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Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Bend vows UGB appeal if state does not budge

ANOTHER BEAR, THIS ONE A 300-POUNDER • C1

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

The city of Bend is willing to take the state to court for the chance to plan its own growth. If the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development doesn’t make certain concessions regarding Bend’s contentious plan to increase the size of its urban growth boundary, the city will challenge the ruling to the State Court of Appeals. Bend has been fighting with the

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state for much of the past year over its UGB proposal, which once approved by the DLCD will dictate how and where the city will be able to grow during the next 20 years.

Build out or up? The basic crux of that battle has been whether Bend really needed as much land as it wanted to add to its UGB — about 8,500 acres — or if it should focus on developing vacant

lots and increasing density within the current limits. Last month, the Land Conservation and Development Commission issued a draft order of what the city must do to get DLCD’s blessing for a UGB expansion. While it took city officials a couple of weeks to digest the 156-page report and prepare their responses, this week they sent a somewhat stern and sometimes conciliatory letter to the state seeking certain changes. See UGB / A4

Park officials The Santiam Wagon Road discuss killing makes the National Register more geese HISTORY PRESERVED

By Hillary Borrud

Images from the Santiam Wagon Road

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The Bend Park & Recreation District will consider the option of killing more of the Canada geese that have taken up residence in area parks in November and December. At a district work session Tuesday night, Park Services Director Ed Moore told board members that the goose population has shown little measurable decline since June, when 109 geese were herded into pens and euthanized. Parks staff and wildlife service agents with the U.S. Department of Agriculture have spent the last few months “hazing” the geese with a dog, a kayak and a paintball gun, in the hopes that some would be persuaded into leaving the area. A count just prior to the June goose cull indicated approximately 340 geese living in local parks, Moore said. There has been some progress, according to Natural Resource Manager Paul Stell, who said park visitors have reported fewer problems with goose droppings in the parks since the 109 geese were removed. See Geese / A4

The Bulletin

The Santiam Wagon Road officially opened in 1866 and connected the Willamette Valley and the Deschutes River Basin. From the mid-19th through the early 20th centuries, the road helped contribute to economic development on both sides of the Cascade Mountains by providing a more reliable route to facilitate trade, commerce and communication, according to the state. Willamette Valley residents also traveled east across the Cascades to settle in Central Oregon. In 1920, the McKenzie Highway opened and the wagon road became largely obsolete.

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Segments of Santiam Wagon Road added to National Register of Historic Places

Ontario Eugene

Judges begin revisiting home foreclosures

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Sources: State Historic Preservation Office, Deschutes National Forest and Willamette National Forest

By Ariana Eunjung Cha and Brady Dennis The Washington Post

On Florida’s west coast, where the housing bust has flooded courts with foreclosure filings, the chief judge of the 6th Judicial Circuit has little sympathy for lenders who have submitted flawed and possibly fraudulent foreclosure cases. Thomas McGrady, whose jurisdiction includes two hard-hit counties with more than 1 million people in the Tampa area, said Monday that foreclosures based on improper paperwork should be tossed out. Judges “are going to have to vacate that judgment and start over again,” he said. Across the country, judges facing pressure from homeowners and their attorneys are beginning to re-examine old cases and dismiss pending ones. The trend could lead to overturned evictions, and it could stall foreclosure cases for years and scare away buyers of millions of seized properties clogging the real estate market. See Foreclosures / A4

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1 This photo shows people camping at Fish Lake circa 1890-1905 by the Santiam Wagon Road,

which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in late September. The lake is near the junction of U.S. Highway 20 and state Highway 126, along one of the best-preserved sections of the Santiam Wagon Road. Today, this section is easily accessible to the public, and there are interpretative panels about the wagon road and how people traveled along it at the Fish Lake Guard Station.

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The passage of time and creeping vegetation have narrowed to a single track some portions of the historic Santiam Wagon Road, which opened Central Oregon to settlers from the West in 1866. Yet grave markers alongside the road, and stories told by history buffs, serve as reminders of the challenging conditions that Oregon pioneers faced in the state’s early days. On Tuesday, the State Historic Preservation Office announced the federal gov- “It was a vital ernment had economic link recognized the wagon road’s between the historical value Willamette Valley by adding part of the trail to the and Eastern National Reg- Oregon. It was ister of Historic Places in late unique in that a September. lot of travel went The portion from west to of the trail listed on the National east. Traditionally, Register is ap- we think of the proximately 38 miles long, and Oregon trail passes through bringing folks out the Willamette National Forest West.” and the Des— Cathy Lindberg, chutes National Forest, accord- heritage program ing to Oregon’s manager, Willamette application for National Forest the designation. A few privately owned portions of the road in this area were not included. The road’s listing on the register will not significantly alter the management of the route, a historian with the state Historic Preservation Office has said. However, it could bring more attention to the road and create more opportunities for the Forest Service to seek grants for maintenance and interpretative installations along the trail, said Cathy Lindberg, heritage program manager for the Willamette National Forest. On a section of the road in Linn County, people can see the grave site of Charity Ann Noble, who died during childbirth and was buried next to the wagon road during the late 1800s, according to Oregon’s National Register application. See Santiam / A5

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TIMES SQUARE BOMBER: Shahzad defiant even after he is sentenced to life in prison, Page A3


A2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Art Lindgren sets up audio recording equipment to record the noise from the nearby wind turbines he believes are operating outside of local noise ordinances in Vinalhaven, Maine. Many families and homeowners say they never knew what emissions might come from wind turbines. Now lawsuits and complaints about noise, vibrations and subsequent lost property value have cropped up in several states.

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Wind turbines generating complaints from neighbors By Tom Zeller Jr. New York Times News Service

VINALHAVEN, Maine — Like nearly all of the residents on this island in Penobscot Bay, Art Lindgren and his wife, Cheryl, celebrated the arrival of three giant wind turbines late last year. That was before they were turned on. “In the first 10 minutes, our jaws dropped to the ground,” Art Lindgren said. “Nobody in the area could believe it. They were so loud.” Now, the Lindgrens, along with a dozen or so neighbors living less than a mile from the $15 million wind facility here, say the industrial whoosh-andwhoop of the 123-foot blades is making life in this otherwise tranquil corner of the island unbearable. They are among a small but growing number of families and homeowners across the country who say they have learned the hard way that wind power — a clean alternative to electricity from fossil fuels — is not without emissions of its own. Lawsuits and complaints about turbine noise, vibrations and subsequent lost property value have cropped up in Illinois, Texas, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Massachusetts, among other states. In one case in DeKalb County, Ill., at least 38 families have sued to have 100 turbines removed from a wind farm there. A judge rejected a motion to dismiss the case in June.

Like the Lindgrens, many of the people complaining the loudest are reluctant converts to the anti-wind movement. The wind industry has long been dogged by a vocal minority bearing all manner of complaints about turbines, from routine claims that they ruin the look of pastoral landscapes to more elaborate allegations that they have direct physiological impacts caused by the machines’ ultra-low-frequency sound and vibrations. For the most extreme claims, there is little independent backing. Last year, the American Wind Energy Association, a trade group, along with its Canadian counterpart, assembled a panel of doctors and acoustical professionals to examine the potential health impacts of wind turbine noise. In a paper published in December, the panel concluded that “there is no evidence that the audible or sub-audible sounds emitted by wind turbines have any direct adverse physiological effects.” A separate study financed by the U.S. Energy Department concluded late last year that, in aggregate, property values were unaffected by nearby wind turbines. Numerous studies also suggest not everyone will be bothered by turbine noise, and that much depends on the context into which the noise is intro-

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

10 19 24 37 44 27 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $41 million for the next drawing.

John Terhune / The Associated Press

Purdue University physics major Tony “Danger” Coiro bought a 1978 Suzuki for $50 and spent $2,500 retrofitting it into a street-legal bike. Two solar panels mounted on either side of the bike charge its lead acid batteries, but they are also chargeable with a plug-in AC current.

Coiro’s solar bike has a range of about 24 miles from each charge, and can go as fast as 45 mph. The South Bend, Ind., junior has received a provisional patent for his invention, and he says he hopes to improve his design to create a 100-mph, sun-driven racing machine.

duced. A previously quiet setting like Vinalhaven is more likely to produce irritated neighbors than, say, a mixeduse suburban setting where ambient noise is already the norm. Of the 250 new wind farms that have come online in the United States over the past two years, about dozen or so have generated significant noise complaints, according to Jim Cummings, the founder of the Acoustic Ecology Institute, an online clearinghouse for information on sound-related environmental issues. Maine, along with many other states, puts a general limit on nighttime noise at 45 decibels — roughly equivalent to the sound of a humming refrigerator. A normal conversation is in the range of 50 to 60 decibels. In almost all cases, it is not mechanical noise arising from the central gear box or nacelle of a turbine that residents react to but rather the sound of the blades, which in modern turbines are mammoth steel appendages more than 100 feet long, as they slice through the air. Turbine noise can be controlled by reducing the rotational speed of the blades. But the turbines on Vinalhaven already operate that way after 7 p.m., and George Baker, the chief executive of Fox Island Wind, said turning the turbines down came at an economic cost.

WASHINGTON — The most famous house in America is going solar. The White House soon will have solar panels to supply the first family’s hot water and some of its electricity, the Department of Energy announced Tuesday. It’s not yet clear whether the panels will be visible to tourists from below, but environmentalists and clean energy ad- “This project vocates hope that the reflects President buzz will give solar a boost, just as first lady Obama’s strong Michelle Obama’s veg- commitment to etable garden got more U.S. leadership people buying seeds. The White House in solar energy solar panels will be a demonstration project and the jobs it to show that “American will create here at solar technologies are home. Deploying available, reliable and ready for installation in solar energy homes throughout the technologies country,” the Energy Department said in a across the statement. country will help “This project reflects President Obama’s America lead the strong commitment to global economy U.S. leadership in solar energy and the jobs it for years to will create here at home. come.” Deploying solar energy technologies across the — Steven Chu, White country will help Amer- House energy secretary ica lead the global economy for years to come,” Energy Secretary Steven Chu said in a statement. Bill McKibben, the founder of 350.org — a campaign to find climate change solutions in communities around the world — said in a statement that the White House “did the right thing.” “If it has anything like the effect of the White House garden, it could be a trigger for a wave of solar installations across the country and around the world,” he said. President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the roof of the White House above the Oval Office in 1979 to heat water in the staff kitchen, according to the National Museum of American History in Washington, which acquired one of them. President Ronald Reagan removed them in 1986. McKibben obtained one of the old White House panels and drove it from Maine to Washington last month, trying to push the administration toward taking action on climate change. After Tuesday’s announcement, White House officials said solar had been in the plans since the early days of the administration. Chu said in a blog post Tuesday that the new solar panels would be installed next summer. The department expects the solar-powered system to produce about 19,700 kilowatt hours of electricity a year. Based on Washington commercial rates, that would mean an electricity bill savings for a typical household of $2,300 per year. The additional savings on hot water would be about $1,000.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 A3

T S Treasury cuts bailout price tag to $50B By Daniel Wagner The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The $700 billion financial bailout will cost about $50 billion, the Treasury Department said Tuesday. The price tag was included in a report on the two-year program and is lower than earlier projections — including a $66 billion estimate this summer by the Congressional Budget Office. Treasury notes in the report that the bailout, known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, helped stabilize the financial system and prevent a deeper

crisis. It says independent economists credit the program with preventing economic collapse.

Expired powers Treasury’s powers under the law expired on Sunday. The report reviews its actions over two years to rescue failing banks, automakers and others. The law passed in October 2008 with support from lawmakers in both parties and the Bush administration. “I hope this report will allow the American people and their representatives in Congress to

reassess the initiative and its impact,” Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner wrote in a cover letter to lawmakers. Independent government watchdogs have criticized Treasury for trumpeting billions in “profits” or “revenues” without mentioning that losses would eclipse those gains. Treasury still makes frequent references to taxpayer profits. The watchdogs also criticized Treasury for treating the banks with too much deference. During a town hall meeting with TARP staffers last month,

Geithner acknowledged some missteps. “TARP was not perfect,” he said. But the program “delivered in ways few could have imagined.” Hundreds of banks still hold billions of bailout dollars. Many need the money to survive. The GAO said 78 bailed-out banks have problems that could sink them. Meanwhile, the bailout’s special inspector general is adding staff to handle the growing number of cases involving alleged bailout fraud by banks.

French police arrest 12 in terror raids

Would-be bomber gets life sentence

By Steven Erlanger New York Times News Service

PARIS — The French police arrested 12 people in two separate raids in southern France on Tuesday in what the Interior Ministry said was part of a campaign against terrorism. France is already on a state of high alert because of threats from al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, a North African group that is linked to but operates separately from al-Qaida. Three of the arrests Tuesday stemmed from the arrest of a man on Saturday near the central train station in Naples, Italy. The authorities said he was carrying materials for a bomb. Two men in Marseilles and one in Bordeaux were arrested by the counterterrorism police after their phone numbers were found in the cell phone of the man arrested in Naples, Ryan Hannouni, the authorities said. Hannouni, 28, is a French citizen of Algerian origin. France has requested his extradition. The men were said to be involved with a group offering housing and false identity papers, presumably to foreigners seeking to enter France and to French citizens who want to train or fight in Afghanistan. Agnes Labregere, a spokeswoman for the Paris prosecutor’s office, which handles terrorism investigations, said Hannouni was suspected of “participation in criminal networks aimed at supplying jihad in the PakistaniAfghan zone.” An additional nine people were arrested Tuesday in Marseilles and nearby Avignon on suspicion of involvement in the trafficking of arms and explosives. Searches were continuing for weapons, the police said, and have produced at least one Kalashnikov automatic rifle, a pump-action shotgun, two knives and ammunition.

Elizabeth Williams / The Associated Press

This courtroom sketch made Tuesday shows Faisal Shahzad, center, surrounded by U.S. marshals and accompanied by his attorney, Philip Weinstein, left, during his sentencing in Manhattan Federal Court in New York. The Pakistani immigrant who tried to set off a car bomb in Times Square in May 2010 was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison.

Shahzad: ‘If I am given a thousand lives, I will sacrifice them all for the sake of Allah’ By Michael Wilson New York Times News Service

Doug Mills/ New York Times News Service file photo

President Barack Obama listens during a discussion on the economy with local families in Des Moines, Iowa.

Obama strains to rally liberals By Peter Baker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — With four weeks until congressional elections that will shape the remainder of his term, President Barack Obama is focused on generating enthusiasm within the base that helped put him in the White House two years ago, from college students to blacks. But Obama has focused much of his prodding on the liberals most deflated by the first two years of his presidency. Assuming that many independents are out of reach, White House strategists are counting on Obama to energize, cajole, wheedle and even shame the left into matching the tea party momentum that has propelled Republicans this year. As he holds rallies aimed at college students and minority groups, sends e-mail to his old list of campaign supporters and prepares to host a town hall-style

A N A LY S I S meeting on MTV, the president is appealing to his liberal base to put aside its disappointment in him. Without offering regrets for policy choices that have angered liberals, Obama argues that the Republican alternative is far worse.

‘We’ve got a real big choice’ “You can’t sit it out,” he told a conference call of college student journalists last week. “You can’t suddenly just check in once every 10 years or so, on an exciting presidential election, and then not pay attention during big midterm elections where we’ve got a real big choice between Democrats and Republicans.” He added that “the energy that you were able to bring to our politics in 2008, that’s needed not

less now, it’s needed more now.” At times, though, the message has come across as scolding and testy, in the view of some Democrats. Obama told Rolling Stone magazine that Democrats “need to buck up” because it would be “inexcusable” for them to stay home. The White House may be making progress closing the socalled enthusiasm gap with Republicans, according to Democratic strategists who point to improving poll numbers and fundraising. But the fact that Obama needs to make such a concerted effort highlights the depth of disaffection among liberals over what they see as his failure to push for the change he promised. Recent polls show that Republicans hold an edge among voters likely to turn out on Election Day, while Democrats pull ahead if all registered voters are counted.

NEW YORK — The defendant came to U.S. District Court in Manhattan on Tuesday ready to ladle out several minutes of anti-American justification for his act of terrorism in Times Square. But the judge, Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, best known of late for presiding over Martha Stewart’s trial, came ready, too. She repeatedly interrupted the defendant, Faisal Shahzad, to spar with him over his interpretation of the Quran, his invocation of a Muslim warrior in the Crusades and, above all, the relevance of any of it to the life sentence that hung over him like the dozen U.S. deputy marshals who guarded the prisoner in court. And after the judge formally sentenced Shahzad to life in prison, she left him a parting shot: “I do hope that you will spend some of the time in prison thinking carefully about whether the Quran wants you to kill lots of people.” The several minutes of back and forth brought a bit of drama to the endgame of a case that, as nerve-rattling as it was at its inception, with the discovery of a potentially lethal bomb in Times Square on May 1, had drawn to a close with the sentencing Tuesday. The hearing was part sentencing and part scolding,

and the latter started before the former. Cedarbaum looked at Shahzad, seated between lawyers, his beard thick and his hair long under his white skullcap, and said, “I think you should get up.” Shahzad, 31, rose. He seemed to have aged these past five months from the boyish man who was arrested aboard a jet that had been cleared for takeoff at Kennedy Airport. He asked the judge for five or 10 minutes, then launched into a soliloquy that was at times rambling, at times threatening and delivered with the crinkly eyed grin of a man who acted as if he could not be happier than where he was at that moment. “This is but one life,” he said. “If I am given a thousand lives, I will sacrifice them all for the sake of Allah, fighting this cause, defending our lands, making the word of Allah supreme over any religion or system.” Shahzad attacked the U.S. military forces “who have occupied the Muslim lands” and said that attacks like his attempted bombing would continue. “Brace yourselves, because the war with Muslims has just begun,” he said. “Consider me only a first droplet of the flood that will follow me.”

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Physicists share Nobel for carbon flakes By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

A pair of Russian-born physicists working at the University of Manchester in England have won the Nobel Prize in Physics for investigating the remarkable properties of ultrathin carbon flakes known as graphene, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said Tuesday. The physicists are Andre Geim, 51, and Konstantin Novoselov, 36. They will split the prize of about $1.4 million. Graphene is a form of carbon in which the atoms are arranged in a flat hexagon lattice like microscopic chicken wire, a single atom thick. It is not only the thinnest material in the world but also one of the strongest and hardest. Among its other properties, graphene is able to conduct electricity as well as copper does and to conduct heat better than any other known material, and it is practically transparent. Physicists say that it could eventually rival silicon as a basis for computer chips, serve as a sensitive pollution-monitoring material, improve flat-screen televisions and enable the creation of new materials and novel tests of quantum weirdness. In a statement, the Royal Acad-

emy said, “Carbon, the basis of all known life on Earth, has surprised us once again.” Graphene is closely related to two other forms of carbon that have generated intense interest in recent years: buckyballs, which are soccer-ball arrangements of carbon atoms, and nanotubes, which are rolled-up sheets of carbon atoms. It was long thought, however, that an essentially two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms would be unstable and would warp or fold up. Geim and Novoselov first succeeded in creating flakes of graphene by peeling them off piles of graphite — the material that is in a pencil lead — using Scotch tape. Geim, who was born in Sochi, Russia, and is now a Dutch citizen, studied at the Moscow Physical-Technical Institute and was awarded a Ph.D. at the Institute of Solid State Physics in Chernogolovka in 1987. He led a wandering research life — “For me it’s very boring to work on the same thing year after year,” he explained in an interview posted on the Nobel Prize website — before he became a professor at the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. It was at Nijmegen that he connected with Novoselov, who was born in Nizhny Tagil and became

Geim’s graduate student in the Netherlands. When Geim moved to Manchester, he took Novoselov with him; Novoselov is now a British and Russian citizen. The graphene creation originated in what Geim and Novoselov call “Friday evening” experiments, crazy things that might or might not work out. In one of them, Geim managed to levitate a frog in a magnetic field, for which he won an Ig Nobel — a parody award for “improbable research” — in 2000. On another occasion they produced a “gecko tape” that mimicked the way geckos and Spider-Man can walk on the ceiling. The work on graphene arose from the pair’s desire to investi-

gate the electrical properties of graphite. The first two papers on graphene were published in Science and online in 2004. Three more appeared in 2005. Since then, the Swedish Academy said, “research in this area has literally exploded,” producing a growing number of papers about graphene, its amazing properties and its promise. If scaled up to the thickness of plastic refrigerator wrap, a sheet of graphene stretched over a coffee cup could support the weight of a truck bearing down on a pencil point, according to tests conducted by two Columbia University researchers, Jeffrey Kysar and James Hone.

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A4 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Palestinian Oktoberfest a mix of cultures

Obama signs bill honoring Japanese-American veterans

By David Wainer

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — Nearly 69 years after President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered JapaneseAmericans to internment camps, President Barack Obama signed legislation on Tuesday awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to aging Japanese-American World War II veterans. A handful of JapaneseAmerican veterans and lawmakers joined Obama in the Oval Office where he signed the legislation awarding the medal to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and the 100th In-

TEL AVIV, Israel — Forget bratwurst and Bavaria’s brassy oompah sounds. Beer aficionados at Oktoberfest in the West Bank town of Taybeh indulged in pita with Labaneh cheese, the aroma of lamb skewers on the grill, Palestinian hip-hop and microbrewed beer. Taybeh, a Christian enclave in the predominantly Muslim West Bank, held the festivities last weekend in what Mayor David Khoury billed as Palestinians’ way of seeking normality under the abnormal conditions of a nation without a state. While the window of opportunity for statehood ebbs as talks between Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu verge on collapse, thousands of visitors flooded this biblical town perched on a hill where Jesus is said to have strode. “This is about doing something for our motherland, creating a sense of normality for Palestinians despite the fact that our freedom is curtailed by the lack of peace,” Khoury, his dark suit drenched in the sweat of a sweltering Middle East day, said. “While we are being encircled by settlements, this is about promoting our town of Taybeh as a flame of peace and non-violent resistance.” Taybeh (“delicious” in Arabic), home to the only Palestinian microbrewery, this year held its sixth annual Oktoberfest. Acts as diverse as a Brazilian bossa nova band and Sri Lankan traditional dancers came to the town, a vestige of a once flourishing Christian community in the West Bank dissipated by Palestinian infighting and hardships imposed by Israeli security measures. A chance to sell honey, olive oil and beer is a welcome way to fight unemployment of about 50 percent in a town of some 1,700 where work opportunities beyond farming, teaching and store-keeping are limited, Khoury says.

Geese Continued from A1 “We’re pleased that we’re where we are today, but I don’t think we’re finished,” Moore said. Moore said the parks board should plan on revisiting the issue in November, after the end of the first of three scheduled goose hunting seasons this winter. It’s uncertain if the hunting season will reduce the local goose population, he said, but hazing efforts may lead some geese to flee to places where they may be shot. It will likely require two to three years of effort to bring the local goose population down to the ideal level. In a memo for board members Tuesday, “success” in the goose control effort was defined as having to haze geese once or twice every two weeks, and spending no more than six to eight hours a month cleaning up waste in the parks — currently,

UGB

David Wainer / Bloomberg News

A worker at the Oktoberfest pours Taybeh beer, made according to German purity law. Oktoberfest in Taybeh, a Christian enclave in the predominantly Muslim West Bank, is billed as Palestinians’ way of seeking normality under the abnormal conditions of a nation without a state.

“We have to build the state of Palestine, to create the job opportunities that will only come with bold initiatives. We can’t sit around and wait for European and U.S. aid.” — Nadim Khoury, Taybeh Brewing Co. “This is an opportunity for awareness of our products to be raised and for our culture to be represented,” said Jeries Zahran, 20, a resident of Taybeh who studies management at Bethlehem University. David Khoury, the mayor, and his brother Nadim returned to the West Bank village of Taybeh from Boston in 1995 to start a brewery during the heady days of the Oslo peace talks. The brothers and their father sold part of a liquor-store business in the U.S.,

stock holdings and a house to raise about $1.2 million to start Taybeh Brewing Co. They weren’t deterred when five bloody years of fighting known as the intifada unraveled starting in 2000, shrinking the factory’s capacity down to about 10 percent. “We have to build the state of Palestine, to create the job opportunities that will only come with bold initiatives,” said Nadim Khoury, who heads the brewery. “We can’t sit around and wait for European and U.S. aid.”

hazing is being conducted three or four times a week. Continued hazing would be another option if the district decides not to opt for removing more geese, as would egg oiling, which kills goslings inside the shell. The park district has also recently placed signs along the river asking park visitors not to feed ducks and geese, a practice believed to contribute to geese choosing to live in the city full time.

possibility of allowing builders to not pay SDCs when a building permit is issued, but nine months later or when an occupancy permit is issued, whichever comes first. The city of Bend offers a similar option for SDCs that pay for roads, sewer and water, providing builders some relief from the burden of borrowing additional money to finance construction. The park district’s SDC is $4,024 for a single-family home, covering 68 percent of the maximum allowable level, which is calculated to reflect the full cost of expanding the parks system. Horton said adopting a policy like the city’s comes with some risks. The city collects SDCs on behalf of the park district, and at times has neglected to collect the park district’s share when issuing a building permit. Horton recalled an episode involving the developers of the Oxford Hotel, who weren’t charged parks SDCs initially, and later refused to pay

SDC deferral In other business, board members indicated little enthusiasm for a proposal to defer the collection of SDCs, the fees paid by builders of homes, apartments and overnight lodging to offset the cost of expanding the parks system to accommodate a growing population. District Executive Director Don Horton said local builders approached the district about the

The company, which has grown to 15 workers from three workers, withstood 10 years without turning a profit because of the family’s resilient ideology and because they never took out any loans, David Khoury says. Now the company sells more than $1.5 million worth of beer annually, though Khoury says profit margins are “very low.” Palestinian Muslims in the West Bank generally frown upon alcohol consumption, and Hamas officials, who control the Gaza Strip, have tried to bring Palestinian society into line with Islamic law. Nadim Khoury, though, says that there’s no friction with neighbors. “The amount of alcohol we sell in the Palestinian territories cannot be drunk by the Christian population only,” he says.

when the error was discovered. The city eventually forced the developers to pay up by threatening to withhold their occupancy permit. “If a mistake like that was made at the only opportunity, the time of occupancy, there’s not a second chance,” Horton said. Board member Scott Asla noted that builders have opted to defer their city SDCs only 27 times since Bend adopted its deferral policy two and a half years ago, and suggested it may not be worth the effort to further study the option. “Fifteen a year or less than 15 a year, it’s just not worth our doing it,” Asla said. District staff will be preparing a report on what it would cost the park district to ensure all deferred SDCs are eventually paid, for further review by the board. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from A1 “We don’t want to keep drawing lines in the sand and set up an impossible situation with a state agency,” City Manager Eric King said. “But at the same time we have to be vigilant in defending this community and what’s best for Bend.” In most cases, the city is asking the state to correct things in its final order that it felt might have been different than what state commissioners decided during a series of public hearings in spring. These could be minor clarifications that ask for more detail so the city knows exactly what it needs to do to get approval of its UGB to downright disagreements about what was meant by a commission decision during those hearings. For instance, one strongly worded section of the Bend’s response states the city does not agree with a section of the order that would require certain lands to be to be set aside for higher-density housing in perpetuity. By requiring particular parcels in Bend to be zoned in a certain manner forever, is “not how planning works,” the letter states, and could infringe upon the rights of private landowners. It goes on to note that if the DLCD did not correct that portion of the order it would be grounds for the city to appeal to the Oregon Court of Appeals. According to staff in Bend’s Planning Department, the state will issue a final ruling anywhere from the next two weeks to the next two and half months after which there’s a 60-day appeal period. Whether the city makes that decision will be up the Bend City Council, which will receive an update on the UGB expansion tonight. “Just because we’ve pointed out something that we think needs to be corrected that doesn’t mean the state will make that correction,” Bend Long Range Planning Manager Brian Shetterly said. “We still don’t really know where we stand until we get the final order. ... (And) we’re going to have to be prepared to make adjustments once we do get that order.” Bend has spent an estimat-

fantry Battalion, known as the “Go for Broke” fighting units, as well as the 6,000 JapaneseAmericans who served in the Military Intelligence Services during WWII. About 120,000 JapaneseAmericans from the West Coast were ordered to internment camps, according to the National Veterans Network. NVN is a coalition of Japanese-American veteran services and civil organizations. A total of 33,000 Japanese Americans served in WWII, and of that 13,000 served in the 442nd and the 100th.

If You Go What: Bend City Council meeting When: Today 7 p.m. Where: Bend City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend ed $4 million over several years to create its UGB expansion plan. Shetterly said that while he doesn’t expect a new plan to take as long to finalize and resubmit to the state, he estimates it will take at least 18 months. “A majority of what was adopted initially will have to be revisited,” Shetterly said. “Some of it will simply clarify findings that we have already made.” One thing is certain, he said, Bend’s proposed UGB will be smaller than the initially expected, and there will be measures that guarantee higher density development. Paul Dewey, an attorney for Central Oregon LandWatch — one of the groups that appealed Bend’s UGB proposal — said he thinks the states remand order was an accurate portrayal of what happened during the public hearings. For that reason, he said, Central Oregon LandWatch did not submit any corrections or clarifications like the city. He said Central Oregon LandWatch has some problems with the city’s response to the state, mainly with those that fight increasing density within the current bounds of the city, but added that most of the requests are for greater clarification that will improve the overall process for getting a reasonable UGB approved. “We think the (Land Conservation and Development Commission) remand is good in that one of things that we requested was as much specificity as possible so that in the next go around people expected what was requested,” Dewey said. “And, equally, the city’s request for clarification and changes for the most part is also good because it furthers that refinement and understanding so everyone’s on the same page.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

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Foreclosures Continued from A1 “We’ve never been inundated to this extent with this number of cases alleging fraudulent paperwork,” said Peter Blanc, chief judge of the 15th Judicial Circuit Court, in West Palm Beach. “We’re in new territory, and we’re struggling to determine what the proper solution is.” Judges nationwide have broad latitude in deciding whether to accept new paperwork and whether to charge the lenders with fraud for submitting problematic documents in the first place. Even before three of the nation’s largest lenders — Bank of America, J.P. Morgan Chase and Ally Financial — announced moratoriums on foreclosures in the 23 states that require a court order to evict a borrower from a home, some judges already were beginning to push back against banks with sloppy or fraudulent filings. The lenders have acknowledged that a handful of employees signing off on hundreds of thousands of files may not have read them, but they have insisted that the problem amounts to a technical issue that can be fixed easily by replacing old documents with new ones. They say that the facts proving borrowers missed their payments are sound and that the procedural errors might delay foreclosures but won’t change the

outcome. As the situation in Florida shows, it’s unlikely to wind up so simple. Armies of consumer attorneys and homeowners are seizing on the paperwork issues to try to protect individual homes from foreclosure and bring into question the legitimacy of the millions of foreclosures undertaken since the housing crisis began in 2007. The recent moratoriums have made life easier for people such as Michael Gaier, a Philadelphia lawyer who has taken on 130 clients hoping to fight their foreclosures.

‘Every story in the book’ Before, he said, judges churning through foreclosure cases tended “to roll their eyes, because they’ve heard every story in the book,” he said. But now, “I don’t have to convince them on my own. I don’t have to start from scratch,” he said, because the moratoriums show that the banks “know that something is wrong.” Gaier and other lawyers say they have been flooded with calls from new clients who had lost hope of keeping their homes but now see an opportunity to stay. In addition, homeowners who had been complaining of flawed or forged paperwork for years feel they are finally getting traction. “My reaction is, it’s about time. In the past people thought we

were crazy; the judges laughed at us. Now everyone knows there is a serious problem,” said Denise McMillan, 51, who was evicted from her four-bedroom home in Pikesville, Md., in July and has been coordinating online with others fighting foreclosure. The collective decisions of judges from across the country could turn a foreclosure slowdown into a far larger mess if they determine that homes were wrongly seized and resold by lenders. Foreclosed homes accounted for nearly onefourth of all residential sales in the second quarter, according to a report by RealtyTrac released last week. That possibility already is driving away potential buyers of bank-owned properties who don’t want to get caught in legal battles between banks and borrowers. At least one company that provides title insurance, Old Republic Title, has refused to work on homes foreclosed by Ally’s GMAC mortgage unit.

Process spooks buyers Travis John, a broker in central Florida who specializes in distressed sales, said buyers in recent weeks have seen the headlines about problems in the foreclosure process and have shied away. “If buyers continue to have this fear — if we have even 30 percent less sales — that would be traumatic,” he said. “We’re already in a traumatic market.”

Across Florida, which has the most foreclosure filings of any state, mortgage companies are already submitting formal requests to judges for the withdrawals for the documents that they say were “not properly verified.” Such actions show that the flawed paperwork is “a serious problem,” said Circuit Court Judge Lynn Tepper, who has presided over foreclosure cases in Pasco County, north of Tampa. “They’ve conceded that the affidavit is flawed,” Tepper said. That means the judgment based on the affidavit must have been problematic as well — and that the decisions should be reversed. Tepper sent a chill through law firms working for lenders this spring when she threw out a request for a foreclosure and ruled that U.S. Bank perpetrated fraud by submitting backdated documents that purported to show the lender owning the loan at the time of the foreclosure. The homeowner, Ernest Harpster, got his home back despite the fact that he owed $190,000 on the loan. Tepper also ruled that U.S. Bank could not refile the case. These days, Tepper is plodding slowly through the pending cases, looking closely at signatures and notarizations, making sure the names and numbers look accurate and legitimate. “You have to be careful,” she said. “It used to be such a pro forma thing; it was a no-brainer. That’s surely not the case now.”

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Despite efforts, U.S. mine safety elusive By David A. Fahrenthold and Kimberly Kindy The Washington Post

In the weeks after the worst U.S. coal-mining accident in 40 years, federal safety inspectors showed up repeatedly at a mine that snakes under the West Virginia hills: Loveridge No. 22. On July 26, an inspector cited the mine for concerns that walls might crumble. He noted that this made 87 citations for problems with the roof or walls over two years. Three days later, a chunk of rock 16 feet long and 41 ⁄2 feet high broke away from the mine’s wall, according to a federal accident report. Miner Jessie Adkins, 39, was caught beneath it. He died before he got to a hospital. Adkins is one of nine men who have died inside U.S. coal mines in the six months since the Upper Big Branch mine disaster in West Virginia, in which 29 men were killed on April 5. This string of accidents has revealed key shortfalls in a push by the Obama administration to improve mine safety. Federal regulators have increased their inspections at 89 coal mines with poor safety records, including Loveridge. They have also upped their use of orders to shut down mines until safety problems are fixed. But despite their efforts, five men were killed by heavy machinery; four were killed by falling rock. They died in mines where safety citations had increased about 31 percent after the Upper Big Branch blast.

Santiam Continued from A1 The road in Linn County also passes by what’s left of the tombstone of James A. McKnight, a 16-year-old who was killed in a hunting accident in 1871. James accidentally discharged a rifle while removing it from its holster, according to the application. His remains were apparently moved to another location the following year, but the tombstone was left in place. History buff and former Forest Service employee Richard Spray, 78, of Bend, led hikes along the Santiam Wagon Road for many years, and said the story he most liked to tell was about a trapper named Daniel, who was working at Fish Lake in 1920. “He’d promised his wife he’d be home by Christmas,” Spray said. A couple days before Christmas, there was a snow storm, but Daniel set off anyway on the Santiam Wagon Trail. Two other trappers waited for the storm to pass, then followed Daniel. They found his rifle, and then his pack, discarded alongside the trail, Spray said. The trappers followed Daniel’s tracks, and saw that he’d apparently grown confused and walked in circles. “Finally, he went up the mountain, and they’ve never found him,” Spray said.

Michael S. Williamson / Washington Post file photo

Workers do maintenance on large water pumps at the Upper Big Branch mine in Montcoal, W.Va., where 29 miners were killed in April. For safety experts and miners’ families, these recent disasters tell a familiar story: Enforcement efforts have been hampered by a backlogged appeals system and the lack of penalty for repeat offenders. The new federal crackdown still couldn’t ensure safe conditions underground. “The government should have seen that the mine took care of their violations,” said Adkins’ mother, Joan Adkins. “If they would’ve, maybe my son would still be here today.” The nine miners died in accidents at eight mines, spread across a swath of coal country from northern West Virginia to southern Illinois. The dead in-

clude Michael Carter, 28, a mine worker for only two years when a slab of rock 10 feet thick fell on him in Kentucky, and veterans such as James Robie Erwin, 55, who was three years from retirement after 36 years underground. Statistically, the government counts their deaths together with those of four men who died in accidents on the surface — driving trucks or operating machinery near mine entrances. That total, 13 fatal accidents in six months, means that the death rate since the Upper Big Branch disaster has been about the same as it has over the past 15 years. Coal mining remains a danger-

Exposition that year in Portland and to generate public support to build a system of national highways, according to Oregon’s National Registry application. The cars struggled through the Cascades, with one car skidding until its drivers were thrown from the vehicle and it came to a stop hanging over a precipice. The

other car’s brakes failed, and the driver had to drag a log behind the car to slow it down, according to the application. When the two cars reached the Santiam Wagon Road toll gate, the toll operator was perplexed. “They came rattling up to the toll gate, and his toll register didn’t have anything for a car,

ous profession, although far fewer people die today than before 1969, when Congress passed broad reforms: In 1968, about 26 miners died every month. In all, more than 104,000 have died in accidents since 1900. Before the blast, the Upper Big Branch mine had been repeatedly cited for safety problems and investigators recently reported finding high levels of explosive dust inside. Massey Energy, a Richmondbased coal giant that owns the mine, said the evidence was not reliable: Federal regulators’ “narrow-minded focus on compromised coal dust evidence is doing a disservice” to the miners’ families, the company said in a statement. After the Upper Big Branch explosion, federal regulators increased by 20 percent their use of orders that require mines to close temporarily, shutting off valuable coal production. They also began what they call impact inspections to increase their presence in 89 of the country’s roughly 2,000 coal mines. At these sites, chosen because of their record of poor safety or health issues, inspectors sometimes arrive in unmarked cars. “There are a number of mine operators who think they’ve got us figured out. So we are changing the dynamics here,” said Joseph Main, a longtime safety expert at the United Mine Workers of America union, whom President Obama appointed to head the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2009.

because he’d never seen one before,” Spray said. “So he charged him the toll for a pig, because he was a road hog. I don’t know how true that is, but it’s told over and over again.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Wagon road led to settlement, commerce The wagon trail followed a pre-existing American Indian trail and was mostly used by horse-drawn wagons and foot traffic from 1866 to 1920, according to the state’s application. When it opened, it was key to the settlement of Central Oregon and cross-mountain commerce. “It was a vital economic link between the Willamette Valley and Eastern Oregon,” Lindberg said. “It was unique in that a lot of travel went from west to east. Traditionally, we think of the Oregon Trail bringing folks out West.” From the late 1800s until U.S. Highway 20 was completed in 1939, people from the Willamette Valley used the wagon road to travel to and settle in Central Oregon, said Glenn Harrison, vice president of the Oregon Historic Trails Advisory Council and president of the Linn County Historical Society. At the same time, families from east of the Cascades traveled to the west side to sell wool to textile mills and purchase produce and other items that weren’t readily available on east side, Lindberg said. The road, which was a privately operated toll road for most of its existence, declined in use after automobiles grew in popularity. However, before the decline, the Santiam Wagon Road figured in Oregon’s automotive history. In 1905, two 1904 Oldsmobile curved dash Runabouts called “Old Steady” and “Old Scout” raced from New York City to Portland, to promote the Lewis and Clark

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 A5

Immigration debate not enough excite Hispanics voters By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

PHOENIX — Arizona’s immigration law has prompted denunciations, demonstrations, boycotts and a federal lawsuit. But it may not bring the protest vote that many Democrats had hoped would stem a Republican onslaught in races across the country. That is because although many voters are disillusioned with the political process, Latino voters are particularly dejected, and many may sit these elections out, according to voters, Latino organizations, political consultants and candidates. A poll released Tuesday found that even though Latinos strongly back Democrats over Republicans, 65 percent to 22 percent, in the congressional elections just four weeks away, only 51 percent of Latino registered voters said they would absolutely go to the polls, compared with 70 percent of all registered voters. The other side in the immigration debate is suffering no such lack of enthusiasm. Political analysts and candidates say the anti-establishment sentiment roiling the electorate, as well as widespread frustration over the country’s porous borders, seems to be helping candidates who favor tougher immigration rules. “In every single race I’m looking at, candidates are being asked, ‘Would you sign an Arizona-like immigration law?’” said Jennifer Duffy, an editor for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. “It’s now on the list of issues like a balanced-budget amendment and a tax cut. It’s part of the political lexicon, and it fires people up.” The results of the poll released Tuesday, by the Pew Hispanic Center, suggest that the raging

debate over Arizona’s law and the lack of congressional action on immigration overhaul may have turned off many Latinos. Latinos have usually voted in lower percentages than nonLatinos, but the current gap between their enthusiasm to vote and that of the general population is wider than in the last midterm election. Just 32 percent of all Latino registered voters said they had given this year’s election “quite a lot” of thought, compared with 50 percent of all registered voters, the poll found. The nationwide poll is based on telephone interviews with 1,375 Latinos, of whom 618 are registered voters. The survey was conducted Aug. 17 to Sept. 19 and has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points for registered voters.

The important issues The Pew poll also found that for Latinos, education, jobs and health care trump immigration as major issues, which could be bad news for Democrats hoping to capitalize on Hispanic anger over the Arizona law. But Tomas Robles, a student at Arizona State, was so enraged by the law, which would require the police to ask people they stopped about their immigration status if they suspected them to be here illegally, that he registered 12 of his family members to vote and joined other activists here in a door-to-door campaign that signed up more than 20,000 Latinos. “For the first time, I felt it was time for me to get involved,” Robles said. He was surprised to find that while some Latinos were as fired up as he was, others slammed the door in his face.


N A T ION / WOR L D

A6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

EPA takes Justices hear sex offender database case bipartisan heat for emissions regulation By David G. Savage

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — A lawyer for Los Angeles County told the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday that the failure to remove a wrongly accused couple from California’s index of reported child abusers was the state’s responsibility, not the county’s. “It’s the state’s database,” said attorney Timothy Coates. “There are no state standards and no specific criteria for removing someone from the list.

We don’t have any procedures on how to go about that.” The case of Craig and Wendy Humphries has highlighted the difficulty of getting off the state index once a person’s name has been reported to Sacramento for abusing a child. The state’s law requires many agencies and employees, including schools, police and child care workers, to report instances of suspected child abuse. More than 800,000 names are on California’s index, and

employers consult the list before hiring people to work with children. The Humphrieses were reported to state authorities in 2001 based on the word of Craig Humphries’ teenage daughter, but a juvenile court judge later pronounced them innocent of the charges. They have been fighting in court for several years to clear their names. In January 2009, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals described their “nightmarish

encounter” with the California system and ruled that both the state and county were liable for violating their constitutional rights. “There is no effective procedure for the Humphries to challenge this listing,” the appeals court said. But the lawyers for the county appealed to the Supreme Court, arguing that the county should not be liable for this state program. As Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg noted, the state of Califor-

nia did not appeal the decision, but the Humphrieses remain on the state index. Despite the county’s battle in the courts, an official of the Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services said reported child abusers can appeal the listing. Michael Watrobski, chief grievance review manager, said the state told local reporting agencies in May 2008 that they should offer appeals. He said his office has heard 313 such challenges this year.

By Renee Schoof McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency has run into bipartisan opposition from senators over its plans to cut mercury and other toxic emissions from boilers at large factories and from the heating plants for places such as shopping malls and universities. The dustup over an environmental rule shows how political worries about the economy and pressure from industries that object to the costs of pollution controls are leading Congress to try to restrain the EPA. The effort is separate from another bipartisan push in the Senate, led by Democrat Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, to prevent the EPA from taking action under the Clean Air Act to reduce emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from large facilities. Now that a climate bill is deemed dead in the Senate this year, opponents of air regulations are turning their attention to new EPA efforts to use the Clean Air Act. Last Friday it announced another proposed air pollution rule, one that would impose limits on emissions of mercury, soot and other harmful pollutants from sewage sludge incinerators. Earlier, it proposed a rule to cut hazardous pollution from commercial and industrial solidwaste incinerators. In addition, the EPA is working on what could be one of its biggest moves: the final form of rules that would tighten the standards for ozone, or smog. A final decision is expected at the end of the month. Industry groups have objected to pollution controls on the grounds of costs throughout the 40-year life of the Clean Air Act. Environmentalists say that their dire predictions through the decades have failed to materialize. Now, however, jobs are a key issue in the midterm elections. Republicans have a shot at taking control of both houses of Congress. Opponents of air pollution controls are warning about job losses. “The reality is that with the climate bill in a deep freeze, I think, frankly, the big polluter interests see the Clean Air Act as the only thing left that’s threatening them. So they are ramping up their political pressure,” said Joe Meldelson, an attorney for the National Wildlife Federation. “They’re doing that on all the Clean Air Act rules, both for greenhouse gases and the conventional stuff, and sort of smell blood in the water.”

Kim, son appear at N. Korean military exercise

HUNGARY

By Mark McDonald New York Times News Service

Bela Szandelszky / The Associated Press

A villager walks through his yard flooded by toxic mud in Kolontár, Hungary, on Tuesday. A fourth person has died in flooding caused by the rupture of a red sludge reservoir at an alumina plant in western Hungary, rescue services said Tuesday. At least six were missing and 120 injured, many with burns, in what officials said was an ecological disaster. The government declared a state of emergency in three counties affected by the flooding.

Sludge flood called ‘ecological disaster’ By Bela Szandelszky and Pablo Gorondi The Associated Press

KOLONTÁR, Hungary — A lethal torrent of toxic red sludge from a metal refinery engulfed towns in Hungary, burning villagers through their clothes and threatening an ecological disaster Tuesday as it swept toward the Danube River. The flood of caustic red mud spurred Hungarian officials to declare a state of emergency. At least four people were killed, six were missing and 120 injured, many with burns. Hundreds were evacuated in the aftermath of the disaster Monday, when a gigantic sludge reservoir burst its banks at an alumina plant in

Ajka, a town 100 miles southwest of Budapest, the capital. The torrent of sludge inundated homes, swept cars off roads and damaged bridges. Named for its bright red color, the material is a waste product in aluminum production that contains heavy metals and is toxic if ingested. In Kolontár, the town closest to the plant, Erzsebet Veingartner was in her kitchen when the 12-foot-high wave of red slurry hit, sweeping away everything in its path. “I lost all my chickens, my ducks, my Rottweiler, and my potato patch. My late husband’s tools and machinery were in the shed, and it’s all gone,” Veingartner said, sobbing. . “I have a winter’s worth

of firewood in the basement, and it’s all useless now.” Emergency workers wearing masks and chemical protection gear rushed to pour 1,000 tons of plaster into the Marcal River in an attempt to bind the sludge and keep it from flowing on to the Danube some 45 miles away. Nearby, desperate villagers waded through the toxic mud trying to salvage possessions with little more than rubber gloves as protection. The 1,775-mile-long Danube

passes through some of the continent’s most pristine vistas from its origins as a Black Forest spring in Germany to its end point as a majestic stretch of water emptying into the Black Sea. Dozens of villagers were burned when the caustic material seeped through their clothing. Two women, a young man and a 3-year-old child were killed, and health officials said two of the injured were in critical condition.

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SEOUL, South Korea — The North Korean leader, Kim Jong Il, watched a livefire military exercise with his youngest son and heir apparent in what was believed to be the first public appearance of Kim Jong Un since he was given the rank of four-star general last week. The North’s official Korean Central News Agency reported on Tuesday that the two Kims were joined by other members of their family and senior officials in the new North Korean leadership. The location and date of the drill were not specified. Kim Jong Un, who is believed to be 27 or 28, was joined at the drill by Vice Marshal Ri Yong Ho, the chief of the army’s general staff, the news agency said. Both men were appointed last week as deputy chairmen of the party’s military commission. Also watching the military exercise were two other members of Kim Jong Il’s ruling inner circle — his sister, Kim Kyong Hui, who was also made a four-star general last week, and her husband, Jang Song Taek, long rumored to be effectively in charge of the daily running of the government.

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010

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The Bulletin

The Small Business Administration announced Monday $14 billion in additional funding is available for SBA-backed loans and that another $30 billion will be allocated to banks by the Treasury Department for smallbusiness lending. The funding is from the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 signed by President Barack Obama last week. The act also includes $12 billion in tax cuts for small businesses, establishes a small-business loan fund in the Treasury

and incorporates provisions of 11 bills intended to improve credit availability, reduce taxes, make health insurance more affordable for small businesses and other actions to stimulate job creation at small businesses. “Oregon cannot grow its economy if we ignore small business,” said Sen. Ron Wyden, DOre., who voted for the act along with every member of Oregon’s congressional delegation except Reps. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., and Greg Walden, R-Ore. “Organizations such as the National Association of Small Business and the Independent

Community Bankers of America applaud the bill because it will jump-start job growth in Oregon and across the nation,” Wyden said. According to the ICBA, Wyden said, the small-business tax cuts and other reforms could create 500,000 jobs over the next two years. Mike Stamler of the SBA press office in Washington, D.C., said Tuesday that the $14 billion appropriated for SBA-backed loans for small businesses and the $30 billion appropriated to the Treasury to stimulate lending by small community banks, will be allocated in fiscal year 2011, which began Oct. 1. See Lending / B5

By David Holley The Bulletin

A new version of Gottschalks could return to Bend in 2012 if everything goes according to plan for Gottschalk by Joe Levy, a California company headed by Joe Levy, the former CEO of the department store chain that closed last year after filing for bankruptcy. Gottschalk by Joe Levy is trying to secure financing to open four stores in 2011, and possibly 12 more in 2012, Bob Lawson, chief financial officer and chief

Big name in sausage opens a deli in Bend

Televisa invests $1.2B for stake in Univision Univision Communications Inc., the leading Spanish-language television network in the United States, will retain the rights to popular telenovelas produced by the Mexican television giant Grupo Televisa for another 10 years. In a deal announced Tuesday, Televisa will invest $1.2 billion in Univision in exchange for a minimum 5 percent stake in the company and a new content licensing agreement for the telenovelas (Spanishlanguage soap opera dramas) and for the telecasts of some Mexican soccer matches in the United States.

Index gains strength The Non-Manufacturing Business Activity Index is a composite index reflecting growth and decline in service industries.

$22.714 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.701

operating officer for the company, said Tuesday. One of those 12 additional stores could be in Bend, while two other Oregon stores might be in Grants Pass and Klamath Falls. Lawson said he and the company’s other executives would talk about the 12 additional stores in mid-2011, if and when the first four are in operation. The executive team is trying to secure funding to open three stores in California and one in Nevada. See Gottschalk / B2

Behind Tribune’s decline: hubris, profanity By David Carr New York Times News Service

More female execs leave, study finds CORVALLIS — A new Oregon State University study suggests that women executives are more than twice as likely than men to leave their jobs. The rates were higher for female executives whether they left on their own or involuntarily. John Becker-Blease, an assistant professor of finance at Oregon State, said the study of data from Standard & Poor’s 1,500 firms did not find any strong patterns of discrimination. But he noted that women CEOs are still rare. A 2009 report showed only 13 female CEOs among Fortune 500 companies. The study is featured in October’s issue of Economic Inquiry. — From wire reports

s

Gottschalks $14 billion made available for small-business lending may return in new form By Ed Merriman

PARIS — Jerome Kerviel, the former Société Générale trader, was sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay restitution of 4.9 billion euros Tuesday. While the sentence may have brought the trial to an end, it did little to resolve the broader question of who was responsible for a culture of risk-taking that prevailed at banks before the financial crisis. The sentence, legal experts said, again laid bare the deep distrust among the French public of its elites and financial institutions — a suspicion that has strengthened since the subprime mortgage crisis led to multibillion-dollar bailouts of many big banks. Holding Kerviel responsible for the bank’s nearly $7 billion in losses “is probably the most debatable part of the decision,” said Christopher Mesnooh, a lawyer with Field Fisher Waterhouse in Paris. “The message from the court is that Société Générale — a leading jewel of the French banking sector — did not act irresponsibly but was the victim of a rogue trader.”

t

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Legislation also includes $12B in tax cuts

Former trader gets 3-year sentence

B

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub employee Mike Lindsay serves up a couple of hot dogs to regular customers Danielle Wagner, left, and Jessica Nunnelly at the newly opened Bend restaurant Tuesday. Along with the hot case, Taylor’s sells dishes for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as handmade sausages and other meats made at Taylor’s Sausage in Southern Oregon.

Oregon-based Taylor’s Sausage now serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and brews in space formerly occupied by Cheerleaders Grill

By David Holley The Bulletin

A well-known sausage maker from Southern Oregon opened a deli and pub Sept. 17 in the space formerly occupied by Cheerleaders Grill on Northeast Third Street in Bend. Owned by Terry Taylor and Tracy Savage, of Cave Junction, Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub sells frozen sausages and other meats made at the Taylor’s Sausage facility in Cave Junction. Taylor’s Sausage is a recognized name in the processed meat arena. The company distributes its products throughout the West Coast, from Seattle to Oakland, Calif.; some meats are frozen while others, like jerky, are preserved fresh. It also owns a popular store and restaurant in Cave Junction. The Bend location is technically separate from Taylor’s Sausage, a family-owned com-

Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub Hours: 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday through Saturday; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday Address: 913 N.E. Third St., Bend Phone: 541-383-1694 Website: taylorsausage.com

pany established in California in 1924 and later relocated to Cave Junction. But Terry Taylor, a great-grandson of the founder, and Savage, who are engaged, are part-owners of the Southern Oregon company. From the pub, the business serves breakfast, lunch, dinner and beer. Food can be ordered in or to go. See Taylor’s / B2

60

In January 2008, soon after the venerable Tribune Co. was sold for $8.2 billion, Randy Michaels, a new top executive, ran into several other senior colleagues at the InterContinental Hotel next to the Tribune Tower in Chicago. Michaels, a former radio executive and disc jockey, had been handpicked by Sam Zell, a billionaire who was the new controlling shareholder, to run much of the media company’s vast collection of properties, including The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, WGN America and the Chicago Cubs. Soon after Michaels arrived, according to two people at the bar that night, he sat down and said, “watch this,” and offered the waitress $100 to show him her breasts. The group sat dumbfounded. (Michaels denies the story.) It was a preview of what would become a rugged ride under the new ownership. Zell and Michaels, who was promoted to Tribune’s chief executive in December 2009, arrived with much fanfare, suggesting they were going to breathe innovation and reinvention into the conservative company. By all accounts, the reinvention did not go well. At a time when the media industry has struggled, debt-ridden Tribune has done even worse. Less than a year after Zell bought the company, it tipped into bankruptcy, listing $7.6 billion in assets against a debt of $13 billion, making it the largest bankruptcy in the history of the U.S. media industry. More than 4,200 people have lost jobs since the purchase, while resources for Tribune newspapers and television stations have been slashed. The new management did transform the work culture, however. See Tribune / B5

53.2% 55

Tech companies, rural areas benefit from construction of data centers

50

By Adam Satariano

45

Bloomberg News

2009

2010

Note: Figures above 50 indicate sector growth Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple Inc. needed land owned by Donnie and Kathy Fulbright for a $1 billion data center in rural North Carolina. The couple showed no interest in moving out of their home of 34 years in the town of Maiden.

The Fulbrights say they spurned one offer, then a second. Finally, they agreed to sell for $1.7 million, county records show, opting to leave the single-story house on the less than one acre of land they purchased for $6,000. “They told us to put a price on it and we did,” said Kathy Fulbright, 62, seated on a brown leather sofa in the living room

of the home she and her husband built with the proceeds. The 49-acre property boasts a 4,200-square-foot house with a Jacuzzi in the master bathroom plus a manmade pond stocked with bass and catfish. Apple was willing to pay up to get the land in its drive to improve digital entertainment services that fuel demand for

iPods, iPhones and iPads. The plot is adjacent to the site where Apple is building a 500,000-square-foot warehouse-like structure that analysts say will brim with servers, generators and other gear that make it easier to deliver songs, TV episodes and movies via the iTunes online store. See Apple / B2


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Gottschalk

Ramila Chawda, second from right, leads a group of female customers of Ujjivan, a microfinance firm in Bangalore, India, that lends to the poor, in counting money for the repayment of a loan at the branch of the firm in Mumbai, India. Vinod Khosla, a billionaire venture capitalist, has had success with the initial public stock offering for SKS Microfinance, which lends to poor women in India.

Continued from B1 “It’s in the realm of possibility,” Lawson said about a store in Bend. “A lot of things can change. I don’t know what will happen.” Fresno, Calif.-based Gottschalks filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in January 2009, and eventually liquidated all its stores, including the one in Bend. That store, located in the Pioneer Crossing shopping center, was short-lived. It opened in October 2008 and Gottschalks had vacated the 55,000-square-foot building by about July 2009. Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores announced in March it would move into about 23,000 square feet of the building. Lawson said it’s likely that Gottschalk by Joe Levy would look for a new building if it returns to Bend. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

Kainaz Amaria New York Times News Service

David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

Apple

By Vikas Bajaj New York Times News Service

MUMBAI, India — Vinod Khosla, the billionaire venture capitalist and co-founder of Sun Microsystems, was already among the world’s richest men when he invested a few years ago in SKS Microfinance, a lender to poor women in India. But the roaring success of SKS’ recent initial public stock offering in Mumbai has made him richer by about $117 million — money he says he plans to plow back into other ventures that aim to fight poverty while also trying to turn a profit. And he says he wants to challenge other rich Indians to do more to help their country’s poor. An Indian transplant to Silicon Valley, Khosla plans to start a venture capital fund to invest in companies that focus on the poor in India, Africa and elsewhere by providing services like health, energy and education. By backing businesses that provide education loans or distribute solar panels in villages, he says, he wants to show that commercial entities can better help people in poverty than most nonprofit charitable organizations. “There needs to be more experiments in building sustainable businesses going after the market for the poor,” he said in a telephone interview from his office in Menlo Park, Calif. “It has to be done in a sustainable way. There is not enough money to be given away in the world to make the poor well off.” Khosla’s advocacy of the bootstrap powers of capitalism is part

pects to generate 250 more jobs in areas such as maintenance and security, according to a state website and records compiled by the city and surrounding Catawba County. North Carolina projected the creation of an additional 3,000 jobs related to construction of the center. Maiden and Catawba County may receive $9.3 million in taxes and other revenue over 10 years, according to the documents. That includes $5.1 million for Maiden, which has an annual budget of $13.1 million, and $4.2 million for Catawba, which has an annual $202.2 million budget. Locals aim for added payoff from “Project Dolphin,” as officials have dubbed the center: that Apple will lure other companies. Google, owner of the world’s largest search engine, already has a facility in a neighboring county. “Names like Google and Apple indicate you’re in the 21st century and open for business, so we hope to propel this to something greater,” said Kitty Barnes, chairman of the Catawba County Board of Commissioners. U.S. technology companies increasingly are setting up shop in small-town America. Facebook is building a data center in Prineville, and Microsoft and Twitter are placing facilities in other sparsely populated regions, drawn by tax incentives, inexpensive labor, cheap electricity and abundant space. Microsoft, based in Redmond, Wash., weighs more than 35 different issues when selecting a site, said Kevin Timmons, general manager of the company’s data center operations. The com-

of an increasingly popular school of thought: Businesses, not governments or nonprofit groups, should lead the effort to eradicate global poverty.

India’s torrid growth over the last decade has helped enrich many here — Forbes estimates that India now has 69 billionaires, up from seven in 2000 — but only a few have set up large charities, endowments or venture capital Setting an example funds. Some nonprofit experts say “It surprises me that in India commercial social enterprises there is not a tradition of largehave significant scale giving and limitations and helping to solve pose conflicts “(Helping the poor) social problems of interest. But has to be done and set a social proponents like model,” Khosla Khosla draw in- in a sustainable said. spiration from the way. There is not A recent Bain & astounding global Co. study estimatgrowth of micro- enough money to ed that Indians finance — the be given away in give much less business of givas a percentage ing small loans the world to make of the country’s to poor entrepre- the poor well off.” gross domestic neurs, of which product than SKS Microfi- — Vinod Khosla, Americans. Morenance is a notable billionaire venture over, individual practitioner. capitalist and co-founder and corporate doAdvocates also of Sun Microsystems nations account find intellectual for just 10 percent support for the of the charitable idea from the work of business giving in India, compared with management professors like the 75 percent in the United States late C.K. Prahalad, who have ar- and 34 percent in Britain. The gued that large corporations can balance comes from the governdo well and do good by aiming at ment and foreign organizations. people at the so-called bottom of Rich Indians “are more into the pyramid. temple building and things like Besides Khosla, entrepreneurs that,” said Samit Ghosh, the chief like Pierre Omidyar, a co-founder executive of Ujjivan Financial, of eBay, and Stephen Case, a co- a microlender based in Bangafounder of America Online, have lore, “rather than putting their started funds with similar aims. money into real programs, which But Khosla, who moved to will have real impact on poverty the United States from India as alleviation.” a graduate student in 1976, has another motive, too. He wants to goad other rich Indians into giv- The pursuit of profit ing away more of their wealth. Khosla said his experience

pany plans to build a $500 million data facility in Virginia, Gov. Bob McDonnell’s office said in August. “Topping the list were factors such as its close proximity to our customers, fiber-optic networks, a large pool of skilled labor and an affordable energy source,” Timmons said. Data centers have helped bring 3,100 jobs and more than $3.6 billion in capital investments to Virginia since 2006, said Rob McClintock, director of research at the Virginia Economic Development Partnership. To land its Apple facility, North

Carolina’s legislature approved $46 million in tax breaks for the company. Local governments also trimmed Apple’s real property taxes by half and slashed personal property taxes by 85 percent, records show. Some local officials say companies, not communities, benefit most as big providers locate operations in rural areas. “I have a problem with government giving large multinational corporations millions of dollars in handouts,” said T.J. Rohr, a Libertarian city councilman in Lenoir, N.C., site of a $600 million Google data center lured by

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Continued from B1 “Apple’s growth has been pretty dramatic, and they have probably exceeded their capacity,” said David Cappuccio, chief of research at Gartner Inc., which advises companies on the use of data centers such as the one Apple is building. “Between iTunes and the video store they are going to have, you’re talking about massive amounts of data and millions of people trying to access that at the same time.” The center is due to be completed by year’s end. It will help Apple customers stream and store music and videos remotely, via the so-called cloud, rather than having to download files to a hard drive, said Gene Munster, an analyst at Piper Jaffray. Apple may also use the center to help stream video to a newly revamped Apple TV set-top box, said Richard Doherty, director of the consulting firm Envisioneering Group. Cappuccio of Gartner said Apple may use the Maiden facility for initiatives the company has yet to unveil or discuss in detail, including social networking and Web search. Apple, based in Cupertino, Calif., hasn’t disclosed its plans for the project. Steve Dowling, a spokesman, declined to comment. The data center is already making a mark on Maiden, population 3,200, about 45 miles west of Charlotte. In its pitch for approval and tax breaks, Apple said it may employ 50 people at the center and ex-

Immigrant tycoon urges peers to invest in well-being of poor

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Continued from B1 Many of the meals are made with freshly ground hamburger and sausages made on-site each morning, Savage said. She and Taylor chose to open in Bend because Savage said she heard the city needed a sausage company. “We just have such great sausage,” she said. “I just figured there was no way (the pub and deli) could fail over there.” Cheerleaders relocated to a smaller space on North U.S. Highway 97 near The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center and Shilo Inn. With the down economy, owners Linda and Al Larson wanted a smaller space than the Third Street restaurant. For the past four years, they’ve closed at 2 p.m., no longer serving dinner — a decision that has helped the restaurant survive the recession, Linda Larson said. “It’s been a great move” to Highway 97, she said. Taylor’s will host live music on Fridays and open-mic nights on Thursdays, and always has Scrabble available for diners to play, Terry Taylor said. He said he’s working with state officials for approval to accept game meat from local hunters, which the owners would process for customers at the Taylor’s Sausage facility in Southern Oregon. The couple expects to host a grand opening event Oct. 16. The Taylor family doesn’t raise the meat it uses to make its sausages and other products, Savage said. “We wouldn’t be able to,” she said. “At the processing plant, we grind 4,200 pounds a day to make sausage.”

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Taylor’s

with microfinance had helped shape his views on the best way to tackle poverty. He has invested in commercial microfinance lenders and has donated to nonprofit ones, and he said that moneymaking versions had grown much faster and reached many more needy borrowers. Philanthropy experts say commercial companies play an important role in combating poverty by creating jobs. But they say these “social enterprises,” as they are sometimes known, cannot be solely relied upon to address the many entrenched causes of poverty. Moreover, as the fallout from the global financial crisis has made clear, the profit-maximizing tendencies of businesses can hurt society, said Phil Buchanan, president for the Center for Effective Philanthropy, a research organization based in Cambridge, Mass. Nonprofits are effective because they can “take issue with the unbridled pursuit of profit at the expense of people’s lives,” Buchanan said. “I think some of that gets lost in all of the hype around social enterprise.” Khosla says that he is not completely opposed to charities — that his fund may even donate to some nonprofit entities. But he says he is generally skeptical that nongovernmental organizations can accomplish much because they tend to drift away from what their donors wanted them to do. “I am relatively negative on most NGO’s and their effectiveness,” he said. “I am not negative on their intentions.”

incentives. While Google has been a “good corporate neighbor,” funding Wi-Fi downtown and donating computers to local schools, tax breaks are “a lazy way to recruit business.” Google spokeswoman Emily Wood said the company has hired more than 80 employees at the site and has “had an excellent experience in Lenoir.”

Expanded info to be required for boarding passes By Hannah Sampson McClatchy-Tribune News Service

No full name, date of birth or gender on your airline reservation? Then no boarding pass, according to a security rule that goes into effect soon. The final phase of the Transportation Security Administration’s Secure Flight program requires airlines to collect complete information from passengers at the time they book their flights. Passengers who do not enter all information at least 72 hours prior to departure will not be able to print out boarding passes. Instead, they will need to provide the information at the airline counter before a pass is issued. The rule applies to all travel commencing Nov. 1 on all flights on domestic airlines; international carriers are expected to be on board by the end of the year. The regulation is designed to aid TSA in vetting travelers against government watch lists — and to smooth the process for passengers who have names similar to those flagged as risks. “It makes it more efficient, and it provides that extra passenger convenience, which is that they don’t have to start supplying information at the airport to be vetted properly and to get their boarding pass,” said Sari Koshetz, a TSA spokeswoman. Here’s the information needed at booking: first, middle and last name as it appears on the government photo identification used for traveling; date of birth; and gender. Passengers who incorrectly have been identified as a flight risk must also enter their redress number. Airlines have been phasing in the additional information request for months now and say that travelers who regularly book online shouldn’t notice much of a difference. American Airlines spokesman Tim Smith said the full information has been requested but not required at the time of reservation until earlier this month, when the airline starting mandating it to complete a booking. The vast majority of customers complied, he said. “It’s pretty basic information for most people,” he said. “It’s much more likely to keep them off the extra screening list or even the no-fly list that TSA maintains.” American has sent e-mails to customers urging them to include all their information in their frequent flier accounts so they don’t have to enter it every time they book a flight.

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 B3

A W Hoping for a seasonal job? Start looking now By Diane Stafford McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It’s barely October. Halloween candy is filling store shelves. That means it’s time to get serious about seasonal jobs related to the end-of-the-year holidays. Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa shoppers make or break the fiscal year for retailers, and according to early indicators there will be more seasonal jobs available this year than in the last two. A survey of hiring managers by SnagAJob.com released last week found that half planned to hire temporary workers. That’s up 3 percentage points from 2009 and up 7 percentage points from 2008. Good news, but not great news yet. This year’s seasonal hiring still is likely to lag the 2007 total. (The recent recession officially began in December 2007.) But SnagAJob found another sign that 2010 looks better than the last two years. Retail hiring managers said they expect to bring on seasonal help earlier. In fact, 47 percent said they already started hiring in September — an 11 percentage point increase from last year. That’s what I meant about getting serious now. Average hourly pay is expected to be $10.60, according to the survey, up from $10.40 last year.

Getting the job What is going to help you stand out from the competition? • Apply in person if you can, presenting a friendly, positive, can-do attitude. • Have previous experience in the industry. • Be flexible about the shifts you’re willing to work. • Commit to the entire holiday season, including the postChristmas rush. • Show a passion, knowledge or loyalty to the company or products.

OTHER OPTIONS Retail jobs not your bag? Other seasonal job possibilities include shipping companies, photo studios, restaurants, catering companies and even tax preparers. April isn’t all that far away.

Getting more done in less time By Cindy Krischer Goodman McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Jessica Kizorek used to start her day by reading email and responding until she noticed she wasn’t getting to the priorities on her to-do list. “Half the day had gone by and e-mail had sucked the juice out of me.” To break the habit, Kizorek, founder of BadassBusinessWoman.org, challenged herself to be more productive, cutting back to only four work hours a day. The rest she allocated to leisure. Instead of planning business meetings at Starbucks, she had phone conversations. “It’s amazing when you see what you can cut out, what doesn’t go directly into making you money. You only see that when you force yourself to work smarter, not longer,” she says. How often are you asking yourself if you are spending your workday being productive or just being busy? Most likely, the answer is not often enough. Even as the average workweek expands, worker productivity in the United States is on a slide, a new Labor Department study shows. In the most recent quarter, the measure of employee output per hour fell at a 0.9 percent annual rate, while hours worked climbed at a 3.6 percent rate. During our workdays, we’re answering e-mails, we’re responding to text messages, we’re chatting with coworkers, we’re blogging and twittering. We’re spending more than 3 billion minutes on Facebook each day. We’re putting in longer hours but we’re not necessarily landing more business or moving closer to our goals. “We’re focusing on the urgent at the expense of the important,” says Dan Markovitz, president of TimeBack Management. “People feel overwhelmed. Some is real, some is psychological. They never feel like they are caught up because they aren’t getting to the important stuff.”

Less e-mail Most of us could learn a lot from the hyper-efficient entrepreneur or business executive. They make lists, they set goals, they delegate, they work in blocks of time. They don’t start their day in their Inbox. When Carol Greenberg Brook arrives at the office, she’s already read her e-

Peter Andrew Bosch / Miami Herald

Michelle Villalobos, left, and Jessica Kizorek have different strategies for getting more done while working and being more productive versus just appearing to be busy.

Tips for being more productive • Identify priorities. Miami productivity expert Michelle Villalobos suggests you write down each day the one thing that would make a huge difference in your career. Do that task first. • Create deadlines. Villalobos says you are more likely to stay focused if you have a set amount of time to finish a task. • Manage interruptions. Figure out what or who is interrupting you. Is it instant messages? Is it your co-worker? Is if phone calls? Figure out how you can stop them. Consider using computer programs that block use of certain sites during the workday. • Designate set e-mail time. Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek, says people often assume their boss wants immediate response. He found most executives appreciate when workers limit e-mail use to certain times of the day to be more productive. • Streamline tasks. Amy Gross, founder of Gotfamilygetorganized.com, stays productive by lumping errands together by location. She also sets a block of time for phone calls and another for paperwork. • Say no. Stever Robbins, author of “Get-It-Done Guy’s 9 Steps to Work Less and Do More,” says get rid of poor uses of time. This may require delegating, outsourcing or changing habits. • Limit e-mail. Dan Markovitz gives himself three chips a day, each worth half-hour of e-mail time. When the chips are used up, he’s done with e-mail.

mails, flagged the priorities and sent them to her assistant to print out and create a to-do list. As cofounder and president of Continental Real Estate Companies, she walks into her Coral Gables, Fla., office focused on what needs to get done. That usually includes delegating and guiding staff on how to spend their time wisely. “I’m a good communicator. I pull myself back from mi-

Self Referrals Welcome

nutia and give direction.” Experts say the biggest mistake most workers make is starting the day out reading e-mail. Instead, do the important to-dos in the first hour of work. “Ask yourself, if that’s the only thing I accomplish, will I be satisfied with my day?” says Timothy Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek. He says what’s most important, typically, is the task

you’re most uncomfortable doing — having a conversation with your boss or a challenging customer. “We need to reprogram ourselves from ‘more is better’ to making better decisions about how we spend our time.”

Tracking your time Ricky Arriola, CEO of Intel Direct in Miami, is among the highly productive. He runs a 700-person company and chairs Miami’s Adrian Arsht Performing Arts Center. He says being in good shape and exercising gives him energy to stay productive. Weekly, he writes down his goals and includes deadlines and an action plan. He knows what he must do himself, and what to delegate. “The goal is to not get caught up in things that consume my time, but don’t get me a whole lot of productivity. I want to focus on the big things.” Arriola carefully scrutinizes whom he gives face time. “When things come up and people want my attention, I have to measure what they want with whether it will further my goal. If not, then I think before I get involved.” He says this takes instilling discipline in his staff, teaching them to only request a meeting when

it’s something only he uniquely can handle. “Otherwise I push back.” Experts believe the secret to being productive is to track how you spend your day. One woman I know tracked her hours for a week to figure out why she was busy, but not making money. She discovered she was spending 10 hours a week driving to see clients. She hadn’t been billing them for drive time. “It doesn’t have to be a monumental analysis,” Markovitz says. “It doesn’t even have to be consecutive days. You just need five or six days of data.” The next step is asking why you are spending time on each task and getting rid of what isn’t working. RescueTime is software that can track how you spend your time. One executive who used it realized that even though he was reading and responding to e-mail only a couple of minutes at a time, it was adding up to a couple of hours a day. When Stever Robbins, author of “Get-It-Done Guy’s 9 Steps to Work Less and Do More,” scrutinized his time use, he found he was attending networking events for a group, but had never picked up a single client. Robbins says he faced up to recognizing the events as social and decided he would rather spend time hosting a dinner party. After assessing how you spend your time, you should decide how you should be allocating it, what is essential to your success or organization’s success. This often requires a talk with the boss for guidance. Once it is clear, you will want to make those tasks visible — as a PostIt on your computer screen. Clearly, the biggest challenge is avoiding distractions and staying focused. Ferriss says when people get overwhelmed, they often turn to reading e-mail as a default, instead of being proactive. He suggests sticking to set times to read e-mail. Ferriss insists the key to productivity is asking, “Why?” “Do you want more income, more time with the kids? If you are doing something and you are having fun, you’re not wasting time.”

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B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL n APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATC Tech ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accenture AcmePkt h AcordaTh Actel ActivIden ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom ADAM AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlldHlthcr AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altisrce n Altria AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmPubEd AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Angiotc gh Anglgld 13 AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g

7.83 +.03 18.97 +.76 0.48 21.48 +.47 0.54 21.94 +.61 1.28 59.50 +1.40 12.67 +.02 11.68 +.31 1.20 52.74 +1.29 38.38 +1.27 1.08 9.95 +.08 0.20 13.85 +.27 18.92 +.05 1.12 27.10 +.09 6.11 +.15 24.96 +.73 5.78 +.09 0.27 30.31 +.50 1.68 29.36 +.50 24.81 +.06 13.49 +.18 10.46 +.16 1.76 +.03 0.18 13.87 +.15 6.85 +.38 0.05 17.13 -.83 1.62 +.06 1.76 53.08 +.57 0.70 38.81 +.89 0.42 6.93 +.01 11.12 +.38 53.05 +.26 2.93 +.14 21.43 +.93 0.72 19.47 +.44 0.90 45.15 +.76 37.98 +1.07 31.13 -.19 20.90 -.05 2.20 1.39 +.04 0.15 11.35 +.36 0.04 22.88 +.57 0.52 44.46 +.66 16.28 +.69 6.68 +.22 25.77 +.17 0.36 36.27 +.76 0.25 4.30 +.17 0.24 58.67 +.89 3.66 +.01 13.15 +.39 6.98 +.04 1.01 -.08 0.06 4.20 +.11 6.37 +.02 2.02 -.11 24.37 +.45 0.04 17.72 +.74 6.20 +.25 11.96 +.20 23.69 +.73 1.30 +.02 0.04 31.06 +.56 82.55 +3.48 6.34 +.22 4.42 +.13 2.51 -.02 33.04 +.45 0.18 72.94 +2.61 0.11 76.22 +2.47 1.96 84.20 +2.13 6.41 +.31 0.40 8.48 +.24 1.00 68.32 +.07 7.35 +.01 0.18 29.16 +.91 47.91 +.52 4.05 +.12 48.86 +.29 0.86 10.19 +.32 0.56 48.14 +1.44 0.34 37.52 -.13 3.46 +.15 0.12 12.14 +.22 3.95 168.00 +1.07 30.33 +.33 1.26 35.34 +.97 1.40 72.35 +.91 4.80 +.25 66.31 +2.75 2.75 -.24 19.50 +.18 14.92 +.24 0.60 24.68 +.23 0.72 47.43 +1.96 0.20 66.62 +1.46 65.04 +1.62 4.25 +.11 0.48 8.41 -.01 2.06 27.10 +.68 1.58 36.60 +.11 2.63 +.21 1.34 -.01 27.61 +.52 0.80 55.89 +.31 4.34 +.06 4.50 +.05 18.10 -.09 0.80 32.38 +.68 3.15 +.04 12.23 +.12 42.85 +1.33 2.21 +.03 0.40 6.85 +.22 0.66 5.53 +.09 15.58 +.04 .66 +.00 0.24 29.98 +.22 0.48 20.17 +.52 27.58 -1.99 1.52 24.25 +.42 25.38 +.68 1.90 +.06 4.23 129.05 +3.16 2.57 -.02 160.87 +5.48 .59 +.04 29.39 +.69 24.16 +.69 1.54 29.04 +.38 41.60 +.94 1.31 54.30 -.12 1.29 -.03 8.91 +.33 1.35 31.41 +.54 5.60 27.01 +.06 5.89 +.23 0.44 15.06 -.15 1.68 36.34 +.14 0.08 10.56 +.31 0.72 38.28 -.77 0.65 30.94 +.65 0.56 19.43 +.64 6.38 8.51 +.13 39.94 +.66 1.93 24.20 +.05 19.87 +.59 8.41 +.29 2.40 -.02 32.86 +.65 33.46 +1.58 51.88 +.82 0.84 23.69 +.22 10.55 +.12 0.72 49.48 +1.61 0.32 31.50 +.76 0.24 49.23 +1.42 56.12 +1.07 6.92 +.41 0.06 50.15 +1.90 18.90 +1.59 21.74 +.51 0.36 57.47 +1.17 5.87 +.08 0.88 32.01 +.98 .47 +.01 3.00 54.03 +.88 0.18 47.00 +.86 0.49 59.30 +1.71 3.25 55.98 +2.66 20.89 +.53 2.60 17.71 +.06 1.17 +.11 42.56 +1.27 1.49 +.05 0.92 7.38 +.08 0.60 39.67 +.47 8.94 +.25 0.60 98.90 +1.89 3.00 58.36 +.72 0.40 22.24 +.61 50.49 +.28 1.12 10.44 +.24 288.94+10.30 0.68 31.48 +.96 0.28 11.86 +.37 9.20 -.09 12.12 +.57 0.62 20.49 +.06 5.12 +.10 0.75 33.24 +1.12 0.40 26.47 +.26 0.60 32.38 +.77 43.47 -.02 1.72 +.01 1.40 15.64 -.10 3.85 +.05 19.65 +.49 0.12 19.20 +.04 40.55 +.63 3.43 +.19 9.89 +.16 26.89 +.70 4.43 +.24 0.24 15.62 +.54 21.30 +.78 16.39 +1.02 3.59 +.08 9.84 +.46 0.60 50.66 +2.71 19.93 +.35 0.60 30.23 +.49 10.87 +.24 0.04 13.47 +.43 0.68 14.08 +.18 0.64 41.36 +.95 0.18 18.03 +.63 0.52 13.57 +.02 2.41 51.65 +.74 33.55 +.67 26.60 +.96 51.51 +2.13 29.59 +.54 18.30 +.58 8.40 +.42 1.34 29.43 +.03 30.04 -.08 3.84 +.17 6.98 +.18

Nm AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfD BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo rs BioSante BioScrip BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blckbaud Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BonTon Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch h CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CDC Cp rs CEVA Inc CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive Cal-Maine CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapitolBcp CapFedF CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh

D 23.59 +.08 32.71 +1.33 1.40 66.50 +1.50 1.36 42.16 +.41 233.33 +2.70 26.89 +1.71 22.45 +.14 3.57 106.57 +.57 3.16 -.05 0.80 37.73 +1.05 11.80 +.09 1.00 21.34 +.34 27.20 +.59 0.88 32.13 +.60 1.89 +.05 0.84 33.66 +.83 0.60 24.29 +.22 0.68 10.10 +.24 1.83 32.70 -.02 31.16 +.94 0.42 6.40 +.29 1.74 78.20 +1.82 1.74 66.13 +1.95 41.86 +.18 40.14 -.14 41.33 +.51 3.43 -.04 1.50 42.30 +.23 0.10 16.06 +.30 4.21 +.27 21.25 -.27 102.70 +6.48 0.60 43.87 +1.05 0.68 40.62 +1.39 0.40 60.50 +1.51 35.23 +.77 0.16 11.02 +.02 1.34 66.97 +1.26 0.57 13.99 +.77 0.51 21.23 +.80 0.81 13.18 +.73 0.33 14.63 +.55 0.88 14.15 +.25 0.04 13.56 +.41 1.55 22.32 +.06 6.79 +.21 2.52 +.16 1.80 45.41 +.91 1.04 3.69 +.07 2.80 58.72 +1.06 0.36 26.46 +.25 1.96 53.94 +1.00 .98 +.01 0.04 2.10 -.03 23.63 +.31 79.16 +1.07 2.03 25.89 +.09 0.22 19.70 +.71 84.93 -1.87 16.43 -.94 0.72 83.20 +1.75 1.00 16.24 +.37 0.32 17.62 +.51 0.48 47.32 +1.34 9.16 +.53 1.16 48.33 +.75 .31 -.01 14.58 +.36 4.21 +.05 1.00 6.90 +.05 0.72 47.15 -.38 1.48 74.87 +1.20 43.50 +.37 6.20 +.11 0.92 33.12 +.91 16.79 +.78 0.28 27.19 +.32 83.43 +1.32 0.30 32.42 +1.32 0.60 40.88 +.63 32.94 -.24 36.89 +.84 4.52 -.23 2.40 +.45 57.53 +.87 22.40 +.21 0.68 18.90 +.38 1.06 1.67 +.01 5.30 +.02 1.44 32.25 +.62 1.28 11.87 +.17 0.44 24.46 +.65 36.34 +.80 4.00 171.31 +.40 20.00 -.02 0.32 3.97 -.01 1.36 10.71 +.16 1.09 13.12 +.40 0.40 12.67 +.27 0.60 12.71 +.30 13.56 +.78 22.85 -.35 2.04 33.04 +.14 1.68 68.60 +2.27 6.65 +.19 10.44 +.38 1.27 +.09 53.28 +1.21 0.04 6.68 +.19 2.00 85.08 +1.51 6.24 +.16 0.22 11.36 +.01 7.53 +.29 0.60 12.15 +.05 20.67 +.77 15.20 -.43 0.44 18.81 +.43 19.99 +1.07 7.17 +.33 1.74 +.12 0.56 19.25 +.03 0.40 23.39 +.61 1.28 27.14 +.41 0.32 35.96 +.92 0.60 22.88 +.04 2.01 +.14 5.76 +.08 16.37 +.34 0.52 28.84 +.38 0.56 16.77 +.36 0.34 10.09 +.16 6.68 +.21 0.31 20.27 +.31 0.28 11.70 +.41 1.20 62.18 +.43 14.58 +.44 0.05 16.01 +1.15 0.16 14.87 +.53 0.80 26.58 +.13 0.10 72.20 +3.49 0.42 47.47 +2.41 49.47 +.91 0.92 57.84 +.21 0.25 23.95 +.04 .28 -.10 0.16 21.61 +.43 18.03 +.34 0.80 13.55 +.16 0.40 20.83 +.44 0.20 16.66 +.27 4.52 +.21 15.63 +1.41 0.40 98.03 +3.92 15.96 +.30 1.00 70.89 +1.35 0.04 35.82 +.66 40.71 +.49 5.01 +.04 1.00 30.26 +.53 4.60 267.63 +7.73 0.84 18.55 +.28 37.31 +1.53 5.42 +.16 5.28 208.41 +4.35 0.26 23.80 +.52 1.04 56.06 +1.61 0.26 22.54 +.63 0.34 7.61 +.11 0.35 32.06 +.63 19.03 -.08 0.50 26.85 +.53 0.72 33.48 +.89 0.12 30.72 +.95 8.73 +.33 7.76 +.26 5.30 +.10 0.95 27.89 -.19 0.60 8.11 +.08 0.63 8.89 +.08 15.19 +.61 13.40 -.10 0.04 7.27 +.21 4.49 +.24 4.72 +.18 12.75 +.11 3.36 -.03 1.80 48.44 +.02 0.28 28.18 +.56 19.07 +1.72 43.48 +1.39 1.10 35.95 +.01 3.48 74.88 +1.85 1.08 64.81 +.98 0.30 36.76 +1.20 1.08 62.01 +1.52 14.63 +.02 .34 -.01 47.85 +1.06 4.72 +.09 0.20 40.39 +1.82 0.04 5.35 +.13 1.21 +.10 2.00 24.03 +.02 1.66 10.99 +.08 .79 +.05 0.78 32.95 +.77 .54 +.01 15.47 +.50 24.85 +.43 21.01 +.15 0.68 31.03 +.98 27.77 +.04 0.40 39.86 +1.77 0.72 34.98 +.36 24.40 +.31 26.19 +.38 0.54 41.31 +.31 4.39 +.20 35.81 +1.15 1.76 79.40 +2.13 0.04 12.47 +.28 29.71 +.77 0.25 13.84 +.42 0.36 6.40 +.26 .67 +.01 0.20 32.94 +1.37 6.60 -.01 8.70 +.30 58.72 +1.35 .39 +.01

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D 3.24 31.52 +.74 4.73 +.81 0.43 8.49 +.18 0.86 17.32 +.39 0.80 29.49 +.09 23.41 +.58 0.78 16.03 +.25 0.03 16.36 +.76 1.56 13.84 +.52 21.46 +.37 24.88 +.68 0.01 17.20 +.45 13.26 +.47 2.90 40.09 +.57 5.03 +.18 63.10 +.95 19.82 +1.54 86.14 +1.42 3.84 +.06 33.11 +.46 3.61 +.15 21.13 +.89 37.83 +1.11 27.50 +1.18 5.53 +.04 2.68 +.05 1.70 19.24 +.40 0.30 22.32 +.04 2.88 83.39 +2.08 24.53 +.75 0.16 10.24 +.02 51.95 +1.44 0.69 4.06 11.84 -.81 16.40 +.28 10.33 -.13 4.42 -.12 9.63 +.29 .28 -.00 6.58 +.08 14.83 +.88 1.54 64.30 +4.17 9.98 +.27 0.55 12.06 -.29 14.48 +.57 1.85 52.99 +1.24 0.28 4.45 -.04 11.08 +.65 6.70 -.44 1.63 +.02 5.61 3.68 +.20 0.23 15.06 +.36 7.08 -.36 0.35 19.57 +.57 27.36 +.01 1.50 +.19 178.98 +6.02 13.63 +.41 0.24 6.60 +.06 1.48 56.57 +.48 1.27 22.54 +.10 0.68 68.40 +.72 3.15 +.11 15.44 +.08 0.32 70.34 +1.94 2.65 +.07 1.60 29.47 +.59 0.72 16.67 +.34 0.48 27.64 +.48 17.12 +.03 21.99 +.23 2.13 26.54 +.14 4.13 +.10 .97 +.02 70.00 +2.59 0.40 53.46 +1.50 0.42 39.42 +1.58 3.49 +.10 1.56 +.07 13.91 +.65 7.77 +.08 5.45 +.31 0.56 66.11 +1.99 2.20 66.69 +.02 18.50 +.12 0.60 43.65 +.75 9.43 -.07 22.32 +.31 1.76 59.66 +.78 20.08 +.83 10.73 -.01 0.24 27.22 +1.23 65.94 +1.29 0.40 23.07 +1.36 0.96 16.18 +.28 0.72 8.07 +.20 1.20 13.30 +.11 44.40 +1.23 5.14 +.06 2.12 74.92 -1.50 16.01 +.08 0.60 17.08 +.38 0.04 19.17 +.61 1.16 +.04 0.38 18.07 +.41 0.38 17.01 +.39 0.20 38.66 +1.55 0.94 38.60 +1.04 0.48 14.69 +.45 10.63 +.98 2.00 25.99 +.19 23.49 +.41 31.51 +.97 27.69 +1.23 0.69 72.69 +1.83 17.29 -1.22 22.74 +.36 0.50 5.89 +.91 0.60 46.40 +1.05 8.92 +.38 22.76 +.81 1.00 28.28 +1.00 0.40 30.88 +.70 0.92 22.32 +.32 13.49 +.35 68.90 +1.67 51.16 +1.82 1.62 +.01 5.00 +.30 2.20 58.79 +1.53 0.40 38.48 +.91 2.38 48.41 +.34 20.72 -.03 17.76 +.10 0.96 31.56 +.31 48.65 +2.09 10.75 +.14 .42 -.01 0.06 47.50 +.82 1.08 49.72 +1.47 0.42 19.51 +.72 2.30 28.30 +.38 33.49 +.73 1.09 24.34 +1.13 0.24 87.00 +.16 18.03 -.43 16.02 -.05 7.17 +.21 0.56 38.15 +.79 0.20 18.51 +.59 1.65 38.29 +.52 24.95 +.28 11.92 +.35 4.63 +.46 0.82 64.66 +.10 7.89 +.11 29.11 -1.88 0.16 7.25 +.27 46.71 +.01 1.50 15.80 +.16 21.01 +.25 0.80 40.57 +.79 0.88 52.48 +1.36 0.92 38.96 +.61 7.01 +.22 1.70 119.11 +3.51 1.98 27.58 +.08 1.85 44.19 +1.27 0.32 2.93 +.04 54.15 +1.86 13.56 +.52 8.05 +.23 13.34 +.52 44.06 +.45 28.95 +.18 .35 -.01 47.55 +1.23 23.98 +.79 1.80 53.78 +.90 1.05 92.24 +2.55 1.41 +.05 137.85 +1.46 118.91 +.27 27.21 +1.67 1.63 -.05 3.79 -.01 12.97 +.20 2.40 13.42 +.01 .82 0.05 58.20 +2.22 2.66 +.07 0.28 4.86 +.13 20.86 +.64 1.21 26.45 +.17 0.15 10.84 -.14 0.60 44.95 +.46 2.24 47.01 +.67 0.96 18.91 +1.57 0.96 14.32 +.88 12.87 +.71 0.08 40.78 +1.06 1.28 44.01 +1.01 8.60 +.29 69.21 +.97 0.20 49.75 +1.65 10.80 +.19 1.84 +.05 52.53 +2.75 9.75 -.09 1.20 71.30 +2.68 0.36 13.76 +.32 7.40 +.20 13.40 +.50 11.83 +.32 .79 +.03 1.00 19.20 +.41 10.53 -.12 17.04 +.80 41.22 +.23 1.73 +.03 3.31 +.16 0.20 32.11 +.99 4.62 +.29 0.93 56.54 +2.30 38.42 +1.43 9.02 -.37 0.08 12.20 +.29 0.64 65.38 +1.03 11.12 +.12 13.29 +.02

Nm

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2.38 70.23 +.90 0.50 66.87 +1.61 0.03 10.15 +.39 12.70 +.19 28.51 +.66 1.08 32.14 +.91 2.12 62.27 +1.29 34.91 +.52 31.80 +1.23 0.16 23.96 +.42 17.81 +.70 41.84 +.11 6.26 34.58 +2.13 5.68 37.83 +1.98 33.01 -2.38 24.36 -2.30 0.20 21.63 -1.13 39.91 -2.84 0.01 31.43 +1.85 24.53 -1.34 12.47 -.82 22.75 +1.31 7.35 34.57 +.54 3.41 51.71 +2.41 9.91 -.89 4.77 49.75 +3.84 11.78 -.77 8.06 55.26 +3.12 5.06 35.30 +2.24 0.08 16.88 +.59 43.89 +1.29 38.39 +1.01 .21 +.01 2.00 19.63 +.57 0.35 33.83 +.69 9.53 +.26 0.24 33.99 +.10 9.65 -1.24 59.92 +2.15 9.23 +.06 29.24 +.30 50.00 +.08 49.06 +.83 1.83 44.58 +.69 13.25 +.16 1.00 67.28 +3.54 0.50 47.10 +.84 1.04 17.46 +.71 1.56 +.07 1.65 -.07 0.40 17.98 +.03 1.10 54.32 +2.20 0.60 28.47 +1.00 1.00 35.49 +.85 6.26 -.11 31.63 +.36 23.68 +.35 37.46 +.78 0.52 4.51 +.01 64.00 +1.90 1.89 +.05 4.66 +.05 1.64 45.77 +1.35 0.48 26.07 +.75 0.84 12.62 -.24 0.98 17.74 -.01 0.68 11.85 +.17 1.40 74.99 +1.09 13.26 +.41 2.69 +.13 2.34 +.07 10.42 +.42 1.86 +.05 5.60 -.08 4.69 -.07

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0.25 19.00 14.84 +.38 24.59 +.51 21.92 +.38 20.41 +.40 25.21 +.71 2.51 44.26 +1.13 0.62 97.33 +1.61 0.14 12.10 -.09 0.88 36.81 +.60 5.23 +.18 0.40 23.37 +.47 0.10 6.43 +.15 0.64 8.63 +.01 0.04 16.71 +.54 1.76 76.17 +2.09 4.14 +.18 2.32 83.42 +2.13 0.64 29.87 +.98 1.80 14.10 +.13 1.29 16.09 +.39 1.23 14.18 +.23 1.62 11.77 +.17 1.53 11.12 +.20 1.56 12.69 -.01 24.78 +1.00 0.62 52.10 +1.33 1.34 43.80 +2.40 1.26 35.02 +.33 14.31 -.06 0.20 7.41 +.14 67.70 +1.19 2.40 +.14 0.04 12.53 +.36 1.60 32.15 -.01 5.59 +.05 0.05 18.67 +.44 17.82 +.86 14.30 +.15 0.38 28.80 +.79 .86 +.08 12.08 +.26 1.34 53.80 +.72 0.24 15.75 +.49 10.40 +.21 4.11 57.89 +.84 1.70 53.89 +.98 0.80 29.96 +.24 1.33 +.05 4.26 +.17 33.90 +.76 1.00 39.85 +.49 3.75 -.01 30.30 +.06 0.52 46.00 +.52 69.76 +1.23 4.94 -.17 1.00 -.12 2.16 37.76 +.49 3.58 48.16 -.24 24.28 +1.03 4.84 +.08 2.16 26.46 +.25 0.68 23.81 +.04 25.82 +1.28 1.40 44.71 +.74 4.78 +.20 3.32 77.64 +.98 2.30 40.31 +.08 .30 +.01 2.60 44.87 +.70 9.68 +.32 11.41 +.37 9.11 +.39 0.16 31.42 +.68 105.09 +3.99 0.88 17.49 +.21 1.35 48.89 +.66 0.28 11.01 +.20 0.55 63.77 +.84 22.75 +.82 0.20 18.87 +1.85 1.92 86.65 +1.47 1.26 -.04 .68 -.02 7.57 +.57 5.96 +.12 5.64 +.18 0.16 14.99 +.58 4.10 +.12 2.10 42.91 +.20 6.02 +.02 4.90 +.09 0.28 28.30 +1.13 0.40 47.48 +1.88 48.97 +1.07 2.19 +.03 23.97 +1.20 0.33 16.73 +.50 3.15 +.16 1.76 63.26 +1.07 20.12 +.85 111.50 +5.61 3.19 +.03 25.28 +.22 0.50 69.60 +1.73 69.69 +2.18 0.48 8.90 +.38 2.86 +.22 35.10 +.24 4.47 +.35 0.92 82.33 +1.96 9.44 +.39 2.87 +.01 0.62 45.34 +.97 0.84 53.99 +1.35 0.48 87.83 +2.40 2.68 84.25 +1.34 0.24 5.40 +.09 0.96 23.26 +.21 4.76 +.18 13.32 +.74 4.56 +.35 17.49 +.18 0.72 14.77 -.03 0.20 26.85 +.28 1.26 11.25 +.27 0.04 12.51 +.61 19.40 +.90 0.16 14.62 +.34 0.24 13.90 -.05 .28 +.01 27.65 +.94 0.04 5.62 +.15 0.72 11.41 +.09 5.20 +.21 0.04 12.11 +.61 0.56 11.93 +.14 142.63 +.36 0.06 17.35 +.33 0.08 16.71 +.34 2.20 38.82 +.25 0.64 18.98 +.66 54.43 +.79 5.20 +.21 2.33 +.38 0.16 10.00 +.15 6.15 +.18 1.50 +.05 0.80 25.40 +.19 1.16 111.11 +2.53 0.50 51.74 +2.08 25.47 +.77 0.32 51.60 +.32

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D 0.60 14.88 +.02 5.21 +.15 13.01 +.17 4.86 +.10 3.25 49.28 +.38 12.89 +.17 31.31 +.54 31.00 +.99 8.68 +.40 25.53 3.75 +.22 0.76 50.97 +1.37 54.14 +1.39 24.37 +.59 1.77 22.13 +.65 0.88 112.03 +5.21 0.76 12.91 +.43 1.20 91.18 +3.95 .03 -.01 0.81 62.00 +.06 21.78 +.31 7.36 +.26 0.75 8.39 +.21 13.42 +.31 1.90 27.79 +.53 38.69 +.12 1.21 0.28 20.38 +.68 0.12 9.29 +.16 6.48 -.17 9.13 +.23 1.12 29.88 +1.05 0.20 4.97 +.35 4.50 1.84 23.35 +.26 4.88 +.16 25.07 +.75 8.47 +.16 4.14 -.21 32.23 +1.02 0.84 14.09 +.21 0.48 5.12 +.15 1.68 17.48 +.15 0.14 17.22 +.69 1.28 26.48 +.26 20.24 +.35 6.99 +.18 0.16 12.60 +.31 0.40 18.68 +.28 1.50 30.19 +.46 30.87 +.95 .30 +.00 31.39 +.99 48.62 +.52 16.38 +.77 4.96 +.28 26.65 +.88 1.68 63.41 +1.66 0.48 16.51 +.41 16.04 +.10 0.32 4.65 +.09 1.12 37.22 +.23 3.70 +.14 2.86 -.02 .48 -.01 44.00 +2.04 0.18 17.93 +.28 0.44 20.13 +.57 21.37 +.37 1.64 44.68 +.25 .59 +.01 12.40 +.35 71.52 +.51 24.59 +.88 16.71 +.83 0.21 13.65 +.13 5.39 +.22 1.99 +.05 28.46 +.50 36.02 +.66 0.52 14.84 +.49 1.98 40.55 +.76 1.69 +.09 0.40 6.50 +.30 4.05 +.04 5.65 +.31 0.08 41.90 +.25 1.06 44.75 +.97 19.20 +.68 1.71 +.10 0.15 14.21 -.02 0.40 16.72 +.40 0.16 15.80 +.58 0.09 22.94 +2.24 0.18 44.09 +1.17 21.67 +1.02 5.11 +.20 1.40 149.57 +3.00 1.08 75.28 +2.17 15.10 +.38 10.87 +.31 538.23+15.88 1.64 26.88 +.29 28.90 +1.03 0.80 32.51 +1.10 16.13 +.63 2.16 121.69 +3.44 1.84 -.10 7.48 -.06 22.10 +.38 0.92 23.46 +.61 3.37 +.07 4.09 +.14 2.44 +.04 0.07 6.01 +.19 0.83 18.93 +.11 45.08 -1.02 29.34 +.93 12.51 +.53 1.80 78.65 +.49 31.02 +1.45 1.25 +.03 10.20 +.23 0.52 21.51 +2.60 0.64 39.82 +.27 0.38 23.39 +.48 0.51 46.17 +.91 14.21 +.46 .66 +.04 51.33 +3.09 0.58 26.04 +.21 1.86 36.23 +.48 1.70 52.96 +1.28 2.03 27.79 +.05 27.14 +.13 30.82 +.98 0.36 34.06 +1.03 7.92 +.33 26.63 +.88 1.28 +.03 1.00 45.80 +.28 1.49 +.05 46.98 +1.31 18.43 +.81 0.40 32.09 +2.67 34.24 +1.06 7.10 +.20 0.07 11.84 +.60 1.00 44.81 +1.00 0.82 24.88 +1.01 0.20 23.77 +.52 15.16 +.41 3.91 +.06 11.08 +.52 1.00 45.79 +1.24 4.60 29.05 -.08 1.24 22.90 +.39 5.85 +.10 3.77 +.14 2.76 48.77 +1.03 7.64 +.24 1.20 23.81 +.37 25.81 +.20 19.50 +.62 26.19 +.71 6.55 +1.15 11.67 +.43 0.08 14.92 +.49 3.95 +.15 6.61 +.36 1.80 47.76 +.40 11.58 +.51 0.24 41.13 +.80 .54 +.02 58.63 +1.59 1.00 61.75 +1.54 2.60 -.03 0.20 5.31 +.19 1.28 48.10 +.47 10.14 +.20 0.40 61.42 +1.93 0.32 40.81 +.17 18.72 +.97 25.54 +.86 21.25 +.98 24.97 +.46

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D 1.70 0.41 0.75 0.60 0.95 2.32 1.21 0.84

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I-J-K-L IAC Inter 26.86 +.63 IAMGld g 0.06 17.75 +.49 ICICI Bk 0.53 51.72 +.72 IESI-BFC g 0.50 22.60 +.04 iGateCorp 0.11 17.87 +.37 ING GRE 0.54 7.61 +.13 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.37 +.09 ING 10.68 +.52 ING 8.5cap 2.13 26.36 +.19 INGPrRTr 0.32 5.72 +.01 ION Geoph 5.01 +.18 iShGold s 13.12 +.25 iShGSCI 30.72 +.52 iSAstla 0.81 24.32 +.54 iSAstria 0.76 20.46 +.56 iShBraz 2.58 79.68 +1.52 iSCan 0.42 28.72 +.57 iShEMU 0.96 35.55 +1.24 iShGer 0.30 22.35 +.59 iSh HK 0.48 18.52 +.12 iShJapn 0.16 10.03 +.31 iSh Kor 0.39 55.16 +.59 iSMalas 0.25 13.91 +.19 iShMex 0.75 54.94 +.82 iShSing 0.38 13.62 +.16 iSPacxJpn 1.37 45.37 +.74 iShSoAfr 1.36 68.81 +1.63 iSSpain 2.26 42.25 +1.96 iSTaiwn 0.21 13.62 +.06 iSh UK 0.44 16.84 +.32 iShThai 1.20 62.96 +.99 iShChile 0.68 74.20 +.16 iShTurkey 1.22 72.31 +2.85 iShSilver 22.34 +.83 iShS&P100 1.08 52.39 +1.00 iShDJDv 1.69 47.60 +.82 iShBTips 2.65 110.09 +.70 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 62.47 +.79 iShChina25 0.68 44.27 +.92 iShDJTr 1.01 82.43 +1.96 iSSP500 2.34 116.39 +2.25 iShBAgB 3.75 108.44 iShEMkts 0.59 46.11 +.82 iShiBxB 5.35 112.52 +.23 iSh ACWI 0.64 44.19 +1.03 iSEafeSC 0.89 39.15 +.73 iShEMBd 5.64 111.72 +.76 iSSPGth 1.13 60.20 +1.18 iSSPGlbEn 0.82 34.81 +.74 iShSPLatA 1.22 51.82 +1.14 iSSPVal 1.24 55.29 +1.08 iShB20 T 3.82 104.25 -.63 iShB7-10T 3.77 99.20 +.02 iShB1-3T 1.10 84.37 +.04 iS Eafe 1.38 56.22 +1.55 iSRusMCV 0.83 41.12 +.84 iSRusMCG 0.52 50.55 +1.14 iShRsMd 1.42 91.78 +1.94 iSSPMid 0.99 81.02 +1.66 iShiBxHYB 7.98 89.23 +.32 iShSemi 0.44 47.80 +1.19 iShNsdqBio 87.41 +1.68 iShC&SRl 1.85 63.74 +.98 iSSPGlb 1.42 59.65 +1.35 iSR1KV 1.28 60.09 +1.15 iSR1KG 0.72 52.13 +1.01 iSRus1K 1.11 64.18 +1.25 iSR2KV 1.06 63.13 +1.62 iSR2KG 0.47 76.24 +2.16 iShR2K 0.79 68.84 +1.90 iShBShtT 0.08 110.22 +.02 iShUSPfd 2.91 39.49 +.06 iShDJTel 0.67 22.22 +.41 iShREst 1.88 54.29 +.70 iShFnSc 0.59 53.30 +1.09 iShSPSm 0.58 60.31 +1.65 iShBasM 0.91 66.37 +1.89 iShDJOG 0.20 53.18 +1.22 iShEur350 1.02 38.82 +1.10 iSSCVal 0.79 63.47 +1.78 iShSCGrth 0.38 63.72 +1.72 iStar 3.26 +.20 ITC Hold 1.34 61.77 +.16 ITT Corp 1.00 47.71 +1.25 ITT Ed 68.52 +.96 Icon PLC 21.86 +.32 IconixBr 17.90 +.71 IdenixPh 3.40 +.28 IDEX 0.60 36.42 +1.25 Ikanos 1.16 +.01 ITW 1.36 48.10 +1.30 Illumina 51.16 +1.39 Imax Corp 17.87 +.21 Immucor 20.30 +.84 ImunoGn 6.49 +.23 Imunmd 3.35 +.11 ImpaxLabs 20.79 +.60 Incyte 16.79 +.85 IndiaFd 0.09 37.97 +.78 Inergy 2.82 40.35 +.09 Infinera 11.68 +.39 Informat 38.44 +.93 InfosysT 0.54 69.73 +.92 IngerRd 0.28 37.16 +1.10 IngrmM 17.25 +.40 InlandRE 0.57 8.41 +.22 InovioPhm 1.29 +.08 InspPhar 6.22 +.17 Insulet 15.07 +.62 IntgDv 5.94 +.24 ISSI 8.66 +.16 IntegrysE 2.72 52.97 +.94 Intel 0.63 19.15 +.28 InteractBrk 17.31 -.02 IntcntlEx 111.30 +3.94 InterDig 29.94 +.33 Intrface 0.04 14.30 +.05 Intermec 12.24 +.36 InterMune 13.77 +.52 InterNAP 4.90 +.18 IntlBcsh 0.38 17.07 +.86 IBM 2.60 137.66 +2.41 Intl Coal 5.44 +.13 IntFlav 1.08 49.55 +1.05 IntlGame 0.24 14.24 +.23 IntPap 0.50 22.27 +.75 IntlRectif 21.58 +.80 InternetB 13.20 +.01 InterOil g 66.53 +1.17 Interpublic 10.49 +.51 Intersil 0.48 11.55 +.26 IntPotash 26.04 +.74 Intuit 45.46 +1.31 IntSurg 292.89 +9.64 Invesco 0.44 21.81 +.75 InvMtgCap 3.57 21.48 +.15 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.64 -.03 InvTech 14.12 +.15 InvRlEst 0.69 8.56 +.11 IridiumCm 8.66 +.08 IronMtn 0.25 20.45 -1.92 IronwdP n 10.96 +.41 IsilonSys 25.88 +.72 Isis 8.14 +.09 ItauUnibH 0.59 25.24 +.76 Itron 60.86 +1.03 IvanhoeEn 2.12 +.01 IvanhM g 24.46 +1.12 JCrew 33.82 +.71 JA Solar 8.30 +.09 JDASoft 22.00 -1.00 JDS Uniph 12.87 +.53

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Nm JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfK JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap JpnSmCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KandiTech KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Keithley Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g Kirklands KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohlberg Kohls KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Lance Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LloydBkg50 Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy Lufkin s lululemn g

D 0.20 1.80 1.47 1.68 0.28 0.38

39.64 +.69 34.24 +.15 25.20 +.20 25.60 +.09 15.14 +.59 26.02 +.49 21.69 +.48 1.17 +.10 39.93 +1.58 6.90 +.16 18.15 +.69 2.32 +.27 16.98 +.27 0.04 11.35 +.50 0.05 8.33 +.33 0.33 31.67 +.42 10.26 -.25 0.30 23.29 +.90 6.59 +.24 30.40 +.98 44.41 +1.02 2.05 +.04 2.16 62.80 +1.13 0.52 31.76 +1.44 0.20 19.97 +.75 0.20 84.50 +.19 1.27 +.01 45.02 +1.71 0.70 70.51 +2.01 32.59 +1.84 46.78 +1.01 0.25 11.30 +.10 0.20 25.11 +.23 11.65 +.46 0.08 10.83 +.10 0.48 8.89 -.11 1.00 35.16 +.92 21.53 +.38 2.55 +.07 4.58 +.34 38.32 +1.48 0.76 35.82 +1.48 1.92 26.30 +.13 0.15 21.59 1.62 50.64 +.06 3.23 -.01 0.48 31.79 +1.12 4.72 +.12 9.95 +.25 0.04 8.46 +.39 1.40 33.64 +.57 2.64 65.51 +.33 0.64 16.66 +.39 4.36 69.00 13.06 +.35 37.67 +.62 10.16 +.19 0.10 19.42 +.56 13.85 +.28 0.24 4.73 +.29 12.72 +.36 0.24 19.14 +.54 1.20 18.76 +.38 0.08 16.03 +.89 3.59 +.02 0.68 6.75 +.04 52.60 +.21 14.54 +.50 1.16 31.28 +.34 29.60 +.56 4.85 +.16 0.42 21.37 +.01 6.29 +.25 8.22 -.04 11.78 1.60 70.65 +.70 0.46 29.86 +.58 9.89 +.08 17.39 +.39 4.18 +.32 20.95 +.53 4.50 +.03 6.30 +.18 8.59 -.12 .93 -.04 79.35 +1.43 3.97 +.09 1.15 +.05 43.17 +1.63 31.48 +1.01 0.64 23.21 +1.15 0.20 38.51 +1.05 37.10 +.66 0.44 23.81 +.66 5.15 +.02 8.48 +.28 0.50 36.35 +1.24 12.29 +.07 81.11 +2.28 0.16 31.45 +1.30 1.08 23.71 +.68 0.40 27.31 -1.45 0.16 15.47 +.11 0.60 42.20 +1.11 24.01 +.56 .94 -.02 1.58 +.05 0.40 7.43 +.19 45.45 +1.85 10.29 +.09 1.62 +.02 0.29 4.45 +.09 31.31 +.60 31.05 +.62 14.16 +.23 53.47 +.56 65.55 +.95 1.90 32.74 +.21 47.71 +1.24 41.19 +2.33 35.31 +.78 1.60 +.04 1.96 36.89 +.59 6.11 +.43 0.60 27.81 +1.19 0.80 25.45 +.59 14.08 +.77 0.04 24.70 +.80 0.92 30.72 +.80 2.52 31.94 -.14 4.61 +.31 7.36 +.10 9.74 +.21 8.93 +.46 6.63 +.06 1.45 4.83 +.25 1.94 26.49 -.24 4.09 +.10 3.00 70.60 +1.25 2.29 +.04 0.25 38.48 +.82 17.39 +.37 36.29 +1.28 39.72 +1.16 2.52 -.02 4.50 79.52 +.82 7.57 +.10 0.44 22.67 +.43 1.44 110.12 +4.20 1.93 -.19 0.50 44.62 +.90 44.49 +.43

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MMTrip n Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g

2.80 83.09 +.94 0.04 16.52 +.64 10.84 +.79 0.24 6.17 +.27 1.00 28.30 -.10 10.29 +.13 0.63 20.51 +.23 6.64 +.07 12.34 +.58 7.36 +.19 0.90 7.96 +.06 0.58 6.95 -.03 9.24 +.34 11.71 +.35 0.60 14.56 +.47 10.16 +.24 2.50 -.07 0.88 54.66 +.66 34.39 +.52 2.00 44.84 +.29 1.80 33.23 +.74 0.20 23.52 +.76 21.33 +.03 2.93 51.87 -.11 3.94 +.23 1.20 84.50 +2.47 4.14 +.14 37.33 -.97 0.08 11.80 +.29 6.46 +.18 0.74 51.97 +1.58 0.52 12.73 +.25

Nm MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MkVNucEn MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel MaximIntg MaxLine n McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedQuist MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio Meritage Mesab Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Asia Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTT DOCO NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax

D 1.00 34.32 +.95 24.47 +.19 0.11 57.26 +1.71 0.08 34.13 +.77 34.66 +1.32 0.42 46.65 +1.05 0.45 59.07 +1.61 0.42 21.16 +.22 2.56 36.92 +.43 0.16 37.81 +1.11 0.84 24.01 +.36 0.04 7.53 +.42 1.60 78.58 +.99 16.90 -.34 0.30 11.63 +.54 2.00 28.00 +.53 0.24 31.88 +.79 10.68 +.45 0.60 225.90 +3.26 0.75 24.07 +.82 0.84 18.67 +.42 10.03 -1.33 3.82 +.03 1.04 41.69 +.13 14.41 2.44 75.82 +.87 0.94 33.64 +.67 0.72 61.22 +1.34 17.29 +.41 47.20 -.01 0.90 56.25 +.30 0.12 8.60 +.11 0.92 24.54 +.72 25.34 +.62 4.70 11.90 +.12 21.03 +.18 53.12 +1.48 6.79 +.18 0.80 10.46 +.14 14.07 +.11 0.24 30.51 +1.24 12.50 +.14 55.45 +.37 0.90 33.88 +.67 5.47 +.08 20.23 +.70 0.36 24.65 +.82 10.92 +.31 68.10 +1.31 5.02 +.09 1.52 37.02 +.50 0.92 33.07 +.36 0.76 21.85 +.74 19.73 +.40 1.70 38.96 +1.26 3.98 +.07 0.62 25.66 +.89 0.74 39.80 +.96 10.97 +.16 3.80 +.10 0.14 10.31 +.29 1.37 31.42 +.17 7.00 +.43 6.93 -.06 43.45 +1.43 19.03 +.73 0.64 24.35 +.44 2.11 -.02 2.46 60.52 +1.61 .63 +.03 0.09 19.83 +.80 7.24 98.78 +2.19 0.20 29.68 +.54 7.60 -.15 9.73 +.25 10.04 +.14 4.70 +.12 2.81 +.10 22.75 +.45 13.23 +.43 53.94 +.73 0.61 21.36 +.67 0.61 17.63 +.42 1.12 48.33 +.73 29.00 -.28 14.99 +.42 2.47 +.11 16.27 +.09 1.12 48.80 +1.03 13.21 +.51 0.36 17.31 +.17 0.42 25.57 +.59 0.20 25.47 +.76 0.26 15.86 +.12 0.20 60.80 +2.01 8.64 +.18 2.21 +.04 0.07 3.16 +.15 1.10 62.91 +1.90 18.85 +.17 17.00 +.46 13.96 +.26 28.00 +1.36 0.60 15.88 +.12 32.54 +1.05 42.77 +.28 2.14 +.05 6.91 +.41 21.26 +.46 0.57 17.20 +.67 0.44 12.94 1.20 29.33 +.70 18.21 +.62 0.14 25.60 +.82 15.31 +.51 19.88 +.59 2.36 +.04 12.99 +.54 1.38 53.09 +1.04 7.17 44.87 +.70 0.40 46.13 +2.19 0.04 6.37 +.19 1.52 26.00 +.46 0.40 12.96 +.36 1.84 40.21 +.83 0.24 5.76 +.11 45.91 +3.11 14.92 +.39 11.62 +.25 13.00 +.09 27.53 +.67 50.92 +1.59 39.08 -1.16 26.87 -.02 156.16 -.23 2.95 +.04 1.78 +.17 23.89 +.87 1.53 +.07 6.34 +.35 24.66 +.14 12.85 +.07 5.16 +.22 .12 -.01 6.98 +.37 92.86 -3.66 2.99 +.29 1.00 16.47 +.20 7.86 +.11 0.28 12.90 +.18 3.20 +.10 0.20 18.38 +.51 57.52 +.52 0.60 63.67 +.93 8.56 +.01 0.15 13.55 +.58 0.15 15.48 +.44 0.20 20.85 +.52 2.00 54.40 +.41 0.92 17.71 +.12 1.86 47.52 +.98 6.38 +.01 1.08 81.30 +1.42 18.64 +.27 22.30 +.55 0.20 33.76 +.62 0.72 77.20 +1.46 0.56 10.40 +.35 4.91 +.11 1.55 26.91 +.26 0.80 37.77 +.61 1.44 59.51 +1.14 4.35 +.11 1.36 28.56 +.26 1.03 30.21 +.40 18.18 +.59 1.12 48.60 +.93 2.95 +.08 1.88 62.05 +1.94 0.40 3.80 +.14 0.40 11.04 +.21 5.70 +.04 9.18 +.48 1.99 58.00 +.95 8.75 +.36 2.22 +.06

Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncolyt g 1800Flowrs ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTable OpnwvSy OplinkC Opnext Oracle OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OrientFn OriginAg Oritani s Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PPL pfU PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PanASlv PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pebblebk n Pegasys lf Penford Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske PensonWw Pentair PeopUtdF PepcoHold PepsiCo PerfectWld PerkElm PermFix Perrigo PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimcoHiI PimcoStrat PinnclEnt PinnaclFn PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PwShHiYD PwSWtr PSFinPf PSETecLd PSBldABd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PremGlbSv PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUShtSem PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltSemi PrUPShR2K ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProUShEur ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUltGold ProUSGld rs

D 5.88 +.01 27.05 +1.05 1.60 40.19 +.50 0.50 29.28 +.73 34.49 +1.24 15.24 -.26 1.44 39.53 +.98 0.70 19.14 +.33 0.47 10.03 -.07 0.75 8.51 +.06 0.75 8.88 +.05 11.32 +.08 20.00 +.65 6.22 +.03 1.45 41.27 +.77 30.54 +.79 54.06 +.67 20.82 +1.24 1.52 82.46 +1.87 53.29 +.79 .95 +.01 16.10 +.67 9.48 -.21 4.56 +.08 13.69 +.03 2.60 114.81 +3.17 47.97 +.72 .51 -.01 25.43 +.78 0.28 10.47 +.24 0.69 13.70 -.03 0.80 20.58 +.85 1.44 23.15 +.35 0.13 23.24 +.38 0.80 40.24 +1.16 23.54 +.55 7.53 +.34 7.24 +.13 4.99 +.08 1.88 +.02 1.84 47.76 +1.96 26.25 +.72 66.35 -.61 1.80 +.12 20.41 +.92 1.65 +.07 0.20 27.30 +.40 15.01 +.20 5.94 +.09 10.91 +.29 0.16 13.24 +.20 8.08 +.07 0.30 9.98 +.07 2.12 +.04 28.62 +.94 1.75 33.52 +.42 0.71 28.25 +.73 27.46 +1.19 28.87 +.76 .28 +.02 1.00 5.29 +.14 0.42 49.03 +2.04 1.82 46.70 +.97 21.73 +.53 7.26 +.12 3.67 +.06 0.40 53.48 +1.38 0.50 11.49 +.07 1.43 118.35 +2.99 2.20 74.00 +1.76 1.40 27.93 +.31 2.44 58.19 +.77 21.58 +.69 0.48 49.65 +2.08 6.11 +.15 .88 -.00 1.05 5.60 +.34 0.60 23.53 +.62 32.97 +.02 4.20 +.06 0.64 42.52 +1.16 0.05 29.78 +.54 91.60 +3.16 31.35 +1.23 0.20 3.96 -.01 19.97 +.57 1.81 +.16 22.65 +.21 4.42 +.21 1.08 71.02 +2.74 2.00 80.37 +.45 12.49 +.73 0.40 28.63 +.66 0.20 17.27 +.60 1.24 27.59 +.37 0.28 50.46 +1.01 18.41 +.40 0.12 28.62 -.23 5.51 +.71 0.84 11.21 +.03 30.86 +.61 0.23 15.66 +.17 1.80 20.45 +.26 1.04 10.82 +.22 0.80 29.02 +1.45 0.60 12.01 +.27 13.35 +.41 5.21 +.07 0.76 34.34 +1.37 0.62 13.29 +.18 1.08 19.07 +.27 1.92 67.76 +.89 26.53 +.56 0.28 23.33 +.69 1.67 +.01 0.25 65.72 +1.54 3.97 124.04 +2.63 16.60 +.44 1.18 32.73 -.06 1.18 36.71 +.12 28.68 +.72 6.18 +.30 0.50 34.65 +.03 0.72 17.23 +.33 7.59 65.35 +1.04 0.60 24.98 +.18 8.22 +.17 9.67 +.27 2.56 55.35 +.06 0.95 31.76 +.89 0.15 62.41 +1.87 2.12 +.14 5.55 +.27 1.12 29.70 +.44 1.26 18.81 +.14 8.27 +.09 6.21 +.29 1.38 17.48 -.18 1.46 13.05 +.03 0.90 10.65 +.09 11.50 +.47 9.66 +.39 2.10 41.66 +.40 6.35 +.16 0.08 69.33 +3.77 1.46 21.78 +.46 3.77 63.47 -.40 27.33 +1.41 0.20 34.71 +1.41 2.11 +.02 0.32 43.15 +.46 .38 -.01 1.68 36.15 +.75 1.60 66.80 +2.46 0.40 92.96 +1.71 25.86 -.85 1.90 -.01 12.66 +.64 31.26 +1.78 2.85 +.01 1.04 20.46 +.29 0.80 29.66 +.55 0.40 143.01 -1.04 2.04 34.95 +1.01 0.20 31.83 +.48 9.61 +.39 63.62 -1.90 24.57 +.49 26.96 +.57 25.98 +.32 22.50 +.41 22.56 -.19 27.35 +.22 0.35 8.44 +.11 0.11 16.80 +.47 1.30 18.29 +.06 0.11 17.82 +.30 1.12 26.72 -.04 1.02 14.46 +.03 1.64 27.94 +.01 0.12 26.38 +.29 0.33 49.66 +1.18 1.79 -.01 1.80 91.19 +2.15 0.12 131.31 +3.87 7.03 +.10 7.60 +.56 .47 10.13 +.31 1.08 51.92 +2.14 344.94+13.30 30.99 +1.24 0.50 26.55 +.86 0.04 11.74 +.59 47.51 -.82 38.39 -.93 48.03 -1.00 28.57 -1.20 0.40 48.25 +1.61 23.80 -.86 0.04 50.79 +2.01 15.21 -.63 67.81 +3.11 14.29 -.74 0.43 40.67 +1.59 31.73 +.35 15.61 -.71 30.18 -1.32 35.59 -1.28 20.24 -.60 53.75 -2.50 27.29 -1.72 0.41 47.01 +1.26 18.95 -.82 0.09 57.06 +2.38 42.67 -3.44 0.14 29.42 +1.24 36.00 -3.27 0.23 32.96 +1.44 0.10 37.31 +1.97 15.76 -1.10 37.10 -1.10 113.01 +7.83 16.80 -1.01 0.01 33.03 +1.75 25.68 -1.66 0.48 160.29 +8.97 10.85 +.28 63.95 +2.37 32.09 -1.25

Nm

D

ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PPrIT

1.93 2.48 0.16 0.60 1.21 0.62 0.56 0.72 0.70 0.61 1.37 3.20 0.71

Nm 20.42 -1.68 12.45 -.34 91.36 +6.38 16.57 -.08 19.23 -.42 60.82 +.86 45.50 +.38 34.29 +1.17 21.15 +.54 12.26 +.38 9.80 +.11 32.70 +.54 9.10 +.04 22.56 +.63 7.15 54.02 +1.47 20.39 +.28 33.56 +.02 33.57 +.49 97.98 +.51 8.16 +.26 8.60 -.04 6.76 -.04

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Lending

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 B5

Oregon to get those startup resources,” Larson said. Evergreen Business Capital, of Eugene, and a few other entities make some loans to startup businesses in the area, but Larson said funding made available under the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act could help fill a gap in resources for early stage businesses. “In addition to current resources, this will be helpful, due to the fact that small businesses are an integral part of Central Oregon’s economy,” Larson said. Bob Moore, senior vice president of government loan programs at Umpqua Bank, said he sees potential benefits for the additional funding and guaranteed loans to help small businesses. In addition to providing more funding and extending the higher loan guarantees and reduced fees at least through the end of the year, the act passed last week also raises the loan limits on SBA-guaranteed loans from $2 million to $5 million, and increases the maximum guarantee to $3.75 million, he said. “I think it is a good thing for both the borrower and the bank, which will spur lending and will spur job creation,” Moore said. “Here at Umpqua Bank, we are ramping up for the increased

loan volume.” Moore said SBA loan guarantees give banks a degree of security to make loans to businesses on the edge of meeting cash flow requirements. But even with the guarantee, banks won’t risk making a loan in cases where cash flow falls short of the amount required to repay a loan. Tom Unger, spokesman for Wells Fargo Bank, said the success of small business is crucial to the overall economic recovery. But, he said, “We are not currently commenting on whether or not the bill will help us make more loans until we know more about the intricate details of the bill, which will take some time. However, I can tell you that in the first six months of this year, we extended $6.6 billion of new lending to small businesses in the United States. This includes $403 million in SBA loans, making Wells Fargo the largest SBA lender in dollars. “While demand for small-business loans continues to be soft, we saw some improvement in the second quarter with new loan volume increasing 30 percent from the first quarter. We have a goal of providing $16 billion in new lending this year. Our ability to meet this goal is dependent on continued improvement in the economy

and demand from small-business owners,” Unger said.

Many Republicans, including Walden, opposed the bill. In explaining Walden’s vote against the 2010 Small Business Jobs and Credit Act, his press

secretary, Andrew Whelan, referred to a survey by the National Federation of Independent Businesses, which showed 8 percent of businesses listed a lack of credit as a major problem keeping them from growing and creating jobs. However, nearly three times as many cited the growing government debt, unnecessary government regulations and the looming prospect of the largest tax increase in history taking effect in January as the primary factors hindering job creation and economic recovery. Central Oregon economic development officials and bankers said they see potential benefits from the $14 billion in funding for SBA-guaranteed loans and $30 billion in Treasury funds to stimulate business lending in smaller communities. “One obstacle that startup companies in Central Oregon face is a lack of an ongoing, sustainable investment fund or finance group, such as angel investors, so any additional funding source that becomes available for small businesses and early stage businesses would be helpful,” said Scott Larson, venture capitalist manager at Economic Development for Central Oregon. “Oftentimes, startup businesses have to go outside Central

Tribune

ties to Michaels, received tens of millions of dollars in bonuses.

Continued from B1 Based on interviews with more than 20 employees and former employees of Tribune, Michaels’ and his executives’ use of sexual innuendo, poisonous workplace banter and profane invective shocked and offended people throughout the company. Tribune Tower, the architectural symbol of the staid company, came to resemble a frat house, complete with poker parties, juke boxes and pervasive sex talk. Michaels declined to be interviewed, but the company said he has the support of the board. “Randy is a tremendous motivator, very charismatic, but he is very nontraditional,” said Frank Wood, a member of the Tribune board. “He has the kind of approach that motivates many people and offends others, but we think he’s done a great job.” The company is now frozen in what seems to be an endless effort to emerge from bankruptcy. (The case entered mediation in September after negotiations failed, and a new agreement between two primary lenders was recently announced.) But even as the company foundered, the tight circle of executives, many with longtime

Failed innovations

the deal has not turned out how he had hoped. But noting a recent upturn in results, he said through a spokesman, “Tribune has made significant strides in becoming a current, competitive and sustainable media company. The measure of management’s performance is reflected in the increased profitability of Tribune’s media properties.” When Zell purchased Tribune in December 2007, he bought into an industry desperately in need of new ideas. And Zell, a billionaire deal maker, had a barrelful. Tribune, home to some of the most important newspapers in the country — The Baltimore Sun, The Hartford Courant and The Orlando Sentinel as well as The Chicago Tribune and The Los Angeles Times — had been battered by big drops in advertising and circulation. According to Zell, the company was also suffering from stodgy thinking and what he called “journalistic arrogance.” Zell’s first innovation was the deal itself. He used debt in combination with an employee stock ownership plan, called an ESOP, to buy the company, while contributing only $315 million of his own money. Under the plan, the company’s discretionary matching contributions to the 401(k) retirement plan for nonunionized

Tribune employees were diverted into an ownership stake. The structure of the deal allowed Tribune to become an S corporation, which pays no federal taxes, making taxpayers essentially silent partners in the deal. His second innovation was bringing in a new management team, largely from the radio business, that, like Zell, had little newspaper experience, which constituted more than 70 percent of the company’s business. Michaels, for instance, was a former shock jock who made a name for himself — and a lot of money for Zell — by scooping up radio stations while at Zell-controlled Jacor Communications.

vice the enormous debt. In his initial tour of the company, Zell promised there would be no job cuts. But like other media companies caught in the downdraft of advertising revenue, the company was forced to cut staff and slash budgets. James Warren, the former managing editor and Washington bureau chief of The Chicago Tribune, said: “They wheeled around here doing what they wished, showing a clear contempt for most everyone that was here and used power just because they had it. They used the notion of reinventing the newspapers simply as a cover for cost-cutting.” (As a contributor to the Chicago News Cooperative, Warren writes a column that appears in the Chicago edition of The New York Times.) It wasn’t simply the huge debt that burdened the company; the performance under new management continued to slide. While its television division has since done well in the advertising rebound — overall, the 23 stations are on track in 2010 to pass $1 billion in revenue for the first time since 2007 — Tribune’s newspapers have continued to underperform the rest of the industry. The Chicago Tribune’s circulation continues to slide, with weekday circulation down 9.8 percent in the first half of 2010. The Los An-

Continued from B1 It will go to borrowers that qualify on a first-come, firstserved basis. “We know small businesses are still facing challenges when it comes to getting loans, and that’s why it is important that these loan enhancements were extended last week in the Small Business Jobs Act, which gives SBA the resources to approve another $14 billion in small-business lending,” said SBA Administrator Karen Mills. The bill continues initiatives to encourage small-business lending included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which increased the SBA loan guarantee on its 7(a) loans from 75 percent to 90 percent, and waived fees on both its 7(a) and 504 loans, according to Russ Hooker, small-business loan manager with the SBA regional office in Portland.

Opposition, support

Behind the collapse of the Tribune deal and the bankruptcy is a classic example of financial hubris. Zell, a hard-changing real estate mogul with virtually no experience in the newspaper business, decided that a deal financed with heavy borrowing and followed with aggressive cost-cutting could succeed where the longtime Tribune executives he derided as bureaucrats had failed. And while many media companies tried cost-cutting and new tactics in the past few years, Tribune was particularly aggressive in planning publicity stunts and in mixing advertising with editorial material. Those efforts alienated longtime employees and audiences in the communities its newspapers served. “They threw out what Tribune had stood for, quality journalism and a real brand integrity, and in just a year, pushed it down into mud and bankruptcy,” said Ken Doctor, a newspaper analyst with Outsell Inc., a consulting firm. “And it’s been wallowing there for the last 20 months with no end in sight.” Zell has acknowledged that

Unwelcome change On Dec. 11, 2008, the Tribune board was made aware that not everyone appreciated the new cultural dynamics at the company. The board received an anonymous letter detailing a hostile work environment and a pattern of hiring based on personal relationships and suggested that the company was leaving itself open to “potential litigation risk.” While the new owner and managers went about changing the corporate tone at Tribune, they were also under pressure to ser-

Long-awaited On Tuesday, the SBA announced that a portion of the $14 billion provided under the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act has already been used to fund a backlog of 1,939 loans for nearly $937 million that had been approved nationwide when funding for the 2010 fiscal year ran out last spring. “Beginning in May, we saw the SBA loan queue begin to grow, which was evidence of both the continued need for these tools and the challenges small-business owners face in getting loans,” Mills said “Within days of the president’s signature, the authority and the funding provided in the Small Business Jobs Act have allowed us to clear out our loan queues.” Many of the small-business owners had been waiting all summer for renewed funding for loans with the 90 percent SBA guarantee, and without the traditional 2 percent to 3 percent fee waived under the 2009 and 2010 acts, according to Hooker and Rob DuCote, deputy director of the SBA regional office in Portland.

“The lenders like the higher guarantee. We saw good use in 2010,” said Rob DuCote, deputy director of the SBA regional office in Portland. “I think lenders are going to continue using the SBA programs. I am hopeful we will see the numbers continue to go up in 2011.” “I know they cleared out all the queues, at the national level,” DuCote said. “I haven’t called to see if all the Oregon companies had been processed. The bottom line is a lot of people were waiting for funding to come through.” Hooker said nine Oregon businesses were among the 1,939 nationwide that had been waiting most of the summer for additional funding. “Now there is plenty of money available for small businesses looking to get their loans and not pay the fees,” Hooker said. DuCote said part of the $30 billion separate allocation to the Treasury Department is earmarked for small banks and businesses in smaller communities, but he said some of the details about how those funds will be dispersed are still being worked out. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

geles Times is in worse shape, having lost 14.7 percent of its weekday circulation in the period. (Overall, the industry lost 8.7 percent weekly circulation in the period.) “How can anybody say that they have done a good job?” said Henry Weinstein, a former Los Angeles Times reporter who filed a lawsuit, still pending, that contends that the use of employee pensions to finance the purchase was illegal. Management still is confident that the new thinking has Tribune on the right track. The company recently announced the creation of a new local news format in which there would be no on-air anchors and few live reports. The newscasts will rely on narration over a stream of clips, a Web-centric approach that has the added benefit of requiring fewer bodies to produce. “The TV revolution is upon us — and the new Tribune Company is leading the resistance,” the announcement read. And judging from the job posting for “anti-establishment producer/editors,” the company has some very strong ideas about who those revolutionaries should be: “Don’t sell us on your solid newsroom experience. We don’t care. Or your exclusive, breaking news coverage. We’ll pass.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

10 14 90 29 54 ... ... 29 23 60 17 11 34 12 ... ... 21 ... 15 ... 7

48.86 +.29 +41.4 21.34 +.34 -1.2 13.56 +.41 -10.0 15.76 +.99 +28.2 68.60 +2.27 +26.7 .55 +.03 -19.1 32.69 +2.24 +18.9 59.07 +1.23 +51.3 64.66 +.10 +9.3 7.22 +.28 +200.8 25.28 +.22 -22.8 40.81 +.17 -20.8 12.41 +.42 -6.8 19.15 +.28 -6.1 8.46 +.39 +52.4 21.37 +.01 +4.1 5.15 +.02 +90.7 7.57 +.10 +8.5 20.51 +.23 -13.1 10.92 +.31 +23.7 24.35 +.44 -20.1

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1341.00 $1338.90 $22.714

Pvs Day $1315.00 $1315.40 $22.013

Div

PE

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 16 18 24 79 ... 36 20 ... 23 18 9 25 21 ... 16 85 10 ... ...

Market recap 81.30 37.77 49.61 13.69 49.65 2.12 36.15 131.31 21.30 48.95 74.72 39.44 26.25 9.46 10.94 22.34 15.22 26.25 2.49 16.13

+1.42 +.61 +1.08 +.03 +2.08 +.02 +.75 +3.87 +.36 +.73 +1.01 +1.10 +.56 -.08 +.10 +.72 +.36 +.87 ... +.35

+23.1 +.5 +10.1 +7.9 +36.9 -24.6 -4.3 +19.0 ... +2.6 +21.2 -1.4 +13.8 +57.6 -18.4 -.8 -21.3 -2.7 +18.6 +1.8

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl iShEMkts

6018906 1939837 1867426 1229488 739564

4.13 +.10 116.04 +2.29 13.56 +.41 14.73 +.33 46.11 +.82

Gainers ($2 or more) Name FlagstB rs GpTelevisa BrkfldH Furmanite EthanAl

Last

Chg %Chg

2.33 +.38 +19.5 21.51 +2.60 +13.7 8.65 +.94 +12.2 5.35 +.54 +11.2 18.87 +1.85 +10.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name BkASP8-12 Talbots MaxLine n Dolan Co NoahEduc

Last 10.52 10.71 10.03 9.65 2.04

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name NthgtM g VirnetX NovaGld g GoldStr g ChinNEPet

Last Chg

63556 2.95 +.08 55202 18.55 +1.75 34812 9.18 +.48 27674 5.11 +.20 27120 6.70 -.44

Gainers ($2 or more) Name GoldResrc BioTime wt VirnetX Banro g AmDGEn n

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel MicronT

1071857 1.28 +.01 750448 49.66 +1.18 747578 24.35 +.44 593036 19.15 +.28 590506 6.93 -.06

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

22.94 +2.24 +10.8 2.98 +.28 +10.4 18.55 +1.75 +10.4 2.60 +.24 +10.2 3.27 +.27 +9.0

Name

Last

Dialogic n BioFuelEn HlthStrm CelldexTh CompCrd h

7.32 +2.18 +42.4 2.40 +.45 +23.1 6.55 +1.15 +21.3 4.73 +.81 +20.7 5.89 +.91 +18.3

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-16.2 -14.6 -11.7 -11.4 -10.9

HeraldNB AmShrd MercBcp ChinNEPet Advntrx rs

2.25 2.87 2.24 6.70 2.02

-.40 -15.1 -.23 -7.4 -.16 -6.6 -.44 -6.2 -.11 -5.2

GenFin un FstBcMiss Alexza SuperMda n Tengion n

2.90 -1.10 -27.5 8.64 -1.34 -13.4 2.75 -.24 -8.0 9.57 -.80 -7.7 3.00 -.25 -7.7

2,477 578 87 3,142 273 9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

327 169 37 533 33 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -2.03 -1.83 -1.33 -1.24 -.25

Nasdaq

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 2,145 487 132 2,764 173 13

11,258.01 9,481.09 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,107.44 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,944.72 4,576.47 403.02 7,434.18 2,059.44 2,399.83 1,160.75 12,223.03 689.35

+193.45 +122.55 +4.14 +161.65 +39.14 +55.31 +23.72 +252.22 +19.90

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.80 +2.75 +1.04 +2.22 +1.94 +2.36 +2.09 +2.11 +2.97

52-wk %Chg

+4.95 +11.63 +1.26 +3.47 +12.85 +5.76 +4.09 +5.84 +10.23

+12.47 +21.08 +7.53 +7.75 +15.65 +14.08 +10.05 +11.97 +14.51

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

335.03 2,595.93 3,731.93 5,635.76 6,215.83 22,639.14 34,257.40 20,510.02 3,218.32 9,518.76 1,878.94 3,162.36 4,660.60 5,606.99

+1.40 s +1.45 s +2.25 s +1.44 s +1.33 s +.09 s +.64 s +2.09 s -.33 t +1.47 s -.02 t +.16 s -.38 t +.95 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9716 1.5901 .9843 .002070 .1494 1.3850 .1289 .012021 .079904 .0333 .000891 .1493 1.0351 .0322

.9671 1.5833 .9778 .002057 .1494 1.3686 .1289 .011994 .079530 .0328 .000884 .1477 1.0281 .0321

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.27 +0.38 +5.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.34 +0.36 +5.6 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.87 +0.09 +7.0 GrowthI 23.41 +0.50 +6.2 Ultra 20.50 +0.42 +5.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.15 +0.33 +3.8 AMutlA p 24.01 +0.40 +5.7 BalA p 17.09 +0.22 +7.2 BondA p 12.50 +0.01 +9.1 CapWA p 21.21 +0.09 +8.6 CapIBA p 49.49 +0.58 +6.3 CapWGA p 34.74 +0.68 +4.2 EupacA p 40.39 +0.71 +5.3 FdInvA p 34.07 +0.69 +5.3 GovtA p 14.74 +7.5 GwthA p 28.28 +0.53 +3.5 HI TrA p 11.20 +0.04 +11.6 IncoA p 16.21 +0.20 +8.0 IntBdA p 13.68 +0.01 +6.1 ICAA p 26.43 +0.50 +3.4 NEcoA p 23.82 +0.40 +5.9 N PerA p 26.98 +0.52 +5.2 NwWrldA 53.73 +0.66 +13.8 SmCpA p 36.47 +0.61 +15.7 TxExA p 12.45 +6.5 WshA p 25.69 +0.46 +6.1 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.33 +0.53 +3.9 IntlEqA 28.58 +0.52 +3.7 IntEqII I r 12.15 +0.23 +3.1 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.03 +0.45 +1.8 MidCap 30.00 +0.70 +17.4 MidCapVal 19.03 +0.35 +5.8 Baron Funds: Growth 45.03 +0.93 +9.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.17 +0.02 +10.3 DivMu 14.70 -0.01 +4.5

TxMgdIntl 15.45 +0.32 +1.1 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.52 +0.31 +5.3 GlAlA r 18.77 +0.25 +5.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.52 +0.23 +4.7 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.55 +0.30 +5.5 GlbAlloc r 18.86 +0.25 +5.5 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.98 +1.05 +7.9 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.19 +0.19 +5.4 DivrBd 5.09 +8.7 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.51 +0.65 +11.6 AcornIntZ 38.55 +0.51 +14.6 ValRestr 44.50 +0.92 +5.1 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.60 +0.24 +6.5 USCorEq2 9.87 +0.23 +9.0 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.86 +0.50 +2.8 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.24 +0.50 +3.0 NYVen C 30.66 +0.48 +2.3 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.74 +0.01 +8.5 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.24 +0.29 +17.9 EmMktV 36.09 +0.54 +15.9 IntSmVa 15.92 +0.30 +6.6 LargeCo 9.16 +0.19 +5.7 USLgVa 18.26 +0.43 +8.5 US SmVa 21.99 +0.66 +12.2 IntlSmCo 15.80 +0.29 +12.5 Fixd 10.38 +1.2 IntVa 17.55 +0.44 +5.0 Glb5FxInc 11.64 +7.3 2YGlFxd 10.23 +1.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.00 +1.12 +5.0 Income 13.40 +0.01 +7.2 IntlStk 34.37 +0.94 +7.9 Stock 98.88 +2.24 +3.9

Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.58 NatlMunInc 9.99 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.34 LgCapVal 16.62 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.63 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.95 FPACres 25.92 Fairholme 33.20 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.19 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.57 StrInA 12.88 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.77 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.24 FF2015 11.04 FF2020 13.29 FF2020K 12.69 FF2025 11.01 FF2030 13.10 FF2035 10.83 FF2040 7.55 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.08 AMgr50 14.78 Balanc 17.42 BlueChGr 40.50 Canada 53.49 CapAp 23.30 CpInc r 9.16 Contra 63.16 ContraK 63.20 DisEq 21.18 DivIntl 28.90 DivrsIntK r 28.92 DivGth 25.34 EmrMk 25.45 Eq Inc 40.77 EQII 16.82

NA +9.2 -0.01 +4.3 NA +0.23 +3.5 +2.9 +0.25 +6.0 +0.48 +10.3 +0.10 +11.4 +0.36 +7.9 +0.04 +9.6 +0.37 +8.1 +0.16 +0.14 +0.19 +0.18 +0.18 +0.22 +0.21 +0.14

+6.5 +6.6 +6.6 +6.7 +6.6 +6.4 +6.2 +6.1

+0.25 +5.6 +0.18 +8.2 +0.23 +7.5 +0.92 +6.7 +1.04 +10.3 +0.52 +8.7 +0.06 +11.1 +1.22 +8.6 +1.23 +8.7 +0.43 +0.8 +0.64 +3.2 +0.64 +3.4 +0.61 +7.6 +0.36 +12.6 +0.89 +5.5 +0.35 +4.1

Fidel 29.10 FltRateHi r 9.67 GNMA 11.67 GovtInc 10.81 GroCo 75.46 GroInc 16.53 GrowthCoK 75.51 HighInc r 8.88 Indepn 21.65 IntBd 10.80 IntmMu 10.40 IntlDisc 31.58 InvGrBd 11.98 InvGB 7.50 LgCapVal 11.60 LatAm 56.91 LevCoStk 24.40 LowP r 35.10 LowPriK r 35.09 Magelln 65.69 MidCap 25.60 MuniInc 12.90 NwMkt r 16.36 OTC 49.04 100Index 8.21 Ovrsea 30.70 Puritn 17.03 SCmdtyStrt 10.99 SrsIntGrw 10.62 StIntMu 10.76 STBF 8.51 SmllCpS r 17.19 StratInc 11.49 StrReRt r 9.17 TotalBd 11.11 USBI 11.67 Value 62.66 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.04 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.10 IntlInxInv 34.44 TotMktInv 33.64 Fidelity Spart Adv:

+0.64 +3.2 +0.02 +5.2 +7.3 +7.4 +1.67 +9.4 +0.35 +3.4 +1.67 +9.5 +0.03 +10.5 +0.54 +8.7 +0.01 +9.2 +5.1 +0.64 +4.1 +0.01 +8.7 +9.3 +0.26 +3.2 +1.01 +11.4 +0.64 +6.6 +0.62 +10.1 +0.62 +10.2 +1.55 +2.3 +0.65 +9.6 +6.8 +0.08 +13.4 +1.11 +7.3 +0.17 +3.5 +0.74 -0.7 +0.24 +7.2 +0.20 +0.8 +0.24 +8.9 +2.9 +0.01 +4.0 +0.42 +7.8 +0.03 +9.9 +0.08 +8.3 +0.01 +9.2 +8.0 +1.42 +10.0 +1.38 +27.3 +0.84 +5.6 +0.78 +3.0 +0.70 +6.9

500IdxAdv 41.10 +0.84 +5.7 TotMktAd r 33.64 +0.70 +6.9 First Eagle: GlblA 43.67 +0.69 +9.2 OverseasA 21.65 +0.29 +11.3 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.07 +6.3 FoundAl p 10.14 +0.13 +5.0 HYTFA p 10.36 +9.1 IncomA p 2.12 +0.01 +8.6 USGovA p 6.81 +6.0 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.0 IncmeAd 2.11 +0.01 +8.8 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.14 +0.01 +8.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.72 +0.30 +4.4 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.72 +0.11 +2.6 GlBd A p 13.76 +0.02 +11.7 GrwthA p 17.11 +0.34 +1.8 WorldA p 14.20 +0.24 +1.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.79 +0.03 +11.5 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.43 +0.80 +1.5 GMO Trust III: Quality x 19.21 +0.23 +0.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts rx 14.04 +0.21 +14.6 IntlCorEq 27.98 +0.64 +4.7 Quality x 19.22 +0.24 +0.4 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.22 +0.02 +10.4 HYMuni 8.81 +12.0 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.11 +0.03 +9.7 CapApInst 33.55 +0.72 +1.8 Intl r 57.78 +1.29 +5.3 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.47 +0.61 +2.6 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 31.45 +0.60 +2.7 Hartford HLS IA :

CapApp 38.39 +0.81 +5.0 Div&Gr 18.40 +0.39 +5.0 Advisers 18.44 +0.29 +5.7 TotRetBd 11.43 +0.01 +8.5 HussmnStrGr 13.20 -0.13 +3.3 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.04 +0.21 +0.1 CmstkA 14.45 +0.28 +5.8 EqIncA 8.05 +0.11 +4.8 GrIncA p 17.59 +0.34 +2.8 HYMuA 9.64 +10.4 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.50 +0.24 +3.3 AssetStA p 23.15 +0.25 +3.9 AssetStrI r 23.35 +0.25 +4.1 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.70 +8.2 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.69 +8.3 HighYld 8.09 +0.02 +11.1 IntmTFBd 11.09 +4.3 ShtDurBd 11.05 +3.2 USLCCrPls 18.95 +0.42 +4.2 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 48.70 +0.74 +14.6 PrkMCVal T 20.91 +0.34 +5.6 Twenty T 61.58 +1.38 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.52 +0.16 +7.9 LSGrwth 12.31 +0.21 +7.5 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.47 +0.58 +8.3 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.52 +0.29 +19.9 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.87 +0.30 +19.7 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.05 +0.01 +5.2 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.15 +0.48 +8.6 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.33 +0.06 +12.3 StrInc C 14.90 +0.07 +11.4 LSBondR 14.27 +0.06 +12.0 StrIncA 14.82 +0.07 +12.0

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.61 +0.04 +12.0 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.47 +0.24 +3.1 BdDebA p 7.70 +0.02 +9.7 ShDurIncA p 4.67 +0.01 +6.3 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.62 +0.16 +5.6 ValueA 21.33 +0.40 +3.7 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.42 +0.40 +3.9 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.86 +0.01 +9.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.48 +0.22 +5.1 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 18.06 +0.16 +15.9 PacTiger 23.41 +0.07 +21.7 MergerFd 15.93 -0.01 +2.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.70 +0.01 +12.0 TotRtBdI 10.70 +0.01 +12.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.41 +0.39 +6.4 GlbDiscZ 28.79 +0.38 +6.5 QuestZ 17.66 NA SharesZ 19.91 +0.30 +4.7 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.71 +0.88 +7.8 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.22 +0.91 +7.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.25 +0.01 +10.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.28 +0.29 +2.9 Intl I r 18.40 +0.30 +9.3 Oakmark r 39.01 +0.80 +5.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.88 +0.05 +11.5 GlbSMdCap 14.45 +0.27 +13.2 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.03 +0.85 +0.3 DvMktA p 34.38 +0.42 +19.5 GlobA p 57.31 +1.36 +8.1 GblStrIncA 4.35 +0.02 +15.9

IntBdA p 6.89 +0.06 +11.1 MnStFdA 29.94 +0.57 +6.4 RisingDivA 14.34 +0.27 +4.1 S&MdCpVl 28.74 +0.65 +8.1 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.02 +0.25 +3.4 S&MdCpVl 24.70 +0.56 +7.5 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.97 +0.24 +3.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.31 +9.6 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.07 +0.42 +19.8 IntlBdY 6.88 +0.05 +11.2 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.64 +0.01 +10.1 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.20 +0.02 +12.3 AllAsset 12.57 +0.06 +13.2 ComodRR 8.33 +0.18 +9.0 HiYld 9.29 +0.02 +12.1 InvGrCp 11.92 +0.02 +13.8 LowDu 10.66 +0.01 +5.1 RealRtnI 11.66 +0.06 +9.9 ShortT 9.93 +1.9 TotRt 11.64 +0.01 +10.3 TR II 11.22 +0.01 +9.3 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.66 +0.01 +4.8 RealRtA p 11.66 +0.06 +9.6 TotRtA 11.64 +0.01 +9.9 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.64 +0.01 +9.3 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.64 +0.01 +10.0 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.64 +0.01 +10.2 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 43.53 +0.55 +12.6 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.20 +0.77 +4.9 Price Funds: BlChip 34.71 +0.86 +5.9 CapApp 19.26 +0.25 +6.1 EmMktS 34.42 +0.40 +14.4

EqInc 21.83 EqIndex 31.27 Growth 29.38 HlthSci 28.06 HiYield 6.75 IntlBond 10.44 IntlStk 13.76 MidCap 54.18 MCapVal 22.06 N Asia 19.56 New Era 45.05 N Horiz 29.68 N Inc 9.76 R2010 15.03 R2015 11.50 R2020 15.75 R2025 11.44 R2030 16.30 R2040 16.31 ShtBd 4.89 SmCpStk 30.99 SmCapVal 32.42 SpecIn 12.42 Value 21.66 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.45 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.36 PremierI r 18.12 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.03 S&P Sel 18.32 Scout Funds: Intl 31.04 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.56 AmShS p 38.50 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.83 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 49.87 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.48 IntValue I 27.06 Tweedy Browne:

+0.45 +5.6 +0.64 +5.4 +0.74 +6.8 +0.63 +7.2 +0.03 +11.4 +0.06 +7.8 +0.26 +9.2 +1.13 +14.1 +0.37 +6.5 +0.14 +21.2 +1.00 +3.3 +0.70 +16.0 +8.4 +0.19 +7.7 +0.16 +7.8 +0.26 +7.9 +0.20 +7.8 +0.31 +7.8 +0.33 +7.7 +3.4 +0.83 +15.0 +0.87 +10.0 +0.06 +8.7 +0.46 +5.8 +0.26 +4.6 +0.27 +9.6 +0.40 +11.1 +0.70 +6.2 +0.37 +5.7 +0.67 +7.5 +0.59 +3.5 +0.59 +3.3 +0.34 +3.0 +0.45 +7.7 +0.44 +7.4 +0.45 +7.7

GblValue 22.71 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.23 CpOpAdl 69.19 EMAdmr r 38.75 Energy 111.21 500Adml 106.87 GNMA Ad 11.04 HlthCr 51.60 HiYldCp 5.72 InfProAd 26.32 ITBdAdml 11.77 ITsryAdml 11.99 IntGrAdm 59.44 ITAdml 13.84 ITGrAdm 10.42 LtdTrAd 11.14 LTGrAdml 9.82 LT Adml 11.29 MuHYAdm 10.70 PrmCap r 63.53 STsyAdml 10.92 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.88 TtlBAdml 10.90 TStkAdm 28.90 WellslAdm 52.69 WelltnAdm 51.80 Windsor 41.47 WdsrIIAd 42.52 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.43 CapOpp 29.95 DivdGro 13.65 Energy 59.21 EqInc 19.13 Explr 64.51 GNMA 11.04 GlobEq 17.07 HYCorp 5.72 HlthCre 122.23 InflaPro 13.40 IntlGr 18.67 IntlVal 31.51

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ITIGrade 10.42 LifeCon 16.05 LifeGro 20.94 LifeMod 18.98 LTIGrade 9.82 Morg 16.27 MuInt 13.84 MuLtd 11.14 PrecMtls r 23.99 PrmcpCor 12.70 Prmcp r 61.21 SelValu r 17.34 STAR 18.51 STIGrade 10.88 StratEq 16.57 TgtRetInc 11.23 TgRe2010 22.10 TgtRe2015 12.17 TgRe2020 21.44 TgtRe2025 12.14 TgRe2030 20.67 TgtRe2035 12.42 TgtRe2040 20.35 TgtRe2045 12.85 USGro 16.50 Wellsly 21.75 Welltn 29.99 Wndsr 12.29 WndsII 23.96 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 106.86 Balanced 20.43 EMkt 29.44 Europe 26.49 Extend 36.65 Growth 28.68 ITBnd 11.77 MidCap 18.37 Pacific 10.34 REIT r 17.84 SmCap 30.89 SmlCpGth 19.08 SmlCpVl 14.54 STBnd 10.73

+0.01 +12.7 +0.15 +8.0 +0.36 +7.7 +0.25 +8.2 -0.02 +14.9 +0.36 +6.5 -0.01 +5.6 +2.7 +0.72 +17.4 +0.26 +4.9 +1.21 +3.0 +0.37 +8.7 +0.24 +6.6 +5.4 +0.40 +8.4 +0.09 +7.7 +0.24 +7.7 +0.15 +7.6 +0.31 +7.4 +0.19 +7.2 +0.36 +7.0 +0.23 +6.9 +0.38 +6.8 +0.24 +6.9 +0.38 +0.2 +0.15 +9.8 +0.40 +6.2 +0.26 +3.9 +0.48 +2.3 +2.18 +5.6 +0.26 +7.5 +0.43 +13.7 +0.65 +2.1 +0.86 +12.2 +0.58 +5.8 +0.01 +13.2 +0.40 +12.3 +0.24 +6.8 +0.30 +23.2 +0.79 +12.4 +0.49 +13.4 +0.36 +11.4 +0.01 +4.8

TotBnd

10.90

TotlIntl

15.27 +0.32 +6.0

+8.1

TotStk

28.89 +0.60 +6.6

Value

19.37 +0.39 +5.8

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

9.81 +0.23

NS

EmMkInst

29.50 +0.42 +13.8

ExtIn

36.70 +0.85 +12.3

FTAllWldI r

91.31 +1.91 +6.5

GrwthIst

28.69 +0.58 +6.0

InfProInst

10.72 +0.06 +8.1

InstIdx

106.17 +2.17 +5.7

InsPl

106.17 +2.16 +5.7

InsTStPlus

26.12 +0.54 +6.8

MidCpIst

18.44 +0.41 +12.5

SCInst

30.94 +0.78 +12.5

TBIst

10.90

TSInst

28.90 +0.60 +6.7

+8.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

88.28 +1.80 +5.7

STBdIdx

10.73 +0.01 +4.9

TotBdSgl

10.90

TotStkSgl

27.89 +0.58 +6.7

+8.2

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.33

NA

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.97 +0.01 +12.4


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY HOME ENERGY ANALYST CORE TRAINING : Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering this five-day training for building professionals who would like to become home energy analysts and/or become certified by the Building Performance Institute. Cost includes books and materials. Registration required by Sept. 28; $795; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu/energy. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION LOAN BRIEFING: Presented by SBA loan specialist Russ Hooker, the briefing will cover financing options to start or grow a small business. Topics will include the SBA loan guarantee program, credit requirements, use of proceeds, how to approach a lender and loan proposal assistance. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT CERTIFIED TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST COURSE: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning department, this four-session course will prepare participants for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam 70-680. Required text and test fee not included. Registration required; $259; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION LOAN BRIEFING: Presented by SBA Loan Specialist, Russ Hooker, briefing will cover financing options to start or grow a small business. Topics will include SBA loan guarantee program, credit requirements, use of proceeds, how to approach a lender and loan proposal assistance. Registration required; free; 6-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the

alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. TOWN HALL/TALK OF THE TOWN BREAKFAST : District 54 Candidate Forum presented by the Bend Chamber in partnership with COTV. Representative Judy Stiegler, Jason Conger and Michael Kozak will speak, moderated by Dave Jones. RSVP by Oct. 6 to receive lower pricing; $25 per person, $35 at the door; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3827437 or www.bendchamber.org. HOME ENERGY ANALYST CORE TRAINING : Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering this five-day training for building professionals who would like to become home energy analysts and/or become certified by the Building Performance Institute. Cost includes books and materials. Registration required by Sept. 28; $795; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu/energy. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/. INDIVIDUAL TAXES: Study for the Enrolled Agent IRS exams in courses offered by COCC’s Continuing Education Department. Registration required. 541-383-7270. Class continues Nov. 11 and 12; $480 plus $145 for required text available at first class; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu.

FRIDAY CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE FORUM: Sponsored by the Bend Business PAC, this forum will allow participants to express views on issues important to the business community; $25; 7:309:30 a.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend; www.bendchamber.org. HOME ENERGY ANALYST CORE TRAINING : Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering this five-day training for building professionals who would like to become home energy analysts and/or become certified by the Building Performance Institute. Cost includes books and materials. Registration required by Sept. 28; $795; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu/energy. MANAGING TO WIN!: Michael Canic, a Vistage speaker and president of Bridgeway Leadership, will speak about alignment within organizations and why it is critical to achieving results. Presentation includes buffet breakfast at 7:30; $59; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by High Desert Vision Source; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-2221. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Class covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Successful completion earns an ODOT credential for flaggers, valid for three years in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY MS OFFICE FOR MAC: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department, this three-evening class will teach participants to operate Microsoft Office on the Macintosh operating

Service sector expands system. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. SECOND IN A SERIES, DEMYSTIFYING HEDGE FUNDS: Learn to better understand how hedge funds produce returns independent of stocks and bonds. Space is limited, please RSVP; free; 4 p.m.; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, 705 S.W. Bonnett Way, Suite 1200, Bend; 541617-6038 or http://fa.smithbarney. com/payne_wettig. 20/20 VISION, STOCK INVESTMENT STRATEGIES FOR THE DECADE AHEAD: Learn why it may be appropriate to focus on the long term and why equities are worth considering for your portfolio. Presented by Jake Paltzer of LPL Financial. RSVP by Oct. 8; free; 5-7 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3893624 or jake@jakepaltzer.com. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WEB DESIGN WRITING THAT SELLS: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 13 FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about financial planning, managing income and spending, tracking expenses and creating a spending plan. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506 ext. 109.

By Steve Goldstein MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — Activity in the nation’s service sector expanded for a ninth straight month during September, Institute for Supply Management data showed Tuesday, with the key employment subindex registering growth for the third time in the past five

months. The Tempe, Ariz.-based ISM’s nonmanufacturing index climbed to 53.2 percent, up from 51.5 percent in August and coming in stronger than the 52.3 percent expected in a MarketWatch-compiled poll of economists. Readings higher than 50 percent indicate expansion.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Sept. 29

Matthew J. Loftus, 20939 Greenmont Drive, Bend James D. and Esther E. Lea, P.O. Box 277, La Pine Jeromy L. Miller, 915 S.W. Rimrock Way #201-322, Redmond William C. Bradford, 2001 S.W. Salmon #19, Redmond Jeffrey C. and Genene L. Cheatham, 60855 Opal Drive, Bend Roger W. Watkinds, 9047 16th St., Terrebonne Filed Sept. 30

Linda J. Van Winkle, 3062 N.W. Clubhouse Drive, Bend James F. and Pamela J. Bradbury, 2410 N.E. Sixth St., Bend Shannon L. Harp, 2640 N.E. Harvey Lane, Bend Jean M. Stetz, 2640 N.E. Harvey Lane, Bend Tony L. and Kelley H. Atkinson, 20911 Ridgewater Court, Bend David N. and Deborah A. Chaney, 2214 N.E. Wolverine Loop, Prineville Charles W. and Kristy A. Johnson, 8716 S.W. Crater Loop, Terrebonne Dave P. and June A. McNiff, 65528 93rd St., Bend Laurence P. and Leann E. Caldwell, 2406 N.W. Summer Hill Drive, Bend Filed Oct. 1

Carol A. Armstrong, 60357 Tekampe Road, Bend Celine F. Coons, 1808 N.W.

Fir Ave., Redmond Candis W. Wood, 422 E. Lakeshore Drive, Culver Darlene S. and Gary S. Dyche, 1001 S.E. 15th St. #1, Bend Andrea M. Patterson, 78 Allen Road #2, Bend Michael S. and Susan M. Smith, 3064 N.E. Wells Acres Road, Bend Thomas J. Griffin, 14450 S.W. Peninsula Drive, Terrebonne Patsy R. Rozzell, 2310 S.W. Wickiup Ave., Redmond Jeffrey A. and Amy S. Adams, 1416 N.E. Fourth St., Redmond Filed Oct. 4

Richard K. Wickman, 67905 Cloverdale Road, Sisters Sherry Brooks, 1928 N.W. Harriman, Bend George W. Burgen, 55531 Gross Drive, Bend Jason L. and Kendra M. Marcoulier, 1205 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend Filed Oct. 5

Boyd V. and Arline V. Joyce, 1104 N.E. Stoneridge Loop, Prineville Chapter 13 Filed Sept. 29

Donald R. and Carol D. Dunbar, 61575 E. Lake Drive, Bend Alan E. and Cheri L. Shrum, 1895 N.E. Diablo Way, Bend Filed Sept. 30

Jennifer M. Bardwell, 1106 N.W. Federal St., Bend John G. and Karla B. Proud, 20720 Farenuff Place, Bend Robert L. and Sandra K. Gregg, P.O. Box 201, Madras


L

Inside

C LOCAL SCHOOLS Students learn why fruit is good for them, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010

No trace of man who went missing 10 days ago

Second black bear found in Bend

TO CRASH VICTIMS, A ROADSIDE MEMORIAL

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

As the last weekend of September was nearing, Daniel Carter told his boss, a co-worker and his mother that he planned to take a drive on the McKenzie Highway to check out changing fall colors. It was supposed to be a day trip, but on the following Monday, the 36-year-old Bend man didn’t show up for work and wasn’t answering his phone. His friends and family members began handing out fliers seeking information, and police searched a large area with the help Daniel Carter of Deschutes County Search and Rescue volunteers and an Oregon State Police plane. But 10 days later, there’s been no sign of Carter. Lisa Baker, the co-owner of Bend Construction Supply, said Carter has worked for the company for about eight and a half years. He’s done a variety of tasks, from taking orders to delivering merchandise to helping with accounting work.

Biologists, firefighters tranquilize, then lower 300-pound beast out of resident’s tree By Kate Ramsayer and Erin Golden The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Flowers, deflated balloons and stuffed animals mark the spot on U.S. Highway 26, next to the Deschutes River, where four people were killed in a two-car crash last week.

Relatives mourn deaths of 4 crash victims

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

‘Reliable, responsible’ In all his years with the company, Baker said Carter has only missed work for prearranged vacations or when he was ill. “He’s one of the most reliable, responsible people you’ll ever meet,” she said. Before he went missing, Carter, who is single and has no children, had taken a few weeks off of work because he’d been hospitalized for a heart infection. Baker said he’d seemed to be on the mend and had no intention of taking more time off. But Monday morning, when Baker’s husband showed up to work, Carter wasn’t there. It was unusual, she said, because Carter was typically in by 6:30 or 7 a.m., making coffee and getting the store ready for the day. Not long after, she started getting calls from Carter’s mother and his roommate, both wondering about his whereabouts. On Wednesday, Bend police detectives announced that he was missing and distributed his photo and a description of his car, a white 1995 Subaru Legacy wagon with Oregon license plate numbers 088 DJV. See Missing / C2

Three Trails OHV project areas 45

Odell Lake

LOOKING PAST THE ‘WHY?’

V

erleen and Roland Kalama may never know why their daughter-in-

Toyota with her last week.

Boy in serious condition The infant boy, Ladamire Lydell Kalama, sustained a broken jaw and hip, a massive head injury and severe bruising. He was in serious condition Tuesday afternoon at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland. A Warm Springs police officer,

The Deschutes National Forest is proposing to create an off-highway vehicle trail system on the Crescent Ranger District with 140 miles of trails for different types of vehicles.

58 97

Royce Mountain

Junction project area Odell Butte

Crescent Lake

Crescent Cutoff Rd. 61

0

Gilchrist Crescent

Trails for class I and III vehicles Trails for class II vehicles Trails for class III vehicles Shared use trails

MILES 5

97

Rivers project area Class I - ATVs, quads, three-wheelers Class II - four-wheel-drive vehicles, Jeeps Class III - dirt bikes, motorcycles Source: U.S. Forest Service

The wandering kind

law put her two young children in the

It seemed out of character. Normally, April Scott-Kalama, 26, would have considered her children’s safety. But for whatever reason, they were in the car with her as she allegedly fled the scene of a Madras burglary. And when she lost control of her car, slamming into a police officer’s vehicle, Grace Sybil Kalama, her 4year-old daughter, died in the crash. Scott-Kalama was also killed, along with two of her friends, Valerie Suppah, 25, and Sean Star, 22.

Tod Kerr, was also injured. He suffered a broken foot and a shattered knee but has been released from the hospital. Verleen Kalama watched April ScottKalama, her son’s future wife, grow up. She thought of her as her own daughter. “It’s very hurtful, because a lot of people are judging her harshly,” Verleen Kalama said of her daughter-in-law. “I don’t want people to paint a picture of an unfit mother. It was bad what she did. But she had extra-good qualities of a mother. That was a bad mistake she made, and it cost her life and her daughter’s,” she said. See Tragedy / C2

AT LEFT: A wedding picture of April ScottKalama.

Off-road trail proposal unveiled USFS option adds 140 miles to routes in Crescent Ranger District By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A new network of off-road vehicle trails would add more than 140 miles of trails to the area south and west of Crescent, under a new proposal from the U.S. Forest Service. The Three Trails OHV Project is designed to outline where off-highway vehicle enthusiasts can ride on the Crescent Ranger District, said Joan Kittrell, team leader with the ranger district.

Nationwide restriction

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

submitted photos

ABOVE: A picture shows Ladamire Lydell Kalama with his sister Grace Sybil Kalama. Ladamire has been upgraded to stable condition.

George said he didn’t know why the bear would have roamed into town, but it could have simply been hungry and followed the Deschutes River into Bend, ending up in the neighborhood. “Bears tend to just wander,” he said. The old bear first attracted attention Monday night, when residents spotted it in Woodriver Village, south of Reed Market Road and just east of the river. After someone spotted it rummaging through trash cans on Cherrywood Lane, it ran up a tree. When police arrived, it was too dark to safely tranquilize the animal. Tuesday morning, however, Pole spotted the bear on his property on Marlece Court and called police. Biologists with the Department of Fish and Wildlife arrived and shot a dart to tranquilize the bear. See Bear / C2

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

58

Walker project area

When Phil Pole saw his cat staring intently at something in a tree in the yard of his southwest Bend home, he figured he’d go have a look. The sun was still coming up, so it was hard to see what was lounging about 20 feet up a ponderosa pine. “I looked up and thought I saw a really big porcupine,” he said. He stepped out on his deck to get a better view and realized he was dealing with something else entirely — a 300-pound black bear, the second bear found roaming within the city limits in the last nine days. “It’s two bears in the last two weeks,” said Steve George, wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “It’s really unusual.” But while last week’s bear was about 15 months old and 50 pounds, the bear tranquilized Tuesday was much larger and in its teens — old age for a black bear.

In 2005, the U.S. Forest Service passed a nationwide rule requiring national forests to develop maps designating which areas and trails were open to motorized vehicles — all the rest of each forest would be off-lim-

Project info For more information, including maps of the routes, visit www.fs.fed. us/r6/centraloregon/travel-mgmt/ threetrails/index.shtml or contact Joan Kittrell or Holly Jewkes at (541) 433-3200. Comments are due by Nov. 15, and should be sent to Holly its. This was a switch for Central Oregon’s national forests, where most areas were open to offhighway vehicles unless officials specifically designated them as closed. So the Crescent Ranger District and an advisory committee started to work on mapping areas where trails should be open to motorized vehicles under the new rules, Kittrell said. The dis-

Jewkes, Crescent Ranger District, P.O. Box 208, Crescent, OR 97733. The agency will also hold an open house about the project from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Central Cascades Fire and EMS District Community Service Center building, 20400 Crescent Lake Highway in Crescent Lake. trict covers the portion of the Deschutes National Forest southwest of La Pine. “They looked at where they could all agree on where the trails could go, where we could have sustainable trails,” she said. After making a couple of drafts of a trail system, and taking into account public concerns about how the trails connect or the number of miles involved,

the agency released its preferred option earlier this week. The proposed trail system involves trails just for motorcycles, trails for motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, and trails for fourwheel-drive vehicles like Jeeps. It avoids the riverside areas and gets rid of stream crossings, Kittrell said, and often sticks to trails that riders have already created to avoid creating tracks across additional ground. “We’ll utilize as much of the disturbed ground as we can,” she said.

Close or rehabilitate The proposal recommends closing about 115 miles of Forest Service roads and rehabilitating 94 miles of trails that riders have created. The trail system was designed to connect three areas, she said. See Trails / C3


C2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:08 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 60800 block of Brookswood Boulevard. Theft — Cash was reported stolen at 10 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 2500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:10 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 900 block of Northwest Carlon Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and cell phone stolen at 10:14 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — Artwork was reported stolen at 11:14 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 500 block of Northwest Franklin Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a camper was reported at 11:46 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 800 block of Southeast Breitenbush Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:38 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 600 block of Northwest Portland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:47 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 4:33 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 62800 block of Bilyeu Way. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 4:58 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 1500 block of Northeast Neff Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and iPod stolen at 7:04 p.m. Nov. 4, in the 61300 block of Sally Lane. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:11 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 1100 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:07 a.m. Oct. 5, in the 1500 block of Northwest Wall Street. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to vehicles was reported at 10:32 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 200 block of Northwest Kingwood Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 6:42 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made wat 3:08 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 1200 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:58 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 900 block

of Northwest 15th Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:25 p.m. Oct. 4, in the area of Rosland and Tracy roads in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:16 p.m. Oct. 4, in the 17100 block of Oxnard Road in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:58 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 18600 block of Bull Springs Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:21 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 63100 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:18 a.m. Oct. 4, in the 52100 block of Lechner Lane in La Pine. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:20 p.m. Oct. 4, in the area of Old Bend Redmond Highway and Tumalo Road in Bend. DUII — Arlette Marie Warner, 47, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:57 p.m. Oct. 4, in the area of Southwest 17th Street and Southwest Knoll Avenue in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 11 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic medium-haired cat — Female, gray and white; found near Centennial Park. Chihuahua mix — Male, black and white; found near 13th Street in Terrebonne. Chihuahua — Male, brown; found near Southwest Nighthawk Avenue. Cocker Spaniel — Adult female, tan and white, pink collar; found near Southwest 23rd Street. Newfoundland — Adult male, black and white; found near Northwest Tetherow Road and Northwest Zamia Avenue.

Egypt’s leader killed in ’81 The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, Oct. 6, the 279th day of 2010. There are 86 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 6, 1927, the era of talking pictures arrived with the opening of “The Jazz Singer,� starring Al Jolson. ON THIS DATE: In 1683, thirteen families from Krefeld, Germany, arrived in Philadelphia to begin Germantown, one of America’s oldest settlements. In 1939, as military resistance in Poland crumbled, Adolf Hitler blamed the Poles for the Nazi-Soviet invasion of

T O D AY IN HISTORY their country. In 1973, war erupted in the Middle East as Egypt and Syria attacked Israel during the Yom Kippur holiday. In 1981, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat was shot to death by extremists while reviewing a military parade. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Broadcaster and writer Melvyn Bragg is 71. Rock singer Kevin Cronin (REO Speedwagon) is 59. Actress Elisabeth Shue is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Melinda Doolittle (TV: “American Idol�) is 33.

Tragedy Continued from C1 A Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy stopped Scott-Kalama’s car at about 10:15 p.m. last Wednesday near mile post 107 on U.S. Highway 26. When the deputy approached the vehicle, Kalama sped away. A chase ensued. Kalama lost control, crossed into oncoming traffic and hitting the Warm Springs officer’s vehicle. Before the crash, the group allegedly burglarized a Madras stereo store and left the store with about $400 in equipment. An investigation is ongoing. Instead of focusing on why the children were in the car, Verleen Kalama will be at the hospital with her grandson. And instead of trying to figure out what was going through her daughter-inlaw’s head that night, she will remember the young woman she considered one of her own, as the intelligent, kind woman she was. They remember her loving horses as a child and growing up to be a true cowgirl. Her young daughter, Gracie, also loved

Bear Continued from C1 “It went on farther up the tree, and found a spot where it went to sleep,� George said. Then officials had to figure out what to do with a big black bear, 60 feet off the ground. Tranquilized bears can easily fall out of trees, hurting or even killing themselves, George said. Plus, the tree was close to the edge of the rimrock over Deschutes River, said Bob Madden, battalion chief with the Bend Fire Department. So, after some debate, the fire department brought in its special operations team to lower the bear from the tree. While rescuers have harnesses for people and are confident using them for human rescues, the tranquilized and limp bear posed a challenge, Madden said.

horses. Verleen Kalama, 47, will remember fishing on the Columbia River with her daughter-in-law. She will think of the joy April Scott-Kalama took in shopping for her two children, and how much time and energy she spent planning her sister-in-law’s first baby shower. And when she thinks of “Gracieâ€? or “Gracie Lou,â€? she’ll remember what an impact the young girl had on the family in four years. She’ll think of how smart she was, how she would play makebelieve with her cousins — Grace would always be the teacher, and her cousins the students. “She was in early childhood education, and when she was in the 3-year-olds’ room, they wanted her to advance because it wasn’t challenging enough,â€? Verleen Kalama said. “She was bored and (the teachers) would say, ‘Gracie, come help us,’ and she would say, ‘You guys are the teachers, I’m the kid,’ and she had this lisp and sounded so sweet. ‌ Oh, my little Gracie Lou.â€? Roland Kalama, 49, remembered staring out the window watching Grace play with her

“The bear was a big 300-pound blob of Jell-O,� he said. So rescuers rigged up a makeshift harness out of webbing, wrapping it around the bear’s limbs, and lowered the bear to the ground, dodging branches on the way down. The bear was asleep the whole time, Madden said, although at one point it started to stir so the firefighters gave it an extra shot of sedatives. The Fire Department doesn’t usually rescue animals out of trees, he said. But in this case, firefighters determined that it was a matter of public safety. If the bear had fallen and injured itself, or had woken up upset, it could harm people in the area, Madden said. “We don’t go to cats in trees, that’s kind of a policy we have,� he said. “But when cats come out of trees they don’t run around and threaten to kill people.� The Department of Fish and

cousins. “My little sweetheart,� he said. “She was a very smart little girl, like she was getting ready to tackle the world.� The Kalamas were set to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary only three days after losing their daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Roland Kalama said at first they were thinking, what an awful day to celebrate anything. But, he said, the family decided to focus on the positive: little Ladamire fighting at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland. “We’ll be here to help him stay strong,� Roland Kalama said. “It’s a gift to have one of our grandkids back. They could have both been gone.� Family members of Suppah and Starr could not be reached for comment. On Saturday, April Scott-Kalama and Grace Sybil Scott were buried side by side on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Wildlife released the bear west of Crane Prairie Reservoir Tuesday afternoon, in the same general area where biologists released the small bear last week. Sgt. Dan Ritchie of the Bend Police Department said Tuesday’s bear operation was one of the more complex animal calls officials have had to deal with in the recent past. “It was a pretty unique thing, with three agencies working on it,� he said. “We all put our heads together, and the (Fire Department) did a great job of getting it out of there.� Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

L B  Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Flu shots offered at fire station A flu shot health clinic will be held today at the Crooked River Ranch Fire Station, according to a news release. The flu shot, which will take place from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., is being held by the Jefferson County Public Health Department. The annual seasonal flu vaccine will cost $30, while the high-dose flu vaccine will cost $45. Supply is limited, so the vaccines will be given out on a first-come first-served basis.

Prescribed burns set for Sisters area Two prescribed burns are scheduled for lands near Sisters today, according to a news release. Ignition times for the controlled burns will take place at 11 a.m., and smoke may be visible from U.S. Highway 20 and Black Butte Ranch. The first burn will be a 96acre area near U.S. Highway 20 at the base of Black Butte. The other burn will consist of 65 acres two miles north of U.S. Highway 20 and about five miles west of Sisters. The burns are designed to reduce hazardous fuels and improve forest health. All prescribed burns are dependent on weather conditions.

First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street, Bend

Saturday, Oct 9th, from 9 - 2 pm

Missing Continued from C1 The same day, Oregon State Police troopers searched the McKenzie Highway area from a plane. Over the weekend, Search and Rescue volunteers fanned out across western Deschutes County on foot, but they were not able to turn up any clues. On Tuesday, Sgt. Brian Kindel of the Bend Police Department said officials had received a few tips, but nothing that’s led them much closer to Carter. Baker said Carter’s disappearance has been hard on his family and co-workers. She said his mother traveled from California to be in the area when she heard her son was missing. Employees at the store are continuing to hand out fliers and ask anyone heading to the McKenzie Highway area to keep an eye out for Carter. Baker said she doesn’t know what to make of the situation, particularly because Carter is so reliable and not the type to take off on an outdoor adventure. “Honestly, in my heart of hearts,

I don’t think he’s run off,� she said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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October 15, 2010


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 C3

L S The healthy classroom A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

IN BRIEF

Bend FFA students head to nationals

The Bend FFA chapter will send three representatives to the national convention at the end of October in Indianapolis. Emily Garcia will compete in the creed speaking career development event, a public speaking contest. Mari Palacio will compete in the public prepared speaking career development event. Sam Palacio will run for a national officer position. He served as president of the Oregon state officer team last year. In November, Grant Garcia, Ryan Kelly, Rebecca Porter and Mari Palacio will compete in the national livestock judging competition in Louisville.

Episcopal School hosts Bend meeting Oregon Episcopal School, a day and boarding school in Portland, will host an information meeting Oct. 13 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Rambler Room at McMenamins Old St. Francis School. Prospective students and families are invited to learn more about the school. For more information, call the OES admissions office at 503-768-3115.

College fair set at fairgrounds The Central Oregon College Fair will feature more than 70 higher education institutions. The fair, which is free and open to the public, will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in the Middle Sister building. — Bulletin staff reports

T E E N F E AT S Kellie Riper has been named the October High Desert Hero by The Center Foundation of Bend. Riper, a senior at Mountain View High School, works with a nonprofit organization that establishes orphanages and schools for special-needs children. This summer she traveled to China as a representative of the organization. She maintains a 3.97 grade point average and is active in varsity tennis, concert and jazz choirs. She is vice president of the honor society and a member of The Center Foundation Student Advisory Council. Two local youths recently attained the rank of Eagle Scout from Boy Scouts of America. Greg Shipman is a member of Troop 21 in Bend. Shipman’s community service project was to build raised planter beds for the Bend Senior Center. He spent more than 325 hours volunteering to complete the project. Jon Simning is a member of Troop 18 in Bend. Simning’s community service project was planting fruit trees and plants to complete a section of the orchard at Nativity Lutheran Church. He spent approximately 227 hours volunteering to complete this project.

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

OSU program helps students discover, savor nutritious foods

Elk Meadow Elementary School fourth-grade students, from left, Eric Woodall, 9, Hunter House, 9, Hannah Maxwell, 9, and Emelia James, 9, make a healthy snack after getting a nutrition lesson from Oregon State University Extension Services nutrition education volunteer Lynette Patterson on Thursday in Bend.

By Megan K ehoe The Bulletin

Gasps erupted when nutrition education volunteer Lynette Patterson uncovered a cart Thursday afternoon, revealing a plump, electric-green fruit. “Watermelon!” students whispered excitedly, recognizing the fruit immediately as something they’d been enjoying all summer. But what students of Olivia Variel’s fourth-grade class didn’t realize was that the benefits of the fruit didn’t end at its crisp, delicious flavor. “I like to start with watermelon to get them trusting the fruit, and then we can build from there,” said Patterson, a volunteer from the Oregon State University extension program who has taught nutrition education in schools for 25 years, and has been teaching nutrition in Central Oregon classrooms over the past year. “We have the opportunity to go in and provide kids with information and encourage them to make healthy choices.” Though it’s not quite watermelon season anymore, Variel’s students at Elk Meadow Elementary School in Bend learned all about the summer fruit during Thursday’s session — including what it adds to their diets. “I like that it’s healthy, and that it tastes good,” said Sienna Bales, 9. “It’s fun to learn about how much vitamins it has, and how it’s healthy for you.”

Photos by Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Eric Woodall, a fourth-grade student at Elk Meadow Elementary School, studies a nutrition wheel that shows the nutritional values of various fruits and vegetables.

“I like that it’s healthy, and that it tastes good. It’s fun to learn about how much vitamins it has, and how it’s healthy for you.” — Sienna Bales, Elk Meadow Elementary fourth-grader

Program teaches value of being healthy The Oregon State University Extension’s nutrition education program is designed to teach students about the importance of being healthy through a series of classes. The classes focus on the basics of staying healthy, including segments on fruits and vegetables, hand washing and physical activity. The session started Thursday with students pulling out their nutrition folders, which they had received the week before during the first health session. Patterson placed a transparency on the overhead projector, showing a colorful wheel of fruits and vegetables, and asked the students to describe what they saw. “It’s a rainbow of fruit,” said one student. Patterson nodded, adding that rainbows have a variety of colors — and that the

Trails Continued from C1 The northern section, near Crescent Junction, includes a trail around Royce Mountain and the Black Rock Pit area. The central area around the Two Rivers community includes several motorcycle loops and longer trails, she said. And the southern area includes trails for Jeeps and other four-wheel-drive vehicles, she said, as well as the other types of motorized recreation.

Some prefer more Patti Pyland, with Deschutes County 4-Wheelers, was wading though the 500 pages of the Forest Service’s draft environmental statement Tuesday. She prefers an alternative to the one highlighted by the Forest Service — one with more trails for Jeeps and other four-wheel-drive vehicles. “If they don’t build the trails without satisfying obstacles and trail elements, it’s not going to solve the problem,” she said. “People will be bored.” Riders want rocks to climb over, changes in grade and direction, ascents and descents — “something to do other than drive down a road,” she said. Joni Mogstad, who owns a cabin in the area and advocates for

word “variety” is key when it comes to a healthy and balanced diet. “Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables,” said Patterson, having students transfer the words to a nutrition worksheet. While the fourth-graders were busy carefully spelling out the words, Patterson uncovered her cart, bringing out a medium-sized watermelon. “Watermelon is my favorite,” said Cameron Greener, 9, eyeing the electric green fruit. “I like it because it’s really juicy and good for you.”

Choosing quality fruit Patterson then launched into a discussion about how to choose a ripe watermelon — making sure to observe the color, the weight

off-highway-vehicle riders, said that while she can’t yet comment on the plan itself, it’s important the proposal includes access to parking and staging areas, restrooms and other infrastructure, including good signs. And riders need trails that are connected, so they don’t have to retrace their steps, as well as trails of varying difficulty. “There needs to be a place where beginners can go and sort of get their feet wet,” Mogstad said, “but there also needs to be places where there’s a challenge for experienced riders.”

Wildlife concern But Tim Lillebo, with the conservation group Oregon Wild, said he is concerned about the proliferation of off-road vehicles and the areas where the

and the sound the fruit makes when you knock on it. “It sounds hollow,” said Eric Woodall, 9, curling his hand into a fist and rapping on the melon. Patterson went on to say that a hollow sound was a sign of a good watermelon, along with the bright green color, and a spot of yellow on the fruit’s bottom where it would have been lying in the garden. Students then pulled out a nutrition wheel, in which they were able to see the nutritional benefits of the watermelon, including a healthy helping of vitamins A and C. These are essential vitamins, Patterson pointed out, for keeping eyes, skin, gums and the immune system healthy. After, Patterson unveiled a buffet of chopped watermelon,

bananas, blueberries and vanilla yogurt, showing students how to build a banana split using healthier ingredients than ice cream and chocolate syrup. Eric, who was first in line to make his split, said he enjoyed the fresh fruit mix so much he wants to have it in lieu of cake for his birthday this January — even though it may be tricky to find watermelon in the heart of winter.

Fun break from 3 R’s “I finished it pretty quickly,” said Eric, adding that he liked learning about the fruit. “It’s kind of fun getting away from math and science and stuff.” This is the second year that Elk Meadow Elementary has had the nutrition program. With

many of her students coming from a low socioeconomic background, Variel said sometimes health and nutrition are not topics discussed at home. “Every time Lynette comes in, we notice the kids start choosing more vegetables and fruits in the cafeteria,” said Variel, saying students have started trying once-unpopular veggies like green peppers at lunchtime. “Instead of bypassing them like usual, they pick them because they remember trying them and liking them in class.” The session ended Thursday with a short stint of exercise, students stretching, doing jumping jacks, and running in place. They waved goodbye to Patterson as she wheeled out her cart, knowing that she’d be back for another session the following week. “They can take back what they’ve learned here and share it with their families,” said Patterson. “I really believe they can influence what happens at home.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

trails are. Trails can disrupt wildlife habitat or migration corridors, he said, noting that the Deschutes National Forest already has thousands of miles of roads. “We’ve got to be really careful when we create new ones,” he said. People can comment on the proposed trail system until midNovember, and the Forest Service is hosting an open house on the subject on Oct. 21. The agency plans to have a final environmental report on the project in late winter or early spring, Kittrell said, and could start work on designing the new staging areas and putting up signs on existing loops. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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C4 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Vote ‘no’ on M75

O

regonians need to have a debate about gambling, which is currently dominated by the state and Indian tribes. But Measure 75, which would permit one — and only one —

privately owned casino in Oregon, isn’t a good place to start.

Voters should oppose the measure and stick with the status quo, as imperfect as it might be. Measure 75, in brief, would clear the way for a $250 million casino and destination resort at the site of the old Multnomah Kennel Club in Wood Village. One quarter of all gambling revenues would go to the state to be divvied up by various entities, including public schools and local governments. A companion measure that would have amended the constitutional prohibition on private casinos failed to qualify for the ballot. But proponents now believe that Measure 75 alone will do the trick. We’ll see. We do have some sympathy with Measure 75’s backers. Gambling in Oregon is rampant already, with the state’s 12,000-plus video terminals, the other Lottery games it promotes aggressively and, of course, the freestanding casinos run by Indian tribes. So, given what’s happening already, why not let the private sector buy some gambling gizmos and set up shop, subject, of course, to appropriate taxation and regulation? The casino’s opponents argue that the facility would put the squeeze on various state services supported by Lottery revenue, which they believe would drop substantially. They also argue that the ballot measure’s distribution formula would shortchange public education, which is the Lottery fund’s most prominent beneficiary. The casino’s supporters, meanwhile, argue that the project’s effect on the state Lottery would be modest and would be more than offset by gaming revenue and various taxes. They also point out that the casino is, in effect, an enormous economic development project that could produce thousands of permanent jobs. We don’t know who’s right here, but nobody denies that competition from the casino would affect the Lottery fund. That isn’t necessarily a reason to oppose privately owned

casinos in principle, but it could be a good argument for proceeding very slowly and deliberately. But an even better reason is provided by Measure 75 itself. It’s one thing to open up the gambling business to the private sector in a fair and careful manner. It’s another thing entirely to allow a single private-sector casino to dig into the money pile along with the state and tribes. This wouldn’t be a monopoly, exactly, but it’s objectionable for the same reasons. Supporters argue that nothing would prevent another private group from asking voters to approve a second casino elsewhere. That’s true enough, we suppose, but there’s got to be a better way to even the gambling playing field than adding casinos serially by ballot measure. In some ways, the state’s grip on gambling is like its monopoly on hard liquor, which we oppose. But as solutions to the problem go, Measure 75 is akin to “fixing” the liquor monopoly by allowing the creation of a single, privately owned Mega Booze Mart. The battle over Measure 75 is a cynic’s paradise. The self-interest of its proponents is obvious enough. So is the self-interest of those funding the campaign in opposition. According to the Secretary of State’s Office, the biggest contributor to the Vote No on 75 — It’s a Bad Idea Committee is Spirit Mountain Gaming Inc., whose Spirit Mountain Casino is currently the closest gambling mecca to the Portland area. While opponents have done their best to characterize Measure 75’s backers as greedy opportunists, they’re neither more nor less “greedy” than anyone else in the gambling scrum, including the state of Oregon. But that doesn’t make Measure 75 a good idea. As cockeyed as Oregon’s gambling spoils system may be, allowing a single privately owned casino to cash in is no way to fix it.

Teachers deserve praise

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hanks to stagnating state revenues and the shift back to a fiveday week, the Redmond School District has had to eliminate some courses at the high school level this year. Other courses are being offered less frequently than they were before. As students have discovered, eliminating or reducing classes can cause real problems. Redmond officials trimmed classes that attracted the fewest students. In all, about 100 electives disappeared from the high school curriculum, and others, including AP calculus, are being offered less often. Those courses and a handful of others haven’t completely disappeared, however. Roughly half a dozen of the high school’s teachers are volunteering to teach students during the time set aside for preparation for their regular classes. They hope the advanced classes, which require substantial independent work, won’t consume all of their

prep time. In any case, though, they’re committed to doing what they were hired to do: teach kids. This use of prep time is a remarkable act of generosity. Yet administrators and the teachers’ union have expressed reservations. Administrators wanted to make sure students were earning credits in such classes, though that concern seems to have been addressed. The union, meanwhile, worried that using prep time in this fashion would send the wrong message: namely, that prep time isn’t really necessary. Teachers had no prep time last year when the district operated on a four-day week, and the union’s spokesman said she didn’t want its return jeopardized. In the end, the union, too, has signed off, and that’s a good thing. Teachers who go above and beyond the call of duty deserve praise and gratitude, not grumbling and grudging acceptance.

My Nickel’s Worth We goofed Yesterday afternoon I received a phone call from the Bend Bulletin regarding an unfortunate error that was made by my campaign in the publication of the voters’ pamphlet. In the course of several revisions, prior to its submission, a quote in my candidate’s statement was mistakenly ascribed to the Bend Bulletin instead of to Dr. Nathan Boddie and misplaced. This quote could be misconstrued as an endorsement by the newspaper for my campaign, which was never my intent. Just as I handled any issues during the 19 years I owned my own business, as the candidate, I take full responsibility for this mistake. The Bend Bulletin has not yet made its final endorsement for the candidacy of the congressional representative for the 2nd District. I believe The Bulletin will make its endorsement decision based on the merits of the two candidates, and I look forward to its decision. Joyce Segers Democratic candidate for Congress 2nd District

Bad for bikes Deschutes County is ruining its roads by covering decent asphalt surfaces with gravel and goo. I live off O.B. Riley Road, and I’m extremely frustrated with the quality of work done over the last two years. The chip seal work has ruined a fine smooth surface — compounded by not even replacing the painted bike lanes or cleaning the loose gravel on the edges, making it hazardous to ride on the shoulder.

I ride on 700x25 MM 130 PSI tires, so the quality of the surface is noticeable. Surely engineers recognize the increased tread wear, road noise and reduced mileage that results in poor quality road surfaces. Clearly, when main routes (U.S. Highway 20) are resurfaced, asphalt is used, so someone recognizes the low-cost, quick and dirty fix doesn’t cut it. Tyler, O.B. Riley, Brinson, Tumalo Reservoir, Tumalo Market — all have been wrecked in the last five years by summer projects. Is it a coincidence that these are the favorite riding routes of local cyclists? No, I’m not a conspiracy nut case, so why can’t the bike lanes be left alone? Stop applying the chip-seal to perfectly smooth shoulders. It would mean labor and materials savings of at least 20 percent. Also the paint crews would not need to remark the shoulder — more money savings. Has anyone in the Deschutes County Roads Department ever ridden a bicycle on the department’s “product?” Peter Gunby Bend

Bend’s parking tickets I’m a local (Sunriver) but must admit I was not aware of the two-hour parking limitation on downtown Bend streets. However, after I spent more than $275 with downtown merchants today, you can imagine my dismay to return to my car and find a $22 parking ticket. Ticketing people shopping downtown merchants is outrageous behavior by the city of Bend. It is a huge detriment to downtown merchants who, at best, are struggling to survive in a depressed economy, reduction in tourists,

and now angry locals who will take their business to local shopping malls and business centers with free, unlimited parking — all to avoid the hassle of this type of action. We were planning next week to have dinner at a downtown restaurant and then see a play at the Tower Theatre, but with no place to park, I guess it will have to be dinner and a movie at the Old Mill District instead. Sorry, Tower Theatre, we’d love to support you — and sorry, Cat Call Productions, the local theater production company trying to make a go of community theater here in Bend. But it’s just not worth going downtown anymore as long as these types of tactics exist. Shame on the city of Bend. Shame! Thomas Sims Sunriver

Wilderness act The proposed Cathedral Rock and Horse Heaven Wilderness Act of 2010 is an opportunity to correct fragmented Bureau of Land Management ownership, interspersed with private lands, and to add high-value private land to public holdings along the John Day River. Every year the Big Muddy Ranch has trespass problems and gunshots potentially crossing into private land intended for Christian youth recreation. Growing use by floaters of the John Day River is limited by the number of available campsites. Both these problems are reduced by the act. Whatever one’s political persuasion, this one makes sense. Jim Carlson Mitchell

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon park enthusiasts should support Measure 76 By George Thayer and Phyllis Kosanke Bulletin guest columnists

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n the July 30 edition of The Bulletin, an editorial titled “Don’t lock up lottery funds” argued against constitutionally dedicating funds to water, parks and wildlife. Twelve years ago, Oregon was faced with closing 65 state parks and had a backlog of costly maintenance and repairs. Rivers and salmon runs across the state were listed in poor condition. Then passage of Measure 66, overwhelmingly approved by Oregon voters in 1998, dedicated 15 percent of lottery receipts to state parks, wildlife-habitat improvements and salmon recovery. Today our state parks offer Oregonians a wealth of safe and affordable outdoor experiences. The parks’ maintenance backlog is almost caught up, and our rivers and salmon runs have improved. Measure 66 has provided thousands of jobs to people all across the state working with watershed councils and parks organizations to clean up our rivers, restore riparian and wetland habitats, and build parks and trails.

The Bend Park and Recreation District and the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District Board of Directors adopted resolutions supporting Measure 76, which will come before Oregon voters in November. We believe its passage is imperative to build upon the successes of the past decade. It will assure that all Oregonians are afforded clean, safe drinking water, well-maintained and affordable parks, and the continuation and creation of jobs that this economy desperately needs. Renewing the current system of parks and wildlife funding is vital to Oregon’s future. Without it, state parks as we know them will cease to exist. We can see the disastrous effects that budget crises in California, Arizona and Colorado have wrought on their state and local parks: closures of as many as half of all state parks, increased user fees, reduced hours, and even selling land once dedicated to public recreation. All 12 state parks in central Oregon receive operations and capital improvement dollars from lottery proceeds. None of these parks receive

IN MY VIEW funding from state property tax revenues, but rely heavily on state lottery funds to operate. Cove Palisades is the most-visited state park in Oregon and has a huge economic impact on Madras. Smith Rock State Park is an icon for the entire state. Reducing hours or closing any of the state parks in Central Oregon would have a profound economic impact on local business and our entire tourism industry. Oregon’s park and natural-resource dollars also fund projects for local park agencies through the Local Government Grant Program. Central Oregon communities have received more than $2.5 million in lottery dollars to fund projects such as the Bend Pine Nursery, the Lake Ewauna multi-use trail in Sisters, American Legion Community Park in Redmond, and Finley Field improvements in La Pine. Cities and towns in every Oregon county have received a total of $49 million in lottery monies to fund local parks projects. These dollars have also

leveraged more than $100 million from other funding sources. Imagine what your community would look like without trails to hike and parks to play in. Central Oregon’s environment has benefited from more than $8 million in lottery proceeds that have funded projects such as the riparian and wetland-habitat restoration projects at Farewell Bend and River Bend parks in Bend, restoration of Polk Camp along Wychus Creek, and numerous riparian-habitat projects along the Deschutes River. The Deschutes Land Trust used lottery dollars to acquire Rimrock Ranch. State funding for parks and natural areas also makes Oregon eligible for federal matching funds that will be lost to other states unless Oregon’s share of these funds is ensured for the future. This is not only a quality of life concern, but also an economic development issue. The current funding arrangement reaches every Oregonian — ensuring a healthier and better quality of life for all of us, and making our region more attractive to businesses seeking to relocate or launch operations here. A re-

cent Headwaters Economic study determined that most businesses relocating to Bend do so because of the investment we have made in parks and outdoor recreation opportunities. Our economy has struggled in recent years, but voting yes on 76 will help Bend continue to attract and keep employers, and it will generate thousands of living-wage jobs. The Measure 76 vote gives Oregonians a historic opportunity to sustain and enhance parks, open spaces, wildlife habitat, clean water and, ultimately, public health and economic vitality. Maintaining the current funding mechanism will preserve a healthy, economically prosperous, and environmentally diverse Oregon for all our citizens, today and tomorrow. We owe it to ourselves and to future Oregonians to vote yes on Measure 76 in November. George Thayer is chair of the Bend Park & Recreation District Board, and Phyllis Kosanke is vice chair of the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District Board.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 C5

O Sandra Lee (Brown) Mary Florence Veeck Berry July 19, 1942 - Sept. 14, 2010

June 24, 1916- Sept. 20, 2010

Sandra died on September 14, 2010, in Bend, OR, at age 68, after a long battle with colon cancer. She was born in San Francisco, CA, to Gladys and Forest Brown and raised in and around northern California, primarily in Chico, CA. In 1971, she Sandra Lee R. (Brown) Veeck married Kim Veeck in San Rafael, CA, who preceded her in death in 1981. Sandy moved to Sisters in 1981, and later to Bend. Sandy’s interests were many and varied. She had been an avid hunter and fisherwoman and was a skilled skeet competitor. She had also fenced (foil) nationally. She was a talented artist and enjoyed painting, scrimshaw, engraving and etching. She spent several years painting homes but particularly enjoyed faux painting artistic touches. She also enjoyed remodeling her homes over the years. She loved rocks and collected many specimens during her lifetime. One of her great passions was land-sailing with her friends at the Alvord Desert in Eastern Oregon. For the past five years, she enjoyed the company of her four cats, whom she had fostered as kittens and subsequently adopted. Sandra was preceded in death by her parents, and her long time partner, Donald T. Moody. She is survived by her sister, Jude Hanson of Bend, OR; stepsons, Kristopher Veeck of Fresno, CA, and Kurt (Patti) Veeck of Sausalito, CA; two grandchildren; one great-grandchild; several cousins and many friends and neighbors. There will be a memorial coffee gathering on Saturday, October 16, 2010, at 10:30 am, at 21616 Old Red Road, in Bend, OR.

Mary Florence Berry, 94, of Golden Valley passed away Monday, Sept. 20, 2010, at Kingman Regional Medical Center. She was born June 24, 1916, on a homestead in rural Central Oregon. She moved to the Kingman/Gol den Valley/ Mary Florence Wickenburg areas of AriBerry zona 30 years ago from Prineville, OR. Among the many occupations she pursued, Mary was one of the "Rosie the Riveters" helping build ships in Portland, OR. She was also a seamstress, a ranch hand, a ranch cook, and loved to play softball, garden and can produce. She shared it with everyone. She was active with the 4-H, Paralyzed Veterans, Wickenburg Horseman's Association, Wise Owl Senior Center, American Cancer Society, and at one time she and her late husband manned separate watchtowers for the Oregon Forest Service, keeping in contact with each other by radio. Mary is survived by two grandchildren, Jeri Houle of Oregon and Greg Miller of Washington State; and four great-grandchildren, Robbie, Kerrie, Natalie and Jackie. She is also survived by her sister, Ruth Thalhofer of Oregon. There will be no services. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to the American Cancer Society - (800) 227-2345.

John Jacob Carriker July 3, 1938- October 2, 2010 La Pine, Oregon - John passed at home with his family, of a Thoracic Aortic Dissection. He began a new journey at the age of 72. He went peacefully to the Lord. John was born in Sayre, Oklahoma to Marion and Cassie Carriker. He John Carriker married his loving wife of 53 years, JoAnn (Conatser) Carriker. They have five children, Kim & (Barry) Martin, John & (Nancy) Carriker, Joseph & (Rosa) Carriker, Dawn & (Dave) Olson, and Shawn O’Grady; 11 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by his parents, four brothers and one sister. He grew up in the Bay area and raised his family in Napa Valley, California. John and JoAnn moved to La Pine 26 years ago. He was a manager for Gallenkamp’s Shoe Store, then continuing his career as a Union Journeyman Painter for 40 years before his retirement. His interests were family gatherings, hunting, camping, fishing, and the San Francisco Giants. John’s Celebration of Life will be held at La Pine Community Church, Saturday, October 9, at 11:00 a.m. The family welcomes fond memories, shared stories and pictures. The family would like to say Thank You for all the loving prayers. We would also like to give thanks to the La Pine Fire Department, Air Link, Partners in Care and Dr. Eddie Young, MD.

Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

(541) 678-0020

Brock Lamar Brooks Oct. 5, 1963 - Oct. 1, 2010 Brock Lamar Brooks, age 46, passed away from cancer on October 1, 2010, at St. Charles Hospital in Bend. Brock was born on October 5, 1963, in McPherson, KS, lived in Elkhorn, NE, until he was 15 when he moved to Madras with Brock Lamar his family. Brooks He graduated from Madras High School in 1982, where he was a natural athlete. Brock played high school basketball, football (including MVP) and tennis in which he and his tennis partner were two year 3A State doubles tennis champions. He attended one year at Oregon Tech and one year at Oregon State University. He worked for Agency farms from age 15. Brock was married to Jamme (Peck) in December 1995 and had two sons, Marshal (11 yrs) and Garyn (9 yrs). Brock enjoyed the outdoors including fishing, hunting, camping, skiing, softball and golf. He is survived by his natural father, Loren Johnson; his adoptive father, Dean Brooks; his mother, Barbara Brooks; two brothers, Brad Johnson and Phil Brooks; and two sisters, Babette (Johnson) Hubbard and Cheryl (Brooks) D' Antonio. We want to thank our community of family and friends who have helped and prayed for us during this difficult time. A private family service was held on Oct. 4, and a public celebration of life will be held on Oct. 16, at the Madras High School Gym at 10:00 AM. Donations in Brock's memory should be directed to Bank of the West in Madras designated to scholarship funds for Marshal and Garyn. Brock, you will be greatly missed. We love you.

Mary (Molly) Beatrice de Fremery

Virginia ‘Ginny’ Lea Rev. Raymond Ruck Arthur Ferguson April 6, 1938 - Sept. 29, 2010

Nov. 24, 1936 - Sept. 26, 2010

April 21, 1915 - Sept. 28, 2010

Virginia Lea Ruck passed away peacefully in her sleep Wednesday, September 29, 2010, in Bend, at the age of 72. Virginia Lea Ruck was born April 6, 1938, in Evanston, Illinois, to Robert and Dorothy (Wilson) ‘Ginny’ Ruck Cazel. Ginny was raised in Gaylord, Michigan, and graduated from Gaylord High School. Ginny worked in the banking industry for most of her working career. Her last job was with US Bank in Bend, first in the Main branch then retiring from the Northgate branch. Ginny loved gardening, especially her flowers, arts and crafts, waterskiing, camping, but the most important thing in her life, was her family. She loved family gatherings and cooking for everyone. She loved her grandchildren very much - they meant the world to her. Ginny is survived by her husband of 25 years, Daryl Ruck; children, Chris Robinson, Cindy Larson, and Cherie Mitchell, all of Bend; sisters, Beverly Rodgers and Coral Hoke of Michigan; sister-in-law, Beth Cazel of California; 10 grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. She was preceded in death by her parents, brother, Robert and sister, LaDonna. A celebration of Ginny's life will be held Saturday, October 9, 2010, 12:00 - 2:00 at the family home, 65255 85th Street, Bend, Oregon. Autumn Funerals has been entrusted with arrangements.

The Rev. Raymond Ferguson, 73, passed away Sept. 26, 2010, in Tillamook, OR. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Louise; three daughters; numerous grandchildren, one great-granddaughter; a brother, Larry Ferguson of Prineville; and a sister, Nancy Cayward of CT. Fr. Ray served Episcopal parishes in White Earth, Minnesota, Portland, OR, St. Alban's Church in Redmond, OR from 1971-1979, and St. Alban's in Tillamook from 1979 to the present. He was a selfless social activist, serving various organizations in his community. He was a volunteer fireman and a chaplain for the Tillamook County Sheriff's Dept. A funeral service is set for October 9, at one o'clock at St. Alban's Church, in Tillamook, Oregon. Remembrances may be made in Fr. Ray's name to St. Alban's Episcopal Discretionary Fund, P.O. Box 285, Tillamook, OR 97141.

Mary (Molly) Beatrice de Fremery, age 95, passed away in Sandpoint, Idaho, on Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2010. Graveside funeral services will be conducted 10:00 am, Friday, October 8, 2010, at the Pilot Mary Butte Cemde Fremery etery, in Bend, Oregon. Contributions in her memory may be made to Save the Redwoods League. Local services will be held at a later time at The Bridge in Sandpoint. Molly was born on April 21, 1915, in Santa Barbara, California. She attended schools in Port Hueneme and Piedmont and started college at the University of California, Berkeley, but left to care for her mother and sisters while her father was sick and died. She lived in Piedmont and Pleasant Hill, California for many years. She lived in Bend, Oregon from 1969 until 2004, when she moved to Sandpoint, ID to be close to her daughter. She was active in the Girl Scouts organization and was a longtime member of the Sierra Club and enjoyed hiking the mountains of Northern California. She also pledged and maintained membership in her sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta. She loved gardening; her year-round vegetable garden in Bend was featured in Sunset Magazine. She also enjoyed knitting and sewing for her children and grandchildren. To know Molly was to love Molly. Her smile could brighten your day and warm your heart like a giant beam of sunlight. She was a woman of great courage and adventure, as she traveled extensively during her long life. She spoke at length about her travels with Pete throughout the west. She cruised around the tip of South America on a barge and visited many countries on that long voyage. She loved England and enjoyed the Chelsea Garden Show while there. She also took a garden tour of New Zealand and said that it was one of the most beautiful places she had ever been to. Molly loved horses and traveled to Rome, Italy for the 1998 World Equestrian Games. She took a cruise to Alaska when she was 90 years old and loved to watch the glaciers calve from her balcony. When entertaining visitors in Sandpoint, Molly enjoyed train rides and long scenic drives through the countryside admiring the fall colors. She loved to read and had an extensive library covering a wide variety of subjects. She read the newspapers daily and was always interested in what was going on in the world. She is survived by three children, Charles Green of Las Vegas, NV, Edward de Fremery of Pittsburgh, CA, and Lexie de Fremery of Sagle, ID; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Charles Green; and her husband, Peter de Fremery; two great-grandchildren, Mitchell Green and Robert Green; and two sisters, Barbara and Lally. Family and friends are invited to sign Molly's online guestbook at www.coffeltfuneral.com. Funeral arrangements are entrusted to the care of Coffelt Funeral Service.

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Robert E. Aukerman II Aug. 29, 1954 - October 1, 2010 “Grateful” Bob passed from this earth Friday, October 1, 2010. He was a talented musician that eagerly lent his skills to many ensembles, a patient loving teacher, and a truly generous human being. He is survived by his father, sister, and brother. Bobby also leaves behind a large musical family, too numerous to name, that will sorely miss their “brother” and dear friend. A memorial celebration and jam will be held October 17, 2010, details will be posted at the Northside Pub.

Obituaries are continued on Page C6.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Aidan Jane Rauscher

Eryn Flannery Rauscher

August 18, 2001 – September 20, 2010

February 11, 2003 – September 20, 2010

These beautiful girls, the warm-hearted Aidan, and the precocious Eryn, were tragically killed on Sept. 20th - Aidan had just turned 9 and Eryn was 7½ . These loving sisters both attended Oak Hill School in Eugene. Aidan was in the 4th grade and Eryn in the 3rd. Their wonderful school held a private memorial service for Aidan and her sister Eryn, on Saturday, September 25th. Although there are only 150 students in this K through 12th grade school, there were over 300 students, teachers, friends and family who attended the services. The love and deep grief felt by all who knew these two wonderful little girls permeated every inch of Oak Hill’s small campus. Survivors include their mother, Jennifer Flannery of Eugene, grandparents Dennis and Zelia Flannery of Bend and Janel and Mike Johnson of Eugene. Their uncles are Vance Flannery, Sean Nobel Flannery, Christian Nauer and Joseph Nauer. Their aunts are Amanda Nobel Flannery and Leah King Nauer. We all have love in our hearts and tears in our eyes. The family asks that in lieu of flowers, a donation to Oak Hill School would be much appreciated. Musgrove Family Mortuary in Eugene made final arrangements.

Born in Ithaca, NY on March 8, 1942 to Hannah and Richard Bradfield, Jim’s official birth certificate reads “James Worthington Bradfield”. Jim had five older siblings, Richard (deceased), Robert, Stillman (known as Tan), David, and Patricia. Jim spent six months with his family in Mexico at age six, and two years in the Philippines, Japan, India and other parts of Asia and Europe when he was 12 and 13 years old. Jim graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with honors in psychology. After entering the graduate program in clinical psychology at Kansas, Jim decided that sitting in an office was not how he wanted to live. Jim always chose his own adventuresome paths. He spent most of his adult life on the Pacific Coast. He fished commercially for salmon and king crab in Washington and Alaska; worked as a chef in many places; owned several restaurants and espresso bars in the San Francisco Bay Area with his friend and partner, Bob Carey; worked as a real estate broker on mall development; and developed food products and packaging for a start-up company. Jim sailed for many years as a member of various Bay Area sailing clubs before he and his wife, Carole, bought their own sailing catamaran, Joyous. They sailed Joyous to Mexico and across the Pacific to the Marquesas, to Tahiti in the Society Islands and through the Tuamotu Islands of French Polynesia. In addition to being a dedicated member of Friends of Bill W., Jim spent many years studying and practicing Buddhist meditation. For his 60th birthday, he treated himself to a month-long silent meditation retreat at Spirit Rock Meditation Center in northern California. He studied and assisted in the teaching of ikebana: the Japanese art of flower arranging. After retiring, Jim and Carole moved to Bend where they have lived for twelve years. In Bend, Jim has been a dedicated volunteer for Big Brothers, for Partners In Care hospice and for Bend Parks and Recreation who named him Volunteer of the Year in 2003. Skiing and hiking were lifelong pleasures. He led many group trips snowshoeing, cross country skiing, and hiking. He became interested in hunting wild mushrooms among his many other outdoor pursuits. He was one of the organizers of the Bend Vipassana Meditation group that meets at Hospice House Chapel. He loved to cook great food for his wife and friends. He was an avid reader. Jim was also active in Democratic Party work, including campaigning for Bill Bradley in the New Hampshire presidential primary. He and fellow democrat Mara Stein spearheaded the formation of the Truman Club of Central Oregon, a social and progressive organization. In 2003 Jim received his first diagnosis of a degenerative neurological disorder (variously diagnosed as Multiple System Atrophy, Parkinson’s Disease and Lewy Body Dementia: three closely related conditions). Since knowing that he had a terminal degenerative neurological condition, he crewed on a trans-Pacific sailboat; traveled to Australia and New Zealand with three of his siblings; and studied in Costa Rica with the Shaolin Chi Gong Grand Master. He and Carole attended family reunions in Florida, in Ohio and in Ithaca, N.Y. where he had grown up. He made many additional trips with his wife, including a European cruise last year and recently a helicopter ride into the crater of Mt. St. Helens. Knowing that he was terminally ill, Jim planned with his wife, his doctors, his family and friends how to die with dignity, since he did not wish to follow the path of his parents who spent twelve years of senility in a nursing home. He chose the path of deciding when life no longer felt comfortable and manageable to share a final festive dinner with many friends and then to voluntarily stop eating and drinking. He carried out this plan with calm determination, dying peacefully at home on September 30, 2010 at age 68 with his wife, his sister, his best friend, and Zeke, Zeldy, and Zephyr, his three beloved cats, attending him. The family wishes to acknowledge that Jim’s feeling of completion and his peaceful transition would not have been possible without the active love, support, and assistance of his and Carole’s many friends. Jim and Carole decided in advance of his death to request that memorial contributions be made to Partners In Care (hospice), 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701 in memory of Jim Bradfield. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral home is handling the final arrangements. Please visit our guestbook at www.niswonger-reynolds.com


WE

C6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 6 Today: Increasing cloud cover late, slightly warmer.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

66/45

64/42

72/41

60/40

Warm Springs 76/45

68/35

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

70/40

Camp Sherman 67/35 Redmond Prineville 72/38 Cascadia 69/38 71/39 Sisters 70/37 Bend Post 72/38

69/37

60/26



68/35

Hampton 67/35

Fort Rock

64/50

Seattle

73/43

Bend

76/48

73/47



Idaho Falls 68/37

69/37

67/36

San Francisco

Partly cloudy today. A chance of showers tonight.

60/38

73/43

Elko

79/54

Crater Lake

74/45

Boise

72/38

Redding

Silver Lake

65/32

75/42

Helena

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

Eugene

71/36

61/28

City

66/48

Reno



61/42



63/54

Salt Lake City 70/51

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

New

First

Full

Last

Oct. 7

Oct. 14

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 65/42/0.00 . . . . . . 70/46/s. . . . . . 63/51/pc Baker City . . . . . . 66/42/0.00 . . . . . 71/43/pc. . . . . . 66/41/sh Brookings . . . . . . 74/49/0.00 . . . . . 63/52/pc. . . . . . 61/53/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 67/41/0.01 . . . . . 70/45/pc. . . . . . 64/42/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 67/38/0.00 . . . . . 73/43/pc. . . . . . 70/47/pc Klamath Falls . . . 66/31/0.00 . . . . . . 70/34/c. . . . . . 67/33/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 50/36/0.00 . . . . . 66/39/pc. . . . . . 63/36/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 56/25/0.00 . . . . . 66/34/pc. . . . . . 71/32/pc Medford . . . . . . . 70/37/0.00 . . . . . 79/49/pc. . . . . . 74/47/pc Newport . . . . . . . 61/43/0.00 . . . . . 67/48/pc. . . . . . 61/50/pc North Bend . . . . . . 61/45/NA . . . . . 65/50/pc. . . . . . 63/54/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/52/0.03 . . . . . 74/48/pc. . . . . . 70/45/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 67/37/0.00 . . . . . 72/47/pc. . . . . . 67/44/pc Portland . . . . . . . 69/48/0.01 . . . . . . 72/49/s. . . . . . 71/52/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 61/29/0.00 . . . . . 69/38/pc. . . . . . 74/39/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 63/26/0.00 . . . . . 72/36/pc. . . . . . 69/39/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 67/46/0.00 . . . . . 75/52/pc. . . . . . 74/51/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 69/47/0.00 . . . . . 74/45/pc. . . . . . 71/49/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 61/26/0.00 . . . . . 70/37/pc. . . . . . 73/36/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 75/45/0.00 . . . . . 72/45/pc. . . . . . 70/46/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

4

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59/30 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 in 1979 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 in 1969 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.05” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.96” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.92” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.25 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.17 in 1938 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

70 36

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers. HIGH

70 42

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:31 a.m. . . . . . .6:28 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:05 a.m. . . . . . .7:01 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:57 a.m. . . . . . .7:47 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:56 p.m. . . . . . .5:42 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:38 a.m. . . . . . .6:32 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:56 p.m. . . . . . .5:52 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 68/45

Partly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Eastern

69/36

66/34

65/33

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:09 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:37 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:10 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:35 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:53 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:43 p.m.

LOW

68 40

BEND ALMANAC

72/49

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 75° The Dalles • 26° Redmond

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy and cool.

67 38

Portland



69/34

Mostly cloudy, isolated rain showers, LOW cool.

NORTHWEST

64/35

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

FRIDAY

Wet weather should stay to the south with dry and pleasant conditions across the region.

Paulina

68/36

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Partly to mostly sunny skies today. Partly cloudy skies tonight. Central

74/44 72/43

Oakridge Elk Lake

LOW

38

STATE

Maupin

Marion Forks

Tonight: Partly cloudy and cool.

72

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,025 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,615 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,030 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 24,172 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95,041 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 885 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49.2 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,301 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 64/50

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 68/45

S

Saskatoon 69/43

Seattle 66/48

Winnipeg 64/41

Rapid City 70/44

Philip, S.D.

Cheyenne 66/43

• 25° Houghton Lake, Mich.

San Francisco 63/54

• 1.37” Bryce Canyon, Utah

Salt Lake City 70/51

Las Vegas 76/57

Phoenix 88/66

Honolulu 87/72

Des Moines 76/48

Kansas City 80/54 Oklahoma City 81/54

La Paz 94/74 Juneau 49/38

Mazatlan 89/79

Little Rock 79/52

Houston 82/53 Monterrey 80/59

FRONTS

Nov. 11, 1983 - Sept. 27, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial celebration will be held Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 11:00 AM at the Christian Life Center, 21720 East Highway, Bend, OR 97701.

Marian L. Claxton, of Bend Feb. 21, 1921 - Oct. 2, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held, per Marian’s request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Jimmie (Jim) Simmons, of Culver Jan. 12, 1950 - Sept. 29, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 762 NE 10th, Madras, 541-475-2241 Services: Memorial Service will be held Saturday, October 9 at the Culver Christian Church, 501 W. 4th Street, Culver, Oregon at 11:00 a.m. A meal will be provided after the service. Contributions may be made to:

The Facial Pain Association, 925 NW 56th Terrace, Suite C, Gainesville, FL 32605-6402 or Culver FFA Alumni Association, c/o Jodi Wittenberg, 2881 SW Jericho Lane, Culver, Oregon 97734 in Jim’s name.

Edwin L. Hill, of Bend Aug. 2, 1944 - Oct. 2, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Services will be held at a later time.

Brock Lamar Brooks, of Madras Oct. 5, 1963 - Oct. 1, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Celebration of Life to be held Saturday, October 16, 2010 at 10:00 am at Madras High School Gym.

S S

Halifax 61/50

Boston 63/51

To ronto 59/51 Buffalo

Detroit 67/47 Chicago 73/52

New York 65/52 Philadelphia 64/48 Washington, D. C. 64/50

55/46 Columbus 67/46

Louisville 75/50

Charlotte 73/44

Nashville 74/47 Birmingham 76/48

D N Saul Nathaniel Bivens, of Chemult (Beaver Marsh)

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Portland 57/48

New Orleans 78/61 Chihuahua 82/55

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Quebec 57/46

St. Louis 77/53

Dallas 82/51

Tijuana 67/53

Anchorage 48/40

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Green Bay 69/44

Omaha 79/44

Denver 70/47 Albuquerque 78/53

Los Angeles 67/55

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Thunder Bay 66/39

St. Paul 70/45

Boise 73/47

• 93°

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Bismarck 68/39

Billings 74/46

Portland 72/49

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Atlanta 74/49

Orlando 81/59 Miami 84/70

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .79/56/0.00 . . .85/55/s . . . 86/55/s Akron . . . . . . . . .52/45/0.11 . .58/44/sh . . 65/45/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .60/50/0.09 . . .57/47/r . . 64/45/pc Albuquerque. . . .74/57/0.00 . 78/53/pc . . 77/54/pc Anchorage . . . . .49/38/0.00 . . .48/40/c . . . 44/39/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 79/53/s Atlantic City . . . .58/53/0.16 . .65/51/sh . . . 71/55/s Austin . . . . . . . . .80/43/0.00 . . .83/49/s . . . 85/50/s Baltimore . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . . .63/48/c . . . 70/51/s Billings. . . . . . . . .72/54/0.05 . 74/46/pc . . 80/49/pc Birmingham . . . .73/39/0.00 . . .76/48/s . . . 83/55/s Bismarck . . . . . . .84/51/0.00 . . .68/39/s . . 78/48/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.01 . 73/47/pc . . . .69/43/t Boston. . . . . . . . .57/54/0.03 . .63/51/sh . . . 66/50/s Bridgeport, CT. . .63/54/0.10 . .65/51/sh . . . 68/51/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .50/46/0.40 . .55/46/sh . . . 60/48/s Burlington, VT. . .66/48/0.00 . . .58/46/r . . 61/42/sh Caribou, ME . . . .66/30/0.00 . 57/47/pc . . 55/37/sh Charleston, SC . .75/53/0.00 . . .74/53/s . . . 79/56/s Charlotte. . . . . . .69/40/0.00 . . .73/44/s . . . 79/49/s Chattanooga. . . .71/43/0.00 . . .74/45/s . . . 79/51/s Cheyenne . . . . . .77/44/0.00 . 66/43/pc . . 74/44/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . 73/52/pc . . . 70/53/s Cincinnati . . . . . .68/43/0.01 . . .70/48/s . . . 73/47/s Cleveland . . . . . .54/47/0.50 . .60/51/sh . . 67/52/pc Colorado Springs 79/47/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . . 76/46/s Columbia, MO . .68/40/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . . 73/49/s Columbia, SC . . .71/50/0.00 . . .76/46/s . . . 82/49/s Columbus, GA. . .72/48/0.00 . . .76/51/s . . . 82/55/s Columbus, OH. . .56/48/0.05 . 67/46/pc . . 71/46/pc Concord, NH . . . .65/52/0.00 . . .57/45/r . . 62/41/pc Corpus Christi. . .80/61/0.00 . . .85/61/s . . . 85/60/s Dallas Ft Worth. .76/51/0.00 . . .82/51/s . . . 86/55/s Dayton . . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . 72/47/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . 70/47/pc . . . 79/47/s Des Moines. . . . .71/42/0.00 . 76/48/pc . . . 72/49/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . 67/47/pc . . . 69/50/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .69/39/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . . 67/49/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .80/62/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . 85/56/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .48/23/0.00 . . .42/28/c . . . 34/24/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .67/42/s . . . 72/48/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .57/44/0.58 . . .62/37/t . . 62/31/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .68/33/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . 68/46/pc Rapid City . . . . . .90/49/0.00 . 70/44/pc . . 82/53/pc Green Bay. . . . . .68/36/0.00 . 69/44/pc . . . 68/46/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .58/46/0.23 . . .61/42/t . . 64/42/sh Greensboro. . . . .65/47/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 77/49/s Richmond . . . . . .66/44/0.00 . 67/46/pc . . . 75/52/s Harrisburg. . . . . .55/48/0.02 . .59/45/sh . . 67/46/pc Rochester, NY . . .53/48/0.56 . .54/46/sh . . 60/48/pc Hartford, CT . . . .59/53/0.05 . .61/48/sh . . . 66/46/s Sacramento. . . . 73/52/trace . .76/54/sh . . . 75/54/c Helena. . . . . . . . .59/50/0.27 . 74/45/pc . . 75/46/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . . 74/47/s Honolulu . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . .87/72/s . . . 87/71/s Salt Lake City . . .70/56/0.00 . . .70/51/t . . . .66/47/t Houston . . . . . . .79/49/0.00 . . .82/53/s . . . 85/54/s San Antonio . . . .79/51/0.00 . . .83/49/s . . . 85/53/s Huntsville . . . . . .72/41/0.00 . . .73/45/s . . . 80/51/s San Diego . . . . . .69/62/0.00 . . .68/62/t . . . 68/63/s Indianapolis . . . .67/37/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 75/50/s San Francisco . . .73/57/0.00 . 63/54/pc . . 64/54/pc Jackson, MS . . . .75/40/0.00 . . .80/46/s . . . 85/56/s San Jose . . . . . . .76/53/0.00 . .72/54/sh . . 73/55/pc Madison, WI . . . .68/32/0.00 . 71/42/pc . . . 70/45/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .75/48/0.18 . 74/45/pc . . 72/46/pc Jacksonville. . . . .76/56/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 80/53/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .52/42/0.90 . .49/38/sh . . . 49/39/c Kansas City. . . . .71/41/0.00 . 80/54/pc . . . 75/54/s Amsterdam. . . . .72/54/0.00 . .62/57/sh . . 63/54/sh Lansing . . . . . . . .66/31/0.00 . 69/45/pc . . 70/44/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .73/62/0.00 . 79/68/pc . . . .72/62/r Las Vegas . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .76/57/t . . 75/56/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .65/51/s . . . 64/53/s Lexington . . . . . .64/44/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . 73/50/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .98/80/0.00 . . .97/76/s . . . 96/71/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/41/0.00 . 80/45/pc . . 76/50/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .82/77/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .89/78/t Little Rock. . . . . .74/42/0.00 . . .79/52/s . . . 83/55/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 77/55/s Los Angeles. . . . .66/59/0.03 . . .67/55/t . . 68/56/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .88/73/s . . . 87/72/s Louisville . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 77/51/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .66/54/s . . 60/45/pc Memphis. . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . . .79/54/s . . . 84/55/s Bogota . . . . . . . .68/52/1.56 . .63/51/sh . . . 65/50/c Miami . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . . 82/70/s Budapest. . . . . . .57/45/0.88 . .57/44/sh . . 56/39/pc Milwaukee . . . . .67/39/0.00 . 70/47/pc . . . 68/50/s Buenos Aires. . . .75/50/0.00 . .76/56/sh . . 71/49/sh Minneapolis . . . .74/45/0.00 . 70/45/pc . . . 69/49/s Cabo San Lucas .91/73/0.00 . . .91/76/s . . . 92/75/s Nashville . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . .74/47/s . . . 78/50/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .87/69/s . . . 86/68/s New Orleans. . . .75/59/0.00 . . .78/61/s . . . 82/63/s Calgary . . . . . . . .59/43/0.11 . . .68/45/s . . . 72/44/s New York . . . . . .61/53/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . . 69/52/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . 83/67/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .61/54/0.01 . .66/52/sh . . 70/50/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .60/48/s . . . 59/51/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .66/50/0.00 . 68/52/pc . . . 73/56/s Edinburgh . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .57/51/s . . . 59/50/s Oklahoma City . .75/41/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 85/54/s Geneva . . . . . . . .72/48/0.06 . . .74/58/s . . . 75/50/s Omaha . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . 79/44/pc . . . 75/51/s Harare . . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .85/59/s . . . 86/58/s Orlando. . . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . . 82/58/s Hong Kong . . . . .81/75/0.06 . . .80/76/t . . . .79/66/t Palm Springs. . . 78/57/trace . 78/59/pc . . . 82/61/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . 70/60/pc . . . .66/56/r Peoria . . . . . . . . .68/37/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 72/47/s Jerusalem . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . . .77/61/s . . . 78/58/s Philadelphia . . . .58/52/0.29 . .64/48/sh . . . 70/54/s Johannesburg . . .79/55/0.00 . . .84/61/s . . . 85/62/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .86/71/0.01 . . .88/66/t . . . 87/65/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . 65/58/pc . . 67/57/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .51/44/0.10 . .57/45/sh . . . 63/43/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .70/62/r . . 75/63/sh Portland, ME. . . .65/53/0.00 . . .57/48/r . . 61/43/pc London . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 63/46/pc Providence . . . . .61/56/0.19 . .62/50/sh . . . 66/49/s Madrid . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .72/60/s . . 73/53/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .69/48/0.00 . . .71/46/s . . . 79/48/s Manila. . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .88/80/t . . . .89/77/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . . 80/54/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .66/48/s . . 66/53/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .75/49/0.00 . 71/40/pc . . . 72/45/s Spokane . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . 67/48/pc Springfield, MO. .69/39/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 77/49/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .82/60/s . . . 82/61/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .89/65/0.01 . 90/64/pc . . . 88/61/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .75/40/0.00 . . .80/52/s . . . 84/55/s Washington, DC .63/50/0.00 . . .64/50/c . . . 71/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .78/44/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . 84/54/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . . .72/41/s . . 67/45/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .80/62/0.00 . 83/60/pc . . . 81/66/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .111/88/0.00 . .107/84/s . . 108/82/s Mexico City. . . . .72/50/0.00 . 69/52/pc . . 72/50/pc Montreal. . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . 59/47/pc . . 57/41/sh Moscow . . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . . .50/33/s . . . 51/32/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .79/57/t . . . .80/56/t Nassau . . . . . . . .88/79/1.06 . . .85/77/t . . 86/76/sh New Delhi. . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .93/71/s . . . 92/72/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .77/63/s . . . 79/62/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . . .52/47/r . . . .51/46/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .52/45/r . . 59/39/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . 70/54/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .81/72/0.00 . 76/70/pc . . . .82/72/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . . 77/56/s Santiago . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 75/43/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .75/64/s . . . .79/62/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .66/64/0.22 . 66/51/pc . . . 68/52/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .73/55/s . . . 74/54/s Shanghai. . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .74/63/s . . 75/64/pc Singapore . . . . . .91/77/0.11 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/45/0.00 . 55/45/pc . . 54/44/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 72/62/pc . . 64/59/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .83/76/t . . . .84/75/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .83/70/s . . . 82/69/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . .76/64/s . . 74/65/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .59/48/0.03 . . .59/51/c . . 66/45/sh Vancouver. . . . . .57/46/0.09 . . .64/50/s . . 61/54/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . . 58/42/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .54/41/s . . . 51/35/s

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Duaine "Bud" J. Birkhofer, of Redmond Aug. 12, 1924 - Oct. 4, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 Services: A memorial service will be held at 1:00 PM, Saturday, October 9, 2010 at Redmond Memorial Chapel, 717 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR.

Walter Erwin Helferstine, of Prineville May 11, 1915 - Sept. 26, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, OR 97754. 541-416-9733. Services: A private service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Central Oregon’s BIGGEST On-line Auction Event Is Coming November 7th Watch For More Details Coming Soon!

Holiday

American Cancer Society, 2350 Oakmont Way, Ste. 200, Eugene, OR 97401.

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Football Inside Speed at practice leads to speed on game day for Oregon, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010

MLB P L AYO F F S

NHL PREVIEW

TEE TO GREEN

Salary cap could hinder Blackhawks’ Cup repeat

A look at Major League Baseball playoff games being played today (times PDT)

ALDS Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, 10:37 a.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, 5:37 p.m. (TBS)

NLDS Cincinnati Reds at Philadelphia Phillies, 2:07 p.m. (TBS)

By Ira Podell The Associated Press

NBA PRESEASON Clippers no match for Blazers in first preseason game PORTLAND — Wesley Matthews scored 20 points, LaMarcus Aldridge had 17, and the Portland Trail Blazers rolled to a 115-86 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Tuesday night in the preseason opener for both teams. Matthews, the former Utah guard signed by the Trail Blazers as a free agent this summer, hit three three-pointers and went nine of 10 from the free throw line during a 21-minute performance. Aldridge shot six of 12 from the field and grabbed seven rebounds in 30 minutes. Blake Griffin, the No. 1 pick in the 2009 draft, made his first appearance in a Clippers’ uniform after sustaining a knee injury last summer. Griffin scored nine points, hitting three-of-five shots, and grabbed seven rebounds in 22 minutes. Portland took a 16-15 lead midway through the first quarter and never trailed after that. Brandon Roy, Portland’s three-time All-Star guard, scored all of his 12 points during the third quarter after going zero-of-five in the first half. Applause was mixed when Portland’s Rudy Fernandez, who said before training camp that his heart was in Spain, entered the game. He quickly turned the crowd in his favor when he hit three consecutive threepointers during the second quarter and finished with 15 points. Center Chris Kaman led the Clippers with 14 points and seven rebounds. Portland led by as many as 38 points in the second half. Both teams resume preseason action Thursday, with Portland at Utah and Los Angeles at Sacramento. — The Associated Press

Submitted photo

The first hole at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course. The photo was taken in September, nearly one month before renovations for the course began.

A clearing vision

NEW YORK — Forget about celebration hangovers and short summers, the biggest threat to the Chicago Blackhawks’ hopes to repeat as Stanley Cup champion might be the salary cap. The cloud that has hung over the NHL since the end of the lockout in 2005 literally shadowed the Blackhawks’ parade just days after they claimed their first title since 1961 with a six-game win over the Philadelphia Flyers. Gone is 25-year-old postseason hero Dustin Byfuglien, who scored a team-high 11 playoff goals — including five game-winners, top goalie Antti Niemi, and others who provided key roles in the run to the championship. In all, the Blackhawks sent away eight players to get under this season’s salary ceiling of $59.4 million. “Everybody was talking about players getting traded and what the team was going to look like next year, while at the same time we’re trying to enjoy what we just did,� Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews said. “It’s not easy for those guys and it’s not easy for the rest of our team. Now we’re at that point where it’s all behind us: the salary cap, the trades and this and that. We’re ready to move forward with the guys we do have.� While Chicago was clearly the best team in June, the Blackhawks certainly will face strong claims to that distinction as hockey gets rolling again Thursday when the regular season opens with a fivegame slate. See Repeat / D4

PREP VOLLEYBALL

Storm roll to IMC victory over Cowgirls By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A dumptruck sits near the location of the first green on a widened first fairway as seen from the first tee Monday at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course near Sisters. The 30-year-old golf course is undergoing a major renovation after an irrigation upgrade prompted the consideration of other improvements.

It is early in the renovation, but already Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow is beginning to show off its natural attributes BLACK BUTTE RANCH — ever could the small lake be seen from the first tee of Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course. But there it is, sparkling in the October sun. The site of the water is beautiful, but even more than that, it is surprising. Though the basic routing of the hole is the same as it has been since 1980 when Glaze Meadow opened, seeing anything other than ponder-

N

ZACK HALL osa pines and the turf of the fairway in the distance was a rarity. Since the course opened, Glaze Meadow had become a claustrophobic collection of trees and turf.

Those trees prompted Black Butte Ranch and its homeowners to earlier this year approve a $3.75 million renovation project of Glaze Meadow. That renovation began last week, mostly work to clear some of those trees and move some of the turf on the front nine of the golf course. Calling this project a renovation is like calling 6,436-foot Black Butte a molehill. See Vision / D6

Summit is starting to look like the team to beat in Class 5A volleyball. The Storm, who have placed second two of the last four years at the 5A state volleyball tournament, improved to 4-0 in Intermountain Conference play this season with a 25-18, 25-20, 25-19 home victory over Crook County on Tuesday, a rematch of the 2009 5A state title match. Senior outside hitter Jordyn Hagan led a balanced Summit offense with nine kills. Sophomore Laney Hayes went 15 for 16 from the service line with four aces and added seven kills and two blocks, while setter Brenna Crecraft dished out 23 assists. “We talked about how it’s not who we’re playing, but how we play,� Storm senior Taylor Pierce explained about not getting too excited against Crook County, which defeated Summit in last year’s state final. “We were just concerned about our side of the court.� Summit disposed of the Cowgirls (4-2 IMC) in business-like fashion, taking advantage of multiple service errors by the reigning 5A state champions, who this season are competing in Class 4A. See Storm / D5

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Los Angeles Clippers’ Craig Smith (1) looks for a shot against Portland Trail Blazers’ LaMarcus Aldridge (12) during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Portland.

Half of playoff teams watch wallets 5IFQSJDFPGTVDDFTT 1MBZPGGCPVOE 5&".

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Cycling ......................................D2 Football .....................................D3 College basketball .................... D4 Baseball .....................................D5 Tee to Green.............................. D6

By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

Spending money on a baseball franchise doesn’t always equate with postseason play. Low payroll teams can also compete for a playoff spot.

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NEW YORK — It’s not just the usual suspects in the playoffs this year. Texas, ranked 23rd according to Major League Baseball’s latest payroll figures, won the AL West. Tampa Bay, just 20th, beat out the high-spending New York Yankees and Boston to win the AL East. Cincinnati won the NL Central and is going to the postseason for the first time since 1995 despite ranking 19th. No. 16 Atlanta won the NL wild card. It’s the first time since the playoffs expanded in 1995 that four postseason teams came from the bottom half by payroll. See Playoff / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Laney Hayes (3) fires a shot through Marissa Pope (9) and Hannah Troutman (7) to score during the first game against Crook County on Tuesday at Summit High School.


D2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASEBALL

Today Cross country: Sisters at Star City XClassic in Salem, 3:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Junction City at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Sisters at Junction City, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Junction City at Sisters, 6:45 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Culver at Regis, 6 p.m.

10:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, TBS. 2 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Cincinnati Reds at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. 5:30 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, TBS.

SOCCER 1 p.m. — English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Arsenal (taped), FSNW. 4 p.m. — Women’s international match, United States vs. China, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Alabama-Birmingham at Central Florida, ESPN.

THURSDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, first round, Golf channel. 10 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, first round, Golf channel. Noon — PGA Tour, McGladrey Classic, first round, Golf channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Navistar LPGA Classic, first round, Golf channel.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Football: Madras at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 7 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Bend, 3:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m.; Irrigon at Central Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Redmond, 3:30 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at Redmond, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 6:30 p.m. Friday Football: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Washougal (Wash.), 7 p.m.; Culver at Santiam, 7 p.m.; Powers at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Cross country: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County, Madras, La Pine, Culver at Oxford Classic in Bend, 12:30 p.m. Volleyball: Paisley at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Hosanna, 5:30 p.m. Saturday Cross country: Sisters at Paul Mariman Invitational in Philomath, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Summit at Glencoe Invitational in Hillsboro, 8 a.m.; Madras, La Pine at Junction City tournament, TBA; Sisters at Seaside tournament, TBA; Gilchirst tournament, 9 a.m.; North Lake at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m

HOCKEY 9 a.m. — NHL, Carolina Hurricanes vs. Minnesota Wild, VS. network. 4 p.m. — NHL, Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Colorado Avalanche, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 11:30 a.m. — NBA preseason, Los Angeles Lakers vs. FC Barcelona, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, TBS. 3 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, TBS. 6:30 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, TBS.

FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, Nebraska at Kansas State, ESPN.

SOCCER 5 p.m. — MLS, Los Angeles Galaxy at Philadelphia Union, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, KICE-AM 940. 2 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Cincinnati Reds at Philadelphia Phillies, KICE-AM 940. 5:30 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, KICE-AM 940.

THURSDAY BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, KICE-AM 940. 3 p.m. — MLB, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, KICE-AM 940. 6:30 p.m. — MLB, NL Division Series, Atlanta Braves at San Francisco Giants, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT ——— DIVISION SERIES American League Tampa Bay vs. Texas Today Texas (Lee 12-9) at Tampa Bay (Price 19-6), 10:37 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 Texas (Wilson 15-8) at Tampa Bay (Garza 15-10), 11:37 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 9 Tampa Bay (Davis 12-10 ) at Texas (Lewis 12-13), 2:07 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Tampa Bay (Shields 13-15) at Texas (Hunter 13-4), if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 Texas at Tampa Bay, if necessary Minnesota vs. New York Today New York (Sabathia 21-7) at Minnesota (Liriano 14-10), 5:37 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 New York (Hughes 18-8 or Pettitte 11-3) at Minnesota (Pavano 17-11), 3:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9 Minnesota (Duensing 10-3) at New York (Pettitte 11-3 or Hughes 18-8), 5:37 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Minnesota (Blackburn 10-12) at New York (Burnett 1015), if necessary Tuesday, Oct. 12 New York at Minnesota, if necessary National League Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati Today Cincinnati (Volquez 4-3) at Philadelphia (Halladay 2110), 2:07 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 Cincinnati (Arroyo 17-10) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 3:07 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at Cincinnati (Cueto 12-7) Monday, Oct. 11 Philadelphia at Cincinnati, if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, if necessary San Francisco vs. Atlanta Thursday, Oct. 7 Atlanta (Lowe 16-12) at San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10), 6:37 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 Atlanta (Hanson 10-11) at San Francisco (Cain 13-11), 6:37 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Atlanta (Hudson 17-9) Monday, Oct. 11 San Francisco at Atlanta, if necessary Wednesday, Oct. 13 Atlanta at San Francisco, if necessary

TENNIS

S   B Football • Bills send RB Lynch to Seahawks: Bills running back Marshawn Lynch was traded to Seattle on Tuesday, and the Seahawks made room for him by releasing Julius Jones. The Bills said they will receive undisclosed draft picks for Lynch. The Seahawks have a bye week following their 20-3 loss to the St. Louis Rams. Buffalo (0-4) lost to the New York Jets 38-14 and plays host to Jacksonville on Sunday. Seattle’s run game has struggled through four games, ranked 27th with 79.5 yards per game. • Dolphins fire special teams coordinator: The Miami Dolphins fired special teams coordinator John Bonamego on Tuesday, only 12 hours after a calamitous prime-time performance against the New England Patriots. Special teams cost Miami 21 points in a 41-14 loss Monday night. Two blocked kicks led to touchdowns, and the Patriots returned a kickoff 103 yards for another score. • AP Source: Patriots, Vikings discussing Moss trade: The New England Patriots and Vikings are discussing a trade that would bring star receiver Randy Moss back to Minnesota. A league source spoke to The Associated Press about the discussions on condition of anonymity on Tuesday night because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the negotiations. The seven-time Pro Bowler was a first-round draft pick of the Vikings in 1998 and spent his first seven seasons in the NFL with Minnesota. He was traded to Oakland in 2005, where he languished for two years before being revitalized in New England.

Basketball • AP source: Pistons to sell team: The Detroit Pistons have decided to sell the team to Tigers and Red Wings owner Mike Ilitch, a person involved with the process said Tuesday. The person, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because of a confidentiality agreement, said both sides were negotiating financial terms. If the sale goes through, Ilitch would control three of the city’s four major professional sports teams. Ilitch, the Little Caesars pizza mogul, said in August he wanted to buy the Pistons in part to make sure another buyer doesn’t move the NBA club out of town. Forbes last year valued the team at $479 million.

Auto racing • Clint Bowyer’s 150-point deduction upheld: Richard Childress Racing lost its last bid Tuesday to overturn Clint Bowyer’s championship-ending penalty. NASCAR chief appellate officer John Middlebrook ruled Bowyer will not get back the 150 points he was docked after his winning car at New Hampshire on Sept. 19 failed inspection. — From wire reports

CHINA OPEN Tuesday Beijing Singles Men First Round Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-4, 6-4. David Ferrer (8), Spain, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-4, 6-1. Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 6-2, 6-3. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 7-5, 6-2. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Gong Mao-Xin, China, 6-1, 6-3. Marin Cilic, Croatia, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 6-2, 6-2. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Mikhail Youzhny (7), Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 7-6 (7). Albert Montanes, Spain, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 3-0, retired. Robin Soderling (3), Sweden, def. Tommy Robredo, Spain, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. Nikolay Davydenko (4), Russia, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3, 6-4. Women Second Round Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, 4-6, 3-2, retired. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 2-6, 6-1, 6-2. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-3, 6-3. Vera Dushevina, Russia, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Shahar Peer (15), Israel, def. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-2. Elena Dementieva (7), Russia, def. Kimiko Date Krumm, Japan, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-4, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-0, 7-5.

Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Maria Sharapova (12), Russia, 7-6 (3), 6-2. Li Na (9), China, def. Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, 6-1, 6-4. JAPAN OPEN Tuesday Tokyo Singles Men First Round Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Andy Roddick (2) United States, def. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-4, 6-3. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, def. Michael Llodra (8), France, 6-3, 6-0. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 7-6 (1). Richard Gasquet, France, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 64, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-4, 6-4. Gael Monfils (5), France, def. Go Saeda, Japan, 7-6 (10), 6-4. Milos Raonic, Canada, def. Florent Serra, France, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (3), France, 6-4, 5-7, 6-1. Jurgen Melzer (4), Austria, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1. Women First Round Ayumi Morita (4), Japan, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Alberta Brianti (8), Italy, def. Aiko Nakamura, Japan, 6-0, 6-2. Jill Craybas, United States, def. Jelena Dokic (2), Australia, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Ryuko Fuda, Japan, def. Chiaki Okadaue, Japan, 6-3, 6-0. Tomoko Yonemura, Japan, def. Hsu Wen-hsin, Taiwan, 6-2, 6-1. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, def. Rika Fujiwara, Japan, 6-2, 7-5. Magdalena Rybarikova (3), Slovakia, def. Sachie Ishizu, Japan, 6-4, 6-4. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-0, 6-3. Olga Savchuk, Ukraine, def. Tetiana Luzhansaka, Ukraine, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. Iveta Benesova (1), Czech Republic, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia, 6-0, 4-6, 7-5.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 106 New England 3 1 0 .750 131 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 Buffalo 0 4 0 .000 61 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 1 0 .750 108 Jacksonville 2 2 0 .500 71 Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 117 Tennessee 2 2 0 .500 98 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 61 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 79 Cleveland 1 3 0 .250 68 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 113 Denver 2 2 0 .500 87 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 76 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Washington 2 2 0 .500 73 N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 72 Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 95 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 3 1 0 .750 93 New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 79 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 Carolina 0 4 0 .000 46 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 1 0 .750 69 Green Bay 3 1 0 .750 106 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 Detroit 0 4 0 .000 82 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 2 2 0 .500 58

PA 61 96 92 125 PA 102 111 92 68 PA 55 50 78 77 PA 38 71 85 107 PA 79 88 79 53 PA 60 72 59 87 PA 68 73 38 106 PA 118

St. Louis Seattle San Francisco

2 2 0 .500 77 52 2 2 0 .500 75 77 0 4 0 .000 52 103 ——— Sunday’s Games St. Louis at Detroit, 10 a.m. Denver at Baltimore, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Houston, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Washington, 10 a.m. Chicago at Carolina, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Tennessee at Dallas, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Games Minnesota at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m. Open: Miami, New England, Pittsburgh, Seattle

College All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Tuesday’s Game Troy 42, Middle Tennessee State 13 ——— Today’s Game SOUTH UAB at UCF, 5 p.m. ——— Thursday’s Games MIDWEST Nebraska at Kansas St., 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Prairie View at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 4:30 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Connecticut at Rutgers, 4:30 p.m. SOUTH Oklahoma St. at Louisiana-Lafayette, 6 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Duquesne at Cent. Connecticut St., 9 a.m. Cornell at Harvard, 9 a.m. Richmond at New Hampshire, 9 a.m. Illinois at Penn St., 9 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. at Robert Morris, 9 a.m. Lafayette at Columbia, 9:30 a.m. Fordham at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. at Albany, N.Y., 10 a.m. Sacred Heart at Bryant, 10 a.m. Penn at Bucknell, 10 a.m. Maine at Delaware, 10 a.m. Wagner at Georgetown, D.C., 10 a.m. Brown at Holy Cross, 10 a.m. Colgate at Princeton, 10 a.m. Yale at Dartmouth, 10:30 a.m. VMI at Stony Brook, noon UNLV at West Virginia, 12:30 p.m. James Madison at Towson, 4 p.m. SOUTH Butler at Davidson, 9 a.m. Howard at Furman, 9 a.m. Drake at Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Boston College at N.C. State, 9 a.m. Syracuse at South Florida, 9 a.m. Cent. Michigan at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Tennessee at Georgia, 9:21 a.m. Savannah St. at Georgia St., 10 a.m. Morgan St. at N. Carolina A&T, 10:30 a.m. Memphis at Louisville, 11 a.m. Norfolk St. at S. Carolina St., 11 a.m. Jacksonville St. at Tenn.-Martin, 11 a.m. Chattanooga at The Citadel, 11 a.m. Texas Southern at Alcorn St., noon Elon at Appalachian St., noon Texas St. at SE Louisiana, noon Samford at W. Carolina, noon W. Kentucky at Fla. International, 12:30 a.m. Virginia at Georgia Tech, 12:30 a.m. Charleston Southern at Liberty, 12:30 a.m. Clemson at North Carolina, 12:30 a.m. Army at Tulane, 12:30 a.m. Alabama at South Carolina, 12:30 a.m. Delaware St. at Bethune-Cookman, 1 p.m. Utah St. at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Missouri St. at Murray St., 1 p.m. Hampton at N.C. Central, 1 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Austin Peay, 2 p.m. Alabama St. at Grambling St., 2 p.m. Alabama A&M at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. at Nicholls St., 2 p.m. Wofford at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Cal Poly at Old Dominion, 3 p.m. MVSU at Southern U., 3:30 p.m. Navy at Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m. E. Illinois at E. Kentucky, 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Louisiana-Monroe, 4 p.m. E. Michigan at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Rhode Island at William & Mary, 4 p.m. LSU at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Auburn at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. East Carolina at Southern Miss., 4:30 p.m. Stephen F.Austin at McNeese St., 5 p.m. Florida St. at Miami, 5 p.m. MIDWEST

L.A. CLIPPERS (86) Gomes 3-4 0-0 8, Griffin 3-5 3-6 9, Kaman 6-13 2-2 14, Foye 1-9 4-4 6, Butler 3-9 0-0 8, Bledsoe 2-5 5-5 9, Smith 3-4 0-0 6, Jordan 3-6 1-1 7, Aminu 0-3 1-2 1, Collins 0-1 1-2 1, Cook 4-5 0-1 9, Blakely 3-4 0-0 6, Dennis 1-4 0-0 2, Scheyer 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-73 17-23 86. PORTLAND (115) Batum 4-7 0-0 10, Aldridge 6-12 5-6 17, Pendergraph 3-4 2-2 8, Miller 2-4 4-5 8, Roy 4-11 2-2 12, Cunningham 3-6 3-4 9, Bayless 3-6 0-0 9, Matthews 4-9 9-10 20, Fernandez 5-8 0-0 15, Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Babbitt 1-5 0-0 3, El.Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Mills 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-77 25-29 115. L.A. Clippers 19 17 23 27 — 86 Portland 30 34 26 25 — 115 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 5-20 (Gomes 2-2, Butler 2-5, Cook 1-1, Scheyer 0-1, Bledsoe 0-1, Blakely 0-1, Aminu 0-2, Dennis 0-2, Foye 0-5), Portland 16-27 (Fernandez 5-6, Bayless 3-3, Matthews 3-8, Roy 2-3, Batum 2-3, Babbitt 1-2, El.Williams 0-1, Miller 0-1). Fouled Out—Aminu, Pendergraph. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 45 (Griffin, Kaman 7), Portland 46 (Aldridge 7). Assists— L.A. Clippers 17 (Foye 5), Portland 22 (Miller 5). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 28, Portland 20. Technicals—Portland defensive three second. A—18,209 (19,980).

W. Michigan at Ball St., 9 a.m. Temple at N. Illinois, 9 a.m. Indiana at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Minnesota at Wisconsin, 9 a.m. Bowling Green at Ohio, 11 a.m. Marist at Valparaiso, 11 a.m. N. Iowa at S. Illinois, noon Illinois St. at Indiana St., 12:05 p.m. Akron at Kent St., 12:30 p.m. Michigan St. at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame, 12:30 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Youngstown St., 1 p.m. S. Utah at North Dakota, 2 p.m. Miami (Ohio) at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Utah at Iowa St., 4 p.m. Colorado at Missouri, 4 p.m. W. Illinois at S. Dakota St., 4 p.m. Tennessee St. at SE Missouri, 4 p.m. Purdue at Northwestern, 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Baylor vs. Texas Tech at Dallas, 9 a.m. Wyoming at TCU, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas at Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m. Northwestern St. at Cent. Arkansas, 4 p.m. Langston at Lamar, 4 p.m. Arkansas St. at North Texas, 4 p.m. Mississippi St. at Houston, 5 p.m. Tulsa at SMU, 5 p.m. Rice at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Colorado St. at Air Force, 11 a.m. Idaho St. at Montana, 12:05 p.m. UCLA at California, 12:30 p.m. Portland St. at Montana St., 12:35 p.m. N. Arizona at E. Washington, 1:05 p.m. Dayton at San Diego, 2 p.m. Oregon at Washington St., 2 p.m. N. Colorado at Sacramento St., 2:05 p.m. San Diego St. at BYU, 3 p.m. Oregon St. at Arizona, 4 p.m. Toledo at Boise St., 5 p.m. New Mexico at New Mexico St., 5 p.m. Southern Cal at Stanford, 5 p.m. South Dakota at UC Davis, 6 p.m. Hawaii at Fresno St., 7 p.m. Arizona St. at Washington, 7 p.m. San Jose St. at Nevada, 7:30 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times EDT ——— Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Carolina at Minnesota, 9 a.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 4 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 7 p.m. Calgary at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Minnesota at Carolina, 9 a.m. Columbus at San Jose, noon Dallas at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.

Betting Line Favorite RAVENS BILLS COLTS LIONS Falcons BENGALS Bears Packers TEXANS Saints Chargers COWBOYS 49ERS JETS

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Sunday 7 7 PK PK 9 8.5 3 3 3 3 7 6.5 2.5 2.5 3 2.5 3 3 6.5 7 5.5 6 6.5 6.5 2 3 Monday 4.5 4

Underdog Broncos Jaguars Chiefs Rams BROWNS Buccaneers PANTHERS REDSKINS Giants CARDINALS RAIDERS Titans Eagles Vikings

COLLEGE Today 12.5 Uab 12 KANSAS ST Friday Connecticut 5.5 5.5 RUTGERS Oklahoma St 23 24 UL-LAFAYETTE Saturday WISCONSIN 21 22 Minnesota S. FLORIDA 10 8 Syracuse PENN ST 8.5 7.5 Illinois OHIO ST 23.5 22.5 Indiana MICHIGAN 5 4.5 Michigan State LOUISVILLE 15.5 17 Memphis CINCINNATI 14.5 17 Miami-Ohio NC STATE 10 10 Boston College N. CAROLINA 1.5 2.5 Clemson GEORGIA TECH 8 10 Virginia N. ILLINOIS 2.5 3 Temple Navy 5.5 5.5 WAKE FOREST W. VIRGINIA 27.5 27.5 Unlv BALL ST 4.5 4 W. Michigan GEORGIA 11 12 Tennessee VANDERBILT 23.5 26 E. Michigan Utah 7.5 6 IOWA ST MISSOURI 12.5 13 Colorado VIRGINIA TECH 24 22 C. Michigan OHIO 7.5 7.5 Bowling Green S. MISS 9.5 9.5 E. Carolina AIR FORCE 23.5 25.5 Colorado St KENT ST 16.5 17 Akron Alabama 8 6.5 S. CAROLINA FLORIDA 7.5 6.5 Lsu TCU 35 34.5 Wyoming WASHINGTON 1.5 2.5 Arizona St CALIFORNIA 7.5 7.5 Ucla NOTRE DAME 5.5 6 Pittsburgh TULANE 1 (A) 1 Army d-Texas Tech 1.5 2.5 Baylor a-Arkansas 8 6 Texas A&M MIAMI-FLA 6.5 6.5 Florida St LA TECH 3 (U) 1 Utah St NEVADA 38 39 San Jose St San Diego St 5 5 BYU Oregon 34.5 36 WASHINGTON ST ARIZONA 8.5 7.5 Oregon St Auburn 8 6.5 KENTUCKY NORTHWESTERN 10 10 Purdue Miss St 4.5 5 HOUSTON NEW MEXICO ST 3.5 3.5 New Mexico STANFORD 7.5 9.5 Usc BOISE ST 39 39 Toledo SMU 6.5 6.5 Tulsa UTEP 7.5 9 Rice FRESNO ST 9.5 11 Hawaii Arkansas St 1 (N) 2.5 NORTH TEXAS FLORIDA INT’L 9.5 9 W. Kentucky UL-MONROE 2.5 3.5 Fla Atlantic Note: North Texas started as the favorite d-Dallas a-Arlington, Texas

C. FLORIDA Nebraska

12 11.5

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 87, Charlotte 72 New Jersey 103, Philadelphia 96 Miami 105, Detroit 89 Milwaukee 92, Chicago 83 Orlando 97, Houston 88 Washington 97, Dallas 94 Portland 115, L.A. Clippers 86 Sacramento 109, Phoenix 95 Today’s Games New York vs. Minnesota at Paris, France, 11 a.m. Oklahoma City vs. Charlotte at Fayetteville, NC, 4 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Boston at Manchester, NH, 4:30 p.m. Indiana at Memphis, 5 p.m. Toronto vs. Phoenix at Vancouver, British Columbia, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s Summary ———

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Thursday’s Game Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday’s Game Columbus at Chicago, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Real Salt Lake at New York, 1:30 p.m. Colorado at FC Dallas, 3 p.m. San Jose at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, October 10 New England at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Los Angeles Angels minor league RHP Jordany Gomez (Dominican Summer League) for 50 games after testing positive for performance-enhancing substances. American League TEXAS RANGERS—Named Rick George chief operating officer. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Announced Nashville (PCL) manager Don Money, coach Sandy Guerrero, pitching coach Rich Gale, athletic trainer Dave Yeager, and strength & conditioning specialist Andrew Emmick will return in 2011. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Waived LB Robert James. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Waived WR Dwayne Jarrett. Claimed WR David Clowney off waivers from the New York Jets. CHICAGO BEARS—Terminated the contract of DE Mark Anderson. Signed DE Charles Grant. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Placed S Melvin Bullitt and RB Devin Moore on injured reserve. Activated S Mike Newton from the practice squad. Re-signed S Aaron Francisco. Released DT Mitch King. Released WR Alric Arnett from the practice squad. Signed WR Kenneth Moore. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released QB Todd Bouman. Signed DL C.J. Mosley. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Fired special teams coordinator John Bonamego. Named Darren Rizzi special teams coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Acquired RB Marshawn Lynch from Buffalo for two undisclosed draft picks. Resigned G-OT Chester Pitts. Released RB Julius Jones and G Evan Dietrich-Smith. TENNESSEE TITANS—Placed DE Derrick Morgan on injured reserve. Signed DT Amon Gordon. Signed TE-FB Joel Gamble to the practice squad. Released FB Jack Corcoran from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES—Waived F Matt Ellis. DETROIT RED WINGS—Assigned D Doug Janik and G Joey MacDonald to Grand Rapids (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Traded D Ryan Parent and F Jonas Andersson to Vancouver for D Shane O’Brien and F Dan Gendur. Assigned D Aaron Johnson to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Placed F Andy Hilbert on waivers. Announced D Rob Davison cleared waivers and was assigned to Albany (AHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Waived F Ryan Craig and D Andrew Hutchinson. Assigned forward Dustin Jeffrey to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Claimed C Mattias Ritola off waivers from Detroit. Assigned F Chris Durno, F Johan Harju and G Cedrick Desjardins to Norfolk (AHL). Released F Eric Perrin. COLLEGE AUBURN—Named Jenny Rowland assistant gymnastics coach. BROWN—Named Scott Dalgilesh and Kip Turner men’s assistant lacrosse coaches.

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 3,799 783 714 173 The Dalles 2,013 408 2,289 790 John Day 1,959 469 2,534 808 McNary 3,398 371 2,712 772 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 793,231 89,296 408,417 153,572 The Dalles 526,255 71,394 309,586 114,198 John Day 447,829 65,833 251,081 90,975 McNary 395,901 41,617 227,903 76,924

AP Source: Contador samples show plastic residue By Samu el Petrequin The Associated Press

A urine sample taken from three-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador showed abnormally high levels of plastic residues that could indicate he received a transfusion of his own blood during this year’s race, a person with knowledge of the test results told The Associated Press on Tuesday. Contador, who has previously denied receiving a transfusion, was provisionally suspended by the international cycling federation last week after a small amount of the banned drug clenbuterol was discovered in one of his samples by a laboratory in Cologne, Germany. The Spanish rider blamed contaminated beef for the result. In a separate sample taken a day earlier, the Cologne lab also found plastic traces that might turn up after a transfusion of blood from a plas-

CYCLING tic bag, according to the person, who spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because Contador’s investigation by the UCI is ongoing. Contador’s abnormal sample showed eight times the normal amount of the plasticizer, the person said. The UCI said the clenbuterol was detected on July 21, the Tour’s final rest day. The plastic residue was found in another test carried out on July 20, according to the person who spoke to the AP. Contador has denied he underwent a blood transfusion before the grueling mountain stage on July 22. His spokesman, Jacinto Vidarte, on Tuesday denied any plastic residues were found in the tests.

“We are not aware of any findings of this plastic substance in any of the tests,” Vidarte said. “We — officially and unofficially — have no information on anything to do with this. There were no traces of plastic in any of the tests.” Francisco Contador, the rider’s brother and manager, also denied there was blood doping. “There is not even the remotest possibility of speaking of blood manipulation because Alberto has not done anything illegal, neither in the Tour or ever,” he told Cadena Ser radio Tuesday. “We have absolutely nothing to hide.” The plasticizer test result was also reported last week by French sports daily L’Equipe and German television network ARD. The New York Times reported on the finding Tuesday. Francisco Contador said the UCI “has already stated that the July 20 doping test was negative.”


F OO T BA L L

Pac-10 on verge of important decisions

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Chip Kelly, University of Oregon football team head coach, leads the team practices at Autzen Stadium in Eugene on Sept. 30. The team has averaged nearly a point per minute with Kelly’s nohuddle spread offense.

By John Marshall The Associated Press

Leah Nash / The New York Times

Oregon works on its prolific spread offense at full speed By Pete Thamel New York Times News Service

EUGENE — As Oregon began pulling away from Tennessee in the middle of the third quarter last month, a Volunteers defensive end approached Ducks center Jordan Holmes with a plea. “If you guys run two more plays at this speed,” Holmes recalled him saying, “I’m going to fall over dead.” The tongue-wagging Tennessee lineman stayed upright, but Oregon never stopped. The Ducks scored 35 unanswered second-half points on the way to a 48-13 victory in Knoxville. The win showcased Oregon coach Chip Kelly’s innovative no-huddle spread offense, behind which the Ducks have averaged scoring nearly a point per minute — 56.6 per game — thanks to a frenetic tempo that might represent the next offensive revolution in college football. From Dennis Dixon to Jeremiah Masoli to Darron Thomas to a half-dozen pinch-hitting quarterbacks in between, the Ducks’ offense has not slowed since Kelly arrived in Eugene as the offensive coordinator four seasons ago. Why do Kelly’s schemes allow just about any quarterback to lead the Ducks to the top of college football’s offensive statistical categories? The answer comes from the blur that is an Oregon practice, a kaleidoscope of colors, whistles and music so intense that team managers have to tape their ankles. The practices illustrate the white-knuckle philosophy of a program designed to leave opponents in its wake. “The tempo is unique,” said the former NFL coach Jon Gruden, who nearly took a job at Oregon to learn Kelly’s offense. “They’re not the only no-huddle, but they’re as fast as any team that plays football.” Other programs pride themselves on tempo, but Gruden said he had never seen an operation that was both this fast and this refined. Oregon’s practices last two hours, an hour less than a typi-

cal college practice, and Chris Petersen and Kevthere is so little time bein Wilson, Oklahoma’s tween plays that coaches offensive coordinator, must do their teaching came through durwith only a few words or ing the Ducks’ spring wait until the film room. practice. Kelly said that practice Next up “The NFL scouts on had become so sophisthe sideline, the first • Oregon at ticated and fluid that time they come and Washington getting off 30 snaps in watch practice, they’re State a 10-minute period had like, ‘What the heck become common. is this?’” Costa said. • When: That relentless pace “They’re mesmerized Saturday, and superior conditionby it. There’s nothing 2 p.m. ing help explain how Orlike it.” egon has outscored its • TV: Comcast An eclectic music SportsNet (6 opponents 114-7 in the shuffle constantly p.m. delay) second half this season blares to simulate crowd without ever running • Radio: noise. Songs include the that staple of football symbolic (“Sympathy KBND-AM conditioning drudgery for the Devil” before the 1110 — wind sprints. Arizona State game); “Practice is a wind the hip (tracks from sprint,” said Nate Costa, Oregon’s the rapper Drake); and the out of backup quarterback. “There’s no place (“Circle of Life” from “The real need to do that additionally.” Lion King”). For good measure, The high-speed practices mean the players hurry around attired that wide receivers must learn to in the Ducks’ dizzying yellowrun backward to the huddle to and-green color scheme. see the next play. Receivers are “Our practices are bedlam,” taught not to chase after missed said offensive line coach Steve passes and to sprint to the refer- Greatwood, who did request ee, which is a manager wearing more variety from Kelly’s music an official’s jersey, to hand him playlist. “Not enough country for the ball after a completion. Ob- me,” he said. viously, the Ducks cannot start The culture of the Oregon their next play until the referee football program changed when spots the ball. Kelly showed up as the offensive Four managers signal plays at coordinator in spring 2007 after a all times in practice, with three coaching stint at New Hampshire. using hand signals and another Lineman Max Unger, now with holding up large cue cards that the Seattle Seahawks, recalled feature everything from the the impression that Kelly made. “Caddyshack” gopher to a pic“When he talks to the team, ture of the ESPN anchor Scott he doesn’t need to do it for an exVan Pelt. In some drills, man- tended period,” Unger said. “He’s agers posing as defensive line- to the point. Everyone sits up and men wear concoctions of duct listens.” tape and cardboard — inspired But the players and coaches by samurai flags Kelly saw in a struggled to keep up. After the movie — that mimic the size of initial spring practice of Kelly’s a tall defensive lineman with his first year, he said, the coaches arms outstretched. returned to the locker room and “I was dizzy walking off the said it was the fastest practice field,” Gruden said. “It’s a philos- they had ever been involved with. ophy that is the damndest thing “I said, ‘That was the slowest I’ve ever seen. I love it and can’t practice I’ve been involved with get enough of it.” in the last 10 years,’” Kelly said. This cacophony has become a Oregon had run elements of a must-see stop for other coaches. no-huddle offense before Kelly’s Kelly said that Boise State coach arrival, but the pace of his prac-

tices required adjustments from players and coaches. “In the old days, you could pull aside a guy while they huddled up,” said Mike Bellotti, Oregon’s former coach. “You do that now and you would miss five plays.” Oregon caught on — or caught up — as Kelly made his reputation by turning Dixon from an underachiever to a Heisman Trophy contender in 2007. From there, a parade of quarterbacks — nine in Kelly’s first three seasons — maintained the offensive production. Oregon has ranked in the top 10 nationally in scoring or total offense all four years Kelly has been in Eugene. This year, the Ducks are No. 1 in both scoring offense and total offense, with 569.2 yards per game. Because Oregon’s offense will score so frequently, Kelly keeps his defense fresh by using 25 players — nine defensive linemen, six linebackers and 10 defensive backs — every game. “The only way to get in shape for the no-huddle is you have to be competing against it and running it,” said Ed Dickson, a former tight end for the Ducks. Kelly’s wild offense helped lure three speedy sophomores — Thomas and star tailback LaMichael James (158.3 yards a game) from Texas, and Kenjon Barner from California — to Oregon. “We’re scoring a lot of points and putting up numbers,” Kelly said. “You can run a similar-type offense, but if you’re averaging 20 points a game, people don’t want to play in it.” If Oregon keeps winning, its hyper-tempo offense should keep spreading. “I was so eager to learn it, I almost took the job,” said Gruden, who turned down a shot to become Kelly’s offensive coordinator to become an ESPN analyst. “My wife said, ‘Are you the craziest human being alive, you want to move to Oregon to learn an offense?’ “I said: ‘But Cindy, it’s the Oregon spread. It’s unbelievable.’ She didn’t see it from my point of view.”

NFL owners set for no football in 2011 By Chris Jenkins The Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. — NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith sees new signs that owners are preparing for a football-free 2011. With support from Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, he asked fans to take the players’ side. Speaking at a tailgate-style fan luncheon a few blocks from Lambeau Field on Tuesday, Smith referred to a recent Sports Business Journal report that said the NFL is requiring banks that lend money to its teams to extend grace periods for loan defaults through the end of the 2011 season in the event of a lockout. “That to me is a step where the owners are protecting themselves in the event that there is no season,” Smith said. Smith said that move, along with provisions in television deals that provide for some pay-

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 D3

ments even if there is a lockout, are evidence that owners are planning for the possibility that there won’t be a season in 2011. NFL officials did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Rodgers, the Packers’ newly elected player representative to the union, asked the crowd of about 300 fans for their support. “We’re going to keep you guys daily on our minds and we realize how much this means, and affects not only us but this community,” Rodgers said. “We thank you for your support, and stand with us. It’s going to be a tough fight, but we’re trusting that in the end everything’s going to turn out to way it’s supposed to.” In a meeting Monday, Packers players voted to become the latest NFL team to give the union approval to decertify in the event of a lockout. Decertification would give players the right to

sue the NFL under antitrust laws if there is a lockout, a threat that could strengthen the players’ position in CBA negotiations. Smith said lawsuits have played an important role in past gains by the players, referencing late Packers icon Reggie White’s role in the implementation of today’s free agency system. “Look, the fact is most of our fans who love this game right now believe mistakenly that free agency was a gift to the players,” Smith said. “That’s not true. Reggie White and Freeman McNeil put their careers on the line and had to sue for free agency.” But Smith wouldn’t say whether the union or individual players currently are considering a new lawsuit, or are simply relying on the threat of legal action to force owners to make concessions in negotiations. “The only thing that we will do is continue to protect our interest,” Smith said.

Smith said players have always been willing to keep playing under an extension of the existing CBA, and reiterated complaints that owners refuse to open their financial records. As the NFL’s only publicly owned franchise, the Packers are the only team that makes it financial information public. The Packers posted an operating profit of approximately $9.8 million in the fiscal year that ended March 31, down from $20.1 million the previous year. Taking into account investment losses that were less severe, the team reported net income of approximately $5.2 million, up from $4 million. “Show us the financial data that says that the National Football League is in some sort of economic (hardship),” Smith said. “And so far all we’ve heard back is from their lead negotiator, who said that’s none of our business.”

PHOENIX — A relative newcomer with a background in tennis, not football, Pac-10 commissioner Larry Scott doesn’t feel comfortable characterizing this week’s athletic directors meetings as the most important in conference history. He’ll leave that to someone who’s been around a little longer. But don’t confuse reticence for naivete. Scott understands the potential landscape-altering significance Wednesday and Thursday in San Francisco — and the meeting of presidents and chancellors later in the month — will have on the future of what will become the Pac-12 next year. “This is an inflection point with the conference moving to 12 teams,” Scott said. “This conference is about to scale to new heights in terms of the popularity that we had and the types of media agreements we’re about to strike next year. How we move to a 12-team conference when we haven’t expanded since 1978 has obviously kicked up some pretty weighty issues.” The heavy lifting will be a three-headed monster: creating divisions and a schedule that don’t foul up existing rivalries, divvying up the revenue and deciding on a format — and possibly a site — for a football championship game. Revenue sharing will likely be the top priority. The Pac-10’s current model is based on TV appearances; get on TV more, get more money. With the conference’s current TV deals set to expire, the Pac-10 could be on the verge of a massive financial windfall, particularly if it’s able to create its own network similar to the Big Ten’s. With so much money potentially on the table, there will likely be a push to divide it up more equally. Figure on USC and UCLA voting against a share-the-wealth model, though, since those schools traditionally make more TV appearances. Another potentially divisive issue is figuring out how to divide the schools now that Colorado and Utah are joining the conference. The conference is looking at numerous models, including north/south or coastal/inland splits, even breaking schools into pods. There’s also been discussion of a “zipper” model that would split geographical rivals down

the middle and have them play in the regular season finale, which would allow each team to play in Los Angeles every year while still getting a shot at their biggest rival. The Southern California trips are big for schools around the conference because of the rich recruiting grounds and, at least under the current deals, the extra TV money. Whatever is decided, expect the revenue-sharing plan to be a big influence. “Between those two issues, I think there is some interrelation,” Scott said. “Traditionally, our conference has shared football TV revenue on the basis of how often you’re on TV and folks correlate division structure with how often you’re playing certain teams, particularly LA teams, and some get on TV more often than others. “Until we are able to agree on our new revenue-sharing plan, we will have to decide those things in concept.” One decision appears to be an all-but-done deal: a football championship game. The question will be where to play it. One proposal is to have it at a neutral site, with Las Vegas, San Diego or NFL stadiums in Phoenix and the Bay Area as top contenders. The conference also is looking into the NFL playoff model, giving the higher-ranked team home-field advantage. The neutral-site option appears to be most likely, since the logistics of planning a championship game in less than a week would be a nightmare and three of the conference’s stadiums hold less than 50,000 fans, which would result in a huge loss in revenue for the conference. The conference’s athletic directors have already been discussing all three issues, but don’t expect any decisions to come out of the meetings. It’ll be more like a list of pros and cons that the presidents and chancellors will have to hash out at their meeting on Oct. 21. “I don’t think these are the kinds of issues where you have unanimous positions or recommendations,” Scott said. “I expect we’re going to be narrowing and framing options, but ultimately the decisions will be coming out of our board meeting.” Whatever the board decides, the new Pac-12 isn’t likely to look anything like the current Pac-10.

Lawmakers urge review of bowl game tax complaint The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Four lawmakers, including a former college football kicker, are urging the Internal Revenue Service to “thoroughly examine” a tax complaint filed against three premier college football bowls. Playoff PAC, a political action committee that wants the bowls replaced with a championship playoff system, recently filed the IRS complaint against the operators of the Fiesta, Sugar and Orange Bowls. They are three of the five games that constitute the Bowl Championship Series (the other two are the Rose Bowl and the BCS title game). The complaint accuses the three bowls of violating their tax-exempt status by paying excessive salaries and perks, providing “sweetheart loans” and doing undisclosed lobbying. “As public charities that take in millions of dollars each year, they receive significant tax exemptions and benefits that must not be abused,” wrote the four House members in a letter to

IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman, obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press. The lawmakers, all critics of the BCS, added: “We therefore ask that you act on our request and thoroughly examine these troubling claims” made about the bowls. An IRS spokeswoman said the agency was prohibited from commenting on any specific taxpayer situation, case or allegation. The Fiesta Bowl declined to comment, and officials from the Sugar and Orange bowls did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The bowls said last month in response to the complaint that they fully comply with tax laws and rules.

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fter ending their 49-year drought by knocking off the Philadelphia Flyers in six games, can the Chicago Blackhawks add their names to the Cup again next season? The Blackhawks should be competing for the Cup for years to come with their roster of young stars. Jonathan Toews, Patrick Kane, and Duncan Keith are all locked up for at least five years. They lost nearly half the roster that was last seen together celebrating at center ice in Philadelphia – including netminder Anti Niemi – but picked up veteran Marty Turco to replace him between the pipes. Although salary-cap considerations forced them to shed a lot of their depth, the core is still there, and thanks to a young, talented nucleus, should be considered one of the top teams in the league.

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Repeat Continued from D1 “That’s the worst part about it, seeing some of your best friends leave,� star forward Patrick Kane said. “Not that they were some of our best players, but they were obviously instrumental in what we did. “If you look at our team this year, it’s kind of a new team. It’s a new challenge. Of course you want to keep that team together, but it’s just not the way the NHL works anymore. You’ve got to make changes.� And the rest of the league has noticed. The Detroit Red Wings, the NHL’s last repeat champion in 1997 and 1998, might be poised to reclaim the Western Conference title they held the two previous years. They also might have an advantage with a less condensed schedule instead of last season’s jam-packed one that accommodated the long break for the Vancouver Olympics. With Pavel Datsyuk, Henrik Zetterberg, and ageless defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom healthy and hungry, the Red Wings are happy to slip under the radar and let the Blackhawks carry the burden of the bull’s-eye. Detroit was knocked out in the second round by regular-season Western champion San Jose and now

seems to have lost some of the intimidation factor. “I don’t know. I was reading the other day that we’re not that good,� Red Wings coach Mike Babcock said with a smile. “We are good. I just know that we’re going to end up with a lot of points.� That will be necessary again in the wide-open West, where it took 95 just to qualify for the postseason. Seventh-place Nashville got in with 100 points, and clubs such as the Colorado Avalanche, Los Angeles Kings and Phoenix Coyotes that finished at the bottom of the standings in 2009 all made surprise trips to the playoffs. “It’s not a whole lot of point differential between eighth and fifth,� Kings forward Anze Kopitar said. “It’s one of those things where we can all thrive on it and take it to our advantage because everything is so close in the West. Pretty much anybody can win.� Out East, the Flyers and Montreal Canadiens nabbed the final two places with only 88 points — one more than the ninth-place New York Rangers — but then surged all the way to the conference finals over overwhelming favorites such as the Washington Capitals, New Jersey Devils and Pittsburgh Penguins. Montreal knocked out pow-

“We have the motivation we need in the organization. We have to realize it’s time to move forward. We have to improve our mentality. We know we can play good offensively, but we have to play good defensively if we want to win.� — Washington Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin erhouses Washington and Pittsburgh in the first two rounds. Philadelphia ousted Boston to reach the conference finals after trailing the series 3-0, and then 3-0 in Game 7. The Penguins reached the Stanley Cup finals in 2008 and 2009, splitting the final series with the Red Wings in those seasons, but were stunned in the second round by the upstart Canadiens. The only thing that kept that from being the most surprising result in last season’s playoffs was Montreal’s comeback from a 3-1 deficit to Presidents’ Trophywinning Washington in the first round. “I think teams are still hunting us down during the regular season,� Capitals defenseman Mike Green said. “We did well in the regular season, but once the playoffs came around for whatever reason we couldn’t suc-

ceed. That might play into our advantage come playoffs. Maybe they’ll underestimate us and you never know.� Not likely with Alex Ovechkin still lurking in the nation’s capital. Ovechkin might have the individual statistical edge over Pittsburgh captain Sidney Crosby — the Washington star’s biggest rival — but he hasn’t turned that into playoff success. The Capitals have won the Southeast Division for two consecutive years, including posting the NHL’s best mark last season for the first time, but they haven’t gotten as far as even the Eastern Conference finals since Ovechkin came to town after the lockout — the same year Crosby landed in Pittsburgh. Ovechkin and Crosby will be the featured stars in this year’s

NCAA begins new strategy for officials The Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA thinks it has a corporate solution for all those college basketball coaches upset with inconsistent calls. On Tuesday, the national governing body said it had formed limited liability companies for officials in hopes of putting all the rules under one consistent banner. “The way a game is called in the West should be no different than a game in the East,� Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference commissioner Rich Ensor said in a statement released by the NCAA. He chaired the task force that came up with the plan to form the two limited liability

COLLEGE BASKETBALL corporations. One perception is that the Big East and Big Ten permit more rugged play during the conference season than is typically allowed during the NCAA tournament, and that can hurt those teams when it comes to postseason play. NCAA officials are hoping that by creating two organizations — one for refs who call men’s games and another for those who call women’s games — that they can better coordinate points of emphasis and consistency of calls. It’s not the first time the NCAA

has tried something like this. In 2007, the NCAA adopted a similar strategy for college football referees, a move NCAA officials say has provided more consistency with player safety concerns and the implementation of instant replay. The basketball goals are different, with an emphasis on consistent standards, standardized education and evaluation programs, and an expanded pool of officials. “Conferences invest time and resources into officiating, but right now we operate in our own officiating world,� said Gloria

Nevarez, senior associate commissioner of the Pac-10 and the first chair of the women’s officiating board of managers. “In this structure, we can roll out initiatives at a national level that can help improve officiating.� Big Sky Conference commissioner Doug Fullerton will chair the men’s group. Nevarez and Fullerton will each serve twoyear terms, though neither group will assign officials. Conferences will still make those decisions. “It is something that has been long overdue,� Fullerton said. “We know college basketball fans expect a different game than any other levels of basketball. The best time to start something new is right now.�

Winter Classic in Pittsburgh on New Year’s Day. The buildup will be even bigger this time with a multipart HBO reality series in advance of the outdoor game at Heinz Field. “We have the motivation we need in the organization. We have to realize it’s time to move forward,� Ovechkin said of the Capitals. “We have to improve our mentality. We know we can play good offensively, but we have to play good defensively if we want to win.� The want to win is always there. The belief that any team can is stronger than ever. Five teams have new hope with new coaches, including four clubs that missed the playoffs; Atlanta (Craig Ramsay), Columbus (Scott Arniel), Edmonton (Tom Renney) and Tampa Bay (Guy Boucher). John MacLean, the Devils’ career leader in goals, was promoted by New Jersey from the AHL to take over for the retired Jacques Lemaire. The Tampa Bay Lightning dipped into Detroit’s deep pool of success and hired Hall of Famer Steve Yzerman to be their general manager. That move can only help the development of 20-yearold forward Steven Stamkos, who in his second NHL season tied Crosby for the league lead with 51 goals. With hulking youngster Victor Hedman anchoring the defense,

and veteran forwards Vincent Lecavalier and Martin St. Louis still providing offensive punch, the Lightning might not be too far away from getting back to an elite level. “The hiring of Steve Yzerman has definitely made our team more popular,� Stamkos said. “Tampa is not your traditional hockey market, but having won the Cup in ’04 and having guys like Vinny and Marty there as well as myself, we are a fun team.� For the fourth straight year, the NHL regular season is opening on two continents. This time a record six teams are getting started with two games outside of North America: Carolina is taking on Minnesota in Helsinki, Finland; Columbus faces San Jose in Stockholm, Sweden; and Phoenix and Boston are playing a set in Prague, Czech Republic. Everyone will be getting used to a pair of new rules. The ban on blindside shoulder hits to the head, adopted during last season’s playoffs, now carries a five-minute major penalty and a game misconduct along with being subject to supplemental discipline. The NHL has also instituted size specific goalie pads. Before this season, the rule provided only for a maximum pad length of 38 inches. Now the rule specifies a maximum “limiting distance size� for each goalie.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 D5

Summit boys soccer edges Redmond 1-0 in IMC match Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Summit broke open a scoreless draw in the second half and carried the 1-0 advantage over Redmond to the final whistle of an Intermountain Conference boys soccer game Tuesday. Earlier in the season, the Panthers (3-2-2-overall) got the better of Summit, winning 2-1 in Bend. The road squad won again Tuesday, but this time it was the Storm which posted the victory. “Both teams came out kind of flat,” Summit coach Ron Kidder explained about play in the first half. Though both schools had ample scoring opportunities before halftime, the score remained locked at 0-0 until the Storm (35-1 overall) broke the tie in 55th minute. Running on the counterattack, Jesse Sanderson laced a through ball to sophomore Glenn Sherman, who rifled a shot from inside the 18-yard box. Redmond goalkeeper Ulisses Faurrieta saved Sherman’s initial shot, but the Summit forward gathered his own deflection and finished the play, scoring the game’s only goal. “They just waited for the right opportunity,” Redmond coach Jason Clark said. “They out-hustled us to the ball and it showed.” Both teams return to the pitch Thursday as Summit entertains Crook County, while Redmond travels to Bend High. In other Tuesday prep matches: BOYS SOCCER Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PRINEVILLE — Mountain View’s Logan Riemhofer opened the scoring in the 18th minute, and his older brother Cam tallied the game’s second goal one minute later, setting the tone for

Scoreboard Continued from D6 RIVER’S EDGE Men’s Club, Sept. 28 Stroke play Gross: 1, Scott Brasher, 76. 2 (tie), Rod Turcott, 80; Hi Becker, 80. 4, Kevin Rueter, 81. 5 (tie), Roger Bean, 84; Mike Brasher, 84. 7 (tie), Steve Langenberg, 86; Jerry Egge, 86. 9 (tie), Mike Shay, 88; Dave Bryson, 88. 11, Dave Hancock, 90. 12, Mike Reuter, 91. 13 (tie), Roy Fullerton, 92; Taylor Story, 92. 15, Dave Fiedler, 93. 16, David Loadman, 95. 17 (tie), Chuck Mackdanz, 96; J.J. Somer, 96. 19 (tie), Ron York, 97; Terry Loose, 97. 21 (tie), David Black, 98; Dick Carroll, 98. 23, Ben Becker, 100. 24 (tie), Richard Schieferstein, 105; Jim Wilcox, 105; Flip Houston, 105. 27, Stan Brock, 106. 28, Keith Wood, 112. Net: 1, Egge, 69. 2 (tie), Bryson, 70; M. Brasher, 70; York, 70. 5 (tie), Langenberg, 71; Bean, 71. 7 (tie), S. Brasher, 72; Shay, 72; Hancock, 72. 10 (tie), Turcott, 73; Fullerton, 73; Houston, 73. 13 (tie), H. Becker, 74; Loose, 74. 15 (tie), Rueter, 75; Reuter, 75; Story, 75; Black, 75. 19, Somer, 76. 20 (tie), Fiedler, 77; Mackdanz, 77. 22 (tie), Loadman 79; Schieferstein, 79. 24, Carroll, 80. 24 (tie), Wilcox, 81; Wood, 81. 27, Brock, 83. KPs — Ben Becker, No. 4; Chuck Mackdanz, No. 16. River’s Edge-Sunriver Home and Home, Sept. 29 Two-Man Best Ball Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun/Frank Vulliet (Sunriver), 73. 2, Dan Weybright/Eric Saukkonen (Sunriver), 75. 3 (tie), Robert Hill/Gerry Stearns (Sunriver), 76; Scott Brasher/Keith Wood (River’s Edge), 76. 5, Wayne Johnson/Jim Wilcox (Rivers Edge), 77. Net: 1 (tie), Scott Brasher/Keith Wood (River’s Edge), 61; Wayne Johnson/Jim Wilcox (River’s Edge), 61; Robert Hill/Gerry Stearns (Sunriver), 61; Mike Brasher/Terry Loose (River’s Edge), 61. 5, Dave Fiedler/Taylor Story (River’s Edge), 72. KPs — Chuck Mackdanz, No. 4; Dave Hughes, No. 7. River’s Edge Club Championship, Oct. 2 Stroke Play Gold Tee Division — Gross: 1, Lance Kuykendall, 73. 2, Jeff Hansen, 76. Kevin Rueter, 82. Net: 1, Matt Dietz, 74. John Foran, 74. Tony Powers, 76. Tim Gregor, 76. White Tee Division — Gross: 1, Don Gregor, 76. Rigo Montes, 81. Rich Robertson, 83. Net: 1, Taylor Story, 67. Wes Jones, 70. Roy Fullerton, 70. Ladies Division — Gross: 1, Susan Anderson, 99. Wynan Pelley, 101. Diana Loadman, 110. Net: 1, Sheila McCaffery, 68.

Playoff Continued from D1 What in the name of the almighty dollar is going on? At least thus far this season, youth and tight budgets have prevailed. “Just the way the economics of the game are,” Reds general manager Walt Jocketty said. “There’s such a wide discrepancy in revenues at different clubs. You have to survive and compete, and you have to find new ways to do it.” Tampa Bay with an average age of about 28½ by season’s end, is the youngest playoff team and 19th in the majors by age, according to STATS LLC. Texas is 17th and Minnesota 15th, both at 28-plus, while Cincinnati is 12th at 29. Whether relative inexperience will hurt these teams in the crucible of October baseball remains to be seen, but young legs and arms got them this far. More and more, teams are willing to take a chance on youth — especially those prized players not-yet-eligible for salary arbitration or free agency. “You don’t see people giving up as many of their (former) draft choices as they use to,”

PREP ROUNDUP the rest of the match. Matt Van Hemelryck added the Cougar’s third goal in the 22nd minute and Santiago Mansilla scored the first of his two goals in the 27th minute to give the visiting team a 4-0 lead at halftime. The second half proved more of the same as Miguel Molina scored a pair of goals for the Cougs, and Brandon Navarro posted a goal to put Mountain View (3-2-3 overall) ahead 7-0. Mansilla recorded his second goal of the afternoon to cap the scoring in the 8-0 match. Crook County (0-5-3 overall) is at Summit Thursday, while Mountain View hosts the Storm on Tuesday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Molalla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MADRAS — After a scoreless first half, Madras found the back of the net in the 57th minute and took a lead it would not relinquish. Goalkeeper Jonny Villanueva connected with forward Jose Medina after smothering, then clearing, a Molalla shot. Medina collected the ball and beat the Indians’ keeper in a one-on-one situation to give Madras a 1-0 advantage. The undefeated White Buffaloes (4-0 Tri-Valley Conference, 7-0 overall) added a second goal in the 64th minute when Asvaldo Diaz heeled the ball to an awaiting Derrick Pacheco, who finished the play with a score. Madras’ next conference test is Tuesday at North Marion. Umatilla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 CULVER — Martin Leal posted 14 saves in goal for the host Bulldogs, but the Vikings scored four times in the second half and rolled to the shutout victory. Culver, which plays at Irrigon next Tuesday, is now 4-3 in Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 games.

Ardene Fullerton, 69. Candy O’Rear, 75.

GIRLS SOCCER Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 After losing two consecutive games to end September, the Storm have now won two consecutive matches by a combined score of 16-0. Senior Tashia Davis posted her second consecutive hat trick to lead the Summit offense. Davis scored once in the first half and twice in the second against the Panthers. The Storm also received two goals from senior Eve Hess and a pair of scores from junior Kristin Parr. “Rianna Alyward was excellent in the back for us,” Summit coach Jamie Brock said about her junior defender. “She also started a lot of our goal-scoring attacks.” Rachel Estopare and Kristine Fjelde split time in goal to post the clean sheet for the Storm (6-2-1), who host Mountain View next Tuesday night. Redmond (1-6-0) has lost five straight matches and will host Bend on Thursday. Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 The Cougars improved to 8-0 overall with the Intermountain Conference shutout over the Cowgirls. Maddy Booster and McKayla Madison paced a balanced Mountain View offense with two goals apiece. Allie Cummins, Torie Morris, Niki Ryan, Courtney Candella, Bre Rosen, Tash Anderson, Edna Ibarra and Katie Newell all added goals of their own. The Cougars are at Summit on Tuesday. Molalla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 MOLALLA — The Indians were too much for Madras in the Tri-Valley Conference match, scoring five times in the first half. The Indians have now won seven consecutive matches by a combined score of 30-1. Madras (0-5-1 ,0-4-0 Tri-Valley) will look to snap a six-game losing streak next Tuesday when the Buffs host North Marion.

VOLLEYBALL Mountain View . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-21-17 Mountain View had no trouble with Bend in the first game, but the Lava Bears played the visiting squad close in the second game behind the strong play of middle blocker Molly Maloney. Maloney recorded six kills and one block for Bend. In the end, the Cougars proved too much for the home team in the Intermountain Conference matchup. Mountain View’s Karlee Markham posted 13 kills and nine blocks while Maddy Seevers added 13 kills and eight blocks of her own. The Cougars travel to Prineville Thursday to meet Crook County, while Bend is on the road at the Glencoe tournament on Saturday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Molalla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-10-16 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes followed up an undefeated weekend at the Philomath Invitational with a Tri-Valley Conference victory over winless Molalla in three straight games. “We controlled the ball pretty well and tried to minimize our errors as much as possible,” said Madras coach Jamie Smith. Junior Shani Rehwinkel and senior Hannah Mikkelson each recorded eight kills for the Buffs while setter Rachel Simmons ended the night with 28 assists. Madras (2-2 TriValley) will play in a tournament at Junction City on Saturday. Butte Falls . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10-16 GILCHRIST — Butte Falls swept the Grizzlies in three games to win a Class 1A Mountain Valley League match on the road. Grizzlies Brenna Gravitt and Ashley James combined for 22 digs. Gilchrist (2-8 Mountain Valley) has failed to win a game in their last three matches, but host Paisley on Friday, a team they swept on the road in September.

WIDGI CREEK Men’s Club, Sept. 29 Two-Man Best Ball Gross: 1 (tie), Jim Wellock/Greg Haugen, 71; Gary Hoagland/ Dennis Percell, 71. 3 (tie), Bill Burley/Brian Case, 73; Bob Brooks/ Fran Ostlund, 73. 5, John Masterton/Mitch Cloninger, 75. Net: 1, Chas Nelson/Bob Bailey, 57. 2, Rich Belzer/Ron Stassens, 58. 3, Roger Bergeson/Jim Guettler, 59. 4, Jerry Olsen/Tony Lord, 61. 5, John Shelton/Jim Smith, 62. KPs — Daryl Hjeresen, No. 5; Dennis Percell, No. 15. Women’s Club, Sept. 29 Stableford Flight 1 — 1 (tie), Sylvie O’Keefe, 43; Elly Cashel, 43. 3, Lynn Chase, 41. Flight 2 — 1, Karen Larson, 39. 2, Janet Campbell, 38. 3 (tie), Kathy Madrigal, 37; Mindy Cicinelli, 37. Flight 3 — 1 (tie), Carol Colby, 43; Tie 1st Place – Joni Ehly, 43. 3, Nancy Stewart, 41. KPs — 1st Flight: Elly Cashel, No. 11. 2nd Flight: Kathy Lauchlan, No. 2. 3rd Flight: Maxine Fletcher, No. 15.

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. TOURNAMENTS Oct. 7 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-3897676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 9 — Summit Football Golf Tournament at Broken Top Club to benefit the Summit High School football program. The 18-hole scramble will begin with a noon shotgun start. The cost to play is $125 per player or $500 per team and includes greens fees, driving

range balls, cart, dinner and awards. Presenting sponsorships and hole sponsorships are also available. For more information or to register, call Jerry Hackenbruck at 541-647-4802. Oct. 11 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Oct. 14 — Maverix Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 15-17 — The Tetherow Two-Ball Invitational is a two-person, select-drive best ball at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times Saturday will be between 10:30 a.m. and noon. Play will begin Sunday at 11 a.m. Cost is $600 per team, with no more than one professional on each team, and includes Friday practice round, breakfast and oncourse snacks, Saturday dinner, caddy, gifts, trophies and prizes. The field will be limited to the first 30 teams to register. For more information, call Tetherow at 541-388-2582, Oct. 21 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www. maverixgolftour.com. Oct. 23 — Warner Pacific College Fall Fellowship Golf Tournament at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. Four-person scramble begins with a 1 p.m. shogun start. Cost is $100 per person and includes greens fees, lunch, range balls, golf cart, and tee prize. Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Warner Pacific golf team, and the Portland school’s golf tournament at Aspen Lakes. For more information, call 503-517-1144, e-mail jrobertson@warnerpacific. edu, or visit www.aspenlakes.com. Oct. 28 — Maverix Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Maverix Golf Tour is a weekly competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses with prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-3897676, or www.maverixgolftour.com. Nov. 6 — The Turkey Open at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a two-person best-ball tournament. Event tees off with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. Dec. 12 — Christmas Goose Golf Tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Two-person scotch ball tournament tees off with an 10 a.m. shotgun start. To register or for more information, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113.

Twins President Jerry Bell said. “George Steinbrenner, he didn’t care. Everything was about win now. But teams are pulling back a little more and being a little more apt to hold on to their minor league players. And obviously we believe that’s the way to go.” The golf courses of the U.S., Caribbean and Asia will be filled this month with players from teams that failed. The second-, third- and fifth-through-ninth biggest spenders as of opening day were all flops: Boston, the Cubs, the Mets, Detroit, the White Sox, the Angels and Seattle. Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is absolutely glowing when talking about the success of the small markets. It’s not just because he used to own the Milwaukee Brewers. Boosting the little guys has been a primary goal since he became commissioner in 1992. Revenue sharing has improved the fortunes of the clubs with less to spend, with $433 million transferred to the poorer teams in 2009 and an estimated $401 million this year, according to MLB. “When you’ve got Cincinnati winning and San Diego up there, and even San Francisco and

Colorado and Tampa, it’s a great sign,” he said. “There’s no doubt, as I study things, that we have more competitive balance than we’ve ever had in our history.” Fans empty their wallets to see a winner, and teams unload their treasury to produce one. When they fall short, owners look to assess blame — witness the firing of Mets general manager Omar Minaya this week, partly because $36 million pitcher Ollie Perez had as many wins this year as Kukla, Fran and Ollie — 0. Successful teams, with the exception most notably of the star-filled Yankees and Phillies, largely added experienced players to their prospects. “You do need a core group,” Bell said. “I think you need a sprinkle of veterans here and there. I don’t think you need too many, but a couple are of them are awful nice to have around. People look up to them. You know, we’ve got (Carl) Pavano now who’s kind of had a rebirth here. He’s kind of a leader. And (Jim) Thome obviously. Yeah, you need some of that.” Too many veterans, and the payroll balloons to a Yankee-like $200 million-plus or even Philadelphia’s $140 milliion-plus. Texas began the season at $55

million, while Cincinnati and Tampa Bay were in the $70s, Atlanta in the $80s, and San Francisco and Minnesota (in its first season at Target Field) in the $90s. Just as it is in a department store bargain basement, combing the January and February free-agent discount sales is key. “We got lucky. The whole industry got lucky,” Giants general manager Brian Sabean said. “The whole free-agency market has crashed. The days of the mega multiyear deals are gone. There are more guys, because of the way the game’s being turned over in a lot of organizations to younger players, to having to take shorter-term contracts for less money. That helps everybody. It helps them stay in the game without being pushed out by younger players. It also helps management to balance the budget or spread the money through the roster.” But, as the teams that have gone home know from firsthand experience, you have to make the right selections. “We have little margin for error here,” Jocketty said. “Any market this size is the same way. You can’t afford to made mistakes, at least not too many.”

SUNRIVER RESORT Central Oregon Women’s Team Golf, Sept. 29 Four Ball Match Play Season Champions — Gross: 1, Bend Golf and Country Club, 326. Net: Prineville Golf Club, 264 points. Week 9 — Gross: 1, Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 38. 2, Bend Golf and Country Club, 37.5. 3, Broken Top Club, 37. 4, Sunriver Resort, 30.5. 5, Crooked River Ranch, 30. 6, Eagle Crest Resort, 24. 7, Prineville Golf Club, 23.5. 8, Black Butte Ranch, 17. 9, Juniper Golf Course, 16.5. 10, Pronghorn Club, 16. Net: 1, Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 33.5. 2 (tie), Broken Top Club, 29.5; Crooked River Ranch, 29.5. 4, Bend Golf and Country Club, 29. 5, Prineville Golf Club, 28.5. 6, Sunriver Resort, 25.5. 7, Juniper Golf Course, 25. 8 (tie), Black Butte Ranch, 24.5; Eagle Crest Resort, 24.5. 10, Pronghorn Club, 20.5. Final standings — Gross: 1, Bend Golf and Country Club, 326. 2, Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 300. 3, Juniper Golf Course, 272. 4, Crooked River Ranch, 244.5. 5, Broken Top Club, 233. 6, Sunriver Resort, 228.5. 7, Pronghorn Club, 224. 8, Eagle Crest Resort, 223. 9, Prineville Golf Club, 216.5. 10, Black Butte Ranch, 162.5. Net: 1, Prineville Golf Club, 264. 2, Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 260. 3, Juniper Golf Course, 259. 4, Crooked River Ranch, 252.5. 5, Bend Golf and Country Club, 244. 6 (tie), Broken Top Club, 238.5; Eagle Crest Resort, 238.5. 8, Sunriver Resort, 237.5. 9, Pronghorn Club, 223.5. 10, Black Butte Ranch, 212.5.

Hole-In-One Report Sept. 25 PRINEVILLE GOLF CLUB Dale Close, Prineville No. 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-iron Sept. 30 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ron Tokuyama, Bend No. 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-iron Sept. 30 SUNRIVER WOODLANDS Cork Cieslinski, Portland No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-hybrid Oct. 1 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Susie Hoffman, Bend No. 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-wood Oct. 2 SUNRIVER MEADOWS Jeff Kuppenbender, Bend No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-iron Oct. 3 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Annie Mertens, Sisters No. 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-iron

Calendar

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Crook County’s Marissa Pope (9) tips the ball over the fingertips of Calli Prestwood during the second game against Summit on Tuesday. Summit won the match 25-18, 25-20, 25-19.

Storm Continued from D1 “Our hitting, which was something we’ve been struggling with, was great,” said Crook County coach Rosie Honl, whose squad hit just 79 percent of its serves. “But our serve and serve receiving stunk up the place.” Marissa Pope led the Cowgirls with 12 kills. Annie Fraser and Makayla Lindburg each added five kills. “We have a service creed that says things like, ‘Make every first serve and make every game point,’ ” explained Crook County outside hitter Kirsti Kelso, whose team has another tough test on Thursday with a home match against Mountain View. “We didn’t do any of that tonight.” While all three games were close, Summit grabbed the

momentum in game two after rallying back from an 18-14 deficit. After a Cowgirl service error made the score 18-15, Summit’s Nicole Ruttke served three consecutive points to tie the game 18-18. The Storm won seven of the next nine points to win the game and take control of the match. “We want to come out and compete in every contest,” said Summit coach Jill Waskom, whose squad is the top-ranked team in Class 5A based on the Oregon School Activities Association’s power rankings. “Crook County’s a great team who we enjoy playing. They’re a great program that makes us better.” The Storm resume IMC play Thursday with a road contest at Redmond. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

BROADCASTING

ESPN set to air NBA games in 3-D New York Times News Service The game between the Miami Heat and the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on Dec. 17 will be broadcast on ESPN’s 3-D network, making it the first NBA game broadcast in 3-D, according to NBA and ESPN officials. The network will show eight regular-season games in 3-D during the 20102011 season, and another six in the playoffs. The full schedule, which will be announced today, includes games in Phoenix, Denver, Orlando, Miami and Atlanta. ESPN said the sites were chosen for their ability to accommodate the extra equipment needed to record and broadcast a game in 3-D. ESPN is trying to build a more extensive schedule of programming on its 3-D network, which has been broadcasting since June. ESPN now shows about one live event a week.

The channel is carried by DirecTV, Comcast Corp. and AT&T Inc., and it is scheduled to be available on Time Warner Cable in the near future. It is currently available to 45 million households, ESPN said, but the network does not know how many of those households own 3-D television sets or watch its programming. About 500,000 3D TV sets have been shipped to dealers, the Consumer Electronics Association said. Manufacturers of 3-D television are looking to sports to drive the adoption of the technology. It is unclear whether many television viewers are interested. Further, there are indications that those who have seen the technology are not impressed.

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D6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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G R EEN

Vision Continued from D1 In just a week’s time it is obvious that the work going on at Black Butte Ranch is less a renovation of Glaze Meadow and more the construction of a brand new golf course. “Every single green is getting rebuilt, and every single tee box is being rebuilt,” says Charles Kingsbaker, Black Butte Ranch’s director of sales and marketing and my personal guide for a tour through Glaze Meadow earlier this week. “It’s a whole new golf course. “It’s not just taking a couple of tee boxes out here and a couple there.” John Fought, the well-regarded course architect who in the 1990s helped Bob Cupp design Crosswater Club at Sunriver Resort and Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club near Portland, was hired to rebuild Glaze Meadow. The project includes installing a new irrigation system, clearing of trees, and stretching the course to roughly 7,100 yards from the back tees — or about 700 yards longer than its previous measure. Fought’s plan is to create a course that is a throwback to the Donald Ross 1920s and ’30s designs made famous by courses such as Pinehurst No. 2 in North Carolina. Fought, who lives in Arizona, has been in and out of Central Oregon twice since the work at Black Butte Ranch began. He talks about the course’s future like a proud father about to whisk his kid off to college for the first time. “I am absolutely thrilled,” says Fought, whose brother Jeff is Black Butte Ranch’s director of golf. “I know it’s shocking to a lot of people, the difference of just getting the tree cover back to its normal limits. But it’s just fabulous.” Shocking? When the work just began a week ago?

G W PGA EUROPEAN ALFRED DUNHILL LINKS CHAMPIONSHIP Site: St. Andrews and Carnoustie, Scotland. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Courses: St. Andrews, Old Course (7,279 yards, par 72), Carnoustie, Championship Course (7,412 yards, par 72) and Kingsbarns Golf Links (7,160 yards, par 72). Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Piles of logs and construction equipment lay on the third and fourth holes Monday at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course near Sisters. The 30-year-old golf course is undergoing a major renovation after an irrigation upgrade prompted the consideration of other improvements, according to Charles Kingsbaker, director of sales and marketing at Black Butte Ranch. Fought is not exaggerating. Looking from the new first tee, a hole that will be turned from a twisting par 5 into a par 4, the lake behind what will eventually be the green is obvious. The outline of fairway is much wider and more fair to golfers. “It’s shocking, isn’t it?” Fought says of the first hole. “That’s probably one of the places where we really needed to (renovate) as much as anywhere. There were trees in the middle of the fairway. There were trees all over the place. “And players have a hard time playing through all that. You can see now how people can play the golf course.” The first tee is just the first sign that Fought’s plans are to open mountain views and better use the course’s natural attributes.

For instance, the course’s namesake meadow — which barely came into play on the third, fourth and, fifth holes — will now take a starring role on four of the first five holes. Trees, which had grown rapidly due in large part to the course’s irrigation and fertilization, had obscured the meadow’s lake in the 30 years since the course opened. Fought wanted to bring the natural beauty back to Glaze Meadow. “I have done this many times,” says Fought, who compares Glaze Meadow’s renovation to his renovations of Ross’ Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club in North Carolina. “But I think Glaze is the most overgrown golf course I had seen in many, many years. I think there is the oppor-

tunity there to create something spectacularly beautiful.” Plenty of work remains. The renovation of Glaze Meadow will continue through midDecember if weather permits. Shaping the course will begin next spring, and then Ross’ influence will begin to take hold. Seeding will then follow. If all goes according to plan, the course will reopen in spring 2012. But Fought’s vision is already apparent. “It’s amazing what’s going on there,” says Fought. “I am very confident we are going to be able to create something that is spectacular there. I mean REALLY spectacular.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Purse: $4.8 million. Winner’s share: $800,000. Television: Golf Channel (ThursdaySaturday, 5:30-9 a.m.; Sunday, 4:30 -9:30 a.m.). Last year: England’s Simon Dyson won the rain-delayed tournament in a Monday finish at the Old Course, closing with a 6-under 66 for a three-stroke victory. Last week: Europe won the Ryder Cup in a Monday finish at Celtic Manor in Wales, beating the United States 14½-13½ when U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell held off Hunter Mahan 3 and 1 in the final singles match. Notes: McDowell is in the field along with European Ryder Cup players Martin Kaymer Lee Westwood, Rory McIlory, Padraig Harrington, Ross Fisher, Peter Hanson, Edoardo Molinari, captain Colin Montgomerie and South African stars Ernie Els and Retief Goosen. Harrington won in 2002 and 2006, Westwood took the 2003 title, and Montgomerie won in 2005. ... The final round will be played on the Old Course. ... The Portugal Masters is next week at Oceanico Victoria. Online: www.europeantour.com

LPGA TOUR NAVISTAR LPGA CLASSIC

GOLF SCOREBOARD

Site: Prattville, Ala. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.

LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Women’s Nine-Holers, Sept. 29 One Net 1, Bev Murphy/Christine Cercone/Tamera Florio, 31. 2, Lorchild Macri/Cindy Rowley/Norma Hodge, 31. Men’s Sweeps, Sept. 29 1-2-3 Net Rotation 1, Greg Walsh/Larry Hinkle/Ron Lemp/Tom Stump, 114. 2, Richard Smith/Les Segel/Bill Jarrett/Marshall Thomas, 119. 3, Rusty Ertle/Ken Waskom/Gary Rito/Ray Lundeen, 122. Women’s Sweeps, Sept. 30 1-2-3 Net Rotation 1, Sue Rogers/Theresa Kavanagh/Sandy Rosencrance/Patti Jordan, 131. 2, Shannon Morton/Judy Paige/Dee Anderson/Bev Murphy, 134. Chip-ins — Edith McBean, No. 9; Hilary Gilmore, No. 12; Neenie Greenhoe, No. 14. Couples Fall Classic, Oct. 1 Better Ball Flight 1 — Gross: 1, Dianne & Bob Browning, 73. Net: 1, Kaye Williams & Larry Hinkle, 63. Flight 2 — Gross: 1, Chris & Bert Larson, 82. Net: 1, Molly & Michael Mount, 66. KPs — Kaye Williams, Nos. 6, 13; Craig Biss, No. 6; Bob Browning, No. 13. Secret KP — Michael Mount. Solo for 10 Holes Award — Donna Waskom. Saturday Men’s Game, Oct. 2 Net Better Ball 1, Tom Kemph/Dick Smith, 64. 2, Ed Hagstrom/Ron Lemp, 64. Skins — Gross: Dick Smith, Nos. 4, 14, 17, 18; Tom Kemph, Nos. 8, 10; Les Segal, No. 1. Net: Les Segal, Nos. 1, 7, 15; Dick Smith, Nos. 14, 17; Tom Kemph, No. 10; Ron Lemp, No. 13. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Daily Game, Sept. 23 King Of The Hill First Flight (9 handicap or less) — Gross: 1, Chuck Wehrle, 75. Net: 1, Bill De Gree, 69. 2, Mac Ryder, 72. 3, Jim Keller, 73. Second Flight (10-13) — Gross: 1, Jim Rodgers, 79. Net: 1 (tie), Gene Powell, 71; Jerry Mattioda, 71. 3 (tie), Tom Richardson, 73; Brad Chambers, 73. Third Flight (14 and higher) — Gross: 1, Bill Boos, 80. Net: 1, Jim Brommer, 68. 2, Joe Miller, 70. 3, Dan Newport, 71. Central Oregon Senior Women’s Golf Association Sept. 27 Stroke Play A Flight — Gross: 1, Melinda Bailey, 84. 2, Jan Sandburg, 87. 3, Kristina Evans, 88. 4 (tie), Sue Rogers, 89; Judy Blumn, 89. Net: 1 (tie), Judy Boulet, 70; Kathleen Mooberry, 70. 3, Veronie Rygh, 71. 4, Janet King, 72. B Flight — Gross: 1, Mary Ann Doyle, 90. 2, Joan Thye, 95. 3, Kathy Madrigal, 97. 4 (tie), Mary Clark, 98; Moe Bleyer, 98. Net: 1, Joey Dupris, 69. 2, Carmen West, 71. 3, Janet Campbell, 72. 4, Hilary Kenyon, 73. C Flight — Gross: 1, Jackie Yake, 96. 2, Chris Fitzgibbons, 100. 3 (tie), Cookie Dillavou, 101; Barb Weybright, 101. Net: 1, Karen Mayberry, 68. 2, Darlene Ross, 69. 3, Marilyn Baer, 70. 4 (tie), Ann Moore, 73; Diane Storlie, 73. D Flight — Gross: 1, Deanna Cooper, 101. 2, Pat Majchrowski, 104. 3, Jan Bull, 107. 4 (tie), Anita Lohman, 109; Jo Modrell, 109. Net: 1, Kathy Snavely, 68. 2 (tie), Chris Larson, 71; Sharon Madison, 71. 4 (tie), Pat Weed, 72; Pat Porter, 72. KPs — A Flight: Molly Mount. B Flight: None. C Flight: Ann Bard. D Flight: Pat Weed. Accurate Drive — A Flight: Joan Springer-Wellman. B Flight: Carol Reinhard. C Flight: Chris Fitzgibbons. D Flight: Lynne Henze. Ladies’ Golf Association, Sept. 29 Two Net Bestball 1, Marci Barnes/Elaine Dehart/Anita Brown/Martha Weaver, 117. 2, Donna Keller/Linda Bjorvik/Joy Strickland/Joan Gyesky, 118. 3 (tie), Judie Bell-Putas/Joan Thye/Terri Holm Dorothy Stenkamp,

125; Bev Dunderdale/Judith Bornholdt/Linda Kammerich/Deborah Cox, 125. 5, Barb Wehrle/Mary Ellen Marlatt/Ann Moore/Eloise Elliott, 127. Men’s Daily Game, Sept. 30 Two Man Bestball 1st Flight (7.5 handicap or less) — Gross: 1, Brett Evert/ Sam McColl, 71. Net: 1, Franz Miller/Benji Gilchrist, 64.5. 2, Bill De Gree/Brian Mikkelborg, 66. 2nd Flight (8-11) — Gross: 1, Dave Lamson/Jim Keller, 73. Net: 1, Bob Roach/Wes Colbo, 64. 2 (tie), Pete Nielsen/Bill Brewer, 65; Maury Hardman/Tom Archey, 65. 3rd Flight (12 or higher) — Gross: 1, Rich Gagne/Gene Powell, 76. Net: 1, Gary Christensen/Tom Riley, 60. 2, Greg Vernon/Mike Barker, 64. Bend Parks & Recreation Foundation Scramble, Oct. 1 Scramble Gross: 1, Scott Holmberg/Darrin Kelleher/Mitch Cole/Dan Parr, 59. 2, Chris Cooper/Jay Moore/Jeff Nary/Jon Walker, 62. Net: 1 (tie), Randy Edwards/David Mackenzie/Bill Boos/Charlie Rice, 61.5; Jay Lynch/T.J. Paskewich/John Wells/Curt Heimuller, 61.5. KPs — Kirk Mansberger, No. 3. LDS — Scott Holmberg, No. 9; Connie Newport, No. 10. Long Putts — Darrin Kelleher, No. 1; Julie Lipsitz, No. 18. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Central Oregon Tournament Oct. 4 Scramble Gross: 1, Mark Wilke/Eric Carmichael/Drew Bledsoe/David Hayes, 58. 2, Adam Bledsoe/Doug Rychard/Burke Morgan/Scott Auerbach, 59. Net: 1, Chaz Nelson/Chris Nelson/Travis Mcdermot/Ben Tupper, 54.5. 2, Bill Brewer/Jeff Harding/Mark Landry/Greg Haugen, 59.5. KPs — Chris Nelson, No. 3; Sam McColl, No. 11; Larry Kimmel, No. 16. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Glaze Meadow Closing Tournament, Sept. 21 at Glaze Meadow 1, Dick Howells/Rod Morris/Brad Rossa. 2, Owen Osborne/Marv Hoff/Bob Hausman/Monte Stoughton. 3, Josh Badden/Jay Wiggins/ John Lyda/Griff Aproberts. BROKEN TOP Men’s Closer, Sept. 29 Three Net Best Balls, Stableford Scoring Green Flight — 1, R. Cortese/G. Fish/B. Crosby/J. Brewer, 175. 2, R. Grimm/P. Craig/J. Moekel/J. Davis, 154. Green/Silver Flight — 1, T. Harrington/B. Wagar/R. Tower/C. Thornburg, 154. 2, T. Hignell/J. Tompkins/D. Light/B. Brookman, 145. KPs (Nos. 8, 10) — Paul Craig, Lynn Smith, Jim Wolfe. Ladies Closer, Sept. 30 Scramble 1, B. Jermane/N. Kerher/P. Falck/S. Swanson, 60. 2, S. Hummel/C. Palanuk/G. Friesen/P. Williams, 63. 3, L. Stack/C. Frazier/A. Scarff/G. Bauhofer, 64. 4, S. Michel/B. O’Shea/J. Stoltz/B. Gladder, 64. Men’s Golf Association, Oct. 2 Skins Gross: Harlan Friesen, Nos. 1, 14, 15; Charley Berry, No. 9; David Light, No. 13; Bob Abraham, No. 17. Net: Jack Whittemore, Nos. 6, 8; Bob Abraham, No. 10; Charley Berry, No. 18. Indidvidual Stroke Play — Gross: 1, Rick Cortese, 79. 2, Harlan Friesen, 81. Net: 1, David Light, 72; Jack Whittemore, 72. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Ladies Club, Sept. 29 Three Sticks and a Putter Flight A —Gross: 1, Anita Britton, 83. Jean Gregerson, 95. Net: 1, Marie Olds, 74. Ellie Rice, 78; Jana Dunham, 78. Flight B — Gross: 1 (tie), Judy Parker, 102; Ruth Smallwood, 102. Net: 1, Jan Majors, 75. Becky Hopper, 77. Flight C — Gross: 1, Jeanne Bonnell, 108. Carole DeWing, 109. Net: 1, Kathy Wierschke, 72. Pat Nordstrom, 73. Chip-ins — Bonnie Gaston, No. 14; Judy Parker, No. 7; Kathy Snavely, No. 9. Birdies — Anita Britton, No. 3; Bonnie Gaston, No. 6; Judy Parker, No. 16. DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Sept. 30 Throw Out One Hole Gross: 1 (tie), Sam Brown; Jordan Say. Net: 1, Bob Victorin. 2, Dean Hunt. KP — Sam Brown. Long Drive — Jordan Say.

Friday Night Couples, Oct. 1 Chapman 1, Kurt Olsen/Margaret Sturza. 2, Fransisco Moralas/Kris Conner. Sunday Group Play, Oct. 3 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Fred Blackman. 2, Brad Mondoy. Net: 1, Don Kraus. 2 (tie), Jim Manion; Trimble Cannon. KP — Carl Daniels Long Drive — Mike Gardner. EAGLE CREST Women’s Golf Group, Sept. 28 Joker’s Wild at Ridge Course 1, Donna Hawkes/Teddie Crippen/Sharon Madison/Charleen Hurst, 125. 2, Kat Widmer/Betty Stearns/Bonnie O’Reilly/Blind draw, 126. 3, Veron Rygh/Charlene Kenny/Sharon Loberg/Blind draw, 127. 4, Kathleen Mooberry/Jean Sowles/Sandra Martin/Bette Wald, 128. Three-Day Fall Classic Sept. 26, Modified Chapman at Challenge Course Sept. 27, Scramble at Ridge Course Sept. 28, 1 net best ball at Resort Course A Flight — 1, Roy Deitchler/Jim Keeton, 49-63-64—176. 2, Bob Mowlds/Ron Cady, 50-65-64—179. 3, Reed Sloss. Lee Roehlke, 55-64-62—181. 4, Jim Hehn/Bill Olson, 53-68-62—183. 5, Hank McCauley/Ray Schadt, 58-61-65—184. B Flight — 1 (tie), Bert Fanning/Bill Carey, 54-66-58—178; Gary Jackson/Jerry Kelly, 53-64-61—178. 3, Ken Murrill/John Wisemiller, 50-62-67—179. 4, Mike Bessonette/Melvin Nunn, 5068-63—181. 5 (tie), Bill Goss/Mike Farley, 56-66-61—183; Larry Clark/Ernie Brooks, 51-66-66—183. GREENS AT REDMOND Ladies of the Greens Club Championship, Sept. 28 Stroke Play Club Championship — 1, Hazel Blackmore, 77. 2, Diane Miyauchi, 78, A Flight — Gross: 1, Julie Deaton, 81. 2, Sharron Rosengarth, 82. Net: 1, Lois Morris, 63. 2, Marjorie Rose, 64. B Flight — Gross: 1, Bert Gantenbein, 86. 2, Helen Hinman, 86. Net: 1, Claudia Brandow, 56. 2, Linda Kanable, 61. C Flight — Gross: 1, Lois Houlberg, 99. 2, Evelyn Kakuska, 105. Net: 1, Judi Vanderpool, 65. 2, Gwen Holliday, 69. D Flight — Gross: 1, Anita Ertle, 107. 2, Carol Suderno, 110. Net: 1, Marilyn Marold, 66. 2, Edna Kirchhoff, 69. Golfer of the Week — Annette Reinhart, 41/24. Low Putts — Lois Morris, 14. Men’s Club Championship, Sept. 30 Stroke Play Club Champion — Gross: 1, Clyde Foster, 63. Flight A — Net: 1, Clyde Foster, 58. 2, Ron White, 59. 3 (tie), Ted Brunot, 60; Ken Ennor, 60; Steve Rupp, 60; Phil Weimer, 60. Flight B — Net: 1, Louis Rogerson, 57. 2, Randy Thomason, 62. 3, Roy Brown, 64. KPs — Jack Morris, Nos. 4, 13; Steve Rupp, No. 5; Clyde Foster, No. 12. JUNIPER Ladies Club, Sept. 22 Odd Holes 1 (tie), Carol Mitchell, 34.5; JoAnne Hare, 34.5. 3 (tie), Janet King, 35; Darlene Ross, 35; Sally Martin, 35. 6, Jackie Yake, 36. Chip-ins — Becky Carl, No. 10; Pat Majchrowski, No. 13. KPs — 0-20 handicap: Kareen Queen. 21-28: Linda Wakefield. 29-35: Shar Wanichek. 36 and over: none. LDs — 0-20 handicap: Kareen Queen. 21-28: Jackie Cooper. 29-35: Shar Wanichek. 36 and over: Cherie Kurth. Ladies Club, Sept. 29 Criss Cross 1, Pat Majchrowski, 27.5. 2, Darlene Ross, 28. 3, Ronda Reedy, 29. KPs — 0-20 handicap: none. 21-28: Debbie Cooper. 29-35: none. 36 and over: none.

LDs — 0-20 handicap: Ronda Reedy. 21-28: Linda Wakefield. 29-35: Marilyn Baer. 36 and over: Doris Thompson. Men’s Club, Sept. 30 Stableford Gene Peles/Lynn Kurth/Don Garney/Bob Babcock, 161. 2, Roger Aikin/Scott Hakala/Don Doyle/Byren Dahlen, 153. 3, Bob Kennedy/ Alan Stewart/Bill Nelson/Blind draw, 145. 4, Johnny McDaniel/Pat Ross/Kip Gerke/Blind draw, 142. KPs — Jim Flaherty, Nos. 3, 8; Johnny McDaniel, No. 13; Paul Klotz, No. 16. MEADOW LAKES Senior Men’s League Season End, Aug. 31 Two-Man Best Ball 1, Jeff Fisher/Robert Wolcott, 28. 2 (tie), Trevor Russell/Richard Mayers, 29; Sherm Feetham/Robert Wolcott, 29. KPs — Henry Hartley, No. 4; Charlie McDermott, No. 8. Ladies Golf Club, Sept. 2 Blind Partners Gross: 1, Diane Hayes/Lee Miller, 191. 2, Patricia McLain/Jean Gregerson, 207. Net: 1, Linda Richards/Barb Schmitke, 175.5. 2, Verna Bedient/Carol Conti, 187.5. Men’s Association, Sept. 8 Modified Chapman, No Scotch Gross: 1, Zach Lampert/Pat O’Gorman, 32. 2, Clay Smith/Caleb Henry, 34. Net: 1 (tie), Larry Conklin/Steve Kidder, 30.75; John Mitchell/Paul Adams, 30.75. 3, Steve Spangler/Rick Fosburg, 31.75. KPs — A Flight: Pat O’Gorman, No. 4; Curtis Scofield, No. 8. B Flight: Ron Richardson, No. 4; Paul Adams, No. 8. Ladies Golf Club, Sept. 9 Odd Holes Gross: 1, Norma McPherren, 46. 2, Diane Hayes, 49. Net: 1, Donna Jones, 32. 2, Lee Miller, 33. Men’s Association, Sept. 15 Three-Man Blind Draw Hidden Three Gross: 1, Dale Close/Dewey Springer/Britton Coffer, 41. Net: 1, Zach Lampert/Tony Ashcraft/Jimmy George, 34. 2, Les Bryan/Johnnie Jones/John Novak, 36. KPs — A Flight: Caleb Henry, No. 13; Dave Barnhouse, No. 17. B Flight: Mike Close, No. 13; Mark Jones, No. 17. Ladies Club Championship, Sept. 16-17 36-Hole Stroke Play Gross: 1, Sharon Taylor, 185. 2, Jean Gregerson, 189. Net: 1, Deanna Alacano, 142. 2, Lee Miller, 142. 3, Donna Jones, 143. 4, Linda Richards, 146. Men’s Association, Sept. 22 White Night Gross: 1, Zach Lampert, 30. 2, Pat O’Gorman, 34. 3, Jim Montgomery, 35. 4, Dustin Conklin, 36. Net: 1 (tie), Larry Conklin, 32; Brian Jordan, 32; Allan Burnett, 32; Shawn Lampert, 32. 5 (tie), Les Bryan, 33; Mike Close, 33; Mark Jones, 33. KPs — A Flight: Dave Barnhouse, No. 4; Mark Payne, No. 8. B Flight: Larry Conklin, No. 4; Tony Ashcraft, No. 8. PRINEVILLE GOLF CLUB Men’s Closing Three-Man Scramble, Sept. 25 Scramble 1, Dale Close/Phil Powell/Bob Pierce, 58. 2, Mark Payne/Ron Rhoden/Von Thompson, 59. 3 (tie), Pat O’Gorman/Willie McKenzie/ Mark Iellick, 61; Richard Kludt/Grant Patterson/Steve Wienke, 61. KPs — Shane Howard, No. 7; Bill Clements, No. 9. QUAIL RUN Men’s Club, Sept. 29 One Gross, Two Net Flight A — Gross: 1, Dick Beeson, 72. Net: 1 (tie), Earl Allen, 69; Steve Randol, 69. Flight B — Gross: 1, Doug Massey, 66. Net: 1, Willie Wornstaff, 67. 2, Tim Jenning, 71. KPs — Willie Wornstaff, No. 8; Earl Allen, No. 10.

Course: Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Capitol Hill, The Senator (6,607 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.3 million. Winner’s share: $195,000. Television: Golf Channel (ThursdaySunday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., 11 p.m.-2 a.m.) Last year: Lorena Ochoa successfully defended her title for the last of her 27 LPGA Tour victories, beating Michelle Wie and Brittany Lang by four strokes. Ochoa retired in May after making five winless starts this season. Last event: Taiwan’s Yani Tseng won the Northwest Arkansas Championship on Sept. 12 for her third victory of the year, closing with a 6-under 65 to beat Michelle Wie by a stroke. Tseng also won the Kraft Nabisco and Women’s British Open. Notes: Top-ranked Ai Miyazato is in the field along with Tseng and fellow major winners Paula Creamer (U.S. Women’s Open) and Cristie Kerr (LPGA Championship). Wie is skipping the tournament. ... The linksstyle Senator is part of a 54-hole facility. ... The CVS/pharmacy LPGA Challenge is next week at Blackhawk in Danville, Calif. Online: www.lpga.com

PGA TOUR MCGLADREY CLASSIC Site: Sea Island, Ga. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Sea Island Resort, Seaside Course (7,055 yards, par 70). Purse: $4 million. Winner’s share: $720,000. Television: Golf Channel (ThursdaySunday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m.).

Last year: Inaugural event. Last week: Europe won the Ryder Cup in a Monday finish at Celtic Manor in Wales, beating the United States 14½-13½ when U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell held off Hunter Mahan 3 and 1 in the final singles match. ... Bill Haas won the Viking Classic in Madison, Miss., for his second victory of the year. Champions Tour player Michael Allen finished second, three strokes back in the Fall Series event. Notes: The tournament is the second of five Fall Series events. ... U.S. Ryder Cup player Zach Johnson is in the field along with Haas and area resident Davis Love III. ... The bankrupt Sea Island Co. will be sold at auction Monday in Atlanta. ... The Frys.com Open is next week in San Martin, Calif., followed by the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open in Las Vegas. Online: www.pgatour.com

CHAMPIONS TOUR CONSTELLATION ENERGY SENIOR PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Potomac, Md. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm (7,139 yards, par 70). Purse: $2.7 million. Winner’s share: $405,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 10 a.m.-noon, 9-11 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.-noon, 9-11 p.m.; SaturdaySunday, 9:30 a.m.-noon, 9-11 p.m. Last year: Jay Haas won at Baltimore Country Club/Five Farms, birdieing the final hole for a 64 and a a onestroke victory over Tom Watson. Last week: Gary Hallberg won the Ensure Classic in Conover, N.C., for his first Champions Tour title, closing with an 11-under 61 for a one-stroke victory over Fred Couples. Hallberg matched the tournament record at 18-under 198. Notes: The tournament is the last of the 50-and-over tour’s five major championships. ... Bernhard Langer won the British Senior Open and U.S. Senior Open in consecutive weeks this summer and leads the tour with five victories. ... Michael Allen is coming off a second-place finish last week in the PGA Tour’s Viking Classic. ... The tour is off next week. Play will resume Oct. 22-24 with the Administaff Small Business Classic in The Woodlands, Texas. Online: www.pgatour.com

NATIONWIDE CHATTANOOGA CLASSIC Site: Chattanooga, Tenn. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Black Creek Club (7,149 yards, par 72). Purse: $500,000. Winner’s share: $90,000. Television: None. Last year: Canadian Chris Baryla won his first tour title, beating Troy Kelly by a stroke to move. Last week: Australia’s Steven Bowditch won the Soboba Golf Classic in San Jacinto, Calif., beating Daniel Summerhays by three strokes. Bowditch earned $180,000 to jump from 76th to 11th on the money list. Notes: The final top 25 on the money list will earn 2011 PGA Tour cards. ... The Miccosukee Championship is next week in Miami, followed by the Jacksonville Open and the season-endiong Nationwide Tour Championship at Daniel Island in Charleston, S.C. Online: www.pgatour.com ——— All Times PDT

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2010

SHOPPING IN BRIEF COCC to hold sale of surplus technology Central Oregon Community College (2600 N.W. College Way) will hold a technology surplus sale, open to the public, Monday starting at 8 a.m. in Room 106 of Pioneer Hall. Used computers, servers, projectors and more will be sold at discounted rates. Thinkstock All funds Used computers will be among the raised will be used to items at COCC’s tech surplus sale. purchase new equipment for the school. After selecting your items in Pioneer Hall, you will take a ticket to the campus bookstore to pay; all major forms of payment will be accepted. Brian Allison, who works in user services at the college, said the bulk of the sale will be 50-60 desktop computers that have been in use for about 5 years at the college. Each computer comes with Windows XP and some open source software. Computers have all been wiped and tested, and will be sold for about $120. A 17-inch, flat-screen monitor will be available for purchase with a computer for $80. If you’re hoping to score a computer, show up early. Allison expects high turnout; “like locusts,” he said.

In the trenches Iconic coat can help fight off the autumn chill — and it has a colorful history, too

World gift, decor sale supports fair trade The River Mennonite Church will host a Fair Trade world gift and decor sale from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at The Old Stone Church (157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend) on Friday. The sale will feature the products of Ten Thousand Villages, an organization that works to bring goods from Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East to North American markets using sustainable, fair trade business practices. “Product sales help pay for food, education, health care and housing for artisans who would otherwise be unemployed or underemployed,” the organization says on its website. According to a news release, the sale will feature handmade gifts, jewelry, accessories, home decor, art, ceramics, textiles baskets and musical instruments. Contact: Darrell Wisseman, 541-447-7013. — Eleanor Pierce, The Bulletin

By Eleanor Pierce The Bulletin

T

here are few looks as iconic as the trench coat. The trench coat, generally a kneelength rain coat with military detailing, a double-breasted, button enclosure and a belted waist, has endured in the annals of style for decades. Why does it endure? Perhaps because for many men and women, the trench coat hits several desirable notes all at once: It’s chic, it’s utilitarian and it’s even a little sexy.

Early trench days The history of the trench coat goes back to the early decades of the 20th century. Most credit Thomas Burberry as the creator of the trench coat, though there’s some debate on that point. Doubtless, Burberry was enlisted by the top brass of the British military to create a coat that would keep soldiers warm and dry. Beth Dincuff, an adjunct professor of fashion history at Parsons The New School for Design in New York said that at the time Burberry was commissioned, others, including the British company Aquascutum, were making what we now think of as trench coats, but it’s Burberry that gets the credit of history. The name of the coat comes from the style of fighting that epitomized World War I: trench warfare. See Trench coats / E6

Top sellers For the week of Sept. 30

Los Angeles Times fiction best-seller “Freedom,” by Jonathan Franzen

Los Angeles Times nonfiction best-seller

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

“The Grand Design,” by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow

Top Billboard album “You Get What You Give,” Zac Brown Band

Top R&B/hip-hop album

‘As Seen on TV’ products: Are they helpful or just hype?

TARGETING FEMALE FANS

‘Star Wars’ actress is now a force in merchandising

“Recovery,” Eminem

Top rock album “A Thousand Suns,” Linkin Park

Top jazz album “Crazy Love,” Michael Buble

Top Amazon.com DVD seller “Iron Man 2” Sources: Wire reports

This London Fog trench coat can be found at Macy’s for under $100.

By Ellen Warren By Tish Wells McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ORLANDO, Fla. — When Ashley Eckstein, 29, was first cast as the voice of Jedi apprentice Ahsoka Tano in the animated “Star Wars: The Clone Wars,” she went looking for “Star Wars” merchandise aimed at her gender. She rapidly realized it was scarce on the ground. “I scoured the Internet

looking for more female ‘Star Wars’ merchandise and realized it didn’t really exist, and, if it did, it was either sold out or on back order or very small,” she says. Eckstein decided that female science-fiction fans deserved better. In June, she launched a company called Her Universe that sells T-shirts, hoodies and jewelry. See Star Wars / E6

Chicago Tribune

Courtesy of Her Universe

Ashley Eckstein sports a red nouveau “Star Wars” T-shirt.

It’s crazy how it happens. You’re idly flipping around late at night for something decent to watch on television and suddenly you’re mesmerized by a commercial for a wacky solution to a problem you didn’t know you had. Now you’ve got two competing, contradictory thoughts: 1. “That is the stupidest thing I’ve ever seen. Only a lunatic would buy that,” and

2. “I wonder if it works. I think I’ll buy that now.” And so I did. I bought six “As Seen on TV” products — fashion and style items — and put them to the test. There seems to be a bit of an obsession with buttocks and breasts in these TV gizmos. Lifting, enlarging, concealing. For this experiment, I mostly stuck with above-the-waist anatomy. See Seen on TV / E6


T EL EV ISI ON

E2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Woman wants boyfriend to hang up his party line Dear Abby: My boyfriend, “Ronnie,” and I have a very active and “different” sex life. I’m happy I have found someone who is so compatible, but it has also presented a problem for me when we’re out with friends. Our bedroom activities occasionally include a third party — a female. I’m perfectly happy with this arrangement because I am the one who initiated it. However, I have a problem with Ronnie’s recruiting practices. He seems to think that because I have one friend who has joined us, all of them are fair game. Most of my friends are not aware of our activities. They’re mainstream, and it’s embarrassing when he propositions them. I try to blame it on booze, but they get offended. I have lost one good friend over it. I have tried repeatedly to explain to Ronnie that there’s a time and a place for everything. He just doesn’t get it. He says not to worry about what others think. I don’t want to end what we have, but I need him to understand that our sex life is not open for discussion among our tight-knit group of friends. Any suggestions? — Embarrassed in Jersey Dear Embarrassed: Because you have explained to Ronnie that what he’s doing is making you uncomfortable, that not all of your friends are into threesomes and it has already cost you one friend — then face it. He doesn’t WANT to “get it.” Or, this may be his way of letting you know that he wants to do some recruiting of his own. Before any more of your private business is broadcast, you will have to decide if Ronnie’s ability in the bedroom makes up for the fact that he’s embarrassing in other important social situations. Only you can decide that one. Dear Abby: You probably have heard things like this before, but I don’t know where to turn. I have been dating “Jeff” for five years and we have a lot of

DEAR ABBY fun together. Last week Jeff proposed marriage and — I choked! Now I’m having doubts about everything, and he’s getting impatient with me because I haven’t given him an answer. Things are not going the way I had hoped, Abby. Everything is falling apart. Does this happen often? How do I know if he’s the right one? — Panicked in Pittsburgh Dear Panicked: It doesn’t happen “often,” but panicking at making a lifetime commitment certainly isn’t unheard of. You need to relax, calm down, and realize that you have spent five enjoyable years with Jeff or the relationship would have ended. Then ask yourself how you would feel about a lifetime of similar experiences, and you’ll have the answer you’re looking for. I hope you’ll be very happy together. Dear Abby: I was friendly with a woman I’ll call Paula. In the past, whenever I’d buy a lottery ticket I’d promise to buy her a house if I won. Our friendship has become strained. In fact, we’re no longer friends at all. It has been a year and a half since I’ve spoken to her. Am I legally bound to buy Paula a house if I win? She’s the kind of person who would take you to court and generally try to ruin your life. Could you please give me some advice and help me out of this jam? — Winner-to-Be in Staunton, Va. Dear Winner-to-Be: Yes. A verbal agreement is only as good as the paper it is written on. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Channel surfing in strange waters A re your favorite networks and cable channels letting you down? Check out Wealth TV or World Fishing Network

Blackbelt TV, which bills itself as “the martial arts network,” is among the far-frommainstream channels you can check out if you need a change from your regular programming lineup. Its real draw is cheesy Asian martial arts films such as “Taoism Drunkard.”

By Holly J. Morris, Kristen Page-Kirby and Marc Silver The Washington Post

“Glee” has leapt over the proverbial ocean predator. “Lone Star,” fall’s most critically acclaimed pilot, was canceled by Fox after two episodes. So, network TV’s in the gutter. Basic cable is unnervingly highbrow (AMC) or wallowing in filth (MTV). The middle ground is literally in the middle — the channels we are blind to as a culture brainwashed by the media’s marginalization of niche programming. Fight the power!

Lifestyle • Halogen TV: The greenminded, public-servicey, edgy channel aims at Gen Y. Think PBS-style informational programming, plus frequent airings of “Regenesis,” a Canadian drama that probes biotech ethics. Sample plot: Intense, goateed scientist Carlos harvests an egg from a hard-boiled prostitute so its stem cells can be injected into a dying doc. As Carlos manipulates the wee egg, a sexy colleague quips, “One false move and that egg is toast.” • MavTV: “TV Created by Men for Men” (or to be more accurate, TV Created by Men Stuck in Adolescence for Other Men Stuck in Adolescence). So much to choose from: “I Love This Bartender,” the “Motorsports Hour” and “Bikini Allstars,” which goes behind the scenes at model shoots. But

Thinkstock

MavTV isn’t all booze and broads. “Okie Noodling II” documents the strategies and legal ramifications of catching catfish barehanded in Oklahoma. • Wealth TV: The channel illustrates how wealthy folks achieve their dreams. “Mediterranean Mega Yachts” reminds us that “shopping in Monaco is a must!” “Planet Luxury” details the making of the $2 million Veyron auto, which uses the hides of 12 cows raised in the mosquito-free Alps for its perfect leather interior. Reruns of “The Ellen Show” are a cautionary tale: In this sitcom bomb, the comic played a failed Internet entrepreneur.

Religious • Eternal Word Television Network: Your source for all beadbased entertainment. Find saying the rosary at home alone tiresome? Has EWTN got programming for you! There’s “Rosary for Kids,” which features an animated cherub to assist children in their prayers; “Rosary

for Life”; “The Holy Rosary with Mother Angelica”; “Holy Land Rosary” (not to be confused with “The Holy Rosary in the Holy Land”); “International Rosary” and “The Holy Rosary in Stained Glass.” • World Harvest Television: What all TV would look like if the religious right ran the airwaves. Multiple-times-a-day showings of ’60s series “The Rifleman” is as secular as this channel gets. See how far fallen evangelist Jim Bakker has tumbled on his new “Jim Bakker Show,” which is so poorly produced that you can’t help but feel bad for him. “American Religious Town Hall” is like a cage match featuring white men in suits discussing the death penalty. It’s pretty fun to pick your denomination and root for its representative, though — my money is on the Lutheran guy every time.

www.educate.com

• Blackbelt TV: “The martial arts network” lives up to its slogan: “Kicks, Flicks, and Chicks.” The latter are scantily clad women

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who host various shows. Interviews with black belt stars and fight competitions are featured, but the real draw is cheesy Asian fight movies such as “Taoism Drunkard,” in which a kung fu granny battles an evil kung fu lady, and Three Stooges-like antics are expertly executed by an inebriated, buck-toothed man whose name, according to the subtitles, is “Protruded Teeth.” • World Fishing Network: WFN is dedicated to the pursuit of fish. “Lunkerville” stars real reel people with real reel fish stories about how to use “fluttering” bait and other tricks to catch bass in secret spots. What do you do with a pair of old leaky waders? “WFN Green” has an answer. In “Hookin’ Up with Mariko Izumi,” the bubbly daughter of a famed fisherman seeks the best places to “wet the line.” She is very good at catching fish in the water, not so good at catching a tossed salmon at Pike Place Market in Seattle. • Pursuit Channel: Founded by a man named Rusty, Pursuit is dedicated to keeping Man at the top of the food chain. “Natural Born Killers” sets its rifle sights on deer, turkey, predators and big game. Many of the titles are bafflingly misleading, such as “Arctic Cat Outdoors” (a real estate show that would eat “Property Virgins” alive and then have it stuffed), “Fist Full of Dirt” (land conservation) and “ScentBlocker Most Wanted” (which uses crime-scene forensics to track prey).

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WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 10/6/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Everyday Food Scandinavian Tracks Ahead ‘G’ Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Passport-Adv. Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Travelscope ‘G’ Passport-Adv. Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ ��

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Cougar Town (N) Undercovers Devices (N) ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Survivor: Nicaragua (N) ’ Å Criminal Minds (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Cougar Town (N) Hell’s Kitchen Hosting a prom with a retro theme. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News Burn Notice Pilot ‘14’ Å Feinstein’s American Songbook Great Performances ’ ‘PG’ Å Undercovers Devices (N) ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit America’s Next Top Model (N) ‘PG’ Hellcats The Prisoner’s Song ‘PG’ For Your Home Katie Brown Knit & Crochet Watercolor Quest Feinstein’s American Songbook Great Performances ’ ‘PG’ Å

10:00

10:30

11:00

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The Whole Truth (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ News Jay Leno The Defenders Nevada v. Carter ‘14’ News Letterman The Whole Truth (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News (N) (11:35) Nightline News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Burn Notice Pilot ‘14’ Å South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Great Performances Macbeth Patrick Stewart stars in “Macbeth.” (N) ‘14’ Law & Order: Los Angeles (N) ‘14’ News Jay Leno Married... With Married... With King of Queens King of Queens Test Kitchen Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Everyday Food Scandinavian Great Performances Macbeth Patrick Stewart stars in “Macbeth.” (N) ‘14’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘14’ Å Dog the Bounty Hunter (N) ‘PG’ Steven Seagal Steven Seagal Steven Seagal Steven Seagal 130 28 8 32 Bounty Hunter › “Wild Wild West” (1999, Action) Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh. Secret agents fight to stop a (3:00) ›› “Life” ››› “Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. A hot-shot Navy jet pilot ››› “True Lies” (1994) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A man lives 102 40 39 (1999) Å presidential assassination. downs MiGs and loves an astrophysicist. Å the double life of a spy and a family man. Most Extreme Most Extreme Most Extreme Maneaters Tigers/Leopards ’ ‘PG’ I’m Alive Out of the Blue ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Most Extreme Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts (N) ‘14’ (11:15) Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ 137 44 (6:15) CMT Music Are You Smarter? The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ ›› “The Whole Nine Yards” (2000) Bruce Willis, Matthew Perry. CMT Music ’ Home Videos The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “The Whole Nine Yards” Goldman Sachs: Power and Peril (N) Goldman Sachs: Power and Peril Mad Money Goldman Sachs: Power and Peril Goldman Sachs: Power and Peril Million $ Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle’s Futurama ’ ‘PG’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Ugly Americans Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Wayne’s World Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Bend on the Run Bend City Council Outside Presents Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb “Halloweentown High” (2004) Debbie Reynolds. ‘G’ Suite/Deck Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark MythBusters Deadly Straw ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Buster’s Cut (N) ‘PG’ MythBusters Hair of the Dog ’ ‘PG’ Bad Universe Alien Attack! (N) ‘PG’ MythBusters Buster’s Cut ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football Alabama-Birmingham at Central Florida (Live) 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker NFL Live (N) NASCAR Now 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker 22 24 21 24 Women’s Soccer Boxing: 1999 Brewster vs. Navarre Boxing: Lorenzo vs. Marquez Cheap Seats Cheap Seats AWA Wrestling Å NBA Finals game 6, from June 14, 1987. (N) 23 25 123 25 College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Friday Night Lights State ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Sadie, Sadie... ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped The Next Iron Chef Ingenuity Bobby Flay Unwrapped Snacks Snacks. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Seahawks Beavers Football Beavers Cougars Access Huskies Mariners Beavers Football Huskies Cougars Access Beavers The Final Score Football Preview Seahawks 20 45 28* 26 After-Jay Glazer (4:00) ›› “Ghost Rider” (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Leatherheads” (2008, Romance-Comedy) George Clooney, Renée Zellweger. Premiere. Terriers The Lindus conspiracy. ‘MA’ (11:01) Terriers ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Holmes-Homes Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place Income Property House Crashers House Hunters Hunters Int’l All American Handyman ‘G’ Å 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Tuna ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Who Really Discovered America? ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Saws ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Reba ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met ››› “Flatliners” (1990) Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts. Premiere. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life Connect with fathers. ’ Teen Mom ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å The Challenge: Cutthroat (N) ’ ‘14’ The Challenge: Cutthroat ’ ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ SpongeBob BrainSurge ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Star Trek: Voyager Emanations ‘PG’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) ’ ‘14’ UFC-Lesnar UFC-Lesnar 132 31 34 46 Star Trek: Voyager ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å 133 35 133 45 “Yeti” (2008, Horror) Peter DeLuise, Carly Pope, Ona Grauer. ‘14’ Å Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Van Impe Pres Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins American League Division Series, Game 1. From Target Field in Minneapolis. MLB Postgame Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 MLB Baseball (7:15) ›››› “The Seventh Seal” (1956, Drama) Max von Sydow, Gunnar Bjornstrand, ›››› “The Third Man” (1949, Suspense) Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten. Visiting post- ››› “The Earrings of Madame De...” ›››› “Citizen Kane” (1941, Drama) Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten. Orson Welles’ 101 44 101 29 classic about a publisher’s rise to power. Å (DVS) Nils Poppe. A weary knight plays chess with Death. war Vienna, Austria, a writer probes a friend’s death. Å (1953, Drama) Charles Boyer. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Sister Wives ‘14’ Sister Wives ‘14’ LA Ink Oh Brother ’ ‘PG’ Å LA Ink Rock and Ink (N) ‘PG’ Å LA Ink Oh Brother ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Blackmail ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Bones That Foam ’ ‘14’ Bones The Beginning in the End ‘14’ CSI: NY Cuckoo’s Nest ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order For the Defense ‘14’ Billy & Mandy Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bert-Conqueror Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Food Wars ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Harry Loves Lisa Harry Loves Lisa Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Reopened investigation. ‘PG’ NCIS An agent is gunned down. ‘14’ NCIS Knockout ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A blogger turns up dead. ‘14’ NCIS A Marine’s body surfaces. ‘14’ ››› “Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) 15 30 23 30 NCIS Escaped ’ ‘PG’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Soul Train: The Hippest Trip in America ’ ‘PG’ La La’s Wed La La’s Wed La La’s Wed I Love Money (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:10) ›› “The Juror” 1996 ’ ‘R’ (6:10) ››› “The Big Chill” 1983 William Hurt, Glenn Close. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Contact” 1997 Jodie Foster. A scientist seeks alien life in deep space. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:35) “Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion” ‘R’ ››› “Silent Movie” 1976 Mel Brooks. ‘PG’ Å After Film School ››› “Love and Other Catastrophes” 1996 Matt Day. ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å ››› “Rising Sun” 1993 Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Bubba’s World The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Built to Shred Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Firsthand ‘PG’ The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Built to Shred Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Playing Lessons Top 10 Top 10 (N) Big Break Dominican Republic 19th Hole Golf Central Quest-Card Top 10 Big Break Dominican Republic 19th Hole European Tour Quest-Card Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “Dad’s Home” (2010, Drama) David James Elliott, Sharon Case. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (9:15) Boardwalk Empire Agent Nelson (10:15) Boardwalk Empire Chalky’s team (11:15) Real Time With Bill Maher Jour› “I Love You, Beth (5:45) ›› “The Express” 2008, Biography Dennis Quaid, Rob Brown, Clancy Brown. Born poor, Ernie Davis Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire HBO 425 501 425 10 Cooper” ’ pays a big price. ’ ‘MA’ Å becomes a star football player. ’ ‘PG’ Å Jimmy makes an alliance. ‘MA’ Van Alden visits Nucky. ’ ‘MA’ nalist Arianna Huffington. ‘MA’ (5:15) ››› “Reservoir Dogs” 1992, Crime Drama Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. ››› “11:14” 2003 Henry Thomas, Blake Heron. ‘R’ ›› “From Dusk Till Dawn” 1996, Action Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ (11:15) ›› “The Hearse” 1980 IFC 105 105 (4:00) ›› “Psycho” (5:45) ›› “Funny People” 2009, Comedy-Drama Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen, Leslie Mann. A gravely ill (8:15) › “All About Steve” 2009 Sandra Bullock. Premiere. A smitten woman follows a › “The Fourth Kind” 2009, Suspense Milla Jovovich, Will Patton, “Co-ed ConfidenMAX 400 508 7 1998 ‘R’ comic mentors a struggling performer. ’ ‘R’ Å news cameraman around the country. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Elias Koteas. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tial 2” Lockdown Gang Central ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Fog of War (N) ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ Lockdown Gang Central ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Fog of War ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ Nat Geo Amazing! ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Big Time Rush Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Action League NTOON 89 115 189 S.W.A.T. Maga Shooting USA ‘G’ Sighting Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Shooting Gallery Cowboys Shooting USA ‘G’ Sighting Best Defense Cowboys Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ›› “Tenure” 2009, Comedy Luke (5:50) “The Vicious Kind” 2009 Adam Scott. iTV. A man be(7:25) “Staten Island, New York” 2009 Ethan Hawke. The lives Inside the NFL (iTV) (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Inside NASCAR (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å SHO 500 500 Wilson. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å comes infatuated with his brother’s girlfriend. ‘R’ of three residents of Staten Island intersect. Stealth Rider (N) Stealth Rider ‘14’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Intersections (N) Intersections Stealth Rider Stealth Rider ‘14’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Intersections Intersections NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:05) ››› Bolt (5:45) › “Pandorum” 2009, Science Fiction Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:35) ›› “Dear John” 2010, Romance Channing Tatum. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:25) ›› “Hancock” 2008 Will Smith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Martin Lawrence Martin Lawrence STARZ 300 408 300 (4:25) ››› “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice” (6:15) ›› “Love N’ Dancing” 2008, Drama Amy Smart, Tom Malloy, Billy Zane. Dance › “Crossing Over” 2009, Drama Harrison Ford, Ray Liotta, Ashley Judd. Premiere. “Extreme Movie” 2008 Michael Cera. Stories about teens and › “Disaster Movie” TMC 525 525 1969 Natalie Wood. ‘R’ partners compete for a world title. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Immigrants seek new lives in Los Angeles. ’ ‘R’ Å sex involve a geek and a chat room. ’ ‘R’ 2008 ’ Roenick’s Rnd ››› “Slap Shot” (1977, Comedy-Drama) Paul Newman, Michael Ontkean, Lindsay Crouse. The Daily Line (Live) Quest for Cup NASCAR: Next Whacked Out Whacked Out The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE Love Behind Bars ‘14’ 20/20 What He Did For Love ‘14’ 20/20 on WE Deadly Encounters ‘14’ 20/20 on WE She Cried for Help ‘14’ 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å John Edward Cross Country ‘G’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GREG BROWN: The folk singer and songwriter performs, with Bo Ramsey; $30 plus fees in advance, $35 day of show; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON COLLEGE FAIR: The ninth annual event showcases more than 70 higher-education options; free; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541383-6002. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” by Art Spiegelman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 611 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. BENEFIT CONCERT: With a performance by Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Every Dollar Feeds Kids; free; 6:30 p.m. appetizers, 7 p.m. performance; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541549-1058. CLOTHES DOWN CHILD ABUSE: A fall fashion show, with appetizers and a silent auction; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; $10; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 151 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-408-3616. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com.

FRIDAY A DAY OF CULTURE: Learn about cultures that have influenced the museum and visit various stations; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-midnight; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. SOCIAL GATHERING: Central Oregon veterans talk about their experiences, preceding the symposium on World War II; free; 4-6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “Evolution of Human and Primate Behavior” with Frances White; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541593-4442. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Stein reads from and discusses his book “The Art of Racing in the Rain”; free; 7-9:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-7978, mashcraft@crooklib.org or www .crooklib.org. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: Staff from the Museum at Warm Springs present “The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-9237551. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com. “CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. EX-COWBOYS: The Portland-based rock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

SATURDAY “WORLD WAR II IN CENTRAL OREGON”: Symposium features several speakers and highlights the local impact of World War II; $20; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory .org. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School, 63175 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541322-5323. COLD HANDS, WARM HEART BOUTIQUE: A sale of crafts, with a bakery, lunch and a silent auction; proceeds benefit local charitable programs; free admission; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DAS RHEINGOLD”: Starring Bryn Terfel in a presentation of the masterpiece directed by Robert Lepage; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm .org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 35th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or www. sisterscountry.com. FROM TIMBER TO TURNED WOOD: Featuring a 1900s-style logging competition, axe throwing, chopping, log rolling, chain saw carving and more; free; shows at 11 a.m., 1 p.m.

and 3 p.m.; Hood Avenue, across from Les Schwab Tires, Sisters; 541549-0251. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper talks about her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder, Legacy of the Sheepshooters”; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. ANIMAL AND AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Meet a golden eagle; followed by a presentation from author Garth Stein; proceeds benefit the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; $10; 4:30 p.m.; Mavericks at Sunriver, 18135 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-2525 or541-593-4394. KIWANIS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring an Oktoberfest feast, live music and an auction; proceeds from the auction benefit the Kiwanis Doernbecher Children’s Cancer Program; $30, $50 per couple; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-350-6877 or www .redmondkiwanis.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Sue Baker and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3308943. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs, with Andy Warr; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www.bendgospel .webs.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth Stein reads from his work; $20; 7:30 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; www .garthstein.com. “CHEERS”: A screening of the snowboard film, with performances by Valient Thorr, Red Fang and Lamie Lynn in Kandi Coded; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SAPIENT: The Portland-based rapper performs, with Al-One and KP; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

SUNDAY BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www .bendfilm.org. CLIMATE CHANGE EVENT: Kids learn to plan and grow their own food; come prepared for light construction; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-3856908, ext.14 or denise@ envirocenter.org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 35th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or www.sisters country.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Denise Fainberg

reads from her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. WORLD HOOP DAY: Bring hula hoops for a community hooping jam; proceeds benefit World Hoop Day; donations accepted; 2-4 p.m.; Harmon Park, 1100 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; www.worldhoopday .com. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. BELLY DANCE SHOWCASE: The High Desert Bellydance Guild performs Middle Eastern dances; free; 6-8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. LIBERTY QUARTET: The Boise, Idaho-based gospel ensemble performs; free; 6 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. DAVID GRISMAN QUINTET: The mandolinist and dawg act performs; $40 or $50; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org or www .randompresents.com.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

ANIMAL KINGDOM (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 7:20 GET LOW (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05 JACK GOES BOATING (R) Noon, 2:20, 4:25, 6:55 MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 7:15 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

1 A MINUTE LIVE SUPPORTING SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE (no MPAA rating) 8 ALPHA AND OMEGA 3-D (PG) 12:10, 2:15, 5:30 CASE 39 (R) 2, 5, 7:35, 10:10 DEVIL (PG-13) 1:35, 4:10, 6:20, 9:05 EASY A (PG-13) 2:10, 5:10, 7:40, 9:55 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 12:25, 3:30 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 6:40, 10:05

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3-D (PG) 12:50, 4:05, 6:25, 9 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 2:05, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45 LET ME IN (R) 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 12:20, 3:40, 6:15, 9:10 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3-D (R) 7:45, 10:20 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 12:35, 1:55, 3:50, 4:45, 6:50, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:20, 7:10, 10 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 12:15, 12:55, 3:25, 4, 6:30, 7, 9:30, 10:05 YOU AGAIN (PG) 1:40, 4:30, 6:55, 9:25 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 8:30 SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) 5:45

N   N 

MONDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Art Through Ancestry”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; October’s theme is “Scary Stories”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-9775677.

TUESDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Art Through Ancestry”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “THE MAFIOSO MURDERS”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www .bendticket.com. JUDY COLLINS: The veteran folk singer performs; $31-$50; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. SAVING KENYA’S RENOWNED WILDLIFE: Featuring a slide show and stories of black rhinos, lions and other endangered wildlife in Kenya and Namibia; free; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 13 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. “DIRT! THE MOVIE”: A screening of the documentary that explores soil; with a dirt-themed dessert potluck; donations accepted; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com.

M T For Wednesday, Oct. 6

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

TOY STORY 3 (G) 3:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 4:45, 7, 9:15 MACHETE (R) 5, 7:15, 9:30 THE SWITCH (PG-13) 4:30, 6:40, 9 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 4, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

GET LOW (PG-13) 6:45 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 6:30 THE TOWN (R) 6:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 6:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG) 4, 7

Prosecutor describes ‘circle of enablers’

Donnie Wahlberg’s new role: Single guy

LOS ANGELES — A nna Nicole Smith was surrounded by a circle of enablers — including her boyfriend and two doctors — who supplied her with drugs for years despite her obvious addiction, a prosecutor told jurors Tuesday. Deputy District Attorney Renee Rose continued the prosecution’s closing argument in the drug conspiracy trial of Smith’s law yer-boyfriend Howard Stern and two physicians. Stern took no action to help Smith withdraw from opiates and sedaAnna Nicole tives, while Smith Drs. Sandeep Kapoor and Khristine Eroshevich continued to prescribe painkillers for the former Playboy model despite signs she was addicted, the prosecutor said. The three defendants have pleaded not guilty to conspiring to provide excessive prescription drugs to an addict and other charges. They are not charged in her 2007 accidental overdose death. In closing arguments Monday, another prosecutor said Smith pressured the trio into providing her with narcotics. Smith experienced physical and emotional pain after the birth of her daughter, Dannielynn, and the death of her son, Daniel, who collapsed and died in her Bahamas hospital room of a drug overdose. Witnesses have said Smith suffered from chronic pain syndrome, seizures, migraines, spinal pain and fractured ribs, among other ailments. But Deputy District Attorney David Barkhurst suggested all the ailments were a ruse to get drugs, including the powerful painkillers methadone, Vicodin and Dilaudid. Superior Court Judge Robert Perry has told jurors that someone who seeks drugs primarily to control pain is not an addict. The three defense lawyers have said they would have a total of about six hours of summations before the case goes to the jury.

LOS ANGELES — Donnie Wahlberg is the new single kid on the block. Court records in Simi Valley, Calif., show the actor-singer and his wife of nearly nine years finalized their divorce on Sept. 28. The pair each filed for divorce on the same day in August 2008 and reached an out-of-court settlement in the case, which was handled at a Ventura County courthouse. They have two sons, were married in 1999 and separated in early 2008. Wahlberg was a member of the boy band New Kids on the Block, which was intensely popular in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have reunited in recent years. The 41-year-old is also an actor, appearing in series such as “Band of Brothers” and the new police drama “Blue Bloods.”

Ozzy pays tribute to Lennon with cover

Whoopi Goldberg finds solace in staying busy

NEW YORK — John Lennon would have been 70 this week, and who better to honor his legacy in song than ... Ozzy Osbourne? Yes, Ozzy Osbourne. The Black Sabbath h e av y- m e t a l king has made a cover of Lennon’s “How,” available Tuesday on Ozzy iTunes to ben- Osbourne efit Amnesty International. Osbourne says Lennon was a “driving force for humanity.” He also credits the Beatles as the inspiration for his musical career. A video for the song is debuting on AOL’s PopEater.com. The former Beatle would have been 70 on Saturday. He was shot to death in December 1980.

NEW YORK — Whoopi Goldberg says she channels her grief from her mother’s death last month by staying busy. The co-host of “The View” attended a recent New York launch party for purewow.com, a website with daily tips for women 35 and over. She is an investor. Asked how she’s handling her mother’s death, Goldberg said, “I’m here, but it’s not easy.” Her mother, Emma Johnson, died from complications following a stroke. Goldberg had been doing a limited stint as Mother Superior in the London version of “Sister Act” and immediately returned to the U.S. “Sister Act” moves to Broadway this season with an opening planned for Spring 2011. Goldberg is also one of the show’s producers but says she has no plans to reprise her role. — From wire reports

Lil Wayne lands in solitary confinement NEW YORK — Lil Wayne is facing the music after being accused of breaking jail rules by having gear for listening to tunes: He can expect to go solo for the rest of his time behind bars in a gun case. The Grammy Aw a r d - w i n ning rapper has been moved into what city jail officials call “punitive segregation” for a month, until his expected No- Lil Wayne vember release date, Correction Department spokesman Stephen Morello said. It’s his punishment for stashing a charger and headphones for a digital music player in his cell, officials said. Lil Wayne generally will now be confined to his new cell 23 hours a day, with such exceptions as visits and showers. He also will have to forego TV, and he’ll be limited to one phone call a week instead of a chat a day or more, except for calls to his lawyer, Morello said. The 28-year-old rapper has been held since March in the Rikers Island jail complex. He pleaded guilty in October 2009 to attempted criminal possession of a weapon.


E4 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010: This year, you open up to the possibilities. Though you might spend a lot of time thinking and reflecting, you also come up with unusual answers. The quality of your daily life, health and work become an issue. You might decide on a major change that suits the “new” you. If you are single, you could meet someone in 2011. Take your time getting to know this person. Also, don’t commit unless you are sure, as more than one suitor could head your way. If you are attached, you will want to keep in mind your partner. It will be unusually easy to become me-oriented. A fellow LIBRA might seem different but has similar core issues. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Dive into work with a strong sense of what you must do. Sudden realizations come your way through others and/or some thought about a situation. Postpone any meetings until later today. Tonight: Defer to others. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your creativity surges when in a meeting. Others present options that might not be quite workable, but could be with some touches and adjustments. News from a distance forces a change in your schedule. Tonight: Working late. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You might be slow to get

started, despite others who prod and push to get a response. You could toss your hands in the air, saying “enough.” Work through a situation, and you’ll come out smiling. Tonight: Midweek break. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Sorting through all the paperwork, calls and inquiries could easily have you a bit crazed. If you feel the need to find an expert, do. You will come out ahead only if you find the appropriate path. Tonight: Home is where the heart is. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Be aware of the financial implications of a partnership. You could suddenly decide to veer in another direction. Make it OK to be somewhat erratic, though normally you behave in a steadfast manner. A discussion could be quite animated and enlightening. Tonight: Hang with friends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Others put an inordinate amount of pressure on you. Examine what needs to be done and why. You don’t have to do anything a particular way, though others certainly think they have better ideas. Tonight: Treat a friend to munchies and a drink. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Take your time. Do needed research, and don’t back off a decision, even if it isn’t popular. Associates could be quite challenging and full of themselves. Your diplomatic skills could be a necessity. Tonight: As you like it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Emphasize other opinions as well as your own. If you don’t

have the necessary support, you could have a problem. Know what you want and why. Your creativity finds a merging point where others can hop on the bandwagon! Tonight: Much-needed private time. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Take a firm hand in clearing out errands or a project. Whether you are organizing an event or working, others trust you to do the right thing. A financial matter could slow you down. Tonight: Where the fun is. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Getting a complete vision will take detachment or perhaps a conversation with someone you respect who has expertise. You could be overwhelmed by all the input you receive. Know when to pull back and rethink a decision. Tonight: Check in on an older friend. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Others make it clear where they are coming from. You could be overwhelmed by what is happening. Investigate alternatives with greater care, yet with diplomacy. You could be struggling with how to tell someone you might have changed your mind. Tonight: Relax to good music or a movie. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Juggling the pros and cons of a situation could be difficult, especially as someone makes it clear that you are not the lead player. Say little, and watch what others propose. Tonight: Dinner with a close friend.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Trench coats Continued from E1 The trench coat was made of gabardine, a material Burberry had developed in the late 1800s. According to a 1989 Chicago Tribune story on the history of the trench coat written by Claire Streeter, the raincoat, which was originally called a “slip-on,” allowed for ventilation through the fabric, making it a dramatic improvement over its rival at the time, the mackintosh. The mackintosh (over time this coat’s name has come to be spelled differently from its maker’s, Charles Macintosh) was made with fabric coated with a special mixture of rubber and coal tar. Although it was so waterproof it could double as a bathtub, it was stiff and had an unpleasant odor. Burberry’s trench coat was designed to be worn over a military uniform. It was primarily intended for officers, though it wasn’t required, and it was also available for sale to all soldiers. The trench coat was an optional item, but it proved popular. “By the end of the war, half a million men wore the trench coats,” Streeter wrote. As soldiers returned home from war, Dincuff said, they continued wearing the trench coats. “Especially in that time of scarcity after the war, you are going to wear this coat over and over again,” she said. By World War II, many other armies, including the U.S., had adopted a trench-style coat. The coats had also become popular outside the military, and they were soon adopted by women.

Unisex outerwear Dincuff said there were a number of reasons women adopted the trench coat. In some ways, it was about style. “By the 1940s, women are starting to wear more masculine clothing, like a stronger-shouldered suit,” Dincuff said. Also, during the shortages of World War II, it was considered patriotic to conserve. Dincuff said many women would repurpose their husband’s clothes into clothes for themselves. They might make men’s trousers into a skirt, or tailor themselves a coat out of their husband’s garments. The adoption of masculine garments was also supported by a large-scale movement of women into the work force as men went off to fight. “Women were stepping into roles that men traditionally filled,” she said. “Women were working as factory workers, women were working as farmers, as drivers. Any type of traditionally male-dominated career was being taken over by women, and designers responded.”

Trench goes pop By mid-century, pop culture had adopted the trench coat and taken it away from the muddy trenches of WWI. Memorably, Humphrey Bogart paired the coat with a fedora and a flippedup collar in the romantic 1942

“I don’t think it’s going to go away. It’s part of the culture of outerwear; it’s an important anchor. It’ll always get a new twist.” Submitted image

Warner Brothers via The Associated Press

Looking to buy a trench coat? If you’re looking for the (arguable) original, a Burberry trench coat, be prepared to get out the platinum card: Burberry trench coats start at about $700 at online retailers like Nordstrom.com. You can also shop Burberry.com, where you can buy a women’s double-breasted silk lace trench coat for $3,595. A classic men’s trench on the site will run you $2,195 — but hey, shipping’s free (for a limited time, it appears). The Bend Macy’s has a couple of women’s trench coats for sale, including a classic London Fog trench for just less than $100 and a DKNY trench, also about $100. The film “Casablanca.” The coat also came to be identified with detectives, including Dick Tracy and the bumbling Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau of the Pink Panther series. “I think it’s interesting because it’s become a symbol for a lot of different things that it no longer functions for,” said Hersha Steinbock, an instructor at School of Fashion at Academy of Art University in San Francisco. “It’s got all sorts of twists and turns in terms of its function.” “It became really sexualized in the ’60s, I think,” she said. “You think of it sort of with a dark side, where people run around in trench coats and there’s nothing underneath,” she said. In some characterizations, the person in the trench coat might be a woman who wants to surprise her lover; in others, it may be a flasher on a darkened street corner.

local store didn’t carry men’s trench coats, but a similar style (sans belts and shorter than a traditional trench) are available on the Macy’s website for less than $100. Several other shops in Bend are carrying women’s trench coats right now, including Dress Barn ($60), White House Black Market ($178) and Hot Box Betty ($125-$150). Robert’s on Wall Street carries men’s trench coats, but owner Brett Mellon said that they sell few because “it doesn’t rain that much here.” Men’s trench coats at the store are priced from about $325 to $500. But there are even darker elements to the trench coat mythology, especially when the trench coat is black.

The dark side “Any kind of Hollywood interpretation of Nazi soldiers, the officers are always in black leather trenches,” Dincuff said. She said that it’s the edginess associated with black trench coats may be what drove the goths of the late 1980s and 1990s to adopt a black version of a relative of the trench coat, the duster. She described dusters as similar to the trench coat, but less fitted, and often only single-breasted. “It’s very big when people start driving cars,” she said. “The first automobiles are almost all convertible, and the roads are dusty, and you have to crank your car,

Six products advertised on TV were put to the test to see if they are really answers to wacky problems you didn’t know you had. Bill Hogan Chicago Tribune

Buyer beware When it comes to ordering “As Seen on TV” products, ridiculous online processing fees can exceed the cost of the item. “Free” online additional sets often carry a second huge handling fee. Delivery sometimes takes weeks. Buying at drug, big box and convenience stores is cheaper. It works, but I felt like my bra had been yanked toward my chin. If you hate showing your straps, this is a fast fix, but a racerback bra is preferable. • Just in time for Halloween! When I looked at myself wearing the Bumpits hair accessory (“Flat hair is so last year”) my very first thought? Bride of Frankenstein. Or, if you want to look like a ’60s go-go dancer, buy these.

so you want a big smock or duster over you.” The image of the trench coat was sullied by the horrific 1999 Columbine High School attack after media reports came out that the two high school shooters called themselves members of the “Trenchcoat Mafia.” The name came from a group of gamers at the school who wore long black dusters. Media reports also suggested that the shooters hid their weapons in their long coats on their way to the massacre. Steinbock said in the long term, she doesn’t think the negative associations from that violence have hurt the status of the trench coat. “I really don’t think it has in any way,” she said. “That’s not something that was on my radar screen, it’s not come up in the style tribes and subcultures.”

Enduring appeal

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Seen on TV Continued from E1 • Of the items I tried, the one that sounded the absolute cheesiest turned out to be a favorite. That was Bare Lifts (“The instant breast lift ... but without the surgery”). You slap this sticky crescent on your bare bosom, yank upward and plaster the top half of the thing to your chest. Vavoom, your breasts are 2 inches higher. Call it The Perk-ifier. It works. Don’t let anyone see these in place. The adhesive adds wrinkles (not a good look). A minor redness resulted from sleeping in them. But they stayed put while running. And, I know you’re thinking it must kill to remove them but really, it’s not a problem. • On the flip side of breast-related gimmickry, there’s the cover-up Cami Secret, a triangle of lace-trimmed fabric you clip to your bra straps to conceal cleavage in low-cut tops. I could live with the polyester and the nylon/spandex lace, but the deal-breaker was that the thing wouldn’t stay flat. It wrinkled and buckled. Also, the weird garter clips dug into my skin when I wore a seat belt. A full camisole is better. • And just in case I wanted to “add a full cup size instantly” there was Strap Perfect, a piece of plastic that turns your regular bra into a racerback model. By pulling your bra straps up and in, your breasts are squished together, giving you enforced cleavage.

Humphrey Bogart, left, popularized the trench coat in films such as “Casablanca.” The fictional Dick Tracy, above, helped cement the coat’s association with detectives. These women’s trench coats, left, are available in an array of colors, fabrics and designs for less than $100 at Macy’s. The black coat is by DKNY; the green and khaki are by London Fog.

— Hersha Steinbock, instructor, School of Fashion at Academy of Art University in San Francisco

Otherwise, take a pass. Especially lousy for thin hair. • We all have necklaces and bracelets we can’t wear because they’re impossible to close. No more. Clever Clasp magnet closures work great with a twist-lock feature for added security. The clasps are bulky and cheap looking and can travel to the front of your necklace — but I love them for allowing me to wear jewelry I’d given up on because I couldn’t work the clasps. • You’ve spent a ghastly amount on a pair of jeans, and they’re the perfect length — with heels. But they drag on the ground in flats. Multitask denim with Style Snaps. Sticky snapons let you change the length depending on heel height. These are a good option for quickly changing pants length, and are reusable — if you’re careful. Also better than a safety pin to close a gaping blouse or tame a curling lapel.

There can be a certain edge to the trench coat, but today that edge is balanced with the coat’s stodgy British roots. A trench coat can be appropriate for a businessman, an older woman walking in the park, a mother or a dominatrix. “It’s been repurposed and reconstructed and reintroduced,” Steinbock said. “It has lost its attachment to its original meaning.” She said there are so many variations on the design already, it’s hard to say what still counts as a trench coat. If you remove the epaulets and make it singlebreasted, is it still a trench coat? She said she’s even seen variations on trench coats that were sleeveless, short, jacket-weight or even blouse-like. What’s most interesting about the trench coat, she said, is where it might go in the future. “It’ll be interesting to see what happens to fiber, with new fibers and new fabrics. It might make it something that keeps you warm while being really lightweight,” she said, or “we might not need those things. With global warning and temperatures rising, it may take some completely different form.” One option Steinbock didn’t consider? That the trench coat might disappear from popular fashion. “I don’t think it’s going to go away. It’s part of the culture of outerwear; it’s an important anchor,” she said. “It’ll always get a new twist.” Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

Star Wars Continued from E1 “I started talking to Lucasfilm and we joined forces. My first license is ‘Star Wars,’ naturally, because of my role in ‘The Clone Wars,’” Eckstein says. She is in talks with other media franchises.

Blasting away at stereotypes Science fiction commonly is viewed as a mostly male field. Challenging that perception are the latest demographics from the Syfy channel, where viewership in the third quarter was 48 percent female. “I will say that behind the scenes in Syfy, the people working at Lucasfilm, the people running some of the top sci-fi websites — a lot of women are making things happen,” Eckstein says. “Girls need not be scared to show it. There are a lot of other girls who are closet sci-fi fans that aren’t talking about it publicly. “I don’t understand how there’s still a stereotype that it’s a boy’s world, and I’m not trying to say it’s a girl’s world, I’m just trying to say that it’s for everyone.” She’s been working on the clothing line for three years. “My very first product I made, way before the line, was my Swarovski crystal ‘Star Wars’ ball cap. I ordered a hat online — they didn’t have any girls’ hats, there were only guys’ hats — and it was just kind of bland when I got it in the mail. So I ordered Swarovski crystals that were the same color as the logo, and some clear crystals, and completely bedazzled the hat.” Eckstein works with original artists, and with Lucasfilm, on the T-shirt designs. At the “Star Wars” convention Celebration V in Orlando, Fla., in August, buyers jammed the Her Universe booth. Buyers tried on shirts

On the Web http://heruniverse.com www.syfy.com

in a women’s cut that appeared to run slightly small. One T-shirt, a red art nouveau-style shirt of doomed heroine Padme Amidala from the “Star Wars” films, sold out at various sizes, for $30 a pop.

A larger universe of merchandise Eckstein hopes to have more merchandise soon. On the website, there’s only a Rebel Alliance necklace, $30, but she wants more jewelry in the future including R2-D2 charms, purses and lip gloss in a lightsaber holder. She is firm on keeping quality control. “The thing I started with my line is that if I wouldn’t pay for it — if I wouldn’t buy it — I’m not going to sell it. ’Cause I can’t tell you how many items I’ve bought that were ruined after the first time I washed it or fell apart. ... It’s very important to me to maintain a certain sense of quality.” Fan support is crucial. “I say to the girls, if we can show sales now, this is just the beginning,” she said. “We can do so much more, but we have to prove that girls will buy. If girls won’t buy, we won’t get to make more.” As for those male fans? “The male gender has been so supportive. I would say we had just as many guys at our booth (at Celebration) as girls because they’re buying for their wives, their daughters, their girlfriends, their sisters, and the nice thing is that they’ve all been supportive,” Eckstein says. “Honestly, the guys have come up and said, ‘Thank you. I’ve wanted to get something for my daughter.’”

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 F1

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Pets and Supplies Boxer, 1 Yr. AKC Male Fawn. Sweet, handsome boy. Includes x-large crate. $450.00. 541.504.6303. Cats for barn/shop/companionship. FREE, fixed,shots. Will deliver! info@craftcats.org

Want to Buy or Rent Paying cash for used carpet. in decent condition. Call 541-388-0871, leave msg. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

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CHIHUAHUA BABIES! 6 weeks, 1st shots. Ready for their new families! Set appointment, 541-419-6445. Chihuahua Puppies, 2 females, 8 weeks, $250, call 541-390-8875. Chi-pom Pups, adorable, lovable males and females, party color or brown frosted. 5 weeks old ready for you. $225 cash. 541-480-2824

FREE LLAMA MANURE 5 miles east of Bend. Companion cats free to seniors! You Load! 541-389-5071 Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, Hop Vines, Attn. Crafters, free, 541-598-5488 craftcats.org you haul, please call Doberman Pups, blacks & 541-617-3843. blues, family raised, tails, TV, Sony Trinitron 36”, anadewclaws, shots, wormed, logue, PIP, works, free, you $400 ea. 530-739-3280 haul, 541-280-0663. English Bulldog AKC female, 9 208 mos. old, house trained, $1595 firm; willing to accept Pets and Supplies payments. 541-604-6653. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Adorable, healthy, fur balls! Toy poodle mix. No shed. Ready for loving homes. $225. Many references. 541-504-9958 Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix 4-wk-old pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $250. 541-923-1174. Baby Boa Constrictors and Carpet pythons for sale! $50-$75 ea. Eating, healthy, and born in my facility! Rodents available too! Contact Stephanie @ 541-610-5818 or rabid_angel@hotmail.com Bloodhound AKC Pups, SAR lines, parents on-site, ready Nov., $500, 541-390-8835.

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES AKC registered, champion lines. Up to date on all shots & microchipped. $1750.00 541 416-0375 English Bulldog puppies, AKC, exc. champion pedigree, (3) males, (3) females, $2000/ea. 541-306-0372 EXTRA large pet porter, 40”x27”x30”, 29”H, never used, $65. 541-350-6012. Free 3-yr-old male neutered Yellow Lab. Great dog! Love kids, good with other dogs, very athletic. We had to move to small yard and are having another baby. He needs a home with large yard and owner with lots of time to exercise and play. Email us your story at jahurd@hotmail.com. We are so sad to give up our buddy and will screen heavily for a good home. German Shepherd Pups, males & females, 7 wks, ready now, $300, 541-550-0480

Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready 10/8. Females $900, males $850. 541-852-2991. Golden Retriever Pups, 2 left, 12 weeks, Males, purebred, to approved homes only. $300 Call 541-788-2005 Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839.

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COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

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Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bdrm. Set, 8-piece, pine, king size, $495, call 541-617-1858 Bookshelves, 7’ long, 7’ high, 12” deep, maple, beautiful cond., $700, 541-419-0882. Entertainment Center, pine, Bork Holder, Amish crafted, $175, call 541-617-1858 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Large beveled glass dining set. w/ 4 wood & upholstered chairs, $400. 541-617-5787. Maltese, AKC Pups, 1 male, 2 females, 10 weeks old, shots & dew claws, $500/ea. 541-536-2181,541-728-8067

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. NEWER faux old leather look hide-a-bed sofa, love seat, chair and ottoman. $500. 541-617-5787

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Husqvarna 55234Se Snow coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & blower 24” Tecumseh elect. dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex start, like new 1 yr old, used & vintage watches. No col1 time. $450. 541-420-1217 lection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 W a n t e d - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIn241 tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, Bicycles and NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Benelli 12 Gauge Shotgun Semi Auto/Camo 2¾”-3” $800. 541-480-9181 Browning BLR 30.06 Like new, $575. 541-382-0321 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

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BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

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Franklin tandem bike,great cond, Medical Equipment rode cross country, ready to go, $600, 804-512-8212 Electric Rascal 245 mobility 3-wheel scooter, baskets 246 front & rear, enclosed batGuns & Hunting tery charger, exc. cond., $500. 541-420-1217. and Fishing

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Griffin Wirehaired Pointers Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Oct. 3 males, 11 weeks, all shots, Power Chair, Jazzy Classic 14, 1 13th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call $800, 541-934-2423. yr. old, used 3 mo., new Kevin, Centwise, for reservaIt's still kitten season! CRAFT $5600. Make offer. tions $40. 541-548-4422 has over 2 dozen, all colors, 509-429-6537. KIMBER Custom Eclipse II with friendly, altered, shots, ID internal laser site, only fired chip, more. Just $25 or 2 for Range, Kitchenaid, elec., w/ convection oven, black, ce10 times, ½ box ammo incl. $40. Adult cats just $15 or 2 ramic top, self-cleaning $500 $1000. 541-610-6002. for $25, or free as a mentor Firm, 541-617-1858 cat with kitten adoption. M1 Garand plus 2046 rds Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days ammo in 8 rd clips $2,250. by appt. 598-5488 or visit Find It in M1 carbine standard plus website, www.craftcats.org. 2000 rds and 2-40 rd, 7-30 rd The Bulletin Classifieds! and 5-15 rd clips. $2000. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants, 541-385-5809 541-508-8119 end of Season Sale! Everything 50% Half off! Ruger 10-22 cal semi-auto rifle, Round oak dining table with six 541-408-3317 blue, new in box, w/scope chairs, two 18” leaves, $200. mount. $175. 503-319-4275 541-382-4008. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, Smith & Wesson Model 19-5, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st The Bulletin .357 magnum, nickel plated, shots, wormed, parents on recommends extra caution 6” bbl, $450. 503-319-4275 site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. when purchasing products www.kinnamanranch.com Taurus 40 Cal, semi-auto, subor services from out of the compact, holster, & case, area. Sending cash, checks, Labradoodles, Australian $350, 541-647-8931 or credit information may Imports - 541-504-2662 be subjected to F R A U D . www.alpen-ridge.com Taurus PT 145, 45 ACP/Dbl. For more information about stack, compact, 2 clips, as Mini Dachshunds 6 wks.3 black an advertiser, you may call new, $380, 541-728-1036. & tan male; 1 piebald female. the Oregon State Attorney 1st shots and wormed, adorGeneral’s Office Consumer 251 able and family raised! $300 Protection hotline at Hot Tubs and Spas 541-610-7341 1-877-877-9392. Nice Calico cat, 8yrs, spayed, deHot Tub, exc. cond., all clawed, needs loving home w/ chemicals incl., $2500 OBO, no dog. $15. 541-504-0712 Please call 541-408-6191. Old English Sheepdog, adorTwin Bed, Colonial maple, in253 able female puppy, great AKC cludes box spring, mattress, lines, 541-382-2531 TV, Stereo and Video frame and headboard. Like new! $175. 541-536-5067 POMERANIANS - 5 beautiful, Speakers,pair Dolquist DQ-10’s, lovable pups ready for adopsub woofer incl., good cond, tion. Semona, 541-948-9392 Wanted washers and dryers, $400, call 541-419-0882. working or not, cash paid, Poodlepointer Pups, ready 541-280-7959. 255 10/9, 1st shots, wormed, father was 1 of the dogs to Washer/Dryer set, Frigidaire, Computers stack combo, 2005, like new, retrieve the kicking tee at the $595, 541-408-7908 OR State-Boise State football THE BULLETIN requires comgame.Great hunting & family puter advertisers with mul212 dog, $1200, 541-419-2931 tiple ad schedules or those Antiques & selling multiple systems/ POODLES AKC Toy, tiny software, to disclose the Collectibles toy. Also Pom-a-Poos, Chiname of the business or the poos. Joyful! 541-475-3889 term "dealer" in their ads. Antique and Estate Sale. Private party advertisers are PUG-MIX puppies, males, 1st Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-4. defined as those who sell one shots, $200 each. 20133 Wasatch Mtn Ln. computer. 541-389-0322. Cash & Carry or leave bid. Furniture, collectibles. Queensland Heelers 257 Details on CraigsList. Standards & mini,$150 & up. Musical Instruments 541-280-1537 Chinese dishes, from Hong Kong, http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com 99-piece set, everyday pat- Moving-must sell Wurlitzer piWALKER HOUND pups, 6 wks, tern, $50 OBO, 541-595-6261 ano, reduced $400 obo. good hunting parents, ready Great starter piano. Phone to Guitars, autographed, Rolling to go. $100 541-815-6705. see. 541-330-2490. Stones, Led Zepplin, McCartney, Eagles, more, all ap210 260 praised over $2500, asking Furniture & Appliances Misc. Items $400 ea., come w/certificate of authenticity & appraisal, #1 Appliances • Dryers Bedrock Gold & Silver call for pics, 541-330-9702. • Washers BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash The Bulletin reserves the right 541-549-1592 to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Buying Diamonds Bulletin Internet website.

Pets and Supplies

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A-1 263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food

A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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Tools Big 5hp DeWalt 18” radial arm saw with extra blades, $475 OBO. 541-447-1039 Powermatic Tilt Table Mortiser, w/stand, never used, $800; Jet 8” joiner, long bed, like new, $950; Jet 1200 CFM dust collector, w/floor sweep, $200, 541-306-4582. Scaffolding, 2 6’ section, & 1 3’ section, all accessories, Safe Way Light Weight, $700, 541-419-0882. TABLE SAW - LIKE NEW. 3 HP 10" inch blade 5000 rpm with stand and sawdust collection bag. $200 OBO. Call 541-385-0542. Cash only. You pick up.

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436. LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

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Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . WINDOWS Milgard white vinyl, two 5’x18”; one 3’x3’; one 4’x5’ double pane. $400 OBO. 541-388-1484.

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

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Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found Bike: Girl’s, Schwinn, 10/4, 2200 NE Hwy 20, unit 44 call to ID, 541-383-1427. Found Binoculars, Purcell/Empire in RD, morning of 9/28, call to ID, 541-330-7369. Found German Shorthair Pointer, male, OWWI, 9/26, call to ID, 860-638-9746

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

1st, 2nd, & 3rd cuttings of Alfalfa, Orchard Grass, & Blue grass, all small bales, 2-tie, Madras, 541-325-6317 or 541-325-6316.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb bales, $140-$160/ton Qty Discount! Patterson Ranch in Sisters - Call 541-549-3831 2nd cutting orchard grass 100 lb. bales. 541-480-8185

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., If no answer, please leave msg., I will return your call. Redmond, 541-548-2514

Rained-on Orchard Grass

Put up dry, barn-stored. Exc. feeder hay. $105. 541-383-0494 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Horses and Equipment 1870 Surrey, 2-seater with top, harness, all original, Rose Parade Trophy Winner. Exc cond. $3500. 541-576-2002

Crosby Sovereign English saddle, perfect for beginner or child, $199. 541-678-3546

Lost Pembroke Corgi, male, tricolored, 1 ear up, 1 down,pm of 10/1, near Wells Acres, needs medication, family misses him, 541-306-8289. Lost White Maltese female, NW Crossing area, Oct. 1. 4 lbs, no collar, medical condition. REWARD. Call 541-647-2598 NECKLACE LOST IN OLD MILL Shopping Center Wed. 9/22. Extreme sentimental value, Reward! 541-350-1584. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Call to identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Need a seamstress? I can sew or alter anything! Call me 541-382-7556

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FOUND Toyota key with remote keyless entry. Call to identify. 541-410-9936.

Lost pair of eyeglasses, possible locations: Culver Middle School, Albertsons Redmond. Reward. 541-923-2161.

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Looking for Employment

Hay, Grain and Feed

Found Subaru Key Fob, Roadkill firewood area, 9/27, call 541-593-5279.

Lost: Large Green Cooler, filled with fishing gear & jackets, Century Dr. or Hwy 97, between Sunriver & Bend, 541-390-4763.

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Lost Keys, set of 8-10 on plain ring, 9/24, Redmond Fred Meyer parking lot, $25 reward, 541-382-8244.

Employment

300 400

Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713

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Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

Farm Market

9 7 7 0 2

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Livestock & Equipment Female Pig, FFA backup. $1.85/lb. hanging weight plus cut and wrap. Leave message 617-1757

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Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Meat & Animal Processing

Delivery Driver CDL required, willing to work in yard and sales. Do light mechanical, operate boom truck and Bobcat. Pick up application from 8am-2pm at 63026 NE Lower Meadow, Suite 200, Bend.

Angus/Angus cross, home grown, humanely raised, grass fed, grain sweetened, by the ½ or the ¼ $1.85/lb + cut & wrap. 541-948-7499

Driver Experienced transfer driver wanted. Home most nights. Contact Keven @ 541-891-1156 for details.

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F2 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Front desk The Riverhouse is seeking a Front Desk Agent. Qualified applicants will be able to work a varied schedule, be energetic, upbeat, and excel in customer service. Must have basic computer skills and cash handling skills. Previous front desk experience is preferred but not required. Medical Insurance & FREE GOLF available. Bring resumes and complete application in person at The Riverhouse, 3075 N Hwy 97, Bend, OR. Or you may apply and submit your resume/ cover letter on line at: www.riverhouse.com. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING IS REQUIRED.

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Driver/Technician Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum, Inc is looking for a route driver/service technician for safe delivery of fuel or heating related products and other products as directed. Deliveries are made in a regional area to small commercial establishments and residential households. No overnight travel is required.

The successful applicant will have a Class A or B CDL License and able to get Hazmat, Tanker and Air Brake Endorsement. Must be able to pass an MVR check and Background verification. Fuel or propane delivery and service technician experience is preferred. We offer competitive pay and health benefits. paid holidays and vacation along with an excellent incentive bonus pay plan, 401(K) plan and a substantial profit sharing plan. To apply, e-mail resume to employment@edstaub.com or request an application at 3305 South Hwy 97, P.O. Box 1244, Redmond, OR 97756

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Mental Health Assertive Community Response Manager Lutheran Community Services Northwest is looking for an Assertive Community Response Manager for its Crook County Mental health Program. This management level position will oversee all elements of service related to transitioning clients from the State Hospital system and diverting emerging clients into community services, averting State Hospital services. Applicants must have management experience in community mental health and meet state requirements of a QMHP. A LCSW that is bi-lingual would be preferred. Resume: LCSNW, 365 NE Court St. Prineville, OR 97754. Fax: 541-447-6694. Email: crookcounty@lcsnw.org. Closing Oct. 13th.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Office Busy dermatology office is looking for a part time front desk professional. Medical reception and EMR exp. preferred. Must be friendly, energetic, great work ethic and a team player. Salary based on experience. Please email resume to Jodi@centraloregondermatology.com or fax 541-323-2174. Physical Therapist Partners In Care has an opening for a part-time (24 – 31 hours per week) Physical Therapist. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a resume via email to HR@partnersbend.org or by regular mail to:

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Get your business

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR.

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All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment drug test and criminal background check.

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional"

Partners In Care is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Fair Trade Sale: Featuring 10,000 Villages, Fri. Oct. 8th, 11-7, at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin A v e , Hosted by the River Mennonite Church. Handmade gifts incl. jewelry, personal accessories, home decor, art, ceramics, textiles, baskets & musical instruments, incl. holiday gifts.

Estate Sale: Fri. 8-2, Sat. 8-12, 19988 Rock Bluff Cir., Like New Wheel Mounted tires for Jeep, tools, furniture, king & dbl. beds, lots of misc., Cash only.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily ESTATE AUCTION: Sat. Oct. 9th • 10 a.m. Sharp 65425 76th St. • Bend, OR Partial Listing: Big Tex dump trailer; 5’x10’ inside, double axle, exc. cond.; compressed air tools - Sears, Snap-On, Bostich, router table, extension. ladder; their is hardware, large assortment Simpson strong ties; 2 king canopies; 4 studded tires and chromed wheels for Chevy truck; stainless steel wheeled cart; metal cabinets; metal boxes; Sony Handycam video camera; games; office chairs; office products; tools; planer; upright band saw; metal horizontal band saw; large Champion compressor; Miller arc welder; acetylene welder; 14” chop saw Makita; 10” Delta chop saw; 16 speed drill press w/stand; Craftsman chain saws; DeWalt plate joiner; router pantograph; Kreg jig; MK tile cutter; Snap-On tool boxes; Makita 12V 3” circular saw; 4” electric circular saw; too many tools to list. Matchbox Collection: Approx. 1310 pieces (cars & boxes), 21 cases, 3 shadow boxes, 5 display cases, 2 small cases. To be sold as one lot. Furniture: Oak L-shaped computer desk; computer desk; oak book shelf; oak entertainment center; armoire; Lane leather recliner; vintage beveled mirrors, vintage chest of drawers (wooden); SW motif; 6 painted pictures 20”x25” from the Bowen family; Norman Rockwell books, calendars, & collectors plate; 2 raku pottery urns; ski & ski equip.; moped, needs brake cable; wrought iron patio furniture; stainless steel BBQ - 3 burners; round cement fire ring; pottery, too many to list. Cross 1306 pellet pump action pistol; camping equip; Christmas stuff. Too much to list. VW Thunder Bug, eng. needs work. Auctioneer’s Note: This is a quality auction. Everything is sold as-is, no warranty. Terms of the Sale: Cash, Check with proper ID. Not responsible for accidents. Sale Site Directions: From Bend, Oregon, go north on Hwy. 97 14 miles to 61st Ave, jog right, then turn left onto Gift Rd., cross the valley, head up then turn left onto 76th. Go to 65425 76th St. Follow the auction signs. Hank Potter, Auctioneer 541-621-7438 Lunch wagon will be on site rain or shine.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

7-Day Liquidation Sale: Corner of SE Dell Ln & SE Yew Ave, Sat.-Sun, 10-6, Mon.-Fri. 1-5, homes, businesses, storage,clearance,10,000+ pieces, jewelry, $1- $20 ea., furniture, home decor, clothes, goodies galore! 2 full size pickups, trade for economy car/SUV. Freebies too! Directions or questions: 541-420-7328.

AMAZING MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE. SAT., OCT. 9 at 7:30 a.m. Take Ferguson Rd. to Sage Creek Dr. to 61149 Ridge Falls Place Estate Sale: Writing desk, furniture items, quilt fabrics, antique quilt pieces, lawn mower, weed whacker, misc., Sat. 8-4, 1001 SE 15th, Space 216.

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

541-383-0386 Sales Agent: Don’t find a sales job, find a sales career. Combined Insurance is looking for quality individuals to join its sales force. We provide training, a training completion bonus, comprehensive benefits & leads for your local market. For immediate consideration please contact Joanne Berk, Recruitment Specialist, at 847.953.8326. or email a resume and cover letter to joanne.berk@combined.com. You may also apply directly in the Careers tab on our website: www.combinedinsurance.com/ careers. EOE. We will be conducting interviews in Bend Thursday 10/7, so apply today! Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, energetic and motivated person to join our team as a part time sale associate. If you are dependable and have a good work attitude, please leave your resume at Saxon’s in the Old Mill District, Bend.

Independent Contractor

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Sales Redmond Area

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Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat., 8-1, FIND IT! 3750 SW Gene Sarazan BUY IT! Dr., furniture, yard equip., SELL IT! clothes, much more! The Bulletin Classifieds Moving Sale - Furniture & lots of misc!, Fri & Sat, 9-4 MOVING: DESIGNER 13778 SW Canyon Dr, CRR; Living-room, Bedroom, Acfollow signs from fire station. cessories, etc. Sat 8-5 Oct. 9 23012 Lariat Lane, Bend 292 541-617-1193

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

Multi-Family Garage/Estate Sale - English saddle & tack, cookware, dishes & cups, tools, knick-knacks. Fri.-Sat., 9-4. 20785 Wagontire Way. Sat. 8-3, Kids clothes & toys, furniture, truck bed toolbox, Playstation 2, misc., 63609 Hunters Cir. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & H Madras/ Culver & La Pine Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

H

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Storage Rentals 15 x 44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499

616

Want To Rent Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Finance & Business

500 507

Family seeks condo lease. Dec-May, Bend area. Prefer 2-3 bdrm, 2 bath. May want option to buy. 503-663-6460 or eric@ytm-law.com Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished quiet room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking/ drugs/pets. $350 + $100 deposit. (541) 388-2710.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365 Nice home in DRW, private bath/entrance, W/D, storage, pets interviewed, $350 + elec., no smoking. 541-388-6787

Room w/private bath, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, garage,hot tub, tons storage, wi-fi+ cable. $500 mo util. incl, No dogs/ drugs 541-410-4384 Lori

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Sisters Estate Sale: Thur., 3-7, Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3. House & garage full,everything must go! Furniture, china hutch, women’s clothes & shoes, costume jewelry, yard tools, lots & lots of misc. Cash only, 18025 2nd Ave, Bend, between Bend & Sisters off Fryrear Rd. Follow Blue signs.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

528

Operate Your Own Business

MOVING SALE Saturday 10/9 8-4 Furniture - Electronics - Home Decor - Fridge 3401 NE Wild Rivers Loop BEND

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Directory

(Private Party ads only)

286

ING

With an ad in

WE

282

Resort The Riverhouse is seeking a detail-oriented person with strong customer service skills to work Night Audit. Previous computer skills required. Benefits include insurance and FREE GOLF! Please apply at 3075 N Hwy 97 or online at www.riverhouse.com. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING IS REQUIRED.

CAUTION

Rentals

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

ALL LIKE NEW! 3Bdrm 2.5 bath duplex. Garage, nice fenced yard, gas frplc, tile, no pets, no smkg, W/S paid, $850mo + deposit. 541-382-2260

* FALL SPECIAL * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. NEWLY

REMODELED

QUIMBY ST. APTS. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1 bdrm Units with Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios Water, sewer & garbage paid.

CALL 541-382-9046 TTY 1-800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 F3 656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

636

642

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

141 NW Portland: 2 bdrm, oak cabinets,dishwasher, laundry facilities, W/S/G & cable pd, cat OK. $650/mo., $500dep. 541-383-2430; 541-389-9867

Autumn Specials Are Here!

River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688. WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. W/S/G paid; small pet OK. $775/mo. Call 541-480-2233

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

SW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new flooring & paint, appls incl W&D, no pets/smoking, WS&G owner paid, credit check req’d, discount 1st mo rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. For appt/info: 541-504-6141

Clean, spacious 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath, w/d hkup, w/s/g paid, 2 parking spaces, convenient loc, good schools. $600/mo. 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $650 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

640

646

638

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Apt./Multiplex Furnished 1 Bdrm quiet, private home, carport, new stainless appl., jet tub, elec., internet, & cable incl., W/D, $785, 1st. & last, 541-408-5460.

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678

Furnished apt on acreage. quiet, garden space, greenhouse. Minutes from downtown Sisters. No-smoking. $550 mo. 541-549-3838.

648

Houses for Rent General

61284 Kristen St. 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, 1613 sq. ft., gas heat and fireplace, dbl garage, dogs neg. $1095+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 A clean 3 bdrm, 1.25 bath, 1269 sq.ft., near Old Mill, large fenced yard, gas stove in living room, $825. (541) 480-3393 or (541) 610-7803. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

658

Houses for Rent Redmond A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Country Setting: 2 bdrm, 2 bath, mfd. home, wood stove, no smoking, pets neg., 8 mi. W. of Terrebonne, refs req., $750, $500 dep, 541-419-6542

Location, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, single garage, fenced yard, pets okay, $625/mo. + dep. 541-788-9027.

Great

LIKE NEW! 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, 1120 sq ft, double garage, gas Houses for Rent fireplace, central air, fenced, NE Bend underground sprinklers, no pets/smoking. $850/mo. + 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, near En$850/dep. Available now. sworth school, dbl garage, Call 541-480-2468 1715 Sonya Ct., no smoking, pets neg., $850/ mo., (541) 660 383-2586, (541) 749-8127.

650

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063

Houses for Rent La Pine

La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

700 800 738

860

Multiplexes for Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

FSBO: 4-Plex Townhomes, NE Bend, all rented w/long term renters, hardwood floors, great neighborhood near hospital, $399,000, 541-480-8080

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809

The Bulletin Classified *** Short Sale…Our company may be able to help. We have a record of getting results for homeowners in over their heads. First you need answers. Find out why homeowners thank us for the assistance we have given them. Hunter Properties LLC 541-389-7910 Serving all of Central Oregon

A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $117,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004

• Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4295

541-504-9284

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield,back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Allegro

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes 2137 sq ft 1-level, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, hardwood & granite, lrg ¼ acre lot, not SS. $223,990 Debbie Lahey • 541-977-4825 RE/MAX Town & Country

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

755

Homes with Acreage

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

870

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, 12’ Fiberglass Navy boat/trailer, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 new tires, working lights. $400 or trade. 541-388-1533 Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 rage kept, rear walk round XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, queen island bed, TV’s,levelmint condition, includes ski ing hyd. jacks, backup camtower w/2 racks - everyera, awnings, non smoker, no thing we have, ski jackets pets, must see to appreciate, adult and kids several, watoo many options to list, ter skis, wakeboard, gloves, won’t last long, $18,950, ropes and many other 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Boats & Accessories

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $18,500. 541-548-3985.

17’

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712

Seaswirl

1972,

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $500 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

773 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613 Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Travel 1987,

Acreages Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

865

ATVs

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Queen

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, rear camera/monitor, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Travel Trailers

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) 541-322-7253 Domestic Services

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894.

Barns

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon Stove 541-815-2406 CCB# 87690 Stove Installation & Repair Gas Piping.

Excavating

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Heating & Cooling

Landscaping, Yard Care Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

I DO THAT!

Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Handymen at affordable prices: sheds to changing a light bulb, hanging a picture, to shovelling a walk, give a call, we do it all! 541-526-5894

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012 Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Nelson Landscape Painting, Wall Covering Maintenance

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns. HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916. Montana 32’ 2002 5th wheel, 2 slide-outs, new generator, stereo, cassette, 2 TVs plus many extras. Exc. cond., $18,500. (541) 548-0783.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

881

Accounting/Bookeeping

541-385-5809

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Reduced to $595!

Call Bill 541-480-7930.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

882

Fifth Wheels

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

762 Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

749

Southeast Bend Homes

693

1St Mo. 1/2 off, like new, The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE 2/1.5, W/D, walk-in closet, Rental rate! If you have a mtn. views, W/S/yard paid, home to rent, call a Bulletin 654 no smoking, 61361 Sally Ln, Classified Rep. to get the NOW $700+$700 security, 1 Houses for Rent new rates and get your ad yr. lease, 541-382-3813 SE Bend started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. 2850 Sq.ft., totally renovated townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D 650 farm house on 18.3 acres, 4 hookups, patio, fenced yard. Houses for Rent bdrm., 2 bath, 3 car garage, NO PETS. W/S/G pd. horses & pets OK, close in NE Bend Rent starts at $545 mo. Knott Rd. location, great 179 SW Hayes Ave. views of Bachelor & 3 Sisters, 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 2200 Sq.ft., upgraded stainless $1300 mo., $1300 dep, appl., 3 bdrm., bonus room, 2.5 Credit check req. bath, dbl. garage, mtn. views, 642 541-610-5882 no smoking, 1 small pet? Apt./Multiplex Redmond $1299+dep. 541-390-2915 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced 1st Month Free w/ 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath newer home yard, 2 car garage, RV park6 mo. lease! with fireplace, 2-car garage, ing, fireplace, close to 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. insmall yard - no pets. schools and hospital. cludes storage unit & carport. 2883 NE Sedalia Loop. $900 $845/mo., 541-948-4531 Close to schools, parks & mo. + dep., 541-389-2192 shopping. On-site laundry, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath house 1200 Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, no-smoking units, dog run. 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Pet Friendly. sq.ft., single level, 21354 Old Mill. No smoking/pets. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS Starling Dr., $925/mo., no $975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call 541-923-1907 pets or smoking, Ed, Rachel 541-604-0620. www.redmondrents.com 503-789-0104.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

748

Weekend Retreat or Family Home - $155,000 Like new home, 1 acre, La Pine. Terms considered. 503-986-3638 www.odotproperty.com

Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408

881

Travel Trailers

Northeast Bend Homes

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

880

Motorhomes

Baja Vision 250 2007,

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Office/Retail Space for Rent

865

ATVs

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Pet Services Serious On-site Horse Care with full-service sitting, exercise, training, healthcare, & other options. Call EquiCare, 928-301-3889

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Forest River Sierra 26.5’ 1998, Moving sale, like new, $6900 OBO, must see! 541-923-4237.

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

875

885

Canopies and Campers

Bigfoot

9.5’

1998,

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm. Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

18’ 1972 CAMP TRAILER Everything works great! $1100 OBO. 541-462-3067.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com


F4 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Autos & Transportation

932

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

900

Dodge Charger SE, 1973, 318, complete, needs work, must trailer. $499. 503-319-4275 Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422. OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $10,800. 541-420-2715

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 940

975

975

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

Mercury Marquis, 1984 Grandpa’s car! Like new, all leather, loaded, garaged, 40K miles. $3495. 541-382-8399 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998. 916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3500! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Buick LeSabre 2004,

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5400; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $3400. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

CHEVY BLAZER 4x4 LS 1998 good condition, 110k miles, $5,295. For more information 541-382-9411 after 4 p.m.

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

FREE (4) 1995 Honda Accord wheels, perfect to mount snow tires on. 541-548-2467 Tow Bar, Falcon, $300, please call 541-330-5975 for more info. WINTER IS COMING! 4 only P195/75R14 studded snow tires, used very little last year $150 set. 541-383-1811.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Quad Cab, 6.7 liter Diesel 6-speed manual, 8ft bed w/bed liner, exhaust brakes, drop down gooseneck hitch, camper tie downs, back axle air bag. 29,000 miles, asking $36,000. Call 541-815-1208 or e-mail larson1@uci.net FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

SOLD!!!!! Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford F150 King Ranch 4x4. 2005 Super Crew, every option + many extras. 82k mi, Exc.! $19,900 541-420-2385.

Ford F250 1983, tow Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy

Wagon

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edition, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Lincoln Navigator 1998, clean, solid SUV, 6CD, leather, all pwr., 7 passenger, $7500, 541-593-8321 after 6 p.m.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. Ford F250 1995 4WD, X-cab, 5 spd, 134K, tow ready, new tires. $4300. 541-410-2449.

Vans

940

1957, FORD F350 2002 Supercab, 7.3 Chrysler Town & Country

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler New Yorker 1973, 440, complete, needs work, must trailer, $499. 503-319-4275

Diesel, Lariat, Loaded, Leather, Black, Lifted, tow package, Short Bed 133K, 541-593-1258 $17,900 OBO

SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Call 541-385-5809 Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., diesel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954. Ford Ranger 4x4, 1998, 5speed, canopy, hook-up for motorhome w/tow bar, new clutch. $5500. 541-389-8961

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

541-322-7253

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. Saturn SC2 1994, sunroof, all lthr, 5-spd, snow tires, exc eng.$1300 OBO 541-408-8611

Subaru Outback Limited Wagon 2003, Too many features to list, always garaged, 48,650 miles. Call 541-390-1017 for details. $13,995 FIRM.

SUBARUS!!!

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto,

Dodge Ram 2001, short GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003

Dodge Ram 4X4 2009,

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

FORD EXPEDITION 1999 4x4, 118,000 miles, new paint and trans, exc. cond., garaged. $6000 OBO. (541) 549-4834, (541) 588-0068

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C,

A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4700. Call 541-429-2966 bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Motorcycle Trailer, Kendon Stand up, 2007, used seldom & only locally, some custom work, $1700 OBO 541-306-3010.

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Pontiac Grand Am 2003, gold, AC, CD-AM/FM, good tires, very clean, well maintained. 60K, $5000 obo. 541-416-9557

SUBARU Impreza Sport 2005, 50K miles, automatic, snow tires with wheels included. 1-1/4” rear hitch, 1 owner, $11,895. 541-400-0218. CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111. CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Pickups

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Sport Utility Vehicles Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256 VW Beetle 1967, lots of new parts, needs motor work. $2000 OBO. 541-548-7126

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Automobiles

935 Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Avalon 1999, clean, good cond., heated leather, pwr. seats, PL, sunroof, CD, 30 mpg, $6500 541-593-8321 after 6 p.m.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/ Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 190K hwy. mi. $1000 below kbb. $6500. 541-410-7586.

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5750. 541-593-4016 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1000

1000

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE Trustee's Notice of Sale Loan No: 57983 T.S. No.: 10-02440-5 JV Reference is made to that certain Line of Credit Deed of Trust made by, Daniel H. Cutter as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as Beneficiary, recorded on 04/09/2003, as Instrument No. 2003-23214 and Modified on 9/11/2003, as Instrument No. 2003-62986 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 18-12-04-DD-400 Lot one (1), Pine Ridge Plaza, recorded December 10, 2001, in cabinet E, page 772, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 1400 SE Reed Market Road Bend, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with default interest due; failed to pay attorneys' fees and expenses; By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $194,573.97 together with interest thereon at the rate of 18.00000% per annum from June 8, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned trustee will on 1/7/2011 at the hour of 01:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For further information, please contact Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, 3075 Prospect Park Dr., Ste. 100, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 Sale Information can be obtained on line at www.priorityposting.com Automated Sales Information Please Call 714-573-1965 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any

successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owning an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/3/2010 Fidelity National Title Insurance Company Rozalyn Tudor State of California County of Sacramento I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Rozalyn Tudor P744107 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/2010 PUBLIC NOTICE Trustee's Notice of Sale Loan No: LARSEN T.S. No.: 10-02352-5 JV Reference is made to that certain Line of Credit Deed of Trust made by, Gerhard Larsen and Chris Larsen, husband and wife or the survivor thereof as Grantor to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Westamerica Bank, custodian for the benefit of George S. Simmons account no. 042575, as to an undivided one-third interest, and, Westamerica Bank, custodian for the benefit of Eugene O. Michelson account

no. 042595, as to an undivided one-third interest, and Westamerica Bank, custodian for the benefit of Janet M. Simmons account no. 042768, as to an undivided one-third interest, as Beneficiary, recorded on 09/02/2005, as Instrument No. 2005-59360 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 20 10 31D0 06500 Lot four (4), block eight (8), first addition to Fall River Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 54824 Lonesome Pine RD., Bend, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; and all subsequent payments; failed to pay attorneys' fees and expenses; failed to pay insurance premiums; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the obligation secured by the Trust Deed described below is in default, and that the beneficiary has elected to foreclose the Trust Deed pursuant to ORS 86.705 to 86.795. No action is now pending to recover any part of the debt secured by the Trust Deed. Information required by ORS 86.735 and ORS 86.745 is as follows: 1. Grantor: Living Water Development, LLC Trustee: AmeriTitle Successor Trustee: Joseph E. Kellerman 717 Murphy Road Medford, OR 97504 Beneficiary: PremierWest Bank 2. Property covered by the Trust Deed: Parcel One (1) of Partition Plat No. 2004-20, Recorded July 13, 2004 in Partitions MF No. 1919941, Records of Crook County, Oregon, Located in the E ½ of Section 14 Township 15 South, Range 15 East of the Willamette Meridian, Crook County, Oregon. 3. Trust Deed was originally recorded on June 14, 2006, as instrument number 2006-212024 of the Official Records of Crook County, Oregon and was thereafter modified several times. 4. Default for which foreclosure is made is: 1) failure of Grantor to pay loan upon maturity; 2) failure of Grantor to pay real property taxes assessed against the premises; and 3) encumbering the property with junior trust deed in violation of the terms of the trust deed. 5. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $2,338,883.03 as of the 19th day of March 2010. Interest is accruing on the unpaid principal of $1,988,884 at the rate of Wall Street Journal prime plus 6.50% with a minimum interest of 7.75%, plus late fees, attorneys' fees, trustee's fees and such sums as the Beneficiary may advance for the benefit of Grantor (i.e., real property taxes, insurance premiums, etc.) 6. The Beneficiary has and does elect to sell the property to satisfy the obligation. 7. The property will be sold in the manner prescribed by law on the 10th day of November 2010, at 10:00 a.m. standard time as established by ORS 187.110, at the front steps of the Crook County Circuit Court, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, Oregon, 97754, Crook County, Oregon. 8. Interested persons are notified of the right under ORS 86.753 to have this proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment of the entire amount then due, other than such portion as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with costs, trustee and attorney’s fees, and by curing any other default complained of in this Notice, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. 9. In construing this notice and whenever the context hereof so requires, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and their successors in interest, the word “trustee” includes any successor trustee and the word “beneficiary” includes any successor in interest of the beneficiary named in the Trust Deed, and any collateral beneficiary, and their successors in interest. DATED this 6th day of July, 2010. HORNECKER, COWLING, HASSEN & HEYSELL, L.L.P. By: Joseph E. Kellerman, Successor Trustee

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7168 T.S. No.: 1266244-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Christopher M. Starling, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Mortgageit, Inc., A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 26, 2006, recorded April 27, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-28981 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 5 of Gardenside P.U.D- Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61717 Darla Place Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,229.87 Monthly Late Charge $94.73. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $283,925.01 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-338381 09/15, 09/22, 09/29, 10/06


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

KENNETH GAMBEE, JOHN D. BRADLEY, and RANCH CABIN ASSOCIATION OF UNIT OWNERS, Defendants.

secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $164,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.00000% per annum from 12/31/2006 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned trustee will on 1/3/2011 at the hour of 01:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For further information, please contact Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, 3075 Prospect Park Dr., Ste. 100 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 Phone 916-636-0114 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantorft includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 26, 2010 Fidelity National Title Insurance Company Rachel Cissney Slate of California County of Sacramento I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Rachel Cissney P741758 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/06/2010

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In the Matter of the Estate of TAMARA J. YATES-HAGEDORN, Deceased. Case No. 10PB0097BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published September 29, 2010. MATTHEW HAGEDORN Personal Representative FAX: (541) 388-5410 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Matthew Hagedorn 1746 NW Jackpine Ave. Redmond, OR 97756 TEL: (541) 325-3997 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Brent S. Kinkade, OSB #933301 bsk@karnopp.com Erin K. McDonald, OSB# 024978 ekm@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Public Auction Spacemaker Storage Sunriver Business Park On Saturday October 16th At 9:30 a.m. The following storage units Will be disposed of at at public auction to satisfy delinquent storage charges: Ray Schnichel - #5 Andrew Jameson-#115 Scott Mason-#18 Brian Hodson-#79 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) LEE D. DORSEY, III, Trustee of his successor trustee in the trust under the Dorsey Loving Trust, dated October 8, 1992, and any amendments thereto, and SUSAN A. THOMPSON, Trustee of the Susan A. Thompson Revocable Trust dated April 12, 2004, Plaintiffs, v. ALPINE HOLDINGS, LLC.,

Case No. 09CV0827AB Notice is hereby given that I will on November 4, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property known as #29 Ranch Cabin also known as 57480 Ranch Cabins Lane, Sunriver, Oregon 97707, to wit, A Leasehold as created in that certain instrument recorded April 11, 1973 in Book 194, Page 159, Deed Records, between Sunriver Lands, Inc., an Oregon corporation, Lessor, and Sunriver Properties, Inc., an Oregon corporation, Lessee, and amended by instrument recorded May 25, 1976 in Book 231, Page 886, Deed Records, in and to the following described property: That certain Unit No. F29, as described in that certain Declaration of Unit Ownership submitting RANCH CABINS, PHASES 1 and 2 to Oregon Unit Ownership Law recorded November 8, 1973 in Book 200, Page 740, Deed Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, first page of said Declaration was re-recorded December 3, 1973 in Book 201, Page 367, Deed Records, appertaining to a tract of land situated in the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section 32, Township 19 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, as described in said Declaration, which is incorporated herein by reference and made a part hereof as if fully set forth herein, together with an undivided interest in and to the common elements appertaining to said unit as set forth in said Declaration. Said sale is made under an Amended Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated August 30, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein LEE D. DORSEY, III, Trustee or his successor trustee under the Dorsey Loving Trust, dated October 8, 1992, and any amendments thereto, and SUSAN A. THOMPSON, Trustee of the Susan A. Thompson Revocable Trust dated April 12, 2004, recovered General Judgment Foreclosure on June 11, 2010; a Supplemental General Judgment For Attorney Fees and Costs on July 7, 2010 and Supplemental Judgment for Attorney Fees and Costs for Ranch Cabin Association of Unit Owners on August 20, 2010 against ALPINE HOLDINGS, LLC, KENNETH GAMBEE, JOHN D. BRADLEY and RANCH CABIN ASSOCIATION OF UNIT OWNERS as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regu-

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lations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 29, 2010; October 6, 2010; October 13, 2010 Date of Last Publication: October 20, 2010 Attorney: Frank C. Rote, OSB #893898 Hughes, Rote, Brouhard & Thorpe, LLP 612 NW Fifth St. Grants Pass, OR 97526 (541) 479-2678 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) SOUTH VALLEY BANK & TRUST Plaintiff, v. PATRICK TODD, ALLEN TODD, BANK OF AMERICA, NA; PRONGHORN COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., and JOHN DOE, Defendants. Case No. 10CV0195ST Notice is hereby given that I will on October 21, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property known as 23098 Watercourse Way, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lot One Hundred Ten (110), ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE 2, recorded August 18, 2003, in Cabinet G, Page 3, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated August 6, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein

SOUTH VALLEY BANK & TRUST, recovered Default General Judgment of Foreclosure on July 16, 2010, and a Supplemental Judgment for Costs and Attorney's Fees on July 16, 2010 against PATRICK TODD as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 15, 2010; September 22, 2010; September 29, 2010 Date of Last Publication: October 6, 2010 Attorney: Andrew C. Brandsness, OSB #831597 Brandsness, Brandsness &

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-372107-NH

Rudd, P.C. 411 Pine Street Klamath Falls, OR 97601 (541) 882-6616 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property). WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, formerly known as WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB; Plaintiff, v. KARI L. HUTCHENS, Individually and in her capacity as personal representative; DOES 1-10, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 66275 Barr Road, Bend, Oregon; DOES 11-20, being the unknown heirs of Michael C. Hutchens and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien or interest in the property described in the complaint herein; and, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Defendants. Case No.09CV1002ST. Notice is hereby given that I will on November 4, 2010, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auc-

tion to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property known as 66275 Barr Road, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, A parcel of land being a portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼) of Section 7, Township 16 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying West of Lower Bridge Market Road, being further described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼) of said Section 7; thence East along the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼), 330 feet to a point; thence South 660 feet to a point; thence West 330 feet to a point on the West line of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼) of said Section 7; thence North along said West line 660 feet to the point of beginning. AND ALSO a parcel of land situated in the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼) of said Section 7, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point, a No. 5 steel rod set along the North-South Center Quarter line of Section 7 from which the Center Quarter corner of Section 7 bears South 00°1216'15" East, 656.66 feet; thence South 89°1238'45" East, 330.00 feet

to a No. 5 steel rod; thence South 00°1216'15" East, 132.00 feet to a point; thence North 89°1238'45" West, 330.00 feet to a point along the North-South Center Quarter line; thence along said Center Quarter line North 00°1206'15" West, 132.00 feet to a point of beginning. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated September 8, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, recovered General Judgment Based on Foreclosure on August 11, 2010, against KARI L. HUTCHENS as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON, Deschutes County Sheriff. By Rebecca Brown, Civil Technician. Published in Bend Bulletin: Date of First and Successive Publications: September 29, 2010; October 6, 2010; Oc-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25837-5 Loan No.: 0145745998 Title No.: 4452398 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Randy S. Vanpoole and Lori A. Vanpoole, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 01/31/2007, recorded on 02/06/2007 as Document No. 2007-07790, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot Thirteen (13), Block Six (6), Tamarack Park East, Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon, except a tract of land located in Block 6, Tamarack Park East IV, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon: That portion of Lot 13 of said Block 6, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 13; thence along the boundary between Lots Twelve (12) and Thirteen (13), East, 90.00 feet; thence along the Easterly boundary of said Phase IV, North, 3.00 feet; thence leaving said boundary South 88º 5' 27" West, 90.05 feet, to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. Account No.: 174356 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2936 NE Deborah Court, Bend, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,482.23 beginning 02/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $227,981.64 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.500% per annum from 01/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/01/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, at the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 7-19-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 202023, 10/06/10, 10/13/10, 10/20/10, 10/27/10 )

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KATHLEEN A. WANDA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SUNSET MORTGAGE CO. A OREGON CORPROATION, as Beneficiary, dated 12/28/2006, recorded 1/3/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-00384,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251170 LOT 15, REDSIDE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. A.P.N.: 251170 Commonly known as: 209 NW 27TH CT. REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,002.50 Monthly Late Charge $50.13 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $188,706.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/26/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/26/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/27/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 9/20/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Delwyn P. Schulze, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Co Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated November 10, 2005, recorded November 21, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-80255 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Real property in the county of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: unit no. 3 in Stage I of Fairway Village Condominiums, more fully described in the condominium declaration for Fairway Village Condominiums, recorded August 08, 1986 in Book 129, Page 1086, Deschutes County Records, as amended or supplemented by amendments or supplemental condominium declarations recorded in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon, together with general and limited elements appertaining to said unit therein described. Commonly known as: 17732 West Core Road Sunriver OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,505.62 Monthly Late Charge $75.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $237,051.44 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3745823 10/06/2010, 10/13/2010, 10/20/2010, 10/27/2010

R-341342 09/29, 10/06, 10/13, 10/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9112 T.S. No.: 1296091-09.


F6 Wednesday, October 6, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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tober 13, 2010. Date of Last Publication: October 20, 2010. Attorney: Nancy K. Cary, OSB #902254, Hershner Hunter, LLP, PO Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440, (541) 686-8511. Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE The State of Oregon, by and through its Department of Transportation, is offering for sale, property located at 907 Highland Avenue, Redmond, OR 97756. The parcel is 4,887 sq. ft. more or less, and has a 2,136 sq. ft., one and a half story log, commercial structure that was constructed in 1978. Sale will be by sealed bid. The minimum bid is: $130,000. Offers must be received by 4:00 PM on Tuesday, November 2, 2010. No fax bids will be accepted. Bids must be submitted to State of Oregon, 355 Capitol Street NE, Room 420, Salem OR 97301. The State of Oregon has the right to reject any and all bids. For further information, to obtain a bid form, or to present public comment, contact Property Agent Steve Eck, 503-986-3638. You may also visit our website at: www.odotproperty.com for complete information and forms. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031389257 T.S. No.: 10-10172-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRIAN KASHIMA as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS-

TRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-65019 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 114286 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THAT PORTION OF LOT 9 IN BLOCK 3 OF CAGLE SUBDIVISION, PLAT NO. 5, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 9 BEING ALSO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BURGESS ROAD AND ANTLER LANE; THENCE NORTHERLY 659 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE EAST 305 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 9; THENCE NORTH 165 FEET; THENCE WEST 305 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 9; THENCE SOUTH 165 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 52460 ANTLER LANE, LA PINE, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,149.83 Monthly Late Charge $51.04 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 246,607.07 together with interest thereon at the rate of

4.17100 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25926-5 Loan No.: 0205065022 Title No.: 4457147 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Gerald Lentz, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 02/20/2007, recorded on 02/28/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-12075, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A parcel of land located in Section 18, Township 18 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: The South half of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter (S1/2 NW1/4 SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 18. Account No.: 112571 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61050 Sum View Drive, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,426.86 beginning 12/01/2009, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $376,371.38 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 11/01/2009, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/01/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 7-19-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 202022, 10/06/10, 10/13/10, 10/20/10, 10/27/10 )

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-99694

FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com / AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enrique ASAP# 3748841 09/29/2010, 10/06/2010, 10/13/2010, 10/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030931802 T.S. No.: 10-10173-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CLAIN G. CAMPAGNA, JACQUELINE L. CAMPAGNA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on January 18, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-03354 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 118904 LOT 18 AND THE WEST 5 FEET OF LOT 19, BLOCK 27, BONNE HOME ADDITION TO BEND. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1550 NW ELGIN AVENUE, BEND,

OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,319.02 Monthly Late Charge $58.52 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 216,080.76 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby

secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons â-¡wing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 21, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Javier Vasquez, Jr. ASAP# 3748416 10/06/2010, 10/13/2010, 10/20/2010, 10/27/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25925-5 Loan No.: 0207309238 Title No.: 4457146 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Tammy R. Lake, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 11/15/2007, recorded on 11/26/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-61195, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 50 of Pines at Pilot Butte Phase 5, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 207856 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1649 NE Lotus Drive #1 & #2, Bend, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,844.52 beginning 02/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $219,402.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 01/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/01/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 7-20-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 202021, 10/06/10, 10/13/10, 10/20/10, 10/27/10 )

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0022 T.S. No.: 1289625-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CRAIG S. ACHATZ, BARBARA A. ACHATZ, AND CARRIE J. ACHATZ, NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, FSB, A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/26/2009, recorded 2/12/2009, under Instrument No. 2009-06027, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 12, CHESTNUT PARK, PHASE 1, IN THE CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20334 SHETLAND LOOP BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of September 13, 2010 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,200.08 each $4,800.32 (06-01-10 through 09-13-10) Late Charges: $140.49 Beneficiary Advances: $31.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,971.81 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $168,878.68, PLUS interest thereon at 5.125% per annum from 05/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 5.125% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on January 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 9/13/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION TRUSTEE By JEAN GREAGOR, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Marilyn J. Stoner and Rick H. Evans, as Grantor to Ameri Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated February 06, 2007, recorded February 09, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-08489 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot seventeen (17), Williamsburg Park, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 63387 NE Freedom Place Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,940.54 Monthly Late Charge $97.02. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $314,903.33 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 7, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3734695 09/22/2010, 09/29/2010, 10/06/2010, 10/13/2010

R-341658 09/29/10, 10/06, 10/13, 10/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $589,065.07. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL-BE-MAILED- TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registrations Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc. and its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated September 1, 2005, recorded September 9, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-60688, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: See Exhibit A for Legal Description: Exhibit "A": PARCEL, 1: In Township 17 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section 33: Commencing at a point whence the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4) of said Section 33 bears South 00°00'48" West, 387.95 feet; thence South 89°49'51" East, 30.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 89°49'51" East, 825.38 feet; thence South 01°44'31" East, 388.17 feet; thence North 89°49'51 " West, 837.28 feet; thence North 00°00'48" East, 387.95 feet to the true point of beginning and the terminus of this description. TOGETHER WITH that portion conveyed in deed recorded June 23, 1995 in Book 376 Page 2948, Official Records, described as follows: A parcel of land located in the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) Section Thirty-three (33), described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 33; thence South 00°03'41 " West, 1321.25 feet along the West line of said Section 33 to the North 1/16 corner between Sections 32 and 33, a 5/8 inch iron rod, the true point of beginning; thence South 89°19'06" East along the South line of the NW1/4NW1/4, 207.94 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod; thence leaving said line South 06°54'40" East, 2.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence South 89°51'04" West, 208.19 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod on the West line of said Section 33; thence North 00°17'01" East along said West line, 5.00 feet to the point of beginning and terminus thereof. PARCEL II: A tract of land located in the Southwest One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW1/4NW1/4) of Section Thirty-three (33), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the said Southwest One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW 1/4NW 1/4) of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW 1/4NW 1/4 South 89°48'24" East, 208.28 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 89°48'24" East, 355.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 00°01'27" East, 2.42 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89°33'37" West, 354,90 feet; thence North 07°02'47" West, 0.90 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. And commencing at the Northwest corner of the said SW 1/4NW 1/4 of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW 1/4NW 1/4 South 89°48'24" East, 563.28 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 89°48'24" East, 304.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 01°41'38" East, 3.73 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89°33'37" West, 304.12 feet, thence North 00°01'27" West, 2.42 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 4/1/2010 through 8/21/2010: 5 payment(s) at $2335.62; Total Payments:$11,678.10; Late Charges: 4 late charge(s) at $116.78, for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date - Total Late Charges $467.12; THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED:$12,145.22; 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $589,065.07 as of August 3, 2010. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on December 8, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: August 6, 2010. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for November 24, 2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month and one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than November 8, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe to your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice.


Bulletin Daily Paper 10/06/10