor beneath the long arrays of cages. Krouse said the houses were cleaned out in early August. Here, there was no suggestion of chocolate smells. The air had an ammonia bite, although it was far from overpowering. And there were flies, though not in large numbers (in part because of plenty of fly traps). Gary Casper, a farm manager, said the key to controlling flies and rodents in this type of barn was to keep the manure dry. Large fans around the room kept the air moving. And he said it was

crucial to watch for problems in the system that carries water to the birds in the cages above, and to stop leaks before they can soak the manure piles. Many egg producers have been working for years to keep salmonella out of their flocks. Midwest Poultry began testing barns for salmonella in the late 1990s and has never found the toxic strain that can infect eggs. In July, the FDA put in place a set of egg safety rules that all producers must follow, with an emphasis on testing and rodent control. For companies like Midwest, that has meant only minor adjustments. The company, which has a total of 6 million laying hens in three states, spent about $200,000 upgrading refrigeration equipment to meet stricter rules for cooling eggs to prevent the growth of bacteria. Krouse sells eggs to the large supermarket chains Kroger and Wal-Mart, and he says that those stores now scrutinize their farm suppliers much as they would a food manufacturing company. “They’re looking at us as just another part of their food production system,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 B3

P F   Job offer may be good, but housing market isn’t

Tuning up your 401(k) for a comfier retirement By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

We want to be good retirement savers, we really do. But many working Americans find the process intimidating, confusing or financially impossible. Unfortunately, in an era where more of the retirement burden is falling on individuals than their employers, ramping up savings is essential. Which helps explain why 401(k) plans, where contributions come out of your paycheck tax-free — and often are matched by the boss — are one of the most common retirement tools out there, research shows. To get some tips on how to fine-tune your 401(k), we talked by phone with Mary Beth Franklin, senior editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, who spent weeks researching the topic for the magazine’s October issue. Here’s some of her advice: Matthew Staver / New York Times News Service

Kimberly Smith, chief executive of Avenue West Corporate Housing and CorporateHousingByOwner.com, recently worked with an executive at who was asked to relocate from the East Coast to San Francisco. The executive was wary of selling his home and uneasy about buying something in his new city. So he rented out his former residence and rented a place in San Francisco before buying.

Owning a house has complicated calculus of a job change By Paul Sullivan New York Times News Service

Given the high unemployment rate, a job offer would seem a sign of great fortune. But it’s not that simple if the offer means relocating. While choosing between the prospect of exciting new work and uprooting a family has long been part of the calculus of a job change, the current economic slump is complicating the process. Specifically, the problem is the house, that once-great sign of American success. It is not easy to sell these days and worth a lot less than it used to be. The difficulty in selling a home has prompted many people to second-guess a move — and the job offer that precipitated it. Is the job really worth it? What if the job goes away in a year? What happens then? Jim Carpenter, managing partner at J. Carpenter & Co., a recruiting firm based in Darien, Conn., said he recently had a candidate who would not move to another city for a job even though he was unemployed and had limited prospects where he was. He said he had another candidate in the mid-Atlantic states who was hesitant about taking a job in New England. “It’s hard for the husband to look his wife and children in the eye and say, ‘We’re making this move, but our house is going to be 30 percent smaller,’ ” said Carpenter, who has done highlevel searches for Unilever, Digitas and Black & Decker. With unemployment still high, many Americans would love to have the luxury of a job offer. Still, for people whose careers are still chugging along, the home can be a problem. So how do you address it? What options do you have in a bad housing market? The options vary from not great to pretty astonishing, given the economy.

Staying put There are risks to moving, but there are obviously financial risks to staying put, even if your current job is a good one. For one, that job could go away. John Archer, managing director of Catalyst Advisors, which specializes in recruiting for health care companies, said the dislocations of the last three years have left many people opposed to employment elsewhere. Their house, in a sense, is a good excuse to stay put. Beyond the costs of selling it in a bad market, there are the challenges of uprooting their families. Yet Archer said ambitious executives are just as game as ever to make a move. “If you look at the macro dis-

cussion, the American economy is slowing down,” he said. “If someone is blocked in their current role, they could be looking several years out to a promotion. So looking at a new opportunity could be a motivator.” And that may mean taking a loss on the house but being happy to have a new opportunity.

Renting Still, the insecurity in the housing and job markets has been a boon to people who want to rent before committing to a new area (or selling in an old one). Kimberly Smith, chief executive of Avenue West Corporate Housing and CorporateHousingByOwner.com, said she recently worked with an executive at Kaiser Permanente who was asked to relocate from the East Coast to San Francisco. Even though it was a promotion, the executive was wary of selling his home and just as uneasy about buying something in his new city. So he rented in both places. This is becoming more common, she said. In a recent study of the corporate rental industry conducted by her firm, only 56 percent of respondents considered themselves long-term investors. The remaining 44 percent are what Smith calls “accidental landlords,” pressed into the role by the realities of the housing market. That was the case with Anna and Noah Crossley. In 2007, she bought a condominium in Nashville, and two years later the two got married. Then, Crossley, a classically trained trombonist, received a fellowship that required them to move to Kansas City, Kan. When they went to sell their condo, though, they found out that they literally could not: The developer of the project had never gotten proper Federal Housing Association approval, which meant that the buyer would have to come up with the entire price in cash because no bank would make a loan. They also failed to find a traditional renter. So, in the end, they listed it fully furnished on CorporateHousingByOwner.com. Since June 2009, Crossley said there had been only one month in which the condo was not rented. “We clear our mortgage and utilities, so it’s wash,” she said. “But we rent here, and it would be very tight if we had to pay that mortgage as well.” Some of the people renting out their homes are out-of-work executives who are now living someplace less expensive. It is a difficult option, but it has been a way for some to keep their homes from dragging them under while they search for new jobs. This is what Stuart Cave, who

lost his job in technology sales a year ago, has done. “I hadn’t factored in a perfect storm of real estate and rental prices falling and being unemployed for a substantial amount of time,” said Cave, who owns a condo in Hoboken, N.J., with views of New York. “I did this as an interim step so I don’t have to blow through a whole lot more of my savings.” For most of these people, renting out their homes is a shortterm solution. Smith, whose website charges $279 for a one-year listing, said the Kaiser executive decided he liked San Francisco and bought a home, moving his furniture out with him. He is still renting out his home on the East Coast, but that was more a reflection of the soft housing market than fears about his new job.

Negotiating The reality is companies that really want someone are still putting together perk-filled relocation packages. And for certain executives, those perks have actually become sweeter, which may seem counterintuitive given the high unemployment rate. But for many companies, this is a good business decision. “If you’re moving a guy who’s making $300,000 a year and has a $600,000 house, you can’t say, ‘You’ve got to sit on that,’ ” Carpenter said. “It’s an enormous distraction to the guy and his family that he can’t sell his house and buy a new one.” So if you are one of those lucky people, what can you expect? Well, if your $2 million house is down $600,000 in value, no company is going to cover that loss, but, recruiters said, you may be able to get your new employer to chip in $100,000. For an even more fortunate few, companies may still buy your house. This practice is rare, given how many companies did this during the boom and got stuck holding houses that have plummeted in value. But Carpenter said he had seen companies use third-party relocation companies to buy the homes of senior executives. The era of gaming the appraisal market has come to an end, though. Archer said there was a time when a company would ask you for three estimates and pay the lowest one. But executives got to pick the appraisers, and many of the values were inflated. “All of that has dissipated,” Archer said. There is a third option that is somewhere in between. Companies are willing to help executives cover the rent on an apartment in a new city, with the expectation that they will commute there during the week. This is certainly not ideal, but it is a job.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Q:

Trying to save for retirement can be daunting. How do you know if you’re saving enough? People have to rely on themselves for their future retirement. We’ve got the first of baby boomers turning 65 who still have pensions. But going forward, those who are middle-aged and younger will really be on their own. The onus of making sure you’re doing it right, that you’re setting aside enough for your retirement, falls more and more on the shoulders of workers themselves. Now is a great time to reassess your plan.

A:

Q:

What’s the magic formula for how much you should be socking away in your 401(k)? You should be contributing about 15 percent of your gross salary a year; that’s combined between you and your employer. If you’re contributing 10 percent and your employer is matching 50 cents on the dollar, which is typical, that’s (an additional) 5 percent. Always contribute at least enough to get your employer match or you are walking away from free money. Nobody can afford that. If you don’t take the 3 percent your boss was going to give you in 2010, it’s gone forever.

A:

Q:

What are some quick fixes employees can make to fortify their retirement accounts? A typical 401(k) plan participant is a 45year-old employee earning

A:

“The onus of making sure you’re doing it right, that you’re setting aside enough for your retirement, falls more and more on the shoulders of workers themselves. Now is a great time to reassess your plan.” — Mary Beth Franklin, senior editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine $50,000, who contributes 6 percent of salary, has a 50 percent employer match (combined contribution: 9 percent of total salary) and plans to work full time until age 65. Assuming an average annual return of 6 percent, that person would have a nest egg at retirement of $420,000. Here are three things you can do: • If you work two more years, until age 67, you could move that nest egg from $420,000 to $490,000. • If you boost your contribution to 10 percent of salary, and your employer match is still half (in this case, 5 percent), you could boost that nest egg at retirement to $540,000. • If you rejigger your portfolio to get an 8 percent return instead of 6 percent, you would have $560,000. • If you do all three things, you would have a retirement nest egg of $850,000, more than twice where you started in the original scenario. It shows that you can make some small changes that add up. For somebody who’s 45 years old, you still have two decades. ... Maybe it’s a wake-up call that if you’re only saving 6 percent, frankly that’s not enough.

Q:

What if you’re in your 50s or 60s and don’t have two decades left to stash away enough for retirement? Those are the ones hit hardest. You probably have to save more and may have to work longer to come up with a nest egg that you consider comfortable. If you lost your job at 58 and can’t find a new job, a lot of these strategies aren’t going to help. We’re quite aware that for many people, it’s a dismal situation.

A:

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

But those coming of age in the work force today — 20-somethings and those in their early 30s — will be in an environment where the only retirement plan available is a 401(k). This is the new normal for them. By the time they reach retirement age, they’ll be fine.

Q: A:

Why is it so hard for many people to get going on retirement savings? Part of it’s inertia. Which is why this trend toward automatic enrollments and contributions since 2006 (endorsed by the Pension Protection Act that year) is so helpful. You can opt out, but you have to take an action to do so. Don’t say no (if your employer automatically enrolls you in the company 401(k) ). It’s coming directly out of your paycheck, just like state taxes or Social Security. If you don’t see it, you’re not going to spend it. We’re starting to see more companies (using) automatic escalation dates: On your anniversary date, they’ll bump you up 1 or 2 percent, unless you say no. That’s a very powerful tool and a very painless way of increasing your retirement savings.

Q: A:

What if your company doesn’t offer a 401(k)

Q: A:

Some final thoughts?

plan? Roughly 50 million Americans don’t have any retirement plan at work ... generally those working for businesses that are too small to make it financially viable to offer retirement plans. But everyone who has a job can set up an IRA. You can have your paycheck make direct deposits to your IRA. There’s no excuse: If you don’t have a 401(k) at work, set up an IRA.

This extraordinary recession, which has focused people on how they’re spending money, is also focusing them on how they’re saving money. And a 401(k) is one of the best forms of saving money. We’re all running out of excuses on why we aren’t saving for retirement. Twenty years from now, if you reach retirement without enough set aside, you won’t have a lot of people to blame but yourself. Commit to boosting your 401(k) contribution 1 percent a year for the next five years. The sooner you start, the better off you’ll be.


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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Nm Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AVEO Ph n AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm pfU BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blckbaud Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkrkHigh Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw BrasilTele BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch h CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNO Fincl CSG Sys CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadenceFn CadencePh Cadence Cadiz h CalDive Cal-Maine CalaCvHi CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CentAl

D 26.33 -.56 22.28 -.17 3.57 104.53 -2.04 3.15 -.01 14.24 -.02 0.80 37.74 +.01 4.12 -.10 11.27 -.53 1.00 21.22 -.12 27.25 +.05 0.88 31.69 -.44 1.84 -.05 0.84 33.05 -.61 .73 -.05 0.60 24.30 +.01 1.83 33.12 +.42 32.63 +1.47 0.42 6.49 +.09 1.74 80.09 +1.89 1.74 67.84 +1.71 41.56 -.30 39.65 -.49 41.61 +.28 3.32 -.11 1.50 42.11 -.19 0.10 15.83 -.23 4.21 21.87 +.62 98.40 -4.30 0.60 44.32 +.45 0.68 41.42 +.80 0.40 60.22 -.28 34.82 -.41 1.34 66.50 -.47 0.57 13.77 -.09 0.51 21.08 -.15 0.81 13.20 +.02 0.33 14.40 -.23 0.88 14.28 +.13 0.04 13.39 -.17 6.73 -.06 1.47 23.99 1.80 45.86 +.45 1.04 3.82 +.13 2.80 59.42 +.70 0.36 26.81 +.35 1.96 54.45 +.51 .93 -.05 0.04 2.01 -.09 2.58 -.02 42.69 +.13 23.78 +.14 79.20 +.04 0.22 19.47 -.23 85.08 +.15 16.24 -.20 0.72 82.95 -.25 1.00 16.28 +.04 0.32 17.62 0.48 48.59 +1.27 9.78 +.62 1.16 48.56 +.23 .31 +.00 14.65 +.07 4.14 -.07 1.00 6.99 +.09 0.72 47.82 +.67 1.48 75.13 +.26 43.02 -.48 6.18 -.02 0.92 33.12 0.28 26.97 -.22 83.54 +.11 0.30 31.96 -.46 0.60 40.82 -.06 32.77 -.17 2.90 +.02 37.30 +.41 4.77 +.25 2.83 +.43 56.63 -.90 21.83 -.57 0.68 18.76 -.14 1.67 1.44 32.39 +.14 1.28 11.91 +.04 0.44 24.21 -.25 37.23 +.89 4.00 171.35 +.04 0.32 4.00 +.03 0.17 2.15 +.01 0.40 12.66 -.01 0.60 12.91 +.20 13.77 +.21 22.41 -.44 2.04 32.93 -.11 1.68 68.58 -.02 6.65 1.58 +.31 52.19 -1.09 0.04 6.81 +.13 2.00 84.81 -.27 6.14 -.10 0.22 11.36 7.72 +.19 0.72 28.78 -.22 0.60 12.12 -.03 20.80 +.13 15.36 +.16 0.44 18.76 -.05 20.02 +.03 7.12 -.05 1.75 +.01 0.56 18.98 -.27 0.40 23.62 +.23 1.28 27.19 +.05 0.32 35.16 -.80 0.60 22.56 -.32 2.21 +.20 5.63 -.13 4.02 16.22 -.15 0.52 28.88 +.04 0.56 16.73 -.04 6.62 -.06 0.31 20.37 +.10 1.20 61.78 -.40 14.40 -.18 0.05 15.66 -.35 0.80 26.70 +.12 0.10 73.37 +1.17 0.42 48.31 +.84 48.64 -.83 0.92 58.09 +.25 0.25 23.94 -.01 .25 -.02 0.16 21.33 -.28 18.59 +.56 6.11 +.15 0.80 13.45 -.10 0.20 17.10 +.44 14.92 -.71 0.40 98.92 +.89 1.00 71.10 +.21 0.04 34.58 -1.24 40.79 +.08 1.00 30.18 -.08 4.60 267.24 -.39 0.84 18.60 +.05 5.49 +.07 18.32 +.02 1.04 56.81 +.75 0.26 22.73 +.19 0.34 7.91 +.30 8.50 +.11 0.35 32.41 +.35 18.40 -.63 0.50 26.48 -.37 0.72 32.98 -.50 0.12 31.53 +.81 2.54 +.46 8.75 +.02 7.58 -.18 11.19 +.99 5.40 +.10 0.95 28.08 +.19 1.02 12.98 +.09 1.14 12.91 0.60 8.13 +.02 0.63 8.90 +.01 15.30 +.11 13.08 -.32 0.04 7.21 -.06 4.48 -.01 4.97 +.25 12.67 -.08 3.47 +.11 1.80 48.37 -.07 0.28 28.33 +.15 17.78 -1.29 43.42 -.06 1.10 36.08 +.13 3.48 75.61 +.73 1.08 65.11 +.30 0.30 37.52 +.76 1.08 62.51 +.50 15.28 +.65 .35 +.01 47.03 -.82 4.80 +.08 0.20 40.16 -.23 0.90 8.59 +.09 0.04 5.46 +.11 1.66 10.98 -.01 .77 -.02 0.80 80.04 +.60 0.78 32.46 -.49 5.70 -.29 .55 +.01 24.71 -.14 20.56 -.45 0.68 31.24 +.21 27.86 +.09 0.40 39.95 +.09 0.72 34.90 -.08 24.47 +.07 25.99 -.20 0.54 41.38 +.07 4.39 36.46 +.65 1.76 79.08 -.32 0.04 12.81 +.34 28.97 -.74 0.25 13.80 -.04 .69 +.02 0.20 33.45 +.51 6.40 -.20 8.66 -.04 57.80 -.92 .38 -.01 4.47 -.26 0.43 8.49 0.86 17.08 -.24 0.80 29.43 -.06 23.16 -.25 0.78 15.89 -.14 0.03 16.18 -.18 1.56 13.90 +.06 21.72 +.26 0.01 17.50 +.30 13.47 +.21

Nm CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereEn CheniereE Cherokee ChesEng ChespkL n Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaBiot ChiCbl rsh ChinaCEd ChCBlood n ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChiCache n ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp Citigrp pfZ CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearChOut ClearEFd n Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CCFemsa CocaCl Coeur Cogent Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE CohStDiv Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CoreSite n CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CtrySCkg n CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crucell CrudeCrr n Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE DWS Value DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk

D 2.90 40.26 +.17 4.95 -.08 62.32 -.78 19.39 -.43 85.94 -.20 32.36 -.75 3.63 +.02 21.20 +.07 37.02 -.81 27.02 -.48 5.54 +.01 2.66 -.02 1.70 19.61 +.37 1.52 17.80 -.20 0.30 22.59 +.27 0.20 16.35 -.55 2.88 83.89 +.50 24.96 +.43 0.16 10.07 -.17 50.09 -1.86 0.69 4.09 +.03 11.30 -.54 3.78 +.21 10.28 -.05 .50 +.05 7.60 +.05 5.20 9.89 +.26 2.19 +.16 .26 -.02 14.79 -.04 1.54 63.84 -.46 22.55 -.45 10.04 +.06 0.55 11.89 -.17 14.26 -.22 1.85 53.10 +.11 0.28 4.47 +.02 11.22 +.14 6.83 +.13 2.79 89.31 -1.36 1.57 -.06 10.62 -.15 5.70 +.09 4.40 +.19 0.23 14.86 -.20 7.28 +.20 0.35 20.13 +.56 26.15 -1.21 1.37 -.13 174.82 -4.16 13.69 +.06 1.48 56.12 -.45 1.27 22.70 +.16 0.68 68.36 -.04 15.45 +.01 0.32 72.02 +1.68 2.65 1.60 29.51 +.04 0.72 16.94 +.27 0.48 27.56 -.08 16.25 -.87 22.30 +.32 2.13 26.42 -.12 1.97 26.12 4.10 -.03 1.74 24.28 -.20 .95 -.02 60.15 -9.85 0.40 52.87 -.59 1.57 +.01 13.78 -.13 11.08 -.42 0.35 20.66 +.20 7.40 -.37 5.46 +.01 0.56 66.89 +.78 2.20 67.17 +.48 18.61 +.11 0.60 43.48 -.17 9.49 +.06 22.51 +.19 1.16 78.02 -2.29 1.76 59.80 +.14 20.17 +.09 10.57 -.16 0.24 26.29 -.93 64.69 -1.25 0.96 16.39 +.21 0.72 8.08 +.01 1.20 13.26 -.04 0.50 11.77 +.27 43.12 -1.28 5.38 +.24 2.12 73.96 -.96 15.85 -.16 0.60 16.97 -.11 0.38 17.76 -.31 0.38 16.76 -.25 0.20 39.14 +.48 0.48 14.86 +.17 10.71 +.08 2.00 26.10 +.11 22.98 -.51 31.71 +.20 25.59 -2.10 0.69 71.58 -1.11 1.56 76.19 +1.43 17.10 -.19 23.13 +.39 0.60 46.03 -.37 8.65 -.27 21.99 -1.69 23.81 +1.05 1.00 28.32 +.04 0.40 30.38 -.50 0.92 22.03 -.29 13.67 +.18 69.24 +.34 47.67 -3.49 1.58 -.04 5.04 +.04 2.20 59.70 +.91 0.40 39.29 +.81 2.38 48.19 -.22 20.35 -.37 18.52 +.76 0.96 31.46 -.10 48.77 +.12 10.75 0.06 47.51 +.01 1.08 49.46 -.26 0.42 19.33 -.18 1.09 52.83 -.29 2.30 28.41 +.11 33.59 +.10 1.09 24.27 -.07 0.24 88.28 +1.28 18.11 +.08 15.30 -.72 6.98 -.19 0.56 38.17 +.02 0.20 18.36 -.15 1.65 37.53 -.76 25.09 +.14 11.93 +.01 4.92 +.29 0.82 65.41 +.75 7.92 +.03 27.90 -1.21 0.16 7.16 -.09 47.33 +.62 1.50 15.70 -.10 20.47 -.54 0.80 40.93 +.36 0.88 51.50 -.98 0.92 38.25 -.71 6.94 -.07 1.70 118.59 -.52 1.85 44.48 +.29 0.32 2.94 +.01 52.58 -1.57 13.54 -.02 .20 -.01 8.05 13.12 -.22 43.31 -.75 29.00 +.05 34.20 +.38 0.50 18.15 +.25 .36 +.01 46.07 -1.48 23.76 -.22 1.80 53.72 -.06 1.05 93.22 +.98 1.41 138.83 +.98 98.39 +.66 119.33 +.42 26.39 -.82 1.65 +.01 36.61 -.87 3.82 +.03 12.54 -.43 2.40 13.34 -.08 .80 -.02 0.05 57.35 -.85 5.18 +.20 0.28 4.79 -.07 20.08 -.78 1.21 26.31 -.14 0.15 10.81 -.03 0.60 44.82 -.13 2.24 46.86 -.15 0.96 14.35 +.03 12.91 +.04 0.08 40.88 +.10 1.28 43.62 -.07 8.79 +.19 69.53 +.32 0.20 50.34 +.59 10.67 -.13 2.04 +.20 50.37 -2.16 10.02 +.26 1.20 71.96 +.66 .33 +.02 0.36 13.50 -.26 7.24 -.16 13.22 -.18 0.44 26.13 +.20 11.78 -.05 .83 +.04 1.00 19.00 -.20 10.48 -.05 17.12 +.08 38.93 -2.29 1.79 +.06 3.13 -.18 0.20 32.19 +.08 0.93 57.23 +.69 2.01 26.97 +.15 38.88 +.46 8.90 -.12 0.08 12.17 -.03 0.64 66.30 +.92 13.32 +.03 2.38 70.11 -.12 0.18 40.72 -1.73 0.50 66.80 -.07 0.03 10.28 +.13

Nm

D

DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DimeCBc DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax DynaVox n Dynegy rs

1.08 2.12 0.16 0.56

6.26 5.68 0.20 0.01

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 12.65 28.65 31.36 59.46 34.44 30.93 23.88 13.93 45.66 17.28 41.87 33.82 37.71 33.73 24.61 21.88 39.03 30.35 24.55 12.50 22.69 33.35 51.02 9.69 49.31 11.81 55.16 36.13 17.00 43.33 37.87 .20 19.10 33.72 9.32 34.58 10.08 57.91 9.13 29.76 49.09 49.25 44.49 13.29 68.05 17.51 1.67 1.56 17.96 53.98 28.95 35.08 6.34 32.06 24.24 37.34 4.55 63.96 1.82 4.63 45.87 24.69 17.70 11.96 74.90 13.57 2.78 2.82 2.30 10.24 1.82 5.57 4.64

-.05 +.14 -.78 -2.81 -.47 -.87 -.08 -.06 -.91 -.53 +.03 -.76 -.12 +.72 +.25 +.25 -.88 -1.08 +.01 +.03 -.06 -1.22 -.69 -.22 -.44 +.03 -.11 +.83 +.12 -.56 -.52 -.01 -.53 -.11 -.21 +.59 +.43 -2.01 -.10 +.52 -.91 +.19 -.09 +.04 +.77 +.05 +.11 -.09 -.02 -.34 +.48 -.41 +.08 +.43 +.56 -.12 +.04 -.04 -.07 -.03 +.10 -1.38 -.04 +.11 -.09 +.31 +.04 +.13 -.04 -.18 -.04 -.03 -.05

E-F-G-H ETrade rs 14.82 -.02 eBay 24.45 -.14 EGIndiaSC 24.90 +.11 EMC Cp 19.70 -.71 EMCOR 25.02 -.19 ENI 2.51 44.87 +.61 EOG Res 0.62 98.52 +1.19 EPIQ Sys 0.14 11.62 -.48 EQT Corp 0.88 37.37 +.56 ETF Pall n 58.80 +1.05 EagleBulk 5.28 +.05 EaglRkEn 0.10 6.64 +.21 ErthLink 0.64 8.63 EstWstBcp 0.04 16.49 -.22 EastChm 1.76 76.02 -.15 EKodak 4.10 -.04 Eaton 2.32 83.09 -.33 EatnVan 0.64 29.65 -.22 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.35 +.09 EVRiskMgd 1.80 14.10 EV TxDiver 1.62 11.79 +.02 EVTxMGlo 1.53 11.16 +.04 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.71 +.02 Ebix Inc s 23.28 -1.50 Ecolab 0.62 52.16 +.06 Ecopetrol 1.34 46.32 +2.52 EdisonInt 1.26 34.75 -.27 EducMgmt 14.40 +.09 EdwLfSci s 67.78 +.08 8x8 Inc 2.17 -.23 ElPasoCp 0.04 12.66 +.13 ElPasoEl 24.16 -.02 ElPasoPpl 1.60 32.29 +.14 Elan 5.64 +.05 EldorGld g 0.05 19.08 +.41 ElectArts 17.41 -.41 EBrasAero 0.38 28.54 -.26 Emcore hlf .87 +.01 Emdeon 12.60 +.52 EmersonEl 1.34 53.55 -.25 Emulex 10.16 -.24 EnbrEPtrs 4.11 58.48 +.59 EnCana g s 0.80 30.21 +.25 EndvrInt 1.31 -.02 EndvSilv g 4.49 +.23 EndoPhrm 34.14 +.24 Endologix 4.71 +.14 EndurSpec 1.00 39.25 -.60 Energen 0.52 45.78 -.22 Energizer 69.29 -.47 EngyConv 4.73 -.21 EngyFocus 1.13 +.13 EnrgyRec 3.59 -.04 EngyTEq 2.16 38.13 +.37 EngyTsfr 3.58 48.53 +.37 EgyXXI rs 24.03 -.25 EnergySol 4.71 -.13 Enerpls g 2.16 26.29 +.01 Enersis 0.68 23.66 -.15 EnerSys 25.77 -.05 ENSCO 1.40 45.37 +.66 Entegris 4.71 -.07 Entergy 3.32 76.67 -.97 EntPrPt 2.30 40.74 +.43 EntGaming .31 +.01 EnterPT 2.60 44.75 -.12 EntropCom 8.88 -.80 EnzonPhar 11.41 EpicorSft 8.89 -.22 Equifax 0.16 31.41 -.01 Equinix 70.34-34.75 EqtyOne 0.88 17.57 +.08 EqtyRsd 1.35 48.58 -.31 EricsnTel 0.28 10.69 -.32 EsteeLdr 0.55 62.55 -1.22 EtfSilver 23.11 +.36 EthanAl 0.20 18.54 -.28 EverestRe 1.92 85.32 -1.33 EvrgrSlr h .71 +.03 ExactSci h 7.50 -.07 Exar 5.93 -.03 ExcelM 5.62 -.02 ExcoRes 0.16 15.29 +.30 Exelixis 4.00 -.10 Exelon 2.10 42.85 -.06 ExeterR gs 6.15 +.13 ExideTc 4.97 +.07 Expedia 0.28 27.70 -.60 ExpdIntl 0.40 47.24 -.24 ExpScrip s 47.91 -1.06 Express-1 2.32 +.13 ExterranH 24.30 +.33 ExtraSpce 0.33 16.15 -.58 ExtrmNet 3.05 -.10 ExxonMbl 1.76 63.94 +.68 EZchip 23.65 -1.80 Ezcorp 20.72 +.60 F5 Netwks 97.54-13.96 FEI Co 19.84 -.09 FLIR Sys 24.99 -.29 FMC Corp 0.50 69.43 -.17 FMC Tech 69.70 +.01 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.92 +.02 FSI Intl 2.96 +.10 FTI Cnslt 34.46 -.64 FX Ener 4.54 +.07 Fabrinet n 15.39 -1.32 FactsetR 0.92 81.96 -.37 FairchldS 9.05 -.39 FalconStor 2.83 -.04 FamilyDlr 0.62 45.81 +.47 Fastenal 0.84 53.96 -.03 FedExCp 0.48 87.38 -.45 FedRlty 2.68 83.15 -1.10 FedSignl 0.24 5.40 FedInvst 0.96 23.04 -.22 FelCor 4.95 +.19 Ferro 13.39 +.07 FiberTw rs 4.47 -.09 FibriaCelu 17.48 -.01 FidlNFin 0.72 14.57 -.20 FidNatInfo 0.20 26.81 -.04 FidClayOp 1.34 19.34 -.03 FifthStFin 1.26 11.23 -.02 FifthThird 0.04 12.28 -.23 FinEngin n 13.60 -.10 Finisar 18.98 -.42 FinLine 0.16 14.78 +.16 FstAFin n 0.24 14.15 +.25 FstBcpPR .28 FstCashFn 27.75 +.10 FstCwlth 0.04 5.76 +.14 FstHorizon 0.72 11.62 +.21 FstInRT 5.28 +.08 FMidBc 0.04 12.16 +.05 FstNiagara 0.56 11.82 -.11 FstSolar 138.64 -3.99 FTNDXTc 0.03 22.41 -.45 FTDJInet 29.66 -.83 FT Fincl 0.11 13.57 -.05 FT Matls 0.25 21.27 +.08 FirstEngy 2.20 38.62 -.20 FstMerit 0.64 18.79 -.19 Fiserv 54.16 -.27 FlagstB rs 2.57 +.24 Flextrn 6.06 -.09 Flotek h 1.52 +.02 FlowrsFds 0.80 25.53 +.13 Flowserve 1.16 110.82 -.29 Fluor 0.50 52.05 +.31 FocusMda 25.24 -.23 FEMSA 0.32 50.38 -1.22 FootLockr 0.60 15.05 +.17 ForcePro 5.24 +.03 FordM 13.24 +.23 FordM wt 5.07 +.21

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf Furmanite FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar G-III GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt Geeknet GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h GenesWyo Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoEye Gerdau GeronCp Gerova wt Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GblXChCon GlbXChiFn GblXChiInd GlbXSilvM GlbXCopM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldRsv g GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC s GreenPlns GrnHCmdty Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC Gug BRIC GugMultAs GulfRes n GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HSBC HSBC Cap HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HarteHnk HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthStrm HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelenTroy HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HenryBros HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg

D 3.25 49.09 -.19 12.82 -.07 31.39 +.08 31.00 8.51 -.17 24.19 -1.34 3.76 +.01 0.76 50.13 -.84 52.97 -1.17 24.52 +.15 1.77 22.29 +.16 0.88 112.54 +.51 0.16 11.67 -.32 1.20 93.62 +2.44 .03 -.00 21.90 +.12 7.34 -.02 0.75 8.40 +.01 13.51 +.09 1.90 28.26 +.47 1.18 -.03 0.28 20.22 -.16 0.12 9.43 +.14 6.33 -.15 5.55 +.20 9.21 +.09 1.12 29.58 -.30 0.20 4.90 -.07 4.50 4.39 -.49 24.53 -.54 8.18 -.29 29.89 -2.34 0.84 14.18 +.09 0.48 5.11 -.01 1.68 17.70 +.22 0.14 16.86 -.36 1.28 26.37 -.11 20.21 -.03 7.20 +.21 0.16 12.45 -.15 0.40 18.67 -.01 0.20 53.46 -.42 1.50 30.10 -.09 30.46 -.41 .32 +.01 3.84 -.10 31.33 -.06 1.81 +.16 16.59 +.21 4.91 -.05 26.74 +.09 1.68 63.64 +.65 0.48 16.90 +.39 16.05 +.01 0.04 4.40 -.25 1.12 37.30 +.36 3.80 +.10 2.91 +.05 .46 -.02 43.96 -.04 0.18 17.95 +.02 0.44 20.08 -.05 21.63 +.26 1.64 44.72 +.04 .61 +.02 12.40 71.75 +.23 24.40 -.19 41.10 -.51 0.21 13.44 -.21 5.32 -.07 .15 -.02 28.37 -.09 35.75 -.27 0.52 14.71 -.13 1.98 40.72 +.17 1.80 +.11 0.40 6.29 -.21 4.05 5.68 +.03 0.08 41.77 -.13 20.51 -.14 14.22 +.08 17.14 -.13 19.61 +.41 16.47 +.39 1.67 -.04 0.15 14.66 +.45 0.40 16.75 +.03 0.16 15.93 +.13 1.60 +.11 0.09 22.70 -.24 0.18 45.18 +1.09 21.56 -.11 5.19 +.08 1.40 150.84 +1.27 1.08 76.19 +.91 14.84 -.26 10.92 +.05 534.35 -3.88 1.64 27.34 +.46 28.88 -.02 0.80 32.35 -.16 16.29 +.16 2.16 122.62 +.93 1.93 +.09 7.55 +.07 22.13 +.03 0.92 23.47 +.01 3.31 -.06 3.98 -.11 2.47 +.03 0.07 5.84 -.17 0.83 18.96 +.03 46.15 +1.07 28.67 -.67 12.24 -.27 28.14 +.05 31.32 +.30 10.06 -.14 0.52 21.90 +.39 0.64 39.74 -.08 0.03 30.88 -.04 0.51 45.68 -.49 0.93 19.44 -.00 7.94 -.16 14.85 +.64 .70 +.04 52.03 +.70 0.58 26.17 +.13 1.86 36.43 +.20 0.81 187.61 -2.22 1.70 52.67 -.29 2.03 27.65 -.14 27.19 +.05 29.67 -1.15 0.36 33.97 -.09 8.00 +.08 26.31 -.32 1.28 1.00 45.49 -.31 1.52 +.03 47.58 +.60 18.67 +.24 0.40 30.99 -1.10 33.44 -.80 7.10 0.07 11.87 +.03 1.00 44.18 -.63 11.64 +.11 0.82 24.81 -.07 0.30 11.45 -.22 0.20 23.74 -.03 11.16 +.08 1.00 45.80 +.01 4.60 29.05 1.24 22.71 -.19 5.97 +.12 3.75 -.02 2.76 48.71 -.06 7.63 -.01 1.20 23.73 -.08 25.04 -.77 19.28 -.22 25.59 -.60 6.24 -.31 0.08 14.82 -.10 3.95 6.70 +.09 1.80 48.17 +.41 25.93 -.96 11.73 +.15 0.24 42.25 +1.12 .55 +.01 6.91 +2.31 58.48 -.15 1.00 61.45 -.30 2.25 -.35 0.20 5.40 +.09 1.28 48.17 +.07 9.97 -.17 0.40 61.61 +.19 0.32 40.74 -.07 19.08 +.36 25.05 -.49

Nm Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom Hittite HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon HutchT Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 1.70 0.41 0.60 0.95 2.32 1.21 0.84 1.80 0.04 0.28 1.44 0.60 0.48 0.04 0.40

24.70 33.52 37.26 49.08 29.51 11.80 16.10 31.74 49.01 54.30 36.25 45.72 45.46 19.71 56.48 22.42 15.45 5.97 3.88 28.79 51.58 12.12 28.91 49.59 35.58 5.89 11.66 19.66 3.77 39.78 6.29 2.43

-.27 +.22 -.17 -.28 +.14 +.32 +.06 -1.65 -.75 -.27 +.71 +.20 +.21 -.39 -.14 +.14 +.03 -.02 -.03 +.61 -.04 -.88 -.91 +.59 -.05 +.19 +.05 -.24 -.34 -.04 +.14

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICOPDig rs IdexxLabs IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 7.05 INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBelg iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iShEMBd iShIndones iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShSft iShSemi iShNifty50 n iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSSPGlb iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBShtT iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShREst iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShEur350 iSSCVal iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX iGo Inc ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte Inergy Infinera Informat InfoSvcs wt InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InovioPhm InsitTc InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl InterDig Intrface InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InternetB InetInfra InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntervalLs inTestCp IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdP n

26.26 -.60 0.06 18.04 +.29 0.53 51.37 -.35 2.29 +.39 62.23 -.61 0.50 22.64 +.04 0.11 17.48 -.39 0.54 7.62 +.01 1.20 11.35 -.02 10.77 +.09 1.76 24.15 +.15 0.32 5.70 -.02 4.91 -.10 13.20 +.08 30.85 +.13 0.81 24.53 +.21 0.19 13.65 +.10 2.58 78.64 -1.04 0.42 28.90 +.18 0.96 35.82 +.27 0.60 24.86 +.27 0.30 22.60 +.25 0.48 18.55 +.03 0.16 10.14 +.11 0.39 55.97 +.81 0.25 13.88 -.03 0.75 55.23 +.29 0.38 13.66 +.04 1.37 45.66 +.29 1.36 69.04 +.23 0.61 29.06 -.26 0.36 23.48 +.16 0.21 13.73 +.11 0.44 16.93 +.09 1.20 63.38 +.42 0.68 74.18 -.02 1.22 73.23 +.92 22.69 +.35 1.08 52.48 +.09 1.69 47.60 2.65 111.06 +.97 0.87 62.65 +.18 0.68 44.24 -.03 1.01 82.77 +.34 2.34 116.41 +.02 3.75 108.55 +.11 0.59 46.09 -.02 5.35 113.25 +.73 0.64 44.39 +.20 5.64 112.01 +.29 0.08 29.87 -.27 1.13 60.17 -.03 0.82 35.00 +.19 1.22 51.38 -.44 1.24 55.36 +.07 3.82 105.56 +1.31 3.77 99.84 +.64 1.10 84.38 +.01 1.38 56.69 +.47 0.83 40.99 -.13 0.52 50.03 -.52 1.42 91.23 -.55 0.99 80.48 -.54 7.98 89.15 -.08 51.03 -1.48 0.44 47.07 -.73 0.12 31.91 -.05 86.78 -.63 1.85 63.32 -.42 1.42 59.95 +.30 1.28 60.16 +.07 0.57 88.12 -.95 0.72 52.06 -.07 1.11 64.12 -.06 1.06 63.22 +.09 4.53 108.46 +.29 3.26 105.12 +.09 0.47 75.69 -.55 0.79 68.61 -.23 0.08 110.22 2.91 39.47 -.02 0.67 22.05 -.17 1.88 54.13 -.16 0.59 53.27 -.03 0.58 60.07 -.24 0.91 67.00 +.63 0.82 45.09 +.45 1.02 39.04 +.22 0.79 63.36 -.11 3.32 +.06 1.34 61.18 -.59 1.00 47.93 +.22 68.04 -.48 21.39 -.47 17.56 -.34 1.20 36.39 -.47 3.62 +.22 0.60 36.20 -.22 1.88 -.10 1.36 48.30 +.20 50.78 -.38 17.31 -.56 20.44 +.14 6.56 +.07 3.29 -.06 20.85 +.06 16.52 -.27 2.82 40.53 +.18 11.34 -.34 36.13 -2.31 .01 +.00 0.54 69.02 -.71 0.28 38.17 +1.01 17.19 -.06 1.30 +.01 24.53 -.51 6.38 +.16 5.96 +.02 8.89 +.23 2.72 52.63 -.34 0.63 19.31 +.16 17.07 -.24 110.79 -.51 0.42 18.75 +.37 29.50 -.44 0.04 14.20 -.10 13.45 -.32 4.42 -.48 2.60 137.84 +.18 5.42 -.02 1.08 49.60 +.05 0.24 14.21 -.03 0.50 22.35 +.08 21.17 -.41 13.18 -.02 3.65 -.12 66.97 +.44 10.25 -.24 0.48 11.31 -.24 13.55 -.14 3.37 +.38 15.32 -1.63 26.56 +.52 44.92 -.54 292.88 -.01 0.44 21.93 +.12 3.57 21.80 +.32 0.29 4.60 -.04 14.14 +.02 8.73 +.07 0.25 20.43 -.02 11.01 +.05

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm IsilonSys Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KEYW n KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KandiTech KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Keithley Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohlberg Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP n KratosDef KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LRAD LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Lance Landrys Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq

D 23.88 -2.00 8.29 +.15 0.59 24.98 -.26 61.90 +1.04 2.38 +.26 24.74 +.28 12.67 -.17 33.55 -.27 8.95 +.65 22.23 +.23 12.43 -.44 0.20 39.90 +.26 1.80 34.37 +.13 1.68 25.56 -.04 0.28 14.75 -.39 0.38 25.81 -.21 21.67 -.02 1.16 -.01 40.33 +.40 6.95 +.05 18.15 2.30 -.02 16.98 0.04 11.46 +.11 0.33 31.57 -.10 10.32 +.06 0.30 23.21 -.08 6.54 -.05 29.75 -.65 42.02 -2.39 2.08 +.03 2.16 63.21 +.41 0.52 31.29 -.47 0.20 19.52 -.45 0.20 85.00 +.50 1.25 -.02 45.21 +.19 0.70 71.39 +.88 31.22 -1.37 46.62 -.16 0.25 11.27 -.03 0.20 25.16 +.05 12.47 +.24 11.56 -.09 0.08 10.50 -.33 0.48 8.99 +.10 1.00 34.70 -.46 21.70 +.17 2.54 -.01 4.45 -.13 38.72 +.40 0.76 35.61 -.21 1.92 26.22 -.08 0.15 21.50 -.09 1.62 50.49 -.15 3.04 -.19 0.48 32.25 +.46 4.67 -.05 9.94 -.01 0.04 8.33 -.13 1.40 33.30 -.34 2.64 66.04 +.53 0.64 16.81 +.15 4.36 69.47 +.47 12.97 -.09 37.50 -.17 10.14 -.02 0.10 19.55 +.13 0.24 4.76 +.03 12.84 +.12 0.24 19.11 -.03 1.20 18.78 +.02 0.08 16.61 +.58 3.52 -.07 0.68 6.65 +.07 53.07 +.47 3.56 +.01 14.49 -.05 1.16 31.30 +.03 28.90 -.70 10.47 -.28 4.83 -.02 0.42 21.22 -.15 6.33 +.04 8.05 -.17 11.76 -.02 1.60 70.83 +.18 0.46 29.60 -.26 9.99 +.10 17.76 +.37 4.40 +.22 20.85 -.10 1.59 +.23 4.48 -.02 6.31 +.01 8.52 -.07 79.14 -.21 3.97 1.09 -.06 41.91 -1.26 32.65 +1.17 0.64 23.38 +.17 24.51 +.01 0.20 38.38 -.13 36.10 -1.00 0.44 23.66 -.15 5.00 -.15 8.36 -.12 0.50 35.95 -.40 12.12 -.17 5.74 +.01 81.06 -.05 2.55 +.01 0.16 31.07 -.38 1.08 23.62 -.09 0.40 27.84 +.53 0.16 15.41 -.06 0.60 42.32 +.12 24.20 +.19 .93 -.02 1.56 -.02 0.40 7.33 -.10 43.43 -2.02 10.35 +.06 1.63 +.01 0.29 4.47 +.02 31.43 +.12 31.23 +.18 14.10 -.06 53.43 -.04 1.90 32.75 +.01 46.87 -.84 40.73 -.46 35.21 -.10 1.96 37.17 +.28 5.70 -.41 0.60 27.59 -.22 0.80 25.45 0.04 24.73 +.04 0.92 30.49 -.23 2.52 32.18 +.24 4.59 -.02 9.37 -.37 8.79 -.14 6.66 +.03 1.45 4.78 -.05 4.02 -.07 3.00 70.90 +.30 2.41 +.12 0.25 38.76 +.28 17.41 +.02 33.55 -2.74 38.98 -.74 2.41 -.11 12.80 +.05 4.50 79.04 -.48 7.68 +.11 0.44 22.67 1.44 109.07 -1.05 0.50 44.28 -.34 43.49 -1.00 24.40 -.39

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys Magma MagnaI g

2.80 78.91 10.49 0.24 6.22 1.00 28.29 10.18 0.63 20.46 6.57 12.33 7.31 0.90 7.92 0.58 6.90 9.42 11.62 10.00 2.53 0.88 54.87 33.98 2.00 43.82 1.80 32.87 0.20 23.70 3.96 1.20 84.55

-4.18 -.35 +.05 -.01 -.11 -.05 -.07 -.01 -.05 -.04 -.05 +.18 -.09 -.16 +.03 +.21 -.41 -1.02 -.36 +.18 +.02 +.05

Nm MagHRes MaidenBrd MMTrip n Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MkVPoland MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedQuist MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Mesab Metalico MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer MillerPet Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys MonroeBc Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap3 MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Nautilus NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh Ness Tech NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt

D 4.18 +.04 26.37 -2.30 35.46 -1.87 0.08 11.93 +.13 6.58 +.12 0.74 51.79 -.18 0.52 12.58 -.15 1.00 35.10 +.78 24.56 +.09 0.11 58.12 +.86 0.08 34.19 +.06 27.40 +.03 35.41 +.75 0.42 46.84 +.19 0.45 58.46 -.61 0.18 88.85 -.69 0.31 39.14 +.23 0.16 37.86 +.05 0.84 23.77 -.03 0.04 7.44 -.09 1.60 79.23 +.65 16.42 -.48 0.30 11.77 +.22 2.00 28.12 +.12 0.24 33.82 +1.94 10.84 +.16 0.60 223.30 -2.60 0.75 23.49 -.58 2.78 +.02 0.84 18.57 -.10 3.60 -.22 1.04 41.70 +.27 14.30 -.11 2.44 75.56 -.26 0.94 33.63 -.01 0.72 60.32 -.90 16.85 -.44 47.22 +.02 0.90 56.00 -.25 0.92 24.83 +.29 24.99 -.35 4.70 12.04 +.14 21.28 +.25 52.67 -.45 0.80 10.31 -.15 13.62 -.45 0.24 29.93 -.58 54.81 -.64 0.90 33.65 5.39 -.08 19.66 -.57 0.36 24.25 -.40 10.70 -.22 64.32 -3.78 5.13 +.11 1.52 37.01 -.01 0.92 33.09 +.02 3.00 +.02 19.44 -.29 1.70 39.87 +.91 3.98 0.74 39.46 -.34 11.06 +.09 0.14 10.08 -.23 1.37 30.91 -.51 6.95 +.02 42.72 -.73 19.13 +.10 0.64 24.43 +.08 2.89 2.04 -.07 2.46 60.39 -.13 .65 +.02 0.09 19.97 +.14 6.03 +.25 7.24 97.35 -1.43 0.20 29.62 -.06 7.37 -.23 9.65 -.08 9.98 -.06 4.89 +.19 3.04 +.23 22.94 +.19 13.29 +.06 53.30 -.64 0.61 21.47 +.11 0.61 17.76 +.13 1.12 48.87 +.54 27.87 -1.13 14.84 -.15 15.92 -.35 0.04 11.25 +5.87 1.12 48.65 +.12 12.78 -.43 0.36 17.48 +.17 0.42 26.05 +.48 0.20 25.38 -.09 1.56 24.04 -.02 1.20 17.15 -.10 7.11 -.43 0.20 61.01 +.21 8.56 -.08 2.17 -.04 0.07 3.12 -.04 1.10 62.81 -.10 18.79 -.06 16.53 -.47 10.39 +.65 13.84 -.12 26.18 -1.82 0.60 15.80 -.08 .81 -.04 32.29 -.25 41.49 -1.28 2.09 -.05 6.84 -.07 21.45 +.19 0.44 12.87 -.07 1.20 29.66 +.33 18.21 0.14 25.72 +.12 14.39 -.92 19.90 +.02 2.51 +.15 13.00 +.01 1.38 52.82 -.27 7.17 44.99 +.12 0.40 46.21 +.08 0.04 6.48 +.11 1.52 26.03 +.03 0.40 12.73 -.23 1.84 40.05 -.16 1.36 -.03 11.75 +.01 0.24 5.81 +.05 47.54 +1.63 15.06 +.14 4.40 13.08 +.08 26.80 -.73 47.70 -3.22 37.96 -1.12 26.86 -.01 150.27 -5.89 21.20 -.25 1.84 +.06 21.46 -2.43 1.49 -.04 24.45 -.21 12.91 +.06 5.12 -.04 .04 -.00 .11 -.01 7.18 +.20 90.22 -2.64 2.84 -.15 1.00 16.49 +.02 7.77 -.09 0.28 12.75 -.15 3.43 +.23 0.20 18.27 -.11 57.71 +.19 0.60 64.72 +1.05 8.42 -.14 0.15 13.48 -.07 0.15 15.56 +.08 0.20 21.13 +.28 2.00 54.78 +.38 0.92 17.55 -.16 1.86 47.45 -.07 6.35 -.03 1.08 81.31 +.01 17.96 -.68 22.37 +.07 1.40 20.01 +.25 0.20 33.59 -.17 0.72 76.74 -.46 0.56 10.47 +.07 5.27 +.36 8.75 +.34 1.55 26.97 +.06 0.80 37.54 -.23 1.44 59.67 +.16 4.35 1.36 28.63 +.07 1.03 30.20 -.01

NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OSI Sys OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncolyt g Oncothyr 1800Flowrs ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OplinkC Opnext Oracle OraSure OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OrientFn OriginAg Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PC Mall PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PanASlv PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo Peregrne rs PerfectWld PerkElm Perrigo Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimcoHiI PimcoStrat PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PwShCurH PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PS USDBear PwShHiYD PwSIntlDv PwSWtr PSFinPf PSDvTecLd PSETecLd PS SC HCre PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PremGlbSv PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUSL7-10T PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500

D 8.84 +.19 18.19 +.01 1.12 48.89 +.29 2.98 +.03 1.88 62.08 +.03 0.40 3.83 +.03 0.40 11.18 +.14 9.54 +.36 1.99 57.84 -.16 8.85 +.10 2.19 -.03 5.87 -.01 26.37 -.68 1.60 39.30 -.49 0.50 29.45 +.17 33.81 -.68 14.97 -.27 1.44 39.83 +.30 0.75 8.46 -.05 0.75 8.88 10.78 -.54 20.38 +.38 6.13 -.09 1.45 42.55 +1.65 31.16 +.62 53.65 -.41 34.64 -2.16 21.05 +.23 1.52 82.93 +.47 52.91 -.38 .95 +.00 0.85 14.85 -.08 16.34 +.24 9.13 -.35 1.93 +.12 4.50 -.06 13.64 -.05 2.60 114.81 47.24 -.73 .51 +.01 25.09 -.34 0.28 10.10 -.37 0.69 13.77 +.07 0.80 20.41 -.17 1.44 23.14 -.01 0.13 23.16 -.08 0.80 39.77 -.47 22.56 -.98 7.54 +.01 6.97 -.27 4.82 -.17 3.62 +.10 1.81 -.07 1.84 47.49 -.27 26.26 +.01 45.75 -.92 62.96 -3.39 1.77 -.03 20.19 -.22 1.70 +.05 0.20 27.58 +.28 4.55 +.23 15.14 +.13 5.87 -.07 11.15 +.24 0.16 13.26 +.02 8.50 +.42 2.16 +.04 28.30 -.32 1.75 33.57 +.05 0.71 28.30 +.05 27.82 +.36 29.25 +.38 .27 -.01 5.37 -.17 1.00 5.34 +.05 0.42 47.11 -1.92 1.82 46.34 -.36 22.00 +.27 7.14 -.12 3.89 +.22 0.40 53.78 +.30 0.50 11.41 -.08 1.43 120.47 +2.12 2.20 74.76 +.76 1.40 27.66 -.27 21.23 -.35 0.48 49.16 -.49 .83 -.05 1.00 -.05 5.54 -.06 0.60 23.43 -.10 33.00 +.03 4.09 -.11 0.64 42.19 -.17 0.05 30.24 +.46 88.66 -2.94 31.81 +.46 19.49 -.48 1.81 21.57 -1.08 4.45 +.03 1.08 70.19 -.83 2.00 79.22 -1.15 13.24 +.75 0.40 28.31 -.22 0.20 17.26 -.01 1.24 27.50 -.09 0.28 50.70 +.24 0.12 28.34 -.28 0.84 11.23 +.02 30.76 -.10 0.23 15.59 -.07 1.80 20.49 +.04 1.04 10.92 +.10 0.80 29.00 +.18 0.60 12.20 +.19 13.23 -.12 0.76 34.48 +.14 0.62 13.43 +.14 0.12 10.61 +.06 1.08 19.01 -.06 1.92 68.11 +.35 1.52 +.12 26.27 -.26 0.28 22.77 -.56 0.25 65.75 +.03 16.80 +.20 1.18 31.22 -1.51 1.18 35.09 -1.62 6.17 -.01 0.50 35.16 +.51 0.72 17.26 +.03 1.40 -.03 7.59 65.51 +.16 0.60 24.83 -.15 8.20 -.02 9.56 -.11 2.56 56.31 +.96 0.95 32.23 +.47 0.15 61.93 -.48 2.05 -.07 5.52 -.03 1.12 29.45 -.25 8.21 -.06 6.27 +.06 1.38 17.45 +.09 1.46 13.00 +.08 0.90 10.58 +.01 11.33 -.17 2.10 41.43 -.23 6.31 -.04 0.08 69.54 +.21 1.46 21.96 +.18 3.77 63.65 +.18 27.40 +.07 0.20 33.85 -.86 2.14 +.03 .38 +.01 1.68 36.12 -.03 1.60 65.39 -1.41 0.40 91.63 -1.33 27.17 +1.31 1.92 +.02 12.66 32.76 +1.50 2.85 -.00 1.04 20.38 -.08 0.80 29.49 -.17 0.40 141.38 -1.63 0.20 31.20 -.63 9.74 +.13 62.93 -.69 24.58 +.01 23.47 +.18 26.79 -.17 26.09 +.11 22.45 -.11 27.47 +.12 0.35 8.45 +.01 0.44 15.11 +.08 0.11 16.85 +.05 1.30 18.28 -.01 0.44 20.57 -.05 0.11 17.78 -.04 25.24 -.08 1.02 14.44 -.01 1.64 28.09 +.15 0.12 26.34 -.04 0.33 49.23 -.43 1.75 -.04 1.80 91.18 -.01 0.12 131.03 -.28 7.11 +.08 7.45 -.15 .50 +.03 10.23 +.10 1.08 51.99 +.07 332.69-12.25 29.93 -1.06 0.50 26.84 +.29 0.04 11.93 +.19 38.69 +.30 48.04 +.01 28.56 -.01 0.40 48.57 +.32 23.66 -.14 0.04 50.08 -.71 15.39 +.18 66.73 -1.08 14.50 +.21 0.43 40.68 +.01 30.97 -.76 38.52 -.47 30.15 -.03 35.60 +.01 20.41 +.17 53.01 -.74 26.72 -.57 0.41 46.65 -.36 18.97 +.02 0.09 56.86 -.20 43.60 +.93 0.23 33.40 +.44 0.10 38.06 +.75 37.24 +.14 110.13 -2.88 16.90 +.10 0.01 32.79 -.24 40.10 -.49 25.67 -.01

Nm

D

ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam PrognicsPh ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PPrIT

0.48 160.40 +.11 10.96 +.11 31.66 -.43 19.81 -.61 12.30 -.15 94.20 +2.84 16.45 -.12 18.95 -.28 1.93 60.87 +.05 4.98 -.16 2.48 44.43 -.45 33.82 -.47 0.16 21.02 -.13 0.60 12.42 +.16 1.21 9.83 +.03 0.62 32.67 -.03 9.50 +.40 0.56 22.49 -.07 0.72 7.23 +.08 0.70 54.13 +.11 33.59 +.03 1.37 33.03 -.54 3.20 96.35 -1.63 7.79 -.37 8.48 -.12 0.71 6.75 -.01

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QiaoXMob QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadioShk Radware Rambus Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc ResCare RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy ReynldAm RightNow RINO Intl RioTinto s RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Rollins Roper RosettaGn RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 n RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold S&PEAsia SpdrEMSmC SpdrIntRE SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrBarcCv SpdrITBd SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth s SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schulmn Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SeahawkDr SealAir Seanergy SearchMed SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGp n ShandaGm ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens

0.02 30.79 +.40 17.11 -.67 3.37 -.04 1.53 +.05 16.99 -.55 0.76 44.65 +.39 1.20 65.17 +.17 0.16 17.47 +.15 19.10 -.06 1.98 -.04 .57 +.03 0.40 50.62 -.04 24.39 -.62 0.56 17.40 -.11 9.81 -.15 5.19 -.07 12.59 -.06 4.11 +.15 0.32 6.41 +.05 1.70 6.10 -.08 0.24 21.76 +.29 0.82 20.43 -.01 3.53 -.02 30.77 +.40 23.29 -2.92 0.01 8.16 +.26 17.70 -.22 0.25 21.75 -.09 31.80 -2.78 20.39 -.36 0.17 104.85 -.19 0.16 37.79 +.03 7.63 -.75 .27 +.02 0.44 26.60 +.25 2.00 49.22 -1.46 1.50 45.93 +.35 3.35 -.07 1.73 34.33 +.01 38.32 -3.18 4.83 -.20 1.00 14.66 +.06 0.68 56.43 -.60 0.72 13.41 +.12 1.85 41.21 1.78 24.93 +.26 29.18 +.73 0.58 75.91 +.20 0.04 7.50 -.04 0.16 19.50 +.15 0.48 49.16 +.21 0.40 42.72 +.44 12.23 +.08 0.24 22.51 -.03 .96 -.01 .38 +.00 1.15 28.09 +.48 8.38 -.23 0.80 31.20 +.15 13.25 +.05 48.01 -1.67 33.24 +.11 1.00 6.37 -.05 0.16 14.83 +.06 1.66 99.60 -.10 11.54 +.04 13.01 +.07 3.60 59.25 -.62 19.91 -.34 14.27 +.06 0.90 62.35 +1.64 .93 -.01 44.47 -4.05 0.17 25.29 -1.39 0.52 26.20 -.16 0.60 51.25 -.05 1.40 62.06 -.49 0.96 59.34 +.14 33.90 +.54 1.28 38.70 +.28 0.36 24.10 +.40 0.38 66.95 +.28 .97 -.11 24.20 -.20 0.64 54.32 +.06 49.09 -.99 31.60 +.35 2.00 54.37 +.74 32.96 +.11 3.36 60.58 +.23 3.36 62.54 +.23 0.36 51.36 +.79 4.25 +.02 19.51 -1.45 12.69 +.14 26.67 +.02 4.17 -.04 2.29 31.89 +.30 1.08 43.31 +.01 0.62 42.91 -.15 46.34 +.04 0.12 17.09 +.29 5.40 +.04 15.94 -.05 0.67 51.10 +.32 40.53 -.24 1.90 40.62 -.23 0.20 20.68 -.01 6.62 +.04 18.31 +.13 0.40 64.37 -1.64 11.45 +.04 0.10 38.50 -.38 2.55 109.77 +.37 131.81 +.82 0.82 85.28 +.18 0.87 56.40 +.07 1.31 39.88 +.30 0.42 28.74 +.24 1.54 146.34 -1.07 2.31 116.03 -.01 1.68 51.12 +.01 0.12 15.82 0.11 23.68 -.09 0.43 40.09 -.04 1.75 58.70 -.37 1.93 38.86 -.38 1.32 33.81 +.19 4.30 39.94 -.04 0.45 24.25 +.01 45.85 0.30 23.32 +.02 0.57 42.02 -.20 0.20 43.55 +.32 0.35 55.38 +.83 1.00 64.98 +.06 19.09 -.39 13.08 -.21 0.28 7.53 -.12 21.91 -.15 43.55 +.05 37.98 +.11 1.30 47.05 +.90 0.48 21.32 +.02 24.88 +.24 39.85 +.05 8.63 -.07 104.95 -8.96 37.72 -1.15 11.32 +.07 1.21 -.04 37.32 -.32 5.70 -.17 12.05 -.40 1.63 34.16 -.11 2.97 -.01 0.35 12.31 -.33 0.44 14.25 -.12 1.46 47.73 +.52 3.54 -.10 3.79 22.15 -.39 19.39 -2.24 0.84 63.13 +.17 0.07 49.14 +.19 0.30 28.31 +.21 0.60 20.21 -.71 0.24 14.25 -.11 2.81 +.19 9.42 -.11 1.00 51.86 +.50 0.30 47.02 -.54 29.56 +.37 1.34 2.31 29.88 +.49 11.49 -.44 9.37 +.26 0.52 22.78 -.12 1.25 +.05 1.97 +.07 71.22 -.86 0.50 13.07 +.13 16.05 -.32 6.81 -.02 0.52 27.88 -.22 1.56 54.09 -.08 20.38 -.57 .28 +.01 1.48 24.22 +.01 20.28 -.02 7.08 +.07 0.16 8.53 -.04 17.49 -1.12 6.00 +.24 35.23 +.22 1.44 74.00 -.72 1.40 19.63 +.27 0.34 67.77 -.05 8.38 +.03 26.41 -.12 0.58 17.36 -.15 2.41 107.99 +2.18

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Catheter

Boyle said in a news release. Eric Rosenfeld, managing partner of Portland-based Capybara Ventures, announced last month that Capybara was about to invest in Clear Catheter. Herman confirmed Thursday that Rosenfeld is part of the Oregon Angel Fund investor group that put up the $1.2 million, but she said the fund is not releasing how much individual investors provided. Under terms of the investment, Jim Fee of the Oregon Angel Fund has joined the Clear Catheter Systems board of directors, according to a news release. “Jim’s extensive experience in building global medical device marketing and sales teams will be of tremendous value to us as we move forward with our commercialization efforts,” Boyle said. Fee describes the PleuraFlow device as “a groundbreaking product” to help make heart and lung surgery safer and more cost-effective. “We are excited to support the company in accelerating the adaptation of this innovative solution to a common problem faced in hospitals daily,” Fee said. Clear Catheter Systems was co-founded by Andrew Firlik, a neurologist and venture capitalist partner in the Foundation Medical Partners. The PleuraFlow is one of several proprietary medical devices the Bend-Based company has in its pipeline to prevent tube clogging. Others include systems for clearing urinary catheters and keeping feeding tubes clear as well as systems for standard surgical drains, according to the news release.

Continued from B1 Winning the conference helped Clear Catheter Systems put together its management team and license the PleuraFlow device, which also helped the company raise $600,000 for human trials, she said. “What a win at BVC does is gives them credibility,” Lindley said. Last October, Clear Catheter won a worldwide TechnoCollege Award established by the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery to recognize the most important technological breakthrough related to thoracic and cardiovascular surgery, according to the association. Lindley said Clear Catheter is one of several high-tech companies in Bend generating economic momentum with their technological innovations. Clear Catheter Systems is the second Bend company to land a big investment this year. G5 Search Marketing, a search engine software development company, received $15 million in August from Boston-based Volition Capital to help G5 improve the mobile application and social networking aspect of its software used to market customers’ websites on search engines. Kelly Herman, a media consultant for Clear Catheter Systems, said the Canadian and European governments authorized selling the PleuraFlow devices last spring, and the company is awaiting approval of its application with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “We are very pleased to have the OAF (Oregon Angel Fund) join our investor syndicate,”

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

Bills

based company said this week that it will refund the charges, incurred when software inside its phones received or sent signals or customers were mistakenly charged for Internet access. The cost to the company will be about $50 million, a person familiar with the matter said. FCC spokeswoman Jen Howard declined to comment about further steps in the commission’s investigation. Marquett Smith, a spokes-

Continued from B1 Carriers including Verizon have fought against such requirements, saying they already give customers ways to monitor their usage. Verizon, the largest U.S. wireless carrier, is also under investigation by the FCC for charging 15 million customers incorrectly for data. The Basking Ridge, N.J.-

Documents

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 B5

in court or out of court through counties — most defaulted loans are handled nonjudicially. Nonjudicial foreclosure is cheaper because lenders aren’t forced to file a lawsuit and hire an attorney. Instead, they can hire a trustee to file the necessary public notices and documentation with the county government, attorneys said. There’s also less paperwork. Homeowners who face nonjudicial foreclosure don’t have a chance to regain their home like they do in the judicial process, said Chris Ambrose, an attorney in Bend. Judicial foreclosure gives people who lost a home to foreclosure a six-month post-sale grace period during which the

Continued from B1 Foreclosures are regulated by courts in those states — called judicial foreclosures — and employees of some of the nation’s largest lenders have given sworn testimony that they sometimes didn’t verify numbers on foreclosure documents they signed because of the sheer volume of cases they’re dealing with, according to news reports. Authorities are also investigating accusations of falsified signatures, according to those reports. Though similar problems could potentially arise in Oregon — lenders can file foreclosures

Tax relief Continued from B1 The money was spent on a $3.4 million house in Beverly Hills; a garage full of cars, including a Ferrari, a Rolls-Royce, a Bentley, two Porsches and two MercedesBenzes; and other luxuries. At the FTC’s request, a federal district court judge in Chicago froze the assets of American Tax Relief and its owners Sept. 24 and appointed a receiver to manage the company. The judge also approved a temporary restraining order prohibiting the company and its owners — Alexander Seung Hahn, who is on probation for an earlier marketing fraud case, and his wife, Joo Hyun Park, from making deceptive claims. The FTC does not have criminal jurisdiction or the ability to assess fines. “Everyone has seen these commercials and wondered, ‘Can I really get away with paying

the IRS only a fraction of what I owe?’ ” said C. Steven Baker, director of the FTC’s Midwest regional office, during an interview. “The short answer is no.” Of the 20,000 clients that the FTC says it believes American Tax Relief signed up, “we have not been able to find a single one” that the company helped to reduce a tax burden, said David Vladek, the chief of the commission’s division of consumer protection. Hahn and Park could not be reached for comment. Charles Kreindler, a Los Angeles lawyer who represents the company, said in a statement that it intended to fight the FTC action, which “focused on a small handful of complaints and ignored the thousands of consumers who have been helped.” Baker said that companies like American Tax Relief had created a widespread misimpression that anyone with an outstanding tax debt could settle with the IRS for less than they owed.

man for Verizon Wireless, declined to comment on the proposal. The CTIA, the wireless industry association, has resisted the idea, saying it will cause “customer confusion and frustration” and that carriers already offer customers ways to control their usage. Subscribers can check their usage with online monitors or via text message. “We have several measures in place that allow our customers

to monitor their usage and protect against overages — this is a proactive approach on Verizon’s part,” Verizon’s Smith said in an emailed statement. AT&T, the second- largest wireless carrier, and Sprint Nextel, the No. 3, deferred to the CTIA’s statement on billing practices. One in six U.S. mobile-phone customers has faced unexpected monthly fees, according to a survey released in May by the FCC.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Default Continued from B1 But the number filed monthly has stayed above that figure for 22 straight months, according to Clerk’s Office records. Exacerbating the problem: some of the state’s highest unemployment, which has made it difficult for homeowners to pay their mortgages, many of which financed properties purchased at prices far higher than they’re worth today. The median sales price of single-family homes in Bend in August was almost 56 percent below the peak in May 2007, according to the latest data from Bend’s Bratton Appraisal Group. Still, one foreclosure expert sees a trend. “It’s flattening out,” said John Helmick, CEO of Eugene-based Gorilla Capital, which sells foreclosed properties bought at auction and operates in four states. “I really think we’re seeing a leveling off. “That’s the first step to going down. But before it goes down, it’s got to even out.” Last year, 3,507 notices of default were filed in Deschutes County, according to the Clerk’s Office, an 82 percent increase over the number filed in 2008.

the title insurance company may turn around and sue the lender, Cooper said. With nonjudicial foreclosure, however, if a lender sells a foreclosed home, the new buyer wouldn’t be required to give it back — even if there were errors in the foreclosure process, Ambrose said. Based on current law, the foreclosed homeowner may only be able to file a damages claim, he said. “That’s why it is important, if someone does see an error, it’s important to step up and try to correct it,” he said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

A notice of default is the legal document that starts the foreclosure process. It’s generally filed by a lender after a borrower’s mortgage is 90 days delinquent. Not all notices of default end up in foreclosure, and Deschutes County does not track actual foreclosures. Helmick believes it will be a couple of years before default filings fall to 2007 levels. Deschutes County recorded 589 notices of default in 2007, Clerk’s Office records show. Nationally, the number of properties in the U.S. receiving default notices in August dipped 1 percent from July and 30 percent from August 2009, according to RealtyTrac, a website that tracks foreclosure trends and properties. One in every 381 housing units in the nation received a foreclosure filing in August, RealtyTrac reported. For Oregon, the website reported 1 in 397 properties received foreclosure notices in August, the latest information posted. And in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, it listed ratios of 1 in 160, 175 and 169 housing units, respectively. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Homesites starting at just

$33,000 IronHorse is developed by Brooks Resources, Corp.

www.educate.com

541-389-9252

5 4 1 .3 8 2 .5 8 8 2 www.partnersbend.org

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

new owner can’t take posession. That means the home would sit vacant and be marked as a real estate-owned property on the bank’s balance sheet. The grace period gives the former homeowner a chance to come up with the money the new owner paid. If the original owner does do that, he or she can keep the home, Ambrose said. That could potentially place the lender or its trustee — a third party hired to validate the foreclosure documents — in a vulnerable position if the new buyer has title insurance on the new home, Cooper said. If the new buyer has to return the home because of faulty foreclosure documents and files a title insurance claim,

541-388-4418

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

www.IronHorsePrineville.com REALTOR

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10 14 89 29 54 ... ... 29 23 58 17 11 34 12 ... ... 20 ... 15 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 48.75 21.22 13.39 15.78 68.58 .58 33.21 59.00 65.41 7.00 24.99 40.74 12.44 19.31 8.33 21.22 5.00 7.68 20.46 10.70 24.43

-.11 -.12 -.17 +.02 -.02 +.03 +.52 -.07 +.75 -.22 -.29 -.07 +.03 +.16 -.13 -.15 -.15 +.11 -.05 -.22 +.08

Name

+41.1 -1.7 -11.1 +28.4 +26.7 -14.7 +20.8 +51.1 +10.5 +191.7 -23.6 -20.9 -6.5 -5.3 +50.1 +3.4 +85.2 +10.0 -13.3 +21.2 -19.8

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1347.00 $1346.40 $23.020

Pvs Day $1341.00 $1338.90 $22.714

Div

PE

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 16 17 24 78 ... 36 20 ... 23 18 9 24 22 ... 16 85 10 ... ...

Market recap 81.31 37.54 49.49 13.64 49.16 2.32 36.12 131.03 21.32 49.14 74.00 39.24 26.10 9.59 11.01 22.41 15.22 26.30 2.52 16.06

+.01 -.23 -.12 -.05 -.49 +.20 -.03 -.28 +.02 +.19 -.72 -.20 -.15 +.13 +.07 +.07 +.05 +.05 +.03 -.07

+23.1 -.1 +9.9 +7.5 +35.5 -17.4 -4.3 +18.7 +.1 +3.0 +20.0 -1.9 +13.2 +59.8 -17.9 -.4 -21.3 -2.6 +20.0 +1.4

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF FordM GenElec

4519241 1456568 1377294 907024 724559

Last Chg 4.10 13.39 116.03 13.24 16.90

-.03 -.17 -.01 +.23 +.39

Gainers ($2 or more) Name XinyuanRE McCorm vot FlagstB rs Navistr pfD MizuhoFn

Last

Chg %Chg

3.01 +.43 +16.7 48.00 +6.41 +15.4 2.57 +.24 +10.3 14.50 +1.14 +8.5 3.04 +.23 +8.2

Losers ($2 or more) Name WilmTr Rackspace NetSuite GMX Rs IntraLks n

Last 7.71 23.29 21.46 4.39 15.32

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name VirnetX NthgtM g Taseko NovaGld g GoldStr g

Last Chg

117109 15.99 -2.56 59290 2.98 +.03 46075 6.01 +.36 36391 9.54 +.36 32041 5.19 +.08

Gainers ($2 or more) Last

AlexcoR g NewConcEn DGSE CoreMold HeraldNB

6.10 +1.30 +27.1 3.18 +.53 +20.0 4.39 +.45 +11.3 5.20 +.37 +7.7 2.40 +.15 +6.7

Name

-11.7 -11.1 -10.2 -10.0 -9.6

VirnetX RareEle g LGL Grp Sifco Kemet

1,424 1,583 129 3,136 229 8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Intel Cisco Oracle

758774 707740 534794 521576 490783

Last Chg 1.27 49.23 19.31 22.30 27.58

-.01 -.43 +.16 +.32 +.28

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -1.02 -2.92 -2.43 -.49 -1.63

Nasdaq

Name

Last

MonroeBc TlCmSys CadenceFn Spire h BioFuelEn

Chg %Chg

11.25 +5.87 +109.1 4.89 +1.16 +31.1 2.54 +.46 +22.1 5.10 +.90 +21.4 2.83 +.43 +17.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

15.99 -2.56 -13.8 7.63 -.75 -8.9 24.00 -1.65 -6.4 12.43 -.82 -6.2 3.04 -.19 -5.9

Name

Last

Equinix CitrixSys HercOffsh F5 Netwks AmSvFn pf

Diary

Chg %Chg

70.34 -34.75 60.15 -9.85 2.25 -.35 97.54 -13.96 22.50 -2.73

-33.1 -14.1 -13.5 -12.5 -10.8

Diary 260 221 36 517 23 1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,090 1,541 136 2,767 125 19

11,258.01 9,481.09 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,107.44 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,967.65 4,583.57 401.62 7,448.33 2,058.11 2,380.66 1,159.97 12,200.14 685.33

+22.93 +7.10 -1.40 +14.15 -1.32 -19.17 -.78 -22.89 -4.02

YTD %Chg %Chg +.21 +.16 -.35 +.19 -.06 -.80 -.07 -.19 -.58

52-wk %Chg

+5.17 +11.80 +.91 +3.67 +12.78 +4.91 +4.02 +5.64 +9.58

+12.77 +21.13 +7.45 +7.75 +15.20 +12.81 +9.68 +11.43 +13.83

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

336.97 2,613.44 3,764.91 5,681.39 6,270.73 22,880.41 34,370.64 20,568.31 3,235.04 9,691.43 1,903.95 3,190.07 4,738.00 5,640.84

+.58 s +.67 s +.88 s +.81 s +.88 s +1.07 s +.33 s +.28 s +.52 s +1.81 s +1.33 s +.88 s +1.66 s +.60 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9771 1.5896 .9902 .002075 .1494 1.3935 .1289 .012058 .080040 .0335 .000890 .1491 1.0408 .0324

.9716 1.5901 .9843 .002070 .1494 1.3850 .1289 .012021 .079904 .0333 .000891 .1493 1.0351 .0322

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.36 +0.02 +5.7 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.87 +7.0 GrowthI 23.31 -0.10 +5.8 Ultra 20.43 -0.07 +4.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.14 -0.01 +3.8 AMutlA p 24.04 +0.03 +5.8 BalA p 17.12 +0.03 +7.4 BondA p 12.53 +0.03 +9.3 CapWA p 21.32 +0.11 +9.1 CapIBA p 49.66 +0.17 +6.6 CapWGA p 34.91 +0.17 +4.7 EupacA p 40.71 +0.32 +6.2 FdInvA p 34.12 +0.05 +5.4 GovtA p 14.78 +0.04 +7.8 GwthA p 28.30 +0.02 +3.5 HI TrA p 11.22 +0.02 +11.9 IncoA p 16.25 +0.04 +8.3 IntBdA p 13.70 +0.02 +6.3 ICAA p 26.49 +0.06 +3.7 NEcoA p 23.86 +0.04 +6.1 N PerA p 27.12 +0.14 +5.8 NwWrldA 53.92 +0.19 +14.2 SmCpA p 36.52 +0.05 +15.8 TxExA p 12.47 +0.02 +6.7 WshA p 25.70 +0.01 +6.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.54 +0.21 +4.6 IntlEqA 28.78 +0.20 +4.4 IntEqII I r 12.23 +0.08 +3.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.15 +0.12 +2.4 MidCap 29.42 -0.58 +15.1 MidCapVal 18.98 -0.05 +5.6 Baron Funds: Growth 44.53 -0.50 +7.8 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.21 +0.04 +10.6 DivMu 14.71 +0.01 +4.6 TxMgdIntl 15.59 +0.14 +2.0 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.58 +0.06 +5.7 GlAlA r 18.84 +0.07 +5.6 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.58 +0.06 +5.0 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.62 +0.07 +5.9 GlbAlloc r 18.93 +0.07 +5.9 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.41 -0.57 +6.6 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.20 +0.01 +5.5 DivrBd 5.11 +0.02 +9.2 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.27 -0.24 +10.6 AcornIntZ 38.75 +0.20 +15.2 ValRestr 44.63 +0.13 +5.4 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.70 +0.10 +7.5 USCorEq2 9.84 -0.03 +8.7 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.96 +0.10 +3.2 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.34 +0.10 +3.4 NYVen C 30.75 +0.09 +2.6 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.78 +0.04 +9.0 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.31 +0.07 +18.3 EmMktV 36.20 +0.11 +16.3 IntSmVa 16.05 +0.13 +7.5 LargeCo 9.16 +5.7 USLgVa 18.25 -0.01 +8.4 US SmVa 21.94 -0.05 +11.9 IntlSmCo 15.93 +0.13 +13.4 Fixd 10.38 +1.2 IntVa 17.72 +0.17 +6.0 Glb5FxInc 11.66 +0.02 +7.5 2YGlFxd 10.24 +0.01 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 65.97 -0.03 +4.9 Income 13.43 +0.03 +7.4 IntlStk 34.61 +0.24 +8.7 Stock 98.75 -0.13 +3.7 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.93 +0.03 +2.0

NatlMunInc 10.00 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.34 LgCapVal 16.98 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.66 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.96 FPACres 25.98 Fairholme 33.23 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.18 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.43 StrInA 12.93 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.63 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.26 FF2015 11.05 FF2020 13.31 FF2020K 12.71 FF2025 11.03 FF2030 13.12 FF2035 10.84 FF2040 7.56 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.07 AMgr50 14.81 Balanc 17.43 BlueChGr 40.21 Canada 53.83 CapAp 23.31 CpInc r 9.19 Contra 62.71 ContraK 62.75 DisEq 21.24 DivIntl 29.15 DivrsIntK r 29.17 DivGth 25.33 EmrMk 25.53 Eq Inc 40.84 EQII 16.86 Fidel 29.06 FltRateHi r 9.68

+0.01 +9.3 +4.3 +0.03 +2.2 +0.03 +3.7 +0.01 +3.0 +0.06 +6.2 +0.03 +10.4 -0.01 +11.2 -0.14 +7.1 +0.05 +10.1 -0.14 +7.3 +0.02 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 +0.01 +0.01

+6.7 +6.7 +6.8 +6.9 +6.8 +6.6 +6.3 +6.3

-0.01 +5.5 +0.03 +8.4 +0.01 +7.6 -0.29 +6.0 +0.34 +11.0 +0.01 +8.8 +0.03 +11.5 -0.45 +7.8 -0.45 +7.9 +0.06 +1.1 +0.25 +4.1 +0.25 +4.3 -0.01 +7.6 +0.08 +12.9 +0.07 +5.6 +0.04 +4.4 -0.04 +3.1 +0.01 +5.3

GNMA 11.70 GovtInc 10.83 GroCo 74.27 GroInc 16.53 GrowthCoK 74.32 HighInc r 8.91 Indepn 21.45 IntBd 10.82 IntmMu 10.41 IntlDisc 31.85 InvGrBd 12.01 InvGB 7.52 LgCapVal 11.60 LatAm 56.64 LevCoStk 24.35 LowP r 35.04 LowPriK r 35.03 Magelln 65.57 MidCap 25.39 MuniInc 12.92 NwMkt r 16.40 OTC 48.29 100Index 8.22 Ovrsea 31.08 Puritn 17.03 SCmdtyStrt 11.03 SrsIntGrw 10.69 StIntMu 10.76 STBF 8.51 SmllCpS r 17.06 StratInc 11.53 StrReRt r 9.20 TotalBd 11.15 USBI 11.70 Value 62.55 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.92 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.09 IntlInxInv 34.80 TotMktInv 33.59 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.09 TotMktAd r 33.60

+0.03 +7.5 +0.02 +7.6 -1.19 +7.7 +3.4 -1.19 +7.8 +0.03 +10.9 -0.20 +7.7 +0.02 +9.4 +0.01 +5.2 +0.27 +4.9 +0.03 +9.0 +0.02 +9.6 +3.2 -0.27 +10.8 -0.05 +6.4 -0.06 +9.9 -0.06 +10.1 -0.12 +2.1 -0.21 +8.7 +0.02 +7.0 +0.04 +13.7 -0.75 +5.6 +0.01 +3.7 +0.38 +0.5 +7.2 +0.04 +1.2 +0.07 +9.6 +2.9 +4.0 -0.13 +7.0 +0.04 +10.3 +0.03 +8.6 +0.04 +9.6 +0.03 +8.3 -0.11 +9.9 +0.88 +29.4 -0.01 +5.6 +0.36 +4.1 -0.05 +6.8 -0.01 +5.6 -0.04 +6.8

First Eagle: GlblA 43.98 +0.31 +10.0 OverseasA 21.86 +0.21 +12.3 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.08 +0.01 +6.4 FoundAl p 10.18 +0.04 +5.4 HYTFA p 10.37 +0.01 +9.3 IncomA p 2.13 +0.01 +9.1 USGovA p 6.82 +0.01 +6.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.2 IncmeAd 2.12 +0.01 +9.3 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.15 +0.01 +8.5 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.74 +0.02 +4.6 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.78 +0.06 +3.5 GlBd A p 13.79 +0.03 +12.0 GrwthA p 17.21 +0.10 +2.4 WorldA p 14.25 +0.05 +2.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.81 +0.02 +11.6 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.42 -0.01 +1.5 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.26 +0.05 +0.6 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.11 +0.07 +15.1 IntlCorEq 28.24 +0.26 +5.7 Quality 19.27 +0.05 +0.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.24 +0.02 +10.7 HYMuni 8.82 +0.01 +12.2 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.14 +0.03 +9.9 CapApInst 33.23 -0.32 +0.8 IntlInv t 57.56 +0.45 +5.8 Intl r 58.23 +0.45 +6.1 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.51 +0.04 +2.7 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.50 +0.05 +2.9 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.40 +0.01 +5.0

Div&Gr 18.44 +0.04 +5.2 Advisers 18.47 +0.03 +5.8 TotRetBd 11.46 +0.03 +8.8 HussmnStrGr 13.15 -0.05 +2.9 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.04 +0.1 CmstkA 14.45 +5.8 EqIncA 8.06 +0.01 +4.9 GrIncA p 17.60 +0.01 +2.9 HYMuA 9.64 +10.5 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.46 -0.04 +3.1 AssetStA p 23.11 -0.04 +3.7 AssetStrI r 23.31 -0.04 +3.9 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.73 +0.03 +8.5 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.72 +0.03 +8.6 HighYld 8.11 +0.02 +11.4 IntmTFBd 11.11 +0.02 +4.5 ShtDurBd 11.05 +3.2 USLCCrPls 18.94 -0.01 +4.2 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 48.83 +0.13 +14.9 PrkMCVal T 20.91 +5.6 Twenty T 61.46 -0.12 -0.2 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.53 +0.01 +7.9 LSGrwth 12.31 +7.5 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.49 +0.02 +8.4 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.57 +0.05 +20.2 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.91 +0.04 +19.9 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.05 +5.2 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.24 +0.09 +8.9 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.40 +0.07 +12.8 StrInc C 14.97 +0.07 +11.9 LSBondR 14.35 +0.08 +12.6 StrIncA 14.89 +0.07 +12.6 Loomis Sayles Inv:

InvGrBdY 12.67 +0.06 +12.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.48 +0.01 +3.2 BdDebA p 7.72 +0.02 +10.0 ShDurIncA p 4.67 +6.3 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.66 +0.04 +6.0 ValueA 21.38 +0.05 +4.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.47 +0.05 +4.1 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.88 +0.02 +10.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.55 +0.07 +5.9 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 18.16 +0.10 +16.5 PacTiger 23.46 +0.05 +22.0 MergerFd 15.93 +2.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.73 +0.03 +12.3 TotRtBdI 10.73 +0.03 +12.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.53 +0.12 +6.8 GlbDiscZ 28.91 +0.12 +7.0 QuestZ 17.91 +0.03 +4.0 SharesZ 19.93 +0.02 +4.8 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.65 -0.06 +7.7 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.16 -0.06 +7.4 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.25 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.36 +0.08 +3.2 Intl I r 18.64 +0.24 +10.7 Oakmark r 38.98 -0.03 +5.2 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.90 +0.02 +11.7 GlbSMdCap 14.47 +0.02 +13.3 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 39.91 -0.12 -0.1 DvMktA p 34.42 +0.04 +19.7 GlobA p 57.35 +0.04 +8.2 GblStrIncA 4.37 +0.02 +16.4 IntBdA p 6.93 +0.04 +11.7

MnStFdA 29.95 +0.01 +6.5 RisingDivA 14.37 +0.03 +4.3 S&MdCpVl 28.67 -0.07 +7.9 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.05 +0.03 +3.7 S&MdCpVl 24.64 -0.06 +7.2 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.00 +0.03 +3.7 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.32 +0.01 +9.8 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.11 +0.04 +20.0 IntlBdY 6.93 +0.05 +12.0 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.68 +0.04 +10.5 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.25 +0.05 +12.8 AllAsset 12.63 +0.06 +13.7 ComodRR 8.40 +0.07 +9.9 HiYld 9.32 +0.03 +12.5 InvGrCp 11.98 +0.06 +14.3 LowDu 10.68 +0.02 +5.3 RealRtnI 11.78 +0.12 +11.1 ShortT 9.94 +0.01 +2.0 TotRt 11.68 +0.04 +10.7 TR II 11.26 +0.04 +9.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.68 +0.02 +5.0 RealRtA p 11.78 +0.12 +10.7 TotRtA 11.68 +0.04 +10.3 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.68 +0.04 +9.7 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.68 +0.04 +10.4 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.68 +0.04 +10.6 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 43.66 +0.13 +12.9 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.19 -0.01 +4.8 Price Funds: BlChip 34.49 -0.22 +5.2 CapApp 19.28 +0.02 +6.2 EmMktS 34.48 +0.06 +14.6 EqInc 21.83 +5.6

EqIndex 31.27 Growth 29.17 HlthSci 27.92 HiYield 6.76 IntlBond 10.52 IntlStk 13.86 MidCap 53.67 MCapVal 22.01 N Asia 19.63 New Era 45.36 N Horiz 29.36 N Inc 9.79 R2010 15.04 R2015 11.51 R2020 15.75 R2025 11.44 R2030 16.29 R2040 16.30 ShtBd 4.89 SmCpStk 30.86 SmCapVal 32.31 SpecIn 12.45 Value 21.68 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.46 VoyA p 21.59 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.33 PremierI r 18.07 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.00 S&P Sel 18.32 Scout Funds: Intl 31.17 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.69 AmShS p 38.63 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.01 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.09 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.69 IntValue I 27.27 Tweedy Browne:

+5.4 -0.21 +6.0 -0.14 +6.7 +0.01 +11.6 +0.08 +8.6 +0.10 +10.0 -0.51 +13.0 -0.05 +6.2 +0.07 +21.6 +0.31 +4.0 -0.32 +14.8 +0.03 +8.7 +0.01 +7.8 +0.01 +7.9 +7.9 +7.8 -0.01 +7.7 -0.01 +7.6 +3.4 -0.13 +14.6 -0.11 +9.6 +0.03 +9.0 +0.02 +5.9 +0.01 +4.6 -0.06 +9.4 -0.03 +9.3 -0.05 +10.8 -0.03 +6.1 +5.7 +0.13 +7.9 +0.13 +3.9 +0.13 +3.6 +0.18 +4.0 +0.22 +8.1 +0.21 +8.3 +0.22 +8.6

GblValue 22.76 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.24 CpOpAdl 68.53 EMAdmr r 38.83 Energy 111.97 500Adml 106.85 GNMA Ad 11.06 HlthCr 51.48 HiYldCp 5.74 InfProAd 26.58 ITsryAdml 12.03 IntGrAdm 59.64 ITAdml 13.86 ITGrAdm 10.46 LtdTrAd 11.15 LTGrAdml 9.91 LT Adml 11.30 MuHYAdm 10.71 PrmCap r 63.34 STsyAdml 10.92 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.89 TtlBAdml 10.93 TStkAdm 28.86 WellslAdm 52.86 WelltnAdm 51.97 Windsor 41.48 WdsrIIAd 42.61 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.48 CapOpp 29.66 DivdGro 13.66 Energy 59.61 EqInc 19.17 Explr 64.03 GNMA 11.06 GlobEq 17.13 HYCorp 5.74 HlthCre 121.94 InflaPro 13.53 IntlGr 18.73 IntlVal 31.80 ITIGrade 10.46

+0.05 +7.4 +0.01 +6.8 -0.66 -1.2 +0.08 +14.0 +0.76 -0.1 -0.02 +5.6 +0.02 +7.1 -0.12 +2.5 +0.02 +11.4 +0.26 +9.2 +0.04 +11.3 +0.20 +10.4 +0.02 +5.8 +0.04 +13.3 +0.01 +2.9 +0.09 +16.0 +0.01 +6.4 +0.01 +7.7 -0.19 +2.7 +3.4 +1.3 +0.01 +5.6 +0.03 +8.5 -0.04 +6.6 +0.17 +10.2 +0.17 +6.7 +0.01 +3.9 +0.09 +2.5 +0.05 +10.0 -0.29 -1.3 +0.01 +4.8 +0.40 -0.1 +0.04 +7.3 -0.48 +11.7 +0.02 +7.0 +0.06 +9.3 +0.02 +11.3 -0.29 +2.5 +0.13 +9.1 +0.06 +10.2 +0.29 +3.9 +0.04 +13.2

LifeCon 16.08 LifeGro 20.97 LifeMod 19.02 LTIGrade 9.91 Morg 16.13 MuInt 13.86 MuLtd 11.15 PrecMtls r 24.53 PrmcpCor 12.65 Prmcp r 61.02 SelValu r 17.29 STAR 18.54 STIGrade 10.89 StratEq 16.48 TgtRetInc 11.26 TgRe2010 22.15 TgtRe2015 12.19 TgRe2020 21.46 TgtRe2025 12.15 TgRe2030 20.69 TgtRe2035 12.43 TgtRe2040 20.37 TgtRe2045 12.86 USGro 16.43 Wellsly 21.82 Welltn 30.09 Wndsr 12.29 WndsII 24.01 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 106.85 Balanced 20.44 EMkt 29.49 Europe 26.77 Extend 36.41 Growth 28.61 ITBnd 11.82 MidCap 18.23 Pacific 10.44 REIT r 17.74 SmCap 30.71 SmlCpGth 18.91 SmlCpVl 14.51 STBnd 10.73 TotBnd 10.93

+0.03 +8.2 +0.03 +7.9 +0.04 +8.4 +0.09 +15.9 -0.14 +5.6 +0.02 +5.8 +0.01 +2.8 +0.54 +20.1 -0.05 +4.5 -0.19 +2.7 -0.05 +8.4 +0.03 +6.8 +0.01 +5.5 -0.09 +7.9 +0.03 +8.0 +0.05 +7.9 +0.02 +7.8 +0.02 +7.5 +0.01 +7.3 +0.02 +7.1 +0.01 +7.0 +0.02 +6.9 +0.01 +7.0 -0.07 -0.2 +0.07 +10.1 +0.10 +6.6 +3.9 +0.05 +2.5

TotlIntl

15.39 +0.12 +6.8

TotStk

28.85 -0.04 +6.5

Value

19.39 +0.02 +5.9

-0.01 +5.6 +0.01 +7.5 +0.05 +13.9 +0.28 +3.2 -0.24 +11.5 -0.07 +5.6 +0.05 +13.7 -0.14 +11.4 +0.10 +7.9 -0.10 +22.6 -0.18 +11.7 -0.17 +12.4 -0.03 +11.1 +4.8 +0.03 +8.4

STBdIdx

10.73

TotBdSgl

10.93 +0.03 +8.5

TotStkSgl

27.86 -0.03 +6.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

9.91 +0.10

NS

EmMkInst

29.56 +0.06 +14.0

ExtIn

36.47 -0.23 +11.6

FTAllWldI r

92.01 +0.70 +7.4

GrwthIst

28.61 -0.08 +5.7

InfProInst

10.83 +0.11 +9.2

InstIdx

106.15 -0.02 +5.6

InsPl

106.16 -0.01 +5.7

InsTStPlus

26.09 -0.03 +6.6

MidCpIst

18.30 -0.14 +11.6

SCInst

30.76 -0.18 +11.9

TBIst

10.93 +0.03 +8.5

TSInst

28.86 -0.04 +6.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

88.27 -0.01 +5.7 +4.9

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.52 +0.05 +4.4

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.00 +0.03 +12.7


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. TOWN HALL/TALK OF THE TOWN BREAKFAST : District 54 Candidate Forum presented by the Bend Chamber in partnership with COTV. Representative Judy Stiegler, Jason Conger and Michael Kozak will speak, moderated by Dave Jones. RSVP by Oct. 6 to receive lower pricing; $25 per person, $35 at the door; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3827437 or www.bendchamber.org. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/. IMPLEMENTING LEAN OFFICE, FALL SESSION: Lean Office is a work-improvement methodology focused on eliminating waste, reducing costs and improving efficiency. Webinar continues through Nov. 22; $149; 9 a.m.; www.simplicated.com. INDIVIDUAL TAXES: Study for the Enrolled Agent IRS exams in courses offered by COCC’s Continuing Education Department. Registration required. 541-383-7270. Class continues Nov. 11 and 12; $480 plus $145 for required text available at first class; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:309 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

MANAGING TO WIN!: Michael Canic, a Vistage speaker and president of Bridgeway Leadership, will speak about alignment within organizations and why it it critical to achieving results. Presentation includes buffet breakfast at 7:30; $59; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by High Desert Vision Source; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-2221. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Class covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Successful completion earns an ODOT credential for flaggers, valid for three years in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WORDPRESS BASICS: Learn the basics of small site building and blogging using WordPress, including the difference between a post and a page, how to upload images and how to write for the Web; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. GOOGLE WEBMASTER TOOLS: Learn about the free Google tools available to webmasters. Manage and report on incoming links, page visibility, XML sitemaps and redirects; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704. THE FRESH WEB: A brief review of Web news for the week ending Oct. 8; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

MONDAY MS OFFICE FOR MAC: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department, this three-evening class will teach participants to operate Microsoft Office on the Macintosh operating system. Registration required; $69;

6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com. SECOND IN A SERIES, DEMYSTIFYING HEDGE FUNDS: Learn to better understand how hedge funds produce returns independent of stocks and bonds. Space is limited, please RSVP; free; 4 p.m.; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, 705 S.W. Bonnett Way, Suite 1200, Bend; 541617-6038 or http://fa.smithbarney. com/payne_wettig. 20/20 VISION, STOCK INVESTMENT STRATEGIES FOR THE DECADE AHEAD: Learn why it may be appropriate to focus on the long term and why equities are worth considering for your portfolio. Presented by Jake Paltzer of LPL Financial. RSVP by Oct. 8; free; 5-7 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3893624 or jake@jakepaltzer.com. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WEB DESIGN WRITING THAT SELLS: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about financial planning, managing income and spending, tracking expenses and creating a spending plan. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend;

541-318-7506 ext. 109. BUYING OR SELLING YOUR OWN BUSINESS: Compass Commercial business brokers Peter May and Robert Raimondi discuss tips for successful business buying, selling and investing; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST COURSE: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning department, this four-session course will prepare participants for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam 70-680. Required text and test fee not included. Registration required; $259; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BEND, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RECESSION: John Fregonese will explore what to expect in the future of Bend’s economy and environment with emphasis given to current controversies such as the Urban Growth Boundary proposal; $8; 7-9 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-8153951, mariefayandre@yahoo.com or www.buildingabetterbend.org.

THURSDAY Oct. 14 HOW HEALTH CARE REFORM MAY IMPACT YOUR BUSINESS: Hosted by Opportunity Knocks and Economic Development for Central Oregon (EDCO). Presenters will include Todd Gerdes, owner of Gerdes Dodge LLC; Patrick O’Keefe, owner of Cascade Insurance Center; and Richard MacDonell, owner of MyMD personal medicine clinic; $20 for a single event ticket or free with purchase of Bend Venture Conference ticket; 1-2:30 p.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend; 541-318-4650 or info@oppknocks.org. HOLIDAY PROMOTIONALS SHOWCASE: Learn to harness the power of promotional products to benefit your business. Co-hosted by industry professionals representing some of the biggest names in apparel and promotional products such as BIC, Callaway Golf, Cutter & Buck, Jones Soda, Nike and more. Hors

d’oeuvres and refreshments will be served. Call 541-382-3534 to register or for more information; 4-7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541389-7275. 2010 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS: The Environmental Center will honor individuals, businesses and organizations who push the envelope of sustainability in Central Oregon. Nominations for the awards will be accepted Sept. 1-22. Registration requested to info@envirocenter.org or 541-385-6908; $15; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. BEND CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Maximize your networking at the last YPN meeting of the year; $5 for members ($10 at the door) and $12 for nonmembers ($15 at the door); 57 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-0700. GREEN PATHWAYS, HEATING AND COOLING WITH COMMON CENTS: Randall Marchington and Scott Zettle of Bend Heating will discuss energy efficiency and incentives available in the HVAC industry. Refreshments provided; free; 5-6 p.m.; Neil Kelly , 190 N.E. Irving Ave., Bend; 541-382-7580 or http:// www.greensaversusa.com. “EFFICIENT HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www. buildinggreencouncil.org. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:309 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY Oct. 15 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; American Legion Post #44, 708 S.W. Eighth St.; 541-548-2551.

Monsanto income drops by nearly half By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

Executives of Monsanto told skittish investors Wednesday that earnings per share would grow 13 percent to 17 percent in the next fiscal year and that the company was on its way to fixing problems in its seed business that have undermined the confidence of Wall Street. The remarks, in line with some previous assurances by company executives, were made as Monsanto reported that net income for the year that ended Aug. 31 had dropped by nearly half from a year earlier. “I believe we’ve taken steps to allow our company to return to growth,” Hugh Grant, the chief executive, told analysts and investors on a conference call. He said the seed business was going to offer “more products at more price points” to help regain the trust of farmers who have been put off by high seed prices and lowerthan-expected yields for some products. Company shares, which have lost about 40 percent of their value this year, rose 5 percent in early trading Wednesday but then settled back down. At midday, shares were 2.6 percent higher. Monsanto, the world’s biggest seed company and the leading developer of genetically engineered crops, said that net income for the year plunged to $1.1 billion from $2.1 billion a year earlier.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Joyce E. Coats, co-trustee, 1538 N.W. Newport Ave., $127,000 Solaire Homes Inc., 2427 N.W. High Lakes Loop, $207,493 Bend Equity Group LLC, 1103 N.E. Bennington Way, $136,886 West Bend Property Company LLC, 740 N.W. Mt. Washington Drive, $121,395 International Church of

Foursquare, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, $2,673,000 Kim D. Ward LLC, 1239 N.E. Medical Center Drive, $118,815 Deschutes County

Tetherow Glen 58 LLC, 61465 Dryer Court, Bend, $385,188.84 David J. Long, 56624 Raven Rock Circle, Bend, $575,320.56 Bank of America NA, 56905 Dancing Rock Loop, Bend, $239,847.21 Rex K. Daines, 63045 Stag Drive, Bend, $778,571.53

Geithner tries to stoke international pressure on China over currency By Howard Schneider The Washington Post

The Obama administration is trying to escalate international pressure on China to change how it manages its currency, casting a global focus on what U.S. officials say has become a major risk to the economic recovery. Calling the currency issue the “central existential challenge” facing the world economy, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner acknowledged that the administration’s effort to settle the one-on-one spat through quiet diplomacy had failed and marked a new phase in the struggle with Chinese officials. China’s policy of keeping the yuan cheap on world markets “sets off a dangerous dynamic” that encourages other countries to follow suit and risks touching off a destructive, tit-for-tat competition for jobs and trade, Geithner said in remarks at the Brookings Institution. “It’s unfair to countries that were already running more flexible regimes and let their currencies appreciate,” he said. In seeking to muster a broader coalition, Geithner issued an ultimatum to the International Monetary Fund: take a more aggressive stand on China’s currency or potentially lose U.S. backing for a series of efforts pending at the agency. The IMF is debating changes in how it is governed to give greater

influence to developing nations in Asia and elsewhere, but Geithner said these steps should be tied to these countries, in particular China, allowing their currencies to more closely adhere to free-market levels. “That’s the deal on the table,” Geithner said in his comments, delivered on the eve of the IMF’s annual meeting. His remarks come as concerns grow that China’s currency management may prompt other countries to keep their currencies cheap so their exports remain relatively affordable. The Brazilian finance minister, for one, warned last month of a developing “currency war.” Capital has been pouring into emerging markets such as Brazil, India and China, and analysts talk in terms of a strategic shift in world investment patterns. These analysts say money is moving away from the slower-growing developed countries and toward emerging markets that are producing better returns and have increasingly sound economic institutions and governments. It is a change some regard as a defining shift in the global economy. No one, including Geithner, advocates a quick, dramatic rise in the renminbi of a sort that would disrupt China’s important manufacturing sector. But pressure for some significant change seems to be growing.

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Central Oregon’s BIGGEST On-line Auction Event Is Coming November 7th Watch For More Details Coming Soon!

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L

Inside

C

OREGON Forest Service opts for scaled-back logging plan, see Page C3. Bear killed after attempting to invade home a third time, see Page C6.

OBITUARIES British funnyman Norman Wisdom dies at 95, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010

Measure A GOOD REASON would Board launches TO TAKE A RIDE allow online private survey on casino Mikalson REDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

Community asked for its input before superintendent’s 1-year contract is up

Voters to decide if state should permit gaming center to be built at old dog track near Portland

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

The Redmond School Board wants to know how you feel about the job Superintendent Shay Mikalson has done in his roughly four months on the job. The board recently wrote and launched an anonymous threequestion survey on the district’s website. If it seems quick to pass judgment on a superintendent, the board feels rushed by the timeline a search for a replacement Shay demands. Mikalson Mikalson was hired in the spring with a one-year contract, and if the board decides to replace him, its members want to begin the search in November. The board’s urgency dates back to its search for someone to replace Vickie Fleming, who resigned in January. Beginning the search in January is late and limited the pool of external candidates, the district said. The board rejected all 15 applications from external candidates and eventually hired Mikalson, then the principal at the district’s Obsidian Middle School.

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A six-year push by two Lake Oswego men looking to build a privately owned casino in Multnomah County may be resolved by voters next month. Measure 75 would authorize the state to allow the construction of a casino at an abandoned dog racing track in Wood Village, a small community east of Portland. The backers of the casino plan, Bruce Studer and Matt Rossman, have attempted to bring the issue before voters twice before. In 2006 they met legal challenges from opponents that slowed their signature-gathering efforts, and in 2008, they declined to collect signatures after filing a prospective initiative petition with the Secretary of State’s Office. Casinos are banned under the Oregon Constitution, and a separate constitutional amendment would be required to allow the Wood Village project to move forward. The state’s existing nine casinos are operated by tribes on their tribal reservations, where state law does not apply. If approved, the Multnomah casino would operate under a renewable 15-year lease from the state Lottery Commission, and would return 25 percent of gaming profits to the state. Estimates project the state’s share of profits during the casino’s first year of operation at between $83 million and $147 million. See Casino / C2

ELECTION

Judge dismisses employees’ suit against Bend firm

Board may extend Mikalson’s contract Despite the call for input, the board is pleased with Mikalson and is considering extending his contract, according to board Chairman Jim Erickson. The survey is a chance to reach out to the community, he said. “(The survey) isn’t there because we’re looking for some kind of problem,” Erickson said. “It’s there so folks across the district … feel we are interested in their input. And we are interested in their input.” Though districts often use anonymous surveys to check on issues, polling the public for a superintendent evaluation is uncommon, according to American Association of School Administrators spokeswoman Kitty Porterfield. “It is always helpful for a school board to stay in touch with the community, to check that the work of the school board and staff are serving (the community’s) needs,” Porterfield said. “I think it’s a little more unusual to be quite so focused on one thing.”

3-question survey The survey includes three questions. The first asks for “strengths in Superintendent Mikalson’s leadership.” Next, the board queries the respondents for any “concerns” with Mikalson’s work. See Survey / C2

Correction In an story headlined “Second black bear found in Bend,” which appeared on Wednesday, Oct. 6, on Page C1, Phil Pohl’s name was spelled incorrectly. The Bulletin regrets the error.

By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Highland Elementary School fourth-grader Trinity Falls, 9, foreground, rides her bicycle across the Drake Park footbridge with her fellow students, who were all riding to school during the International Walk and Bike to School day, in Bend on Wednesday morning. More than 100 students from Highland Elementary took part in the event by riding their bicycles, scooters and skateboards to school. Once at the school, each participating student received a goody bag containing a water bottle, an energy bar and a variety of coupons, all donated by area businesses. Sixteen Central Oregon schools participated in the Walk and Bike to School Day, which is promoted locally by Commute Options. The next International Walk and Bike to School Day will be held on the first Wednesday of October 2011. Many of the 16 area schools that participated in this event invite students to take part in monthly Ride to School days. The last week of each June, Commute Options holds a Commuter Challenge. Businesses can win prizes and gift certificates by excelling in the challenge. To compete, employees of participating businesses walk, bike, carpool, telecommute or use public transportation. Commute Options offers year-round program incentives for regional businesses and schools that explore more environmentally friendly modes of transportation.

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit against a Bend customer service company filed by two employees claiming it violated an employment agreement. Pamela Castaneda and Pamela McCauley filed suit earlier this year saying TRG Customer Solutions fired them from positions at its Bendbased call center in 2008 for disclosing confidential personnel information. TRG representatives have declined to comment on the case. But court documents show the company argued the women had no employment contract and their firing was within the company’s discretion as an at-will employer, meaning it can fire employees at any time and without cause under Oregon law. See Lawsuit / C2

Airport’s solar power tracked on new website By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

On the Web

You can now monitor how much energy the Redmond Airport’s solar panels are generating by visiting a new website that tracks the panels’ performance. Since Aug. 25, for instance, the panels have generated enough energy to run 48 60watt light bulbs for a year each. The panels cost about $550,000. The airport only had

To check the solar panels’ performance, visit www.ci.redmond.or.us and click on “Airport Solar Panels Information.” to pay about $27,500 because federal and private grants covered the bulk of the total cost, according to airport Manager Carrie Novick.

The panels will provide up to 10 percent of the recently expanded airport’s power, Novick said. That, however, comes at a time when the airport has become more efficient, she said. The $40 million expansion increased the terminal’s size from 23,000 square feet to 140,000 square feet, but the building’s power needs increase by about 21⁄2 times, Novick said. “It’s clearly a much more efficient building,” Novick said.

A screen shot of a new website that tracks the performance of solar panels at Redmond Airport.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B  Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Open house slated to discuss surface water A public open house to discuss the city of Bend’s surface water improvement project will be held Tuesday, according to a news release. The event, which will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Bend Parks & Recreation District office, will help educate Bend residents about the city’s Bridge Creek surface water supply, along with future projects to comply with new federal regulations. Representatives from the city, the U.S. Forest Service, Deschutes County and Western Federal Lands will be present at the event to answer questions about the improvement project.

Deschutes library to be closed Oct. 18 The Deschutes Public Library system will close Oct. 18 due to staff training, according to a news release. Branches in Bend, La Pine,

Redmond, Sisters and Sunriver will be closed while staff members train. Bookmobile Services will also be closed. The libraries will reopen for normal hours on Oct. 19.

Gala to benefit Sisters Elementary A gala to benefit Sisters Elementary School will be held by the Sisters Parent-Teacher Community on Nov. 6, according to a news release. The 4th Annual Green and Gold Gala Auction, which will start at 6 p.m., will feature dinner, music, dancing and an auction. The event will be held at Brand 33 Restaurant at Aspen Lakes Golf Course, and tickets cost $25 in advance. Money raised from the event will go toward supporting programs at Sisters Elementary School, including art literacy, author assemblies, and Science Day. Tickets for the event can be purchased at Sisters Elementary School, Brand 33 Restaurant at Aspen Lakes or at Metamorphosis Day Spa in Sisters.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 6:01 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 1400 block of Northwest Albany Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:14 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 800 block of Northeast Watt Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:33 p.m. Oct. 5, in the 1500 block of Northeast Forbes Road. Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:15 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 2300 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:18 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 1700 block of Northwest Elm Court. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 8:06 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 1000 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:02 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 2700 block of Southwest Indian Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:01 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 2200 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:35 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 1800 block of Northwest Elm Court. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:53 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 2400 block of Southwest Canal Boulevard. DUII — Timothy Fowler, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:48 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Fifth Street.

Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:02 p.m. Oct. 5, in the area of Northeast Combs Flat Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 5:37 p.m. Oct. 5, in the area of Hinkle Butte and Panoramic drives in Cloverdale. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:54 p.m. Oct. 5, in the 51300 block of Anchor Way in La Pine. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:53 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 15600 block of Sparks Drive in La Pine.

Casino Continued from C1 Funds provided to the state would be widely distributed. Fifty percent would be dedicated to K-12 classroom instruction, and 30 percent would be shared among counties and the state’s 10 largest cities in proportion to their populations. Wood Village would get a 4 percent share, the adjoining communities of Fairview, Gresham and Troutdale would each receive a 3 percent share, and Multnomah County and the state’s Problem Gambling Treatment Fund would receive 2 percent each. Studer said the disbursement would provide both Deschutes County and the city of Bend approximately $974,000 in the first year of operation.

More than gambling While voter approval is key to the development of the casino, the complex would offer more than gambling. Plans released by the backers show indoor and outdoor water parks, restaurants, a hotel, a bowling alley and a 14screen movie theater. Studer said formal opposition to the proposal — which has primarily come from tribes involved in gaming — is based on the assumption that there are only so many gambling dollars to go around. The Wood Village casino would draw players from around the country, he said, and while it could have an impact on Oregon Lottery gaming at nearby businesses with video lottery machines, gaming in the greater Portland area is nowhere close to the saturation point. Spirit Mountain Casino and Lodge is the nearest tribal casino, located about 60

Survey

BEND FIRE RUNS

Continued from C1 The third question is open, requesting additional comments. The survey will remain online until 5 p.m. Friday. So far the district has received 180 responses, according to district spokeswom-

Tuesday 7:02 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 18540 Tumalo Reservoir Road. 16 — Medical aid calls.

Lawsuit

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-4477178 — or check the website at www.humanesocietyochocos. com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador Retriever — Adult female, yellow, pink camouflage collar; found near Northeast Seventh Street. Terrier — Adult male, white and beige; found near Southwest 21st Street and Southwest Quartz Avenue. Pit Bull — Female puppy, brown and white; found near Wal-Mart.

Continued from C1 Castaneda and McCauley claimed confidentiality agreements they signed, saying they would not disclose TRG’s confidential or proprietary information, was essentially an employment contract. The women’s lawyer, Marc Andersen, could not be reached for comment Wednesday. The suit against TRG said the women accessed a file with disciplinary information about an employee against whom McCauley had made a sexual harassment complaint — a file the women believed was available to all TRG employees. But the 2008 letter from TRG states the women did breach their agreement with the company by sharing confidential personnel information. The women claimed they were investigated and fired by the center’s operations manager, Greg Brown, a former Deschutes

Measure 75 A yes vote: Would allow for the development of a casino in Wood Village, provided a separate amendment to the Oregon constitution is approved. State and local governments would receive 25 percent of the casino’s gambling earnings. A no vote: Casinos would remain banned in Oregon, no impact on tribal casinos or the Oregon Lottery. Source: Oregon Secretary of State’s Office

miles away in Grand Ronde. “We’re going to be competition for them, they don’t want it, and I can’t say I blame them,� Studer said. The tribes that operate on-reservation casinos in Oregon do not pay a share of their revenues to the state. In statements prepared for the Voters’ Pamphlet, the Spirit Mountain Community Fund, a philanthropic effort operated by The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, claims to have donated $50 million to charities around the state in the last 10 years, while the Oregon Tribal Gaming Alliance claims Oregon tribes have given almost $100 million to Oregon charities during the same period. Not counting money paid out in prizes, 65 cents of every dollar taken in by Oregon Lottery video lottery machines goes to the state, with 22 cents going to the businesses that host the machines and the remaining 13 cents to administration and maintenance of the machines. Bill Perry of the Oregon Restaurant and Lodging Association, which opposes the amendment, said his clients don’t oppose com-

an Stephanie Curtis. “We’ll compile responses and give them to the board,� Curtis said. The board expects to decide on Mikalson’s future by its Oct. 13 meeting, according to Erickson. Board members, he said, do not want to wait so long that a search would be undermined.

County sheriff once imprisoned for embezzling more than a half million dollars from the county and a fire protection district between 1996 and 2000. When the women were fired, TRG wrote them a letter saying the files they accessed were confidential and that they violated their agreement with the company by sharing the personnel information. “Both Ms. Castaneda and Ms. McCauley admitted to these facts,� the letter reads. Last week, U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan issued a written decision that Castaneda and McCauley did not have a legitimate breach of contract claim. Hogan found the confidentiality agreement was not an employment contract because it did not state a duration of employment or under what circumstances the women could be fired. Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or cpowers@bendbulletin.com

“We’re going to be competition for them, they don’t want it, and I can’t say I blame them.� — Bruce Studer, backer of casino plan petition, but that the proposed amendment would give the casino an unfair competitive edge. Because it would be the only facility in the Portland area allowed to provide large-scale gambling, Perry said the casino operators would be able to use gambling proceeds to subsidize their theaters and bowling alleys and other features. “They’re going to undercut every form of entertainment,,� he said. “It’s going to be the only form of entertainment in town because nobody will be able to compete with them.�

‘It’s not fair’ Changing the law for the benefit of a single project is the wrong way to approach the question of expanded gambling in Oregon, Perry said. “If you want to have a discussion of whether we should repeal the casino ban, that’s a legitimate policy discussion, but all these guys have done is say, ‘We bought this property and we want a special exemption,’ � he said. “Just on its face, it’s not fair.� Studer and Rossman said if they are successful, there’s nothing to prevent another group interested in developing a casino from putting its proposal before voters. Construction of the casino would take about two years, cost at least $250 million, and employ up to 5,000 people, according to estimates by backers. The completed facility would employ more than 2,000 people, at an average of $35,000 per year. Studer said the completed fa-

“We will be ready to make a decision,� Erickson said.

Inform, not decide The survey results will not make up the entire evaluation, according to Erickson. The board has a set evaluation form with Mikalson. Rather, the responses

cility would help the Portland area compete for convention and trade show business, and would attract Portland-area residents who are not currently playing Oregon Lottery games or visiting tribal casinos. “Casino gaming is distinctly different than gaming in a little room off a tavern,� Studer said. “One is convenience gaming and one is destination gaming. One’s like a 7-Eleven and one’s like a Whole Foods.� Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

ELECTION CALENDAR Redmond candidate forum slated Oct. 15 A “meet the candidates� lunch forum will be held in Redmond on Oct. 15 at the Juniper Golf Club, according to a news release. The lunch, which will be held from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., will feature candidates Tory Allman, Margie Dawson, Ed Onimus, Jay Patrick and George Endicott. The event will cost $13 per person, and those interested must make reservations by calling 541-923-5191 or e-mailing Karen@visit redmondoregon.com.

will inform but not determine the board’s decision, Erickson said. “It’s a contributing factor,� Erickson said. “We wouldn’t ask for the information if we weren’t going to read it and see what it says.� Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Tight money prevents some counties from prosecuting The Associated Press PORTLAND — Many Oregon prosecutors say tight money has forced them to stop prosecuting dozens of illegal acts as crimes. The Oregonian reported that Multnomah County is treating many minor crimes — such as being caught with small amounts of drugs or minor shoplifting — as violations where a perpetrator can pay a fine and go free. District Attorney Mike Schrunk said he’s had no choice because his office doesn’t have the funds. Some counties like Washington and Linn have public safety levies or timber money that allow prosecutors to pursue more cases. But other district attorneys say it’s difficult

to get voters to approve levies, and they have had to do more with less. Marion County District Attorney Walt Beglau said his office hasn’t been prosecuting some misdemeanors at all — not even issuing a ticket — for as far back as 20 years. Among those crimes are minor vandalism, failing to appear in court to face misdemeanor charges and punching, slapping or spitting without causing injury, unless it involves domestic or sexual violence or an attack on police.

Palestinian gunmen hijack cruise ship in ’85 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Oct. 7, the 280th day of 2010. There are 85 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 7, 1910, a major wildfire devastated the northern Minnesota towns of Spooner and Baudette, charring at least 300,000 acres. Some 40 people are believed to have died. ON THIS DATE In 1777, the second Battle of Saratoga began during the American Revolution. (British forces under Gen. John Burgoyne surrendered ten days later.) In 1858, the fifth debate between Illinois senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Galesburg. In 1940, Artie Shaw and his Orchestra recorded Hoagy Carmichael’s “Stardust� for RCA Victor. In 1949, the Republic of East Germany was formed. In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy and Republican opponent Richard M. Nixon held their second televised debate, in Washington

T O D AY IN HISTORY D.C. The TV series “Route 66� premiered on CBS. In 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro in the Mediterranean. (The hijackers, who killed an elderly Jewish American tourist, Leon Klinghoffer, surrendered two days after taking over the ship.) In 1989, Hungary’s Communist Party renounced Marxism in favor of democratic socialism during a party congress in Budapest. In 1991, University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill publicly accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriate comments when she worked for him; Thomas denied Hill’s allegations. In 1998, Matthew Shepard, a gay college student at the University of Wyoming, was beaten, robbed and left tied to a wooden fencepost outside of Laramie; he died five days later. (Russell Henderson and Aaron McKinney are serving life sentences for Shepard’s murder.)

TEN YEARS AGO Vojislav Kostunica took the oath of office as Yugoslavia’s first popularly elected president, closing the turbulent era of Slobodan Milosevic. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu is 79. Comedian Joy Behar (TV: “The View�) is 68. Singer John Mellencamp is 59. Rock musician Ricky Phillips is 59. Actress Mary Badham (Film: “To Kill a Mockingbird�) is 58. Actress Christopher Norris is 57. Rock musician Tico Torres (Bon Jovi) is 57. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is 55. Gospel singer Michael W. Smith is 53. Record-

ing executive and TV personality Simon Cowell is 51. Pop singer Ann Curless (Expose) is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Toni Braxton is 43. Rock singer-musician Thom Yorke (Radiohead) is 42. Actress Nicole Ari Parker is 40. Rock singer-musician Damian Kulash is 35. Singer Taylor Hicks (“American Idol�) is 34. Actor Omar Benson Miller is 32. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “If your contribution has been vital there will always be somebody to pick up where you left off, and that will be your claim to immortality.� — Walter Gropius, GermanAmerican architect (1883-1969)

FREE TEXTBOOKS Today’s newspapers become tomorrow’s textbooks, and with the NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION program we’re offering FREE newspapers for teachers to use in their classrooms. So, if you are an educator and would like to include newspapers in your classroom studies, please call Kristen, our NIE coordinator, today.

541- 617-7852 HOW CAN YOU HELP THE NIE PROGRAM? It’s easy, and any Bulletin subscriber can do it. Whenever you leave town, just call and we’ll deliver your newspapers to a local classroom. It’s just that simple. To donate your papers to NIE, call 541-385-5800


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 C3

O Woman gets life after admitting guilt in murder, removal of fetus By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

HILLSBORO — An Oregon woman obsessed with having a baby pleaded guilty Wednesday to the murder of a pregnant woman whose unborn child was cut from her abdomen after she was bludgeoned to death. Korena Roberts, 29, was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Her plea means she won’t face trial and a possible death sentence. She was accused of beating 21year-old Heather Snively with a

collapsible police baton in June 2009 and using a straight razor to open Snively’s abdomen. Roberts’ boyfriend found her in the tub with a lifeless infant that doctors determined had never drawn a breath. It was due two months later.

Body in crawl space Officers found Snively’s body in the crawl space of Roberts’ home. For months before the killing, Roberts told neighbors she

was pregnant, going so far as to acquire a stroller, baby formula and parenting magazines. A few weeks before the killing, Snively moved to Oregon from Maryland to be with her fiance. Detectives have said they believe Roberts and Snively met through an online classified service where both were looking for baby clothes. Roberts had attempted to contact other pregnant women through Craigslist and by telephone before making the connection with Snively, District

Attorney Bob Hermann said in court Wednesday. During a bail hearing last November, Roberts’ attorney said she had given birth to a stillborn child in 2007 and seemed obsessed with babies, repeatedly watching videos of births on YouTube, sewing baby clothes and telling people for about a year that she was pregnant. Roberts’ boyfriend, Yan Shubin, told police he called 911 on June 5, 2009, after coming home and finding Roberts with a baby covered in blood.

UMPQUA NATIONAL FOREST

Logging in roadless area cut back Forest Service still going ahead with plan to reduce danger of wildfires By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — The U.S. Forest Service announced Wednesday it is going ahead with plans to log inside a roadless area in Oregon to reduce the danger of wildfire, but over a much smaller area than originally planned. The Umpqua National Forest announced it will publish Friday the final environmental impact statement on the D-Bug timber sale, which is designed to reduce wildfire danger around the Diamond Lake and Lemolo Lake resort areas. The 2-year-old project was The Associated Press file photo widely seen as a test of Presi- District Ranger Bill Gamble points out a telltale hole indicating beetles have attacked a pine tree in dent Barack Obama’s campaign Umpqua National Forest in September 2009. The U.S. Forest Service announced Wednesday it is promise to protect the 58 million cutting back plans for commercial logging inside a roadless area as part of the plan to reduce fire acres of backcountry that has danger in the area. never been commercially logged on national forests across the country. Area, which is densely packed the start as a way to improve the thinning within their borders. “Although we scaled back from with lodgepole pines, many of ecological health of the forest, But thinning costs money, and what we originally proposed, the which have been killed by moun- and were disappointed that was commercial logging is often project still provides a way for tain pine beetles. Lemolo Lake is scaled back. tacked on to projects to help pay people to evacuate the Diamond a smaller resort lake nearby. Mickey said much of the 7,800 for them. and Lemolo area in case of fire The project scaled back com- acres being treated had to be The idea of preserving roadand provides better safety zones mercial logging from 621 acres subsidized by the Forest Service less areas for wildlife habitat and for our firefighters,” Umpqua within roadless areas to 78 acres. because of low timber value. clean water came out of the ClinNational Forest Supervisor Cliff It is all along a road on the west“We are hoping that somebody ton administration. The Bush adDils said in a statement. ern side of Diamond Lake that will be able to pencil this out to ministration tried to open them “We recognize serves 102 pri- get this out of the woods without up to more logging and mining that fire is part vate cabins on having to go to a total subsidy by giving states control. Courts of the Diamond “The project federal land, Dils situation,” he said. have yet to finally resolve legal and Lemolo lakes said. Without the Roadless areas have escaped issues over which rule applies landscape,” he still provides a logging, there is logging largely because they and where. added. “It is our way for people nowhere for fire- were too remote and rugged to During the presidential camresponsibility to fighters to make make timber harvests profitable. paign, Obama promised to reto evacuate the act within the a stand against a With the government spending spect the Clinton rule, and Agnext five years to Diamond and fire moving out of $1 billion a year fighting wild- riculture Secretary Tom Vilsack address safety is- Lemolo area in the roadless area fires, pressure has built to do repeated that pledge last year. sues that we will toward the cabneed to deal with case of fire and ins, Dils said. over the next 20 provides better “When they deyears.” signed this plan, Dils said the safety zones for it really looked project was re- our firefighters.” like they wanted viewed by Agrito test the limits culture Secretary — Cliff Dils, Umpqua of the Obama adTom Vilsack’s National Forest ministration on office under the supervisor roadless,” said original 2001 rule Steve Pedery, protecting roadconservation diless areas, which allows thin- rector for Oregon Wild. “And NOW THROUGH END OF OCTOBER! *30% Off suggested retail prices on select wall coverings ning to reduce fire danger and from our cursory look the new insect infestations. plan looks like it scaled that way, Diamond Lake is a popular way back, but it seems they still camping, fishing and snowmo- can’t resist pushing the envelope biling area high in the Cascade a little bit.” Range east of Roseburg where 102 Ross Mickey of the American privately owned cabins on nation- Forest Resource Council, a timal forest land stand across a road ber industry group, said they from the Mount Bailey Roadless had supported the project from

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Gang shooting follows gang funeral PORTLAND — Less than an hour after leaving a funeral service for the victim of a gang shootout, a young Portland man was wounded in the legs in what police believe was a drive-by gang shooting. Members of the city’s gang squad in unmarked cars swarmed the streets around the Maranatha Church of God in northeast Portland during the service Tuesday afternoon, then scrambled to investigate the shooting 13 blocks away, The Oregonian reported. The 19-year-old victim was not immediately identified. Police said he is expected to recover after being hit once in each leg. Police said they found the car from which the shots were fired. They said it may have been stolen a week earlier at gunpoint outside a strip club.

Man says he was shot while asleep on couch SALEM — Authorities say a man has reported he was shot while sleeping on his couch, and officers say a car stolen in California was connected to the crime. The Marion County Sheriff’s Office said 30-year-old Ellis Bellack reported the shooting about 3:30 a.m. Wednesday. He was treated for a gunshot wound in the arm and released from the hospital, The Salem Statesman Journal reported. Deputies said he was shot from outside the house. They didn’t know exactly how many rounds were fired but they found a number of bullet holes in the house. Following tips, deputies found a black 1996 Honda parked with its motor running about a mile from the house.

EPA hits coal plant with dirty air notice PORTLAND — U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says Oregon’s only coal-fired electrical generating plant has been violating clean air laws

for more than a decade. The Oregonian newspaper reported the agency notified Portland General Electric last week that improvements at the Boardman plant in 1998 and 2004 increased pollution and should have triggered controls to limit sulfur dioxide. The utility company says it doesn’t believe it violated the law. The agency says the utility could be liable for civil penalties of up to $37,500 for each day the plant operated without proper pollution controls.

Rowdy partyers won’t play ball, Eugene says EUGENE — Eugene authorities say they’re not getting the cooperation they’d hoped for in toning down parties in a neighborhood near the University of Oregon where things got rowdy as the fall term began. Two weekends ago, officers used tear gas to break up an alcohol-fueled party west of the campus. City and university officials then went door to door to talk to renters about being good neighbors. But on Friday and Saturday police dispersed crowds in the same area before things got out of hand. About 60 citations were issued for underage drinkers or for carrying open containers of alcohol in public.

Toddler killed when pulled in to harvester IRRIGON — Morrow County, Oregon, sheriff’s deputies say a 2-year-old boy was killed when he was pulled into an onion-potato harvesting machine. Undersheriff Steven Myren identified the victim of the Tuesday night incident as Aden Martine Marguia. Myren says the boy’s father, 35-year-old Sergio Marguia, was testing a replacement belt on the harvesting machine at a storage facility near Irrigon when the boy got too close and was pulled into the machinery. — From wire reports

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C4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

DMV move puts spotlight on need for change

I

n a state that purports to put as much value on keeping the public informed about its government as Oregon does, it’s hard to figure out why the Oregon Department of Administra-

tive Services opted for secrecy in relocating the Bend Department of Motor Vehicles office. “Because we could” is not a valid reason, and if the law allows it, the law should be changed. The DMV office’s new space, in Brookswood Meadow Plaza on the southern edge of Bend, is ill-suited, it seems to us. Far away from most of the people who’ll use it, the location will serve the citizens of Bend poorly and violates at least the spirit of the city’s development code. Moreover, it flies in the face of a state law that urges consolidation of state office space and it is likely to do so for a minimum of 10 years. It needn’t have been that way. Had the city and neighbors known of the proposed new location, the latter would have protested loudly while the former may well have been able to help DAS find a more suitable location. State Rep. Judy Stiegler says state law does not require public notification, however, at least not when the space in question is under 10,000 feet. The new DMV office will be below that magic cutoff point.

It seems to us it’s time to change the law. Public agencies spend taxpayer dollars to lease space around Oregon, and they should keep the public informed of their plans. Officials may argue that early notification is likely to drive rental prices up, but the opposite is equally likely. In this case, with rental space going begging in the community, public notification might well have allowed another landlord with more suitably located and perhaps less expensive space to step forward. That would have served nearly everyone better than the current new location will. Taxpayers would have saved some amount of money on a less expensive lease. RiverRim neighbors probably wouldn’t now be upset with the new location. And Bend residents would have been able to find the DMV without having to resort to MapQuest. What could be wrong with that?

Make deferral on SDCs permanent B uilders in the city of Bend currently have the right to delay paying systems development charges until a project is completed or nearly so. Now builders want the Bend Park & Recreation District to grant such delays, too, though district directors don’t seem particularly thrilled with the idea. We hope they reconsider. At the same time, we hope both they and the city make the deferrals the standard way of doing business. City officials began the deferral program in 2008 as a sort of homegrown economic stimulus plan. Under it, builders could ask the city for a nine-month delay in paying city SDCs, which normally are shelled out when a building permit is issued. The delay ends either at nine months or when an occupancy permit is issued, whichever comes first. While it hasn’t sparked a turnaround of the housing market, it has eased the crunch at least a bit for some builders, who often must borrow the money to pay SDCs up front. To date, the park district has not joined in the program, and if the discussion at a meeting earlier this week is an indication, directors aren’t particularly taken with the idea. They worry that, should the city forget to collect the park SDCs when it collects for the city, they will have no way of capturing the money once the build-

While the delay hasn’t sparked a turnaround of the housing market, it has eased the crunch at least a bit for some builders, who often must borrow the money to pay SDCs up front. ing is occupied. Surely, however, that is an easily solvable problem, and refusing to address it punishes wouldbe builders for errors beyond their control. Meanwhile, the city should consider making the deferral permanent, and the park district should join it. While the number of builders opting for the delay has been even smaller than the number of building permits issued in the last couple of years, the deferral makes sense. After all, the purpose of SDCs is to allow the city and the park district to recoup, at least in part, what must be spent on the expanded facilities the additional population will require. Until the new buildings are occupied no new demand is there, and forcing builders and ultimately home and business owners to pay even more than they otherwise would have to makes no sense.

My Nickel’s Worth Replace Wyden

cated lottery funding for clean water, healthy rivers, parks, outdoor education and local communities. Having been a resident of Bend for 30 years, I have developed a strong appreciation for the natural environment, particularly here in Central Oregon. Like me, thousands of people have migrated to Central Oregon to experience the outdoor life this area has to offer. Healthy watersheds are critical to maintaining outdoor recreation as a way of life. Fishermen, hikers, bicyclists, hunters, paddlers and other outdoor enthusiasts have all been touched by the natural beauty of rivers and lakes throughout the state. There are many organizations devoted to watershed management, and I have the privilege of being the president of one such organization, the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council. The UDWC works to restore local rivers and monitor long-term watershed health. In addition, the educational programs implemented by UDWC and its partners give students the tools to understand how watersheds work and instill a sense of place. Measure 76 will renew a very successful funding program that has been in place for the last 12 years. I marvel at the accomplishments that have been achieved during this time, and I am excited to see the success that will continue if Measure 76 is passed. I urge the public to support what has made Central Oregon such a spectacular place, the great outdoors. Please vote “yes” on Measure 76. Rick Wright Bend

Sen. Wyden voted for the stimulus bill, which provided $787 billion and was supposed to stimulate the economy (and arguably has failed). The bill allows agencies to award contracts to employers that use foreign labor through the H-2B visa program on the condition that the employers prove they have been unable to find American labor. The Bulletin recently reported that nearly $13 million from the stimulus package has gone to Oregon forest contractors that employ foreign workers. Other federal forest contractors who do not use foreign workers are rightfully outraged that they were outbid by contractors who are using foreign labor. At $12 to $22 per hour, these contractors say they can find plenty of local workers. Recently, Wyden sent a letter of inquiry to the Department of Labor/Forest Service requesting justification of the use of stimulus funds to hire H-2B workers. So, on the one hand Wyden votes for the stimulus package that specifically allowed for H-2B workers to be hired, and on the other hand he writes to the Forest Service asking why it is allowing something which he voted to approve. There’s something wrong with this picture. Either Wyden didn’t read the bill or, if he did, he didn’t do his homework to decipher the impact of this legislation and is now trying to cover for it. In either case, it’s time for a change. Vote for Jim Huffman in November. Rich Stanfield Bend

Good under Kitzhaber

Support 76

The negative ads portraying eight bad years under John Kitzhaber are just a flat lie. If I recall, the economy was pretty good under Kitzhaber for

This November, Oregonians will vote on Measure 76. This ballot measure seeks to continue Oregon’s dedi-

six of those years. The last two were brought down by the national dot.com bust and drop in lumber demand. A couple of years later, the whole national economy started imploding. Kitzhaber helped initiate the Oregon Option, a co-op approach with the federal government to increase accountability and reduce bureaucracy related to a number of government services. In his first term, the state reduced the number of welfare cases dramatically, saving the state more than $200 million. He has always fought for children and education, growth management, farmland protection and urban growth boundaries, all issues pertaining to Oregon. The guy has a lot of good ideas, and is willing to work in a bipartisan manner. To portray his two terms as a failure is negative campaigning at its finest. If you want a straight shooter, I’d vote for Kitzhaber. If I want tax advice, I’ll call Dudley. Robert Smith La Pine

Keep Wyden Sen. Ron Wyden is an important member of the U.S. Senate. He has worked hard to reach the opinions and needs of his constituents, was the leader of a balanced, bipartisan group of senators to develop a well-researched health insurance plan during the Bush administration on into the present, and has worked to help overcome the many problems encountered by our veterans. He is well-known for working “across the aisle,” has an excellent reputation in the Senate, and, for that reason, is recognized and respected by U.S. citizens across the country. His seniority under these circumstances has helped keep Oregon strong. We need him in office. Mary Cope Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Those who oppose ground zero mosque aren’t phobic By Andrea Gorman Bulletin guest columnist

T

here have been two issues that have maintained a steady presence in media lately: the mosque at ground zero and burning the Quran. In the newspaper recently, there was an article that piqued my interest in which I read, “Abdul Rauf, who has been the imam of a mosque 12 blocks from the World Trade Center since 1983 …” I did not include the rest of the letter because my point rests in this sentence — 12 blocks away from the World Trade Center. Allow me to think this through here. There are approximately 1,462 mosques in the United States (answers. com, according to a 2007 survey done by the Muslim Group of America), and there are approximately 100 mosques in New York City (didyouknow.org), yet

those who oppose the mosque are intolerant, Islamophobic, hateful, ignorant, racist (the list goes on) for asking that the mosque not be built at ground zero? Really? And from these bridge-building, peace-seeking individuals, we have threats here and abroad of violence if they are not able to build the mosque in this particular location? I’m curious. How many Christian churches are in Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran? What happens to those who are found carrying a Bible or wearing a cross in a region where Islam prevails? What if I were to propose the building of a Christian church in such a region — wouldn’t it be a bit nervy of me to impose my beliefs on them, in their backyard? Yet they threaten us when we voice our opposition to this mosque at ground zero, in our own country? Unlike previous letters, I do not claim

IN MY VIEW to write from any point of view but my own. This issue stirs my emotions and leads to a frustration that there is so much more at play here than the right to build or protection of religious freedom. These terms are masking what is truly at the center of this debate — is it insensitive to build the mosque in this particular site? Would building in the name of peace and tolerance be better served by moving the mosque to another location? Are not peace and tolerance sacrificed by pushing ahead in such a bullish manner? And if this mosque truly is being built as a bridge to peace and to promote a greater knowledge of Islam, are not the threats of violence if the mosque is not built in this site a hindrance to this end?

It is unfortunate that as this mosque debate intensified, we had an individual threaten to burn the Quran on the anniversary of 9/11, bringing the issue of how we relate to the Muslim world and Islamic faith to an alarming crescendo. While I do not support the burning of the Quran, it would be refreshing to see an outpouring of support when our beliefs and freedoms are compromised. We live in a country where a crucifix can be placed in a jar of urine and called art. We can burn the American flag, and it is called freedom of speech. Illegal immigrants can protest our immigration policies and demand rights in our cities without fear — heck, they are supported by our own administration — yet reasonable opposition to the mosque at ground zero is somehow un-American, and the thought of burning the Quran causes an uprising of opposition the

likes of which I have not seen. Did the threats of violence against not only this pastor, but against the United States and our soldiers, make anyone wonder if our message of tolerance (appeasement and weakness would be more accurate terms) is effective in this world climate? This should make us all take pause when we evaluate how to move forward in this arena. We are foolhardy if we believe that showing tolerance in a climate where none is shown to us will win over our enemies, and we will sacrifice our freedom in the process. If we continue to put tolerance and political correctness above all else when determining our priorities, we will protect the interests of all others at the expense of our own. Andrea Gorman lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 C5

O Edwin Lavern Hill

D

N   Clara Christine Volk, of Bend July 12, 1935 - Oct. 5, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Services will be held at a later date.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Norman Wisdom, British funnyman, dies at 95 New York Times News Service Norman Wisdom, one of Britain’s best-loved cinematic clowns, who also earned a Tony nomination on Broadway, died Monday on the Isle of Man. He was 95. He had continued performing until he was 90. His family conf ir med the death to The Associated Press. An elfin man of doleful mien, Wisdom was often Norman d e s c r i b e d Wisdom as the right- in 1965 ful heir to Charlie Chaplin. For six decades he reigned as one of Britain’s most celebrated comics, appearing in nearly 20 films and many television shows as well as in live performances. His films shown in the United States include “Trouble in Store” (1953) and “Follow a Star” (1959). He was also featured in the Hollywood picture “The Night They Raided Minsky’s” (1968).

On Broadway Wisdom appeared in two Broadway shows, most notably in the musical “Walking Happy,” for which he received a Tony nomination. The show, which ran for 161 performances in 1966 and 1967, had music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Sammy Cahn. He later starred in the comedy “Not Now, Darling,” which ran briefly in 1970. Reviewing “Walking Happy” in The New York Times, Walter Kerr called Wisdom “a zany original with ruffled hair, rueful eyes and an altogether irresistible appeal.”

Aug. 2, 1944 - Oct. 2, 2010 Edwin Lavern Hill passed away on October 2, 2010, after suffering a stroke. He was born in Pendleton, Oregon, on August 2, 1944, to Wilbern Archi Hill and Gladys Mae (Casebeer) Hill. He moved from Heppner, Oregon, to Portland, Oregon, when he was six years old, but always called Heppner his home. He graduated from Sunset High School, in Portland, Oregon, in 1962. While working for X-Ray, Inc., in Portland, Oregon, he met and married Rhoda G. Work on September 20, 1969. In 1973, after the births of his children, he started Processor Chemical Services, Inc. a medical X-ray service and supplies company, in the family’s garage. The business grew steadily over the years, as did his reputation for quality, honesty, and fairness in the X-ray community throughout the state. The business was sold in 1998, allowing him to retire to Bend, Oregon, and also enjoy the family cabin in the Ochoco Mountains. He had a lifelong love of the outdoors and hunting in Oregon. He made four hunting trips to Africa and several to Canada and Alaska. He enjoyed fixing anything and working in his woodshop where he was known for his handmade jewelry boxes. He also supported a number of organizations by participating in and donating to their causes. He was a life member of the Rocky Mountain Elk foundation, and a member of Safari Club Int’l, Oregon Hunters’ Assoc. and B.P.O.E. (Elks). He supported the High Desert Museum, Oregon Public Broadcasting, The Nature Conservancy, Smithsonian Institution, Oregon Food Bank, Humane Society of Central Oregon and the AARP Foundation. Ed is survived by his wife, Rhoda; son, Michael Edwin (Mindi), Klamath Falls, OR; son, Timothy Alan, Beaverton, OR; sister, June Evans, Aloha, OR; sister, Joan Jarvis, Beaverton, OR; brother, Larry Hill, Portland, OR; uncle, Marvin Casebeer; aunt, Alvina Padberg; aunt, Joyce Breeding; many cousins, nieces, nephews, and extended family members; and his dog, Mollie. A celebration of Ed’s life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Rd., Missoula, MT 59808, or to a charity of choice.

Ex-congresswomen McCarthy, 63 McClatchy-Tribune News Service KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Karen McCarthy, the former English teacher turned five-term member of Congress, died Tuesday afternoon of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. She was 63. She was single and had no children. McCarthy, a longtime resident of the Kansas City, Mo., Roanoke neighborhood, championed the environment, public education, women’s rights and an expansion of prescriptiondrug coverage under Medicare during a career in public office that spanned nearly three decades. “It’s a human tragedy,” said David Westbrook, a McCarthy friend of 40 years. “It’s a tragic event in the life of an individual who really cared and really tried.”

Emmy-winning filmmaker Marshall Flaum dies at 85 McClatchy-Tribune News Service LOS ANGELES — Marshall Flaum, an award-winning producer, director and writer who specialized in documentaries, died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications after hip surgery, his family said. He was 85. Flaum won five Emmy Awards, had several more nominations and was twice nominated for an Academy Award, for the documentaries “The Yanks Are Coming (1963) and “Let My People Go: The Story of Israel” (1965). Flaum wrote, directed and produced both documentaries. “His flair for drama and entertainment made those documentaries stand out,” said his daughter, Erica, a film editor. “His view of history was very cultural and not very dry. … It was very important to him to have some kind of historical story. You always had the feeling of the times.”

William C. Patrick III, one of the chief scientists at the Army Biological Warfare Laboratories at Fort Detrick and who was responsible for overseeing the military’s top-secret weaponization of some of the world’s deadliest diseases, including anthrax and tularemia, died of bladder cancer Oct. 1 at Citizens Nursing Home in Frederick, Md. He was 84. Patrick held five classified U.S. patents for the process of weaponizing anthrax. He was chief of the development program at Fort Detrick in Frederick for much of the Cold War. In the 1960s, Patrick led the highly classified weaponization of tularemia, a disease he considered superior to anthrax as a biological agent because of its potency. Under Patrick’s direction, scientists at Fort Detrick developed a tularemia agent that, if disseminated by airplane, could cause casualties and sickness over thousands of square miles, according to tests carried out by the U.S. government. Some experts believed that the research showed biological weapons could be as devastating as a nuclear blast. In a 10,000square-mile range, the biological weapon had a 90 percent casualty rate and 50 percent fatality rate, capable of killing its hosts

Olivia de Havilland in “Romeo and Juliet” while studying with acting teacher Lee Strasberg. In 1957 Flaum joined CBS and worked as a writer, story editor and associate producer on “The Twentieth Century.” He twice won Emmys for writing segments of the program. Flaum moved to Hollywood in 1962 to work for David L. Wolper’s company, where his other credits included “The Battle of Britain” and “Hollywood: The Selznick Years.”

Work with Cousteau His work with Jacques Cousteau resulted in two Emmys as executive producer of “The Unsinkable Sea Otter” and “A Sound of Dolphins,” episodes of “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau.” Flaum also won an Emmy as executive producer of “Jane Goodall and the World of Animal Behavior: The Wild Dogs of Africa.”

form of Alzheimer’s disease. At the time, she was also said to be dealing with a bipolar disorder that apparently went undiagnosed for at least a decade. “She’s one of the most vibrant political figures I’ve ever known,” said Alan Wheat, the Democrat who held Missouri’s 5th Congressional District seat before McCarthy. “It was more than her intense interest in issues and policy. It was her character and personality. She was truly interested in reaching out to all people and getting them involved in the political system.” U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, who succeeded McCarthy in 2004, lauded her as a “consummate public servant from her days as a schoolteacher through the time she served in the Missouri General Assembly.”

Cleaver described her as “unashamedly liberal in her theology of politics. She never violated her belief in progressive causes.” That included what Cleaver called McCarthy’s principled stand against the Iraq war in 2002. “She stood up and voted no at a time when voting no meant that you would get hate calls,” he said. “She never hesitated at all in doing that.” Her career in Congress was marred by a much-publicized battle with alcoholism that led to staff turnover and caused her to seek treatment in 2003. “I deeply regret my behavior and, as difficult as it is, recognize that my drinking has hurt those who I am closest to, those I love and work with,” McCarthy said at the time. “I have hit bottom.”

Joseph “Zeke” J. Zarosinski June 27, 1957 – September 28, 2010 Joseph J. “Zeke” of Bend passed away peacefully with his family by his side on September 28, 2010, due to complications after surgery. Joe was born on June 27, 1957, in Klamath Falls, OR, to Raymond and Millie (Motschenbacher) Zarosinski. In 1975, he graduated from Klamath Union High School, where he was a 3-sport athlete, sang in Madrigals, and was elected class president in his senior year. After high school, he moved to Bend and worked for his dad at Zarosinski Industries as a salesman. It was during this time Joe developed his passion for golf and softball. On October 21, 1989, Joe married Shelley (Crandall) Malone in Bend where they raised their children, sons, Devon Malone and Jerome Zarosinski. For several years he coached youth athletics, little league and basketball. Above all, Joe was known for his sense of humor, “celebrations”, generous heart, love of his family, friends and beloved pets. Joe is preceded in death by his father, Ray and his brother, Donnie. Joe is survived by his wife, Shelley; sons, Devon of Portland, Jerome (girlfriend, Justine Lumley) of Bend. Other survivors include his mother, Millie Zarosinski of Bend; brother, Dr. Doug (wife, Gail) Zarosinski of Lafayette, LA; sisters, “TZ” (husband, John) Fargason and Judy (husband, Larry) Mehlmauer, both of Medford; In-laws, Don and Marlene Crandall of Bend; and many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and friends; and his beloved dog, “Poncho” and cat, “Little Kitty”. A Celebration of Life and urn committal will be at 1:00 pm on October 9, at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. Hwy 97, Bend, OR. Due to Joe’s sudden passing, donations to help pay for funeral expenses in lieu of flowers would be appreciated and may be sent to Shelley MaloneZarosinksi, 1319 NE Thompson, Bend, OR, 97701. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements (541)382-0903.

Served in WWII Marshall Allen Flaum was born Sept. 13, 1925, in Brooklyn. After serving in the Army during World War II, he studied acting at the University of Iowa, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1948. After college, he appeared on Broadway with Basil Rathbone in “Julius Caesar” and

William C. Patrick, 84, expert on bio-warfare The Washington Post

Mc C a r t hy died at Garden Terrace at Overland Park, Kan., an A l zhei mer ’s center. She rose to Karen become presiMcCarthy dent of the Nain 1997 tional Conference of State Legislatures in 1994 and, that same year, easily defeated 10 other Democratic candidates to cruise into Congress. Harper’s Bazaar magazine once listed her, along with Hillary Rodham Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, as a potential first female president. But in June 2009, her family announced that McCarthy was suffering from an advanced

within hours of infection. The Fort Detrick biowarfare program was started in the early 1940s under President Franklin D. Roosevelt after the Allies received intelligence reports that the Germans and Japanese were pursuing biological weapons. Patrick joined the effort in 1951 and became chief of the development program in 1965.

LOUISE A. GERLACH REDMOND – Louise A. Gerlach (Butterfield) 87, died of natural causes Saturday, October 2, 2010. She was born December 25, 1922 in Springfield, Massachusetts, the daughter of the late Clarence and Ruth Butterfield. She grew up in Massachusetts. After leaving Massachusetts she went to Glenwood Springs, Colorado where she met Robert (Bob) Gerlach, her future husband while working in the U.S.O. during WWII. Louise married Bob, March 8, 1946 in McMinnville, Oregon. She lived in numerous locations in Oregon before moving to Rawlins, Wyoming in 1972. She moved back to Oregon in 1980. Louise was very active in Daughters of Nile, Rebekahs, Amaranth, Eastern Star and Jobs Daughters. She loved performing vintage-style shows and singing gay ninety songs in Oregon and Wyoming. She was past president or chair of many community and county organizations. Louise is survived by her four children, Donald of Federal Way, Washington, Richard of Anacortes, Washington, Gerald of Redmond, Oregon and Lisa of Attleboro, Massachusetts along with eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband Bob of 62 years, her two brothers James and Robert and her parents. Friends and relatives are invited to a memorial service on Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 11:00 am at the Redmond Masonic Center #154, located at 627 SW 7th Street, Redmond, Oregon. Refreshments will follow afterwards.

Dua ine J . “ Bud” Birk hofe r — August 1 2 , 1 9 2 4 - Octobe r 4 , 2 0 1 0 On August 12, 1924 Hans and Doris (Mathys) Birkhofer welcomed their son “Bud” into the world in Dow City, Iowa. In 1936 the Birkhofer family traveled to Ajlune, WA. Life in rural Western Washington was hard recovering from The Great Depression, but the work ethic that was instilled by his father and mother lasted Bud’s entire life. Bud was a 3-year letterman in baseball at Mossyrock High School. Bud was an avid baseball fan his entire life and was thrilled to have attended a professional baseball game in Seattle at the Kingdome. In 1942 Bud and two friends from Mossyrock, WA enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. Bud was selected to be a part of the slowspeed radio communication battalion. He proudly served with the 3rd Radio Intelligence Platoon in the Marshall Islands intercepting Japanese code. This elite unit broke the code where Japanese Admiral Hirohito was travelling and, subsequently, Hirohito was shot down by American pilots. This has been reported to have been the beginning of the end of Japanese involvement in WWII. Bud and his wife, Gayle, attended many reunions of the 3rd Radio Intelligence Platoon. Bud and Gayle were the proud parents of three children. John (Penny) of Boring, OR, Keith (Sheila) of Winlock, WA and Launi (Bruce) Cross of Redmond. Numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren gave Bud and Gayle a lot of joy in their lives. Bud is survived by two wonderful sisters and brothers-in-law, Marilyn and Bob Swanson, Alexandria, VA and Bernice and Warren Quinn, of Kenmore, WA. Bud followed his father’s love of animals and was a partner with Hans in several farms and dairies. Bud was an avid reader his entire life. He worked for Stocklin Supply Company as a salesman of animal health products for many years. In 1976 Bud was one of the original owners of Central Oregon Ranch Supply. After selling his ownership of CORS, he was a frequent visitor and advisor to the store’s owners. Bud’s love of the livestock industry was evident as he attended most ranch auctions in Central Oregon and was a sought-after advisor to many ranchers. Bud’s quick wit and jokes will be missed by all who knew him. Bud always enjoyed being in attendance at the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale and especially the sale at Thomas Angus Ranch. Bud and Bob Thomas attended grade school in Iowa together and were life-long friends. A memorial service will be held at Redmond Memorial Chapel, 717 SW 6th Street, Redmond on Saturday, October 9th at 1:00 PM. In lieu of flowers please consider making a donation to the Marine Corps League or The Oregon Humane Society. Sign our guest book at www.redmondmemorial.com


WE

C6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 7

HIGH Ben Burkel

66

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

66/44

67/43

71/44

57/43

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

69/45

62/35



Willowdale

Mitchell

Madras

64/40

66/43

Camp Sherman 62/35 Redmond Prineville 66/38 Cascadia 63/39 65/39 Sisters 65/37 Bend Post 66/38

Oakridge Elk Lake 63/37

54/26

Partly sunny today. Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of rain tonight. Central

68/44

63/34

58/36

64/34

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

61/33

61/35

Fort Rock

Chemult 60/32



64/54

Calgary 68/45

Seattle



64/52

Missoula 72/52

Eugene Slight chance of showers 71/48 today. Skies will be mostly Grants Pass cloudy tonight. 73/46 Eastern 71/52



53/35

San Francisco 65/54



Bend

71/45

Boise

66/38

65/44

Idaho Falls



Elko

61/42

58/39



Showers and isolated thunderstorms today. Isolated showers tonight.

Helena

Reno

60/41



Salt Lake City 66/49

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Moon phases First

Full

Last

Oct. 7

Oct. 14

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly cloudy skies, chance of showers, LOW breezy, cooler.

HIGH

66 35

PLANET WATCH

New

MONDAY

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 75/46/0.00 . . . . . 63/51/pc. . . . . . 64/53/sh Baker City . . . . . . 65/33/0.00 . . . . . 62/43/sh. . . . . . 66/42/pc Brookings . . . . . . 71/56/0.00 . . . . . 60/52/pc. . . . . . 63/53/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 71/44/0.00 . . . . . 60/43/sh. . . . . . 67/44/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 75/41/0.00 . . . . . . 71/48/c. . . . . . 72/51/pc Klamath Falls . . . 69/44/0.00 . . . . . 62/38/sh. . . . . . 63/39/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 64/46/0.00 . . . . . 56/35/sh. . . . . . 65/39/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 64/33/0.00 . . . . . 64/34/sh. . . . . . 65/33/pc Medford . . . . . . . 74/43/0.00 . . . . . . 71/47/c. . . . . . 71/51/pc Newport . . . . . . . 75/46/0.00 . . . . . 60/50/pc. . . . . . 62/49/sh North Bend . . . . . 73/45/0.00 . . . . . 62/51/pc. . . . . . 64/58/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/52/0.00 . . . . . 68/47/sh. . . . . . 69/45/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 69/40/0.00 . . . . . 67/46/sh. . . . . . 72/47/pc Portland . . . . . . . 80/47/0.00 . . . . . 65/52/pc. . . . . . 67/55/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 62/36/0.00 . . . . . . 63/39/c. . . . . . 69/42/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 67/32/0.00 . . . . . . 69/39/c. . . . . . 70/39/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 77/44/0.00 . . . . . 73/51/pc. . . . . . 71/53/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 81/45/0.00 . . . . . . 70/49/c. . . . . . 71/52/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 65/32/0.00 . . . . . . 65/37/c. . . . . . 71/37/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 79/41/0.00 . . . . . . 72/50/c. . . . . . 75/50/pc

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

4

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

HIGH

LOW

61 30

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

Mainly sunny skies and significantly cooler.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 in 1979 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 in 1974 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.06” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.96” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.93” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.03 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.09 in 1963 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:36 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:02 a.m. . . . . . .6:57 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:56 a.m. . . . . . .7:45 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:52 p.m. . . . . . .5:37 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:35 a.m. . . . . . .6:28 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:52 p.m. . . . . . .5:48 a.m.

OREGON CITIES City

Portland

59/37

62/33

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:10 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:35 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:11 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:33 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:12 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:12 p.m.

LOW

68 48

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

Crater Lake

HIGH

68 45

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 82° Tillamook • 29° Meacham

SUNDAY Mainly cloudy skies, chance of showers.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

38

Mostly sunny start, afternoon and evening cloud LOW cover.

NORTHWEST

65/36

57/28

LOW

65/52

Burns

La Pine

Tonight: Gradual clearing skies, showers end, cool.

SATURDAY

An upper-level low will bring showers and thunderstorms to portions of Oregon and Idaho today.

58/35

Brothers

62/35

Today: Mainly cloudy skies, chance of showers, remaining cool.

Paulina

62/36

Sunriver

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,108 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,716 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,068 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 24,079 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94,804 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 833 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48.6 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,301 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 64/54

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 68/45

S

Saskatoon 73/45

Seattle 64/52

S Winnipeg 73/45

S

S

Thunder Bay 66/37

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 57/41

Halifax 61/43 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 63/45 81/49 64/45 65/52 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 73/50 71/47 Boise 67/49 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 65/44 63/48 New York 84/53 • 91° 70/49 71/54 Des Moines Mesa, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 73/50 Chicago 74/45 72/45 71/51 70/53 • 28° Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 73/49 65/54 Big Bear, Calif. City 72/53 Las Denver Louisville 66/49 Kansas City Vegas • 2.76” 79/47 78/50 74/53 St. Louis 75/57 Charlotte Otis, Mass. 76/50 79/48 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 79/51 66/56 87/54 82/49 84/53 Phoenix Atlanta 87/64 Honolulu 81/56 Birmingham 87/71 Dallas Tijuana 82/56 88/58 68/55 New Orleans 82/63 Orlando Houston 83/60 Chihuahua 85/54 84/52 Miami 82/71 Monterrey La Paz 82/58 93/75 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/78 48/34 Juneau 48/38 Bismarck 80/50

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . .86/54/s . . . 86/55/s Akron . . . . . . . . .62/47/0.19 . 67/44/pc . . . 72/44/s Albany. . . . . . . . .56/53/0.97 . .65/45/sh . . . 69/43/s Albuquerque. . . .80/56/0.00 . 79/51/pc . . 76/47/pc Anchorage . . . . .49/38/0.00 . .48/34/sh . . 48/37/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . .81/56/s . . . 80/53/s Atlantic City . . . .64/41/0.02 . 69/55/pc . . . 70/55/s Austin . . . . . . . . .82/42/0.00 . . .85/50/s . . . 86/55/s Baltimore . . . . . .60/49/0.02 . . .72/50/s . . . 73/52/s Billings. . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . 81/49/pc . . 70/45/pc Birmingham . . . .78/41/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . . 84/54/s Bismarck . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .80/50/s . . . .80/49/t Boise . . . . . . . . . .72/49/0.00 . . .65/44/t . . 66/44/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .59/55/1.29 . 67/49/pc . . . 69/50/s Bridgeport, CT. . .66/58/0.02 . 71/50/pc . . . 73/52/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .60/48/0.10 . 63/48/pc . . . 68/49/s Burlington, VT. . .55/50/0.49 . .60/43/sh . . 66/38/pc Caribou, ME . . . .59/37/0.00 . .52/39/sh . . 52/34/sh Charleston, SC . .74/46/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 80/59/s Charlotte. . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . . .79/48/s . . . 79/47/s Chattanooga. . . .77/40/0.00 . . .80/51/s . . . 82/48/s Cheyenne . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . 74/45/pc . . 67/42/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .78/46/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . . 73/57/s Cincinnati . . . . . .75/36/0.00 . . .73/46/s . . . 77/45/s Cleveland . . . . . .65/51/0.13 . 68/50/pc . . . 72/47/s Colorado Springs 71/55/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . 71/41/pc Columbia, MO . .77/43/0.00 . . .73/48/s . . . 79/53/s Columbia, SC . . .75/44/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . . 80/50/s Columbus, GA. . .74/50/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . . 84/57/s Columbus, OH. . .69/48/0.01 . . .72/45/s . . . 76/47/s Concord, NH . . . .58/49/0.77 . .63/43/sh . . 65/40/pc Corpus Christi. . .79/59/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . 83/65/s Dallas Ft Worth. .82/53/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 88/59/s Dayton . . . . . . . .71/44/0.00 . . .72/45/s . . . 76/47/s Denver. . . . . . . . .67/51/0.00 . 79/47/pc . . 75/40/pc Des Moines. . . . .82/49/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 78/54/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 75/50/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 69/50/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . . 87/56/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .39/28/0.01 . . .38/24/c . . . 37/21/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 79/54/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .54/44/0.86 . 63/29/pc . . . 64/30/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .72/42/0.00 . . .68/49/s . . 73/47/pc Green Bay. . . . . .74/39/0.00 . . .71/47/s . . . 73/48/s Greensboro. . . . .70/44/0.00 . . .77/47/s . . . 78/48/s Harrisburg. . . . . .59/50/0.04 . 70/46/pc . . . 73/45/s Hartford, CT . . . .59/53/0.46 . 69/45/pc . . . 71/50/s Helena. . . . . . . . .66/37/0.00 . 71/45/pc . . 62/41/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .89/77/0.00 . 87/71/pc . . 87/72/pc Houston . . . . . . .84/49/0.00 . . .85/54/s . . . 86/56/s Huntsville . . . . . .76/38/0.00 . . .80/50/s . . . 82/47/s Indianapolis . . . .75/42/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 77/49/s Jackson, MS . . . .81/42/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 86/54/s Madison, WI . . . .77/37/0.00 . . .71/45/s . . . 75/49/s Jacksonville. . . . .75/50/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . . 83/62/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .47/43/0.09 . .48/38/sh . . 48/41/sh Kansas City. . . . .80/47/0.00 . . .74/53/s . . . 83/55/s Lansing . . . . . . . .72/37/0.00 . . .69/45/s . . 75/44/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . 75/57/pc . . . 78/60/s Lexington . . . . . .73/36/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 79/50/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 84/54/s Little Rock. . . . . .83/42/0.00 . . .84/53/s . . . 86/54/s Los Angeles. . . . .66/59/0.66 . 66/56/pc . . . 70/58/s Louisville . . . . . . .78/46/0.00 . . .78/50/s . . . 81/52/s Memphis. . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .85/59/s . . . 85/60/s Miami . . . . . . . . 84/75/trace . . .82/71/s . . . 85/71/s Milwaukee . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 72/52/s Minneapolis . . . .71/55/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 76/57/s Nashville . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 85/49/s New Orleans. . . .79/58/0.00 . . .82/63/s . . . 84/64/s New York . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 71/54/pc . . . 73/56/s Newark, NJ . . . . .65/54/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . . 77/53/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .76/57/s . . . 74/52/s Oklahoma City . .82/46/0.00 . . .87/54/s . . . 87/54/s Omaha . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . . 83/55/s Orlando. . . . . . . .80/62/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . . 86/62/s Palm Springs. . . .77/55/0.00 . . .75/60/s . . . 83/66/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .78/41/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . . 77/50/s Philadelphia . . . .63/51/0.01 . 71/51/pc . . . 72/52/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .87/64/s . . . 88/65/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .52/44/0.27 . 64/44/pc . . . 72/46/s Portland, ME. . . .58/51/1.42 . .63/45/sh . . 65/43/pc Providence . . . . .63/55/1.44 . 69/47/pc . . . 69/50/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 78/47/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .69/47/0.00 . 84/53/pc . . . .75/47/t Savannah . . . . . .75/49/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 82/56/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .65/43/0.13 . .60/41/sh . . 67/45/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 64/52/pc . . 63/55/sh Richmond . . . . . .65/42/0.00 . . .78/50/s . . . 78/48/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .71/49/0.00 . . .72/46/s . . . 80/56/s Rochester, NY . . .61/51/0.14 . .63/48/sh . . . 69/48/s Spokane . . . . . . .71/43/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . 65/46/sh Sacramento. . . . .76/56/0.00 . . .74/51/c . . 77/52/pc Springfield, MO. .75/40/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 81/53/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .78/45/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . . 80/54/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .82/63/s . . . 85/65/s Salt Lake City . . .72/56/0.07 . . .66/49/t . . 63/49/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . .87/60/s . . . 88/59/s San Antonio . . . .80/51/0.00 . . .83/52/s . . . 84/56/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .81/45/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 86/57/s San Diego . . . . . .68/60/0.74 . 69/61/pc . . . 70/62/s Washington, DC .63/53/0.00 . . .72/53/s . . . 75/54/s San Francisco . . .69/55/0.00 . 65/54/pc . . 68/55/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . . 85/56/s San Jose . . . . . . .79/54/0.01 . 74/55/pc . . 77/58/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .76/34/0.00 . . .66/46/c . . 72/46/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . 74/43/pc . . 70/41/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . .81/61/s . . . 88/65/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .64/55/0.02 . .63/54/sh . . 64/51/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .72/62/r . . 67/59/sh Auckland. . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . . .64/53/s . . 65/51/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .96/71/0.00 . . .96/71/s . . . 98/72/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/77/0.15 . . .89/78/t . . . .90/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . . 75/54/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .87/72/s . . . 85/73/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . 60/45/pc . . . 57/43/c Bogota . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .68/48/c . . .64/49/dr Budapest. . . . . . .63/43/0.02 . 56/39/pc . . . 54/38/s Buenos Aires. . . .73/52/0.00 . .71/49/sh . . . 73/44/s Cabo San Lucas .91/73/0.00 . . .92/75/s . . . 91/76/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .86/68/s . . . 88/69/s Calgary . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . 64/45/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 83/67/pc . . 84/68/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . .59/51/s . . 61/56/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .59/50/s . . 58/51/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 76/52/s Harare . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . 84/57/s Hong Kong . . . . .81/73/0.03 . . .79/66/t . . . .78/65/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . .66/56/r . . 64/53/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . .78/58/s . . . 77/59/s Johannesburg . . .81/55/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . . 86/63/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . 67/57/pc . . 66/58/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .75/63/sh . . . .70/59/r London . . . . . . . .64/50/0.61 . 63/46/pc . . 65/57/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 72/52/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .109/86/0.00 . .108/82/s . . 106/83/s Mexico City. . . . .70/54/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . 73/48/pc Montreal. . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . .61/43/sh . . . 61/43/s Moscow . . . . . . .54/28/0.00 . . .51/32/s . . 49/34/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .80/56/t . . . .78/54/t Nassau . . . . . . . .82/77/0.24 . 86/76/pc . . 84/74/pc New Delhi. . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . . 91/71/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .79/62/s . . 78/64/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.07 . . .51/46/r . . . 52/40/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .55/48/0.00 . .59/39/sh . . 60/45/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .70/54/sh . . 72/55/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .79/72/0.00 . . .82/72/t . . . .77/69/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . 75/54/s Santiago . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .75/43/s . . . 77/44/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .79/62/t . . 72/59/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .63/63/0.00 . . .68/52/s . . . 69/53/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .74/54/s . . 73/57/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . 75/64/pc . . 76/66/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .89/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .54/50/0.00 . 54/44/pc . . 53/43/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . 64/59/pc . . . 66/52/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . . .85/74/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . .82/69/s . . . 80/68/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . .74/65/sh . . 72/64/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .63/52/0.48 . 64/45/pc . . 68/48/pc Vancouver. . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 64/54/pc . . . .59/55/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/50/0.13 . . .58/42/s . . . 56/41/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . . .51/35/s . . . 52/34/s

Bear is killed after attempting third break-in By Mark Freeman Medford Mail Tribune

CAVE JUNCTION — A burglarizing black bear that broke into an 85-year-old woman’s rural Cave Junction house twice over the weekend was trapped by state biologists and killed after it returned for a third time early Tuesday. The 250-pound male bear twice clawed through Laverne Potter’s front door to get at her stash of rice and dried vegetables, ransacking the place in the process. Potter confronted the bear late

Sunday night with a shotgun, but the bear hot-footed it through the broken door before any shots were fired.

Prepared to shoot “If I had to take him out, I would have,” Potter told the Medford Mail Tribune. “I’m a vegetarian and I’ve never killed anything in my life,” Potter said. “(But) to have him break in and throw my stuff all over the place was scary.” Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Mark Var-

gas said he later fatally shot the bear and took the carcass to a local butcher for processing. “The bear, obviously, was not afraid of people and not afraid of going into houses,” Vargas said. The meat will either be donated to an area food pantry that will give it to needy families or it will be given directly to a qualified family that covers the processing costs, which normally run about $100, Vargas said. “I was sorry I couldn’t say just to turn it loose because it would have broken into someone else’s house,” Potter said. “I was afraid

my neighbor could be the next one.” Potter said it was the first time she had experienced any bear problems during her 30 years of living along the East Fork of the Illinois River.

Clawed through door Her ordeal began abruptly Saturday night when the bear clawed through her stained-glass door and hauled away two 5-gallon buckets containing rice and dried split peas, Potter said. “It was terrible,” she said. “It

just took its paws and slapped everything around.” Potter had a friend board up the door and she played a radio loudly in the living room in hopes of keeping the burglarizing bruin away, she said. But all that did was keep her awake — and the animal sneaked in when she finally fell asleep, Potter said. Potter was armed when the pair came face to face, but said she would have shot the bear only in defense. Vargas on Monday placed the department’s large bear box trap, which is welded to a trailer,

in front of Potter’s porch. He baited it with dead fish. Early Tuesday, the bear crept onto Potter’s porch and knocked over some furniture before backtracking to the trap, she said. When it stepped far enough in, its paws triggered the gate to drop shut and end its adventures at the home. The wildlife department has logged a threefold increase in bear damage reports this year in Jackson and Josephine counties, with bears breaking into houses in and around Ashland, Grants Pass, Williams and Eagle Point.


S

College Football Inside Oregon State will face its third top-10 team of the season on Saturday, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010

L O C A L LY Youth basketball clinics slated this month in Bend The Central Oregon Basketball Organization (COBO) has scheduled a series of youth basketball clinics for this month in Bend. The clinics are for boys and girls and will be held on three consecutive Sundays starting with this Sunday (Oct. 10), all at Mountain View High School. Sessions for seventh- and eighth-graders will run from 4 to 6 p.m. Sessions for fifthand sixth-graders will run from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost for all three clinic sessions is $40; registration is through the Bend Park & Recreation District, 541-389-7275. For more information, contact Craig Reid at 541-3188014 or at creid@bendcable. com. —Bulletin staff report

Sisters tops Junction City, stays undefeated in league Bulletin staff report SISTERS — The reigning Class 4A state champion Sisters Outlaws are starting to get hot. Not only have the Outlaws won five consecutive Sky-Em League volleyball matches, but Sisters has not dropped a game in its last four victories. Wednesday’s league match against Junction City was much of the same as the Outlaws made quick work the Tigers, 25-11, 25-8 and 25-15. “We had control of the match from the get-go,” said Sisters coach

PREP VOLLEYBALL Diane Bremer. Chelsea Reifschneider posted 10 kills for the Outlaws and Lizzy Carhart added eight of her own as Sisters improved to 5-0 in league play. Megan Minke tallied three blocks for the Sky-Em’s only undefeated team while setter Kaity Douglass was all over the floor, producing 34 assists, four kills and

No more late nights? Pac-10 considers scheduling By John Marshall The Associated Press

INSIDE

ALDS (best of five) • Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, 11:37 a.m. (TBS); Rangers lead series, 1-0 • New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, 3:07 p.m. (TBS); Yankees lead series 1-0 NLDS (best of five) • Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, 6:37 p.m. (TBS); first game of series

Wednesday ALDS (best of five) Rangers ........................................ 5 Rays .............................................. 1 • Rangers lead series, 1-0 Yankees ........................................ 6 Twins ............................................ 4 • Yankees lead series, 1-0 NLDS (best of five) Phillies.......................................... 4 Reds.............................................. 0 • Phillies lead series, 1-0

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

HUNTING & FISHING

Biketoberfest, an annual Central Oregon fall work party during which volunteers help build and maintain local singletrack mountain bike trails, takes place this Saturday. The event, organized by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA), this year will focus on trails in the Wanoga area. Volunteers are asked to gather Saturday at 9 a.m. at the corner of Simpson and Colorado avenues in Bend. Drinking water, safety glasses, work gloves and sturdy shoes are required. Following the trail work, a barbecue will be held for volunteers at 2 p.m. For more information, go to www.cotamtb.com. — Bulletin staff report

Today

Sisters’ Kristina Johns (5) blocks a shot by Junction City’s Breanna Haney during the first game of a Sky-Em League match on Wednesday in Sisters.

11 digs. Bremer also praised the serving performance of Samantha Williamson, who was 17 of 18 from the line with two aces. The Tigers (2-3 Sky-Em) were led by Holly Gibson’s six kills and Olivia Borden’s three blocks. Sisters, whose only challenge in league play so far this year was a 3-2 win over Sweet Home, will compete in a tournament at Seaside on Saturday. A pivotal Sky-Em match awaits the Outlaws next Tuesday when the Outlaws host Sweet Home.

Trail work party set for Saturday

MLB P L AYO F F S

D

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Greg Gulbrandsen, left, of Bend, and Steve Leonard, of Washougal, Wash., admire a jack chinook taken on the Columbia River at the mouth of the Klickitat River.

Big river, bright salmon

Some of the best fishing of the year in the Pacific Northwest is in October on the Columbia

W

ith the bow of the boat pointed upriver, we drifted down. Wavelets, stirred by a light morning breeze, lapped at the boat. Steve Leonard kept his hand on the kicker motor in case we needed to change direction or correct the drift. Across from Hood River, at the mouth of the White Salmon River, we drifted our eggs through a school of what must have been 1,000 salmon in a drift 400 yards long. They porpoised, they splashed, they pecked at our Pro-Cured baits. Over the flat bottom of the Columbia, downstream from the tributary’s mouth, “hovering” is an easy tech-

GARY LEWIS

nique to master. Drop the rig down, let the ball bounce on the bottom then crank it up one turn of the reel. On a 30-inch leader, the gob of salmon roe runs at an angle. Salmon — fall chinook and silvers — either move out of the way or mouth the bait and pick it back up again. Up top, we tried to discern the difference between the peck of a peamouth and the pluck of a chinook. Perched in the bow, Marc Marcantonio set the hook and manhandled a 4-pound jack chinook to the boat. See River / D5

PHOENIX — Oregon coach Chip Kelly liked the idea of moving the start of his team’s game against Stanford up three hours because fans in Eugene didn’t have to wait all day to see the game, then face a drive home late at night. Other than that, Kelly could have cared less; he’ll play anytime. “I have absolutely no say in the scheduling,” he said. “If you want to play at 3 a.m., I’ll play at 3 a.m. I don’t care.” The Pac-10’s new leadership had a different perspective. They were thrilled with the time change because of the exposure it gave the conference. Had the game gone off at its original time of 8:15 p.m. PDT, it would have started after some East Coasters were already in bed and ended well after last call. By moving kickoff up to 5:15 p.m., No. 9 Stanford at No. 4 Oregon became a prime-time showcase — one not involving those Trojans — that served as the capper to a day filled with premier games. “A year ago when I started in this role, I was told by a lot of people that nationally people see USC and don’t see the depth of the conference after that,” Pac-10 Commissioner Larry Scott said. “To have a year later, Stanford and Oregon be the game that has the most interest in a week with the Red River Rivalry, FloridaAlabama and other important games makes a big statement of where the Pac-10 is at, how it’s seen and the fact that we have two potential national contenders playing.” See Pac-10 / D5

Roundup, box scores, see Page D4

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Yankees Alex Rodriguez, left, and Brett Gardner celebrate after beating the Twins on Wednesday night.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Auto racing ................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D3 Golf ............................................D3 Baseball .................................... D4 College football .........................D5 Hunting & fishing ............. D5, D6

Playoffs open with historic no-hitter by Phillies’ Halladay By Tyler Kepner New York Times News Service

PHILADELPHIA — In a glass case at Citizens Bank Park is a bronze cast of Roy Halladay’s right hand. It holds an official baseball, stamped with a hologram, commemorating his perfect game in May. Halladay did not allow a runner to reach base that night, and the Philadelphia Phillies must have thought that was the greatest game he could pitch. But considering the setting Wednesday, he found a way to top himself. Halladay threw the second no-hitter in postseason history and the first since Don Larsen’s

perfect game for the New York Yankees in the 1956 World Series. Halladay thwarted the Cincinnati Reds, the top-scoring team in the National League this season, in a 4-0 victory in Game 1 of their division playoff series. He allowed only one baserunner, on a walk to Jay Bruce with two outs in the fifth inning, and only a few hard-hit balls. He struck out eight, with exceptional command of his two-seam fastball, cutter, curveball and changeup. The game was bound to be memorable for Halladay, a decorated right-hander who had labored for 12 years with the also-ran Toronto Blue Jays until a trade to the Phillies in December. See Halladay / D4

Rob Carr / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Roy Halladay, left, celebrates with catcher Carlos Ruiz after throwing a no-hitter to defeat the Cincinnati Reds 4-0 during Game 1 of baseball’s National League Division Series, Wednesday in Philadelphia.


D2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, first round, Golf channel. 10 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, first round, Golf channel. Noon — PGA Tour, McGladrey Classic, first round, Golf channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Navistar LPGA Classic, first round, Golf channel.

HOCKEY 9 a.m. — NHL, Carolina Hurricanes vs. Minnesota Wild, VS. network. 4 p.m. — NHL, Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Colorado Avalanche, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 11:30 a.m. — NBA preseason, Los Angeles Lakers vs. FC Barcelona, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, TBS. 3 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, TBS. 6:30 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, TBS.

FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, Nebraska at Kansas State, ESPN.

SOCCER 5 p.m. — MLS, Los Angeles Galaxy at Philadelphia Union, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — USSF Division-2 Pro League, playoffs, Portland Timbers at Vancouver Whitecaps, FSNW.

FRIDAY GOLF

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Football: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Washougal (Wash.), 7 p.m.; Culver at Santiam, 7 p.m.; Powers at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Cross country: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County, Madras, La Pine, Culver at Oxford Classic in Bend, 12:30 p.m. Volleyball: Paisley at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Hosanna, 5:30 p.m. Saturday Cross country: Sisters at Paul Mariman Invitational in Philomath, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Summit at Glencoe Invitational in Hillsboro, 8 a.m.; Madras, La Pine at Junction City tournament, TBA; Sisters at Seaside tournament, TBA; Gilchirst tournament, 9 a.m.; North Lake at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m

CROSS COUNTRY Star City XClassic Bush Park in Salem ——— BOYS Crater, 52; West Salem, 64; St. Helens, 75; Sisters, 128; Sprague, 138; Sheldon, 157; Marist, 205; South Salem, 206; Century, 228; McNary, 254 Individual winner — Neil Seibert, Crater, 16:19 Sisters — 5, Taylor Steele, 16:57; 19, Seth Flanders, 17:56; 21, Mason Calmettes, 17:56; 38, Brandon Pollard, 18:21; 45, David Cowan, 18:38 GIRLS Sheldon, 48; Marist, 64; Crater, 86; Liberty, 137; West Salem, 137; Sprague, 159; Century, 167; Sisters, 191; North Eugene, 197; St. Helens, 291 Individual winner — Maggie Schmaedick, Sheldon, 19:24 Sisters — 13, Zoe Falk, 21:20; 31, Jordan Richerson, 22:27; 32, Hayley Palmer, 22:32; 59, Kati Stewart, 24:06; 71, Kirsten Clark, 25:18

TENNIS CHINA OPEN Wednesday Beijing Singles Men Second Round Gilles Simon, France, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-7 (6), 6-4, 7-6 (4). John Isner, United States, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-3. Nikolay Davykenko (4), Russia, def. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 7-5, 7-5. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Mardy Fish, United States, walkover. Women Second Round Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 6-2, 6-1. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 6-4, 6-2. Third Round Shahar Peer (15), Israel, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1, 6-2. Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 6-2, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (2) Russia, def. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1.

Noon — NHL, Columbus Blue Jackets vs. San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

FOOTBALL NFL

Noon — PGA Tour, McGladrey Classic, second round, Golf channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Navistar LPGA Classic, second round, Golf channel.

HOCKEY

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pepsi 400, practice, ESPN2. 3:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pepsi 400, qualifying, ESPN2.

HORSE RACING 1:30 p.m. — Breeders’ Cup Challenge, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 3 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Cincinnati Reds at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. 6:30 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, TBS.

FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, Connecticut at Rutgers, ESPN. 6 p.m. — College, Oklahoma State at Louisiana-Lafayette, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — High school, Summit at Bend, COTV.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, KICE-AM 940. 3 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, KICE-AM 940. 6:30 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940.

FRIDAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Redmond at Mountain View, KICE-AM 940.

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 106 New England 3 1 0 .750 131 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 Buffalo 0 4 0 .000 61 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 1 0 .750 108 Jacksonville 2 2 0 .500 71 Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 117 Tennessee 2 2 0 .500 98 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 61 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 79 Cleveland 1 3 0 .250 68 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 113 Denver 2 2 0 .500 87 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 76 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Washington 2 2 0 .500 73 N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 72 Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 95 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 3 1 0 .750 93 New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 79 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 Carolina 0 4 0 .000 46 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 1 0 .750 69 Green Bay 3 1 0 .750 106 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 Detroit 0 4 0 .000 82 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 2 2 0 .500 58 St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 77 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 75 San Francisco 0 4 0 .000 52 ——— Sunday’s Games St. Louis at Detroit, 10 a.m. Denver at Baltimore, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Houston, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Washington, 10 a.m. Chicago at Carolina, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Tennessee at Dallas, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Games Minnesota at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m. Open: Miami, New England, Pittsburgh, Seattle

College Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Wednesday’s Game SOUTH UCF 42, UAB 7

PA 61 96 92 125 PA 102 111 92 68 PA 55 50 78 77 PA 38 71 85 107 PA 79 88 79 53 PA 60 72 59 87 PA 68 73 38 106 PA 118 52 77 103

Wreck restarts debate on non-Chase drivers’ rights By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

BASKETBALL NBA

PREP SPORTS

9 a.m. — NHL, Carolina Hurricanes vs. Minnesota Wild, VS. network.

10 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, second round, Golf channel.

d-Texas Tech 1.5 2.5 Baylor a-Arkansas 8 6 Texas A&M MIAMI-FLA 6.5 6.5 Florida St LA TECH 3 (U) 1 Utah St NEVADA 38 39.5 San Jose St San Diego St 5 5 BYU Oregon 34.5 36.5 WASHINGTON ST ARIZONA 8.5 7.5 Oregon St Auburn 8 6 KENTUCKY NORTHWESTERN 10 10 Purdue Miss St 4.5 5 HOUSTON NEW MEXICO ST 3.5 3.5 New Mexico STANFORD 7.5 9.5 Usc BOISE ST 39 39 Toledo SMU 6.5 6.5 Tulsa UTEP 7.5 9 Rice FRESNO ST 9.5 11 Hawaii Arkansas St 1 (N) 2.5 NORTH TEXAS FLORIDA INT’L 9.5 9.5 W. Kentucky UL-MONROE 2.5 3 Fla Atlantic Note: North Texas started as the favorite d-Dallas a-Arlington, Texas

Today Football: Madras at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 7 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Bend, 3:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m.; Irrigon at Central Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at Redmond, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.

JAPAN OPEN Wednesday Tokyo Singles Men Second Round Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, 5-7, 7-6 (7) 4-1, retired. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, def. Richard Gasquet, France, 7-6 (2), 1-6, 6-4. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Daniel GimenoTraver, Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (8). Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Women Second Round Magdalena Rybarikova (3), Slovakia, def. Ryoko Fuda, Japan, 6-4, 6-2. Severine Beltrame, France, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 6-3, 0-1, retired. Jill Craybas, United States, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2. Julie Coin, France, def. Kurumi Nara (7), Japan, 6-2, 5-7, 7-5.

5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, second round, Golf channel.

AUTO RACING: NASCAR

——— Today’s Games MIDWEST Nebraska at Kansas St., 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Prairie View at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 4:30 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Connecticut at Rutgers, 4:30 p.m. SOUTH Oklahoma St. at Louisiana-Lafayette, 6 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Duquesne at Cent. Connecticut St., 9 a.m. Cornell at Harvard, 9 a.m. Richmond at New Hampshire, 9 a.m. Illinois at Penn St., 9 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. at Robert Morris, 9 a.m. Lafayette at Columbia, 9:30 a.m. Fordham at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. at Albany, N.Y., 10 a.m. Sacred Heart at Bryant, 10 a.m. Penn at Bucknell, 10 a.m. Maine at Delaware, 10 a.m. Wagner at Georgetown, D.C., 10 a.m. Brown at Holy Cross, 10 a.m. Colgate at Princeton, 10 a.m. Yale at Dartmouth, 10:30 a.m. VMI at Stony Brook, noon UNLV at West Virginia, 12:30 p.m. James Madison at Towson, 4 p.m. SOUTH Butler at Davidson, 9 a.m. Howard at Furman, 9 a.m. Drake at Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Boston College at N.C. State, 9 a.m. Syracuse at South Florida, 9 a.m. Cent. Michigan at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Tennessee at Georgia, 9:21 a.m. Savannah St. at Georgia St., 10 a.m. Morgan St. at N. Carolina A&T, 10:30 a.m. Memphis at Louisville, 11 a.m. Norfolk St. at S. Carolina St., 11 a.m. Jacksonville St. at Tenn.-Martin, 11 a.m. Chattanooga at The Citadel, 11 a.m. Texas Southern at Alcorn St., noon Elon at Appalachian St., noon Texas St. at SE Louisiana, noon Samford at W. Carolina, noon W. Kentucky at Fla. International, 12:30 a.m. Virginia at Georgia Tech, 12:30 a.m. Charleston Southern at Liberty, 12:30 a.m. Clemson at North Carolina, 12:30 a.m. Army at Tulane, 12:30 a.m. Alabama at South Carolina, 12:30 a.m. Delaware St. at Bethune-Cookman, 1 p.m. Utah St. at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Missouri St. at Murray St., 1 p.m. Hampton at N.C. Central, 1 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Austin Peay, 2 p.m. Alabama St. at Grambling St., 2 p.m. Alabama A&M at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. at Nicholls St., 2 p.m. Wofford at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Cal Poly at Old Dominion, 3 p.m. MVSU at Southern U., 3:30 p.m. Navy at Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m. E. Illinois at E. Kentucky, 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Louisiana-Monroe, 4 p.m. E. Michigan at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Rhode Island at William & Mary, 4 p.m. LSU at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Auburn at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. East Carolina at Southern Miss., 4:30 p.m. Stephen F.Austin at McNeese St., 5 p.m. Florida St. at Miami, 5 p.m. MIDWEST W. Michigan at Ball St., 9 a.m. Temple at N. Illinois, 9 a.m. Indiana at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Minnesota at Wisconsin, 9 a.m. Bowling Green at Ohio, 11 a.m. Marist at Valparaiso, 11 a.m. N. Iowa at S. Illinois, noon Illinois St. at Indiana St., 12:05 p.m. Akron at Kent St., 12:30 p.m. Michigan St. at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame, 12:30 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Youngstown St., 1 p.m. S. Utah at North Dakota, 2 p.m. Miami (Ohio) at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Utah at Iowa St., 4 p.m. Colorado at Missouri, 4 p.m. W. Illinois at S. Dakota St., 4 p.m. Tennessee St. at SE Missouri, 4 p.m. Purdue at Northwestern, 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Baylor vs. Texas Tech at Dallas, 9 a.m. Wyoming at TCU, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas at Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m. Northwestern St. at Cent. Arkansas, 4 p.m. Langston at Lamar, 4 p.m. Arkansas St. at North Texas, 4 p.m. Mississippi St. at Houston, 5 p.m. Tulsa at SMU, 5 p.m. Rice at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Colorado St. at Air Force, 11 a.m. Idaho St. at Montana, 12:05 p.m. UCLA at California, 12:30 p.m. Portland St. at Montana St., 12:35 p.m. N. Arizona at E. Washington, 1:05 p.m. Dayton at San Diego, 2 p.m. Oregon at Washington St., 2 p.m. N. Colorado at Sacramento St., 2:05 p.m. San Diego St. at BYU, 3 p.m. Oregon St. at Arizona, 4 p.m. Toledo at Boise St., 5 p.m. New Mexico at New Mexico St., 5 p.m. Southern Cal at Stanford, 5 p.m. South Dakota at UC Davis, 6 p.m. Hawaii at Fresno St., 7 p.m. Arizona St. at Washington, 7 p.m. San Jose St. at Nevada, 7:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 3, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Previous 1. Alabama (58) 5-0 1,497 1 2. Ohio St. (1) 5-0 1,401 2 3. Oregon 5-0 1,379 4 4. Boise St. (1) 4-0 1,341 3 5. TCU 5-0 1,250 5 6. Oklahoma 5-0 1,183 8 7. Nebraska 4-0 1,172 6 8. Auburn 5-0 1,045 10 9. Arizona 4-0 898 14 10. Utah 4-0 860 13 11. Arkansas 3-1 825 15 12. LSU 5-0 819 12 13. Miami 3-1 769 16 14. Florida 4-1 681 7 15. Iowa 4-1 670 17 16. Stanford 4-1 663 9

17. Michigan St. 5-0 607 24 18. Michigan 5-0 555 19 19. South Carolina 3-1 450 20 20. Wisconsin 4-1 316 11 21. Nevada 5-0 286 25 22. Oklahoma St. 4-0 173 — 23. Florida St. 4-1 162 — 24. Missouri 4-0 99 — 25. Air Force 4-1 94 — Others receiving votes: West Virginia 83, Kansas St. 69, Southern Cal 52, Texas 33, Northwestern 25, Oregon St. 12, Baylor 10, UCLA 8, Virginia Tech 8, N.C. State 4, Penn St. 1. PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. W L Oregon 2 0 Arizona 1 0 Oregon State 1 0 Washington 1 0 Stanford 1 1 USC 1 1 UCLA 1 1 Arizona State 0 2 California 0 1 Washington State 0 2 Saturday’s Games UCLA at California, 12:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington State, 2 p.m. Oregon State at Arizona, 4 p.m. USC at Stanford, 5 p.m. Arizona State at Washington, 7 p.m.

Ov’ll W 5 4 2 2 4 4 3 2 2 1

L 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 3 2 4

PAC-10 TEAM LEADERS Rushing Offense Car Yds Oregon 252 1655 UCLA 233 1312 Southern California 184 1172 Stanford 200 1070 California 149 760 Washington 137 703 Arizona St. 189 838 Oregon St. 123 484 Arizona 117 481 Washington St. 162 430

Yds/G 331.0 262.4 234.4 214.0 190.0 175.8 167.6 121.0 120.3 86.0

Passing Offense Att Comp Arizona St. 198 119 Arizona 155 115 Stanford 154 96 Washington St. 170 96 Oregon 151 88 Southern California 138 91 Washington 134 72 California 116 71 Oregon St. 108 56 UCLA 96 46

Yds/G 301.2 300.8 255.6 253.4 238.2 237.2 235.0 219.3 185.8 91.0

Yds 1506 1203 1278 1267 1191 1186 940 877 743 455

Rushing Defense Car Yds 140 405 173 591 136 504 162 654 181 668 187 790 190 835 180 779 157 939 197 1276

Arizona Arizona St. California Southern California Oregon UCLA Stanford Oregon St. Washington Washington St.

Yds/G 101.3 118.2 126.0 130.8 133.6 158.0 167.0 194.8 234.8 255.2

Passing Defense Att Comp Yds TD Rating Oregon 189 99 1027 5 95.12 Arizona 97 48 518 3 98.36 California 114 62 626 3 102.18 Stanford 142 80 815 4 105.39 UCLA 161 96 1042 7 124.61 Southern California 196 110 1440 10 128.55 Arizona St. 151 90 1144 6 129.73 Washington 108 64 822 4 133.56 Oregon St. 122 73 960 7 135.03 Washington St. 163 104 1273 13 149.59

Betting Line Favorite RAVENS BILLS COLTS LIONS Falcons BENGALS Bears Packers TEXANS Saints Chargers COWBOYS 49ERS JETS

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday 7 7 Broncos PK PK Jaguars 9 8 Chiefs 3 3 Rams 3 3 BROWNS 7 6.5 Buccaneers 2.5 2.5 PANTHERS 3 2.5 REDSKINS 3 3 Giants 6.5 6.5 CARDINALS 5.5 6 RAIDERS 6.5 6.5 Titans 2 3 Eagles Monday 4.5 4 Vikings

Nebraska Connecticut Oklahoma St WISCONSIN S. FLORIDA PENN ST OHIO ST MICHIGAN LOUISVILLE CINCINNATI NC STATE N. CAROLINA GEORGIA TECH N. ILLINOIS Navy W. VIRGINIA BALL ST GEORGIA VANDERBILT Utah MISSOURI VIRGINIA TECH OHIO S. MISS AIR FORCE KENT ST Alabama FLORIDA TCU WASHINGTON CALIFORNIA NOTRE DAME TULANE

COLLEGE Today 11.5 KANSAS ST Friday 5.5 5 RUTGERS 23 24 UL-LAFAYETTE Saturday 21 22 Minnesota 10 7.5 Syracuse 8.5 8 Illinois 23.5 22 Indiana 5 4.5 Michigan State 15.5 17 Memphis 14.5 17 Miami-Ohio 10 9.5 Boston College 1.5 2.5 Clemson 8 10 Virginia 2.5 3 Temple 5.5 5 WAKE FOREST 27.5 27.5 Unlv 4.5 4 W. Michigan 11 11.5 Tennessee 23.5 26 E. Michigan 7.5 6 IOWA ST 12.5 13 Colorado 24 22 C. Michigan 7.5 9 Bowling Green 9.5 8.5 E. Carolina 23.5 25 Colorado St 16.5 17 Akron 8 6.5 S. CAROLINA 7.5 6.5 Lsu 35 34 Wyoming 1.5 2.5 Arizona St 7.5 7.5 Ucla 5.5 6.5 Pittsburgh 1 (A) 1 Army 11.5

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Minnesota 106, New York 100 Oklahoma City 97, Charlotte 93 Boston 93, Philadelphia 65 Memphis 87, Indiana 85 Toronto 129, Phoenix 78 Today’s Games Memphis at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Utah, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City vs. Miami at Kansas City, Mo., 5:30 p.m. Portland at Denver, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— Today’s Games Carolina at Minnesota, 9 a.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 4 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 7 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Minnesota at Carolina, 9 a.m. Columbus at San Jose, noon Dallas at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday’s Game Columbus at Chicago, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Real Salt Lake at New York, 1:30 p.m. Colorado at FC Dallas, 3 p.m. San Jose at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, October 10 New England at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League TEXAS RANGERS — Designated RHP Rich Harden for assignment. Claimed RHP Ryan Tucker off waivers from Florida. National League FLORIDA MARLINS — Assigned LHP Taylor Tankersley, RHP Tim Wood, INF Hector Luna and C Mike Rivera outright to New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Extended their player development contract with Huntsville (SL) through the 2012 season. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Exercised their 2011 contract option on 1B Albert Pujols. Announced the 2011 contract vesting option for LHP Trever Miller has been met. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Claimed INF Jarrett Hoffpauir off waivers from Toronto. Designated C Chris Stewart for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS — Waived F Chris Richard. MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Waived F Keith Gallon. NEW JERSEY NETS — Waived G Eddie Gill. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Signed RB Andre Anderson from their practice squad. Released TE Joe Klopfenstein from injured reserve. Signed DE Ra’Shon Harris to their practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Waived DB Derrick Roberson. DETROIT LIONS — Claimed OT Jamon Meredith off waivers from Buffalo. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed QB Keith Null to their practice squad. Waived DT Kommonyan Quaye. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Traded DE Jayme Mitchell to Cleveland for an undisclosed 2012 draft pick. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Traded WR Randy Moss to Minnesota for an undisclosed draft pick. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed RB Javarris James and RB Keiland Williams to their practice squad. Released LB Mike Balogun from their practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS — Placed F Jim Slater on the injured/non-roster list and F Andrew Kozek on the injured reserve list. BUFFALO SABRES — Assigned G Jhonas Enroth to Portland (AHL). Announced F Matt Ellis cleared waivers and has been assigned to Portland. DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned F Kirk Maltby and D Derek Meech to Grand Rapids (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS — Loaned D Sheldon Souray to Hersey (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned G Erik Ersberg and F Rich Clune to Manchester (AHL). Signed C Jordan Nolan to a three-year contract. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned G Curtis Sanford, D Alex Henry, D Yannick Weber, F Ben Maxwell and F Ryan White to Hamilton (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed D Bryce Salvador on long-term injured reserve. Designated D Anssi Salmela as injured-nonroster player. Assigned D Matt Taormina to Albany (AHL). Recalled C Adam Henrique from Albany. OTTAWA SENATORS — Assigned D David Hale to Binghamton (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Assigned D Maxim Goncharov to San Antonio (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Assigned D Matt Roy to Norfolk (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Traded F Darcy Hordichuk to Florida for F Andrew Peters. Recalled D Lee Sweatt from Manitoba (AHL) Sent G Cory Schneider, LW Jeff Tambellini and C Alexandre Bolduc to Manitoba.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — When David Reutimann intentionally wrecked Kyle Busch at Kansas Speedway, the payback for an earlier incident cost Busch significantly in the championship standings. It also reignited a serious debate about how drivers who aren’t eligible for the title should race drivers who are competing in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Contact between Busch and Reutimann caused Reutimann to wreck early in the race, and he sent Busch into the wall as retaliation about 100 laps later. Busch was running seventh at the time, finished 21st and dropped from third to seventh in the Chase standings. He wondered after the race why Reutimann had to retaliate when Busch has so much on the line. “For a guy that’s in the Chase, that’s racing for something? He’ll be here next year, he could have wrecked me in any of the first 26 races next year. That would have been fine,” Busch said. But Reutimann didn’t wait, arguing this week he didn’t have the luxury of being wrecked by Busch at a more convenient time. “I had a dang good race car, and I didn’t have an opportunity to have a choice of when I wanted to get wrecked or how I wanted to get wrecked,” he said. The conversation coming out of Kansas has centered around the many elements of Reutimann’s actions. Not too many people are hung up on whether or not he had the right to send a message to Busch. Instead, it’s the day of delivery that’s receiving so much scrutiny. NASCAR’s championship format puts just 12 drivers in contention for the title over the final 10 races of the season. Only the Chase drivers are racing against the full field, and everybody on the track has their own personal agendas. There are drivers outside the Chase trying to win races, attract sponsors and line up jobs for next season. Every finishing position is critical, and nobody has a desire to pull over for a Chase driver. Reutimann’s team owner argued this week that the drivers not racing for the championship have every reason to race as hard as possible. “There are 43 drivers on the race track each Sunday, and there is no delineation between Chase participants and non-Chase participants when it comes to respect,” Michael Waltrip said. The issue has been apparent since the opening race of the inaugural 2004 Chase. Robby Gordon and Greg Biffle got into a game of bumper-cars at New Hampshire, and Gordon’s intentional retaliation collected Chase drivers Tony Stewart and Jeremy Mayfield. Their championship chances were ruined before the halfway point of the first Chase race, and the debate over scoring championship contenders on their own points system has raged ever since. NASCAR has never moved to adopt a separate points system, but non-Chase drivers have tried to be more careful in the years since. “When I wasn’t in the Chase, I would just be aware of my surroundings,” said Biffle. “I was cognizant of racing Chase guys and really making sure I didn’t make a mistake and take one out. For personal reasons, I don’t want to be the guy who lost control of my car and hit a guy for a no reason.” Four-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson said he’s never really noticed drivers pulling over and letting him go by without incident just because he’s racing for a title. “The whole theory on etiquette is you race people how they race you,” Johnson said. “I have to say that as a Chase driver, there are times where I wish guys would cut me some slack and recognize that I’m in the Chase. But then once I climb out of the car and really think about it, they’re trying to do everything they can as well, for their jobs and their sponsors.” NASCAR has taken a more relaxed stand this season under the “Boys, have at it” policy of allowing drivers to self-police themselves. In years past, Reutimann likely would been have punished by NASCAR immediately after the accident. But NASCAR took no action Sunday, and series director John Darby indicated there would be no serious follow-up. “We’ll follow up at the track, but the thing that’s easy to get mixed up is there are 43 drivers on the racetrack, not just 12,” Darby said. So Busch will move ahead to California this weekend knowing that if not for a dustup with Reutimann, he’d be in much better shape in the Chase. He’s probably blaming Reutimann for that, but Biffle said Chase drivers have their own responsibility to stay out of trouble. Had Busch not spun Reutimann, Biffle said, the payback never would have occurred. “Be careful,” Biffle said. “Why even put yourself in a position to spin somebody with so much on the line?”

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,669 383 465 140 The Dalles 2,048 475 2,227 822 John Day 1,451 399 2,099 684 McNary 2,610 257 2,313 666 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 794,900 89,679 408,882 153,712 The Dalles 528,303 71,869 311,813 115,020 John Day 449,280 66,232 253,180 91,659 McNary 398,511 41,874 230,216 77,590

Amelia C. Warden / The Associated Press

David Reutimann (00) spins between Reed Sorenson (83) and Dale Earnhardt Jr. (88) after contact with Kyle Busch, early in Sunday’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Kansas Speedway, in Kansas City, Kan.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

S  B

Sisters girls soccer still perfect after Sky-Em win Bulletin staff report JUNCTION CITY — Opponents of undefeated Sisters are getting frustrated in their attempts to hand the Outlaws their first girls soccer defeat of the season. In a match Wednesday marred by a fight in the second half, Sisters improved to 9-0 overall and 6-0 in the Sky-Em League with a 4-1 road victory at Junction City. The Outlaws lit up the scoreboard just two minutes into the match on an unassisted goal by Natalie Ambrose. In the 16th minute Haley Carlson scored on an assist from Jodie Reoch to put the visitors up 2-0. Four minutes later, Reoch scored a goal of her own to make the score 3-0. Junction City responded with a goal on a penalty kick in the 25th minute to narrow Sisters’ lead to 3-1, but Kelly Cole finished the scoring eight minutes later, recording a goal on a corner kick delivered by Reoch. After the scuffle in the second half, both sides were reduced to 10 players due to a red card being issued to each team. Sisters, which is averaging nearly six goals a game in its best start in school history, plays at home next Tuesday against Cottage Grove (5-1 Sky-Em). In other prep action Wednesday: GIRLS SOCCER La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ELMIRA — The Hawks snapped a five-match losing streak and scored more than one goal in a game for the first time this season to earn the road draw. “We were missing three starters and the other kids absolutely stepped up,” said La Pine coach Scott Winslow. Haylee Plotner scored both goals for the Hawks, just four minutes apart late in the first half. The first tally was in the 35th minute and the second goal came moments before the break from an assist by freshman Jocelyn Gerdau, who was playing in just her second varsity game. With only two substitutes, La Pine struggled in the second half as the Falcons scored twice to tie the game. The Hawks (0-4-2 Sky-Em, 0-6-2 overall) host Junction City on Monday. BOYS SOCCER Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 SISTERS — Colby Gilmore scored the first goal of the game and assisted on the second to guide the Outlaws to their fourth consecutive Sky-Em League victory. In the second minute of the contest, Gilmore headed in a Jake McAllister pass to put Sisters ahead 1-0. In the 64th minute, Gilmore assisted on Evan Rickards’ score to give the Outlaws a 2-0 lead. Sisters (4-1 Sky-Em, 6-3 overall) is at Cottage Grove on Tuesday. VOLLEYBALL Sweet Home. . . . . . . . . . . . 25-26-25-25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-24-27-15 LA PINE — Despite falling to 0-5 in Sky-Em League play, the Hawks

PUTTING THE HAMMER DOWN

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sisters’ Lizzy Carhart slams the ball past a Junction City defender during the first game of Wednesday’s Sky-Em League match in Sisters. Sisters won the match in three games. See story, Page D1. played one of their best matches of the season, according to La Pine coach Aaron Mallory. Meagan McReynolds posted 12 kills and a block, Carly Roderick added six kills and five blocks and Dessirae Stinson contributed four kills and a block in the league loss. Jen Pautz dished out 27 assists and went 12 of 13 from the service line with two aces, while Sarah Alford recorded three blocks of her own for La Pine. The Hawks are at a tournament in Junction City on Saturday. Regis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-18-16 STAYTON — Culver’s three-match win streak came to an end with the Tri-River Conference defeat to Regis, which is undefeated and in first place in the Class 2A league. Emilee Zachary posted eight kills for Culver while Kelsie Stafford added five kills and nine digs. The Bulldogs (7-3 Tri-Riv-

er) play at East Linn on Tuesday. CROSS COUNTRY Sisters runner takes fifth SALEM — Senior Taylor Steele was the first Outlaw across the finish line in the boys 5,000-meter race at the Star City XClassic, finishing in fifth place for Sisters with a time of 16 minutes and 57 seconds. Seth Flanders and Mason Calmettes both posted times of 17:56, and the Outlaws finished in fourth place as a team. The best time for the Sisters girls was provided by Zoe Falk, who finished in 13th place (21:20). The Outlaws finished in eighth place in the girls event. “It was kind of our last real training meet of the season and the kids are where we want them to be right now,” said Sisters coach Charlie Kanzig. “We look forward to the important meets later this month.” The Outlaws are at Philomath on Saturday.

Is a ‘world tour’ on the horizon for pros? The Associated Press

NEWPORT, Wales — PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem expects some form of a “world tour” in golf in the future, even if he’s not around when it takes shape. Europe already has one, with sanctioned tournaments on five continents. The PGA Tour is going to Malaysia later this month, returns to Shanghai for a World Golf Championship and has Japan on its wish list. The trick is to get everyone on the same page. “I think that at some point in time, men’s professional golf will become integrated globally,” Finchem said. “Now, what form that takes, whether it’s a total integration, whether it’s a FIFA-type, I don’t know. One question is how the competition is organized. Another question is how the organizational structure behind it is organized. The first one is the key thing.” One reason Finchem believes a world tour is inevitable is marketing and sponsorship, which includes the players. Phil Mickelson is sponsored by Barclays, which promotes tournaments in Singapore, Scotland and New York. He is playing all of them this year. The U.S. tour also has such multinational title sponsors as Deutsche Bank and BMW (both playoff events), Accenture and Zurich. “I think it’s a matter of time,” Finchem said. “Golf generally is a splintered sport, multi-organizational at every level. But there’s movement. The last 15 years there’s been a lot of movement. I would see that continuing to develop toward integration.” Even though the Ryder Cup com-

• Former national champ gets lifetime ban: Former U.S. national pro cycling champion Kirk O’Bee has received a lifetime suspension for a second doping offense. O’Bee, who spent the 2000 season on Lance Armstrong’s U.S. Postal Service team, received his first suspension after testing positive for testosterone when he won the national pro criterium title in 2001. He also won national titles in 1997 and 2007. His lifetime ban stems from an arbitration decision released Wednesday that upheld a positive EPO test from May 2009. The arbitration panel also upheld evidence obtained by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that reflected O’Bee had actually committed a second doping offense, using EPO and human growth hormone, by 2005. All his records since 2005, including his 2007 national title, have been forfeited.

Football

GOLF NOTEBOOK

By Doug Ferguson

Cycling

pleted a rugged stretch of golf — some players competed seven out of nine weeks, all big events — that doesn’t mean the season is over. The Fall Series still has four tournaments left, although the focus shifts overseas. Ernie Els, Retief Goosen, Adam Scott, K.J. Choi and Ryan Palmer are among those planning to play the tour’s event in Malaysia, which is cosanctioned with the Asian Tour. Then it’s off to Shanghai for the HSBC Champions, Singapore and onward to Dubai for Europe, with Tiger Woods heading Down Under again to defend his title in the Australian Masters. Integration can get tricky, for sure. But it starts with cooperation. The European Tour was the first outside tour to set up golf in Asia, and one year had more tournaments in China than in Scotland. Now comes the American tour looking to create tournaments and opportunities for its members. Finchem says he and European tour chief George O’Grady have been “working together.” “We’re not going to play a ton of tournaments over there, so it shouldn’t be a problem. George knows that,” Finchem said. “We’re talking to him constantly about what our plan would be. My guess is it will result in us doing even more together.”

Pavin donation U.S. Ryder Cup players and captains have donated more than $15 million, with $50,000 of their $200,000 charity allotment directed to the “Play Golf America” program at the college of their choice. Oklahoma State received two such

donations, from Rickie Fowler and Hunter Mahan. Georgia Tech also had two players — Matt Kuchar and Stewart Cink — although Kuchar directed his to the Coastal College of Georgia. Phil Mickelson, who had been splitting his contribution between Arizona State (his alma mater) and San Diego (where his brother is the golf coach), sent the entire donation to San Diego this year. The biggest surprise came from the captain. Corey Pavin, an All-American at UCLA, sent his money to Grambling State and Spellman College, two historically black colleges. “We just thought it was something we wanted to do,” Pavin said during the matches. “We looked at several programs and decided on these two. There was really no other reason.” The PGA of America sponsors the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship and has a program devoted to diversity. PGA chief executive Joe Steranka wasn’t surprised when he saw the list of donations, noting that Lisa Pavin is Vietnamese. “Having a captain and his wife, a multicultural couple raising a beautiful daughter, the commitment they have made to historically minority colleges shows people they have their eyes wide open on the future of this country and this sport,” Steranka said.

Stat of the week Graeme McDowell won a major in June and won the decisive point in the Ryder Cup in October. The last player to do both in the same year was Tom Watson in 1983.

• Redskins’ Portis out 4-6 weeks: Clinton Portis will be out at least a month with a groin injury, putting the two-time Pro Bowl running back’s future in doubt once again. His injury leaves the Washington Redskins with a very inexperienced backfield, too. Coach Mike Shanahan said Wednesday that Portis has a third degree separation of the left groin, with the muscle separated off the bone. Portis will not require surgery, and the coach estimated a recovery time of four to six weeks.Portis was hurt in Sunday’s 17-12 win over the Philadelphia Eagles, when he was already starting to share more of the rushing load with Ryan Torain. Now the only two healthy tailbacks on the roster are Torain and Chad Simpson, who have combined for 70 carries in their NFL careers heading into this week’s game against the Green Bay Packers. • Jets’ Revis: Moss put ‘foot on brake’ in Week 2: Darrelle Revis is ready to play, and you can bet Randy Moss hopes the Jets cornerback is out there defending him Monday night. Revis added another chapter to their personal rivalry Wednesday, saying Moss — now with the Minnesota Vikings — eased up in the second half of New England’s 28-14 loss to New York three weeks ago. “He came out full force, early in the game,” Revis said. “In the second half, you could tell he was kind of like putting his foot on the brake. But everybody knows that’s Randy: sometimes he plays 100 percent, sometimes he doesn’t.” Revis was limited at practice Wednesday, but hopes to play after missing the last 2½ games with a strained left hamstring. He was injured defending Moss on a touchdown catch late in the first half of the game in Week 2. • NFL hits Browns safety Ward with fine: T.J. Ward’s “cheap shot” was costly. For delivering a nasty blow to an opponent’s head, the NFL belted the Browns’ rookie safety in the wallet. Ward, who in just four games as a pro has developed a reputation as a ferocious tackler and fearless talker, was fined $15,000 Wednesday for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Cincinnati wide receiver Jordan Shipley during the fourth quarter of the Browns’ win on Sunday. Ward confirmed he was fined, but he would not divulge the amount. However, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press that the league assessed Ward the $15,000 penalty for ramming Shipley, who was knocked out briefly and sustained a concussion. • Rookie QB Hall to start for Arizona: Arizona Cardinals coach Ken Whisenhunt has put his team’s struggling offense into the hands of undrafted rookie quarterback Max Hall. Whisenhunt announced after Wednesday’s practice that the former BYU standout would make his first NFL start Sunday when the Cardinals are home against the Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints, replacing the erratic Derek Anderson. Hall is Arizona’s third starting quarterback since training camp opened. Anderson replaced Matt Leinart in the third preseason game. That led to Leinart’s release and left Hall as Anderson’s backup. The Cardinals are tied for the NFC West lead at 2-2 but have been outscored 82-17 in their two losses.

Golf • Ozaki elected to Hall of Fame: Jumbo Ozaki finally gets to celebrate in America when he is inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Ozaki, who won more than 100 tournaments and led the Japan Golf Tour money list 12 times, was elected Wednesday through the international ballot by receiving 50 percent of the vote from a panel of journalists, golf dignitaries and Hall of Fame members. He will be inducted May 9 at the World Golf Village in St. Augustine, Fla., along with Ernie Els, Doug Ford, the late Jock Hutchison and former President George H.W. Bush. Ozaki had 111 victories, all in Japan except for the New Zealand PGA Championship in 1972. The knock on Ozaki was that he never won in the United States, although he had top 10s in the Masters and U.S. Open. He joins Isao Aoki as the only Japanese men in the Hall of Fame. • No. 1 heir Westwood not playing PGA Tour in 2011: Lee Westwood says he will not be a regular on the PGA Tour in the U.S. next year, meaning Tiger Woods’ anticipated successor as the top-ranked golfer will be based on the European Tour. The 37-year-old Englishman said Wednesday that he will put his family first in 2011, remaining based in Europe despite the millions more he could earn competing for the FedEx Cup. His only trips to America next year will be for the majors, World Golf Championships and

occasional events that might help him prepare for those tournaments. “I’m not taking my card up in the States,” Westwood said as he prepared for today’s start of the Dunhill Links Championship.

Tennis • Garcia-Lopez reaches Japan quarters: Spain’s Guillermo Garcia-Lopez advanced to the quarterfinals of the Japan Open in Tokyo with a 7-6 (5), 6-4 win Wednesday over compatriot Feliciano Lopez. Garcia-Lopez saved four break points to defeat the sixth-seeded Lopez. Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic advanced with a 5-7, 7-6 (7) 4-1 win over Marco Chiudinelli, who retired with a lower back injury. Jarkko Nieminen of Finland defeated Daniel Gimeno-Traver 6-3, 76 (8). Dmitry Tursunov, ranked 432nd after thee left ankle surgeries, outlasted Richard Gasquet 7-6 (2), 1-6, 6-4 to make his first quarterfinal since July 2009. Topseeded Nadal and second-seeded Andy Roddick play their second-round matches today. • Davydenko into China Open quarterfinals: Nikolay Davydenko cruised into the quarterfinals of the China Open in Beijing with a 7-5, 7-5 win over Marin Cilic of Croatia on Wednesday. The fourth-seeded Russian will face American John Isner, who beat Germany’s Philipp Kohlschreiber 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-3. German qualifier Michael Berrer could not duplicate the play that helped him beat fifth-seeded Tomas Berdych in the previous round, falling to Gilles Simon of France 6-7 (6), 6-4, 7-6 (4). On the women’s side, Serbia’s Bojana Jovanovski, who previously knocked out third-seeded compatriot Jelena Jankovic, lost to Shahar Peer of Israel 6-1, 6-2. Second-seeded Vera Zvonereva moved into the quarterfinals after defeating fellow Russian Maria Kirilenko 5-7, 6-4, 6-2. • Venus Williams’ 2010 season over: Venus Williams is done for the season because of a left knee injury that has sidelined her for most of the second half of 2010. In a statement released to The Associated Press on Wednesday, the seventime Grand Slam champion said she is “very disappointed to announce that I will be unable to play” in the WTA Tour Championships at the end of October, and the Fed Cup final between the United States and Italy at San Diego in November. She is No. 3 in this week’s WTA rankings and went 38-7 with two titles in singles, and 18-1 with three titles in doubles this season, earning more than $2.5 million in prize money.

Basketball • Stern wants NBA preseason games in Brazil: David Stern is promising Brazilian fans they will soon have the chance to watch NBA players in action in their own country. The NBA commissioner said during a news conference Wednesday that preseason games will be held in Brazil “likely prior to the 2014 World Cup”, when Brazil will organize the showcase soccer tournament. “My backup position is prior to the Olympics,” Stern said of the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro. “We are well aware of the World Cup and Olympic expectations. And we expect to be following up on that opportunity relatively shortly.” Stern was speaking ahead of a preseason game between the New York Knicks and the Minnesota Timberwolves in Paris. He also said the NBA would soon open an office in Brazil. • GMs pick Lakers to repeat, Durant to win MVP: The Lakers’ Kobe Bryant will earn another ring and Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant will seize the MVP award away from LeBron James. Those are among the opinions of NBA general managers who voted in the ninth annual NBA.com GM survey, which was released Wednesday. Los Angeles was picked by 63 percent of the respondents to repeat as champions, with 33 percent of the vote going to James and the new-look Miami Heat. Durant, the MVP of the U.S. victory in the world basketball championship, received 67 percent of the MVP vote. James, the two-time MVP, was picked by only 4 percent. Top pick John Wall was the overwhelming favorite for Rookie of the Year, claiming 68 percent. The GMs picked Boston — a unanimous choice in the Atlantic — Chicago, Miami, the Lakers, Dallas and Oklahoma City as division champions. • Wade: Leg is still sore: Dwyane Wade’s right hamstring remains sore, and the Miami Heat star guard says he’s undergoing a lengthy round of treatments to try and get back on the court as soon as possible. Wade pulled the hamstring 3:17 into the Heat preseason opener against Detroit on Tuesday night and did not return. He expects to miss up to two weeks, although no timetable for a return has been formally announced.

Track and field • Olympic 100m champ Fraser gets doping ban: World and Olympic 100meter champion Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica was suspended for six months Wednesday after failing a doping test. Fraser will be ineligible to compete until Jan. 7, the IAAF announced. She was provisionally suspended by the track and field governing body in June after she tested positive for the drug oxycodone at the Diamond League meet May 23 in Shanghai. Fraser had a dental procedure shortly before flying to China for the meet. She said she took a painkiller because of a toothache. Fraser won gold in the 100 at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, leading a Jamaican sweep. She won the 2009 world title in Berlin. — The Associated Press


D4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M L B P L AYO F F S C O R E B O A R D AT A GLANCE MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT Subject to change ——— DIVISION SERIES American League Tampa Bay vs. Texas Wednesday, Oct. 6 Texas 5, Tampa Bay 1, Texas leads series 1-0 Today, Oct. 7 Texas (Wilson 15-8) at Tampa Bay (Shields 13-15), 11:37 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 9 Tampa Bay (Garza 15-10) at Texas (Lewis 12-13), 2:07 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Tampa Bay (Davis 12-10) at Texas (Hunter 13-4), 10:07 a.m., if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 Texas at Tampa Bay, if necessary Minnesota vs. New York Wednesday, Oct. 6 New York 6, Minnesota 4, New York leads series 1-0 Today, Oct. 7 New York (Pettitte 11-3) at Minnesota (Pavano 17-11), 3:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9 Minnesota (Duensing 10-3) at New York (Hughes 18-8), 5:37 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Minnesota (Blackburn 10-12) at New York (Sabathia 21-7), 5:07 p.m., if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 New York at Minnesota, if necessary National League Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati Wednesday, Oct. 6 Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 0, Philadelphia leads series 1-0 Friday, Oct. 8 Cincinnati (Arroyo 17-10) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 3:07 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at Cincinnati (Cueto 12-7), 4:07 p.m. or 5:07 p.m. Monday, Oct. 11 Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 2:07 p.m. or 4:37 p.m., if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 3:07 p.m. or 5:07 p.m., if necessary San Francisco vs. Atlanta Today, Oct. 7 Atlanta (Lowe 16-12) at San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10), 6:37 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 Atlanta (Hanson 10-11) at San Francisco (Cain 13-11), 6:37 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Atlanta (Hudson 17-9), 1:37 p.m. Monday, Oct. 11 San Francisco at Atlanta, 5:37 p.m. or 4:37 p.m., if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Atlanta at San Francisco, 6:37 p.m. or 5:07 p.m., if necessary

BOX SCORES Phillies 4, Reds 0 Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Bruce rf Stubbs cf R.Hernandez c Volquez p Tr.Wood p a-J.Francisco ph Ondrusek p Bray p b-Cairo ph Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 27

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB SO Avg. 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 3 .000 0 2 .000 1 0 .000 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 --0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 0 --0 0 --0 0 .000 1 8

Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf C.Ruiz c W.Valdez 3b Halladay p Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 1 3 3 29

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4

H 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 5

BI 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BB SO Avg. 1 0 .000 0 0 .500 0 0 .000 0 2 .000 0 2 .000 0 0 .250 2 0 .000 0 0 .333 0 0 .333 3 4

Cincinnati 000 000 000 — 0 0 1 Philadelphia 130 000 00x — 4 5 0 a-grounded out for Tr.Wood in the 6th. b-fouled out for Bray in the 9th. E—Ondrusek (1). LOB—Cincinnati 1, Philadelphia 5. 2B—Victorino (1), Ibanez (1). RBIs—Victorino 2 (2), Utley (1), Halladay (1). SB—Victorino (1). SF—Utley. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Utley, W.Valdez, Halladay). Runners moved up—W.Valdez. Cincinnati IP H R ER Volquez L, 0-1 1 2-3 4 4 4 Tr.Wood 3 1-3 1 0 0 Ondrusek 1 2-3 0 0 0 Bray 1 1-3 0 0 0 Philadelphia IP H R ER Halladay W, 1-0 9 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Tr.Wood (C.Ruiz). T—2:34. A—46,411 (43,651).

BB 2 1 0 0 BB 1 2-0.

SO NP ERA 0 56 21.60 3 47 0.00 0 22 0.00 1 15 0.00 SO NP ERA 8 104 0.00 IBB—off Tr.Wood

Rangers 5, Rays 1 Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b J.Hamilton cf Guerrero dh N.Cruz lf Kinsler 2b Francoeur rf Cantu 1b B.Molina c Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 37

R 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 5

H 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 3 10

BI 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 5

BB SO Avg. 0 0 .200 0 1 .000 0 1 .250 0 0 .500 0 1 .250 0 1 .250 0 1 .250 0 3 .000 0 0 .750 0 8

Tampa Bay Bartlett ss a-Jaso ph-c B.Upton cf Crawford lf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Baldelli dh b-D.Johnson ph Zobrist rf Shoppach c

AB 3 1 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 3

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

H 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

BB SO Avg. 0 1 .333 0 0 1.000 0 2 .000 0 0 .250 0 1 .250 1 3 .000 0 2 .000 1 0 --0 0 .500 0 1 .000

Brignac ss S.Rodriguez 2b c-Joyce ph Totals

1 3 1 34

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 6

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 2

M L B P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

1 .000 1 .000 1 .000 13

Texas 021 110 000 — 5 10 1 Tampa Bay 000 000 100 — 1 6 2 a-singled for Bartlett in the 8th. c-struck out for S.Rodriguez in the 9th. E—Andrus (1), S.Rodriguez (1), Longoria (1). LOB—Texas 5, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Guerrero (1), Francoeur (1), Zobrist (1). HR— N.Cruz (1), off Price; B.Molina (1), off Price; Zobrist (1), off Cl.Lee. RBIs—Guerrero (1), N.Cruz (1), Francoeur (1), B.Molina 2 (2), Zobrist (1). SB—J.Hamilton (1), Crawford (1). CS—Andrus (1). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 2 (N.Cruz, Francoeur); Tampa Bay 5 (Baldelli 2, Bartlett, C.Pena, Joyce). GIDP—Andrus. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, C.Pena). Texas IP H R ER BB Cl.Lee W, 1-0 7 5 1 1 0 O’Day 1-3 1 0 0 0 D.Oliver 2-3 0 0 0 0 N.Feliz 1 0 0 0 2 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB Price L, 0-1 6 2-3 9 5 4 0 Qualls 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—D.Oliver 1-0. T—3:06. A—35,474 (36,973).

SO 10 1 0 2 SO 8 0 0

NP 104 7 6 20 NP 107 18 7

ERA 1.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 ERA 5.40 0.00 0.00

Yankees 6, Twins 4 New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Golson rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Thames dh Posada c Granderson cf Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 5 0 5 3 4 3 4 4 3 36

R 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 6

H 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 9

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 6

BB SO Avg. 0 1 .200 0 1 .200 0 0 --0 0 .400 1 1 .333 0 0 .250 1 1 .000 0 2 .500 0 1 .250 1 1 .000 3 8

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Delm.Young lf Thome dh Cuddyer 1b Kubel rf 1-Repko pr-rf Valencia 3b 2-Tolbert pr-3b Hardy ss Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 3 4 2 0 3 0 4 34

R 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 3

BB SO Avg. 0 0 .200 0 0 .250 0 2 .200 1 0 .250 1 1 .000 0 1 .500 2 0 .000 0 0 --1 2 .333 0 0 --0 1 .250 5 7

New York 000 004 200 — 6 9 0 Minnesota 021 001 000 — 4 8 0 1-ran for Kubel in the 8th. 2-ran for Valencia in the 8th. LOB—New York 6, Minnesota 10. 2B—Teixeira (1), Cuddyer (1), Hardy (1). 3B—Granderson (1). HR—Teixeira (1), off Crain; Cuddyer (1), off Sabathia. RBIs—Teixeira 2 (2), Cano (1), Posada (1), Granderson 2 (2), Cuddyer 2 (2), Valencia (1). SB—A.Rodriguez (1). S—O.Hudson. Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Granderson, A.Rodriguez, Gardner, Thames); Minnesota 7 (Delm.Young, Span 3, Hardy 2, Thome). Runners moved up—Cano, Mauer, Hardy. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 1-0 6 5 4 3 3 5 111 4.50 Logan H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 D.Robertson H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 10 0.00 K.Wood H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 Ma.Rivera S, 1-1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 21 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano 5 2-3 6 4 4 3 7 106 6.35 Mijares 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Crain L, 0-1 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 17 54.00 Fuentes 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 25 0.00 Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—D.Robertson 1-0, Ma.Rivera 2-0, Mijares 1-0, Fuentes 1-0. HBP—by Sabathia (Thome). WP—Liriano. PB—Posada. T—3:47. A—42,032 (39,504). 2010 No-Hitters Philadelphia — Roy Halladay vs. Cincinnati, 4-0, Oct. 6, 2010, NLDS. Oakland — x-Dallas Braden vs. Tampa Bay, 4-0, May 9, 2010. Tampa Bay — Matt Garza vs. Detroit, 5-0, July 26, 2010. Colorado — Ubaldo Jimenez at Atlanta, 4-0, April 17, 2010. Philadelphia — x-Roy Halladay, at Florida, 1-0, May 29, 2010. Arizona — Edwin Jackson at Tampa Bay, 1-0, June 26, 2010. Most Recent No-Hitters Team-by-Team American League Baltimore — Bob Milacki (6 innings), Mike Flanagan (1), Mark Williamson (1) and Gregg Olson (1) vs. Oakland, 2-0, July 13, 1991. Boston — Jon Lester vs. Kansas City, 7-0, May 19, 2008. Chicago — x-Mark Buehrle vs. Tampa Bay, 5-0, July 23, 2009. Cleveland — x-Len Barker vs. Toronto, 3-0, May 15, 1981. Detroit — Justin Verlander vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 4-0, June 12, 2007. Kansas City — Bret Saberhagen vs. Chicago White Sox, 7-0, Aug. 26, 1991. Los Angeles — Mark Langston (7) and Mike Witt (2) vs. Seattle, 1-0, April 11, 1990. Minnesota — Eric Milton vs. Anaheim, 7-0, Sept. 11, 1999. New York — x-David Cone vs. Montreal, 6-0, July 18, 1999. Oakland — x-Dallas Braden vs. Tampa Bay, 4-0, May 9, 2010. Seattle — Chris Bosio vs. Boston, 7-0, April 22, 1993. Tampa Bay — Matt Garza vs. Detroit, 5-0, July 26, 2010. Texas — x-Kenny Rogers vs. California, 4-0, July 28, 1994. Toronto — Dave Stieb at Cleveland, 3-0, Sept. 2, 1990. National League Arizona — Edwin Jackson at Tampa Bay, 1-0, June 26, 2010. Atlanta — Kent Mercker at L.A. Dodgers, 6-0, April 8, 1994. Cincinnati — x-Tom Browning vs. L.A. Dodgers, 1-0, Sept. 16, 1988. Chicago — Carlos Zambrano vs. Houston at Milwaukee, 5-0, Sept. 14, 2008. Colorado — Ubaldo Jimenez at Atlanta, 4-0, April 17, 2010. Florida — Anibal Sanchez vs. Arizona, 2-0, Sept. 6, 2006. Houston — Roy Oswalt (1 inning), Pete Munro (2 2/3), Kirk Saarloos (1 1/3), Brad Lidge (2) and Octavio Dotel (1), Billy Wagner (1) at N.Y. Yankees, 8-0, June 11, 2003. Los Angeles — Hideo Nomo at Colorado, 9-0, Sept. 17, 1996. Milwaukee (AL) — Juan Nieves at Baltimore, 7-0, April 15, 1987. New York — None. Philadelphia — Roy Halladay, vs. Cincinnati, 4-0, Oct. 6, 2010, NLDS. Pittsburgh — Francisco Cordova (9) and Ricardo Rincon (1), vs. Houston, 3-0, 10 innings, July 12, 1997. St. Louis — Bud Smith at San Diego, 4-0, Sept. 3, 2001. San Diego — None. San Francisco — Jonathan Sanchez vs. San Diego, 8-0, July 10, 2009. Washington — x-Dennis Martinez (Montreal) at L.A. Dodgers, 2-0, July 28, 1991. x-perfect game

Jim Mone / The Associated Press

New York Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez (13) congratulates Mark Teixeira after Teixeira hit a two-run home run during the seventh inning against the Minnesota Twins in Game 1 of an American League Division Series on Wednesday in Minneapolis.

Yankees rally to beat Twins in opener of division series The Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS — Be it the majestic views of Target Field or that dusty old hornets’ nest they called the Metrodome, it just doesn’t seem to matter. The New York Yankees simply own the Minnesota Twins in the playoffs. Mark Teixeira hit a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the seventh inning and the Yankees rallied to a 6-4 victory Wednesday night in Game 1 of the AL division series, the Twins’ 10th straight postseason loss. “Game-winning homers,” Teixeira said with a wide smile on his face, “there’s nothing better.” Yankees ace CC Sabathia labored, but reliever David Robertson fanned Jim Thome in a key spot and Mariano Rivera got the final four outs to close another win for the defending World Series champions. The Yankees rallied from a 3-0 deficit against Francisco Liriano and improved to 10-2 against the Twins in the playoffs since 2003. Even a blown call by the umpires — shades of the last two postseasons — that went against the Yankees with two outs in the bottom of the ninth didn’t hurt them. “It’s just bad luck for Minnesota. We just keep fighting. That’s a great team over there. We’ve played a lot of tough games against them,” Teixeira said. Michael Cuddyer homered, doubled and drove in two runs for the Twins, who played their first outdoor postseason game in Minnesota since 1970. They were hoping a move from the shabby Dome outdoors to gorgeous Target Field would turn their fortunes around, but it was more of the same against the mighty Yankees. “We’ve got to get back up on our feet,” second baseman Orlando Hudson said. “There’s no need for us to sit here and talk about it. This isn’t the Twins’ curse versus the Yankees. It’s a new year. Hey, we’ve still got to battle.” Game 2 is tonight. Carl Pavano will pitch for the Twins against Andy Pettitte. Jorge Posada had two hits and an RBI and Curtis Granderson added a two-run triple for New York, which has never won a postseason series as a wild card.

Lincecum leads Giants into opener vs. Braves SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Lincecum emerged as the most dominant pitcher in the National League in his first two full major league seasons. Back-to-back NL Cy Young Awards. Two All-Star selections, 526 strikeouts. All by the age of 25. Now, the 16-game winner for the San Francisco Giants gets to take the ball for his most important start yet: Game 1 of the division series against the wild-card Atlanta Braves tonight at AT&T Park. Postseason veteran Derek Lowe (16-12) will go for the Braves, who reached the playoffs with a dramatic 8-7 win over the Philadelphia Phillies on the season’s final day to extend manager Bobby Cox’s farewell season. It took big performances by Lincecum’s supporting cast to get the Giants back to the playoffs after a six-year absence. They won the NL West despite enduring a career-worst five-start losing streak by their ace in August. Lincecum came through over the final month and hopes to carry that momentum into his playoff debut. San Francisco manager Bruce Bochy knows Cox will be prepared for anything and everything. The 69-year-old Cox is retiring after the season. He led Atlanta to 14 straight division titles but the Braves are back in the playoffs this season for the first time in five years. “I revere this guy so much with what he’s done and what he’s accomplished,” Bochy said. “It’s going to be good to see him, I will say that. I do know that you have to play your best ball to beat this team. You’re not going to surprise Bobby. He’s a great manager.” — The Associated Press Rivera recorded his 40th career postseason saves in 45 chances, but had to work a little harder than he planned. Replays showed Yankees right fielder Greg Golson — inserted that inning for defensive purposes — caught

Halladay Continued from D1 His 320 starts were the most of any active pitcher who had never appeared in the postseason. “It’s hard to explain, but pitching a game like that, being able to win the game comes first,” Halladay said. “That’s kind of your only focus until after it’s over with. I think once it ends, it’s a little bit surreal.” As Halladay walked across the outfield to the bullpen before Wednesday’s game, his pitching coach, Rich Dubee, gave him a simple instruction. “Go out there and try to be good,” Dubee said he told Halladay. “If you go out there and try to be good, you’ve got a chance to be great.” Halladay, whose perfect game came on the road against the Florida Marlins on May 29, made the most of that chance. He is the fifth pitcher in major league history to throw two no-hitters in the same season, joining Johnny Vander Meer of the 1938 Cincinnati Reds, Allie Reynolds of the 1951 Yankees, Virgil Trucks of the 1952 Detroit Tigers and Nolan Ryan of the 1973 California Angels. It also continued a trend in the majors this season. Halladay’s gem was the sixth no-hitter since opening day, one shy of the single-season major league record. Another potential no-hitter — a

Matt Rourke / The Associated Press

The scoreboard shows Roy Halladay’s no-hitter after the Philadelphia Phillies defeated the Cincinnati Reds 4-0 on Wednesday. perfect game, in fact, by Detroit’s Armando Galarraga — was ruined by an umpire’s blown call with two out in the ninth inning. Halladay, 33, went 21-10 this season, leading the league in innings and complete games, and he is expected to win his second Cy Young Award. He has been everything the Phillies could have

hoped for when they traded three prospects to Toronto to get him, then signed him to a contract extension that could be worth $80 million over four years. It was something of a gamble for the Phillies, who simultaneously traded their best 2009 starter, Cliff Lee, to Seattle. Lee had beaten the Yankees twice last fall for the Phillies’ only World Se-

Delmon Young’s sinking liner for what should’ve been the last out. But umpire Chris Guccione ruled that he trapped it and the call stood after the umpires huddled. Manager Joe Girardi came out to argue, but to no avail. “They got together and talked about it. It’s not that they were out of position. It happens,” Girardi said. In fact, the Yankees benefited against the Twins in the playoffs last year when a ball hit by Joe Mauer that clearly landed fair was called foul. This time, the missed call brought Thome to the plate as the potential tying run. Rivera retired the slugger on a popup to third baseman Alex Rodriguez to end the game. In other division series on Wednesday: Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Picking up where he left off during in a dazzling October run a year ago, Cliff Lee shut down Tampa Bay while outpitching David Price and leading Texas to a victory in the opening game of the AL playoffs. Lee matched a postseason best with 10 strikeouts while allowing five hits — one after the second inning. During one dominating stretch, he retired 16 of 17 batters before giving up Ben Zobrist’s homer in the seventh. The Rangers, in the playoffs for the first time in 11 years, stopped a nine-game postseason losing streak that began in 1996. Nelson Cruz and Bengie Molina homered for the AL West champions. Darren O’Day and Darren Oliver pitched the eighth, and rookie Neftali Feliz worked out of a ninth-inning jam by striking out the final two batters. Price, a 19-game winner, allowed five runs and nine hits in 6 2⁄3 innings. He struck eight and, like Lee, walked none. Phillies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Reds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PHILADELPHIA — Roy Halladay threw the second no-hitter in postseason history, leading Philadelphia over Cincinnati in Game 1 of the NL division series Halladay even did it at the plate. He ignited a three-run, two-out rally in the second inning with an RBI single. See story, Page D1.

ries victories, but he was not signed to a long-term contract. Lee has remained an ace — now with Texas, he beat Tampa Bay in his playoff start Wednesday — but Halladay lent a sense of desperation to the Phillies’ two-time reigning National League champions. If there was ever a danger of their growing complacent, his presence erased it. “He has a lot of hunger,” Phillies Manager Charlie Manuel said Tuesday. “I think he’s starving all right. He’s intense and he wants it.” Halladay ran alone on the warning track in a downpour before the Phillies’ workout on Tuesday, then played catch in the outfield with his fellow starter Cole Hamels. His work ethic and mental sharpness are revered around baseball, as is his wide repertory of weapons. “He’s got probably four of the best pitches in baseball,” another Phillies starter, Roy Oswalt, said on Wednesday afternoon. “All four of his pitches he can throw at any time. When you can do that in the big leagues, you’re going to create a lot of havoc for the opposing hitter.” Even, as Halladay showed Wednesday, when facing the team that led the National League in batting average, runs, hits and homers. The Reds battered him for 13 hits on June 30, but there were signs that Halladay could dominate them. He struck out 10 Reds that day without a walk and tossed nine shutout innings against them at home

two starts later. “Any time you’re facing a good team, I think the more aggressive you can be early in the count — get yourself in pitcher’s counts — the more the numbers play into your favor,” said Halladay, who threw first-pitch strikes to 25 of his 28 hitters. “So that was definitely a priority.” The Reds remain hitless in the postseason since Eddie Taubensee’s eighthinning single in Game 4 of the 1995 National League Championship Series, when they were swept by the Atlanta Braves. It was a dispiriting way to return to the playoffs. “You’ve got to put that one behind us, figure we got beat by a great performance tonight,” Reds Manager Dusty Baker said. “The thing about it is, I don’t think he threw anything down the heart of the plate. Everything was on the corners and moving.” The Reds’ hardest hit might have been a lineout to right by pitcher Travis Wood in the third inning. The final out came on a dribbler in front of the plate by Brandon Phillips, who raced to first as the ball nicked his bat in the dirt. Catcher Carlos Ruiz dropped to his knees to field it, threading a throw over Phillips’ left shoulder. The out secured, Ruiz embraced a beaming Halladay as teammates mobbed them. The Phillies and Halladay hope it was only the first celebration of an already magical postseason.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 D5

Pac-10

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Road doesn’t get easier for OSU Beavers to face third top-10 team of the season when they travel to No. 9 Arizona By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

The Oregon State Beavers have faith their tough schedule will build a tougher team. The Beavers, who it seems can hardly catch a scheduling break, visit No. 9 Arizona on Saturday. The undefeated Wildcats will join now-No. 5 TCU and now-No. 4 Boise State on the list of Oregon State’s early opponents. Rather than shrug at their lot this season, the Beavers are welcoming it. “I think we’re all pretty grateful for the opportunity to play the type of opposition we’ve been playing,â€? linebacker Cameron Collins said. “We all came to Oregon State to play the best and Coach (Mike) Riley’s given us that opportunity.â€? Next up Oregon State lost to the Horned • Oregon State Frogs and the Broncos but beat Louat Arizona isville earlier this season and is coming off a 31-28 victory over Arizona • When: State. Both of those wins came at ReSaturday, ser Stadium. 4 p.m. The Beavers’ nonconference sched• TV: VS. ule was considered one of the most network difficult in the nation — indeed the most recent Sagarin computer ratings give Oregon State the hardest overall schedule among Football Bowl Subdivision teams. Complicating matters is the fact that the Beavers play four of their first six games on the road (however they play four of their final six at home). Oregon State doesn’t return to Reser until Oct. 30 for homecoming against California. The argument can be made that Oregon State’s schedule may have cost the team a couple of early wins, but could pay dividends as far as the conference standings at the end of the year. “I think it helps from a standpoint that we are not going to be scared of a moment, we are not going to shy away from a moment,â€? cornerback James Dockery said. “It is just another opportunity to know what we need to do, to get the job done.â€? Arizona (4-0, 1-0 Pac-10) opened the season with routs over Toledo and the Citadel, followed by an impressive win over then-No. 9 Iowa and a gritty victory over California. Last weekend the Wildcats had a bye.

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon State running back Jacquizz Rodgers breaks through a pack of Arizona State defenders for a 74yard touchdown run during the second half of Saturday’s game in Corvallis. The Beavers, who won that game 31-28, take on Arizona this weekend. The most glaring problem that Arizona presents for the Beavers is their defense, ranked second in the nation behind Boise State. The Wildcats are only allowing opponents an average of 230 yards total offense, 101 on the ground and 129 in the air. They surrendered just 29 rushing yards to Iowa. That will be a challenge for Oregon State’s steadily improving offense. Against Arizona State, Beavers quarterback Ryan Katz played his best game, completing 19 of 29 passes for 260 yards and two touchdowns. And he did it without go-to receiver James Rodgers, who sat out after sustaining a concussion the week before at Boise State. Katz, making his fourth career start, connected with nine different receivers, including sophomores

Markus Wheaton and Jordan Bishop, who each had four catches. “I think we’re just getting more comfortable,� Katz said. “I think the receivers are seeing the open lanes and the line’s giving me time to throw the ball. We’ve corrected a lot of things since the TCU game. I think we’re just scratching the surface.� Rodgers, who was practicing at full speed Tuesday, will return against the Wildcats. While the Beavers have won four straight in Tucson, Arizona beat them 37-32 in Corvallis last season. It was quarterback Nick Foles’ first start and he made the most of it, passing for 254 yards and three touchdowns. This season, Foles has thrown for 1,089 yards with six TDs and a conference-best 74.5 completion percentage.

Moos to get look at Oregon program he helped build Former UO athletic director is now with Washington State as the lowly Cougars prepare for the No. 3 Ducks egon from 1995-2007, where the rising fortunes of the footSPOKANE, Wash. — Bill ball program brought dramatic Moos helped build the Ducks increases in sports revenues. into a football power during his Moos and Knight have never 12 years as athletic director for talked publicly about their split, Oregon. but many found it telling that Next up He’ll view his handiwork Knight gave a $100 million do• Oregon at from the other side for the first nation to Oregon’s athletic deWashington time this Saturday, when No. 3 partment right after Moos left. State Oregon (5-0, 2-0 Pac-10) travels Moos claims to have no hard to Pullman to play Washington • When: feelings, calling the Ducks the State (1-4, 0-2), where Moos has best team in the country right Saturday, been the athletic director since now. They are five touchdown 2 p.m. February. favorites this Saturday. There won’t be any divided • TV: Comcast “We spent 12 very good years SportsNet loyalties for Moos, whose deat Oregon and feel very proud Northwest parture from Oregon was the of our part in building that proresult of an unspecified falling gram,â€? Moos said. “I continue (tape-delay out with Nike co-founder Phil at 6:30 p.m.) to be impressed with how they Knight, a major booster. have continued to grow it.â€? “I’m a Cougar and I work Under a noncompete clause for the Cougars, so people know where with Oregon that paid him nearly my heart is,â€? said Moos, a star player for $200,000 a year, Moos spent three years Washington State in the early 1970s. In- developing a ranch south of Spokane, deed, the answering machine message and caught up on issues at his alma on his cell phone begins with an extend- mater. ed rendition of the WSU fight song. When athletic director Jim Sterk deMoos, 59, was athletic director at Or- cided in February to leave for San Diego

By Nicholas K. Geranios The Associated Press

State, WSU boosters demanded that the administration hire Moos as the replacement. Moos negotiated a deal with Oregon regarding the noncompete and then went to work. What WSU boosters were looking for is the same kind of magic Moos worked in Eugene, where the athletic department budget grew from $18 million in his first year to more than $40 million by 2007. The donor base increased from 4,900 to 12,290. Moos oversaw the expansion of facilities, and the Ducks enjoyed their longest stretches of success in football and men’s basketball. Moos believes a similar renaissance can occur at Washington State, where the $30 million athletic budget is the smallest in the Pac-10 and football attendance has dropped after two dreadful seasons. “I want our fans to realize this can be done at WSU,� Moos said. Much depends on the fortunes of the football team, which was 3-22 in coach Paul Wulff’s first two seasons and continues to struggle this year. Moos remains confident that Wulff can turn the program around. “Paul and his assistants are doing a great job of recruiting,� Moos said. “I’m seeing signs of improvement.� “We changed the culture and mindset at Oregon, but it wasn’t done overnight,�

River Continued from D1 At the end of the next drift, the tip of the 8-foot6-inch Lamiglas shuddered and I set the hook. This fish stayed close to the bottom and when I managed to gain a little line, a trail of bubbles broke to the surface. A sturgeon. A minute later, the 40-inch dinosaur was alongside to be admired and released. Around us, the fish continued to jump, but Leonard, owner of Steve’s Guided Adventures in Washougal, Wash., was antsy. He pointed the bow toward the dock and we pulled the boat out and made the run east up Interstate 84 to the next boat launch. We joined a flotilla of 33 other boats over a deep flat off the mouth of the Klickitat and dropped our baits. Thom Doulder drifted a gob of roe into the yawning maw of a 10-pound male. Around us, rods flexed, salmon churned the surface to froth and nets plunged to draw thrashing chinook from the depths of the big river. As soon as Doulder’s fish was in the box, I rebaited and Leonard leaned over and sprayed his magic juice on the fresh gob of eggs. Over the side it went. With a bounce, it touched down. Thirty seconds later, it was my turn to pin a salmon, this one a 12-pound male. When the sun was well up in the sky, we switched rods and put down K14 Kwikfish in chrome and chartreuse, wrapped with chunks of herring or tuna. At the bottom of the run, we would let the weight down to touch bottom, then troll back upstream. Up in the front of the boat taking pictures, I missed it when a salmon smashed my Kwikfish. Greg Gulbrandsen battled the fish for a minute, but it threw the hooks. A few minutes later, Greg’s rod

Moos said. “Our design there is similar to what we are doing here.� That includes trying to make lots more money from football. Moos believes the football program should generate twothirds to three-quarters of an athletic department’s budget. At WSU, football generates about one-third, $10 million, because of low attendance and lower television income than other Pac-10 teams, Moos said. “We’ve got to increase our revenue streams and have money in the bank,� Moos said. A major step in that direction could come at this week’s meetings of Pac-10 athletic directors. The meetings are part of the effort to hammer out new revenue sharing agreements as the league adds Colorado and Utah in 2011. In the Pac10, participants in a televised game split 64 percent of the money, with the other eight teams getting just 4.5 percent each. Moos favors sharing the TV revenue equally, as many other conferences do, which could be worth $10 million to $15 million a year for the Cougars. Moos noted that Washington State has gone to the Rose Bowl twice since 1997, but failed to keep the momentum going. “We have to work to get back there and then have a plan in place to sustain it,� Moos said. “The latter is tougher than the former.�

Continued from D1 The late-night game has been an issue for the Pac-10 for years. The benefit of playing after dark is the lack of competition for TV viewers; Saturdays are full of clutter and there aren’t as many options for people to switch off to at night in the West. The downside is that some viewers on the East Coast might not be willing to stay up into the wee hours to watch a college football game. That hurts the TV ratings and the Pac-10’s recognition in the East, which could be damaging in poll and award voting. So as the conference heads into a new era, transforming into the Pac-12 with the addition of Colorado and Utah, its leaders are looking into ways of getting its marquee games in front of bigger audiences. The Pac-10’s TV deals expire at the end of the current school year and the starting times for football games are sure to be part of the conversation. “There’s a lot of factors that go into making sure we’re visible nationally for our biggest games, but it’s something that’s a high priority, something that we’re spending a lot of time on and something that will receive a very high priority as we’re looking at our future broadcast agreements,� Scott said. The Pac-10 has already had its share of big games on the latenight slate this season. On Sept 18, a matchup between No. 9 Iowa and No. 24 Arizona, one of the biggest games in the Wildcats’ recent history, started at 7:30 local time. UCLA’s upset win over No. 23 Houston started at the same time and the Wake Forest-Stanford game was even later, kicking off at 8:15. Arizona, looking to cement its status among the nation’s elite programs, played another late game against Cal the next week, the same time as an entertaining shootout between Oregon and Arizona State. Stanford-Oregon was on the latenight list, too, until ABC and ESPN asked if it could be moved up. For the Pac-10, it was a no-brainer. Its long-standing dilemma has been fighting eastern perception that the conference is USC and a bunch of teams nobody cares about. This game was a rare chance to show that’s no longer the case. “The Pac-10 is arguably among the top two conferences in terms of our stature and the performance of our teams and I want to make sure voters across the country are seeing the best of the Pac-10,� Scott said. “That’s one of the reasons we allowed Stanford and Oregon to be moved earlier.� Now it’s time to see if it’s feasible to have more big games played earlier. It might be tough at the two Arizona schools, at least for the first two months of the season. Temperatures reach into the 90s even for night games in September and October; the temperature at kickoff at Oregon-Arizona State was a blistering 100. Other schools have more flexibility and appear willing to shift things around if it means more recognition for their programs and the conference. “We’re a conference that I think has traditionally been seen as pretty conservative and rigid when it comes to when we’ll play, but I think that’s changing,� Scott said. “Not only is there new leadership in the conference office, but throughout the conference and a different mindset is evolving. I think you’ll see a fresh look at where we play.�

H ďœŚ F  C   Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Eventâ€? on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

A herring-wrapped Kwikfish and the weight it takes to run the wobbling lure in 40 to 50 feet of water. plunged and he put the steel to a 10-pound king. At camp, we showed off six bright salmon from the big river then sealed the steaks with a VacUpack sealer while peach cobbler baked to a golden brown in a row of Camp Chef Dutch ovens. Every September, we gather at Peach Beach on the north bank of the Columbia to fish, to eat and to celebrate the fall salmon run. Smallmouth bass, sturgeon, salmon and steelhead are all in the river and on the menu. The variety takes the competition out of camp. Every day someone gets skunked, and someone else lights it up. As hunting seasons get under way, some of the best fishing of the year takes place in October on the Columbia. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at

7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; five-stand and skeet open Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-3881737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-Stand open Monday through Saturday

from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to dusk; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on; rifle and pistol available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; sight-in days Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.


D6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Strong hatches reported on Ochoco Creek Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Angler reports indicate a high growth rate and excellent catch rates. The reservoir has been stocked twice with catchable rainbow trout and will be stocked again in October. BIG LAVA LAKE: The resort is reporting excellent fishing with the cooler temperatures. The fish that are landed have been in great condition ranging in size from 11 to 16 inches. CLEAR LAKE: No recent report, but the lake was stocked with keepers and brood rainbow trout and holdovers from the previous season should still be available. Lake levels may be getting low due to irrigation withdrawals. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Anglers are still catching large fish from two to seven pounds. CRESCENT LAKE: The water temperature is around 60 and the fish are spread throughout the lake. The water level is dropping a bit and some anglers are picking up 8- to 10-pound browns. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing is excellent with flows around 175 cfs. A sample of redband trout and mountain whitefish are tagged with a numbered floy tag protruding from the back. Anglers who catch a trout or whitefish with a floy tag are encouraged

FISHING REPORT to release the fish after recording the tag number, fish length and location caught. Anglers can send the information to ODFW at (541) 447-5111 ext. 24 or michael.r.harrington@state.or.us.

Aug. 4 due to high blue green algae levels. Fishing is not prohibited, but the advisory states that proper precautions should be taken to avoid water contact. In addition,

CULTUS LAKE: There have been reports of nice rainbow trout and lake trout being harvested from Cultus over the last several weeks.

HOSMER LAKE: Fishing for Atlantic salmon has been good early and late in the day. Fishing on Hosmer is restricted to fly fishing with barbless hooks.

DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): The Deschutes River is open to angling for steelhead and trout from the mouth upstream to Pelton Dam (river mile 100). Fishing for summer steelhead has been good and water temperatures have cooled. Summer steelhead are spread out in good numbers from the Columbia upstream to the Locked Gate above Maupin. Good numbers of steelhead have been passing over Sherars Falls. Expect good fishing throughout October in these areas. As November approaches, more steelhead will show up between the Locked Gate and Warm Springs.

KINGSLEY RESERVOIR: Kingsley has been stocked with lots of trout and should offer good fishing for trout. Anglers have the opportunity to catch all size classes of trout including large trophy trout and steelhead.

DESCHUTES RIVER (Lake Billy Chinook to Bend): No recent reports but there should be good fishing for rainbow and brown trout. Rainbow trout average 10 to 16-inches, while brown trout up to 26-inches are available. Anglers will find better access downstream of Lower Bridge.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Anglers are continuing to catch kokanee in the Metolius arm. LAURANCE LAKE: Trout fishing for native rainbow and cutthroat along with lots of stocked rainbows should make summer fishing in Laurance good. It’s a great place to fly fish out of a small boat or personal watercraft.

Twin is a great lake to take young kids to as there is a good beach shoreline and it is protected from the wind. Look to catch rainbow trout in the 8 inch to 13 inch size range. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: A strong hatch has been occurring around 10 a.m. Anglers should be aware that beginning in 2010 new fishing regulations went into effect that permanently restricts fishing to artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Although there are no recent reports, anglers are reporting improved fishing over past years. Opportunities for 12- to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. Anglers should consult the 2010 Sport Fishing Regulations (page 63) for maximum length requirements and bag limits for both largemouth and smallmouth bass.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Fish will be moving to shore as temperatures cool; however, right now fish are still in deeper waters.

PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Anglers should continue to target bass, but the pond will be stocked heavily with trout in the next two weeks.

LOST LAKE: No recent report but Lost Lake has been stocked with rainbow and there are a few resident brown trout. Lost is a great place to troll around in a small boat or fish from the bank.

TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch bass and bluegill. It’s also a great place to catch carp on the fly rod.

FALL RIVER: Trout fishing has been good with several different hatches of insects throughout the day.

METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Lots of insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry fly fishing.

HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: A health advisory was issued for Haystack Reservoir on

NORTH TWIN: No recent reports. North

FLY-TYING CORNER

WICKIUP RESERVOIR: The water is very low and the only places to launch a boat are off the sandy beaches. Four-wheel drive is a must to pull your boat back out. Rainbow trout and brown trout will be following spawning kokanee to feed on eggs.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Morrish’s Mouse 4-6, courtesy Ken Morrish and Idylwilde Flies.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Want to catch big bass on the surface? Want a fly to take to New Zealand or Alaska or Russia, where the trout key on rodents? Here is one of the most cast-able mouse patterns I have seen in a long time. Picture a mouse that fell into the water. Make your fly swim, its tail wiggling, its legs in constant motion. Not the best of swimmers, it goes this way and that. And it is vulnerable. Sometimes bass see the mouse in the air and track it. Once, I had a bass streak from 10 feet away to be there when the mouse hit the water. Fish on! Tie this pattern with 3/0 black thread on a No. 4 TMC 5263 hook. For the tail, tie in a narrow brown rabbit strip with a tuft of hair left at the tip. For the back, tie in a tapered strip of 6mm black foam. Build the body with spun cow elk hair. Trim bottom and top as shown. Pull the foam over and tie down at the eye. Trim foam to leave a head over the eye of the hook.

HUNTING REPORT

Deer hunters enjoyed above-average success for opener Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT DEER OPENER: Opening weekend buck hunters enjoyed average to above-average success though conditions were hot and dry. Most of the animals taken were yearling bucks, but several nice older bucks were taken in the Maury and Ochoco units. The predicted cooler weather

should provide improved hunting conditions, and the bucks taken have been in excellent shape. Overall harvest success for the weekend was 8 percent, an improvement over the 5 percent observed last year. Hunters are reminded the Rager and South Boundary Travel Management Areas (TMA’s) will be in effect in the Ochoco unit. GENERAL: Weather conditions have been variable, with wide temperature extremes, and cold temperatures at higher elevations. The Ochoco National Forest and Prineville BLM should be contacted regarding the latest information on motorized access, camping, and fire concerns. (BLM 541-416-6700, Ochoco Nat. For. 541-416-6500). Two cooperative travel management areas (Rager and

South Boundary) are in effect in the Ochoco unit. Maps are available at entry portal signs and at ODFW and Ochoco National Forest offices in Prineville. EARLY ANTLERLESS ELK: Hunts are ongoing in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. These hunts include private agricultural and range lands where permission from the landowner is needed. Typically elk move into these hunt areas in greater numbers during the late summer to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. COUGAR: Are present at all elevations in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. Like coyotes, cougar will be attracted to deer and antelope, but also elk. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their

greater amounts of public lands and better accessibility. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days after harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts and be sure to call first to make an appointment. BEAR: Best hunting opportunities will be on forest lands at higher elevations on the Ochoco National Forest. The better locations will be on the more densely forested north slopes of the Lookout Mountain and Paulina Ranger Districts in the Ochoco Unit. Remember check in of harvested bears is mandatory. Please check the synopsis for more information and call ahead of time to make an appointment. UPLAND GAME BIRD SEASONS: Includ-

ing valley and mountain quail, and chukar will open Saturday, Oct. 9. A cold wet spring resulted in poor early hatches for these species, but the late hatches appear strong. Hunters should check the synopsis for mountain quail, as only selected counties (including Crook) are open

for hunting. FOREST GROUSE: Opportunities are limited to higher elevation forest lands on the Ochoco National Forest. Hunters should check the more heavily forested portions of the Lookout Mountain and Paulina Ranger districts for these elusive birds.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


O

Inside

Aspen in the offseason

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010

Pack extra layers as temperatures drop “We’ve got fine fall trail conditions,” said Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest early this week. Some trails may be a little dusty, he added, but snow isn’t yet an issue. However, he said Central Oregon hikers and bikers should be aware of cooler fall weather and earlier sunsets. He suggested trail users pack extra layers and their 10 essentials. The seasonal leash restriction along the Deschutes River between the area near the Seventh Mountain Resort and Benham Falls is now off, though Sabo said those whose dogs aren’t under voice control should still consider leashing their pets. Another consideration for trail users: Rifle hunting season has begun. “Just so trail users are aware, they are going to see hunters,” he said. “Maybe wear brighter clothing, or if they see or hear one, whistle or give a hoot so you don’t surprise them.” In the coming weeks, some logging projects may limit access near the Skyliner Trail, but signs will be posted at the Phil’s and Skyliner trailheads.

SPOTLIGHT Free communication workshop tonight Robert Killen will lead an interactive workshop on civil dialogue from 5:30 to 7 tonight at the Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St. The workshop, “Building Dialog in an Age of Demons,” explores ways to communicate civilly, without demonizing others. Killen, the executive director of the City Club of Central Oregon, will talk about gaining freedom from communication processes that consider collaboration a weakness. There is no cost to attend the workshop. Contact: 541617-7080 or www.dpls.us.

Writers Guild to host Literary Harvest The Central Oregon Writers Guild will host its seventh Annual Literary Harvest from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 15 at Central Oregon Community College’s Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, in Bend. Winners of the Literary Harvest Writing Contest will present their entries. Editor and author Elizabeth Lyon will be the keynote speaker. Tickets are $10 at the door, which opens at 6:15 p.m. Contact: 541-408-6306 or www.centraloregonwritersguild.com.

A FALL FROLIC Take a serene hike past waterfall, Oregon’s largest ponderosa pine on La Pine State Park trail system By Eleanor Pierce The Bulletin

O

n a recent visit to La Pine State Park, I discovered it’s not just a great launch point for a long, lazy river float on a hot day. It’s also a good place to find some solitude and enjoy an easy walk among some trees, rivers and critters. The park is also home to the largest ponderosa pine in the state. The 500-year-old Big Tree (some call it Big Red), stands 162 feet tall and nearly 30 feet around, according to the park’s website. While Big Tree is a nice stop on your way into the park, I was drawn to the La Pine State Park trail system. So after stopping off at Big Tree for a couple of photos, I drove farther down the road and followed the signs to the McGregor Memorial Viewpoint, which looks down on a bend in the Deschutes River from cliffs that tower about 30 feet above the water. From the viewpoint, there are several trail options, including the 1.5-mile McGregor Loop, the 3.5-mile Deschutes Loop and the 4.75-mile Fall River Loop. After soaking in the view, I headed off northward on the Fall River trail. The weather was perfect for a fall hike, just chilly enough. Soon after I left the trailhead, the solitude set in. Among the ponderosas, lodgepole pines and scant shrubbery, my dog (kept on leash, per park rules) and I were the only ones around. For most of the well-signed walk, the scenery is the kind that’s good for quiet introspection more than anything else. On the trail, I would occasionally come

Even those who can’t identify mushrooms can enjoy studying their features, like the leopardprint caps on these fungi. to an open area with another view of the Deschutes winding below. At one such outcropping I explored an abandoned cabin I’d seen before while floating the river below. It was eerily ramshackle, with mattress springs, leaves and debris littering the floor. The roof appeared ready to fall in; in fact, it probably would have if it weren’t for the fireplace holding up one wall. After a couple of miles of quiet, I saw a sign reading “Fly Fishing Only,” then I got my first view of the glassy Fall River, a mecca for fishermen. A short way down the trail, I came to a trail intersection and nearly passed by, following the sign to continue on the Fall River Loop. But I glanced back at the sign and noticed an

If you go

The Big Tree stands 162 feet tall and nearly 30 feet around. According to the La Pine State Park website, the tree may be more than 500 years old.

What: La Pine State Park and Fall River Loop Getting there: From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 south toward La Pine. After milepost 160, turn right at the sign to La Pine State Park. The park is about 5.5 miles down the road. Follow signs to the right for Big Tree, or stay straight toward the campground, cross the river and turn right at the signs for the McGregor Memorial Viewpoint. Cost: Free, no passes required Contact: 541-536-2071 arrow pointing a different direction, with the sign “Falls.” I’m glad I caught the sign, or I would have missed the side trip to the Fall River Falls. About a quarter-mile away from the main loop, the falls are about 10 feet high and flow into a languid pool that begs to be visited again come summer. Hooking back up with the main trail, I continued on the second half of the loop, stopping here and there to watch squirrels rushing about to get ready for winter or to inspect some of the leopard-print mushrooms that had popped up in discarded leaves along the trail. I enjoyed the solitude on the walk so much that on the way back to my car, I didn’t notice a deer in the trail until I was close enough to startle it, at which point it bounded off into the woods. Later, we moved aside to let a couple of bikers pass. The flat, multi-use, single- and doubletrack would make a nice mountain bike ride for families or others looking for an easy ride. I suppose then I should amend my description of the solitude: It was just my dog and I, some very active squirrels, one startled deer and two bicyclists. Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

Teens wanted for Bend fire program The Bend Fire Department is seeking high school students for its SPARC (Students Preparing A Responsible Community) Program. Teens “represent and assist the Bend Fire Department with various educational and community events, including National Fire Prevention Week, Firebusters, Team Teaching and fire station tours,” according to a news release. Students must commit to a minimum of four hours per month, attend monthly meetings and maintain passing grades. Students will receive a high school elective credit. Applications, due Friday, are available at the Bend, Summit or Mountain View high school-to-career offices or the Bend Fire Department Administrative Office. Contact: 541-322-6309. — From staff reports

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Thinner crowds and discount rates make for an enjoyable visit, Page E6

OUTING TRAIL UPDATE

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS

The Fall River Falls flow into a wide pool that begs to be visited again come summer.

Photos by Eleanor Pierce The Bulletin

Bend

Fall River

Fall River Falls

Sunriver

La Pine State Park

La Pine State Recreation Area

Fall River Trail (4.75 miles)

McGregor Memorial Viewpoint (trailhead)

LaPine La Pine State State Recreation Rd. Rd. Recreation

La Pine Big Tree

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Pen pal’s story may change after release from prison Dear Abby: I am a parole officer, and while I agree with and support your response to “Smitten in New York” (Aug. 6), I would like to offer an additional comment. People can and do change their lives while incarcerated. However, when they are in a controlled environment, their changed lives on the outside are still in their imaginations. Many inmates who make very positive plans for their future when they’re released discover life “on the outs” doesn’t unfold the way they imagined it would. Some of them deal with substance abuse issues, mental illness, brain injuries and a lack of education and life skills. I would caution “Smitten” not to become too involved with her pen pal after his release until he has proven his ability to be the partner she believes and hopes he will be. — Kelly in Washington State Dear Kelly: Thank you for your comments. I received many letters from former pen pals of inmates, all advising — pleading with — “Smitten” to run as fast as she can from this man. Today, however, I’ll print some from those in the know from the “inside.” Read on: Dear Abby: “Smitten” and countless other women (and men) who write and visit inmates do not fully understand the situation they’re potentially putting themselves in. Any one inmate receives numerous letters, graphic photos and visitors, and not all from the same “potential special person.” Inmates live and breathe a 24/7 confined life, with nothing to do but find ways to entertain or protect themselves. It’s not far-fetched that an inmate may be under the control of a gang affiliation and need to do things to gain a “rep” inside. They have plenty of time to consider the who, how, what and wheres of surviving in jail. Sure, some inmates have taken a different road, but is “Smitten” ready to bring a con into her family in the hopes that he’s telling the truth? I work in a maximum security prison in New York. “Smitten,”

DEAR ABBY I strongly urge you to reconsider communicating with this inmate. And I hope you’re NOT sending him money or letting him know your financial situation. — Seen from the Inside Dear Abby: I am a retired corrections officer from the state of Florida, and this woman has fallen for the most common game played by inmates. One person writes the letter and the others pay him for it with cigarettes or other items they can buy in the canteen. Inmates will come up with amazing fictions to make people feel sorry for them, or send them money to be put in their inmate trust fund. I can guarantee “Smitten” that this inmate has absolutely no feelings for her and is only using her. If she’s that gullible — or stupid — she deserves to be used. If she’s that lonely, she should get a dog! — Chris in Florida Dear Abby: I’m a paralegal who has worked for a criminal defense attorney in Florida for many years. Florida has a comprehensive Web site and its offender information search posts not only photos, but also lists prior incarcerations and case information about the crime for which inmates are presently serving. To find the state prison site, “Smitten” should input “Florida Department of Corrections” and look for the “Offender” information search. “Smitten” is playing with fire, Abby, and if she gets burned it will be because she’d rather believe the fantasy and ignore the reality. She needs to do her homework before accepting this man’s declarations as truth. — Formerly Burned in Florida Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Can Sanchez reinvent himself? If so, it wouldn’t be the first time the former CNN anchor has resurrected his career, but some say his anti-Semitic rant was the last straw

somewhere else,” Dominick said. “There are people in television who think they’re smart because they’re on television,” Roberts said. “They think they don’t have to think. And Sanchez is a victim of that. He really thought that what came out of his mouth was pearls of wisdom, and the stupidity just flowed. ... Is he anti-Semitic? I don’t think so. But he was very intemperate in his remarks, and he deserved to be fired.”

By Glenn Garvin

A checkered career

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — He’s been publicly buried so many times and has always clawed his way back out of the graves: an FBI investigation, a drunk-driving conviction, even being whipped in the ratings by Japanese cartoons. But can Rick Sanchez survive his meandering rant about Jewish control of the media, an ethnic slur that has already claimed his job? The question was asked in broadcast studios and journalism classrooms all over the country this week after Sanchez’s weekend firing from his CNN anchor desk. “I think his career is over,” said Sam Roberts, a former CBS News producer and retired University of Miami journalism professor. “I think he’s just radioactive now, and I don’t think any TV executive is willing to brave it.” “You’ve seen Rick up, and you’ve seen Rick down, and he reinvents himself every time,” countered Miami radio talkshow host Ninoska Perez. “I think we’ll see him up again.”

’He deserved to be fired’ A popular Miami anchor during the 1980s and ’90s, when he was one of the first Cuban-Americans to make it on TV, the 52-year-old Sanchez was fired Friday from CNN after six years at the network.

CNN via The Associated Press

CNN fired news anchor Rick Sanchez last week after he called Jon Stewart a bigot in a radio show interview where he also questioned whether Jews should be considered a minority. His dismissal followed a satellite-radio interview in which Sanchez said he was the victim of anti-Hispanic prejudice by Jewish media bosses. Sanchez, frequently the target of derisive punch lines by Comedy Central host Jon Stewart, called Stewart “a bigot” and sneered at the suggestion that the Jewish Stewart has ever encountered discrimination. “I’m telling you that everybody who runs CNN is a lot like Stewart, and a lot of people who run all the other networks are a lot like Stewart, and to imply that somehow they, the people in this country who are Jewish, are an oppressed minority?” Sanchez said, then added with sarcastic emphasis: “Yeah.” His bitter complaints were anything but a momentary blurt — the raw exchange with Sirius XM radio host Peter Dominick lasted more than 20 minutes. Dominick later told the Hollywood Reporter he felt badly about the outcome of the interview but that Sanchez had entered the studio with “a live grenade in his mouth.” “If Rick didn’t do it on my show, he would have done it

Sanchez was born in Cuba and grew up in Hialeah, Fla., near Miami. His scorching intensity and classic Latin good looks made him an instant sensation when he debuted on WSVN-TV in 1982. But when FBI microphones picked up Sanchez partying with and accepting financial favors from Hialeah political fixer Alberto San Pedro during a 1986 investigation of influence peddling, his South Florida broadcasting career seemed finished. Sanchez went off to Houston, where he was a ratings flop. He returned 18 months later, once again an instant success as he led a new tabloid-ish WSVN news format that became known as “if it bleeds, it leads.” Even a drunk-driving conviction after an accident that left a pedestrian (who was also drunk) paralyzed didn’t dent his popularity there. But a shot on the national stage as an anchor at MSNBC was a ratings disaster and so was his return to host a WTVJ-TV talk show that was consistently whipped in the ratings by cartoons. Sanchez’s career finally seemed to have stabilized since he joined CNN, first as a reporter and then as an afternoon anchor. “He’s a very passionate guy,

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and that can maybe sometimes get the best of him,” said Lisa Navarette, spokeswoman for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic lobby. “But he was an important advocate within CNN for diversity and an important voice for lowering the heat on coverage of the immigration issue. ... We were sad to see him go.” And, Navarette added, the anger over Sanchez’s remarks about Jews is masking the truth of his complaints about discrimination against Hispanic reporters and anchors in the Englishspeaking television world. But for Jews, Sanchez’s words were just more salt in an ancient anti-Semitic wound. “This is an old story, and there are left-wing and right-wing versions of it,” said Todd Gitlin, a Columbia University professor of sociology and journalism. “The intensity and ferocity and dementia of the claim transcend many normal political differences. ... No sooner were the modern media born than we started hearing the accusation that not only do Jews control the media, but they do it invidiously, deploying newspapers and other media against other groups. It’s one of the old arrows in the quiver of routine anti-Semitism.”

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9:00

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Grey’s Anatomy Superfreak (N) ‘14’ (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ The Apprentice (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ The Mentalist (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy Superfreak (N) ‘14’ (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ Fringe The Plateau ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å Without a Trace Birthday Boy ‘PG’ This Emotional Life Relationships and emotional well-being. ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ The Apprentice (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Nikita The Guardian (N) ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Art Workshop Joy of Painting Family Kitchen Mexico This Emotional Life Relationships and emotional well-being. ’ ‘PG’

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KATU News at 11 High School Blitz News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia

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The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Marked for Death ‘14’ The First 48 (N) ‘14’ Å Steven Seagal Steven Seagal 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Sink or Swim ‘14’ Å (2:30) ››› “True ››› “Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. A hot-shot Navy jet pilot ››› “The Perfect Storm” (2000, Suspense) George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg, John C. Reilly. A fishing boat sails into the storm of ›› “Volcano” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, 102 40 39 Lies” Å downs MiGs and loves an astrophysicist. Å the century. Å Anne Heche. Å Pit Boss Smackdown! ’ ‘14’ Å Pit Boss The Seventh Dwarf ’ ‘14’ Texas Rodeo Tykes (N) ’ ‘PG’ Yellowstone: Battle For Life ’ ‘G’ Å Texas Rodeo Tykes ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Pit Boss Shorty Knows Best ’ ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ (10:15) Watch What Happens: Live The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ 137 44 Cribs ’ Are You Smarter? The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ ›› “Young Guns II” (1990) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Young Guns II” (1990) Biography on CNBC Frank Perdue American Greed Suicide Is Painless Mad Money As Seen on TV Biography on CNBC Frank Perdue Get Rich Now! Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Goldman Sachs: Power and Peril Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Ugly Americans Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Ugly Americans South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (3:30) Coneheads Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon Bend on the Run Outside Presents Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb “Return to Halloweentown” (2006) Sara Paxton. ‘PG’ Suite/Deck Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Man vs. Wild ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters Piranha ‘PG’ Å River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Å I Was Bitten ’ ‘14’ Å River Monsters Piranha ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:30) College Football Nebraska at Kansas State (Live) SportsCenter Basketball Los Angeles Lakers vs. FC Barcelona From Barcelona, Spain. NFL Live (N) MMA Live (N) The Body Issue 2010 Poker 22 24 21 24 MLS Soccer Los Angeles Galaxy at Philadelphia Union (Live) One on One One on One 30 for 30 (N) AWA Wrestling Å MLB Baseball: 1995 ALDS Game 5 -- Yankees at Mariners 23 25 123 25 NBA Finals game 2, from June 6, 2010. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Friday Night Lights ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector” (2006) Larry the Cable Guy. › “Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector” (2006) Larry the Cable Guy. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped ‘G’ Good Eats Good Eats (N) Iron Chef America Cora vs. Lahlou Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes Chopped Floundering Around 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Football Preview Runnin’ With PAC Auto Racing Bellator Fighting Championships (N) Huskies Runnin’ With PAC Football Preview The Final Score Tennis 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Perth, Australia. (4:30) ›› “Leatherheads” (2008) George Clooney, Renée Zellweger. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Baby Mama” (2008, Comedy) Tina Fey, Amy Poehler. Premiere. Always Sunny The League (N) Always Sunny The League 131 Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Sale ‘G’ Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Holmes/Homes Modern Marvels Chrome ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Helicopters ‘G’ Most Extreme Airports ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Iron ‘PG’ Å Project Runway Race to the Finish ‘PG’ Å Project Runway There’s a Pattern Here ‘PG’ Å Project Runway A Look in the Line (N) ‘PG’ Å On the Road On the Road On the Road 138 39 20 31 (4:30) Project Runway ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Buried Life The Challenge: Cutthroat ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Jersey Shore (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ SpongeBob BrainSurge ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Gangland Boston. ’ ‘14’ Å Gangland Phoenix. ’ ‘14’ Å TNA Wrestling ’ ‘14’ Å TNA ReACTION ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 Star Trek: Voyager ’ ‘PG’ Å Destination Truth Giant Anaconda Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth Siberian Snowman Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å WCG Ultimate Gamer (N) ’ Å 133 35 133 45 “Bone Eater” (2007, Science Fiction) Bruce Boxleitner, Walter Koenig. ‘14’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants National League Division Series, Game 1. From AT&T Park in San Francisco. MLB Postgame Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins ›››› “Alien” (1979, Science Fiction) Tom Skerritt, Sigourney Weaver, John Hurt. A (9:15) ›› “Countdown” (1968, Science Fiction) James Caan, Robert Duvall, Joanna ››› “Marooned” (1969) Gregory Peck, ›››› “Forbidden Planet” (1956, Science Fiction) Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis. 101 44 101 29 Astronauts find a stranded professor and his daughter. Å (DVS) horrific spaceship stowaway attacks interstellar miners. Å Moore. American astronauts race to get to the moon first. Å Richard Crenna. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ LA Ink Rock and Ink ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Kick Off Cook Off Kick Off Cook Off American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Reality Bites ’ ‘14’ Bones Pregnant teen murdered. ‘14’ Law & Order Boy Gone Astray ‘14’ ›› “Why Did I Get Married?” (2007) Tyler Perry, Janet Jackson. Å CSI: NY A teenager is shot. ’ ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Burn Card ’ ‘14’ Grim Adventures Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Pizza Wars: New York vs. Chicago Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Hamburger Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 World’s Best Fast Food Stops ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford and Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Petty officer is murdered. ‘PG’ NCIS Naval officers targeted. ’ ‘PG’ NCIS See No Evil ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Lt. Jane Doe ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Terminal Leave ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Call of Silence ’ ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS A missing Navy lieutenant. ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:50) › Jack ’ (5:45) ›› “Groundhog Day” 1993 Bill Murray, Chris Elliott. ’ ‘PG’ Å In the House ›› “The International” 2009, Suspense Clive Owen. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Starship Troopers” 1997 Casper Van Dien. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “The Fabulous Baker Boys” 1989 Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ Å ›› “Author! Author!” 1982, Comedy Al Pacino, Dyan Cannon. ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Fabulous Baker Boys” 1989 Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ Å ››› “Class Action” 1991 ‘R’ Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘PG’ The Daily Habit Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘PG’ The Daily Habit LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf McGladrey Classic, First Round From Sea Island, Ga. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf LPGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “Meet My Mom” (2010) Lori Loughlin, Johnny Messner. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (6:45) ››› “Spider-Man 2” 2004, Action Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco. Peter Parker fights a ››› “The Promise: The Making of Darkness on the Edge of Bored to Death ’ Taxicab Confessions: New York, New ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 2009, Action Hugh Jackman, HBO 425 501 425 10 Liev Schreiber, will.i.am. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å man who has mechanical tentacles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Town” 2010 Premiere. ’ ‘NR’ Å ‘MA’ Å York ’ ‘MA’ Å Arrested Dev. (7:25) ››› “Bad Lieutenant” 1992 Harvey Keitel. ››› “Ginger Snaps” 2000, Horror Emily Perkins, Katharine Isabelle. (10:50) ›› “Gothic” 1986 ‘R’ ›› “8 Million Ways to Die” 1986, Crime Drama Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:15) › “12 Rounds” 2009, Action John (6:05) ›› “The Frighteners” 1996, Suspense Michael J. Fox, Trini Alvarado. A psychic ››› “Marley & Me” 2008, Comedy-Drama Owen Wilson. A couple’s new puppy grows ›› “Old School” 2003 Luke Wilson. Three men relive their wild “Bikini Jones & MAX 400 508 7 Cena, Aidan Gillen. ‘PG-13’ detective probes supernatural killings. ’ ‘R’ Å up to become an incorrigible handful. ’ ‘PG’ Å past by starting a fraternity. ’ ‘R’ Å Temple of Eros” World’s Toughest Fixes (N) ‘PG’ Known Universe ‘PG’ Naked Science ‘G’ World’s Toughest Fixes ‘PG’ Known Universe ‘PG’ Naked Science ‘G’ Nat Geo Amazing! ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Big Time Rush Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air (10:05) The Troop Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Monster Bucks American Hunter Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Steve’s Outdoor Bushman Show Beyond, Lodge Legends of Fall Bone Collector Pheasants For. Drop Zone OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “The Longshots” 2008, Docudrama Ice Cube. iTV. A girl (6:35) ›› “Orange County” 2002 Colin Hanks. iTV. A teenage ›› “The Brothers Bloom” 2008, Comedy-Drama Rachel Weisz. iTV Premiere. Con Dexter Hello Bandit Dexter tries to focus Zalman: Body Beach Heat: Miami SHO 500 500 becomes a Pop Warner quarterback. ’ ‘PG’ writer goes to extremes to get into Stanford. ’ artists pick a quirky heiress for their last hustle. ‘PG-13’ on the children. ’ ‘MA’ Å Language (N) ‘MA’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Formula One Racing Japanese Grand Prix, Practice Test Drive SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ‘14’ (5:20) ›› “Tears of the Sun” 2003, Action Bruce Willis. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:25) ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” ’ › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 ‘PG-13’ (10:45) ›› “Armored” 2009 Matt Dillon. ‘PG-13’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (3:45) ›› “W.” 2008, Docudrama Josh “Killshot” 2009, Drama Diane Lane. Premiere. A couple flee a (9:40) “Diary of a Tired Black Man” 2006, Comedy-Drama Jimmy Jean-Louis. A man “I Hope They Serve ›› “Flawless” 2007, Crime Drama Michael Caine. A janitor convinces a frustrated TMC 525 525 Brolin. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å executive to help him steal diamonds. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å relentless assassin and his young partner. ’ ‘R’ Beer” tries to sort out the complexities of relationships. ’ ‘R’ Å NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins Hockey Central NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Colorado Avalanche From the Pepsi Center in Denver. The Daily Line (Live) Sports Soup The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Gloria & Katie ‘14’ Å Bridezillas Katie & Carley ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å Little Miss Perfect ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY CENTRAL OREGON COLLEGE FAIR: The ninth annual event showcases more than 70 higher-education options; free; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-383-6002. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” by Art Spiegelman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1085 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films and workshops at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 6-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. BENEFIT CONCERT: With a performance by Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Every Dollar Feeds Kids; free; 6:30 p.m. appetizers, 7 p.m. performance; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541-549-1058. CLOTHES DOWN CHILD ABUSE: A fall fashion show, with appetizers and a silent auction; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; $10; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 151 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-408-3616. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com.

FRIDAY A DAY OF CULTURE: Learn about cultures that have influenced the museum and visit various stations; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films and workshops at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-midnight; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. SOCIAL GATHERING: Central Oregon veterans talk about their experiences, preceding the symposium on World War II; free; 4-6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3891813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “Evolution of Human and Primate Behavior” with Frances White; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4442. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth Stein reads from and discusses his book “The Art of Racing in the Rain”; free; 7-9:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-7978, mashcraft @crooklib.org or www.crooklib.org. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: Staff from the Museum at Warm Springs present “The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters

High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com. “CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. 2ndstreettheater.com. EX-COWBOYS: The Portland-based rock band performs; free; 10 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappymusik@ gmail.com.

SATURDAY “WORLD WAR II IN CENTRAL OREGON”: Symposium features several speakers and highlights the local impact of World War II; $20; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3891813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School, 63175 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541322-5323. COLD HANDS, WARM HEART BOUTIQUE: A sale of crafts, with a bakery, lunch and a silent auction; proceeds benefit local charitable programs; free admission; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DAS RHEINGOLD”: Starring Bryn Terfel in a presentation of the masterpiece directed by Robert Lepage; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films and workshops at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride an outdoor railroad at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 35th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or www.sisterscountry.com. FROM TIMBER TO TURNED WOOD: Featuring a 1900s-style logging competition, axe throwing, chopping, log rolling, chain saw carving and more; free; shows at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; Hood Avenue, across from Les Schwab Tires, Sisters; 541549-0251. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper talks about her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder, Legacy of the Sheepshooters”; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

ANIMAL AND AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Meet a golden eagle; followed by a presentation from author Garth Stein; proceeds benefit the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; $10; 4:30 p.m.; Mavericks at Sunriver, 18135 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-2525 or541-593-4394. KIWANIS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring an Oktoberfest feast, live music and an auction; proceeds from the auction benefit the Kiwanis Doernbecher Children’s Cancer Program; $30, $50 per couple; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-350-6877 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Sue Baker and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs, with Andy Warr; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3902441 or www.bendgospel.webs.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth Stein reads from his work; $20; 7:30 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; www.garthstein.com. “CHEERS”: A screening of the snowboard film, with performances by Valient Thorr, Red Fang and Jamie Lynn in Kandi Coded; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SAPIENT: The Portland-based rapper performs, with Al-One, KP and DJ Nykon; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappymusik@ gmail.com.

SUNDAY BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films and workshops at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. CLIMATE CHANGE EVENT: Kids learn to plan and grow their own food; come prepared for light construction; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-3856908, ext.14 or denise@ envirocenter.org. MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride an outdoor railroad at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 35th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5490251 or www.sisterscountry.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Denise Fainberg reads from her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. WORLD HOOP DAY: Bring hula hoops for a community hooping jam; proceeds benefit World Hoop Day; donations accepted; 2-4 p.m.;

Harmon Park, 1100 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; www.worldhoopday.com. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. BELLY DANCE SHOWCASE: The High Desert Bellydance Guild performs Middle Eastern dances; free; 6-8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. LIBERTY QUARTET: The Boise, Idaho-based gospel ensemble performs; free; 6 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. DAVID GRISMAN QUINTET: The mandolinist and dawg act performs; $40 or $50; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org or www.randompresents.com.

MONDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Art Through Ancestry”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; October’s theme is “Scary Stories”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

TUESDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Art Through Ancestry”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www. bendticket.com. JUDY COLLINS: The veteran folk singer performs; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SAVING KENYA’S RENOWNED WILDLIFE: Featuring a slide show and stories of black rhinos, lions and other endangered wildlife in Kenya and Namibia; free; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. “DIRT! THE MOVIE”: A screening of the documentary that explores soil; with a dirt-themed dessert potluck; donations accepted; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. BOULDER ACOUSTIC SOCIETY: The Boulder, Colo.-based indie-folk musicians perform; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “DEEPER”: A screening of the film about free riders who travel to snowboarding meccas; $15 in advance, $16 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

M T For Thursday, Oct. 7

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

ANIMAL KINGDOM (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 7:20 GET LOW (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05 JACK GOES BOATING (R) Noon, 2:20, 4:25, 6:55 MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 7:15 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALPHA AND OMEGA 3-D (PG) 12:10, 2:15, 5:30

CASE 39 (R) 2, 5, 7:35, 10:10 DEVIL (PG-13) 1:35, 4:10, 6:20, 9:05 EASY A (PG-13) 2:10, 5:10, 7:40, 9:55 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 12:25, 3:30 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 6:40, 10:05 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3-D (PG) 12:50, 4:05, 6:25, 9 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 2:05, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45 LET ME IN (R) 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 12:20, 3:40, 6:15, 9:10 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3-D (R) 7:45, 10:20 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) 6:35, 9:15 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 12:35, 1:55, 3:50, 4:45, 6:50, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:20, 7:10, 10 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER

SLEEPS (PG-13) 12:15, 12:55, 3:25, 4, 6:30, 7, 9:30, 10:05 YOU AGAIN (PG) 1:40, 4:30, 6:55, 9:25 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 8:30 SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) 5:45

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15 MACHETE (R) 5, 7:15, 9:30 THE SWITCH (PG-13) 4:30, 6:40, 9 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 4, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

GET LOW (PG-13) 6:45 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 6:30 THE TOWN (R) 6:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 6:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG) 4, 7

Uli Seit / The New York Times

Will Arnett, left, and Keri Russell, center, two of the cast members of Fox’s “Running Wilde,” with co-creator Mitch Hurwitz, second from right, as they film on the set in Sands Point, N.Y., on Oct. 1.

Fox’s ‘Running Wilde’ races to find audience By DAVE ITZKOFF New York Times News Service

SANDS POINT, N.Y. — Lunching in the dining room of a Gatsbyesque country club where his Fox comedy “Running Wilde” was filming on a rainy Friday, Will Arnett was making the best of his opulent settings. He took alternating bites of the chocolate chip pie and carrot cake on his plate, and he joked that he had been transported to work that morning by “a driver who takes me to a helicopter that flies me to Boston, and then I take a ferry from there.” But Arnett, 40, a star and cocreator of “Running Wilde,” was also acutely aware of the illusion being perpetrated. Beyond the very real storm that was bogging down production, a figurative cloud loomed over “Running Wilde” even before it made its debut two weeks ago. Before a reporter could fully inquire if he felt uncertain about the new series, Arnett knew what he was about to be asked. “To anticipate your question, yes,” he said. “But you know, it is one of those things that’s out of your control.” “Running Wilde” was a series with some buzz when it was announced by Fox in the spring: It reunited Arnett, a star of the cult comedy “Arrested Development,” with that show’s creator, Mitchell Hurwitz. And it cast Arnett in his apparent comfort zone, as a spoiled oil company scion trying to romance the eco-conscious girl of his dreams (played by Keri Russell of “Felicity”). But any heat around “Running Wilde” dissipated over the summer. Early reaction to the pilot was negative, leading its producers to recast several supporting roles and to reshoot several scenes. The revised pilot that made its debut on Sept. 21 did not fare much better. In a review of “Running Wilde” for The New York Times, Alessandra Stanley described it as a mix of “Arthur” and “Sabrina” that “strains to make the tycoon’s son endearingly weak and childish.” About 5.9 million people watched that episode, which faced stiff competition from shows like ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” and CBS’ “NCIS: Los Angeles.” Viewers of a second episode of “Running Wilde” declined to about 4.7 million. Aware that the Fox network will not hesitate to swing its scythe at poorly performing newcomers

— it has already canceled “Lone Star” after two episodes — the “Running Wilde” team has been getting by with a little hope and a lot of self-deprecating humor. Its cast and crew members seem to recognize that there is little more they can do to win over new viewers and that the best they can do in the time they have is to make one another laugh. “As long as we feel like we’re doing that, we feel fairly confident that what we’re doing is not terrible,” Arnett said. “Whether other people like it or not is yet to be determined.” At his lunch table, Arnett traded affectionate barbs with Russell, his co-star Peter Serafinowicz and Ana Gasteyer, a “Saturday Night Live” alumna who was making a guest appearance on the show. He also spoke frankly about how the legacy of “Arrested Development,” a well-liked if not well-watched Fox series, might have been too great a burden for “Running Wilde” to carry. “It seemed like there was backlash to our show before it started,” Arnett said. (“Forelash,” Serafinowicz added.) After the cancellation of “Arrested Development” in 2006, Arnett, Hurwitz and James Vallely, another “Arrested Development” producer, worked together briefly on an animated series, “Sit Down, Shut Up.” When that show fizzled after a few episodes in 2009, the three partners returned to the idea of a live-action comedy — one with less narrative complexity than the rapid-fire “Arrested Development,” and with a romantic tension at its core. But the “Running Wilde” pilot they devised, Arnett acknowledged, tried too hard for laughs at the expense of establishing a believable relationship between his and Russell’s characters. “We were too busy trying to get to what we think is funny, and what other people might not,” he said. “We just realized how many blind spots we had.” In a telephone interview Hurwitz said he did not expect “Running Wilde” to be as closely measured against “Arrested Development” as it was. Describing his thought process, he said: “No one will ever be stupid enough to attempt this again, and I kind of thought the joke was going to be on the other people that tried. I did not think the joke was going to be on me.”


E4 T hursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Oct. 7, 2010: This year, you will encounter new opportunities because of a willingness to greet differences and enjoy change. You decide to jump over certain barriers, especially if they are self-imposed. Your creativity surges as you allow yourself more flex and mental growth. If you are single, you certainly can wave goodbye to your “alone” status, if you so choose. If you are attached, the two of you can connect as if you were old lovers. Once more, you are the dominant force here. Work on not being too meoriented. A fellow LIBRA can be very different from you, but also motivated by the same issues. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Others continue to make an effort. Some people try charm; others could be overly serious. What is clear is that someone wants a new beginning in relating. Can you let bygones be bygones? Tonight: Defer to another person’s suggestion. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might be looking at reorganizing a key element in your life. This effort could be as simple as some fall cleaning. What is clear is that you want a change and will create it. Tonight: Be sensitive to a friend or associate. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Whether swapping jokes

or lightening up another’s mood, you seem to represent lightness and creativity. Single Gemini could see a change in their status in the near future. Attached Gemini eye their first child. Life could get exciting! Tonight: Think “weekend,” even if it is a little early. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH If you can work from home, by all means, do. Understand what is happening behind the scenes with a family member. Make a decision about a discussion and help this person start anew. Tonight: Happy at home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You have been more serious and less light and easy. You could see this behavior as you weigh the pros and cons of a new major purchase — a computer, car or whatever you need. Nevertheless, you will decide to just do it. Tonight: Catch up on a pal’s news. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You know the pros and cons of a money decision. Decide how to approach your finances, and what works best for you. You will decide to follow through and will be able to keep a resolution. Tonight: Check in with a respected financial expert. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Once you relax, you can move forward with a heartfelt desire. Honor some ambivalence and have a discussion with a trusted adviser. You might be surprised by the direction you decide to head in. Tonight: Use the New Moon in your sign for a new beginning.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HH Sometimes the less said the better. You might feel that you need to eradicate certain negative patterns. Know that with your will power, nothing can stop you once you make up your mind. Tonight: Make it OK to vanish. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Meetings could be more instrumental than you realize. Think before you leap into action. Others want to talk and open up to possibilities. Humor helps eliminate tension. Tonight: Where the gang is. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH A must event allows greater flexibility and fun in your life. Take an opportunity to express your daring attitude. A new beginning becomes a possibility. You have an opportunity to clear the air. Finally. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Take an overview. Be willing to open up to new possibilities. Investigate an opportunity that is forthcoming. You will make a difference if you can graciously let go of what no longer works. Tonight: Seriously consider taking a workshop or class. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Deal with others directly. You’ll discover what is happening. Understanding evolves between you and others, especially if you choose to relate on an individual level. Tonight: A discussion over dinner. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

T R AV EL

Visiting Aspen, off-season can be just right season By Andrea Sachs The Washington Post

A

spen is decompressing, before it starts all over again. During shoulder season, the siesta between the onslaughts of summer and winter sports enthusiasts, the Colorado mountain town reclaims its natural self. For two months, it slows down, the crowds thin out and the landscape displays a mashup of green grasses, golden aspen leaves and snow-white mountaintops. “In the off-season, what I treasure is the stillness. It’s not the hustle and bustle of the high seasons,” said Aspen resident Paul MacFarlane. “It’s the big exhale.” Traveling during the off-season — typically mid-September to pre-Thanksgiving and again in late spring — opens up experiences that are rare during busier times. Beaches and mountain trails regain their personal space. Hotels and restaurants offer special rates and menus. On-street parking becomes available. Stores discount clothes. And locals, now out of the weeds, surface with smiles on their faces. “Leisure travel has peaks and valleys,” said Ike Anand, director of airline analytics at Expedia, “and there is a big valley between Sept. 15 and Nov. 15.” By definition, shoulder season is the transitional period between high and low times. For instance, Bermuda and Nantucket — lovely in summer, less so in winter. But the term can also refer to the bridge that connects two popular seasons: For example, Colorado draws hikers, rafters and campers in the warm months, and skiers, snowboarders and snowmen in the wintertime. That leaves the gap weeks to fringe travelers. If I wanted some alone time on the mountain, I had to go now.

Photos by Andrea Sachs / Washington Post

Guests can hike up to a dramatic ridge from the Shrine Mountain Inn near Vail Pass.

the night watching salsa dancing in the back room of Jimmy’s. As MacFarlane had said, I had not just a photo but also a friend.

GETTING THERE From Denver, the drive to Aspen is about 31/2 hours.

WHERE TO STAY Shrine Mountain Inn, Shrine Mountain Road, near Vail Pass; 970-925-5775, www.shrinemountaininn.com The inn’s three lodges are part of the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association, a network of backcountry accommodations. The road to the inn is open to cars until the first big snowfall. Otherwise, skis or snowshoes are required. $30 or $43 per person per night, depending on the property. Inn at Aspen, 38750 Highway 82, 800-222-7736, www.resortquest aspen.com A full-service hotel at the base of Buttermilk Ski Resort, two miles from downtown Aspen. From $89. Hotel Jerome, 330 E. Main St., 877-412-7625, hoteljerome .rockresorts.com Noted for its luxury and colorful history dating to 1889. Specials include free upgrade to a suite in November. From $100. Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge, 415 E. Sixth St., Glenwood Springs, 800537-7946, www.hotspringspool.com Comfortable accommodations across the street from the hot springs. Breakfast and pool pass included. Rates from $139; from $125 Sunday-Thursday in October.

WHERE TO EAT The Wild Fig, 315 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen, 970-925-5160, www.thewildfig.com Dine off the a la carte Mediterranean menu, or choose the fixed-price menu for $33.

Syzygy, 308 E. Hopkins Ave., 970925-3700, www.syzygyrestaurant .com Hearty fare such as elk and beef tenderloin. Find lower prices but similar items on the bar menu (from $8), or order the three-course meal for $39. For other fall dining specials, check the EatAspen blog at www.eataspen.com/blog/?cat=27

WHAT TO DO Adopt a Tourist, www.aspenpitkin. com/Departments/CommunityRelations/Adopt-A-Tourist-/ Get matched with an Aspen local for a personal tour of town. Free. Maroon Bells Scenic Area, Eight miles from downtown Aspen in the White River National Forest, 970945-2521, www.fs.usda.gov View the most photographed panorama in the state. In the off-season, visitors can drive up to the parking lot and pay the $10 entrance fee; during busy season, a shuttle transports guests for $6. Aspen Historical Society, 620 W. Bleeker St., 970-925-3721, www.aspenhistorysociety.com Through Oct. 10, the organization leads tours by foot, bike or electric car; after Oct. 10, tours by appointment only. The $25 electric car tour visits the mining museum and historical society, among other sites. Aspen Animal Shelter, 101 Animal Shelter Rd., 970-544-0206, www.dogsaspen.com Borrow a shelter dog for a hike or stroll through town. Free.

INFORMATION 800-670-0792, www.aspenchamber.org — Andrea Sachs, The Washington Post

Four-legged friends

Huts and a hike The 10th Mountain Division Huts offer one of the more communal adventures in Colorado. For social and survivalist reasons, you must lose your fears of snoring among strangers and wearing long underwear in public. The backcountry trail honors the U.S. Army soldiers who prepared for World War II battle in the Alps by training in the Rockies. Nearly 30 huts, many resembling youth hostels, spring up along the Aspen-Vail-Leadville route, providing hikers and skiers with nests for the night. The huts book up fast during high season. Winter is already filling up, with many cabins hanging “no vacancy” signs, and summer reservations opened up last week. But three days before arriving in Colorado recently, I had little competition and more options than I could lay my head on. To break up the 3 1/2-hour drive from Denver to Aspen, I grabbed a room at Shrine Mountain Inn, near Vail Pass. The lodge stays open year-round, a rarity among the Mountain Division shelters. The 80-acre property comprises three log structures that are more grand chalet than humble cabin. During my chosen night, the upper level of Chuck’s Lodge, which sleeps six, was available, as was a bed in Jay’s Cabin, which contains a sizable kitchen with a fridge cooled by snow (when available) and mattresses for 12. I chose Jay’s and the family of nine that came with it. I took the top-floor room with twin beds covered in wool blankets and a connecting bathroom with a cotton-candy-pink tub with claw feet. Near the inn, a 1.7-mile trail leads through spruce trees and willows to a ridge ringed by brawny mountains, some already donning snowy caps. I pulled out my orange velour sweat shirt and swooped it around my head like a turban, quickly feeling the blood return to my ears. I ran into the family atop the ridge, and the father pointed out the Mount of the Holy Cross in the far distance. Closer to the trail, I studied a rock formation that resembled a mythical ship that had landed, UFO-style, in the valley. That Rocky Mountain high was taking hold. When I returned to the lodge, pasta was boiling on the stove and wine was flowing from boxes. As I accepted a glass of white, Julie, a nurse who was celebrating her 50th, offered to check my oxygen level with a finger monitor. I placed the oximeter on the tip of my index finger, trying not to hold my breath for fear of skewing the results. I earned an 86, which Marty, also a nurse, ex-

If you go

During shoulder season, lodging can be more available in popular destinations such as Aspen, Colo. Pictured is Jay’s Cabin in Shrine Mountain Inn. plained signified the percentage of oxygen in my blood. “If your doctor in D.C. saw that number, he’d rush you to the hospital,” he said. “But up here, in the high altitude, that’s a good result.” I treated my healthy red blood cells to a sip of wine. The group of nine left the next day. Out of curiosity, I popped in on caretaker Sherry Mieling, who lives in a yurt, and asked about availability for Friday night. Jay’s Cabin was empty; I’d have a dozen beds to myself.

Adopted in Aspen Only two main roads lead into Aspen, but that number drops to one with the onset of winter. Once conditions deteriorate, Independence Pass closes: If you were to skid, you could soar off a cliff like Wile E. Coyote, but without the cartoon ending. The 44-mile highway wiggles like an elongated snake, winding past sparkling lakes with small islands of aspens and peaks that crowd the sky. Many hazards pepper the route, including people creeping around the roadside, their camera lenses sticking out like long branches. After many up-up-ups and down-downdowns, I landed in Aspen, feeling as if I had fallen from the sky. Luckily, I had a new friend to catch me. Six months ago, the city unveiled its Adopt a Tourist program, which brings together locals and visitors for a play date. Since its inception, 45 Aspenites have signed up as chaperons and 150 guests have been adopted. “My goal is that someone would feel welcome, comfortable and embraced from the moment they get here,” said Paul MacFarlane, who developed the idea. “You can go home with a photograph, or you can go home with a photo, e-mails, phone numbers and friends.” To help make the best match,

both sides fill out a form that poses such probing questions as “How long do you want to be adopted?” and asks about day/night habits and hobbies. My local was named Lisa, and for our outing, the 25-year resident suggested a bike ride. A brilliant idea, I told her, though in hindsight, a sporty activity could be as risky as ordering spaghetti on a first date. Potentially messy, especially if one of us took a spill. Lisa, a dark-haired bohemian dressed in a flowy top, dark skinny pants and slip-on sandals, picked me up outside the cafe Peaches. We boarded our bikes and coasted down to the Rio Grande Trail, which parallels the burbling river. Despite her girlie bike with basket and her risky footwear, she jumped the curbs like a BMXer. On an early stretch of path, Lisa explained the cape of exclusivity that wraps itself around Aspen. She said the community changed about 10 years ago, when the billionaires moved to town, fracturing the community’s fraternal nature. To prove her point, she told me how the owners of a mansion we had just passed had challenged the city to remove the bike trail. They lost, and the trail survived. Over two days, Lisa and I spent a substantial amount of time together: She joined me at the Saturday market and took me into stores in search of steep discounts. We drove out to the Maroon Bells to savor the flickering evening light around the muchphotographed peaks, and rode the gondola up Aspen mountain. At the summit, she grabbed a hula hoop from a pile and started swinging the plastic ring around her waist as if she were Saturn. She grabbed a second hoop that she spun on her arm. That night, we looked for visiting billionaires at the St. Regis, then moved on to Sky Hotel, where we roasted by the poolside fire pit. We ended

I decided to give back to a community that emphasizes “body, mind and spirit.” For 18 years, Seth Sachson has run a program at the animal shelter that allows guests to borrow a dog for a day hike or a trot around town. “The animals need love, exercise and touch every day, so they stay adoptable and sane,” he said. The facility can house up to 30 dogs. The ones woofing up a storm in Seth’s office were husky mixes from a nearby dogsledding operation. Other canines come through the Wyly family of Dallas, who find homeless dogs in Hillsboro, Texas, and transport them north in their private jet. Over the summer, the program grew so popular (about 20 walkers a day) that the animals were getting a lot of — even too much — exercise. But now in the offseason, the pace has slowed, and Seth can spend more time pairing the right human with the right dog. His process reminded me of the Adopt a Tourist program, the only difference being that the local has four legs and howls. He chose for me a female husky mix who was less than two years old and already the mother of four. A wall displays bios of each dog, with personal descriptions that read faintly like Match .com profiles. Alex, nee Melana, was noted for being sweet and shy, and easy with the kisses. Seth drove us to the trailhead of the Rio Grande Trail, setting us loose at the top of steep stairs that Alex maneuvered with the grace of a doe. We crossed over the river and continued on the path that I had earlier biked with my own

adopter. We stopped at a waterfall so that one of us could quench her thirst. Traffic was light, with a few cyclists wheeling by, calling out “puppy, puppy.” Alex would glance up, then return to sniffing out the scents mixed in with the flowers and dry earth. After an hour, we retraced our steps. By the time we reached the shelter, we were both panting, having sufficiently worked our bodies and lifted our spirits.

Soaking it all up at Glenwood Springs The hot springs of Glenwood Springs, less than an hour from Aspen, are impervious to air temperature and inclement weather. In rain, snow, sleet or sun, cold or heat, the outdoor baths are a reliable 93 degrees in the 100foot pool and 104 degrees in the 405-footer. Bathers, however, are more programmed to the seasons. In summer, the facility attracts 30 percent more visitors than it does the rest of the year. “I don’t even come here dur-

ing the summer, because I don’t want to deal with the kids and the crowds,” said Rosie Huff, who once owned a restaurant in town. After strolling a few laps, I settled into a spalike chair attached to the inside edge of the pool. When you pop a quarter into a machine, jets emit hot bubbles for five minutes. An elegant older woman named Helen was clutching a plastic change purse full of coins. She deposited four quarters and offered me 50 cents for my own treatment. As we sat together in our boiling pots, she told me that she and her husband divide their time between Glenwood Springs and Venice, Fla. She was soon leaving one shoulder season for another. A man with steaming glasses then joined us, confessing that he had accidentally put his quarters in Helen’s chair. Bubbled out, Helen proffered her seat to me and floated off to join her husband. I moved over to Helen’s spot but first looked around to be sure I was not monopolizing. All the chairs in the row were empty, except mine.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 E7

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E8 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP: 7-9 p.m.; St. Charles Bend; 541-771-7341 or www.hidarg.org. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SONS OF NORWAY: Scandinavian heritage; 7:30 p.m.; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING

PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www.bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@bendbroadband. com or 541-306-4171. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. SWINGING MOUNTAINEERS PLUS SQUARE DANCE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY THE ACCORDION CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON: 1:30 p.m.; Cougar Springs Senior Living Facility, Redmond; hmh@ coinet.com or kgkment@aol.com. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 3 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www. latinocommunityassociation.org. DAR BEND CHAPTER: 1 p.m.; Deschutes County Historical

Society, Bend; 541-322-6996. JUMPIN’ JUNIPER GOOD SAMS: Camping group; 541-382-7031. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB: 1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-9957 or www.otahc.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BENDUBS CAR CLUB: 7 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Lodge, Bend; www.bendubs.com. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0669. DESCHUTES COUNTY FOURWHEELERS: 5 p.m. dinner, 6 p.m. meeting; Papa’s Pizza, Bend; 541389-0090 or www.deschutes county4wheelers.com.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-3859198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON INVENTORS

‘Parenthood’s’ Shepard: ‘There’s no master plan’ By B.J. Hammerstein Detroit Free Press

DETROIT — Things are going well for 35-year-old Dax Shepard, who began his Hollywood ascent in 2003 on Ashton Kutcher’s MTV hidden-camera TV series “Punk’d.” The actor-writer-director appears weekly on the small screen on NBC’s family-centric dramedy “Parenthood” as “I’m just the fun-loving interested in Crosby Braverworking on man, a young good, solid man thrust into projects with adulthood by talented way of a longpeople. And I distance relalove working.” tionship and — Dax (surprise!) a 5Shepard, acyear-old son. tor on NBC’s Critics are “Parenthood” also buzzing about his performance in the critically acclaimed film “The Freebie,” the story of a married couple who decide to give up that whole monogamy thing for just one night. Meanwhile, Shepard’s mockumentary “Brother’s Justice,” in which he gives up his comedy and acting life to pursue a career in martial arts, was just screened at the second annual Friars Club Comedy Film Festival in New York City. The hysterical Shepard, who’s engaged to actress Kristen Bell, caught up with the Detroit Free Press to dish on Coney dogs, his Midwestern work ethic and more. At the start of the second season of “Parenthood,” Crosby is mostly dealing with his girlfriend and son. It’s a pretty compelling relationship, one that many young men can probably relate to — that whole growing-up thing. Any hints you can provide on where Crosby’s going this season? It’s always so annoying to be in this predicament, for all parties involved. I can’t tell you anything! Well, let’s see: Crosby’s girlfriend, Jasmine (Joy Bryant), took off to New York City with our son to take a job dancing. Yeah, this is the one thing about TV — I can’t really tell you anything. You just have to tell everyone that they’re going to have to watch. Sorry.

Q:

A:

For a lot of new shows with a large ensemble cast like yours, it sometimes takes a while for everyone to click on-screen. Your show was getting very positive reviews from critics toward the end of its first season. Does all of this add more pressure going into the second year? I would agree with that, especially in television, there are usually different directors each episode, and when the show is new, there’s not a body of work to look at. And even with the writers, they have to figure out people’s strong suits, too. That’s tricky. We have 14 different actors, and they are all just as unique in real life as they are in the show. ... But what’s really cool about that is the opportunity I get to act in that type of environment. It’s really a great job. It’s the most fun I’ve ever had working, and I think we all have a really good time together. So there might be pressure for us to create this great show, but I think if we’re having a lot of fun doing it, especially in this family-based setting where we work very long hours for most of the year, it’s good to be in a spot where we’re all enjoying it. That Braverman family of yours on “Parenthood” sure does like to spend a lot of time with each other. It’s a TV show! You know, I think that’s what makes the show connect with viewers — everyone can relate to these characters in some way. Luckily for me, I’ve never found out that I actually have a kid out there. It’s weird. On one hand, it’s ultra-realistic — families don’t come together in these nice and neat little packages. But on the other hand, we’re always together, and that doesn’t usually happen. It’s like a hyperreality, but if you’re going to enjoy Superman, you have to get over flying. Somehow all of our characters work 35 hours a week and raise kids and are able to be with each other all the time. You’ve really put together an eclectic career so far, from starring in TV and movies to the behind-the-scenes work of writing and directing. Is there a specific area that appeals to you more than others? There’s this common perception that actors are driving the ship or that people are more into directing. But really, for me, I don’t care how it takes shape

Q:

A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

— whether it’s acting, writing, directing. There’s no master plan. When you make a master plan, or rather, when I make a master plan, the universe collapses. I’m aimless ... never aiming. I used to think I’d never do a TV show and now I’m on a TV show and I love it. Fifteen years from now, who knows? I may hate TV. If I learned anything in this wild world of ours, it’s that I don’t really make those kinds of plans anymore. I’m just interested in working on good, solid projects with talented people. And I love working. Do you miss Michigan at all? For some unknown reason this summer, L.A. was very humid, and I loved it. It totally reminded me of Michigan, and that’s when I start missing that lake living, those warm nights. There was a time when I would have American Coney Island ship out coneys on ice, and I would host Coney dog parties. I wish Lafayette would get it together. Yeah, of course, we come back and see family and hit the lakes. ... But those party days of mine, where I’ve spent many days of my youth checking out bands and hanging out at places like the Lager House, those days of $1 PBRs (Pabst Blue Ribbons), are long gone. Have you been keeping up with all the different projects in Michigan? It’s interesting, that’s for sure. Most actors live in Los Angeles, and — I don’t know — it’s actually got to be kind of hard. It’s cool for Michigan, and everyone knows I’m from there, so I hear a lot of things about people working there. But for me, I’ve been living in Los Angeles for 15 years now, and if there was a version of “Parenthood” that was going to be set up in Philadelphia ... I love Philly, but I can’t move to Philly. I can’t leave L.A. now. I guess I’m just really selfish. I mean, if I told my fiancee I just got a job in Philly, she’d be like, “What the ...?!?” For actors, working on a TV show is very time-consuming — you’re going to be working on that like nine or 10 months out of the year. And it’s not like these NBA athletes where we’re going to make $20 million for this one season: “Here you go. Come do it.” I probably sound like a real jerk. I did mention I am very selfish, right?

GROUP: 6-7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-480-2320. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-382-5376. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. SOUTH CENTRAL LITTLE LEAGUE BOARD: 6:30 p.m.; Midstate Electric, La Pine; 541-536-9845. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 3-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Johnny Carino’s, Bend; 541-923-1369. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SADDLE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-923-2605. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. WOMEN’S GROUP (GRUPO DE MUJERES): 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 4 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS: 7 p.m.;

Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-549-1322. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6-8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition. org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Airport; 541-419-5496 or www.eaa1345.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. MOMS CLUB OF BEND: 10:3011:30 a.m.; First United Methodist Church, Bend; 541-389-5249 or www.momsclubofbendor.org. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; RSVP required; 10 a.m.; 541-3188515 or kdwhite18@yahoo.com. OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; China Sun Buffet, Bend; 541-382-7969. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SOCIETY FOR CREATIVE ANACHRONISM (SCA): 6:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; www.corvaria.antir.sca.org. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

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www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010

Meals for under

“ It’s a lack of awareness. People are still going into the ER and getting that tetanus shot instead of the Tdap.” — Heather Kaisner, immunization coordinator for Deschutes County Health Services

A push to prevent whooping cough Combining booster with tetanus shots would help, local health officials say By Markian Hawryluk

Inside

The Bulletin

Americans are pretty well trained that if • Wh at is they cut themselves — or step on the proverbial whooping rusty nail — they’re probably going to get a tetacough? nus shot in the emergency room. But few realFind out on ize those same jabs could be a powerful public Page F7. health weapon in the fight against pertussis or whooping cough. In 2005, federal MEDICINE public health aucough Whooping thorities recommended that doctors start using a combination shot, known as Tdap, that includes boosters for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, instead of the tetanus-diphtheria booster, or Td, they had been using. But five years later, many patients still aren’t getting the Tdap booster when they need a tetanus shot. Each time a patient gets a Td booster instead, it represents a lost opportunity to control the spread of pertussis. “It’s a lack of awareness,” said Heather Kaisner, immunization coordinator for Deschutes County Health Services. “People are still going into the ER and getting that tetanus shot instead of the Tdap.” See Whooping / F7 droplets Microscopic etella carr ying Bord pertussis are inhaled.

pertussis, the disease Doctors call erium Bordetella after the bact h whic pertussis, re causes a seve with n infectio that symptoms can last for ’s a 1 weeks. Here an look at how infection 3 develops:

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(and they’re healthy, too!) By Betsy Q. Cliff • The Bulletin

D

on’t think you have the time or the money to prepare healthy food? Well, put down that frozen pizza, because we’re here to prove you wrong. The Bulletin recruited NUTR four local nutrition experts to give us their recipes for quick-to-make meals that provide a lot of nutrition without breaking the bank. They each sent in a full dinner that you can make for a family of four for $18 or less. Nutrition experts also gave us some general tips for making your meals less expensive without sacrificing nutrition. One of the biggest complaints that

Laura Spaulding hears is that fresh fruits and vegetables are too expensive. Spaulding, director of the Women, Infants and Children program at the Deschutes County Health I T I O N Department, said it’s cheaper to buy fruits and vegetables that are in season, which are often the same ones that are on sale. She also said that frozen vegetables are a great substitute for fresh and, depending on how they are processed, sometimes more nutritious. Julie Hood, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Central Oregon Community College, advised us to eat

the way the food pyramid is structured. That means the bulk of your diet should come from whole grains, then fruits and vegetables, with meat and dairy as the smallest part of your daily intake. “If we do that, it’s a lot cheaper,” she said. Lynne Oldham, a registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend, said she sees a lot of people wasting money on soda. Buy tea instead, she advises, which is both cheaper and better for you. Oldham also had an idea for one of the quickest and cheapest meals of all. “I’m a big fan of sweet potatoes. Microwave them, and then add any topping.” If you like that one, you’ll love the four cheap dinners below.

Chicken with broccoli and potatoes

Mac and cheese with salad and slushy

From Annie Williamson

From Lori Brizee

Boneless skinless chicken breasts: $9.30 Dried Italian bread crumbs: $2.29 Eggs: $1.39 Broccoli crowns $1.77

Lemon: $0.69 Russet potatoes: $1.35 Sour cream: $0.99

TOTAL COST: $17.78 From the cupboard: Butter

Whole wheat macaroni: $1.69 Cheddar cheese: $1.99 Green lettuce: $1.29 Grape tomatoes: $2.99 Carrot: $0.15 Radish: $0.59

Red wine vinegar: $2.49 Bananas: $0.48 Frozen strawberries: $2.99

in Toxin released ads the lungs spre the body. throughout 5

Journal, Disease Infectious Sciences Center Pediatric th Source: of Virginia Heal University

From Lynne Oldham

From Julie Hood

Apples: $3.16 Apple crisp topping: $1.50

TOTAL COST: $13.95 From the cupboard: Nothing

Spinach: $1.29 Low-fat cottage cheese: $1.59 Eggs: $1.39 Bagged grated cheese: $1.99 Canned black beans: $0.89 Salsa: $2.00 Canned corn: $0.79

By Leslie Barker Garcia The Dallas Morning News

The one theory of stretching everyone seems to agree on can be summed up in two words: Don’t bounce. After that, pull the ring tab and step back. Broaching the topic, triathlon F I T N coach Tommy Johnson says, is like “opening up a can of worms.” What, you may ask, could possibly be contentious about something that is supposed to keep you injury-free and immune from soreness? Plenty, it turns out. “There is a bit of a controversy about whether you should stretch at all,” says Dallas trainer Ron Incerta. When USA Track & Field conducted a clinical trial of almost 3,000 runners, the results, published last month, were essentially a wash: Those who

stretched had the same injury risk as those who didn’t. A Nebraska Wesleyan University study deflated another theory, the idea that flexibility achieved through stretching makes for a better runner. The results showed that E S S runners with tighter muscles are more economical runners than those who are more flexible. “If you want to stretch because you’re tight and think you’ll become more flexible, I don’t see that as the case,” says Plano, Texas, physical therapist Jake Spivey. “Stretching isn’t to improve the length of the tissue, but to prepare the tissue for exercise and not create injury during the course of it. If you just take off, you can create overuse issues such as tendonitis or bursitis.” See Stretch / F8

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From the cupboard: Garlic or garlic powder

Note: Ingredients for these meals were purchased by The Bulletin at a Safeway store in Bend on Sept. 29. We used a Club Card which resulted in savings on some items. Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

FOR RECIPES AND NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION, SEE PAGE F4.

latc

To stretch or not to stretch? The debate that has no end

Compassionate Care Brown rice: $1.53 Canned black beans: $0.89 Tomatoes: $1.32 Salsa: $2.00 Avocado: $1.56 Bagged grated cheese: $1.99

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© 2010 McC

From the cupboard: Skim milk, cornstarch, olive oil, sugar, Italian spices, dry mustard

Quesadilla pie and Spanish rice

C Bacte

6 Pneumonia may develop if tiny air sacs deep s in lung become infected.

TOTAL COST: $14.66

Black beans and rice with apple crisp

Cells

2

4

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F2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

FLU SHOTS Many insurance plans will cover seasonal flu shots. The following prices apply only to recipients without insurance accepted by the provider. Today — 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; $25; Ray’s Food Place, La Pine. Friday — Noon-6 p.m.; $25; Bend Factory Stores. Saturday — 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; $25; Bend Memorial Clinic, eastside. Saturday — 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; $25; Bend Factory Stores. Saturday — Noon-6 p.m.; $30; Erickson’s Thriftway, Bend. Sunday — Noon-3 p.m.; $25; Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Sunriver. Wednesday — 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; $30; Redmond Senior Center. Wednesday — Noon-6 p.m.; $25; Ray’s Food Place, Sisters. The following locations have flu shots available on an ongoing basis. Call for times or appointments. Rite Aid, Prineville — $24.99; 541-447-2466. Walgreens, Redmond — $29.99; 541-548-1731. Walmart, Bend — $24; 541-389-8184. Walmart Supercenter, Redmond — $24; 541-923-1718.

SUPPORT GROUPS GRIEF RELIEF SUPPORT GROUP: An eight-week group with themes of reinvesting in life after loss; registration required; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon Tuesdays, Oct. 19-Dec. 14, or 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 20Dec. 15; Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-382-5882. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS —

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

CLASSES

Submitted photo

Students practice Iyengar yoga. See the Fundamentals of Iyengar Yoga listing for details. MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915.

OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org.

FUNDAMENTALS OF IYENGAR YOGA: Free; 10-11:15 a.m. Saturday; Iyengar Yoga of Bend: 660 N.E. Third St., Suite 5; 541-318-1186, nadine@bendcable.com. HEALTH EMPOWERMENT FOR WEIGHT LOSS: Joshua Phillips leads a four-week class on achieving health and losing weight at an appropriate pace; $150; 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning Oct. 19; Healing Heart Natural Health Center, 20 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334 or docnaturecure@ gmail.com to register. MAKE PARENTING A PLEASURE: Parents of children ages newborn to 8 learn skills to make parenting easier; $40, $65 per couple; 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 12Dec. 7; Vern Patrick Elementary School, 3001 S.W. Obsidian Ave., Redmond; 541-389-5468 or www.frconline.org to register. MOVING FROM FRUSTRATION TO ELATION: For parents who want to connect with their children and who struggle with anger and frustration; registration required by Tuesday; $40; 9-11:30 a.m. Oct. 16; Peace Center of Central Oregon, 816 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541-389-0831, carol@intobalancecoachinhg.com or www.intobalancecoaching.com. PREVENTING OSTEOPOROSIS WITH EXERCISE: Physical therapists lead activity to prevent and reduce osteoporosis; $70; lower impact from 9-10 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Oct. 18-Dec. 15; higher intensity from 9-10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 12-Dec. 14; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; www. stcharleshealthcare.org to register. VOLUNTEER TRAINING CLASS: Train to volunteer with Partners In Care; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 30; register for location; 541-382-5882. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12;

541-389-7665. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-306-1672 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND

RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or www.redmondhealingyoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994.

Over 1 Million Americans will become caregivers this year. “A Caregiver’s Journey” will comfort you, give practical advice and help you through this journey. October 16th at 10:00 a.m. St. Charles Hospital in Bend Tickets are $15.00 each available at: Alyce Hatch Center 1406 NW Juniper Street (541) 389-5437 Tickets will also be available at the door

Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

Sponsored by: Alyce Hatch Board of Directors

Call 541.330.6160 www.aesthetics-md.com

Put Life Back in Your Life Living Well with Chronic Conditions Pre-registration required If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well with Chronic Conditions program can help you take charge of your life. The six-week workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

(541) 322-7430 www.livingwellco.org

Oct. 4 - Nov. 8, Bend 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm Oct. 18 - Nov. 22, Bend 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm Living Well is brought to you in partnership by: Deschutes County Health Services HealthMatters Central Oregon Oregon Department of Human Services PacificSource Health Plans Northwest Health Foundation St. Charles Health System Jefferson County Health Department Clear One Health Plans Mountain View Hospital Mosaic MedicalCrook County Health Department Pioneer Memorial Hospital


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 F3

M New health plans fail to draw much interest

Next week New statewide pilot project begins this month to try to coordinate care for highest-cost patients.

Few patients enroll in federally subsidized high-risk pools

Study shows why some want redo of nose job

By Phil Galewitz

By Jeannine Stein

Kaiser Health News

Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Ruth Titus, a 59-year-old cook from Taos, N.M., leaped at the opportunity in July to sign up for health insurance under a new federally subsidized program for uninsured people with health problems. With her history of bladder cancer, she said, “it was hopeless to even look” for private coverage because she would be turned down. Titus is one of what some officials say has been an unexpectedly small number of people to sign up for the program, which the Obama administration touted as an early benefit of the new health overhaul law. It began last month in 30 states with the expectation that many thousands of uninsured people would apply for the opportunity to get comprehensive coverage regardless of their health status, but that hasn’t been the case. About 3,600 people have applied and about 1,200 have been approved so far in state plans that started in the beginning of July, according to data from the states and federal government. Officials say the new plans, although they’re a better deal than anything comparable on the private market, still may be unafThinkstock fordable for many people. Eligi- High-risk people can sign up for new programs that went into efbility requirements are another fect in July as part of the new health care overhaul. However, the possible barrier, and states have programs in 30 states are seeing fewer applicants than expected. had little time to publicize the plans. It’s too soon to gauge the pro- because insurers no longer will a 40-year-old would pay $275 a gram’s impact — the plans won’t be able to discriminate based on month. be up and running in all the states health status. Titus pays $251 monthly for her The Congressional Budget Of- policy, which includes a $2,000 until September — but some offifice has estimated that as many deductible. cials are surprised. “It’s early, but thus far inter- as 4 million uninsured Americans “It was a huge relief,” she said est in the program is lower than will be eligible and that 200,000 after she obtained coverage. “Even will be enrolled by 2013. though it’s expensive, it is nothing we expected,” said MiThat projection assumes like trying to pay out of pocket for chael Keough, the exthat some people won’t every day in the hospital.” ecutive director of the be interested or won’t North Carolina Health Applicants may be put off by be able to afford the eligibility criteria. They must Insurance Risk Pool, premiums. which started July 1. have been uninsured for at least HEALTH The new plans are six months and have pre-existing As of Tuesday, 314 peoCARE seen as a big improve- conditions. They also must prove ple had applied and 158 had been approved. REFORM ment over existing that a private insurer has rejected “high-risk” programs in them for coverage within the past GettingUSCovered, many states that provide six months or denied coverage for Colorado’s program, has received 204 applications; 108 an option — often at a very high certain benefits. At least a dozen people are enrolled. It’s a “very cost and after long waiting peri- states give applicants the option low number given that there are ods — to people who have diffi- of providing doctors’ notes as hundreds of thousands of unin- culty getting insurance. proof that they have pre-existing Not everyone can afford the conditions such as cancer or rheusured in the state,” said Suzanne Bragg-Gamble, the executive new plans’ premiums, however, matoid arthritis. although they’re cheaper than director. Officials with the state plans Many states were so worried those of the existing high-risk also point to a lack of publicity. about not being able to meet the programs. Federal regulations Government Employees Health demand for coverage with limited prohibit the new plans from Association, the Kansas City, Mo., federal funding that 22 of them charging more when people have company that has the federal condeferred to the U.S. Department health problems, though. tract to run the plans in 22 states, Premiums vary from plan to said it hadn’t yet started a major of Health and Human Services to run the new plans. The other 28 plan and are affected by appli- marketing campaign. states and the District of Colum- cants’ ages, where they live and whether they smoke. For exambia opted to start their own. Kaiser Health News, an Enrollees must pay premiums ple, the monthly premium for a editorially independent news for their coverage, which is com- person age 45 to 54 who doesn’t service, is a program of the prehensive and doesn’t exclude smoke ranges from $330 in Ha- Kaiser Family Foundation, any pre-existing conditions. The waii to $556 in Florida, according a nonpartisan health care federal government is subsidizing to HHS. A 50-year-old nonsmok- policy-research organization the program with $5 billion until er in Denver would pay $397 a that isn’t affiliated with Kaiser 2014, when the program will end month with a $2,500 deductible; Permanente.

Despite how aesthetic plastic surgery is portrayed on reality shows, there isn’t always a happy ending. A study released in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery finds that people who want revisions on their nose jobs may do so because they don’t like the way their nose looks — most cited an asymmetrical tip — or functions. The study surveyed 104 people (83 percent women) who had undergone at least one or more rhinoplasties (also known as nose jobs) and were interested in redoing them. The most common aesthetic concerns among patients and doctors were tip asymmetry, the middle third of the nose being crooked, and having an irregularity in the upper third of the nose. About two-thirds of the patients also had subjective complaints about nasal obstruction, and the most common problems were having the sensation of nasal blockage, breathing through the mouth, and snoring. Physicians backed up 94 percent of those concerns by finding something that was causing a nasal obstruction. The survey also revealed that surgeons dealt with 79 percent of the patients’ worries about aesthetic issues. But patients also said that only 55 percent of the surgeons’ findings mattered to them. The authors noted that this was similar to another study that found surgeons are more critical of how patients look post-op than the patients themselves.

Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Denise Hirschberg has joined the staff of the Center for Integrated Medicine as an acupuncturist. Hirschberg is a graduate of the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland. Alison Elsberry has joined the staff of the Center for Integrated Medicine as an occupational ther- Joyce Stahly Dr. Ann apist. Elsberry uses craniosacral Clemens therapy, a light-touch practice, in conjunction with occupational therapy concepts. Joyce Stahly has joined the staff of Cascade Hand Therapy. Stahly has 16 years of specialty experience with hand injury, burn injuries in the upper extremity and orthopedics of the arm and hand. Megan Haase has been appointed the CEO of Mosaic Medical, overseeing health centers in Prineville, Bend and Madras. Haase previously served Mosaic Medical as medical director and interim executive director. Dr. Ann Clemens has joined the staff of Bend Memorial Clinic’s urgent care department. Clemens is a former employee of Presbyterian Urgent Care in Albuquerque, N.M. She is a graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine. She completed her residency at the University of New Mexico. O’Neill Orthodontics has opened a new office at 745 N.W. Mt. Washington Drive, #204, Bend. The practice is led by Dr. Casey O’Neill. Redmond-Sisters Hospice has opened an office in Bend, at 701 N.W. Hill St. The office will be open Tuesdays and Thursdays, or by appointment.

Costs of infections Costs of infections According to the Agency for Health Research and Quality, about one out of every 500 patients admitted to the hospital will acquire an infection at some time during the stay. In 2007, such infections increased the cost, the length of stay and the risk of death significantly.

Total hospital stays: 22,076,386 Rate of infection: 0.19%

Days in hospital 2 4 .4

Hospital stay with infection Hospital stay without infection

5 .2

Average total cost to hospital Hospital stay with infection Hospital stay without infection

$ 5 2 ,0 9 6 $ 9 ,3 7 7

Percent who died in hospital Hospital stay with infection Hospital stay without infection

9% 1 .5 %

Source: Agency for Health Research and Quality Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

Find Your Dream Home Every Saturday In Real Estate

Desert Orthopedics welcomes Dr. Philip Wallace to Bend and our Team. He specializes in Interventional Spine and Sports Injuries and Physiatry. Philip Wallace, MD Board Certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Fellowship Trained Interventional Spine & Sports

OFFICIAL MEDICAL PROVIDER TO THE US SKI & SNOWBOARD TEAMS Official Medical Provider

www.desertorthopedics.com

PEOPLE

VITAL STATS

Immediate appointments are available in Bend and Redmond

Bend Office

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1303 N.E. Cushing Dr., Suite 100 Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 388-2333

1315 NW 4th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 (541) 548-9159

World Class Care … Outstanding Hometown Service!


F4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N Recipes from local dietitians (continued from Page F1) Thinkstock photos

CHICKEN WITH BROCCOLI AND POTATOES Annie Williamson, a registered dietitian at Bend Memorial Clinic, said she likes this meal because it can be made quickly and easily, particularly if you cook the potatoes either partially or wholly in the microwave. She also put it together, she said, because it contains a variety of different foods. The chicken contains lean protein; a typical portion contains just 10 percent of your daily recommended amount of fat. The broccoli and potatoes, she said, are good sources of fiber and of vitamins A and C. 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts 1 to 1¼ C dried Italian bread crumbs 1 to 2 eggs 2 broccoli crowns 1 lemon

MACARONI AND CHEESE WITH SALAD AND FRUIT SLUSHY Baked potato

4 sm Russet potatoes (we got two lg potatoes) ½ C light sour cream 4 TBS butter or margarine

1. Crack eggs into a bowl and dip in chicken breasts to coat. Roll in bread crumbs. Bake at 425 degrees for 20 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. 2. Wash and chop broccoli. Steam for a couple of minutes, longer if you want it more tender. Sprinkle with lemon juice. 3. Wash and bake potatoes. (Can microwave or bake in the oven until soft.) Serve with small amounts of butter and sour cream.

QUESADILLA PIE AND SPANISH RICE

Lori Brizee, registered dietitian at Central Oregon Nutrition Consultants, submitted this recipe. Macaroni and cheese is a kid-pleaser, and the homemade version has more protein, calcium and whole grains, with much less sodium than the packaged mix. With all the cheese, the main dish is fairly high in fat; Brizee said pairing it with a low-fat salad and no-fat dessert rounds out the meal. The macaroni and cheese contains fiber, B vitamins and calcium. The salad gives a healthy dose of vitamins A and C and folic acid. The fruit slushy adds more fiber along with potassium, vitamins and antioxidants.

MACARONI 2 C whole wheat macaroni 8 C water for cooking macaroni 2 C non-fat milk 2 TBS cornstarch

2 C medium or sharp cheddar, or Swiss cheese Optional: 3-4 drops Tobasco sauce, ¼ tsp dry mustard; 1 ⁄8 tsp ground black pepper

1. Bring water to a boil, add macaroni and cook for 8 to 10 minutes. Drain. 2. While macaroni is cooking, shred cheese. Mix cold milk with cornstarch and optional seasonings in a heavy saucepan until cornstarch is dissolved. Heat mixture over medium to high heat, stirring constantly until mixture comes to a boil and thickens. 3. Add shredded cheese and stir until melted. Mix with cooked macaroni and serve.

Julie Hood, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Central Oregon Community College, said she liked this meal SALAD because it is tasty, cheap and easy to make. She liked Chopped green lettuce that it contained plenty of protein, with the whole Cherry tomatoes (we chose grape tomatoes Macaroni rice and beans, without using meat, which can because they were cheaper) and cheese be more expensive. Chopped carrot This meal contains all the food groups, Sliced radishes Hood said, including some produce and dairy from the cottage and shreeded cheeses. Toss together and serve with salad Spinach contains a lot of nutrients, includdressing you have or make your own using a heaping amount of vitamins A and K ing the recipe below. and a good serving of folic acid. Spinach also contains iron, as do the beans, makVINAIGRETTE SALAD DRESSING ing this dish rich in a nutrient that many of (Makes 16 TBS) us do not get enough of. ½ C red wine vinegar ½ C olive oil 1 ⁄8 tsp sugar QUESADILLA PIE 1 C salsa ¼ tsp Italian seasonings 1 bunch or bag fresh or 1C 1 ⁄8 tsp dry mustard frozen spinach, chopped canned 2 C low-fat cottage cheese corn Mix together well and drizzle over salad. (Note: 1 egg 2 tbsp Here at The Bulletin, we’ve been known to make ¼ C grated Mexican cheese chopped a decent vinaigrette by taking any vinegar in the cupblend cilantro board and adding olive oil at a ratio of two parts oil to one part 2 cloves garlic (or ¼ tsp garlic 8 large flour tortillas vinegar. You can spice it up, but you don’t have to.) powder) Extra cheese for top of 1 can black beans tortillas FRUIT SLUSHY 2 C any frozen fruit (we chose 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Steam or microwave spinach 2 C any fresh fruit (we chose strawberries) and squeeze out excess water. Put spinach in large bowl. bananas) 2. In another bowl, blend cottage cheese, egg, cheese blend and garlic. Add to spinach and mix all together. Place fresh fruit in the blender and blend. Add frozen fruit and 3. Add beans, salsa, corn and cilantro and mix. continue to blend until liquefied. Eat with spoon or drink with a 4. Place a tortilla on a baking sheet. Spoon some of mixture on straw. top and spread evenly. Place a tortilla on top of mixture and sprinkle with cheese. 5. Repeat with all 8 tortillas to make 4 pies. Macaroni and cheese is a kid-pleaser, and the 6. Bake for 30 minutes and spoon salsa on top when done. SPANISH RICE 1 C brown rice

2 to 2½ C water to cook rice Salsa

Cook rice in rice cooker or on stove. Mix in salsa.

homemade version has more protein, calcium and whole grains, with much less sodium than the packaged mix.

How to have a healthy frozen meal Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) Frozen dinners are convenient, but many also are high in fat, calories and salt. Here’s advice from dietitians on making the meals as nutritious as possible. Read labels. Aim for entrees with fewer than 400 calories and no more than 30 percent of those calories from fat. Keep saturated fat at less than six grams — less than four if possible — and sodium under 600 milligrams. Check the ingredients. You want meals with lots of vegetables, lean grilled meats and whole grains

such as brown rice. Avoid heavy cream sauces and lots of cheese. Watch portion sizes. A package marketed as a single meal actually might contain several servings. Supplement with healthy sides. Add vitamins, protein and calcium to your meal by pairing a frozen dinner with a small salad, fruit cup, low-fat yogurt with berries or a glass of low-fat milk. The extra food also will satisfy your appetite, especially if your entree is less than 300 calories. Go light on added sauces. If

a meal comes with a separate packet of seasoning, use less of it to slice sodium content (and often fat and calories, too). Don’t be fooled by advertising. A package marked with words such as “healthy,” “natural” or “organic” isn’t necessarily good for you.

Know the best and worst. Generally, potpies with crust and pizzas with extra cheese or stuffed crust tend to be diet busters. On the flip side, entrees from Lean Cuisine, Smart Ones or Healthy Choice often are your smartest options — although you still need to check labels.

Black beans

BLACK BEANS AND RICE WITH APPLE CRISP Lynne Oldham, a registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend, said this meal is quick; she estimates it would take about 45 minutes, with most of the time spent waiting for the rice to cook. She advises that people buy brown rice, which, unlike white rice, contains nutrients that protect against cancer, heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and weight gain. Beans are a great source of iron, Oldham said, and a cheap way to get protein. The toppings — salsa, avocado, tomato and cheese — contain a number of nutrients including vitamins A and C, calcium and, from the tomatoes, lycopene, an antioxidant that may lower your risk of some cancers. BLACK BEANS AND RICE 1 C brown rice 2 to 2½ C water to cook rice 1 can black beans

2 medium or 1 large tomato Salsa 1-2 avocados 1 bag grated cheese

1. Cook rice over stove or in rice cooker. Heat up black beans. 2. Chop tomato and avocado. 3. Mix rice and black beans together. Top with rest of ingredients. APPLE CRISP 5 TBS butter or margarine Apple Crisp mix

4 to 5 medium tart apples, peeled and cored (we chose Gala)

Cook according to mix directions. If you can’t find the mix, which we found in the produce section, you can substitute a mixture of brown sugar, oatmeal, wheat flour and spices. Combine dry ingredients, then cut softened butter into mix until there is no powder left. Place apples in baking dish and sprinkle mixture over the top. Bake at 375 degrees for 30 to 45 minutes or until juice is bubbling and apples are soft.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 F5

N DID YOU KNOW? Avocados are plentiful this year, but what makes them so good? Did you miss the annual California Avocado Festival in Santa Barbara last weekend? No problem. It’s a bumper crop this year, according to the California Avocado Commission, which represents growers in the state that produces the majority of domestic avocados. Test your knowledge, then head to your local produce stand or supermarket to take advantage of the bounty.

2.

What percent of an avocado’s calories come from fat? a) 20 b) 45 c) 80 d) 95 True or false: Most of the fats in avocados are monounsaturated fats, which can raise levels of good cholesterol and have beneficial effects on the heart.

3.

4.

One avocado contains 10 percent or more of the

Thinkstock

recommended daily allowance of which of the following vitamins. a) vitamin K b) vitamin E c) vitamin C d) folate e) all of the above — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Answers: 1. c) 230; 2. c) 80; 3) True. Two-thirds of the fats in avocados are monounsaturated; 4. e) all of the above Source: California Avocado Commission, www.nutritiondata.com

Kids with food allergies may be targeted by bullies By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

As if kids with food allergies didn’t have enough to deal with at school, now they may have to worry about being bullied. A study finds that some children who have food allergies could be the target of bullies — and some of those bullies could be teachers. A new report in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology finds that about onequarter of children surveyed said they were bullied because of their food allergies. Researchers gave surveys to 353 children and teens with food allergies; the vast majority were completed by parents. The survey revealed that about 24 percent of the participants had been bullied, teased or harassed because of their allergies. About 86 percent of this group said they had been harassed more than once and that it occurred most often at school. (Most children reported having multiple food allergies, but peanut allergies were most common.) When asked why they were bullied, about 79 percent said it was because of the food allergy and the rest thought they were bothered because of a number of related issues, including having to carry medication, being set apart at mealtimes and getting special treatment. Among those who had been bullied, about 44 percent said that the food they were allergic

Which food is more filling? By Sam McManis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

You say you just ate a ton of calories for breakfast but still feel hungry? Obviously, you haven’t consulted Nutrition Data’s handy “Fullness Factor” chart. It lists the satiating effects of foods, with the more calorie-dense offerings supporting weight loss. Take our quiz to see if you can pick which of two options feels the more filling per calorie of food. 1. Grapefruit or raisins? 2. Spaghetti or popcorn? 3. Macaroni and cheese or brown rice? 4. Pizza or watermelon? 5. Roasted chicken breast or broiled sirloin steak? 6. Oatmeal or banana? A N SWER S: 1: Grapefruit; 2: Popcorn; 3: Mac ’n’ cheese; 4: Watermelon; 5: Chicken breast; 6: Oatmeal Source: www.self.com/fooddiet/blogs/ nutritiondata

By Jeremy Olson Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

avocado has about 1.Anhowaverage many calories? a) 80 b) 170 c) 230 d) 320

Bad food habits under attack

to had been waved in their face. However, none of the participants reported having an allergic reaction as a result of being bullied. Most of the bullies were classmates, but about 18 participants said a teacher or other school staff member had done the teasing. Emotional issues were one fallout, with some children saying they felt depressed, embarrassed and humiliated because of the teasing. In the study, the authors wrote, “These actions pose a risk of psychological harm in all people, but unique to this population is that bullying, teasing,or harassment can also pose a direct physical threat when the allergen is involved.”

MINNEAPOLIS — Before Simone French was one of the nation’s foremost researchers on eating habits — long before her studies warned about fast-food marketing and Coke machines in schools — she was a teen who snacked after school on Twinkies and dined at Burger King. Which is to say she un- Simone derstands the French cravings and time crunches and cost concerns that make people choose unhealthy foods even when they know they shouldn’t. “Right now,” she said, “the easy choice is the unhealthy choice.” French, 46, is part of a powerhouse team at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health that won a $7 million federal grant last month to change the habits of hundreds of families. The project is part of an ongoing university research program that seeks to motivate better health and eating through studies of family dinners, school lunches and food commercials. The project is one of the first times that researchers will

wrap multiple, proven solutions around families all at once, including health advisers, classes on eating and exercise, and vouchers for healthy food that researchers will make sure is stocked in neighborhood stores. “If this doesn’t work,” French said, “I don’t know what will.” Raised by a single mom, French sympathizes with parents. Families with two working parents struggle to find time to make dinner, she notes. Those in poorer neighborhoods might lack safe parks for exercise or affordable produce in local stores. Nonetheless, she said, “Parents really are the home environment managers. They decide when (families) watch TV or how much McDonald’s they eat or when they’re going to get the frosted Lucky Charms.” In addition to the time and money pressures they face, today’s parents were raised on the novelty of TV dinners and didn’t gain their parents’ cooking skills, she said. So Many parents she meets in her work are struggling to instill good habits in their children while continuing their own bad ones. “They want their kids to eat well, but they don’t want to stop” drinking soda or munching potato chips, she said. “It doesn’t work because you have to be a role model, and you have to decide what kind of food to

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bring into the house.” At first glance, French seems to be fighting a losing battle. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that 34 percent of American adults are obese. Another 34 percent are overweight. French believes research is starting to chip away at that trend by motivating insurers, employers, schools and governments to enact good health policies. French supports tougher laws to reverse the nation’s obesity epidemic. Schools should dump soda machines, even if they provide valuable revenue, she said. She also supports restrictions on foods that can be bought

through government assistance programs. French’s latest grant is designed to prevent childhood obesity, but she said that will happen only by influencing parents and making eating well an easier choice. Recruiting hasn’t started, but families are already calling, she said. “People do feel overwhelmed.” Critics have already suggested that the grant is a waste and that obese people need to toughen up and control their eating. But French said that kind of cynicism ignores the personal and social challenges that have made 70 percent of Americans overweight.

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October 13 Tuesday

October 19

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F6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week Physical therapist treats vertigo.

‘SAVIOR SIBLING’

CELEBRITY M EDICINE

IVF genetic testing is mainstream, but some say it needs oversight By Josephine Marcotty Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — Ten years ago a little girl from Colorado made medical history when her parents and her doctor at the University of Minnesota used genetic screening to create a baby that could save her life. Now, 16 years old and back in Minnesota for her 10-year checkup, Molly Nash is unimpressed that her little brother — her irritating little brother — became a “savior sibling” by giving her his umbilical cord blood — the sole reason she’s alive today to back sass her parents. Her parents, however, know what was at stake. Jack and Lisa Nash were offered a long-shot chance to save the life of their daughter and to have more children who did not have the fatal disease they both carry in their genes. “I thank God every day that I have a 16-year-old to fight with,” said Lisa Nash, who brought Molly to the university last week. When their story first became public, reaction from around the globe ranged from astonishment to horror and helped fuel the backlash against embryonic research. Molly’s doctor at the university, Dr. John Wagner, was accused of playing God. Over the decade the ethical debate has subsided and the reproductive technologies they used to conceive and test their second child have become mainstream. But Wagner and others who have watched the technologies advance and spread say the larger ethical questions raised by the Molly Nash case are more urgent than ever. They say government and professional oversight of reproductive technology is long overdue. “The question is: Will you say no to anything that parents will ask for?” said Jeff Kahn, director of the university’s Center for Bioethics. Molly Nash was born with a severe type of Fanconi anemia, a blood disorder that almost always results in leukemia by the age of 10. It’s rare, but far more common among people of Eastern European Jewish descent like the Nashes, who live in Englewood, Colo. Until Molly was born they had never heard of it and had no idea that they each carried a gene for it. The only treatment is a bone marrow transplant. The greatest likelihood of success is when the donor marrow comes from a sibling who has genetically identical tissue, called HLA. The Nashes thought they would never have more children — until Wagner, an expert in bone marrow transplantation, came to them with a novel idea. They could use in-vitro fertilization (IVF) to produce several embryos, then genetically test all of them for both Fanconi anemia and HLA type. If the genetic dice rolled in their favor, they would choose the healthy embryo, have a healthy baby and Wagner could use the infant’s umbilical cord blood as a source of new bone marrow for Molly. It took several rounds of in-vitro fertilization, and tens of thousands of dollars borrowed from Jack’s parents, to get an embryo that cleared both hurdles. But six weeks after Adam was born, Molly got her transplant. Then the headlines hit. One of the most memorable for Lisa Nash was the New York Post’s — “Frankenstein Baby.” One of Wagner’s favorites was “Evolution Is Dead.” “How did we go from saving a child to evolution is dead?” he said. Few questioned the Nashes’ decision to use genetic testing so they could have a child without Fanconi anemia. The critics focused on their decision to use genetic screening to select a child for a trait that would benefit someone else, Kahn said. Also, it raised the question of whether they wanted another child or were simply trying to save Molly. “People have all sorts of motivations for having children,” Kahn said. “Some are virtuous, and some not so much. At least they had a good reason for having a child.”

Richard Sennott / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Molly Nash, left, cuddles her 4-week-old brother, Adam, in 2000 in Minnesota. Molly, now 16, suffers from Fanconi anemia and received an umbilical cord blood transplant from her baby brother when she was 6. The Nashes said they found some of the reaction ludicrous. After all, they simply used a few teaspoons of Adam’s umbilical cord blood that would otherwise “have hit the trash can,” Lisa Nash said. “And Adam is not a designer baby.” Since Molly’s transplant Wag-

ner has done the same with “savior siblings” for dozens of other children with Fanconi anemia and other disorders. Genetic testing of embryos is done for hundreds of different types of diseases at IVF clinics and transplant centers across the country. Wagner has recently pioneered “savior sibling” bone marrow transplants for children with a type of genetic skin disease, and he’s finding that the transplanted marrow cells are capable of making new skin. But he’s encountered a number of cases that have made him uneasy and, he said, make the case for regulation and oversight of IVF clinics and transplant centers. Today all the major IVF clinics do genetic testing of embryos at the parents’ request. The Nashes used it for their third child, who is now 7. Most of the time, according to a 2005 survey of IVF clinics, they did it to test for diseases and HLA tissue typing. But about one time out of 10, it was used for gender selection, according the survey. Eventually, Kahn said, as more genes for traits such as hair color or height or skin type are identified, the choices facing parents will expand as well. “Is it time to think about external oversight?” he said.

Multiple sclerosis, symptoms can be treated with drugs Reality TV star and White House crasher Michaele Salahi announced last month that she has multiple sclerosis. According to the National MS Society, multiple sclerosis is a chronic, often disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system. The condition is unpredictable and can affect different people in different ways. Symptoms can range from numbness in the limbs to paralysis or loss of vision. MS occurs when the body’s defense system attacks myelin, the fatty sheath that protects nerve fibers. The damaged myelin forms scar tissue, known as sclerosis, which gives the disease its name. The damage to the sheath and the nerve fibers interrupts or distorts the signals sent from the brain

and the spinal cord, resulting in a variety of symptoms. MS is not considered a fatal disease as most patients live a normal or near-normal life span. Women are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed than men, and most are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50. Michaele Although there is no cure for Salahi MS, a number of medications have been approved to treat the condition and its symptoms. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

An early sign of autism? Possibly By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

Infants frequently gaze at people’s faces. It’s as if they’re fascinated and, perhaps, yearning for interaction with the people in their lives. Infants who don’t exhibit this fondness for human faces, researchers say, may be exhibiting one of the first signs of autism. With autism rates soaring over the last decade, researchers are seeking the earliest clues of the disorder. The sooner a child is diagnosed and begins treatment, experts say, the better the long-term outcome. In the Sep-

tember issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, leading autism researchers say they think infant gaze is among the first clues of social functioning. A hallmark characteristic of autism is an inability to socialize. The researchers, from the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore and the University of Delaware, observed 25 6-monthold infants who were siblings of children with autism. (Siblings have a much higher risk of developing the disease.) They were compared with 25 infants from families with no history of au-

tism. The infants were observed performing a task that measured their ability to learn and their level of social engagement with a caregiver. They found that the infants in the low-risk group were more likely to have normal social gazing. They looked at their caregivers, became excited while playing and pointed to the toy. The high-risk siblings, however, spent less time looking at their caregivers and more time focused on the toy. The two groups did not differ, however, in how well they learned the game the caregiver was playing with them.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 F7

M Doctors call the disease pertussis, after the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, which causes a severe infection with symptoms that can last for weeks. Here’s a 1 look at how an infection develops:

1

By Sh ari Roan Los Angeles Times

Droplets

3 4 5

Bacteria release a toxin that paralyzes the cilia and kills cells.

California outbreak

6

Cells

2

Bacteria hook to cells lining the throat, whose hairlike “cilia” sweep away foreign objects.

Cilia Bacteria

4 3

Bacteria reproduce and migrate toward ciliated cells of the lungs.

Toxin released in the lungs spreads throughout the body. 5

Pneumonia may develop if tiny air sacs deep in lungs become infected.

6

Source: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center © 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

— Heather Kaisner, immunization coordinator for Deschutes County Health Services “We were already looking at expanding those age indications similar to what California did, and then California happened,” said Dr. Jennifer Liang, a CDC epidemiologist. “The process for (the CDC panel) to work through that, it’s a longer process. We’re looking to them to how they’ve expanded the age and how the uptake has been in the state.”

Waning immunity Liang said that pertussis rates rise and fall over time, and outbreaks tend to be cyclical in nature. Every five years or so, pertussis cases spike and more people gain immunity either by catching the disease or through stepped-up immunization campaigns. Then five years later, when their immunity wanes, conditions are ripe for another outbreak. “The last peak nationwide was in 2005, so it looks like California is on target with their rise

Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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C-reactive protein, both markers for oxidative stress, which damages cells. They also had lower levels of antioxidant vitamins C and E, which helps protect cells from stress. The findings are evidence of “an underlying detectable abnormality” in the immune systems of people with CFS, the authors said. The finding is intriguing in light of a meeting this week at the National Institutes of Health that is exploring the link between the xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMLV) and chronic fatigue syndrome.

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Ray’s Food Place (La Pine) ..............Thurs., Oct 7, 11am-6pm Bend Factory Stores (Bend) ................ Friday, Oct. 8, 12-6pm Bend Factory Stores (Bend) ...............Sat., Oct. 9, 11am-4pm Holy Trinity Catholic Church (Sunriver) ..Sun., Oct 10, 12-3pm Ray’s Food Place (Sisters)..................Wed., Oct. 13, 12-6pm Shop Smart (La Pine) .....................Sat., Oct. 16, 11am-4pm Food 4 Less (Bend) ..........................Wed., Oct. 27, 12-6pm Newport Avenue Market (Bend) ....... Thurs., Oct. 28, 12-6pm

“From a public health perspective, we’re really trying to get the word out. Next time you go to the doctor, ask for a Tdap.”

in cases,” Liang said. Although doctors try to immunize parents and other adults who will come in contact with a newborn, a concept called cocooning, there are few other reasons an adult might seek a pertussis booster. It’s why when adults do need a tetanus booster, health officials want to make the most of the opportunity. Costs of the shots vary, but in general, Tdap runs about $20 to $30 more than the Td shot. According to Darin Durham, the emergency room manager at St. Charles Bend, for at least the past six months, all of the ER patients requiring tetanus shots have received Tdap unless they had a contraindication. Bend Memorial Clinic is also suggesting patients get the Tdap shot at their Urgent Care Clinic. “We offer that as a first recommendation,” said Dr. Randall Jacobs, an urgent care physician at the clinic. “We explain that there are two vaccines available and this is why the Tdap is important, and most people elect it.” Deschutes County health officials have been taking the Tdap message to doctors, but they’re also hoping to create more awareness among patients. “From a public health perspective, we’re really trying to get the word out,” Kaisner said. “Next time you go to the doctor, ask for a Tdap.”

LOS ANGELES — Teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome may push themselves too hard, which contributes to ongoing fatigue, claim the authors of a new study. Researchers followed 301 adolescents with mononucleosis, which often precedes chronic fatigue syndrome in teens. They diagnosed 39 teens with chronic fatigue syndrome six months after the mononucleosis diagnosis. That group of adolescents was compared with 39 of the youths who had mononucleosis but who had recovered fully after six months. The two groups were followed for two more years. At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found no differences between the two groups in the amount of physical activity before, during or after the infection. However, the kids with chronic fatigue syndrome slept much more during the day and had much more fatigue, suggesting they paid a higher price for pushing themselves to stay active and keep up with their peers. The study, published recently in the Archives of Child & Adolescent Medicine, was accompanied by several other studies on chronic fatigue syndrome in teens, a mysterious and controversial disorder estimated to affect 1.3 percent to 4.4 percent of U.S. adolescents. In another paper, scientists suggested the importance

of understanding the disorder and providing effective treatment. A study of 54 adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome showed that about half recovered after two years while the rest were still severely fatigued and physically impaired. Finally, a third study compared 25 children with chronic fatigue syndrome with 23 healthy kids and found several differences in blood tests between the two groups. The kids with chronic fatigue syndrome had differences in their white blood cells as well as higher levels of cholesterol and

Although pertussis rates in Oregon are low right now, the state has seen rates spike in recent years. And public health officials are closely following a pertussis outbreak in California, where at least nine babies have died since January. Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said they do not believe the California outbreak is in any way linked to immunization rates among children. More than 83 percent of California children have received the recommended four doses by age 2. (The rates in Oregon and in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties are all over 80 percent as well.) “We see the principal challenge there is ongoing pertussis transmission in teens and adults, and the very youngest of children, babies under 2 months of age, are the most vulnerable to serious complications of pertussis,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “We think that the challenges are increasing vaccination of teens and adults.” States do not generally track adult immunization rates, so there is little good data in Oregon or elsewhere on how many adults are getting the Td shot when they could be getting Tdap. A yet-to-be-published CDC study found that 61 percent of adults in 2008 had received a tetanus shot within the previous 10 years. CDC officials have been working with California health departments to ensure that all new parents can get a Tdap shot to avoid spreading the disease to their newborn. And public health officials are expanding the age groups that are eligible to get the pertussis booster. The two Tdap vaccines — Boostrix and Adacel — have been approved only for ages 11 to 64. California health officials are now giving those shots off-label to seniors over the age of 64 as well as to children starting at age 7. GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur, which manufacture the Tdap vaccines, are scheduled to present new data on the safety and efficacy of the booster shots in those age groups at the upcoming meeting of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices at the end of October.

Teens with chronic fatigue may overextend themselves

Microscopic droplets carrying Bordetella pertussis are inhaled.

Continued from F1 In adults, pertussis can result in weeks of coughing, pneumonia, even cracked ribs from violent coughing fits. But most adults will recover with time. It can be much more serious for infants, who don’t receive their first pertussis immunization until they are 2 months old. Even then, infants aren’t fully immunized until they get multiple doses. Often those infants are exposed to pertussis by adolescents or adults whose protection has waned because they haven’t had a booster shot. Sometimes those adults don’t even know they have pertussis. “A lot of times, adults and adolescents when they get pertussis, it’s not that serious,” Kaisner said. “By the time they go to the doctor, they’ve had the cough for a long time and the doctors may not think about testing for pertussis.”

Whooping cough

COST $25.00 We bill Medicare B, Clear One, Regence Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Oregon For ages 9 and older • Sponsored by Healthwise

Questions? Call Healthwise at 541-389-7211

HealthWise PROFESSIONAL WELLNESS PROGRAMS

Whooping


F8 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F EXERCISE TIPS Core and posture

1

2

No more sit-ups, said Cherie Touchette, a personal trainer at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center who teaches a functional core class there. Instead, Touchette emphasizes moves that teach people to keep their spine correctly aligned while strengthening the abdominal muscles. “It’s all about posture, posture, posture,” she said. This exercise and all of those in this series work the muscles in the abdomen and the back. They can be done individually or you can combine all nine; this is the first in a series that will run in The Bulletin every other week through January.

How to do it: You’ll need a bar or some sort of straight stick for this exercise; Touchette said even a broomstick will do. Stand up straight and place the bar behind you head, holding it vertically with both hands so it touches your tailbone and the back of your head (1). Hinging forward at the hip, bend forward slightly (2). The key in this move is keeping the bar in contact with your head and tailbone throughout the movement. Touchette suggests 10 to 20 repetitions for each exercise. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Stretch Continued from F1 What does work best? It’s a matter, Incerta says, of “dynamic vs. static stretching.” A quick lesson here: Dynamic stretching is basically a foreshadowing of the workout to come — arms in circles if you’re a swimmer, for instance; walking or skipping if you’re a runner; maybe doing knee lifts for other movements. Static, on the other hand, involves held poses: leaning over an outstretched leg or bending toward the ground for 30 seconds or so. Until February, triathlete Brett Skyllingstad began his workouts with traditional static stretches. Then he did some research and learned that muscles aren’t ready for such movement before a workout. Now for 10 minutes before he begins, he focuses on knee lifts, side steps and leg swings. His post-workout stretches are what his beforehand stretches once were, holding positions for 30 seconds or so. “I’ve noticed a huge difference,” says Skyllingstad, 26, project manager for a construction company and triathlon coach for Texas Triple Threat. “I don’t start out feeling flat or have that normal 10 minutes of feeling crummy or awkward. It gets your blood moving and flowing, and your heart rate more elevated.” That gradually increased blood flow is necessary for a successful workout, says Dr. Cindy Trowbridge, associate professor

Cindy Trowbridge demonstrates a static stretch to be done af ter a work out at the U niversity of Texas at Arlington. Louis DeLuca Dallas Morning News

of kinesiology at the University of Texas at Arlington. “It’s cardiovascular, getting your heart rate up and your heart warmed up so it’s now going to pump blood to your muscles instead of your organs,” says Trowbridge, clinical education coordinator of UTA’s athletic training education program. “In a resting state, blood is primarily distributed to the organs: the heart, the brain. It’s secluded from the muscles unless you’re using them.” Warming up with dynamic stretches starts the blood moving from organs to muscles, says physical therapist Spivey, whose practice is SportsCare and Rehabilitation. Many amateurs, whether running, biking or swimming, just take off and start going, he continues. “They think, ‘I’m healthy now!’ But if you just take off, you can create overuse issues such as

tendonitis or bursitis. It takes longer to strengthen muscles and joints than it does to strengthen your cardiovascular system.” Incerta likens the warming-up

process to starting a car in the middle of winter. “It won’t run as efficiently if it’s been sitting in 30-degree weather,” he says. “The gears aren’t going to shift right. But if you turn it on and warm it up for 10 to 15 minutes, it will be fine. Fluids are going through the pipes. No problems. It’s similar to the central nervous system of the body. If you’re not primed, you’re not ready to actually do physical work. Warming up gets all that fluid going.” On the other side of the workout is when Trowbridge advocates the stretching we tend to think of when we hear the word. You’re telling your body the workout’s over, she says. You’re allowing it to rest, to start repairing itself from this workout and to start preparing itself for the next one.

FLU SHOTS!! Bend Erickson’s Thriftway 725 NE Greenwood, Bend

Sat. Oct. 9 Fri. Oct. 15 Sat. Oct. 23 & 30 12pm – 6pm

Madras Thriftway 561 SW 4th St., Madras

Thurs. October 16 • 12pm – 5pm Medicare part-B, Clear One Medicare, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon accepted Minimum 12 years of age • All immunizations by licensed nurse Service provided by GetAFluShot.com

A doctor’s lifestyle matters in counseling patients By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

The last time you saw your doctor, were you counseled about diet and exercise? If not, it could be because he or she didn’t think they had sufficient training to do so. In a study published online in the journal Preventive Cardiology, trainee physicians and more experienced attending physicians were asked about their lifestyle habits and also whether they thought they had received adequate training in counseling patients about diet and exercise. The study participants included 183 doctors, 56 percent of whom were residents or fellows and considered trainees, and 44 percent of whom were attending physicians. Both groups said they didn’t eat enough fruit and vegetables and got little exercise. Trainees said they ate more fast food than did attending physicians — two fastfood meals per week compared with fewer than one — and they exercised less. Among attending physicians, about 40 percent said they exercised four or more days per week, while only about 10 percent of trainees exercised that much. About 26 percent of attending physicians and about 8 percent of trainees reported getting more than 150 minutes of aerobic exercise per week. Meditation and maintaining a regular yoga practice was a low priority for both. About 70 percent of attending physicians and 37 percent of trainees said they counseled twothirds or more of their patients about lifestyle behaviors such as nutrition and physical activity. Both groups said that they counseled patients for less than five minutes per visit. Most doctors in both groups felt ill-prepared to counsel on diet and exercise. Those who felt most confident about counseling were more likely to exercise more than 150 minutes per week and had sufficient counseling training. But doctors who were overweight were also more self-assured about talking to their patients. In the study, the authors wrote, “Given that a prior study on smoking observed that smoking physicians who were considering quitting themselves were more likely to counsel patients on smoking cessation, we hypothesize that overweight providers who are considering changing their exercise habits may be more likely to counsel their patients regarding exercise.”

• •

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 G1

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200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

205

Items for Free FREE LLAMA MANURE 5 miles east of Bend. You Load! 541-389-5071 Hop Vines, Attn. Crafters, free, you haul, please call 541-617-3843.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Adorable, healthy, fur balls! Toy poodle mix. No shed. Ready for loving homes. $225. Many references. 541-504-9958 Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix 4-wk-old pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $250. 541-923-1174. Bloodhound AKC Pups, SAR lines, parents on-site, ready Nov., $500, 541-390-8835. Boxer, 1 Yr. AKC Male Fawn. Sweet, handsome boy. Includes x-large crate. $450.00. 541.504.6303.

1 7 7 7

S . W .

Chi Pom Pups, adorable, 6 weeks old males & females now $175. 541-480-2824 Chi-pom Pups, adorable, lovable males and females, party color or brown frosted. 5 weeks old ready for you. $225 cash. 541-480-2824 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, 541-598-5488 craftcats.org Doberman Pups, blacks & blues, family raised, tails, dewclaws, shots, wormed, $400 ea. 530-739-3280

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Furniture & Appliances

Computers

Building Materials

Lost and Found

Free 3-yr-old male neutered Yellow Lab. Great dog! Love kids, good with other dogs, very athletic. We had to move to small yard and are having another baby. He needs a home with large yard and owner with lots of time to exercise and play. Email us your story at jahurd@hotmail.com. We are so sad to give up our buddy and will screen heavily for a good home. German Shepherd Pups, males & females, 7 wks, ready now, $300, 541-550-0480 Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready 10/8. Females $900, males $850. 541-852-2991. Golden Retriever Pups, 2 left, 12 weeks, Males, purebred, to approved homes only. $300 Call 541-788-2005 Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839. It's still kitten season! CRAFT has over 2 dozen, all colors, friendly, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Just $25 or 2 for $40. Adult cats just $15 or 2 for $25, or free as a mentor cat with kitten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt. 598-5488 or visit website, www.craftcats.org. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Maltese, AKC Pups, 1 male, 2 females, 10 weeks old, shots & dew claws, $500/ea. 541-536-2181,541-728-8067 Mini Aussie, papered, Blue Merle, neutered, 5 years old, current on all meds, affectionate. Need loving owner, country preferred but not necessary, $250. 541-923-1062. MINI AUSSIES AKC, toys, red merles, black tri's some with blue eyes, family raised, very social, great personalities. 541-598-5314/598-6264 Mini Dachshunds 6 wks.3 black & tan male; 1 piebald female. 1st shots and wormed, adorable and family raised! $300 541-610-7341 Nice Calico cat, 8yrs, spayed, declawed, needs loving home w/ no dog. $15. 541-504-0712 POMERANIANS - 5 beautiful, lovable pups ready for adoption. Semona, 541-948-9392

Entertainment Center, pine, Bork Holder, Amish crafted, $175, call 541-617-1858

Antiques & Collectibles

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. La-Z Boy Sofa; recliners on end w/ middle drop down table; in like-new condition, $325 OBO. 541-322-6261

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. Power Chair, Jazzy Classic 14, 1 yr. old, used 3 mo., new $5600. Make offer. 509-429-6537. Range, Kitchenaid, elec., w/ convection oven, black, ceramic top, self-cleaning $500 Firm, 541-617-1858 Round oak dining table with six chairs, two 18” leaves, $200. 541-382-4008. SALE: At a Journey Of Discover, 52 SE Bridgeford Blvd., everything on sale will be marked down another 20% Thur.-Sun. Hours are 10-4, Sun. 12-4. Don’t miss this opportunity to get something of value! 541-382-7333

SALE: At a Journey Of Discover, 52 SE Bridgeford Blvd., everything on sale will be marked down another 20% Thur.-Sun. Hours are 10-4, Sun. 12-4. Don’t miss this opportunity to get something of value! 541-382-7333

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Very large collection antiques & collectibles. $600 - must see to appreciate! 541-546-2891

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 215

Coins & Stamps

shots, $200 each. 541-389-0322. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

WALKER HOUND pups, 6 wks, good hunting parents, ready to go. $100 541-815-6705.

Bicycles and Accessories Franklin tandem bike,great cond, rode cross country, ready to go, $600, 804-512-8212

245

Golf Equipment Brass Ping Golf Clubs, good condition, $350. Call 541-788-0286

246 Twin Bed, Colonial maple, includes box spring, mattress, frame and headboard. Like new! $175. 541-536-5067 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959. Washer/Dryer set, Frigidaire, stack combo, 2005, like new, $595, 541-408-7908

211

Children’s Items Stroller, Graco Baby, good cond., $29, please call 541-504-0707.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

20133 Wasatch Mtn Ln. Cash & Carry or leave bid. Furniture, collectibles. Details on CraigsList.

Chinese dishes, from Hong Kong, 99-piece set, everyday pattern, $50 OBO, 541-595-6261 Furniture

Furniture & Appliances

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Guns & Hunting and Fishing Benelli 12 Gauge Shotgun Semi Auto/Camo 2¾”-3” $800. 541-480-9181 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Oct. 13th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com Guitars, autographed, Rolling Stones, Led Zepplin, McCartney, Eagles, more, all appraised over $2500, asking $400 ea., come w/certificate of authenticity & appraisal, call for pics, 541-330-9702.

10 times, ½ box ammo incl. $1000. 541-610-6002. M1 Garand plus 2046 rds ammo in 8 rd clips $2,250. M1 carbine standard plus 2000 rds and 2-40 rd, 7-30 rd and 5-15 rd clips. $2000. 541-508-8119

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Moving-must sell Wurlitzer piano, reduced $400 obo. Great starter piano. Phone to see. 541-330-2490.

260

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

Ruger M77 338 Win. Mag. With KDF muzzle brake and 4x12 Bushnell scope. Wood/Blued great shape $425.00 Call 541-771-9266 Smith & Wesson Model 19-5, .357 magnum, nickel plated, 6” bbl, $450. 503-319-4275 Taurus 40 Cal, semi-auto, subcompact, holster, & case, $350, 541-647-8931

WINDOWS Milgard white vinyl, two 5’x18”; one 3’x3’; one 4’x5’ double pane. $400 OBO. 541-388-1484.

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Husqvarna 55234Se Snow blower 24” Tecumseh elect. start, like new 1 yr old, used 1 time. $450. 541-420-1217 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Medical Equipment

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Electric Rascal 245 mobility 3-wheel scooter, baskets front & rear, enclosed bat- LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgetery charger, exc. cond., pole firewood, $1200 for $500. 541-420-1217. Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more 263 information.

Tools Big 5hp DeWalt 18” radial arm saw with extra blades, $475 OBO. 541-447-1039

RIGID Combination cut-off/ miter saw, 12”, $195. Sell or trade. 541-383-3839. Scaffolding, 2 6’ section, & 1 3’ section, all accessories, Safe Way Light Weight, $700, 541-419-0882. TABLE SAW - LIKE NEW. 3 HP 10" inch blade 5000 rpm with stand and sawdust collection bag. $200 OBO. Call 541-385-0542. Cash only. You pick up.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

O r e g o n

ALL NEW MATERIALS Found Bike: Girl’s, Schwinn, 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 10/4, 2200 NE Hwy 20, unit 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim 44 call to ID, 541-383-1427. boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reason- Found Binoculars, Purcell/Empire in RD, morning of 9/28, ably priced. 541-647-0115 call to ID, 541-330-7369. Bend Habitat RESTORE Found: Genie garage dr.opener. Building Supply Resale near SW Hemholtz & Quarry, Quality at LOW PRICES Redmond, 10/2, 541-388-8897 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

267 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

Powermatic Tilt Table Mortiser, w/stand, never used, $800; Jet 8” joiner, long bed, like Ruger 10-22 cal semi-auto rifle, new, $950; Jet 1200 CFM blue, new in box, w/scope dust collector, w/floor mount. $175. 503-319-4275 sweep, $200, 541-306-4582.

Taurus PT 145, 45 ACP/Dbl. stack, compact, 2 clips, as new, $380, 541-728-1036. $125 each. Full Warranty. Kitchen Queen, Hoosier type English Bulldog AKC female, 9 Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s from 1920’s, $1500 obo. Ma251 mos. old, house trained, dead or alive. 541-280-7355. hogany 4-poster Bdrm set, Hot Tubs and Spas $1595 firm; willing to accept Cherry finish, (2) night stand, Appliances, new & recondipayments. 541-604-6653. chest of drawers, dresser, tioned, guaranteed. OverHot Tub, exc. cond., all mirror, $800. 541-420-7470 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES chemicals incl., $2500 OBO, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s AKC registered, champion lines. Noritake China, service for 12, Please call 541-408-6191. Maytag, 541-385-5418 Up to date on all shots made and occupied Japan. & microchipped. Bdrm. Set, 8-piece, pine, king $375. 541-312-2448. 253 $1750.00 541 416-0375 size, $495, call TV, Stereo and Video 541-617-1858 Find It in English Bulldog puppies, AKC, exc. champion pedigree, (3) Bookshelves, 7’ long, 7’ high, The Bulletin Classifieds! Speakers,pair Dolquist DQ-10’s, males, (3) females, 12” deep, maple, beautiful sub woofer incl., good cond, 541-385-5809 $2000/ea. 541-306-0372 cond., $700, 541-419-0882. $400, call 541-419-0882. Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

257

Musical Instruments

241 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

210 #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & 541-389-6655 Currency collect, accum. Pre BUYING 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No col- COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! lection too large or small. Bed$199. ALL LIKE NEW! rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 541-280-5006

Antique and Estate Sale. KIMBER Custom Eclipse II with PUG-MIX puppies, males, 1st Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-4. internal laser site, only fired

Chihuahua Puppies, 2 females, 8 weeks, $250, call 541-390-8875.

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

Cats for barn/shop/companToy, tiny ionship. FREE, fixed,shots. Will POODLES AKC toy. Also Pom-a-Poos, Chideliver! info@craftcats.org poos. Joyful! 541-475-3889

CHIHUAHUA BABIES! 6 weeks, 1st shots. Ready for their new families! Set appointment, 541-419-6445.

C h a n d l e r

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

268

Trees, Plants & Flowers Ficus tree, 5’ tall, in ivory colored self-watering pot, $7. 541-389-7280

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Worm Bins, (2) all holes properly drilled, ready for new habitants! $6. 541-389-7280

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Found Keys: 10/3, Post Office at NE 4th, large number of keys, 541-647-9371. Found Subaru Key Fob, Roadkill firewood area, 9/27, call 541-593-5279. FOUND Toyota key with remote keyless entry. Call to identify. 541-410-9936. LOST CAT -Abyssinian breed, red/brown color. Lost 10/4/10 in Shevlin Park area. 541-647-1229 Lost: Large Green Cooler, filled with fishing gear & jackets, Century Dr. or Hwy 97, between Sunriver & Bend, 541-390-4763. Lost pair of eyeglasses, possible locations: Culver Middle School, Albertsons Redmond. Reward. 541-923-2161.

Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Call to identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

9 7 7 0 2 333

Farm Market

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies

300

Laying Hens (5), 2 yrs old, FREE, please call 541-548-0783.

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

341

Horses and Equipment 1870 Surrey, 2-seater with top, harness, all original, Rose Parade Trophy Winner. Exc cond. $3500. 541-576-2002 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Crosby Sovereign English saddle, perfect for beginner or child, $199. 541-678-3546

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st, 2nd, & 3rd cuttings of Alfalfa, Orchard Grass, & Blue grass, all small bales, 2-tie, Madras, 541-325-6317 or 541-325-6316.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb bales, $140-$160/ton Qty Discount! Patterson Ranch in Sisters - Call 541-549-3831 2nd cutting orchard grass 100 lb. bales. 541-480-8185 Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713

Lost Pembroke Corgi, male, tricolored, 1 ear up, 1 down,pm of 10/1, near Wells Acres, needs medication, family Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 misses him, 541-306-8289. bales, approx. 750 lb., If no Lost White Maltese female, NW answer, please leave msg., I Crossing area, Oct. 1. 4 lbs, will return your call. Redno collar, medical condition. mond, 541-548-2514 REWARD. Call 541-647-2598 Premium Orchard Grass, secNECKLACE LOST IN OLD MILL ond cutting, no rain, no Shopping Center Wed. 9/22. weeds. Mid-size 800-lb bales, Extreme sentimental value, $60 each. Call 541-419-2713 Reward! 541-350-1584.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

345

Livestock & Equipment Female Pig, FFA backup. $1.85/lb. hanging weight plus cut and wrap. Leave message 617-1757

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Rained-on Orchard Grass Put up dry, barn-stored. Exc. feeder hay. $105. 541-383-0494 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of October 4, 2010

Employment EXPERIENCED REEFER drivers needed! Our incredible freight network offers plenty of miles! Opportunities for Independent Contractors and Company Drivers. Call Prime Inc. today! 1-800-277-0212, www.primeinc.com. DRIVERS - COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New Team Pay! Up to .48 cents/mile. CDL training available. Regional locations! (877) 369-7104, www.centraldrivingjobs.net. DRIVERS- O/O’s. FED EX ground. All hub-to-hub miles paid. Mileage plus & fuel programs. Monthly safety incentives. Weekly settlements. Fleet owners welcome. 866-832-6339. www.buildagroundbiz.com

Miscellaneous IF YOU used type 2 diabetes drug Avandia between 1999-present and suffered a stroke, heart, attack or congestive heart failure you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727. SAVE THOUSANDS! Repossessed dealer manufactured home inventory. Instant equity. Buy At Factory Cost. All Homes new with Factory Warranty. Call:541-928-1471. jandmhomes.com.


G2 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Hygiene assistance, meals, errands, & doctor appts. Kimberley Black, 541-848-2457 Need a seamstress? I can sew or alter anything! Call me 541-382-7556

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Employment Opportunities Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

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Employment Opportunities

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Physical Therapist Partners In Care has an opening for a part-time (24 – 31 hours per week) Physical Therapist. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a resume via email to HR@partnersbend.org or by regular mail to:

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Driver/Technician Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum, Inc is looking for a route driver/service technician for safe delivery of fuel or heating related products and other products as directed. Deliveries are made in a regional area to small commercial establishments and residential households. No overnight travel is required.

The successful applicant will have a Class A or B CDL License and able to get Hazmat, Tanker and Air Brake Endorsement. Must be able to pass an MVR check and Background verification. Fuel or propane delivery and service technician experience is preferred. We offer competitive pay and health benefits. paid holidays and vacation along with an excellent incentive bonus pay plan, 401(K) plan and a substantial profit sharing plan. To apply, e-mail resume to employment@edstaub.com or request an application at 3305 South Hwy 97, P.O. Box 1244, Redmond, OR 97756

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR. Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Office Busy dermatology office is looking for a part time front desk professional. Medical reception and EMR exp. preferred. Must be friendly, energetic, great work ethic and a team player. Salary based on experience. Please email resume to Jodi@centraloregondermatology.com or fax 541-323-2174.

All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment drug test and criminal background check.

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Partners In Care is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

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READERS:

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

541-385-5809 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

CAUTION

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If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Sales Agent: Don’t find a sales job, find a sales career. Combined Insurance is looking for quality individuals to join its sales force. We provide training, a training completion bonus, comprehensive benefits & leads for your local market. For immediate consideration please contact Joanne Berk, Recruitment Specialist, at 847.953.8326. or email a resume and cover letter to joanne.berk@combined.com. You may also apply directly in the Careers tab on our website: www.combinedinsurance.com/ careers. EOE. We will be conducting interviews immediately so apply today! Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, energetic and motivated person to join our team as a part time sale associate. If you are dependable and have a good work attitude, please leave your resume at Saxon’s in the Old Mill District, Bend.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Awbrey Butte Yard Sale. Sat Garage Sale: Sat. Only 10/9, only 8-1. Tools, Toys, Furni- 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. – 61419 Elder ture, Kids Clothes, MotorRidge St. Collectibles, books, cycle parts, and much more. electronics, etc. 1625 NW Overlook Drive Fair Trade Sale: Featuring 10,000 Villages, Fri. Oct. 8th, Multi-Family Sale: Sat. 8-12, 1433 NW 1st St, furniture, 11-7, at the Old Stone building materials,file cabinets, Church, 157 NW Franklin tools, landscape material. A v e , Hosted by the River Mennonite Church. Handmade gifts incl. jewelry, personal accessories, home deNOTICE cor, art, ceramics, textiles, Remember to remove baskets & musical instruyour Garage Sale signs ments, incl. holiday gifts. (nails, staples, etc.) after your Fri. & Sat., 8:30am-4pm, 1630 Sale event is over! THANKS! NW 11th. Antiques, quilts, From The Bulletin and your china hutch, clothes, jewelry, local Utility Companies household & home decor. Garage Sale: 3244 NW Fairway Heights. Sun. Only 10-3, kids items & books, furniture, golf equip, TV’s, misc. household.

www.bendbulletin.com

ESTATE AUCTION: Sat. Oct. 9th • 10 a.m. Sharp 65425 76th St. • Bend, OR Partial Listing: Big Tex dump trailer; 5’x10’ inside, double axle, exc. cond.; compressed air tools - Sears, Snap-On, Bostich, router table, extension. ladder; their is hardware, large assortment Simpson strong ties; 2 king canopies; 4 studded tires and chromed wheels for Chevy truck; stainless steel wheeled cart; metal cabinets; metal boxes; Sony Handycam video camera; games; office chairs; office products; tools; planer; upright band saw; metal horizontal band saw; large Champion compressor; Miller arc welder; acetylene welder; 14” chop saw Makita; 10” Delta chop saw; 16 speed drill press w/stand; Craftsman chain saws; DeWalt plate joiner; router pantograph; Kreg jig; MK tile cutter; Snap-On tool boxes; Makita 12V 3” circular saw; 4” electric circular saw; too many tools to list. Matchbox Collection: Approx. 1310 pieces (cars & boxes), 21 cases, 3 shadow boxes, 5 display cases, 2 small cases. To be sold as one lot. Furniture: Oak L-shaped computer desk; computer desk; oak book shelf; oak entertainment center; armoire; Lane leather recliner; vintage beveled mirrors, vintage chest of drawers (wooden); SW motif; 6 painted pictures 20”x25” from the Bowen family; Norman Rockwell books, calendars, & collectors plate; 2 raku pottery urns; ski & ski equip.; moped, needs brake cable; wrought iron patio furniture; stainless steel BBQ - 3 burners; round cement fire ring; pottery, too many to list. Cross 1306 pellet pump action pistol; camping equip; Christmas stuff. Too much to list. VW Thunder Bug, eng. needs work. Auctioneer’s Note: This is a quality auction. Everything is sold as-is, no warranty. Terms of the Sale: Cash, Check with proper ID. Not responsible for accidents. Sale Site Directions: From Bend, Oregon, go north on Hwy. 97 14 miles to 61st Ave, jog right, then turn left onto Gift Rd., cross the valley, head up then turn left onto 76th. Go to 65425 76th St. Follow the auction signs. Hank Potter, Auctioneer 541-621-7438 Lunch wagon will be on site rain or shine.

Estate Sale: Fri. 8-2, Sat. 8-12, 19988 Rock Bluff Cir., Like New Wheel Mounted tires for Jeep, tools, furniture, king & dbl. beds, lots of misc., Cash only.

Annual family garage sale: lots of kids clothing (12 mo-5 yrs) boys and girls, toys, women's clothing, decorations. 20974 Rock Park Drive (off of Empire) 8-3pm/Sat only

Estate Sale: Everything in Hobby/Yard Sale Fri-Sat 7 AM to dusk, 17820 Gold Crest Ln, Sunriver area. RC planes, Reloading, Beer Making, more. 541-593-2584

House & Garage, furniture, antiques, knick knacks, HAM radio stuff, #121 in Snowberry Village, 1188 NE 27th St, Sat. 7:30-3:30. Cash Only

Don & Donna LaVenture

MOVING SALE 20760 WAGONTIRE WAY, BEND Friday, Oct. 8th • Saturday, Oct. 9th 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday (Take Hwy 97 north to Cooley RD. Lowe's Jct, go right, east to Ranch Village Way, go north one block to Wagontire Way, go left and follow to second house..)

HUGE HUGE SALE 12' Aluminum boat and motor on trailer; Remote control dust collector; Three Table saws-Ryobi new in box; two Belsaws; Utility Trailer 8' x 4'; Floor Drill Press; Shop Smith system; Two grinders; 12" and 6" Planers; Belt and horizontal sanders and other sanders; Radial arm saw; Airless Sprayer; Five routers-three with tables; Vise; Band saw; Scroll saw on legs; Dremels; Skil saws and polishers; Staplers; Electric motors; Honda 624 Snow blower; Jacks; 1997 Dodge pickup canopy; Gas Stove-living space; Wood includes beams and wide boards and 4 x 6 and 2 x 4 and hunks of hardwood-marquetry stuff; Two gas boat motors, one electric; Thousands of hardware items-nuts, bolts, screws, hinges, nails, brads, ete.etc. Lots of furniture clamps; Leather sofa, loveseat, chair and ottoman-buckskin color; older side by side refrigerator; Air Walker; Nordic trak skier; small treadmill; Airgometer bike; Abs machine; Rubber raft and two windsurfers; 16' and 32' extension ladders; Wrought iron outdoor sofa-loveseatcoffee table; Bakers racks; Queen bed with brass headboard; 46" Television-projection; 38" TV; Lots of pictures; Over 500 paperback books and 300 hardback books-CusslerPatterson, Grisham, Louie Lamor; etc. 24 fishing poles and reels and hundreds of fishing lures and gear; Probably a hundred butcher knives and paring knives and Machetes; Display cabinet; Lots and lots of Ladies & Mens clothing; 245/75R/16 recap tires on 8 hole rims; lawn & garden tools; Pots and pans; dishes; stemware; several punch bowls; dresser and mirror; entertainment center; TV; VCR's; DVD player; New surround sound system in box; Hundreds of hot wheels and matchbox cars; Records; Star Wars posters; Kenmore Washer and dryer; Holiday items; More and More; Presented by:

Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days ~ 541-382-5950 eves

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

GARAGE SALE Sat. only, 8-4. Tools, sports equip., mens bike, much much more. 62750 Stenkamp Road, follow signs from Powell Butte Hwy and Neff Road.

MOVING:

DESIGNER

Living-room, Bedroom, Accessories, etc. Sat 8-5 Oct. 9 23012 Lariat Lane, Bend 541-617-1193

MOVING SALE Saturday 10/9 8-4 Furniture - Electronics - Home Decor - Fridge 3401 NE Wild Rivers Loop BEND Multi-Family Garage/Estate Sale - English saddle & tack, cookware, dishes & cups, tools, knick-knacks. Fri.-Sat., 9-4. 20785 Wagontire Way. Sat. 8-3, Kids clothes & toys, furniture, truck bed toolbox, Playstation 2, misc., 63609 Hunters Cir.

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Sales Southeast Bend 7-Day Liquidation Sale: Corner of SE Dell Ln & SE Yew Ave, Sat.-Sun, 10-6, Mon.-Fri. 1-5, homes, businesses, storage,clearance,10,000+ pieces, jewelry, $1- $20 ea., furniture, home decor, clothes, goodies galore! 2 full size pickups, trade for economy car/SUV. Freebies too! Directions or questions: 541-420-7328.

AMAZING MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE. SAT., OCT. 9 at 7:30 a.m. Take Ferguson Rd. to Sage Creek Dr. to 61149 Ridge Falls Place

The Mattress Factory & Organic Sleep Products

announce their Annual In Store/Factory/Warehouse/Parking Lot

Garage Sale! Friday, Oct. 8 - 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 9 - 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Includes, but not limited to: • Mattresses • Box Springs • Instant Pillowtops • Bedroom Furniture • Lamps • Pillows • Comforters • Mattress Toppers • Mattress Pads • Blankets • Infant and Baby Bedding • Headboards • Outdoor Tables and Chairs • Dining Tables and Chairs • Sleeper Sofas • Pictures • Wall Decor And Much, Much More!!

The Mattress Factory 571 NE Azure Drive, Bend, OR 97701 541-382-9091 Cash and Carry - Bring Cash, Check or Debit Card

Estate Sale: Writing desk, furniture items, quilt fabrics, antique quilt pieces, lawn mower, weed whacker, misc., Sat. 8-4, 1001 SE 15th, Space 216.

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Sales Redmond Area Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat., 8-1, 3750 SW Gene Sarazan Dr., furniture, yard equip., clothes, much more! Moving Sale - Furniture & lots of misc!, Fri & Sat, 9-4 13778 SW Canyon Dr, CRR; follow signs from fire station.

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Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Indoor Swap Meet Every Sat., 9-4, 401 NE 2nd St., Bend (old St. Vincent dePaul bldg, next to Bimart) 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847 Sisters Estate Sale: Thur., 3-7, Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3. House & garage full,everything must go! Furniture, china hutch, women’s clothes & shoes, costume jewelry, yard tools, lots & lots of misc. Cash only, 18025 2nd Ave, Bend, between Bend & Sisters off Fryrear Rd. Follow Blue signs.

Finance & Business

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Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

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Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals

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Storage Rentals 15 x 44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499

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Want To Rent Family seeks condo lease. Dec-May, Bend area. Prefer 2-3 bdrm, 2 bath. May want option to buy. 503-663-6460 or eric@ytm-law.com Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

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Rooms for Rent Furnished quiet room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking/ drugs/pets. $350 + $100 deposit. (541) 388-2710.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365 Room w/private bath, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, garage,hot tub, tons storage, wi-fi+ cable. $500 mo util. incl, No dogs/ drugs 541-410-4384 Lori

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Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

ALL LIKE NEW! 3Bdrm 2.5 bath duplex. Garage, nice fenced yard, gas frplc, tile, no pets, no smkg, W/S paid, $850mo + deposit. 541-382-2260

* FALL SPECIAL * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

NEWLY

REMODELED

QUIMBY ST. APTS. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1 bdrm Units with Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios Water, sewer & garbage paid.

CALL 541-382-9046 TTY 1-800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 141 NW Portland: 2 bdrm, oak cabinets,dishwasher, laundry facilities, W/S/G & cable pd, cat OK. $650/mo., $500dep. 541-383-2430; 541-389-9867 Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 G3

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Houses for Rent SE Bend

Homes for Sale

Acreages

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

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Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688. WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Old Mill. No smoking/pets. $975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call Rachel 541-604-0620.

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Houses for Rent SW Bend A clean 3 bdrm, 1.25 bath, 1269 sq.ft., near Old Mill, large fenced yard, gas stove in living room, $825. (541) 480-3393 or (541) 610-7803.

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Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Clean, spacious 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath, w/d hkup, w/s/g paid, 2 parking spaces, convenient loc, good schools. $600/mo. 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

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A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Great 1 Bdrm quiet, private home, carport, new stainless appl., jet tub, elec., internet, & cable incl., W/D, $785, 1st. & last, 541-408-5460.

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 Studio near Old Mill. Walk to concerts, movies, shopping. Utilities, Cable TV, Internet included. No Pets, Smoking. $500/month. 541-728-8922

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Autumn Specials Are Here! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Location, 2 bdrm.,

1.5 bath, single garage, fenced yard, pets okay, $625/mo. + dep. 541-788-9027. LIKE NEW! 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, 1120 sq ft, double garage, gas fireplace, central air, fenced, underground sprinklers, no pets/smoking. $850/mo. + $850/dep. Available now. Call 541-480-2468 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 660

Houses for Rent La Pine

for Rent An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

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Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041

244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. W/S/G paid; small pet OK. $775/mo. Call 541-480-2233

Apt./Multiplex Furnished Furnished apt on acreage. quiet, garden space, greenhouse. Minutes from downtown Sisters. No-smoking. $550 mo. 541-549-3838.

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Short Sale…Our company may be able to help. We have a record of getting results for homeowners in over their heads. First you need answers. Find out why homeowners thank us for the assistance we have given them. Hunter Properties LLC 541-389-7910 Serving all of Central Oregon

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Northeast Bend Homes 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1402 sq ft, large corner lot, newly painted fence & house, well maintained, storage shed. $145,000. 425-533-1417 A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $117,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

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Motorcycles And Accessories

• Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4295 541-504-9284

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield,back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Redmond Homes 2137 sq ft 1-level, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, hardwood & granite, lrg ¼ acre lot, not SS. $223,990 Debbie Lahey • 541-977-4825 RE/MAX Town & Country Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Call Bill 541-480-7930. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin reach prospective B U Y E R S SELLERS of real esClassified Rep. to get the AND new rates and get your ad tate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809 started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650 732

Weekend Retreat or Family Home - $155,000 Like new home, 1 acre, La Pine. Terms considered. 503-986-3638 www.odotproperty.com

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

762

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

771

Lots 1.15 Acres RM zoned bare parcel for sale: $65,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale, property located near Maricopa Drive in Bend, through a sealed bid process. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

34’

875

870

Boats & Accessories 12’ Fiberglass Navy boat/trailer, new tires, working lights. $400 or trade. 541-388-1533 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $18,500. 541-548-3985.

880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Allegro

31’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

1989,

basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers

HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

sale, like new, $6900 OBO, must see! 541-923-4237.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916. Montana 32’ 2002 5th wheel, 2 slide-outs, new generator, stereo, cassette, 2 TVs plus many extras. Exc. cond., $18,500. (541) 548-0783.

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

Canopies and Campers

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

18’ 1972 CAMP TRAILER Everything works great! $1100 OBO. 541-462-3067.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Motorcycle Trailer, Kendon Stand up, 2007, used seldom & only locally, some custom work, $1700 OBO 541-306-3010.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories FREE (4) 1995 Honda Accord wheels, perfect to mount snow tires on. 541-548-2467 Tires, 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $350, 541-447-1668 Tow Bar, Falcon, $300, please call 541-330-5975 for more info.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

773 Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

916

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Forest River Sierra 26.5’ 1998, Moving

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $500 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

900

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

17’

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, rear camera/monitor, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

Homes with Acreage Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666

Queen

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Sunseeker 31' Class C 2001 33,000 miles, A/C, 1 slide, 2 TVs, ex. cond, non-smoker, $29,900. 541 382 4086

Travel 1987,

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Reduced to $595!

Baja Vision 250 2007,

750

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Boats & RV’s

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

755

SW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new 693 flooring & paint, appls incl Office/Retail Space W&D, no pets/smoking, for Rent WS&G owner paid, credit check req’d, discount 1st mo rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from For appt/info: 541-504-6141 $250 per month, including TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, utilities. 541-317-8717 garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $650 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

646

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek Southeast Bend Homes subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. family room w/ pellet stove, $775/dep. 541-815-5494. dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy 671 Schoning, Broker, Owner, Mobile/Mfd. John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, stor- Light Industrial, various sizes, age units available. Close to North and South Bend locaschools, pools, skateboard tions, office w/bath from park, ball field, shopping cen$400/mo. 541-317-8717 ter and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are 775 misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this Manufactured/ happens to your ad, please Mobile Homes contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be MOVE IN TODAY! happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Week- 2b/1b $11,999; 2b/2b, $13,900; days 12:00 noon for next 3b/2b $19,739. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. $14,900 cash.John,541-350-1782 If we can assist you, please call us:

Autos & Transportation

Bigfoot

9.5’

1998,

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

541-385-5809 WINTER IS COMING! 4 only P195/75R14 studded snow tires, used very little last year $150 set. 541-383-1811.

Commercial/Investment 2200 Sq.ft., upgraded stainless Properties for Sale appl., 3 bdrm., bonus room, 2.5 bath, dbl. garage, mtn. views, no smoking, 1 small pet? $1299+dep. 541-390-2915 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath newer home with fireplace, 2-car garage, small yard - no pets. 2883 NE Sedalia Loop. $900 mo. + dep., 541-389-2192 3 Bdrm., 2 bath house 1200 sq.ft., single level, 21354 Starling Dr., $925/mo., no pets or smoking, Ed, 503-789-0104. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, near Ensworth school, dbl garage, 1715 Sonya Ct., no smoking, pets neg., $850/ mo., (541) 383-2586, (541) 749-8127.

Newer Pahlisch 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1406 sq.ft., vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace, fenced yard, dbl. garage w/opener, $1195 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 3 To 4 bdrm., 2 bath house, very nice, but small, large yard, storage building, heat pump, $890/mo. call 541-310-0058,541-788-1750 Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced yard, 2 car garage, RV parking, fireplace, close to schools and hospital. $845/mo., 541-948-4531

Commercial building for sale: $130,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale, property located at 907 Highland Ave, Bend, through a sealed bid process. OPEN HOUSE: October 15, 10-2:00 pm. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com

738

Multiplexes for Sale FSBO: 4-Plex Townhomes, NE Bend, all rented w/long term renters, hardwood floors, great neighborhood near hospital, $399,000, 541-480-8080

745

Homes for Sale

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

Domestic Services

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894.

Barns

Excavating

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Building/Contracting the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who "any preference, limitation or contracts for construction discrimination based on race, work to be licensed with the color, religion, sex, handicap, Construction Contractors familial status, marital status Board (CCB). An active or national origin, or an inlicense means the contractor tention to make any such is bonded and insured. preference, limitation or disVerify the contractor’s CCB crimination." Familial status license through the includes children under the CCB Consumer Website age of 18 living with parents www.hirealicensedcontractor.com or legal custodians, pregnant or call 503-378-4621. The women, and people securing Bulletin recommends custody of children under 18. checking with the CCB prior This newspaper will not to contracting with anyone. knowingly accept any adverSome other trades also tising for real estate which is require additional licenses in violation of the law. Our and certifications. readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are availDebris Removal able on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of disJUNK BE GONE crimination call HUD toll-free l Haul Away FREE at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for For Salvage. the hearing impaired is Also Cleanups & Cleanouts 1-800-927-9275. Mel 541-389-8107

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Pet Services

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Serious On-site Horse Care with full-service sitting, exercise, training, healthcare, & other options. Call EquiCare, 928-301-3889

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Handyman

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing W e e d fr e e b a r k & fl o w e r b e d s Ask us about

Handymen at affordable prices: sheds to changing a light bulb, hanging a picture, to shovelling a walk, give a call, we do it all! 541-526-5894

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

Roofing

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Painting, Wall Covering

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

MASONRY

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Remodeling, Carpentry

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Fertilizer included with monthly program

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS • DOORS •WEATHERIZATION

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

If you need assistance clean ing up your property, I have a tractor w/scoop, bush hog and harrow. $40/hr, min 2 hrs.Call Victor 541-383-5085

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Dodge Ram 4X4 2009, Quad Cab, 6.7 liter Diesel 6-speed manual, 8ft bed w/bed liner, exhaust brakes, drop down gooseneck hitch, camper tie downs, back axle air bag. 29,000 miles, asking $36,000. Call 541-815-1208 or e-mail larson1@uci.net

Smolich Auto Mall

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

October Deals

Jeep Commander AWD 2007 Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350. Chrysler New Yorker 1973, 440, complete, needs work, must trailer, $499. 503-319-4275

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

SOLD!!!!!

Ford F250 1983, tow pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

541-389-1178 • DLR Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111 Lincoln Navigator 1998, clean, solid SUV, 6CD, leather, all pwr., 7 passenger, $7500, 541-593-8321 after 6 p.m.

Smolich Auto Mall October Deals

Toyota 4Runner 2003 AWD, Limited! Vin #022388

Only $16,988

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

HYUNDAI

Ford F250 1995 4WD, X-cab, 5 spd, 134K, tow ready, new tires. $4300. 541-410-2449.

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., diesel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954. Ford Ranger 4x4, 1998, 5speed, canopy, hook-up for motorhome w/tow bar, new clutch. $5500. 541-389-8961 GMC Sonoma 2003 SLS, extra cab, 3 dr, ZR2, loaded, $9800. 541-388-1469

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Pickups

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $10,800. 541-420-2715

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Sport Utility Vehicles

October Deals

Chevy CK2500 2004 4X4, Duramax, Low 52K Miles! VIN #263331

Only $28,575

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. CHEVY BLAZER 4x4 LS 1998 good condition, 110k miles, $5,295. For more information 541-382-9411 after 4 p.m. Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111. CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

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Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

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Smolich Auto Mall

541-749-4025 • DLR

Vans

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

smolichmotors.com

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Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

FORD EXPEDITION 1999 4x4, 118,000 miles, new paint and trans, exc. cond., garaged. $6000 OBO. (541) 549-4834, (541) 588-0068

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

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Automobiles

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Buick LeSabre 2004,

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5400; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $3400. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

package, Good condition, $1800, 541-815-9939.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

Dodge Ram 2001, short Jeep bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Honda Civic 2002 2 Door, Very Clean! VIN #085713

Only $6,277

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

366

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary EdiFord Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C, CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Honda Civic 1997, 2-dr, spoiler, moonroof, aluminum wheels, red, $3500, 541-447-4516

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4290 T.S. No.: 1296428-09.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3500! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

VW Beetle 1967, lots of new parts, needs motor work. $2000 OBO. 541-548-7126

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

smolichmotors.com

HYUNDAI

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

smolichmotors.com

Dodge Charger SE, 1973, 318, complete, needs work, must trailer. $499. 503-319-4275

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

October Deals

Only $11,773

541-385-5809 Ford F150 King Ranch 4x4. 2005 Super Crew, every option + many extras. 82k mi, Exc.! $19,900 541-420-2385.

October Deals

LOADED, w/leather & more! Best Bang for the Buck! Only 38K Miles! Vin #335514

Only $16,875

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Focus 2007

Only 64K Miles! Vin #534028 FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Smolich Auto Mall

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3938 T.S. No.: 1294342-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Charles E. Clausen Jr., as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated September 21, 2005, recorded September 30, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-66707 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 42 of Braeburn Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19322 Brookside Wy Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,907.45 Monthly Late Charge $75.84. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $316,566.90 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 05, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 03, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 06, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sean A Kluckow and Brianna M. Kluckow Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated January 02, 2008, recorded January 08, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-00985 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 1, block 3, Brightenwood Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 60685 Newcastle Dr. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,219.39 Monthly Late Charge $96.61. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $350,000.00 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-341112 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

R-339022 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1660 T.S. No.: 1289433-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4131 T.S. No.: 1294405-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John T. Ristick, and Judith E. Ristick, as Grantor to David Federal Attorney, as Trustee, in favor of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis, as Beneficiary, dated January 23, 2003, recorded January 24, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-05792 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 in block 55 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 9, Part 2. Deschutes County, Oregon. Model: BD565F-4 serial #GW3OREED49204 Manufacturer: Golden West Homes HUD tags ORE199530, ORE199531 Commonly known as: 17053 Sacramento Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,107.59 Monthly Late Charge $36.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $108,722.48 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ronald R. Vetter, An Unmarried Man and Mary A. Collister, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated May 23, 2005, recorded May 24, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-32043 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot seven, block one, Clear Sky Estates, Deschutes County Oregon Commonly known as: 732 & 734 Southeast 5th St. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $930.13 Monthly Late Charge $37.32. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $137,780.49 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from April 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-341653 09/30/10, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

R-344088 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 7, 2010 G5

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Automobiles

Automobiles

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Automobiles

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

The Bulletin

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

The Bulletin

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Mercury Marquis, 1984 Grandpa’s car! Like new, all leather, loaded, garaged, 40K miles. $3495. 541-382-8399

Pontiac Grand Am 2003, gold, AC, CD-AM/FM, good tires, very clean, well maintained. 60K, $5000 obo. 541-416-9557

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new auto., pearl white, very low tires, soft & hard top, mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Subaru Outback Limited Wagon 2003, Too many features to list, always garaged, 48,650 miles. Call 541-390-1017 for details. $13,995 FIRM.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/ Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 190K hwy. mi. $1000 below kbb. $6500. 541-410-7586.

SUBARUS!!! Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. Saturn SC2 1994, sunroof, all lthr, 5-spd, snow tires, exc eng.$1300 OBO 541-408-8611

SUBARU Impreza Sport 2005, 50K miles, automatic, snow tires with wheels included. 1-1/4” rear hitch, 1 owner, $11,895. 541-400-0218.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Avalon 1999, clean, good cond., heated leather, pwr. seats, PL, sunroof, CD, 30 mpg, $6500 541-593-8321 after 6 p.m.

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5750. 541-593-4016 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6213 T.S. No.: 1294296-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6489 T.S. No.: 1286022-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard W. Anglin, Sr. and Gail E. Anglin As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For Summit Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated September 05, 2008, recorded September 12, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-37534 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, block 6, Timber Haven First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15680 Paulina Avenue La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,214.14 Monthly Late Charge $50.18. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $192,696.20 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from April 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patricia J. Snow, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 08, 2006, recorded December 14, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-81607 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 27 of Shevlin Meadows, Phases 1 and 2, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2348 NW Summerhill Drive Bend OR 97701-5293. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 15, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,021.79 Monthly Late Charge $39.44. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $195,900.39 together with interest thereon at 3.238% per annum from February 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-338746 09/23/10, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

R-339859 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx4448 T.S. No.: 1290365-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David J. Luoma, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated August 31, 2005, recorded September 06, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-59627 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block sixteen (16), Tillicum Village Third Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61356 Eena Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,108.65 Monthly Late Charge $42.86. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $141,319.92 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341687 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Account: 0003041043 County Tax Account Number: 249530

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2266 T.S. No.: 1293174-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert T. Ludwick, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., A Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated March 07, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15546 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 21, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums Recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit. Commonly known as: 1525 Northwest Juniper Street #1 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $764.67 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $76,280.45 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341720 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Christian D. Smelser and Jacqueline Parker Smelser as grantors, to AmeriTitle as trustee, in favor of Umpqua Bank, its successors and/or assigns, as beneficiary, dated August 3, 2006, recorded August 18, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, Document No. 2006-56743. The beneficial interest was assigned to the State of Oregon, by and through the Director of Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs, dated August 7, 2006, and recorded August 18, 2006, in Document No. 2006-56744, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, and whereas a successor trustee, Stephen J. Scholz, was appointed pursuant to ORS 86.790(3) by written instrument, 2010-33439, recorded on August 26, 2010, for said Trust Deed which covers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: (SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON NEXT PAGE) LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot Eleven (11), BRENTWOOD, recorded August 11, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 776, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded on August 26, 2010, in 2010-33440, Deschutes County, Oregon, pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes; the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Full monthly payments in the amount of $2,261.30 due May 1, 2010, and the first day of each month thereafter through August 1, 2010. Payment delinquency totals $9,045.20. Late Payments in the amount of $345.28. Legal Costs in the amount of $1.062.00. The total amount owing is $10,452.48 as of August 30, 2010. The mailing address of the above-described real property is 20480 Brentwood Avenue, Bend OR 97702-3289. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to-wit: The principal sum of $284,665.60 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625 percent per annum from April 1, 2010, until paid, plus trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs, and sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said Trust Deed. AFTER RECORDING RETURN TO: FORECLOSURE SECTION OREGON DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 700 SUMMER ST. NE SALEM OR 97301-1285 Until a change is requested, all tax statements shall be sent to the following address: TAX SECTION OREGON DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 700 SUMMER ST. NE SALEM OR 97301-1285 WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on February 3, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, a.m., in accord with the Standard of Time established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the front steps of the County Courthouse in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors-in-interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) together with costs and trustee's and attorney's fees as provided by law, at any time prior to five days before the date set for said sale. In construing this instrument, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, and the singular includes the plural; the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as each and all other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed; the word "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors-in-interest, if any. DATED: August 31, 2010 Successor Trustee Stephen J. Scholz Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs 700 Summer Street NE Salem OR 97301-1285 Phone 503-373-2235

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6986 T.S. No.: 1290541-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jennifer Shea, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Wealthbridge Mortgage Corp., An Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 17, 2007, recorded April 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-23954 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land lying in the West Halt of the Southeast Quarter (W1/2 SE1/4) of Section Eight (8), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: beginning at the South Quarter corner of said Section 8; thence North 89°52' 48" East along the South Line of said Section 8, 1025.40 feet; thence North 25°08' West along the Northeasterly Right of Way of the Bend-Tumalo State Highway No. 20, 1982.94 feet (sometimes shown as 1,974.85 feet) to the True Point of Beginning, same being the Northwesterly corner of the Nancy Hoefling tract described in a deed recorded November 2, 1389, in nook 195, Page 2320, Deschutes County Records; thence continuing North 25°08' West along said Right of Way, 255,00 feet to the Southwesterly corner of the Games N. Saul, et ux tract, described in a deed recorded March 17, 1989, in book 280, Page 1509, Deschutes County Records; thence North 03'10' East, 558.76 feet along the Saul Southerly boundary to the Southeasterly corner thereof; thence South 04'09 West, 99.25 feet; thence South 42'06' East, 105.23 feet to the Northeasterly corner of the aforementioned Hoefling Tract; thence South 76'37'20" West along Hoefling's Northerly boundary, 524.14 feet to the true point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed in instrument recorded May 3, 2977, in Book 249, Page 657, Deed Records, Commonly known as: 63743 Scenic Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,918.17 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,278.94 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 14, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 06, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 14, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-346213 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28


G6 Thursday, October 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE CIRCUIT COURT, STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of DWIGHT WILLIAM STEWART, Deceased. Case No. 10PB0105BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o the law office of Carl W. Hopp, Jr., 168 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, OR 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional personal representative, Carl W. Hopp, Jr., Attorney at Law, LLC. Dated and first published on September 30, 2010. Kimberly Ann Walton Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Conservatorship and Guardianship of Nathanial G. Potter, A Minor. Case No. 07-PC-0071-AB NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested persons, including the biological father of the minor and pursuant to ORS 125.065(2), that Temporary Guardians have been appointed in the above captioned matter. All persons who object to the Temporary Guardians being appointed as the Permanent Guardians are required to present the objection to Deschutes County Court at 1100 NW Bond, Bend, OR 97701 within in 15 days of the publication. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Temporary Guardians, or the lawyer for the Temporary Guardian, Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. Dated and first published on September 30, 2010. Patricia L. Heatherman, OSB #932990 Conservator/Temp Guardian: Lucinda Downs 61289 SW Brookside Loop Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 815-3319 Temp Guardian: David Downs 61289 SW Brookside Loop Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 815-3319 Attorney for Guardian/ Conservator: Patricia L. Heatherman, OSB #932990 Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 389-4646 Fax: (541) 389-4644 E-mail: patricia@heathermanlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE Legal Notice of Proposed Action Opportunity to Comment Three Trails OHV DEIS The Crescent Ranger District on the Deschutes National Forest has completed a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a designated Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) trail system and is available for public comment. It is called the Three Trails OHV project and it spans 93,016 acres with a focus on areas that are currently being most heavily visited by riders. The goal is to direct the use to the most suitable and sustainable places on the landscape while maintain a trail system and overall recreation experience that riders want. This proposal would provide a system of 100+ miles of interlinking trails that would vary in skill level and density to match the terrain, link to all staging areas, and to provide an opportunity for beginner through advanced riding experiences. Engineered trails would be connected by a road system where riders can have a destination for Walker Mountain, Two Rivers, or Crescent Lake Junction from any staging area. In addition, the proposal would close roads, rehabilitate unneeded trails, and generally locate trails away from water. The Draft EIS is available for review at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/cen traloregon/projects/units/cr escent/index.shtml. How to Comment and Timeframe: The Environmental Protection Agency published a Notice of Availability (NOA) for the DEIS in the Federal Register on October 1, 2010. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, oral, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted for 45 days following that date. The public comment period ends November 15, 2010. The publication date of the NOA in the Federal Register is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for a proposed action documented in a draft EIS. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The regulations prohibit extending the length of the comment period. Written comments must be submitted to: Holly Jewkes, Crescent District Ranger, P.O. Box 208, Crescent, Oregon. 97733. The office business hours for those submitting hand-deliv-

ered comments are 7:45 AM and 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments must be provided at the Responsible Official's office during normal business hours via telephone 541-433-3200 or in person, or at an official agency function (i.e. public meeting) that is designed to elicit public comments. Electronic comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc) to comments-pacificnorthwest-deschutes-crescent@fs .fed.us. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments. Those who provide comments during this comment period are eligible to appeal the decision under the regulations. Interest expressed or comments provided on this project prior to or after the close of this comment period will not constitute standing for appeal purposes. Comments must meet the requirements of 36 CFR 215.6. Names and addresses of commentors will become part of the public record. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS TO BE PRE-QUALIFIED TO SUBMIT A BID FOR PROVISION, INSTALLATION and SUPPORT OF AV EQUIPMENT FOR THE HEALTH CAREERS AND SCIENCE BUILDING PROJECTS Respondent Qualifications due by 4:00PM local time on October 28, 2010. Central Oregon Community College (the College) desires to prequalify vendors (the Vendor) for the provision, installation and support for AV equipment in the Health Career and Science buildings. The Health Careers building is scheduled to go out for Bid in October 2010, with a summer 2012 completion. The Science building is anticipated to go out for bid in January 2011 with a fall 2012 completion. The College has determined that prospective bidders for the AV Equipment must be pre-qualified prior to submitting a bid. It is mandatory that Vendors who intend to submit a bid provide a Pre-Qualification Package that includes a fully completed Pre-Qualification Application and all requested materials. The College will evaluate the Pre-Qualification Package and approve qualified Vendors to be on the final qualified Bidders List. No bid will be accepted from a Vendor that has failed to comply with these requirements. Vendors are encouraged to submit Pre-Qualification Packages as soon as possible, so that they may be notified of omissions of information to be remedied or of their pre-qualification status well in advance of the bid advertisement for this project. To request a copy of the Prequalification Application, contact Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, by email at jmosier@cocc.edu, or by telephone at 541-383-7779. The submittal deadline is October 28, 2010 at 4 pm. Early submissions are welcome. The documents must be returned to Julie Mosier in Metolius 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 by the day and time specified. Publication and Dates: Bend Bulletin, Oregonian, Portland Daily Journal of Commerce, and Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce. First Advertisement 10/7/2010; Second Advertisement 10/18/2010

LEGAL NOTICE The regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2 will be held on Tuesday, October 12, 2010 at 11:30 a.m. at the conference room of the North Fire Station, 63377 Jamison St., Bend, OR. Items on the agenda include: an update on Project Wildfire, the fire department report, a report on the Emergency Services Funding Committee and a first reading of an ordinance adopting 2010 Oregon Fire Code. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to: Tom Fay 541-318-0459. TTY 800-735-2900. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN A. SWAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Eight (8), THE WILLOWS PHASE I, recorded May 13, 1993 in Cabinet C, Page 773, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 16, 2005. Recording No. 2005-79120 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $971.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $135,816.26; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from February 1, 2010; plus late charges of $563.30; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal

as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30297). DATED: August 5, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JULIE B. GRAHAM. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), ALPENVIEW ESTATES PHASE I, recorded March 16, 1995, in Cabinet D, Page 107, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: February 20, 2007 Recording No. 2007-10247 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,186.06 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $222,371.76; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2010; plus late charges of $138.27; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1630 T.S. No.: 1291570-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patrick Whelan, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 02, 2007, recorded March 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-13975 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6, Gallatin, Phases I and II, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61529 Tall Tree Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,786.55 Monthly Late Charge $75.53. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,600.00 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341691 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30781). DATED: August 3, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: TONY ATKINSON, KELLY ATKINSON, and KATHY J. FISH. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Twenty-five (25), RIDGEWATER II, P.U.D., City of Bend, recorded July 3, 2003, in Cabinet F, Page 567, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 6, 2006. Recording No. 2006-73533 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,890.56 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2009 through June 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $431,624.50; plus interest at an adjustable rate

pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2009; plus late charges of $817.25; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: November 4, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30732). DATED: June 23, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS Date of Notice: October 7, 2010 Name of Responsible Entity (RE) City of Bend Address: 710 NW Wall Street City, State, Zip Code: Bend, OR 97701 Telephone Number of RE Preparer Agency: (541)312-4915 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the City of Bend or Grantee REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about October 22, 2010 the City of Bend will submit a request to the Oregon Department of Housing and Community Services for the release of Neighborhood Stabilization funds under Division B, Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008, as amended, to undertake three projects known as: Merrick Subdivision Acquisition, for the acquisition of eleven building lots to provide affordable housing in Bend, Oregon. The project site includes eleven lots (Lots 10, 11, 12, 13, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Merrick Subdivision, Deschutes County, Bend, OR 97702). Shady Pines Subdivision Acquisition, for the acquisition of one structure and nine building lots to provide affordable housing in Bend, Oregon. The project site includes ten lots (Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 of SHADY PINES subdivision, recorded July 28, 2008, in Cabinet H-787, Deschutes County, Oregon). Timber Creek Acquisition, for the acquisition of five building lots to provide affordable housing in Sisters, Oregon. The project site includes five building lots (Lots 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, TIMBER CREEK II, PHASE 3, recorded December 5, 2005, in Cabinet G page 995, Deschutes County, Oregon). FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of Bend has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the City of Bend, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 and may be examined or copied weekdays 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project bay submit written comments to the City of Bend at 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701, attention: Jim Long, Affordable Housing Manager. All comments received within fifteen days form the publishing date will be considered by the City of Bend prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. RELEASE OF FUNDS The City of Bend certifies the Jim Long, in his capacity of Affordable Housing Manager, and Certifying Officer consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfies. HUD's approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS Oregon Housing and Community Services will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of Bend's certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Bend; (b) the City of Bend has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to Oregon Housing and Community Services, NSP Coordinator, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite B, Salem, OR 97301-1266 Jim Long Affordable Housing Manager City of Bend 710 NW Wall Street Bend, OR 97701 Published: September 10, 2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030930879 T.SNo.: 10-10263-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ANTONIO MENDEZ as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE ESCROW AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on January 25, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-05527 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 241009 LOT NINETEEN (19), FORREST COMMONS, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 19, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1327 NW 18TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $803.91 Monthly Late Charge $40.20 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 154,349.99 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25000 % per annum

from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fideljtyasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee'' and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 30, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3759199 10/07/2010, 10/14/2010, 10/21/2010, 10/28/2010

541-322-7253

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-374111-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PEDRO VARGAS, SR. as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR PACIFIC COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2006, recorded 12/7/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-80194, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241945 LOT 25 OF FAIRHAVEN PHASE VI, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 533 NW 24TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,348.00 Monthly Late Charge $67.40 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,491.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/14/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/14/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/15/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 9/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3729671 09/23/2010, 09/30/2010, 10/07/2010, 10/14/2010