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CRATER LAKE

Dog cast out as car falls, rolls 1,100 feet into water

Bend-La Pine school officials seek new way to help students

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Helicopters and possibly rappelling crews will fish crumpled pieces of a Volkswagen out of Crater Lake and its rocky caldera, after the car rolled off an overlook and fell 1,100 feet. While the driver and passenger were safely outside of the car at the time, their dog Haley was trapped inside as the vehicle fell down the steep caldera wall. The Dingo-Akita mix escaped with only minor injuries. She was ejected through the sunroof and then climbed 600 feet up the rocky slope to her owner, according to a news release from the National Park Service. The accident happened Saturday evening, as Shauna McHugh and Tobias Swanson, of Ashland, parked their 2003 VW Passat near the North Junction Scenic Overlook. “Apparently some folks were visiting the park and enjoying the view, but failed to set their emergency brake,” said Marsha McCabe, spokeswoman for Crater Lake National Park. And the car started to roll across the parking area. “There’s a rock wall, but there’s also a section where there isn’t,” McCabe said. The car “just happened to go down the one slot that would allow it to go through.” See Crater Lake / A5

“Apparently some folks were visiting the park and enjoying the view, but failed to set their emergency brake.” — Marsha McCabe, spokeswoman, Crater Lake National Park

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Vol. 107, No. 260, 70 pages, 7 sections

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By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

100 years young J

ack Edlefsen, above, receives a high-five from 4-year-old Max Hardgrave during his 100th birthday celebration at the Ath-

letic Club of Bend on Thursday.

When Jared Lewis took over as Forrest Ramsay’s guardian three years ago, he knew he’d be stretching his paychecks a bit further each month. And since the 16-year-old plays football and lacrosse for Summit High School, he required more than just the usual back-to-school gear; he needed football pads and cleats and a $100 pay-to-participate fee that all high school students in Bend-La Pine Schools must fork over for activities and athletics. “It got to the point where little things were a big deal,” Lewis said. “But athletics is huge to him, football and lacrosse especially.” During the 2009-10 school year, Lewis was determined to pay for the incidentals on his own. But this year, he sought out a scholarship for the payto-participate fee from the Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools. That scholarship, though small, has allowed the family a little breathing room. “We’re counting every single penny. This gave me the ability to breathe a little easier,” Lewis said. See Scholarships / A4

Right, Edlefsen poses for a picture on the rowing machine for Prapin Manomaivibool. Manomaivibool, who met Edlefsen in Seattle in 1968, flew in from Bangkok for his 100th birthday.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Deschutes Sheriff’s Office logging more search hours By Erin Golden The Bulletin

If you got lost while hiking this summer in Central Oregon, you weren’t alone. Not yet nine months into the year, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue volunteers have already logged “The commonality more than 23,000 hours we would find — more than in the full calendar year of 2009, in most of our when volunteers put in a searches is total of 19,000 hours. Missions completed that people are this year include fire not necessarily evacuations, body recoveries and rescues of properly equipped.” people who were injured — Lt. Scott Shelton, while enjoying the outDeschutes County doors. The largest number of calls, however, Sheriff’s Office were for hikers, snowshoers and others who somehow ran into trouble and couldn’t find their way back to where they started. See Search / A5

10 essentials for exploring the outdoors 1) Tools for navigation: a map and compass, a GPS — if you know how to use it and pack plenty of batteries 2) Sun protection, including sunglasses, sunscreen and a hat 3) Layers of clothing that will help you stay warm and dry, usually made of synthetic materials 4) A headlamp and flashlight — and enough batteries to power them 5) First-aid supplies, including bandages and any medications you are currently taking 6) Matches, a lighter or

candle stubs and materials to start a fire 7) Tools for making repairs, like a Swiss Army knife 8) High-energy foods, like energy bars; fats, jerky and high-protein bars are a bad idea 9) At least 1 liter of water for a short day hike and 2.5 liters for an all-day trip; bring extra water for extreme temperatures 10) Materials for an emergency shelter, including a large, bright plastic tarp, space blanket and a few large plastic trash bags Source: Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue

‘Barefoot Bandit’ reward as elusive as Washington fugitive By Erik Lacitis The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — It’s Kenny the security guard calling again from the Bahamas, wondering if there is any news on that $10,000 FBI reward for catching Colton Harris-Moore, not to mention several thousand more in private reward money. The FBI still is pondering it, Kenny, and “coordinating with the Royal Bahamas Police Force.” With each phone call, Kenny Strachan sounds more and more dejected. Wasn’t he the one who spotted the Barefoot Bandit about midnight July 11, running on the dock toward the Romora Bay Resort and Marina in Harbour Island? Wasn’t he the one who ran alongside the 19-yearold, who was holding a 9 mm handgun, trying to persuade him to surrender? Wasn’t he the one who, after Harris-Moore ran off into the bushes, called the cops on his cell phone? That, he says, surely was information leading to the arrest of Harris-Moore. Strachan tried his best to point out the facts as he saw them, giving by his count some 20 interviews to the media that descended on the island. But there are problems. It turns out that a number of other people also have applied for the reward money. And figuring out who gets the money could prove nearly as difficult as catching the elusive HarrisMoore, who now sits in a SeaTac jail. See Barefoot / A4

Boy Scouts shield abuser files used to vet volunteers By Scott K. Parks The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — The Boy Scouts of America calls them the “perversion files.” The stories locked inside a neat row of metal file cabinets at BSA headquarters in Irving would sicken the most callous reader. Many of them document the activities of a pedophile banned from Scouting for mo-

lesting boys in tents, on hikes or while helping them earn merit badges. The BSA, the nation’s premier youth organization, its wholesome image honed by iconic Norman Rockwell paintings throughout the 20th century, has meticulously kept the files since the 1920s. They number in the thousands, but no one knows much about them because Scout exec-

utives and their lawyers insist they remain confidential. Now, a growing chorus of critics is calling on the Scouts to open their sexual secrets to public scrutiny. They argue that the files contain a treasure trove of misdeeds that academic researchers and law enforcement might use to learn more about manon-boy pedophilia. See Boy Scouts / A4

Attorneys Kelly Clark, left, and Paul Mones sit among the files that the Boy Scouts of America have maintained on pedophiles in Portland. Mike Davis Dallas Morning News


A2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Many who risked lives recording explosions died from radiation By William J. Broad

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New York Times News Service

They risked their lives to capture on film hundreds of blinding flashes, rising fireballs and mushroom clouds. The blast from one detonation hurled a man and his camera into a ditch. When he got up, a second wave knocked him down again. Then there was radiation. While many of the scientists who made atom bombs during the Cold War became famous, the men who filmed what happened when those bombs were detonated made up a secret corps. Their existence and the nature of their work has emerged from the shadows only since the federal government began a concerted effort to declassify their films about a dozen years ago. In all, the moviemakers fashioned 6,500 secret films, according to federal officials. Today, the result is a surge in fiery images on television and movie screens, as well as growing public knowledge about the filmmakers. The images are getting “seared into people’s imaginations,” said Robert Norris, author of “Racing for the Bomb.” They bear witness, he added, “to extraordinary and terrifying power.” As for the cameramen, there aren’t that many left. “Quite a few have died from cancer,” George Yoshitake, 82, one of the survivors, said of his peers in an interview. “No doubt it was related to the testing.” The cinematographers focused on nuclear test explosions in the Pacific and Nevada. Electrified wire ringed their headquarters in the Hollywood Hills. The inconspicuous building, on Wonderland Avenue in Laurel Canyon, had a sound stage, screening rooms, processing labs, animation gear, film vaults and a staff of more than 250 producers,

A photograph is taken at the exact moment the shock wave from a nuclear explosion reaches a group of cameramen at a Nevada test site in this 1957 image. directors and cameramen — all with top-secret clearances. When made, the films served as vital sources of information for scientists investigating the nature of nuclear arms and their destructiveness. Some movies also served as tutorials for federal and congressional leaders. Today, arms controllers see the old films as studies in gung-ho paranoia. “They have this very odd voice,” said Mark Sugg, a film producer at the World Security Institute, a private group in Washington. “You and I would be appalled that some hydrogen bomb vaporized a corner of what used to be paradise. But they’ve got a guy bragging about it.” A 2006 book, “How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb,” explores the nature of the cameramen’s secretive enterprise, its pages full of declassified photographs and

“They’re kind of unrecognized patriots. The images that they captured will, for a long time, be a snapshot of what our last century was like.” — Peter Kuran, author, “How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb” technical diagrams. “They’re kind of unrecognized patriots,” said Peter Kuran, the book’s author and a special-effects filmmaker in Hollywood. “The images that they captured will, for a long time, be a snapshot of what our last century was like.” The secret film unit, estab-

lished in 1947 by the military, was known as the Lookout Mountain Laboratory. The lab, just minutes from the Sunset Strip, drew on Hollywood talent and technology to pursue its clandestine ends. “The neighbors were suspicious because the lights were on all night long,” Yoshitake recalled. Film historians say the unit tested many technologies that Hollywood later embraced, including advanced lenses and cameras, films and projection techniques. The cameramen fanned out to governmental test sites in the South Pacific and the Nevada desert, their job to chronicle the age’s fury. It put them as close as two miles from the blasts. The visual records helped scientists do everything from estimating the size of nuclear detonations to measuring their destruc-

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

tive power. Mock towns went up in flames. Yoshitake recalled documenting what a fiery explosion did to pigs — whose skin resembles that of humans. “Some were still squealing,” he said. “You could smell the meat burning. It made you sick. I thought, ‘Oh, how terrible. If they were humans they would have suffered terribly.’” The cameramen were allowed to simply witness, not photograph, their first hydrogen bomb explosions, which were roughly 1,000 times more powerful than atomic blasts. The goal was to get them accustomed to the level of violence. “The purple glow in the sky — that was so eerie,” Yoshitake recalled. “And we were not even close, about 20 miles way. It filled the whole sky.” The guarded enterprise lost its subject matter in 1963 when the superpowers agreed to move all testing of nuclear weapons underground, ending the spectacle of atmospheric blasts and what governments had come to regard as serious risks to human health from radioactive fallout. Late in 1997, an event in Hollywood at the American Film Institute honored the filmmakers. Present were some two dozen of the survivors. “You had to have the cameras running before the detonation,” Douglas Wood, 75, a cinematographer, told a reporter at the gathering. If not, he said, the blinding flash “would burn the film and jam the film gate.” Today, the Energy Department says it has released publicly some 100 movies from the vast stockpile, which the military controls. “What you see is what we have,” said Darwin Morgan, a department spokesman in Las Vegas. A page on the department’s website features links to clips from the films that visitors can view free of charge and sells full versions for $10, plus shipping. It calls them “an enduring, awesome visual documentation of the power and destruction of nuclear weapons.” Many are available free on YouTube under the search heading “declassified U.S. nuclear test film.”

Views of an “Operation Cue” structure being destroyed at a Nevada test site, in a 1955 handout image. Photos courtesy of How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb via New York Times News Service

.

Study on former pimps finds that most endured abuse as children Chicago Tribune CHICAGO — Most of the two dozen former pimps and madams questioned by DePaul University researchers for a study on Chicago’s sex trade had suffered both physical and sexual abuse as children. The study, “From Victims to Victimizers: Interviews with 25 ex-pimps in Chicago,” by researcher Jody Raphael and Brenda Myers-Powell, found 88 percent of those surveyed suffered physical abuse growing up, while 76 percent endured sexual abuse. In many cases, the abuse forced them to leave home early and turn to pimping to survive. The majority also traded sex for money before becoming pimps, Raphael said. Of the 25 former pimps interviewed, seven were women, nearly all of whom had been victims of violence and prostitution. Myers-Powell, who spent more than 20 years as a prostitute, works as peer coordinator for Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart’s prostitution intervention team and does advocacy work through the Dream Catcher Foundation, which helps victims of prostitution. For the study, she spent about two hours interviewing each former pimp. Each was paid $250.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

T S Abbas ready to continue peace talks By Mark Landler New York Times News Service

“We all know there is no alternative to peace other than negotiating peace, so we have no alternative but to continue peace efforts.”

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s arms control treaty with Russia advanced to the Senate floor with bipartisan support Thursday, giving it a major boost toward ratification despite

the election-year polarization that has divided the parties over so many other issues. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 14-4 to approve the treaty known as New START, with three Republicans joining Democrats after negotiating an ac-

companying resolution addressing conservative concerns about missile defense and modernization of the nuclear arsenal. The treaty would bar each side from deploying more than 1,550 strategic nuclear warheads or 700 launchers starting seven years af-

ter final ratification. Perhaps just as significantly, it would establish a new inspection and monitoring regime to replace the long-standing program that lapsed last year with the expiration of the first Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty of 1991, or START.

EUROPE

Roma, on the move, test ‘open borders’ By Suzanne Daley New York Times News Service

Chris Clark / The Associated Press

Pope Benedict XVI greets Maria Pyszczak, who has been held up to his popemobile as he arrives at Bellahouston Park, in Glasgow, Scotland, prior to a Papal Mass on Thursday. Pope Benedict XVI is on a four-day visit, the first-ever state visit by a Pope to Britain.

Pope critical of church abuse crisis By Rachel Donadio and Alan Cowell New York Times News Service

GLASGOW — Pope Benedict XVI arrived Thursday in Scotland, offering his strongest criticism yet of the Roman Catholic Church’s handling of the sexual abuse crisis, saying church leaders had not been “sufficiently vigilant” or “sufficiently swift and decisive” in cracking down on abusers. While Benedict was received graciously by Queen Elizabeth II in Edinburgh and thousands turned out for an open-air Mass in Glasgow, the visit was taking place under the dark shadow of the sexual abuse scandals, which have shaken even the faithful in

nearby Ireland, in his native Germany and elsewhere in Europe. Perhaps mindful of such criticism, Benedict told reporters on his flight from Rome that the church’s “first interest is the victims” of abuse, and that the church needed to ask, “How can we repair, what can we do to help them to overcome the trauma, to refind their lives?”

Critics: Words ‘hollow’ Responding in Italian to reporters’ questions submitted in advance and relayed to him by Vatican officials, the pope’s words marked an evolution in the Vatican’s response. In the heat of

the crisis last spring, top Vatican officials at first blamed the news media for stirring it up. In a statement, the United Statesbased group Bishopaccountability .org, which tracks abuse cases, said the pontiff’s words “ring hollow,” adding that he had said similar things for years with little action. Benedict’s visit to Britain comes as part of his sustained effort to counter a perceived loss of religious belief in Europe and to urge a new struggle against secularism. Benedict’s is the first state visit to Britain by a pope in which he is meeting the queen and political establishment as a fellow head of state.

BUCHAREST, Romania — This city is full of stark, Soviet-era housing blocks, and the grimmest among them — gray towers of one-room apartments with communal bathroom and no hot water — are given over to the Roma population. Roma like Maria Murariu, 62, who tends to her dying husband in a foul-smelling room no bigger than a jail cell. She has not found work in five years. “There is not much for us in Romania,” she said recently, watching her husband sleep. “And now that we are in the European Union, we have the right to go to other countries. It is better there.” Thousands of Romania’s Roma, also known as Gypsies, have come to a similar conclusion in recent years, heading for the relative wealth of Western Europe, and setting off a clash within the European Union over just how open its “open borders” are. A summit meeting of European leaders Thursday degenerated into open discord over how to handle the unwanted immigrants. President Nicolas Sarkozy of France vowed to keep dismantling immigrant camps and rejected complaints from European Commission officials that the French authorities were illegally singling out Roma for deportation. Migration within the 27 nations of the European Union has become a combustible issue during the economic downturn. The union’s latest expansion, which brought in the relatively poor nations of Romania and Bulgaria in 2007, has renewed concern that the poor, traveling far from home in search of work, will become a burden on wealthier countries.

Census: Poverty jumped in 2009 By Erik Eckholm New York Times News Service

The percentage of Americans struggling below the poverty line in 2009 was the highest it has been in 15 years, the Census Bureau reported Thursday, and interviews with poverty experts and aid groups said the increase appeared to be continuing this year. With the country in its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, 4 million additional Americans found themselves in poverty in 2009, with the total reaching 44 million, or one in seven residents. Millions more were getting by only because of expanded unemployment and other assistance. The share of residents in poverty climbed to 14.3 percent in 2009, the highest level recorded since 1994. The rise was steepest for children, with one in five affected, the bureau said. For a single adult in 2009, the poverty line was $10,830 in pretax cash income; for a family of four, $22,050. The Census study found an 11.6 percent increase in the number of such multifamily households over the past two years. There are strong signs that

the high poverty numbers have continued into 2010 and are probably still rising, some experts said, as the recovery sputters and unemployment remains near 10 percent. One indirect sign of continuing hardship is the rise in food stamp recipients, who now include nearly one in seven adults and an even greater share of the nation’s children. While other factors as well as declining incomes have driven the rise, by

mid-2010 the number of recipients had reached 41.3 million, compared with 39 million at the beginning of the year. The Census report showed increases in poverty for whites, blacks and Hispanic Americans, with historic disparities continuing. The poverty rate for non-Hispanic whites was 9.4 percent, for blacks 25.8 percent and for Hispanics 25.3 percent. The rate for Asians was unchanged at 12.5 percent.

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AMMAN, Jordan — After two days of difficult peace negotiations with Israel over the issue of Jewish settlements, the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, sounded a modestly positive note Thursday, declaring that he saw no alternative but to keep talking. The Palestinians have threatened to walk out of the talks if Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu did not extend a partial moratorium on the construction of settlements, something he has refused to do. While Abbas’ comments did not rule out the possibility of a walkout, he appeared ready to soldier on, having spent hours in talks with Netanyahu at the State Department, at a Red Sea resort in Egypt, and most recently at the prime minister’s residence in Jerusalem. “We all know there is no alternative to peace other than negotiating peace, so we have no alternative but to continue peace efforts,” Abbas said before meeting Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the Palestinian Authority’s headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah. There were indications of growing support, by both the United States and Egypt, for an option that would extend the moratorium for three months, during which the two sides would try to resolve their differences over border issues — a step that would help defuse the settlement dispute, because it would be easier to determine the sites for future building. In an interview with Channel 10, an Israeli television station, Clinton said, “Where we sit now it would be useful for some extension, it would be extremely useful, and I don’t think a limited extension would undermine the process going forward if there were a decision agreed to by both parties that, ‘Look, this is it, this is our last effort to try to do this.’”

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A4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Barefoot

Scholarships

Continued from A1 Besides Strachan, among those known to have applied for the reward is Jared Johnson, who captains a water taxi — one of many boats that for $5 ferries passengers between Eleuthera Island and Harbour Island. A taxicab driver, Frederick “Fine Threads” Neely, says he made the claim on behalf of Johnson. Neely says that Johnson saw Harris-Moore in a skiff near the water taxi stand on Eleuthera. As happens with some frequency, the phone system was down on the island, says Neely, and so Johnson drove to the police station and made the report. That was the first eyewitness report that Harris-Moore had managed to make his way from Abaco — the island where he had crash-landed a stolen Cessna — to Eleuthera, some 40 miles south. “Until then, nobody knew he was here,” says Neely, making the case for Johnson. Ronald Billiot, captain of the 92-foot-yacht Picasso; Jordan Sackett, son of the yacht’s owner, Richard Sackett; and Pat Young, captain of another yacht are also attempting to claim the award. The Picasso was docked at the Romora Bay when Harris-Moore was spotted on the dock. In fact, security cameras on the yacht caught the Barefoot Bandit on video. When Harris-Moore stole a powerboat on the dock and took off, leaving the Bahamian cops standing there, they looked for somebody with a boat to give chase. Richard Sackett, of New Orleans, agreed to let them use a 27-foot Boston Whaler he also had at the dock. “Who was there? Who made it able for the officers to catch him? We put ourselves in danger. We knew he had a gun,” says Jordan Sackett. At the very least, says Richard Sackett, “it’d have been nice” if the FBI had written the three young men “a nice thank you letter ... what a great example of American citizenship and youth.”

Continued from A1 But not everyone has been so lucky. The foundation expects to hand out about $25,000 in activities fees scholarships in the 2010-11 school year, but foundation administrators worry that won’t be anywhere near enough to cover the need. During the 2009-10 school year, the Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools handed out $20,000 worth of activity fee scholarships. It received more than $47,000 worth of requests. “(2009-10) was the first year since the inception of the program that we have not been able to meet the need,” said Executive Director Heather Vihstadt. “It’s definitely a sign of the times.” The fees, primarily for athletics but for some activities that are not

Boy Scouts Continued from A1 “These files represent the largest reservoir of information ever gathered on the sexual abuse of boys in the United States, bar none,” said Paul Mones, an Oregon lawyer who represents former Scouts who suffered sexual abuse at the hands of adult Scoutmasters. “Even before the pediatric medical community and the law enforcement community knew the extent of the problem, the Boy Scouts knew about it and kept it a secret,” Mones said. Another lawyer, from Seattle, who also represents former Scouts in sex abuse cases against the BSA, provided The Dallas Morning News with a hint of what the files contain — spreadsheets indexing 5,133 files opened between 1947 and 2005. The News has not seen the actual files. The Scouts insist the information be kept confidential to protect those who report sexual abuse from retaliation, to shield child victims from exposure and to protect the Scouts from defamation claims brought by suspected pedophiles named in the files. Scouting executives say the perversion files represent a tiny fraction of the millions of adult volun-

extensions of the classroom, are $100 for high school students and $40 for middle school students. Those fees increased during the 2009-10 school year from $65 and $28 in the 2008-09 school year. Beginning this fall, the district will require families to contribute at least 25 percent of the fee; as a result, the foundation’s scholarships will, except in special cases, cover just 75 percent of the fee. “There are those families who even that 25 percent would be difficult to acquire,” Vihstadt said. “In those circumstances, when families can’t make that 25 percent, (the school) will waive it for that child.” The idea to charge a small amount came from La Pine High School, which has long had the policy of paying $25 for the privilege to play a sport or participate in an activity. “The families and kids are a little more invested and more

teers involved in Scouting over the years, and they contend that the pedophile problem is no worse in Scouting than in public schools or in other youth organizations. The BSA also insists the files hold no value for academic or law enforcement researchers hoping to gain greater insight into pedophilia. “Accordingly, while local Boy Scout councils are required to report any suspicion of inappropriate conduct to law enforcement, The BSA believes — and third parties have confirmed — that the files are not useful from a research perspective,” Scout executives wrote in a prepared statement.

‘I.V. files’ Formally, the Scouts refer to the files as “the ineligible volunteer files,” or the “I.V. files.” Each one is labeled with the name of a Scoutmaster, Cub Scout den leader or other adult volunteer who has been banned from Scouting for wrongdoing. Nathaniel Marshall, the Scout executive who keeps the files, says they are separated into six categories: — C-Criminal (murderers, robbers and such) — F-Financial (thieves who steal from the Scouts or others) — M-Moral (gays banned from

How to donate To donate to the Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools, you can send a check to P.O. Box 6566, Bend, OR 97708. For more information, e-mail Heather Vihstadt at educfund@ bend.k12.or.us or call 541-3225493 . Go to www.panthernation.org for more information on donating to Redmond High School’s Panther Nation Booster Club. committed to see through the program,” Vihstadt said. La Pine High Athletic Director Rusty Zysett said the policy helps with ownership. “It’s a little bit of ownership, a little bit of responsibility on them,” he said. “Another thing we do is if a student then quits, they’re responsible for the entire fee.”

Scouting) — L-Leadership (bad-tempered or mean volunteers) — R-Religious (atheists or agnostics banned from Scouting) — P-Perversion (pedophilia, rape, child pornography, public lewdness and other sex-related crimes or incidents) A few of the files involve men who never even made it into Scouting. Their misdeeds were noted by local Scout executives, and a file was opened just in case they ever applied to get involved in Scouting. But the vast majority of the I.V. files involve pedophile adult volunteers and some paid Scout leaders. They run the gamut from those only suspected of wrongdoing to those serving prison time after criminal convictions. Some files are thin, with only basic information about the pedophile. Others are thick and stuffed with court records, witness statements and other investigative material. Scout executives say they use the perversion files for only one reason: to keep pedophiles or other sexual deviants out of Scouting. When someone attempts to register as an adult volunteer, the application goes to the membership office. Clerks make sure the prospective volunteer is not someone named in an I.V. file.

The foundation has an allocations committee. When the foundation cannot pay for all the requests it receives, the committee tries to allocate funds based on the free and reduced lunch numbers at each school. A school with a higher percentage of students receiving free and reduced lunch will likely receive more activity fee scholarships. This year, the foundation plans to hand out about $25,000 in scholarships, in part because it received funds raised in the 2010 Great Rotary Duck Race. That still might not be enough. And it’s not just in Bend-La Pine that schools are seeing an increased need. At Redmond High School, students pay $150 for up to two sports or activities sanctioned by the Oregon School Activities Association. If students are on free or reduced lunch, they pay discounted fees of $75 or $25. Redmond Athletic Director

Brent Walsh has seen those applications rise over the past three years. “Obviously that’s decreased revenue,” Walsh said. “But our booster club has gotten much stronger, and they’re helping offset some of that cost.” Still, like most districts, Redmond could use more athletic and activity funding. “It’s such a cultural part of school,” he said. “You think of filling out scholarship applications, right at the top they always say, ‘What athletics and activities did you do?’ If those opportunities are not there for kids, they’ll suffer a little bit.” That’s why sports are so important to Forrest and Lewis. “I love sports,” Forrest said. “If I couldn’t play, I’d definitely be upset.”

The BSA also performs criminal background checks for all volunteer applicants. Successful applicants are subject to background checks every three years.

reported the abuse — and then share them with experts to learn more about pedophilia and the effectiveness of Scout policies. In the mid-1980s, as their awareness of pedophilia grew, the Scouts instituted the “twodeep leadership” rule that forbids Scoutmasters and other volunteers to be alone with a Scout. And, yet, the Scouts acknowledge that they have never searched the I.V. files to see if the policy is working. Even child sexual abuse experts sympathetic to the BSA’s cause question their reluctance to share the files or expand their use. Dr. David Finkelhor, a wellknown expert in crimes against children, once was a member of the BSA’s Youth Protection Expert Advisory Panel, a working group of Scout executives and outsiders from academia and law enforcement. In April 2009, Finkelhor testified in a sworn deposition that he had become frustrated with Scout executives because they refused to allow him or anyone else to examine the perversion files to see if youth protection policies were working. “It never seemed to get on their agenda,” said Finkelhor, who runs the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.

System seems to work Notations in the file indices obtained by The News indicate the system often works. Pedophiles caught and banned by the BSA have tried to reapply to become Scoutmasters. But their applications have been denied for wrongdoings logged into the I.V. files. Scout executives say they’ve never analyzed the files or used them to generate statistics on pedophilia in Scouting. Nor have they used them to determine whether their policies to protect Scouts from pedophiles are working. Scout executives haven’t used the I.V. files to find the answers, but they insist they are aggressively pursuing improvements in their Youth Protection Program. “The more we learned about pedophilia, we got tuned in to that very quickly,” said James Terry, the assistant chief Scout executive. “We got serious about it.” Critics disagree. They say the Scouts could redact the I.V. files — black out the names of alleged pedophiles, victims and those who

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 A5

Police: Acid attack self-inflicted The Associated Press VANCOUVER, Wash. — A woman who gained sympathy worldwide after she claimed a random assailant threw acid on her face came forward Thursday with a startling admission: She inflicted the attack on herself. Vancouver Police Chief Clifford Cook said Bethany Storro admitted under police question-

Photos courtesy National Park Service

After the driver of a vehicle forgot to set the emergency brake, a 2003 Volkswagen Passat rolled into Crater Lake last weekend. A dog was inside at the time, but was ejected through the sunroof and survived with minor injuries.

Crater Lake Continued from A1 Haley was ejected as the car fell, according to the news release, and it took the dog 15 minutes to make it up the cliff. Swanson and McHugh could not be reached for comment Thursday night. This is the second documented case of a car rolling into the scenic lake — in October 1922, a Klamath Falls couple lost their new Lincoln near the Rim Village. Now park officials are determining exactly how to retrieve pieces of the Volkswagen, which fell apart as it crashed down the rocky slope. Debris, including the engine and personal items, scattered along the avalanche chute area, while other bits of the car, including several tires, ended up in a shallow section of the lake. “We’re still formulating the plan, but it’s probably going to be a two-phased process,” McCabe said. In the first phase, scheduled for next week, a helicopter will be brought in to lift up the heavy sections of the car from the lakeshore as well as the lake itself, where some parts are in 10 to 30 feet of water. The second phase will probably involve technical crews rappelling down the caldera wall to retrieve smaller sections of the car. Park officials are hoping to get the work done in the next week or two, before the snow starts to fall, McCabe said. Once that happens, it’s more likely that debris would wash into the pristine lake. McCabe added that the National Park Service was talking with the couple’s insurance company to determine how the cost of the car

Search Continued from A1 Lt. Scott Shelton, special services coordinator for the Sheriff’s Office, said officials have reviewed this year’s incidents to look for trends. They found no clear profile of a person who gets lost. But it was easy to spot one growing problem: People who venture out without the right supplies or skills, but think they’ll be fine as long as they’ve packed some gadgets. “Age-wise, it’s across the board, activity-wise, it’s across the board,” Shelton said. “The commonality we would find in most of our searches is that people are not necessarily properly equipped. They may have (Global Positioning System) devices or map and compass devices, but they don’t know how to use them or are inadequately trained.” This year, Deschutes County search and rescue crews have participated in 34 searches, which take an average of nine hours. Some missions require a handful of volunteers and one or two full-time staff from the Sheriff’s Office, while others can require dozens of volunteers, deputies and assistance from other law enforcement agencies. Shelton said search and rescue responds to any call that indicates that someone could be in trouble, even when there’s limited information to go on. In March, more than 30 people were involved in a search on Paulina Peak, near La Pine, after officials got reports of several radio transmissions from a person who needed help. Teams searched the area for hours but never found anyone. Most cases are a bit more clearcut, though not necessarily quick and easy to handle. Often, hikers who venture off a marked trail or take a wrong turn will call to report that they’re lost. In other cases, someone else will call to report that a hiker or group hasn’t returned home when they’d planned. Chris Sabo, the trails specialist with the Deschutes National Forest, said an increasing number of hikers who venture into the wilderness expect to see signs and clearly marked trails. When they find themselves in areas that are virtually untouched by development, they become confused about their location. “Folks are expecting ... maybe

A portion of the Passat is seen below the edge of an overlook where it fell 1,100 feet. recovery will be paid for. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

“If someone is relying on a cell phone to get them out of a pinch, right there that’s telling me they’re going out poorly equipped,” he said. “It’s not like calling up for a taxi ride.” — Lt. Scott Shelton, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

the Drake Park experience when they go up to Green Lakes or South Sister,” he said. In some cases, Sabo said, people rely on guidebooks that are no longer accurate because the Forest Service has not maintained trails or because fires have changed the landscape. But like Shelton, Sabo said the biggest problem lately seems to be hikers who leave home without the basics. “With the advent of electronics, people are losing those basic skills of orientation, being about to read a simple map,” he said. “It’s almost scary to see how many folks first off don’t have a map, and if they do, they’re not well-oriented to it.” Many people think they’ve covered their bases if they bring a GPS unit, but search and rescue teams frequently run into people who didn’t pack extra batteries — and didn’t bring a map as a backup. And a large number of people haven’t taken time to learn to use the technology they assume will keep them safe. At a recent gathering of search and rescue officials from around the state, Shelton said one team coordinator described rescuing the same person twice in the same year. The first time, the man had a GPS unit but didn’t know how to use it. After helping him find his way, volunteers showed him how to operate the device. Several months later, when he again called for help, he still didn’t know how to use the GPS. Shelton said many people wrongly believe that cell phones will be able to help searchers find them in the event of an emergency. “There are issues with (phone service) carriers, and it does not always guarantee you that be-

cause you have a phone and a phone signal that we’re going to be able to accurately, 100 percent of the time, pinpoint your location,” he said. Sabo said cell phones should be low on the list after other essential supplies. “If someone is relying on a cell phone to get them out of a pinch, right there that’s telling me they’re going out poorly equipped,” he said. “It’s not like calling up for a taxi ride.” Another problem: People often wait until the sun is beginning to set before notifying anyone that they need help. That means searchers could have to hike in and do their work in the dark, which can come with a good deal of risk. Shelton said people should bring enough supplies and clothing to prepare to camp out overnight, because in some cases rescue crews have to wait for daylight. “Ultimately, we have to take care of our own folks,” Shelton said. “If it’s an extremely hazardous situation, we have to evaluate before we can deploy.” Officials expect the number of calls to drop off as temperatures cool off and fewer people venture outdoors. Hunting season and snowfall can cause those numbers to pick back up. By year’s end, Shelton said he expects search and rescue volunteers will have put in well over 26,000 hours of work. Jim Ross, business manager at the Sheriff’s Office, said the increase in search and rescue calls hasn’t forced officials to dip into reserve funds — though they would if necessary. This year’s budget calls for $13,850 in training expenses, $30,000 for supplies and $23,900 for two new snowmobiles and a trailer. Expenses for fuel come out of the office’s general fuel budget. Shelton said he expects the year to be one of the busiest ever — despite the anomaly of a summer without any major water-related incidents. Last year, five people drowned in Central Oregon’s lakes and rivers. In addition, the body of a Bend man who went missing in Bend in August 2009 was recovered from the Deschutes River in June, and his cause of death was ruled to be drowning. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

ing to fabricating a story about the attack, in which she suffered severe burns. Cook said he did not know a motive for Storro’s actions, but added she is “very remorseful.” He said Storro was still being interviewed by detectives. The police chief said that “during the course of the investigation, several discrepancies

began to emerge regarding the alleged attack,” leading police to search her home earlier Thursday and interview her. “During the interview, Ms. Storro admitted the injuries were self-inflicted,” Cook said. Vancouver police Commander Marla Schuman said detectives were working on a way to return any money donated to Storro.


A6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


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Auto News You may not need to change your oil as often as you think, see Page B3.

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Local vendors have new place to sell at Bend Indoor Markets Owners hope that operating year-round facility ‘is going to spark some creativity in Bend’ By David Holley

Learn more

The Bulletin

For more information on the indoor market, visit www.bendindoormarkets .com. Contact Stephan or Jennifer White at bendindoormarkets@hotmail.com for information about becoming a vendor.

The market will operate year-round. “We’ve thought about it for a long time,” Stephen White said. The group was able to make it happen when the Scott Street building, formerly occupied by Freeman Motor Co. and owned by White, became vacant. “It is going to spark some creativity in Bend.” See Market / B5

BEND

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.88 • Union 76, 260 N.W. Fifth St., Madras. . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.92 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.94 • Texaco, 718 N.W. Columbia St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$2.96 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.98 • Texaco, 539 N.W. SIxth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00

DIESEL • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St., Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.09 • Chevron, 2100 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend . . . . . . .$3.20 • Texaco, 539 N.W. SIxth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.22 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

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When the colder weather of September and October comes around, the outdoor Central Oregon Saturday Market shuts down until the warmer months of spring and summer return. The dozens of vendors who participate in the outdoor market across from the library downtown now have a new way to hawk their wares during the winter: the Bend Indoor Markets, which will open on Sept. 25. More than 30 vendors have signed up for spaces in the indoor market, located at 50 S.E. Scott St., near Sparrow Bakery, and another 40 or so spaces are still available, said Stephan White, who is opening the market with his wife, Jennifer, and Cindy Palmer.

Indoor market coming The former Freeman Motor Co. site on Scott Street will be home to the Bend Indoor Markets starting Sept. 25. More than 30 vendors have signed up to participate in the year-round market. There’s room for up to 77.

Bend Indoor Markets

Tim Reynolds, owner of Above and Beyond Property Management of Bend, says there are a lot of goodquality rentals available at bargain prices. “I am optimistic about the rental market. There are a lot of people losing their homes who are going into the rental market, and investors are buying up those properties,” Reynolds said. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

As more people lose homes and become renters, Bend market stabilizes The Bulletin

Bend’s rental housing market continues to stabilize due in part to the misfortunes of people who lost their homes and are transitioning from homeowners to renters. “In single-family residential rentals, from the summer of 2009 to the summer of 2010, we have actually seen a decrease in vacancies and an increase in rental rates,”

said Lawnae Hunter, president of the Central Oregon Rental Owners Association. “People moving out of homes due to short sales or foreclosures are going into single-family rentals, because that is what they are used to,” Hunter said. Kevin Restine, general manager with Plus Property Management, also sees people who lost their homes due to the mortgage crisis and economic decline

Bend gets up to 2.5 million visits a year, study shows By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

For the first time, Bend has calculated how many tourist visits it gets each year: 1.5 million to 2.5 million. That’s according to results of a study by RRC Associates Inc. of Boulder, Colo., announced Thursday by Visit Bend. RRC counted each day a person spent in Bend as a tourist visit, according to Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend. For instance, if a family of four spent two days in Bend, that counted as eight tourist visits. If one person spent five days in Bend, that counted as five tourist visits, La Placa said. See Tourism / B2

moving into rental houses, which he said is turning out to be “the silver lining in an otherwise dark cloud” for property owners. “We see lots of folks, who have lost their homes due to different scenarios, who have long histories of paying their bills well. They have turned out to be very good tenants,” Restine said. See Renting / B5

Bright spots shine in 2 reports By Christopher S. Rugaber The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The economy may have a long way to go, but at least two big threats are fading. Economists are less worried that the U.S. will experience another round of mass layoffs and its first bout of deflation since the 1930s after the release of two government reports Thursday. The third drop in jobless claims in four weeks and a mild uptick in wholesale prices in August add to evidence that a second recession is unlikely. Concerns about another downturn intensified last month when jobless claims spiked past the half-million mark. Wholesale prices, meanwhile, fell in early summer for three straight months. But those trends have, for now, reversed themselves, leaving an economy that is still growing, but at a pace too slow to create many jobs. First-time applications for jobless benefits fell by 3,000 to a seasonally adjusted 450,000 last week, the lowest level in two months, the Labor Department said Thursday. See Economy / B2

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Congress wants tougher stance on China’s currency practices By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Congress is pressuring the Obama administration to take a tougher stance with China over trade practices that they say have cost Americans millions of jobs. Democrats and Republicans on committees in the Senate and House told Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Thursday that China is manipulating its currency. They said that and other practices have led to a huge trade gap between the two countries and job losses in the United States. Geithner said the administration was ready to work with Congress on an effective strategy. But he cautioned that the government should not take any action that would wind up hurting U.S. companies and businesses by triggering retaliation by China, an important trading partner.

Drew Angerer / New York Times News Service

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington on Thursday. Members of the Senate Banking Committee said they were frustrated because the administration failed to cite China as a currency manipulator in its latest report. Instead, the White House

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30-year mortgage rate rises for week The average interest rate on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages rose this week, but the rate on 15-year mortgages dipped slightly, according to Freddie Mac’s weekly survey. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.37 percent with an average 0.7 point for the week ended Thursday, up from 4.35 percent last week. Last year at this time, the rate averaged 5.04 percent. The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage this week averaged a record low of 3.82 percent with an average 0.6 point, down from 3.83 percent last week. A year ago, the rate averaged 4.47 percent. “Interest rates on 30-year fixed mortgages have remained below 5 percent for the last 19 weeks, giving people ample opportunity to refinance their existing mortgage debt,” said Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist at Freddie Mac, in a news release. — From staff and wire reports

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Visit Bend announced Thursday that Outdoor Research, a leader in the outdoor technical clothing and equipment industry, has chosen to hold its 2010 global sales meeting Nov. 2-4 at The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center and other locations throughout Bend. The conference is expected to attract more than 80 people from several countries for an average of five days, according to Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend. La Placa said the addition in recent years of the Riverhouse Convention Center, which he called a world-class facility, is helping lure conventions and business meetings like that for Outdoor Research. “Visit Bend is honored to play host to Outdoor Research and their sales force from around the world,” said Kevney Dugan, sports development manager for Visit Bend. “Anyone who has spent time in Bend understands the perfect marriage between the culture of Bend and the world-class outdoor recreation products of Outdoor Research.”

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took the same position as previous administrations in simply urging China to move faster to allow its currency to rise in value against the dollar. See China / B2


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Oregon farm income drops 41 percent in ‘09 By William McCall The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Farm income took a nosedive in Oregon last year, following a downward trend that began in 2004. Net income for farmers and ranchers fell 41 percent in 2009, a decline that a state agricultural analyst called “pretty staggering.” Brent Searle of the Oregon Department of Agriculture said

newly released figures showed Oregon net farm income at just under $563 million last year after hitting a record high of $1.3 billion in 2004. The number is based on U.S. Department of Agriculture figures and is considered an important indicator of the overall health of the agricultural economy in any state. Searle said the agricultural economy follows cyclical pat-

terns, so “a downturn isn’t anything new, but the magnitude of last year’s net farm income drop is significant.” Ken Holliday, a longtime rancher in Grant County in Eastern Oregon, said Thursday that he was not surprised by the decline. “As far as the economy goes for agriculture, it’s in the toilet,” Holliday said. “Nobody’s making any money. It’s just pitiful.”

New GM CEO expects it will take several years for U.S. to sell its stake By Bill Vlasic New York Times News Service

DETROIT — He is the fourth chief executive at General Motors in less than 18 months, but Daniel Akerson set out Thursday to show there is now stability at the top of the nation’s biggest automaker — and that his ascension signals a clear break with the past. “I’m not here for the short term,” Akerson said at a news briefing at the company’s headquarters here. In his first extended public comments since taking over on Sept. 1, Akerson said he was “the right guy at the right time” to rebuild GM in the aftermath of the government bailout. Akerson even distanced himself somewhat from his immediate predecessor, Edward Whitacre Jr., who held the chief executive job for just nine months and will step down in January as board chairman. Whitacre, for example, said in August that he wanted the Trea-

Fabrizio Costantini / New York Times News Service

Daniel Akerson, the chief executive of General Motors, attends a breakfast meeting with reporters at the company’s headquarters in Detroit on Thursday. sury Department to sell the government’s entire stake in GM in the company’s initial public stock offering, which is expected later this year.

Not going to happen, Akerson said. “I don’t think that’s going to be done in one fell swoop,” he said, suggesting it would take several years. “I think that’s unrealistic.”

China Continued from B1 American manufacturers contend that the Chinese currency is undervalued by as much as 40 percent. That has given Chinese companies a tremendous competitive advantage — making U.S. products more expensive in China and Chinese goods cheaper in the United States. Under a 1988 law, the Treasury Department is required to submit a currency report to Congress every six months and cite any country that it finds is manipulating its currency to gain trade advantages.

Growing frustration A number of senators complained that the Obama administration, like previous administrations, failed to identify China as a currency manipulator. “At a time when the U.S. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, China’s currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery,” Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said. “This administration refuses to try and take that boot off our neck.” Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., and Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama, the top Republican on the panel, both said they had grown frustrated listening to a string of administrations refuse to cite China as a currency manipulator. “The American public is tired of hearing about the sophisticated nuances of international diplomacy,” Shelby said. “They want the administration to fulfill its promise of balanced international trade.” Geithner said the administration was willing to work with Congress to toughen the law. But he stopped short of endorsing two bills in the House and Senate that would give the administration more power to sanction China on the currency issue. Supporters are pushing for

a vote before the November elections on a House bill sponsored by 143 members. The legislation would expand the definition of illegal government subsidies to include government currency manipulation. That would open the door to U.S. trade sanctions against Chinese products. Geithner said the administration was taking a “careful look” at the House bill. It wanted to determine whether it was consistent with America’s WTO obligations and whether it would produce the desired results of pushing China to stop undervaluing its currency.

Pushing for change During the marathon hearings Thursday, Geithner told both committees that the key point was for China to understand the growing frustration in the United States. China has made some changes. Starting last week, its central bank has allowed the currency, the yuan, to rise more in value against the dollar. That followed an announcement in June that it would allow more flexibility in the currency. Still, Geithner said those changes have had little impact. The currency has risen by only 1.5 percent against the dollar in the past three months, he said. He did not indicate whether the administration might cite China in the next currency report, due on Oct. 15. But he stressed that the administration was looking for more movement than it has seen so far. “We would have to see a very substantial change over time for that judgment to change,” Geith-

SOCIAL SECURITY 101 Everything you wanted to know. Attend a FREE workshop by the Social Security Administration presented by Allan Edwards, Public Affairs Specialist* WHEN:

Economy Continued from B1 Despite the drop, initial claims for unemployment benefits are above levels that would signal a hiring boom. In a healthy economy, claims usually fall below 400,000. And some companies are still letting workers go — FedEx announced Thursday it would be cutting 1,700 jobs. Still, applications for unemployment benefits have dropped nearly 11 percent in the past month. Chris Rupkey, an economist at Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, said last month’s spike in claims was a “false alarm.” “The labor markets are stable, and companies are not increasing layoffs,” he said in a note to clients.

Tourism Continued from B1 Visit Bend paid RRC $1,500 to conduct the study to add to data about tourism’s importance to Bend’s economy, La Placa said. In addition to the primary boost tourism gives to motels, restaurants, retail stores, outdoor

David Resler, chief U.S. economist at Nomura Securities, said last month’s leap in claims may have resulted from the ending of hundreds of thousands of temporary census jobs. With that distortion largely completed, the job market could stabilize, he said. A second Labor report said that wholesale prices, which measure price changes before they reach the consumer, rose 0.4 percent in August after rising 0.2 percent in July. Excluding food and energy costs, so-called “core” producer prices were relatively flat. They rose just 0.1 percent and are up 1.3 percent in the past year. That indicates the weak economy is keeping inflation in check. Concerns about deflation grew this spring after prices declined for three straight months. July’s increase quieted most of those fears. Economists said Thurs-

day’s report confirmed that deflation is not an immediate threat. Deflation is a prolonged drop in prices and wages. Also Thursday, the Commerce Department said the broadest measure of the U.S. trade deficit widened for the fourth straight quarter. The current account trade deficit grew to $123.3 billion in the April-to-June period, a 12.9 percent increase from the first quarter. A year of growth could be viewed as a healing sign for the U.S. economy as Americans slowly regain their appetite to spend. That pushes up imports and widens the current account deficit. The reports follow other data earlier this week that showed modest improvement in the economy. In August, retail sales rose slightly, and output at factories grew for the 12th time in 14 months. Still, the unemployment rate

recreation businesses and others patronized directly by tourism, La Placa said a certain percentage of people subsequently decide to move their businesses and families here. “We know that tourism is the catalyst that brings jobs and residents into our community,” La Placa said. RRC is the same company that

conducted extensive research on summer visitors to Bend in 2008 and 2009, including data on visitor demographics, activities they participated in here, why they came, means of travel and where they stayed. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

is stubbornly high, and there are no signs that companies are ready to add enough workers to change that. Many analysts forecast that economic output will increase by less than 2 percent in the current quarter. That’s down from 3.7 percent in the January-to-March quarter and not fast enough to reduce the 9.6 percent unemployment rate.

Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

Wednesday, Sept. 29 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Call 541-306-4570 for information and to reserve your space Sponsored by:

Serving Main Street with Independent Advice. John Strassman of Bend Financial Group is a financial advisor with, and securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC *Allan Edwards and the Social Security Administration are not affiliated with LPL Financial, John Strassman or Bend Financial Group.

DOWNTOWN BEND • Sept. 18 & 19 PRESENTED BY

For accommodations, please

THE BULLETIN contact C3 Events at 541-389-0995 & ST. CHARLES IMMEDIATE CARE or email inquiry@c3events.com

Saturday

with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

(541) 322-7430 www.livingwellco.org

The Organic Machine ..............Sept. 18 - 1pm Sept. 19 -11am

3:00 pm....................................... Sagebrush Rocks

9:00 pm...........................Empty Space Orchestra

workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life

Tim Coffey ................Sept. 18 - 11:30am

Located Local’s Stage - In The KOHD Food Court

5:00 pm............................................. Shireen Amini 7:00 pm.................................... Larry and his Flask

you take charge of your life. The six-week

• Social Security Administration Web Resources

www.bendfinancialgroup.com

Living Well with Chronic Conditions Workshops Begin September 23

with Chronic Conditions program can help

• Medicare, Disability and Spousal Benefi ts

• Get the Most from Your Program

1:00 pm...............................The Organic Machine

chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well

• How Does Social Security Figure Your Benefi t?

• Social Security Longevity

Put Life Back in Your Life

arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease,

• Retirement Benefi ts and Eligibility

WHERE: AmeriTel Inn, 425 SW Bluff Dr., Bend

11:30 am................................................Tim Coffey

If you have conditions such as diabetes,

ner told the senators. Geithner’s comments were part of the administration’s tougher tact with China over trade ahead of the U.S. midterm elections. The weak economy and high unemployment have emerged as the top issues with American voters. On Wednesday, the administration announced that it was filing two new trade cases against China before the World Trade Organization. One of the cases contends that China violated global trade rules by imposing penalty tariffs on U.S.-made specialty steel products. The other case alleges that China is discriminating against U.S. credit card companies in favor of a state-owned financial services firm. In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu on Thursday rejected the administration’s tougher language on the yuan, saying appreciation of the currency “can’t solve the trade deficit with China.” “Pressure cannot solve the issue. Rather, it may lead to the contrary,” she said. Up until now, the Obama administration had followed the same practice as the Bush administration, choosing to emphasize quiet diplomacy to get China to move more quickly to allow its currency to appreciate in value. Officials in both administrations had been concerned that increasing public pressure could trigger a backlash in China and result in Beijing retaliating against U.S. exports. But Geithner’s comments Thursday indicated the current administration may be willing to try a tougher approach.

Workshop series offered: Each Thursday

Sunday

Sept. 23 – Oct. 28

11:00 am...................The Organic Time Machine

2:00 pm to 4:30 pm St. Charles Medical Center 2500 NE Neff Rd. • Bend

1:00 pm............................................. Shireen Amini 3:00 pm.................................................. Andy Warr

Living Well is brought to you in partnership by: Deschutes County Health Services HealthMatters Central Oregon Oregon Department of Human Services PacificSource Health Plans Northwest Health Foundation St. Charles Health System Jefferson County Health Department Clear One Health Plans Mountain View Hospital Mosaic MedicalCrook County Health Department Pioneer Memorial Hospital

Sagebrush Rocks..................Sept. 18 - 3pm

Shireen Amini ..................... Sept. 18 - 5pm Sept. 19 -1pm

Andy Warr ........................... Sept. 19 - 3pm Empty Space Orchestra.....Sept. 18 - 9pm Larry and his Flask .............Sept. 18 - 7pm


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 B3

A N The 3,000-mile oil change is pretty much history By Alina Tugend New York Times News Service

I still remember learning from my father how to carefully remove a dipstick to check the oil level in our cars. It was drilled into me — along with turning off the lights when you left a room and clearing the plates off the table after dinner — that oil needs to be changed every 3,000 miles or so. I’m not sure what I thought would happen if I didn’t, but I vaguely imagined an unlubricated engine grinding to a halt. Childhood habits are hard to undo, and that’s often good. To this day, I hate seeing an empty room with the lights on. But sometimes, we need to throw aside our parents’ good advice. In March, for example, I wrote about how we should relearn the dishwasher and laundry soap habits we inherited from our mothers. Add frequent oil-changing to that list. “There was a time when the 3,000 miles was a good guideline,” said Philip Reed, senior consumer advice editor for the car site Edmunds.com. “But it’s no longer true for any car bought in the last

seven or eight years.” Oil chemistry and engine technology have improved to the point that most cars can go several thousand more miles before changing the oil, Reed said. A better average, he said, would be 7,500 between oil changes, and sometimes up to 10,000 miles or more. The California Integrated Waste Management Board ran public service announcements for several years about “the 3,000mile myth,” urging drivers to wait longer between oil changes. Although the information is a few years old, the board has a list of cars on its website and how often they need oil changes. The concern is not only the cost to drivers, but the environmental impact of throwing away good oil, said Mark Oldfield, a recycling specialist for the agency. But the situation is not that clear cut, according to Robert Sutherland, a Pennzoil scientist who works at Shell Global Solutions. Rather than picking a number, Sutherland said, he recommends following what your owner’s manual advises. I checked the manual for our 2007 Mazda 5

New York Times News Service file photo

Justin Williamson works on a vehicle at a Valvoline Oil Change in Albuquerque, N.M., in 2006. Oil chemistry and engine technology have improved to the point that most cars can go several thousand more miles before changing the oil. and had to determine if my typical driving included a lot of stopand-go driving, short distances, extended idling, muddy, rough or dusty roads or really humid or cold temperatures. Hmm. Yes, to short distance and stop and go. So that meant I should get the oil changed every 5,000 miles.

The different types of driving are usually known as severe and mild (which is also sometimes called normal), Sutherland said, which seems counterintuitive since most of us probably don’t think we drive in severe conditions. But we do. The reason, he said, is that if you take a trip of less than 10

miles or so, the engine and the oil are not completely warmed up. And if the oil is still cool, he said, it cannot absorb the contaminants that come from internal combustion as efficiently. What actually happens if you don’t change your oil? Well, it doesn’t run out, it simply gets dirtier and dirtier. It’s like mopping the floor with a bucket of water and detergent. The water starts out clean, but the more you use it, the filthier it gets. Eventually, you’re making the floor dirtier if you don’t change the water. Some people remain attached to the 3,000-mile oil change and have a hard time trusting the recommendations in the owner’s manual. If you’re one of those skeptics, you can send your engine oil out to be analyzed. Blackstone Laboratories in Fort Wayne, Ind., one of the best-known places for engine oil analysis, will send you a free kit. You send back an oil sample and for $25, they’ll tell you all sorts of things about your car. “We would compare what your oil looks like compared to the average Mazda 5 of that year,” said Kristen Huff, a vice president at

Blackstone. If there is a lot more lead in my oil than in a typical Mazda 5, for example, it means I have a bearing problem, she said. Her lab runs about 150 samples a day, and a fair percentage of those are consumers looking to find out how often they need to change their oil, Huff said. “Very often, it is the case that they’re changing their oil too often,” she said. “They do what their dad did with his ’55 Chevy.” Another way to get a more accurate assessment of your oil needs is to buy a car that has a maintenance minder, like a Honda. A light on the dashboard alerts the driver when the system judges that the oil has only 15 percent of its useful life remaining. The time between oil changes varies depending on the driver and driving conditions. Honda has used such maintenance minders on most models for at least the last five years, said Chris Martin, a Honda spokesman. Still, some people stick to the 3,000-mile changes, because “the Jiffy Lubes of the world have done a good job convincing people,” Martin said.


B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFC Ent AFLAC AGCO AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n ASML Hld AT&T Inc AT&T 2056 ATC Tech ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivIden ActivsBliz Actuant Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aegon cap Aegon 6.875 Aegon 7.25 AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed h Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlldDefen AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlphaPro Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco n Amerigrp AFTxE AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AIntGr77 AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmPubEd AmRepro AmSIP3 AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Andrsons AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolCRE n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Aptargrp AquaAm ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArcSight ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch

6.22 -.19 18.71 +1.05 0.48 20.53 -.06 1.28 57.79 +.08 12.71 +.02 10.90 -.08 11.08 -.03 1.20 51.85 -.04 38.66 -.26 0.20 13.84 +.14 23.18 -.81 1.12 26.11 -.21 5.16 +.10 6.58 +.08 23.34 +.25 0.27 28.37 +.20 1.68 28.11 +.10 1.59 27.36 +.20 24.48 -.03 12.03 -.10 9.70 -.09 1.95 -.06 5.86 -.15 0.05 17.00 -.01 1.76 51.61 -.05 0.70 36.14 -.44 0.42 6.89 0.75 39.87 +.23 5.94 -.04 6.02 -.17 0.23 16.80 -.34 36.08 -.14 34.99 +.10 2.14 +.02 0.15 10.75 -.54 0.04 22.02 -.40 15.08 32.85 +.09 0.36 33.66 +.06 0.24 57.99 +.58 3.37 -.13 14.17 -.26 6.15 -.07 0.06 3.86 +.03 6.37 -.04 24.24 -.18 0.04 17.08 -.65 5.72 -.08 1.59 23.65 +.42 1.72 24.29 +.28 1.81 24.91 +.17 11.50 +.09 23.14 +.35 1.13 +.02 0.04 30.30 -.05 76.75 -.19 6.44 +.33 4.84 -.03 2.41 +.13 30.04 +.63 0.18 67.91 +.69 0.11 74.60 +2.07 1.96 81.75 +.37 5.14 -.16 0.40 8.55 -.23 1.00 67.30 +.14 4.43 -.05 0.18 26.52 -.23 52.26 +.72 3.94 +.05 47.94 -.48 0.86 9.65 -.08 0.56 43.15 -.10 0.34 30.93 +.12 2.87 -.03 0.12 11.26 -.17 3.95 166.44 +.27 29.96 -.40 4.80 +.13 59.78 -.29 3.27 -.01 18.92 -.01 0.60 22.76 -.24 0.72 45.56 -.10 0.20 64.67 -1.47 63.04 -.72 3.71 -.16 1.20 14.65 +.09 0.48 8.37 -.01 2.06 25.71 -.28 1.58 36.01 -.22 2.26 -.10 1.84 -.09 26.29 +.02 4.02 -.05 4.25 -.01 18.06 +.02 0.80 30.85 +.36 2.54 +.02 14.18 -.09 39.81 +.36 1.56 -.02 2.05 -.01 0.40 6.46 -.01 0.66 5.46 -.01 15.19 .67 +.01 0.24 28.15 +.31 0.48 19.04 -.14 1.52 23.47 -.21 0.15 7.11 -.15 3.16 120.91 +.76 2.80 -.10 148.13 +2.68 .55 -.03 27.44 +.13 28.03 +2.02 1.54 27.56 -.24 13.15 -.50 38.19 -.64 0.50 5.61 -.02 1.31 49.78 -.31 1.25 -.01 8.79 +.10 1.35 30.33 -.52 5.60 29.15 +.35 5.69 -.17 0.44 14.66 +.23 1.68 36.00 -.18 0.08 10.00 -.87 0.72 40.96 +.11 0.65 30.22 -.09 6.38 7.60 +.01 35.71 -.45 1.61 21.66 +.57 1.93 23.50 +.41 19.04 +.04 7.66 +.13 2.33 29.15 +1.19 7.33 +.09 1.18 8.00 -.31 28.96 +.01 48.36 -.52 0.84 22.73 -.12 24.36 9.14 -.47 0.72 47.36 -.05 0.32 30.13 -.12 0.24 45.87 -.13 55.10 -.20 6.07 +.08 0.06 46.89 -.45 15.96 +.05 20.93 -.45 0.36 54.11 4.92 +.06 0.88 29.48 +.58 0.36 39.00 -.37 0.18 44.83 +.33 0.49 56.31 +.02 18.74 +.08 2.61 17.93 -.06 .86 -.00 42.24 +.10 .90 -.00 1.00 6.93 -.03 0.60 37.89 +.12 8.79 +.74 0.60 94.30 +.07 0.40 22.25 -.11 0.33 9.09 -.45 1.60 16.10 -.51 48.34 -.32 1.12 10.04 -.19 276.57 +6.35 0.68 29.69 -.33 0.28 11.08 +.04 11.72 +.13 0.72 45.65 -.07 0.62 20.49 -.09 0.75 32.52 -.17 82.47 -.01 0.40 24.78 +.73 0.60 33.21 +.67 3.13 42.63 +.11 43.55 -.07 3.74 1.40 15.04 -.11 3.68 -.04 18.17 -.09 0.12 24.37 +.63 0.12 18.55 +.29 1.44 7.68 +.05 3.04 +.08 9.20 +.07 25.43 -.11 3.80 -.06 20.92 +.45 14.14 -.14 12.39 -.41 8.97 -.02 0.60 48.34 -.37 15.92 +.01 0.60 29.63 -.22 0.04 13.14 -.13 0.64 39.92 -.27 0.18 17.50 -.20 0.52 12.84 +.14 2.41 52.44 +.04 29.32 +.57 25.24 +.21 27.43 -.83 18.35 -.09 7.12 +.13 1.34 28.56 -.20 27.56 -.70 3.55 +.41 3.40 +.32 6.63 +.28 1.59 23.26 -.31 .85 +.03 32.73 +.24 1.40 61.00 +.15 1.36 41.13 -.07 218.89 -.41 27.25 -.75 19.25 +.14

Nm AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp Ballanty BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD BiPNG Barclay BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkMunvst BlMnyldIns BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat BlueNile Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch h CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNO Fincl CNinsure CSG Sys CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapellaEd CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarF CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh CelluTiss n Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene

D 3.57 110.51 -1.07 2.67 -.01 0.80 35.64 +.17 4.04 -.20 11.00 -.09 1.00 20.44 -.28 26.05 +.08 0.88 31.16 -.12 1.60 -.04 0.84 32.35 +.04 0.60 23.28 -.32 0.74 8.85 +.10 1.83 32.43 +.14 30.61 -.15 0.42 5.67 -.01 1.74 73.26 -.16 1.74 61.34 -.22 26.81 -.57 42.83 +.17 39.09 -.06 38.27 +.09 4.20 -.09 1.50 42.45 -.22 0.10 14.57 +.19 2.55 +.16 22.00 -.07 86.09 -.21 0.60 39.87 -.12 0.68 39.74 -.41 0.40 59.71 -.01 8.42 -.27 34.17 +.27 1.34 64.10 -.49 0.58 13.34 +.05 0.51 19.15 +.01 0.81 13.00 0.33 12.76 +.27 0.88 13.81 -.10 0.04 13.55 -.16 2.05 26.02 +.03 7.28 -.10 2.82 -.10 1.04 3.58 -.09 2.80 59.10 -.60 0.36 25.55 -.13 1.96 51.91 -.29 .93 -.01 0.04 2.22 -.06 21.53 -.35 71.44 -.04 2.03 26.10 -.10 8.92 +.02 0.22 19.80 -.14 17.38 +.07 0.72 80.53 +.59 1.00 15.92 +.02 0.32 17.29 +.16 0.48 45.90 +.91 8.17 -.05 1.16 44.98 -.11 2.16 34.45 +.29 .34 +.00 14.13 -.25 4.09 -.12 1.00 6.29 -.18 0.72 46.62 +.55 1.48 72.75 +.20 41.79 +.12 0.20 24.80 -.47 6.09 -.37 0.92 30.89 -.20 15.25 -.02 0.28 27.05 -.15 83.54 +.06 0.30 29.82 -.53 0.60 36.92 +.16 33.62 -.04 34.21 -1.26 5.16 +.06 4.59 +.31 57.67 -.75 22.69 +.11 0.68 18.57 -.13 1.35 +.03 4.90 -.19 0.38 26.72 -.47 1.28 11.28 -.18 34.99 -.01 4.00 162.54 -2.36 0.32 3.94 -.03 1.94 14.47 +.07 2.28 17.93 -.06 0.17 2.11 -.01 1.36 10.14 -.16 0.68 10.12 +.09 0.85 13.83 -.12 1.09 12.62 +.15 0.40 10.77 0.60 12.97 -.19 12.15 +.04 23.65 +.84 42.61 +1.29 1.68 62.58 -.15 7.19 +.02 3.00 +.02 1.07 -.02 47.65 -.03 0.04 6.59 -.11 2.00 86.77 -.73 5.45 +.06 0.22 11.05 -.04 6.99 -.20 0.72 27.30 +.01 0.60 12.27 -.01 0.02 18.72 +.26 16.58 +.58 0.44 18.73 -.48 16.59 -.40 6.70 +.11 1.47 +.08 0.56 18.81 +.04 0.40 22.48 +.08 1.28 26.95 -.06 0.32 35.35 -.04 0.60 22.59 -.04 1.56 -.06 5.72 +.05 14.16 -.19 0.52 27.34 -.09 0.56 15.58 -.05 0.34 9.80 -.18 5.71 +.01 0.31 20.17 -.02 0.28 10.90 +.27 1.20 60.85 +.88 13.64 -.11 0.05 14.30 -.43 0.80 27.81 -.34 0.10 69.12 +.62 0.42 41.52 +.24 46.99 -.91 0.92 57.09 +.44 0.25 23.80 +.08 .18 -.03 0.16 20.23 +.04 18.09 -.42 0.80 13.48 -.09 0.40 22.30 -.04 0.20 15.24 -.35 0.40 99.74 +2.44 1.00 67.84 -.37 0.04 34.64 -.01 39.13 +.04 1.00 28.91 -.32 4.60 268.06 -3.43 0.84 17.87 -.10 27.71 -.07 5.24 -.10 0.26 22.73 -.34 20.37 +.01 0.96 54.76 -.73 0.26 20.37 -.02 0.34 7.26 +.05 0.35 29.48 +.05 17.29 -.10 0.50 26.46 -.54 0.72 31.93 +.18 0.12 27.82 -1.00 7.78 -.24 7.68 -.05 5.58 -.16 1.02 12.63 +.13 1.14 12.67 +.07 0.60 7.85 +.03 0.63 8.67 -.02 12.99 +.05 13.00 -.30 0.04 6.95 -.17 3.62 -.03 12.51 -.09 2.35 +.17 1.80 47.37 +.07 0.28 26.29 -.16 39.10 -.68 1.10 36.31 +.16 3.48 72.15 -.65 1.08 63.74 -.61 0.30 33.41 +.10 1.08 62.01 -.47 13.09 +.29 .75 -.07 45.30 -.15 66.44 +1.57 3.60 0.20 39.51 +.42 0.04 5.48 +.08 1.66 11.11 +.04 .68 -.02 0.80 79.79 -2.54 0.78 32.56 -.42 4.31 -.04 .55 +.06 24.16 -.33 19.54 +.83 0.68 29.08 -.57 23.48 -.30 0.40 35.52 -.08 0.72 34.40 +.35 23.30 -.04 24.92 -.17 0.54 43.30 -.59 37.48 -2.41 1.76 72.00 -.13 0.04 11.40 -.19 27.47 +.29 11.84 -.59 12.11 +.19 0.36 5.83 -.29 .54 -.01 0.20 32.10 +.87 6.89 -.11 7.94 -.11 54.83 -.08 .38 -.00 3.24 28.62 -.01 3.75 -.06 11.87 +3.94 0.43 8.25 -.34 0.86 16.60 +.15 0.80 27.23 -.22 21.95 -.26

Nm CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChinaEd ChinaGreen ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSky ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n Citigrp pfZ CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor Clarient h ClaudeR g ClayYldHg ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearEFd n ClearwPpr Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cogent CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE CohStDiv Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmwRe pfB ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB Cntwd pfA CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB CraftBrew Crane Cray Inc Credicp CrdS nt7.9 CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurJpn CurSwiss Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton Drdgold DSW Inc DTE Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DeutB pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiamondF DiamMgmt DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg

D 0.78 14.99 -.13 1.56 12.76 +.07 25.06 -.18 0.01 16.24 +.16 9.53 -.07 11.25 -.04 2.90 38.08 +.15 5.79 +.05 62.16 -.36 18.16 -.05 79.22 -.30 3.65 +.02 31.04 +.24 3.52 35.54 +.04 25.90 -.54 4.12 +.05 0.30 21.63 +.20 2.88 79.05 -.16 23.44 -.29 0.16 9.99 +.19 48.21 -1.52 0.63 4.06 -.03 12.00 +.86 3.12 -.08 15.07 +.17 1.75 +.06 10.16 +.03 6.61 +.09 1.23 -.02 3.71 -.05 8.76 +.35 .24 -.01 5.04 +.01 6.28 -.25 1.54 59.68 -.22 8.59 +.76 0.55 12.91 -.43 1.85 50.17 +.27 5.81 -.21 8.29 -.23 5.21 -.10 8.81 +.62 5.58 -.01 6.65 +.25 4.38 -.05 0.23 15.17 +.04 8.21 -.10 167.03 -2.63 13.11 -.22 1.48 57.56 +.21 1.27 21.66 -.11 0.68 64.27 -.19 2.69 -.01 15.05 +.17 0.32 69.09 +.31 2.70 1.60 29.12 +.02 0.72 15.37 -.09 0.48 27.60 -.27 16.36 +.27 21.93 +.34 2.13 26.71 +.02 3.97 +.05 7.50 119.24 +.52 1.74 24.21 -.14 .81 -.03 67.03 +.07 0.39 36.93 -.61 3.46 -.05 1.43 -.01 0.93 19.09 -.02 8.00 +.10 14.37 -.08 65.51 -.52 0.35 20.50 +.08 71.82 -1.01 7.40 +.01 0.56 63.48 +.20 2.20 66.87 -.07 16.63 +.20 0.60 41.50 +.05 8.90 +.30 0.36 30.26 -.08 1.76 57.51 +.09 19.06 +.48 10.94 +.02 63.53 +.11 0.96 15.74 +.42 0.37 7.85 +.36 0.80 13.15 +.42 0.50 11.48 +.28 41.82 +.30 4.86 -.11 2.12 76.58 +.31 15.66 -.10 0.60 16.51 -.04 0.72 55.69 +.38 0.38 17.57 -.47 0.38 16.49 -.45 0.20 37.15 -.64 0.48 14.49 -.09 2.00 27.19 -.11 2.19 25.28 21.72 -.09 30.76 25.88 -.31 1.56 73.15 +.68 17.85 +.05 20.22 -.28 0.60 43.17 -.06 8.31 -.14 20.25 -.44 25.38 +.51 6.63 +.06 0.40 29.64 +.40 0.80 22.06 -.25 64.21 -.59 50.81 -.11 1.41 -.04 2.20 55.36 -.20 0.40 35.29 +1.29 2.38 47.59 -.26 17.73 +.03 0.96 30.65 -.79 23.32 +.43 43.91 -.95 3.50 -.01 10.35 -.10 .44 0.06 46.24 -.02 1.08 45.81 +.54 0.42 18.94 -.27 1.09 50.60 -.21 2.30 25.97 -.10 35.89 +.52 1.09 22.77 -.35 18.29 -.14 6.11 +.47 0.56 37.87 +.46 0.20 17.03 -.11 1.64 37.69 -.08 22.55 +.05 11.44 +.13 0.82 61.24 +.05 7.59 +.04 1.75 24.44 +.04 1.69 24.43 0.16 7.09 -.07 41.00 -.56 1.50 14.83 +.11 21.07 -.57 0.72 39.51 +1.61 3.26 -.13 0.80 50.45 8.31 -1.59 0.92 37.45 -.26 6.09 -.10 1.70 115.95 +1.45 1.98 27.45 +.22 1.85 46.12 -.27 0.32 3.01 -.02 51.75 +.90 11.03 -.06 8.11 -.11 41.64 -1.06 28.93 -.33 .40 +.00 42.96 -.09 23.27 -.23 1.80 53.40 -.10 1.05 84.08 +.76 130.30 +.68 2.74 93.86 -.14 96.85 -.02 115.30 -.33 97.85 -1.07 1.46 -.07 32.10 -.13 3.84 +.01 12.07 -.20 2.40 13.56 -.03 .74 -.02 0.05 54.27 +1.33 0.28 4.76 -.01 18.57 +.65 0.40 3.95 +.04 0.78 9.63 -.17 1.21 25.46 -.32 0.15 10.60 -.38 0.07 5.18 +.22 26.76 -.31 2.24 46.69 -.94 0.10 10.34 -.14 11.00 +.05 0.08 40.17 +.12 1.28 45.00 -.67 8.12 +.01 64.71 -.55 0.20 43.30 +.63 10.09 -.11 46.83 -.19 8.43 +.15 1.20 69.64 -.42 0.36 12.74 +.12 7.42 +.64 12.42 +.12 0.44 25.05 -.19 11.58 +.08 .70 +.00 1.00 18.06 -.08 8.83 -.28 15.71 -.47 41.60 -.59 1.59 -.06 2.66 +.01 0.20 30.42 -.16 0.93 61.58 -1.54 1.66 24.93 -.05 34.88 +.40 10.02 -.12 0.08 11.34 -.26 0.64 62.11 -.01 10.62 +.28 2.38 67.89 -.48 0.18 41.66 -.32 0.36 12.45 0.50 61.51 -.69 0.03 9.70 -.14 12.27 -.06 27.32 +.23

Nm

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Diebold Digirad DigAngel h DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

1.08 29.41 -.17 1.95 +.06 .50 +.11 2.12 61.95 +.07 30.34 -.01 30.49 -.11 0.16 23.90 -.09 16.86 +.63 41.22 +.23 7.51 31.18 +.55 5.66 31.11 -.41 37.16 -.72 29.98 +.48 0.20 23.36 +.43 47.83 +.42 27.56 +.57 30.27 +.44 13.03 +.13 0.15 22.33 -.20 7.35 38.51 +.96 3.41 49.63 -.77 4.83 41.88 -.94 13.14 +.02 8.17 50.44 -.04 5.17 30.08 -.29 0.08 15.79 41.56 +.02 37.08 +.43 .23 +.00 2.00 18.69 +.01 0.35 34.17 -.04 55.74 +1.06 9.10 -.19 27.68 +.21 50.66 -.31 48.16 +.10 1.83 43.59 +.11 13.95 -.07 1.00 64.02 -.12 0.50 44.87 +.20 1.04 16.69 -.03 1.67 +.03 0.40 17.03 -.05 1.10 49.84 -.36 0.60 26.41 +.24 1.00 35.19 -.16 6.87 -.04 31.93 -.12 23.30 -1.14 37.86 -.94 57.83 -1.40 1.76 +.17 4.14 +.02 1.64 43.38 +.45 0.48 26.23 -.12 0.24 11.62 -.13 0.98 17.57 -.01 0.68 11.92 -.16 12.35 -.03 2.52 +.03 2.29 -.02 8.71 -.02 1.60 -.07 4.67 -.23

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETFSGold EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV EEq2 EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc s Ecolab Edgewater EdisonInt EducMgt n EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emdeon EmersonEl EmmisCm EmployH Emulex EnbrEPtrs EnCana g s EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 Energizer EngyConv EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis ENSCO Entegris Entergy EnterpGP EntPrPt EnterPT Entravisn EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl Euronet Evercore EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt Fabrinet n FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FifthTh pfB 51job h Finisar rs FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FInRT pfJ FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FTDJInet FT ConDis FT Fincl FT Matls FT RNG FTrSenFlt FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS FordCr32 ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr

0.25 17.75 -.13 14.00 -.23 23.90 -.29 20.56 -.11 23.77 -.16 2.51 42.77 +.19 0.62 91.00 -.58 0.88 34.40 -.18 127.04 +.73 5.05 -.05 0.40 22.60 -.65 0.64 8.77 +.01 0.04 16.30 -.19 1.76 69.40 +2.47 3.90 +.10 2.32 79.72 +.49 0.64 29.25 +.02 1.44 12.81 +.01 1.39 16.36 +.10 1.80 13.56 +.05 1.23 13.80 -.02 1.62 11.74 +.04 1.53 10.90 -.05 1.56 13.17 +.01 1.60 14.15 +.05 19.11 -.07 0.62 50.15 +.26 2.76 -.05 1.26 33.80 -.08 10.65 +1.47 58.31 +.66 1.82 +.06 0.04 12.06 -.05 22.72 -.38 1.60 31.95 4.82 -.11 0.05 19.87 +.03 16.38 -.26 0.38 27.38 +.02 10.85 -.01 1.34 50.58 +.53 1.07 -.02 0.24 15.45 +.08 10.22 -.13 4.11 52.51 -.05 0.80 28.26 -.06 4.23 +.12 28.97 -.71 1.00 39.00 +.28 3.30 +.12 68.59 +.70 4.89 +.05 3.58 47.50 -.13 20.99 +.32 0.10 5.39 +.04 2.16 23.79 +.02 0.68 23.82 -.11 1.40 44.25 -.32 4.63 -.01 3.32 77.70 -.67 2.24 55.65 -.19 2.30 38.03 -.14 2.60 44.96 -.15 1.68 -.08 2.39 +.05 9.47 +.17 10.56 -.22 8.10 +.24 0.16 29.66 -.10 95.20 -.53 0.88 16.35 -.29 1.35 48.75 +.13 0.28 10.91 -.17 0.55 59.19 -.12 20.73 +.19 0.20 15.22 -.49 16.45 -.06 0.60 26.75 -1.00 1.92 84.68 +.66 1.28 -.03 .62 -.00 6.08 +.20 5.41 -.01 0.16 13.44 -.41 3.93 -.07 2.10 42.14 -.15 7.01 -.04 4.81 -.11 0.28 27.69 +1.03 0.40 43.99 -.56 46.03 -.76 22.74 -.61 0.33 16.51 -.09 3.17 -.04 1.76 60.97 -.03 25.58 -.20 100.52 +1.38 27.20 -.23 0.50 66.66 +.28 65.67 -.76 0.48 8.56 -.05 2.54 +.03 33.68 -.01 16.17 +1.54 0.92 82.53 +.16 0.08 24.45 -.36 8.85 -.08 0.62 42.96 -.34 0.84 51.17 -.52 0.48 82.72 -3.22 2.68 82.30 -.18 0.96 22.90 -.10 4.47 +.04 11.76 -.23 18.03 +.28 0.72 15.13 -.01 0.20 27.49 1.26 10.62 +.10 0.04 12.22 -.25 1.81 24.89 +.02 31.89 +2.41 17.17 +1.09 0.16 15.31 +.21 0.24 14.78 -.28 .31 -.03 0.04 5.37 -.17 0.40 16.30 -.35 0.72 10.95 5.06 -.04 1.81 19.35 +.06 0.04 11.16 -.12 0.56 11.39 -.11 144.74 +4.48 0.03 21.89 +.09 28.80 +.02 0.06 16.46 -.01 0.11 13.39 -.03 0.25 20.57 +.06 0.08 15.70 -.06 0.66 13.00 -.08 2.20 36.24 -.29 0.64 17.45 -.03 53.41 -.39 1.94 +.04 5.62 -.09 1.44 +.01 0.80 24.87 -.12 1.16 103.31 -.02 0.50 48.68 -.31 21.59 -.34 0.32 52.40 +.90 0.60 14.15 +.07 4.11 +.05 12.44 +.57 4.50 +.41 3.25 48.74 +.75 1.90 25.23 +.16 12.85 -.08 30.96 -.31 29.28 -.28 15.25 -.28 8.23 -.47 22.80 +.40 3.62 -.01 0.76 49.00 -.01

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FushiCopp GATX GLG Ptrs GLG Ptr wt GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGDeal GabGldNR Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GE 11-32 GE 2-33 vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenBiotc h GenesisEn Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoEye Geokinetics GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay GblPowEq GblXChCon GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldRsv g Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s Griffon Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GulfIsland GulfRes n GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HSBC HSBC Cap HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc Haemon HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HanPfd3 Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarbrBio h HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthGrades HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HilltopH HiSoft n HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda

D 51.88 +.05 24.18 -.20 1.77 21.39 -.01 0.88 106.49 -.51 1.20 81.73 +.33 .05 +.00 7.67 -.09 0.75 7.88 +.04 13.24 -.13 1.90 28.80 -.05 1.07 -.01 0.28 19.33 +.15 0.12 8.63 -.16 7.07 +.93 7.82 -.04 1.12 29.25 -.51 4.47 .13 +.01 4.31 -.20 23.02 -.32 7.90 +.21 0.84 13.68 +.09 0.48 4.82 +.01 1.28 13.65 -.01 1.68 16.91 -.07 0.14 15.27 -.03 19.40 +.81 7.50 +.19 0.16 13.30 -.10 0.40 18.58 -.02 0.20 53.08 -.34 1.50 29.68 -.01 27.68 -.12 .29 -.01 3.45 +.06 29.28 -.07 47.50 -.42 15.75 -.40 4.73 +.08 25.06 +.20 1.68 61.31 +.04 0.48 16.23 +.01 1.52 25.80 +.34 1.47 25.56 +.24 15.11 -.29 0.32 4.36 1.12 36.74 +.12 3.18 -.04 .41 +.02 1.50 23.01 +.28 16.64 -.24 0.18 16.08 +.05 0.44 18.35 -.24 24.03 -.02 1.64 43.31 -.19 .50 +.00 12.46 +.10 70.35 -.04 22.61 -.19 37.97 -.83 6.38 -.42 16.28 +.29 0.21 14.56 +.09 5.20 0.18 6.17 +.02 1.99 34.97 +.13 0.52 13.98 -.11 1.98 39.91 -.13 1.73 -.07 0.40 6.06 -.24 5.33 -.30 0.08 40.88 +.24 14.95 -.05 18.99 -.17 18.07 +.19 1.65 -.03 12.52 -.03 0.40 14.79 -.29 0.16 15.24 -.05 1.24 +.13 0.18 42.97 +.21 12.90 +1.00 5.19 +.15 1.40 152.23 -.33 1.08 70.43 -.28 12.60 +.24 10.79 -.02 481.06 +.42 1.64 26.34 +.28 27.42 +.43 0.80 30.10 +.24 15.35 -.15 2.16 116.75 -1.43 6.68 +.05 19.10 +.36 0.92 23.37 -.62 3.19 -.18 2.02 -.08 3.85 +.03 2.49 +.04 0.07 4.88 -.09 0.83 18.76 -.13 35.69 +.12 11.85 -.48 28.10 -.17 8.70 -.07 0.52 19.12 -.20 0.64 37.76 +.07 0.04 15.66 +.12 7.05 -.05 11.75 +.09 .68 -.04 41.15 +.14 0.58 26.23 -.22 1.86 36.72 -.35 0.81 179.67 +1.61 1.70 52.89 +.07 2.03 28.09 +.11 27.28 +.06 29.29 -.79 56.22 -.51 23.57 -.21 0.36 31.00 -.21 7.75 -.01 1.35 17.44 +.11 25.69 -.11 15.03 1.25 -.01 1.44 -.03 45.86 -.30 17.02 +.22 .29 -.02 0.40 28.43 -.41 32.44 -.53 6.64 -.28 0.07 11.74 +.19 1.00 44.75 +.18 11.71 -.30 0.82 24.00 -.22 0.20 22.71 -.26 1.81 23.67 -.21 1.00 44.43 +.07 4.65 29.98 +.03 1.24 23.06 -.16 5.53 +.05 3.36 -.03 2.76 47.65 -.10 8.21 +.03 7.54 -.02 1.20 23.31 -.31 26.68 +.01 18.29 +.26 22.64 -.16 0.08 15.91 -.10 3.81 -.18 6.18 +.09 1.80 47.50 +.18 10.09 -.75 0.24 38.52 -1.81 .53 +.02 57.17 -.06 1.00 59.20 +.09 2.45 0.20 5.16 -.03 1.28 47.26 +1.57 10.94 +.23 0.40 55.82 +.92 49.50 +.15 0.32 40.35 +.73 18.47 +.36 23.11 -.04 23.30 -.32 15.88 +.77 0.63 7.39 +.01 1.70 32.37 -.14 0.41 35.08 +.32 9.62 +.06 19.28 -1.11 0.60 27.59 -.46 10.38 -.10 16.33 -.01 0.95 29.95 +.01 47.61 -1.84 2.32 51.90 -.11 34.83 +.03

Nm HonwllIntl HooperH HorMan Hormel Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HspPT pfC HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt n Hyperdyn

D 1.21 43.73 .61 0.32 17.34 0.84 44.28 16.62 55.71 1.80 21.81 1.75 24.16 0.04 14.53 0.28 5.43 3.79 30.13 0.60 12.17 29.39 51.44 0.48 35.00 0.04 5.89 0.40 10.61 3.28 38.59 1.66

+.16 +.03 -.21 -.26 -.15 +.26 -.02 +.36 -.16 -.14 -.07 -.40 -.12 +.23 -.35 -.19 -.18 +.43 -.07 -.34 +.02

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 7.20 ING 6.125 ING 6.375 ING 7.375 ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iPass iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSEafeSC iShEMBd iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShSemi iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShDJPhm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOG iShEur350 iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icagen h IconixBr IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs IncrdMail Incyte IndoTel InergyHld s Inergy Infinera InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed h IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel Intellichk InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare Invesco InvVKTIG InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IronMtn IronwdP n IsilonSys Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh pfI JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB JPMCh pfJ JPMCh pfZ JPMCh pfC

26.31 -.02 0.06 17.90 +.14 0.53 47.50 -.20 0.50 23.90 -.06 0.11 17.38 -.77 0.54 7.36 -.01 1.20 11.08 -.01 10.15 -.13 1.80 23.78 +.07 1.53 22.26 +.16 1.59 22.03 +.41 1.84 24.44 +.10 2.13 25.90 +.04 0.33 5.73 +.03 4.30 -.03 22.85 -.21 0.16 1.05 +.04 12.48 +.08 29.07 -.16 0.81 23.20 -.21 2.58 72.43 +.10 0.42 27.67 +.07 0.30 21.21 +.08 0.48 17.21 -.02 0.16 9.78 -.13 0.39 51.23 -.56 0.25 13.67 -.03 0.75 51.47 -.23 0.38 12.91 +.02 1.37 43.02 -.30 0.21 13.12 -.08 0.44 16.27 +.02 1.20 57.35 +.06 0.68 72.60 -.58 1.22 66.00 +.11 20.35 +.18 1.04 51.26 +.06 1.67 46.27 -.11 2.56 107.70 -.22 0.87 58.14 -.28 0.68 41.59 -.24 0.94 80.20 -.89 2.24 113.42 -.07 3.83 107.75 -.18 0.59 43.09 -.22 5.39 110.99 -.35 0.89 37.27 -.14 5.64 109.55 -.03 1.09 58.37 +.07 0.36 33.65 -.05 1.22 48.31 +.01 1.18 54.17 -.09 3.74 101.26 -1.01 3.79 97.05 -.34 1.13 84.26 +.02 1.38 53.89 -.26 0.69 39.80 -.18 0.50 48.52 +.02 1.22 88.53 -.23 0.94 77.97 -.24 8.10 88.84 +.15 0.44 44.82 +.36 85.31 -.29 1.83 63.38 -.46 1.20 58.88 -.15 0.51 85.46 -.05 0.71 50.28 +.09 1.07 62.38 -.01 1.04 59.98 -.55 4.57 107.32 -.06 3.36 104.77 +.01 0.44 71.47 -.23 0.77 64.94 -.42 2.89 39.79 -.04 1.14 66.50 -.07 0.74 21.13 -.15 1.81 53.84 -.29 0.08 11.50 -.28 0.63 52.87 -.21 0.56 57.21 -.42 0.76 60.27 -.23 0.86 63.49 +.57 0.82 39.59 +.17 0.22 50.07 -.37 1.02 36.98 -.08 3.91 +.01 1.00 45.58 -.19 60.68 +2.87 .15 -.00 16.97 +.03 2.72 -.05 0.60 33.94 +.30 1.36 46.88 -.19 48.95 +1.97 14.79 +.21 18.99 -.66 5.45 -.18 3.03 -.02 17.90 +.07 1.28 5.69 -.11 14.03 +.01 1.25 41.26 -.81 1.36 28.77 +.04 2.82 37.96 -.04 11.06 -.04 7.45 +.12 35.75 +.70 0.54 64.91 +.15 0.28 34.50 +.65 15.97 -.03 0.57 8.12 -.10 1.07 -.04 21.56 -.62 .70 +.01 5.38 +.09 8.45 +.03 2.72 50.09 -.66 0.63 18.97 +.25 .95 -.11 16.95 +.03 106.22 -.94 26.93 +.40 0.04 13.59 -.03 11.51 -.35 12.05 +.05 2.60 129.67 +.24 5.03 +.21 1.08 47.85 0.24 15.10 -.20 0.50 22.78 -.12 19.99 +.04 64.08 +.24 9.21 -.22 0.48 10.71 +.05 15.00 +.40 25.83 +.34 44.87 +.77 292.25 -1.49 0.05 24.33 -.18 0.44 21.01 +.15 1.06 14.65 +.09 0.31 4.62 +.05 14.46 -.09 0.69 8.16 -.17 0.25 20.25 -.12 10.69 -.03 24.60 +.68 8.28 +.03 0.59 22.78 -.10 57.96 -1.36 20.36 +.61 12.57 +.16 34.18 -.84 7.36 +.13 24.35 +.03 12.14 +.31 0.20 40.99 +.01 2.16 28.48 +.21 1.80 32.89 -.05 1.80 26.43 -.03 1.75 25.26 -.37 2.00 27.10 1.68 25.67 -.04

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KA MLP Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimballInt KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc Knot Inc h KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifePtH LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LloydBkg50 Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn Lorillard LaBncp LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq

D 0.28 12.33 -.28 0.38 25.37 +.07 21.80 -.51 .93 +.04 36.03 -.24 6.55 +.01 2.11 -.06 17.29 +.51 0.04 10.46 -.03 0.33 29.29 -.32 9.62 -.27 0.30 24.78 +.02 5.81 -.03 28.91 +1.29 44.17 +.58 2.19 -.01 2.16 61.29 +.24 0.52 29.05 +.34 0.20 18.64 0.20 81.62 +1.49 42.07 -.40 0.70 66.06 -.14 29.74 +.24 26.30 -.12 43.16 -.43 0.25 11.27 -.46 0.20 23.89 -.13 10.74 +.21 0.08 10.20 +.02 0.48 8.35 -.02 1.00 31.08 +1.07 19.09 -.21 2.15 -.20 38.08 -.58 1.92 26.09 +.20 1.62 50.98 -.02 0.48 28.98 +.34 4.44 +.29 9.00 -.06 0.04 8.18 -.03 1.40 33.41 -.39 0.20 5.29 -.02 2.64 66.59 -.02 0.64 15.91 -.09 4.36 68.86 -.26 4.36 60.74 -.46 12.30 -.33 34.15 +.19 9.18 -.18 0.10 18.55 +.97 12.74 -.39 12.42 +.01 0.24 19.59 +.08 0.08 14.64 -.01 8.19 +.04 3.05 +.05 50.64 +.50 3.25 +.04 12.90 -.20 15.51 -.26 1.16 31.40 -.19 4.32 -.18 0.42 21.88 +.39 5.50 +.02 7.80 +.51 9.72 +.06 1.60 69.00 +.21 0.46 28.76 -.71 8.20 +.06 16.43 +.30 19.98 +.01 4.43 +.08 1.74 7.50 -.02 1.10 +.14 74.52 -.93 39.48 +.19 28.55 -.65 0.20 38.53 -.30 32.19 -.09 0.44 23.20 -.38 4.39 -.03 8.15 +.02 0.50 34.38 +.06 10.93 -.62 5.15 +.09 73.67 -.01 0.16 29.63 +.19 1.08 21.47 -.16 0.40 33.24 -.01 0.16 14.09 -.40 0.60 41.83 -.35 23.56 -.18 1.00 -.04 1.43 0.40 7.01 -.09 41.43 -.17 10.13 1.58 +.01 0.29 4.30 -.01 29.13 -.50 29.02 -.45 12.43 -.17 49.02 +.52 62.65 +1.34 1.90 32.17 -.33 47.00 -.45 34.90 -1.79 1.96 35.67 -.03 4.49 -.10 0.60 26.45 +.02 0.80 23.90 +.29 12.37 +.08 0.04 24.72 -.64 0.92 31.64 +.34 2.52 30.39 +.03 7.27 -.06 9.66 -.02 7.07 +.12 5.43 +.05 1.45 4.76 -.04 1.94 26.59 +.24 3.56 -.06 2.52 68.51 +.03 2.70 -.10 0.25 37.02 +.15 15.64 -.18 32.57 +1.08 36.05 +.86 4.50 80.69 -.43 14.66 -.28 7.41 -.22 0.44 21.31 -.17 1.44 105.37 +.47 0.50 41.42 -.59 43.40 -.29 22.96 +.01

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MMT MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MLP StrEq MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MMTrip n Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM

2.80 86.92 -.48 11.19 +.14 0.24 5.80 -.15 1.00 28.22 -.56 9.91 +.01 0.63 19.39 -.18 6.98 +.29 11.41 +.24 7.31 -.07 0.76 7.60 -.04 0.58 6.93 -.03 0.54 6.91 +.01 8.48 -.31 10.24 -.22 8.15 18.49 +.13 0.84 17.56 -.23 2.35 -.08 0.88 51.61 -.22 34.51 +.40 2.00 43.03 -.25 1.80 32.51 -.22 0.20 21.69 +.19 45.19 -.25 2.93 49.86 -.03 3.38 -.08 1.20 76.97 -.84 4.12 28.37 -.43 40.47 +2.08 0.08 10.53 +.12 5.93 -.13 0.74 48.38 +.28 0.52 12.85 -.04 1.00 32.00 -.11 23.52 +.04 0.11 55.36 +.76 0.08 31.58 -.45 33.88 +.59 0.42 46.85 +.22 0.45 55.47 +.47 0.18 83.29 -.86 2.56 34.60 -.09 0.16 35.30 -.64 0.84 24.04 -.18 0.04 6.92 -.21 1.60 76.37 -.50

Nm MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedalFin MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MeridBio Meritage Mesab Metalico Methanx MetLife MetLfe pfB MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant Mitcham MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMuf Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap7 MS Cap8 MSEMDDbt MorgSt pfA Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatCity pfA NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed Navios Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix NetSolTc h NetSuite NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR

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nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NustarEn NuvDiv3 NvIMO NuvMuVal NuvPP NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvPI2 NuvQInc NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OSI Sys OasisPet n OccamNet OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTable OpexaTher OpkoHlth OplinkC OpntTch optXprs Oracle OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg Oritani s OrmatTc OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordRs n Oxigene h PC-Tel PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PLX Tch PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PanASlv PaneraBrd ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PrtnrCm PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PerfectWld PerkElm Perrigo PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhnxTc PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PimCpOp PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioMunHi PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd Plexus PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSClnEn PwSLgCV PwSWtr PSTechLdr PSFinPf PSETecLd PSBldABd PSVrdoTF PwShPfd PShEMSov PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen

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Nm

D

ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl PrudFn68 PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PubSt pfK PulteGrp PMIIT PPrIT

21.58 1.93 61.11 2.48 43.69 0.16 20.99 0.60 11.26 1.21 9.74 0.62 31.28 8.21 0.56 21.09 0.72 6.86 0.44 12.03 0.70 55.39 2.25 28.53 33.45 1.37 31.59 3.20 103.25 1.81 25.25 8.24 0.64 6.28 0.71 6.77

Nm -.25 -.22 +.24 -.15 -.07 -.09 -.25 -.29 +.06 -.22 -.17 +.53 +.14 -.88 -.10 -.33 -.06 -.04

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStrt n QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfE RBS pfG RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI Biolog RTI IntlM RXi Phrm Rackspace Radcom RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk Radware Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn RegeneRx Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepFBcp RepubSvc ResCare RschMotn ResMed s RescAm ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RINO Intl RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prH RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 n Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrNuBMu SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth Safeway Saia Inc StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Schlmbrg Schulmn Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeaChange SeabGld g SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin Shire SiderNac s Siemens SierraWr Sify SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg

0.02 29.70 -.17 19.04 -.12 24.37 +1.11 16.55 +.18 0.76 41.97 -.01 0.16 16.77 -.10 17.71 -.24 1.67 +.14 .47 +.01 0.40 47.80 -.63 23.09 -.09 0.56 17.05 -.08 10.31 +.09 3.73 +.27 12.25 -.51 3.76 -.09 14.32 +.81 0.32 6.06 -.01 1.42 -.04 1.47 14.85 -.02 1.52 15.02 +.07 5.47 +.08 0.24 19.42 -.28 0.82 18.70 -.02 3.58 -.11 7.21 -.09 2.46 +.09 29.41 -.52 2.48 -.09 21.18 -.51 10.44 +.43 0.01 7.47 -.15 17.49 -.12 .67 +.02 .89 +.03 0.25 20.67 +.02 34.65 -.14 60.43 -.44 1.47 -.02 19.49 +.01 0.17 97.89 +.57 0.16 35.21 -.66 5.85 +.09 .33 -.01 0.44 25.40 +.04 2.00 49.12 +.61 1.50 45.72 -.12 17.19 -.02 2.89 -.03 1.72 33.78 -.31 37.44 -1.30 19.08 -.57 3.57 +.55 1.00 14.50 -.07 0.68 60.37 +1.13 0.72 11.74 -.20 1.85 39.40 -.30 1.78 23.81 +.09 .35 +.03 26.00 +.32 0.58 75.89 -.45 0.04 6.95 -.04 0.16 18.62 +.06 17.86 +.12 0.48 47.17 -.36 0.40 40.67 +.07 10.30 +.13 0.24 22.12 -.23 .84 -.02 .51 +.03 1.15 24.73 +.02 2.18 +.19 0.80 30.95 +.11 13.19 -.03 46.49 +.97 33.27 -.16 0.12 5.33 +.06 1.00 6.29 +.17 0.16 11.85 -.08 1.66 94.82 +.43 11.20 -.30 1.23 -.01 3.60 58.43 -.47 14.13 -.03 0.90 55.83 -.19 0.42 19.18 +.21 1.00 -.02 43.99 -.53 0.52 23.93 -.11 1.40 59.40 +.05 0.96 57.91 +.09 30.37 +.55 1.28 37.66 +1.31 0.38 63.97 +.09 20.90 -.30 20.04 +.17 0.64 53.99 -.08 42.91 -1.16 29.59 -.51 2.00 52.87 -.10 15.22 -.28 22.89 +.54 17.46 +.28 29.62 +.18 3.36 57.36 +.55 3.36 58.78 +.44 0.36 50.89 +.95 11.56 -.02 4.15 +.04 23.94 -.10 10.93 -.09 25.51 -.01 2.13 30.25 -.11 1.08 41.95 -.32 0.54 41.61 -.09 0.12 16.80 -.87 5.25 15.69 +.49 0.67 47.91 +.31 37.86 -.58 1.90 39.74 -.40 0.20 19.71 5.96 -.39 17.03 +.03 0.40 64.50 -.29 11.22 -.07 0.10 36.69 -.29 2.53 106.19 +.25 124.63 +.69 1.38 37.54 -.14 1.65 141.66 -.45 2.22 113.05 -.03 1.66 49.23 -.13 0.12 15.13 -.17 0.16 23.42 -.14 0.44 39.63 -.10 4.40 39.65 +.13 0.46 24.32 +.06 0.89 23.47 -.02 45.86 0.32 22.43 -.26 0.56 40.29 -.01 0.23 40.82 -.22 0.35 52.58 +.61 1.00 61.51 -.12 12.70 -.29 0.28 7.21 -.02 23.55 +.40 40.49 -.75 78.35 -3.26 0.48 20.32 -.11 13.84 +.59 24.65 -.16 36.78 -.22 8.65 +.16 116.92 +.11 40.33 -.16 10.49 -.12 1.30 -.03 0.60 43.21 +.28 39.31 -.42 4.92 -.08 10.98 -.18 1.63 32.69 +.40 2.42 +.04 0.35 11.22 -.03 0.44 14.08 -.05 1.19 42.26 +.26 3.03 -.16 5.22 -.04 20.27 +.29 0.84 58.18 -.01 0.60 19.71 +.15 0.24 13.67 -.25 10.13 +.13 1.00 50.81 +.03 0.30 45.36 -.19 7.40 +.24 30.27 +.40 2.31 25.81 +.01 11.30 -.09 0.52 22.12 +.07 2.72 +.03 68.84 -.57 0.50 12.32 +.24 11.97 -.07 5.85 -.05 0.52 26.55 +.35 1.56 53.14 -.01 18.31 -.04 1.44 24.18 +.04 6.73 +.07 0.16 8.35 -.02 5.29 -.01 38.58 +.17 32.99 -.23 1.44 72.41 +.31 0.34 70.64 -.34 0.58 16.73 +.15 2.41 102.01 +2.30 9.73 -.19 1.63 +.11 8.64 -.21 10.49 +.18 0.64 58.82 +.42 28.97 +.36 0.42 31.77 -.23 7.43 -.02 4.22

SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair SinoCkg n Sinovac SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SocQ&M Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera SoltaMed Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstBc SwstnEngy SparkNet SpartnMot Spartch SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n SprottRL g SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCell h Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden s StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StoneMor StratHotels Strayer Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperMicro SuperGen SupEnrgy Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng Sycamre rs SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus SynthEngy Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n Taleo A TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TataMotors Taubmn Team TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia Teleflex TelefEsp TelMexL TelData41 Tellabs TempleInld TmpEMI TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex TerNRoy n Terremk TerreStar TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textainer Textron Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3Par TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc Tix Corp TollBros TomoThera Trchmrk Toreador Toro Co TorDBk g TortMLP n Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm Transocn Travelers Trex TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint

D 36.10 +.15 0.41 4.94 -.04 20.54 +.59 25.38 +.56 0.08 8.16 +.06 2.40 94.59 -.83 50.30 +4.39 7.25 -.14 8.00 -.62 4.08 -.25 1.10 -.01 36.07 -.24 23.22 -.09 19.43 +.17 3.76 +.11 5.62 +.06 13.65 +1.06 6.09 -.16 3.67 -.03 0.84 56.26 +.05 17.07 -.11 1.60 60.77 +.09 19.58 +.30 0.62 48.77 +.49 54.67 -.44 11.70 -.12 16.27 -.42 0.30 41.86 +.79 1.79 +.16 15.09 +.03 4.00 +.12 9.21 -.04 7.73 -.25 8.49 -.19 3.41 -.01 0.28 30.97 +.28 0.20 32.09 -.53 28.92 +.04 .29 -.01 1.82 37.01 -.15 1.43 33.00 +.17 0.60 24.25 -.37 0.02 11.95 +.15 11.66 -.07 31.91 -.61 2.92 -.08 0.10 4.57 +.18 7.99 +.38 1.00 21.74 -.17 4.06 +.07 19.77 +.24 12.26 -.32 4.47 -.11 11.47 +.05 1.78 -.02 0.52 33.39 +.16 0.55 30.10 -.12 0.75 27.82 +.03 0.42 32.77 1.00 54.41 -.25 0.17 14.72 -.05 0.59 30.57 -.04 0.31 22.49 +.13 1.26 31.22 -.11 3.71 -.16 1.36 59.30 -1.20 0.36 19.39 -.32 1.79 -.02 0.52 25.73 -.02 0.20 50.94 -.10 1.32 19.47 -.07 0.04 38.64 -.21 1.02 20.61 -.03 0.30 15.14 +.43 0.16 6.59 +.06 .77 -.03 69.66 -.43 0.60 31.87 -.49 0.06 5.15 -.13 .63 -.01 0.15 14.75 -.24 38.67 +.06 48.89 -.24 15.81 +.03 11.98 -.38 2.22 24.55 +.42 3.98 -.06 3.00 157.10 +6.95 0.60 48.74 +.05 23.64 -.11 .42 +.01 8.42 -.06 1.44 26.99 -.14 0.40 32.25 -.47 .45 +.01 0.60 35.25 -.56 12.33 -.04 12.03 +.05 3.48 -.27 9.30 -.11 8.86 -.13 0.04 25.84 -.42 9.39 -.42 2.13 +.02 26.56 +.05 0.35 11.18 +.16 0.04 8.77 -.17 8.67 7.73 -.01 25.65 -.36 31.53 +.23 13.67 -.38 14.94 -.05 0.20 10.75 +.10 26.50 +.07 1.13 50.18 +.15 22.09 -.75 24.32 +.04 0.04 2.26 -.01 .90 -.10 1.00 29.10 +.09 0.92 22.67 -.54 0.20 14.74 +.05 15.71 +.15 0.82 17.04 -.10 8.99 -.15 3.63 0.71 31.81 +.85 0.60 42.79 +.26 36.33 +1.39 8.76 -.10 18.16 -.36 0.47 9.96 +.08 9.75 -.12 11.75 -.08 23.00 -.07 27.09 +.80 0.25 16.57 1.55 47.03 -.01 6.92 +.27 2.11 27.30 +.10 1.00 53.96 +.20 4.38 -.06 0.32 23.59 +.52 1.66 44.79 -.17 15.62 -.25 39.16 +.03 0.40 38.45 -.26 1.27 27.10 +.44 1.12 12.91 -.06 11.83 -.11 3.33 +.04 1.65 14.15 +.05 0.85 7.56 -.10 0.68 13.57 -.16 1.36 54.06 -.19 4.78 71.65 +.60 1.35 14.96 -.17 1.90 25.89 +.37 0.08 7.56 +.05 0.44 19.63 -.28 1.00 16.73 +.10 0.54 10.75 +.08 26.88 -.33 0.68 36.60 +.16 4.35 -.08 26.85 +.97 34.68 +.17 10.39 +.26 21.67 +.40 8.55 -.07 10.13 +.12 .24 -.02 20.94 -1.04 12.48 -.13 16.81 +.08 19.81 -.20 9.86 -.50 0.72 53.34 -.92 0.30 33.39 -.48 0.48 24.98 +.31 14.45 -.01 1.00 26.06 -.76 0.08 19.24 +.33 15.85 +.09 47.03 +.04 41.04 -.12 10.36 +.16 1.16 37.56 -.03 0.28 25.44 37.10 -.27 2.10 84.95 +.37 32.96 -.01 15.65 -.13 1.00 42.27 -.67 1.00 44.42 +.80 18.25 +.43 1.05 1.60 50.96 -1.47 0.85 31.41 -.34 0.52 37.23 -.29 0.02 11.59 -.28 18.75 +.08 9.53 +.16 .60 -.06 18.17 -.32 3.20 +.06 0.64 53.88 -.42 8.78 0.72 54.22 +.57 2.44 73.66 -.45 0.21 24.01 -.28 3.23 50.61 -.22 0.28 14.75 +.10 0.50 22.48 -.02 1.38 -.02 0.30 46.46 -.30 71.73 +.51 0.28 37.72 -.43 6.49 -.09 1.60 36.92 -.02 0.84 49.28 -.11 2.92 -.05 7.65 62.00 +.10 59.86 +.08 1.44 52.70 +.21 19.22 -.02 32.12 +.10 27.94 +.02 0.32 19.09 -.31 7.74 +.15

Nm

D

TrueRelig TrstNY Trustmk TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwoHrbInv TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

19.63 0.26 5.58 0.92 20.62 4.22 1.00 43.54 0.66 16.62 19.35 1.34 9.28 0.64 27.08 0.85 38.99 0.16 17.02

+.02 -.01 -.07 -.27 -.10 -.19 -.14 -.01 -.10 -.01 -.08

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bcp pfH US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdhlthGp UnivDisp UnvHlth s UnivTravel UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmR h UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValueClick VanceInfo VangSTBd VangTotBd VangEMI VangGrth VangMidC VangSmCp VangTSM VangValu R D W m

D M m G

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m

m m M m

G

Mw

M W& O WG H WM W W W O W W R W M W W W W W R W WR W M W W W W W W W MD W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W W m W W W H WD W R W U W m W W W W W W H W W W m Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W mm D W m W D W W W W W W W W W W W m W G

R M R Ww m G m

mm w m w w mG

0.10 0.74 1.00 1.73

0.06

0.20 1.56 1.22 1.22 1.32

0.08 0.40 1.88 0.89 0.20 0.20 1.70 0.50 0.20 0.37

2.40 0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.72 0.64 1.94 3.00 0.49 0.61 0.71 0.65 1.20 1.29

8.65 -.13 22.22 +.51 18.03 -.29 21.30 +.02 27.81 -.19 26.55 +.66 37.67 -.53 9.12 +.21 .82 -.05 5.39 +.22 .83 +.06 4.95 -.04 12.80 -.22 15.73 -.12 1.99 +.01 28.03 +.02 39.28 +.52 .11 +.00 11.38 -.15 44.07 +1.51 32.59 -.41 28.32 +.15 27.92 -.03 78.92 -.16 25.41 -.46 35.51 -.90 2.53 -.03 2.64 -.06 34.68 -.15 5.12 -.18 66.72 -.94 13.89 -.06 21.40 -.03 22.70 +.03 6.75 +.07 32.98 -.51 46.49 +.71 68.53 +.26 51.75 +.38 34.24 -.03 22.62 -.07 35.56 +.26 4.05 +.19 22.12 -.03 .84 -.05 1.33 +.02 3.03 -.09 .88 +.03 34.82 -.15 20.30 -.13 77.60 -.44 5.29 -.22 33.83 +.55 28.07 -.01 24.77 +.04 64.89 -.81 1.03 -.06 17.21 -.13 26.52 +.19 12.99 -.06 30.71 -.22 12.23 -.03 29.44 +.23 81.46 +.07 81.92 -.13 45.99 -.18 53.79 +.08 64.65 -.15 61.19 -.32 57.57 -.02 48.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Renting

first quarter of 2010, down from $1,003 during the same period in 2009. Rents for a two-bedroom house averaged $803, down from $826 in 2009; and the average rent for a one-bedroom house reported in the association’s 2010 survey was $612, down from $616 in 2009. The association’s surveys show rents for single-family homes haven’t varied more than $30 or $40 in several years, going back to 2006, when the region’s housing market was still booming, and the vacancy rate was low, Ozrelic said. “We have extremely affordable rents compared to other places,” Ozrelic said. “You can’t rent a place in Portland anywhere near what you can rent a place for here.”

Continued from B1 Hunter said the mortgage crisis and recession have taken a toll on home ownership nationwide. The latest U.S. figures show ownership declined from 59 percent to 55 percent over the past two years, she said. In addition to reducing vacancy rates in single-family rentals, Restine and Hunter said the migration of former homeowners into rental housing also has helped stabilize vacancy rates for upper-end duplexes and three-bedroom apartments. Vacancy rates still remain fairly high, however, for twobedroom apartments, especially in complexes Hunter described as being “in the low end of the rental market. “Rentals in the $650-and-below market are more sensitive to job losses,” Hunter said, adding that wage earners in that population are more vulnerable to economic troughs and related unemployment, or reductions in wages or hours. Even in the older, lower-end apartment complexes, Hunter said vacancy rates aren’t as bad as they were a year ago. “Last summer, some of the larger complexes had vacancies of up to 25 percent,” Hunter said. “I think that number has come down.” Becky Ozrelic, a past president and current board member of COROA, said the association’s last vacancy rate survey, done in the first quarter of 2009, showed an overall vacancy rate for rental homes and apartments of 12 percent, which she said was nearly double the vacancy rates that hovered around 6 to 7 percent in 2007 and 2008. Those rates represented a huge increase from a 3.4 percent vacancy rate reported in the group’s 2001 survey. For the first time in 20 years, Ozrelic said, COROA didn’t include vacancy rates in its 2010 survey, so the association doesn’t have current data for comparison.

Market optimism Tim Reynolds, a builder turned property manager, said he bought Above and Beyond Property Management of Bend about a month ago because he believes property values in Bend and Central Oregon will rebound. “I am optimistic about the rental market. There are a lot of people losing their homes who are going into the rental market, and investors are buying up those properties,” Reynolds said. “It gives you good-quality rentals at bargain prices.” As investors buy up foreclosed homes, Reynolds said that adds to the inventory of rentals for property-management companies. Tiffany Lahey, manager of Deschutes Property Management in Bend, said vacancy rates improved dramatically and rents stabilized over the summer for the single-family houses, duplexes and fourplexes in which her company specializes. Property owners dropped rents $100 to $200 a month in 2009 due to higher than normal vacancy rates. During the past year or two, move-in specials went from $100 off the first month’s rent to a free month’s rent for a one-year lease. However, Lahey said the reduced rents and specials probably won’t last much longer since the company’s vacancy rate rebounded to an all-time low at the end of August. “Recently, we have had so many people moving out of home ownership into rentals that our vacancy rate at the end of August was 3.9 percent,” Lahey said. “Our average (vacancy rate) is around 6 percent, so that is a big change.” Lahey credits the improvement in vacancy rates, in part, to an easing of criteria for credit

Rents holding steady Based on reports Ozrelic has heard from fellow COROA members, she said rents have held steady for single-family homes, and apartment rents continued to rebound this summer after dropping the last two years. For single-family homes, Ozrelic said people who couldn’t make $2,000 monthly mortgage payments on homes they lost can afford $969 a month in rent. That’s the average cost for a three-bedroom house in the Bend area reported in the

scores and other financial information by property owners. “There’s more flexibility about employment history and credit scores because so many people came out of foreclosures, bankruptcies and job loss,” Lahey said. “All three of those have really affected people’s credit scores.” She said renters who left big mortgages they couldn’t afford can start rebuilding their credit by paying monthly rent that is often half what they paid on their mortgage.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 B5

Pilot Butte in northeast Bend, which is managed by Quantum Residential, went from around $790 for a two-bedroom, twobath apartment a couple years ago when the vacancy rate was near zero, to $709 this summer. That is up from a low point of $665 last summer. Over two years, O’Connell said vacancy rates topped 10 percent at the older complexes, and rents were dropped 10 to 15 percent as owners of apartment complexes competed for renters. Contrary to the averages, O’Connell said some of the newer, upscale apartment complexes managed by Quantum Residential, like the Village at Southern Crossing in west Bend, sailed through the recession with little effect. “It is a newer place in a nice part of town. It is the highest rent in town right now, but it’s upscale, similar to a condo,” O’Connell said. He said the occupancy rate at the Village at Southern Crossing was around 98 percent throughout the recession. O’Connell said upscale apartment complexes — with rents of $799 to $950 for a nicer two- or three-bedroom unit — are renting well because they represent a choice for people who still have good jobs and are willing to pay more for location and newer quality. While the biggest competition for apartment renters coming out of the recession has been from an influx of singlefamily homes coming onto the rental market, O’Connell said the market appears to be leveling out. “I would say right now we are seeing the rental market stabilize just a little bit,” he said.

More garage rentals Lahey and other property managers said they’ve also noticed an increased demand for garage rentals with the new wave of former homeowners needing extra space to store stuff that fit in larger homes but doesn’t fit in their smaller rental houses or apartments. When it comes to large apartment complexes, Gary O’Connell, owner of Quantum Residential, which manages 5,500 apartment units in Central Oregon, Portland, Vancouver and the Tri-Cities area of Washington, said the large, older apartment complexes in Central Oregon were hit harder than other areas. “Central Oregon is definitely the toughest market we have property in,” O’Connell said. “It has definitely been the most difficult — no question. “We were seeing a lot more roommates and families sharing apartments to save money. That increased demand for three-bedroom units, so those rents have held fairly steady,” O’Connell said. However, vacancy rates soared for two-bedroom units as people who lost their jobs left town or moved in with family members, he said. Rents at The Commons at

Market Continued from B1 Vendors will be selling a vast array of arts, crafts and food, including toys, bath and body products, stained glass, furniture, chocolates and produce, Jennifer White wrote in an e-mail. Stephan White, 72, said people are looking for a way to make some additional money in the recession. He said individuals who lose a job and can’t find work, particularly men older than 50, look to places like a Saturday market. “Now (that guy) says, ‘What the heck? I might as well have a booth,’” said White, who is a professional landlord and owns multiple properties in Bend. The indoor market will operate from 10 a.m. to 4 or 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays initially, but could eventually expand to Fridays. Vendors will have access to the building, which is heated, during the week to work. They also can make weekday appointments with potential buyers, White said. Each 10-by-10-foot space costs $25 per week, and can be purchased on a weekly basis. Palmer and Jennifer White, the two other partners in the market, also are partners in Laughing Girls Studio, which opened on Minnesota Avenue

downtown early this year. The two decided to close that location and move the store to the indoor market. The store next door on Minnesota, LuLu’s Boutique, is expanding into the Laughing Girls space, adding an additional 800 square feet to the 1,300 square feet it now has. Owner Patti Orsatti said the expansion is expected to be completed Oct. 1. At the Central Oregon Saturday Market, which is having its final market this Saturday, President and CEO Bruce Valentine said he and his board of directors have not yet discussed in detail the potential impact of having another market that runs all year. “I think there’s enough vendors out there” for both markets, Valentine said. He plans to discuss the situation at the next meeting. Valentine said the outdoor market has been an asset for many people looking to supplement their income. “(Some) have started their own businesses now,” he said. “That’s what the market is all about.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950 New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .52

10 13 90 26 49 ... ... 28 22 69 18 11 34 11 ... ... 18 ... 14 ... 7

47.94 -.48 +38.7 20.44 -.28 -5.3 13.55 -.16 -10.0 14.47 -.33 +17.7 62.58 -.15 +15.6 .56 -.01 -17.6 29.26 -1.13 +6.4 55.69 +.38 +42.6 61.24 +.05 +3.5 8.31 -1.59 +246.3 27.20 -.23 -16.9 40.35 +.73 -21.7 12.54 -.03 -5.8 18.97 +.25 -7.0 8.18 -.03 +47.4 21.88 +.39 +6.6 4.39 -.03 +62.6 7.41 -.22 +6.2 19.39 -.18 -17.8 10.63 +.07 +20.4 25.33 +.22 -16.9

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80 1.66 ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

20 16 16 22 72 ... 35 19 ... 23 18 9 24 18 ... 16 82 10 ... ...

76.64 +.08 +16.0 36.14 +.06 -3.8 46.11 -.49 +2.4 12.68 -.15 -.1 45.30 -.07 +24.9 2.12 -.06 -24.6 35.64 -.02 -5.6 124.40 +1.21 +12.7 20.32 -.11 -4.6 48.06 +.57 +.8 72.41 +.31 +17.5 37.28 -.34 -6.8 25.73 -.02 +11.6 7.74 +.15 +29.0 11.38 -.15 -15.1 22.70 +.03 +.8 14.81 -.25 -23.4 26.06 -.28 -3.4 2.45 +.04 +16.7 15.84 -.09 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1273.50 $1271.90 $20.745

Market recap

Pvs Day $1268.00 $1266.60 $20.542

Prime rate Time period Last Previous day A week ago

Percent 3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF FordM BkofAm SPDR Fncl

3196750 1776482 1355311 1168171 496474

Last Chg 3.97 113.05 12.44 13.55 14.72

+.05 -.03 +.57 -.16 -.05

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CelluTiss n FtBcp pfE FtBcp pfD FtBcp pfA FtBcp pfB

Last

Chg %Chg

11.87 +3.94 +49.7 5.81 +.79 +15.7 5.79 +.71 +14.0 5.90 +.70 +13.5 5.98 +.68 +12.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name WilmCS KV PhmA AEqInvLf SunriseSen HelixEn

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g NovaGld g NwGold g KodiakO g US Gold

38210 36282 35759 35088 26091

Name

5.19 8.82 5.96 3.05 5.39

Intel PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Oracle Microsoft

+.15 +.26 -.06 +.05 +.22

Augusta g GoldenMin CAMAC n AoxingP rs PolyMet g

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-.29 -10.7 -.20 -8.5 -.87 -8.0 -.27 -7.2 -.75 -6.9

StreamGSv NewEnSys LGL Grp Geokinetics ChinaPhH n

3.40 +.32 +10.4 12.90 +1.00 +8.4 2.35 +.17 +7.8 2.40 +.17 +7.6 2.03 +.14 +7.4

1,269 1,744 129 3,142 151 11

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Last

Vol (00) 675499 602255 533280 481934 437207

Last Chg 18.97 47.94 1.10 25.36 25.33

+.25 +.19 -.01 -.38 +.22

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

2.43 2.15 10.00 3.48 10.09

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Name

Last

Orexigen OccamNet Primoris un CarverBcp Rdiff.cm

6.77 +1.87 +38.2 7.19 +1.90 +35.9 8.22 +1.82 +28.4 3.75 +.68 +22.1 3.57 +.55 +18.2

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

3.50 -.45 -11.4 5.15 -.51 -9.0 20.31 -1.79 -8.1 6.38 -.42 -6.2 2.16 -.12 -5.3

Name

Last

CraftBrew Exceed wt RGSolar Power-One Gentium

8.31 -1.59 -16.1 2.10 -.30 -12.5 2.67 -.33 -11.0 8.72 -.95 -9.8 5.56 -.56 -9.2

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 226 252 36 514 18 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

971 1,630 133 2,734 73 29

11,258.01 9,430.08 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 1,994.20 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,543.89 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,594.83 4,429.08 390.92 7,169.48 1,987.14 2,303.25 1,124.66 11,792.59 647.81

+22.10 -45.09 -1.49 -10.31 -3.24 +1.93 -.41 -11.87 -4.70

YTD %Chg %Chg +.21 -1.01 -.38 -.14 -.16 +.08 -.04 -.10 -.72

52-wk %Chg

+1.60 +8.04 -1.78 -.22 +8.89 +1.50 +.86 +2.11 +3.58

+8.29 +11.34 +2.42 +2.39 +9.50 +8.30 +5.55 +6.82 +5.25

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

334.67 2,585.29 3,736.30 5,540.14 6,249.65 21,691.45 33,046.69 20,684.36 3,195.63 9,509.50 1,811.85 3,067.11 4,650.00 5,668.42

-.35 t -.70 t -.52 t -.28 t -.20 t -.16 t -.03 t -.90 t +.01 s -.07 t -.66 t -.13 t -1.12 t -.13 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9355 1.5640 .9737 .002014 .1486 1.3080 .1287 .011658 .077779 .0320 .000860 .1418 .9856 .0315

.9386 1.5620 .9730 .002022 .1483 1.3006 .1287 .011680 .078247 .0323 .000862 .1410 .9962 .0314

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.82 -0.01 +2.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.76 +4.3 GrowthI 22.51 +0.03 +2.1 Ultra 19.68 +0.02 +1.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.52 -0.02 AMutlA p 23.43 +2.5 BalA p 16.68 +4.6 BondA p 12.36 -0.02 +7.6 CapWA p 20.71 -0.01 +5.1 CapIBA p 48.51 -0.13 +3.2 CapWGA p 33.53 -0.13 +0.1 EupacA p 38.47 -0.23 +0.3 FdInvA p 32.86 -0.05 +1.5 GovtA p 14.62 -0.02 +6.5 GwthA p 27.25 -0.04 -0.3 HI TrA p 11.06 +0.01 +9.8 IncoA p 15.89 -0.02 +4.8 IntBdA p 13.58 -0.01 +5.2 ICAA p 25.61 -0.3 NEcoA p 22.78 -0.09 +1.3 N PerA p 25.87 -0.05 +0.9 NwWrldA 51.11 -0.19 +8.3 STBA p 10.14 +2.3 SmCpA p 34.45 -0.11 +9.3 TxExA p 12.46 -0.01 +6.4 WshA p 24.96 +0.01 +2.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 27.96 -0.05 -1.0 IntlEqA 27.25 -0.05 -1.2 IntEqII I r 11.58 -0.03 -1.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.87 -0.03 -3.8 MidCap 28.45 -0.06 +11.3 MidCapVal 18.31 +1.8 Baron Funds: Growth 43.05 -0.05 +4.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.02 -0.01 +8.9 DivMu 14.75 +4.7 TxMgdIntl 14.85 -0.09 -2.8

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.03 -0.02 +2.2 GlAlA r 18.23 -0.03 +2.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.02 -0.02 +1.7 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.07 -0.02 +2.4 GlbAlloc r 18.32 -0.02 +2.5 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 45.68 +0.14 +2.7 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.06 -0.10 +5.7 AcornIntZ 36.46 -0.21 +8.4 ValRestr 42.97 +0.06 +0.8 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.13 -0.04 +1.7 USCorEq2 9.46 -0.03 +4.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.71 -0.09 -0.9 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.08 -0.08 -0.7 NYVen C 29.57 -0.08 -1.4 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.62 -0.01 +6.9 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.84 -0.10 +10.2 EmMktV 33.72 -0.16 +8.3 IntSmVa 15.10 -0.06 +1.1 LargeCo 8.87 +2.4 USLgVa 17.62 -0.06 +4.7 US SmVa 20.69 -0.20 +5.6 IntlSmCo 14.99 -0.05 +6.7 Fixd 10.37 +1.1 IntVa 16.82 -0.09 +0.6 Glb5FxInc 11.53 -0.01 +6.3 2YGlFxd 10.22 +1.6 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.36 -0.17 +1.8 Income 13.41 -0.01 +6.0 IntlStk 32.62 -0.14 +2.4 Stock 95.41 -0.34 -0.1 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.49 -0.01 -0.7 NatlMunInc 9.96 -0.01 +8.6 Eaton Vance I:

LgCapVal 16.53 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.03 FPACres 25.31 Fairholme 32.58 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.93 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.81 StrInA 12.62 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.00 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.90 FF2015 10.75 FF2020 12.90 FF2020K 12.32 FF2025 10.66 FF2030 12.67 FF2035 10.45 FF2040 7.29 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.68 AMgr50 14.42 Balanc 16.98 BlueChGr 38.78 Canada 51.92 CapAp 22.25 CpInc r 8.93 Contra 60.59 ContraK 60.62 DisEq 20.60 DivIntl 27.63 DivrsIntK r 27.65 DivGth 24.11 EmrMk 23.69 Eq Inc 39.49 EQII 16.32 Fidel 28.16 FltRateHi r 9.60 GNMA 11.63 GovtInc 10.71 GroCo 72.40 GroInc 15.98 GrowthCoK 72.44

-0.01 -0.5 +2.7 +0.02 +3.5 -0.08 +8.3 +5.8 +0.03 +3.5 +7.2 +0.04 +3.7 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01

+3.8 +3.8 +3.5 +3.6 +3.2 +2.9 +2.5 +2.5

+0.01 +2.1 -0.02 +5.1 +4.8 +0.09 +2.2 -0.08 +7.1 +0.01 +3.8 +0.02 +8.0 +0.13 +4.1 +0.13 +4.2 +0.02 -2.0 -0.07 -1.3 -0.07 -1.2 -0.02 +2.4 -0.10 +4.8 -0.09 +1.7 -0.03 +0.7 -0.03 -0.3 +0.01 +4.2 -0.01 +6.7 -0.02 +6.2 +0.02 +5.0 -0.2 +0.01 +5.1

HighInc r 8.77 +0.01 +8.7 Indepn 20.56 +0.03 +3.2 IntBd 10.69 +7.9 IntmMu 10.42 +5.1 IntlDisc 29.99 -0.12 -1.2 InvGrBd 11.86 -0.01 +7.5 InvGB 7.43 -0.01 +8.1 LgCapVal 11.23 -0.03 -0.1 LatAm 54.02 -0.03 +4.2 LevCoStk 23.29 -0.07 +1.8 LowP r 33.64 -0.12 +5.5 LowPriK r 33.63 -0.12 +5.7 Magelln 62.56 -0.18 -2.6 MidCap 24.40 -0.04 +4.5 MuniInc 12.90 -0.01 +6.6 NwMkt r 15.99 -0.01 +10.6 OTC 46.61 +0.01 +1.9 100Index 7.97 +0.01 +0.5 Ovrsea 29.40 -0.06 -4.9 Puritn 16.56 +4.2 SCmdtyStrt 10.72 -0.01 -1.7 StIntMu 10.78 +3.0 STBF 8.48 +3.5 SmllCpS r 16.30 -0.04 +2.3 StratInc 11.26 +7.5 StrReRt r 9.04 -0.02 +6.2 TotalBd 11.00 -0.01 +7.9 USBI 11.56 -0.02 +6.8 Value 59.89 -0.19 +5.2 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 52.09 +0.74 +22.7 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 39.98 -0.01 +2.3 IntlInxInv 33.01 -0.16 -1.2 TotMktInv 32.46 -0.02 +3.2 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 39.99 +2.3 TotMktAd r 32.46 -0.03 +3.2 First Eagle: GlblA 42.08 -0.06 +5.3 OverseasA 20.77 -0.05 +6.7 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.08 -0.01 +6.0 FoundAl p 9.89 -0.01 +2.4

HYTFA p 10.34 -0.01 +8.6 IncomA p 2.09 +6.4 USGovA p 6.81 -0.01 +5.6 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +10.0 IncmeAd 2.08 +6.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.11 +6.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.40 -0.03 +2.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.43 -0.02 -1.8 GlBd A p 13.53 -0.01 +9.9 GrwthA p 16.46 -0.04 -2.1 WorldA p 13.65 -0.03 -2.3 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.55 -0.01 +9.5 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.37 +0.02 -1.3 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.69 -0.01 -2.8 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.10 -0.07 +6.9 Quality 18.70 -0.01 -2.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.16 +9.0 HYMuni 8.77 -0.01 +11.2 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.99 -0.02 +8.0 CapApInst 32.25 +0.04 -2.2 Intl r 54.86 -0.14 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.56 +0.01 -0.4 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 30.54 +0.01 -0.2 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.05 +1.3 Div&Gr 17.84 -0.02 +1.8 Advisers 17.93 -0.02 +2.7 TotRetBd 11.32 +7.5 HussmnStrGr 13.36 +0.01 +4.5 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.72 +0.01 -2.0 CmstkA x 14.06 -0.10 +3.0 EqIncA x 7.86 -0.04 +2.3

GrIncA px 17.10 -0.08 HYMuA 9.62 -0.01 +9.9 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.77 +0.01 AssetStA p 22.39 +0.01 +0.5 AssetStrI r 22.57 +0.01 +0.6 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.62 -0.01 +7.2 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.62 +7.4 HighYld 8.01 +0.01 +9.3 IntmTFBd 11.13 +4.4 ShtDurBd 11.02 +2.8 USLCCrPls 18.32 +0.8 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 47.00 NA PrkMCVal T 20.30 NA Twenty T 59.26 NA John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.22 -0.01 +4.6 LSGrwth 11.87 -0.02 +3.7 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 20.45 -0.17 +3.2 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.97 -0.09 +11.3 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 20.30 -0.08 +11.1 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.10 +0.01 +5.3 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.22 -0.11 +4.7 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.07 +0.02 +9.7 StrInc C 14.63 +0.02 +9.0 LSBondR 14.01 +0.01 +9.5 StrIncA 14.56 +0.02 +9.6 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.37 -0.01 +9.3 InvGrBdY 12.38 -0.01 +9.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.24 -0.02 +0.6 BdDebA p 7.62 +0.01 +8.2 ShDurIncA p 4.65 +5.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.35 -0.02 +3.3

ValueA 20.73 -0.03 +0.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.83 -0.03 +0.7 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.83 +0.01 +8.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.98 -0.01 -1.1 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 17.43 +0.01 +11.8 PacTiger 22.04 -0.13 +14.6 MergerFd 15.93 +0.01 +2.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.61 -0.01 +10.8 TotRtBdI 10.61 -0.01 +11.0 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.06 -0.05 +5.0 GlbDiscZ 28.43 -0.06 +5.2 QuestZ 17.62 -0.04 +2.3 SharesZ 19.58 -0.03 +3.0 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 38.82 -0.15 +2.8 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 40.26 -0.16 +2.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.15 +0.02 +8.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.47 -0.02 -0.3 Intl I r 17.86 -0.04 +6.1 Oakmark r 37.53 -0.01 +1.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.70 +8.9 GlbSMdCap 13.74 -0.04 +7.6 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 38.50 +0.01 -3.6 DvMktA p 32.24 -0.08 +12.1 GlobA p 55.24 -0.09 +4.2 GblStrIncA 4.24 +12.6 IntBdA p 6.57 -0.01 +5.7 MnStFdA 28.93 -0.02 +2.8 RisingDivA 13.99 +0.9 S&MdCpVl 27.55 -0.03 +3.6 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.69 +0.3 S&MdCpVl 23.69 -0.02 +3.1 Oppenheimer C&M:

RisingDvC p 12.65 +0.3 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.33 +5.8 RcNtMuA 7.28 -0.01 +8.7 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.94 -0.08 +12.3 IntlBdY 6.57 -0.01 +5.9 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.48 -0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 12.44 NA ComodRR x 7.96 -0.25 +4.1 HiYld 9.19 +0.01 +10.5 InvGrCp 11.65 -0.02 +10.9 LowDu 10.59 +4.3 RealRtnI 11.38 -0.03 +7.2 ShortT 9.91 +1.6 TotRt 11.48 -0.01 +8.6 TR II 11.08 -0.02 +7.8 TRIII 10.20 -0.01 +8.9 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.59 +4.0 RealRtA p 11.38 -0.03 +6.9 TotRtA 11.48 -0.01 +8.3 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.48 -0.01 +7.7 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.48 -0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.48 -0.01 +8.5 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 42.01 -0.05 +8.6 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 35.93 +0.07 +1.0 Price Funds: BlChip 33.13 +0.05 +1.1 CapApp 18.88 -0.02 +4.0 EmMktS 32.31 -0.14 +7.4 EqInc 21.37 -0.03 +2.7 EqIndex 30.43 +2.1 Growth 27.87 +1.3 HlthSci 26.89 -0.12 +2.8 HiYield 6.66 +0.01 +9.5 IntlBond 9.96 -0.01 +2.7 IntlStk 13.05 -0.06 +3.6

MidCap 51.70 MCapVal 21.26 N Asia 18.52 New Era 42.54 N Horiz 28.09 N Inc 9.67 R2010 14.60 R2015 11.14 R2020 15.20 R2025 11.02 R2030 15.67 R2040 15.65 ShtBd 4.88 SmCpStk 29.35 SmCapVal 30.64 SpecIn 12.22 Value 21.03 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.04 RiverSource A: DEI 8.89 DivrBd 5.05 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.81 PremierI r 17.16 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 33.89 S&P Sel 17.74 Scout Funds: Intl 29.58 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.10 AmShS p 37.05 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.33 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.95 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 46.33 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.51 IntValue I 26.09 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.35 USAA Group:

+0.04 +8.9 -0.02 +2.6 -0.09 +14.7 -0.01 -2.5 -0.09 +9.8 -0.02 +7.2 -0.02 +4.7 -0.02 +4.4 -0.03 +4.1 -0.02 +3.9 -0.02 +3.6 -0.03 +3.3 +3.0 -0.16 +8.9 -0.27 +3.9 -0.01 +6.6 -0.02 +2.7 -0.01 +1.1 +1.7 -0.01 +7.7 -0.04 +3.8 -0.01 +5.2 -0.01 +2.8 -0.01 +2.3 -0.07 +2.4 -0.11 -0.4 -0.11 -0.6 +0.02 +9.5 -0.02 -1.5 -0.28 -0.08 +3.2 -0.07 +3.5 -0.05 +5.4

TxEIt 13.20 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.25 CpOpAdl 66.69 EMAdmr r 36.22 Energy 104.42 500Adml 104.05 GNMA Ad 11.01 HlthCr 50.25 HiYldCp 5.66 InfProAd 25.79 ITBdAdml 11.54 ITsryAdml 11.80 IntGrAdm 56.11 ITAdml 13.87 ITGrAdm 10.26 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 9.61 LT Adml 11.29 MuHYAdm 10.69 PrmCap r 61.67 STsyAdml 10.88 ShtTrAd 15.96 STFdAd 10.94 STIGrAd 10.84 TtlBAdml 10.80 TStkAdm 28.02 WellslAdm 52.13 WelltnAdm 50.88 Windsor 40.06 WdsrIIAd 41.29 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.70 CapOpp 28.86 DivdGro 13.19 Energy 55.59 EqInc 18.78 Explr 61.09 GNMA 11.01 GlobEq 16.27 HYCorp 5.66 HlthCre 119.03 InflaPro 13.13 IntlGr 17.62

-0.01 +6.3 -0.01 +6.7 -0.18 -3.9 -0.19 +6.3 -0.36 -6.8 -0.02 +2.3 -0.01 +6.4 -0.21 +0.1 +0.01 +9.4 -0.07 +5.6 -0.03 +10.9 -0.02 +9.1 -0.18 +3.8 -0.01 +5.7 -0.01 +10.8 +2.8 -0.05 +12.2 -0.01 +6.0 -0.01 +7.2 -0.06 +2.9 +1.3 +3.6 +4.9 -0.01 +7.0 -0.02 +3.0 -0.06 +7.7 -0.08 +3.7 -0.08 +0.3 -0.04 -0.6 -0.03 -0.08 -0.01 -0.19 -0.01 -0.19 -0.01 -0.05 +0.01 -0.51 -0.03 -0.06

+6.4 -3.9 +1.2 -6.9 +4.4 +6.6 +6.3 +3.8 +9.3 +5.6 +3.7

IntlVal 30.14 ITIGrade 10.26 LifeCon 15.81 LifeGro 20.24 LifeMod 18.45 LTIGrade 9.61 Morg 15.62 MuInt 13.87 MuLtd 11.16 MuShrt 15.96 PrecMtls r 22.91 PrmcpCor 12.21 Prmcp r 59.42 SelValu r 16.74 STAR 17.99 STIGrade 10.84 StratEq 15.79 TgtRetInc 11.04 TgRe2010 21.54 TgtRe2015 11.84 TgRe2020 20.82 TgtRe2025 11.77 TgRe2030 19.99 TgtRe2035 11.99 TgtRe2040 19.64 TgtRe2045 12.40 USGro 15.97 Wellsly 21.51 Welltn 29.46 Wndsr 11.87 WndsII 23.26 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 104.02 Balanced 20.03 EMkt 27.52 Europe 25.35 Extend 34.85 Growth 27.68 ITBnd 11.54 MidCap 17.62 Pacific 9.97 REIT r 17.65 SmCap 29.25 SmlCpVl 13.85

-0.14 -1.5 -0.01 +10.7 -0.02 +5.6 -0.03 +4.1 -0.02 +5.1 -0.05 +12.1 +0.02 +2.3 -0.01 +5.6 +2.8 +1.2 -0.08 +12.1 -0.02 +0.8 -0.06 -0.06 +5.0 -0.03 +3.6 +4.9 -0.06 +3.3 -0.02 +5.4 -0.03 +5.0 -0.02 +4.7 -0.03 +4.3 -0.01 +4.0 -0.03 +3.5 -0.02 +3.2 -0.03 +3.1 -0.02 +3.2 +0.02 -3.0 -0.03 +7.6 -0.04 +3.6 -0.03 +0.3 -0.03 -0.7 -0.02 +2.2 -0.02 +4.7 -0.14 +6.3 -0.07 -2.3 -0.14 +6.7 +0.05 +1.8 -0.03 +10.8 -0.05 +7.7 -0.10 +3.0 -0.12 +20.9 -0.16 +6.4 -0.10 +6.1

STBnd

10.68

TotBnd

10.80 -0.01 +6.9

+4.2

TotlIntl

14.56 -0.07 +1.0

TotStk

28.01 -0.02 +2.9

Value

18.97 -0.03 +3.0

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst ExtIn

9.41 -0.05

NS

34.90 -0.14 +6.8

FTAllWldI r

87.00 -0.41 +1.5

GrwthIst

27.69 +0.04 +1.9

InfProInst

10.51 -0.02 +5.7

InstIdx

103.36 -0.02 +2.3

InsPl

103.37 -0.02 +2.3

InsTStPlus

25.32 -0.02 +3.0

MidCpIst

17.69 -0.04 +7.9

SCInst

29.30 -0.16 +6.6

TBIst

10.80 -0.01 +7.1

TSInst

28.02 -0.03 +2.9

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

85.95 -0.02 +2.3

STBdIdx

10.68

TotBdSgl

10.80 -0.01 +7.0

+4.3

TotStkSgl

27.04 -0.02 +2.9

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.15 -0.02 +1.0

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.88

+11.2


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST — LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES: Join chamber members as Oregon Speaker of the House Dave Hunt and Rep. Judy Stiegler talk about their current and upcoming legislative priorities for 2011. Reservations requested; $25 for chamber members, $35 for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Skanska; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; New Redmond High School, 4555 S.W. Elkhorn Ave. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS: Learn the basics of site building using WordPress 3.0. All attendees can get a free Alpine workshop edition of WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. ANATOMY OF A SITE LAUNCH: Learn to move an old site without losing your current search engine position, how to use temporary and permanent redirects and retain rankings; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704. THE FRESH WEB: A short review of Web news for the week ending Sept. 17; free; noon-12:30 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

MONDAY OREGON RESTAURANT & LODGING ASSOCIATION CONVENTION: Annual meeting and convention of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association includes educational sessions, keynotes, award recognition, networking opportunities and golf tournament. Registration required by Sept. 10; $199; 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; info@oregonrla.org or www.ora .org/Convention. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVICE PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol service permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, 810 S.W. 11th St.; 541-5041678. HOW TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS PLAN: Learn to evaluate finances, target markets and present ideas in a written business plan. For firsttime business owners. Cost includes materials. Registration is required at http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-3837290; $49; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend.

WEDNESDAY CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: A joint effort of the Central Oregon Safety and Health Association and Oregon OSHA. Featured topics include safety committees and safety meetings; hazard communication; winter driving tips; waste management and recycling certification. For more information, or to register, call 503-378-3272 or 888-292-5247, or visit www.orosha.org/conferences; registration is $125, with optional preconference workshops for $40. The waste management and recycling certification workshop is $75; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Visit the chamber website for items you can bring to support the Central Oregon Council on Aging; 5-7 p.m.; Whispering Winds, 2920 Conners Ave.; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: A joint effort of the Central Oregon Safety and Health Association and Oregon OSHA. Featured topics include safety committees and safety meetings; hazard communication; winter driving tips; waste management and recycling certification. For more information, or to register, call

503-378-3272 or 888-292-5247, or visit www.orosha.org/conferences; registration is $125, with optional preconference workshops for $40. The waste management and recycling certification workshop is $75; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond. ETFS EXPLAINED: Discover why exchange traded funds are a rapidly growing investment option, and learn how the structure of ETFs offers cost and tax advantages. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or www.schwab.com. ARE YOU READY FOR A TAX INCREASE?: Learn six pre- emptive strategies that can help moderate the impact of tax increases on your investment portfolio. Space is limited. Please RSVP by Sept. 22; free; 4 p.m.; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, 705 S.W. Bonnett Way, Suite 1200, Bend; 541-617-6038 or http:// fa.smithbarney.com/payne_wettig. HOW TO BUY A FRANCHISE: Learn to choose a franchise, how to arrange financing and other critical details. To register, go to http://noncredit .cocc.edu or call 541-383-7290; $19; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: Taught by Central Oregon Contractor Training, this live course is approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board and satisfies the educational requirement to take the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. Prepayment is required. To register, go to http://noncredit.cocc .edu or call 541-383-7290; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. BUILDING ACTIVE COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENTS: Urban development expert Dan Burden of the Walkable and Livable Communities Institute will discuss the relationship between the built environment and public health. For a complete lecture description, visit www.buildingabetterbend.org; $8 available online or at the door; 7-9 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-8153951.

D I SPATC H E S Rozy Arno, co-owner of the historic Landaker Building on the corner of Sixth Street and Evergreen Avenue in downtown Redmond, has opened Soup 2 Nuts 2 Go, a bakery/deli in the building’s corner space that had been empty for several years. The menu features fresh bakery items, deli sandwiches and “Salad by Design,” which will premiere at the eatery’s grand opening today. Soup 2 Nuts’ philosophy is to focus on fresh, local products. All of its bread, cookies, pastries and soups are made from scratch with fresh ingredients, in house, each day. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Jazzercise, a dance-fitness program, has announced the opening of a new fitness center in Redmond at 1721 S.W. Odem Medo Way. The center will offer 19 classes weekly, some with child care available.

A grand-opening celebration will begin with the 8:30 a.m. class on Saturday and will continue through Monday. The center will be open until 2 p.m. both weekend days, classes will be free, and there will be membership specials throughout the celebration. For more information on Jazzercise, contact Robyn Oster at 541-923-6265. Wendy Marlin, of Bend, recently purchased Cascade Graphics from the company’s founder and longtime owner, Jim Wakefield. Cascade Graphics is an award-winning print shop that specializes in promotional and industrial screen printing. The company has a 30-year history in Bend and is located at 135 N.E. Norton Ave. Marlin plans to retain the company’s staff and is looking to expand the business into digital printing, with a move to a larger facility scheduled for the end of the year.

Fiat shareholders OK plan to spin off industrial unit By David Jolly New York Times News Service

The Fiat Group gained approval from shareholders Thursday to spin off its industrial business from its automotive unit, a move the company hoped would lead the stock market to view the two halves more positively than the whole. “The de-merger of the group and the creation of two separate entities will finally solve a strategic issue that has for years been a thorn in the side of Fiat,” Sergio Marchionne, the Fiat chief executive, told shareholders at a meeting in Italy.

He said investors had long speculated about the potential value that could be realized from splitting the company. The automotive side is essentially a retailing business, he said, while the industrial side is essentially a capital goods business. Marchionne, who also runs Chrysler, said the U.S. automaker could hold an initial public offering by the end of next year. He said Fiat, which bought a 20 percent stake in Chrysler last year, hoped to raise its stake to 35 percent by then.


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OREGON City of Portland buys iconic “Made in Oregon” sign, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Jim Winner invented The Club anti-theft device, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

Police seek suspect after car is stolen from camper at gunpoint Victim says he was threatened, duct-taped to tree at Cultus Lake By Erin Golden The Bulletin

An Oregon State Police SWAT team is searching for a man who reportedly threatened a camper at Cultus Lake with a gun, ducttaped him to a tree, grabbed his keys and then led police on a chase in the stolen car. Sometime around noon on Thursday, Mark Buckner, 37, of Hillsboro, was walking on a U.S. Forest Service trail near the Cultus Lake Campground, where he’d been staying for a few days. As Buckner headed to his car, parked less than a mile down the trail, a man approached him from behind, ordered him off the trail and into the forest. The man then ordered Buckner to turn over his keys and wallet and duct-taped his hands to a tree, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The man then took off with Buckner’s keys, wallet and backpack in Buckner’s green 1997 Honda Civic.

MORE BUDGET REDUCTIONS CALLED FOR

State agencies facing 8% cuts Kulongoski seeks to protect education, human services and the prison system By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

“I believe we can continue to protect these critical services while maintaining a responsible level of reserves.” — Gov. Ted Kulongoski

Gov. Ted Kulongoski announced proposals for another 8 percent cut to the state budget on Thursday, part of a continued effort to close an estimated $1.3 billion budget shortfall. As he had earlier in the summer, Kulongoski asked all state agencies to provide him with recommendations for how their budgets could be reduced. Agencies made 9 percent cuts to their budgets after a June revenue forecast projecting reduced tax receipts through the end of the

2009-11 biennium. Another anemic revenue forecast released in late August prompted the latest round of cuts, totaling an additional $377.5 million. In August, Gov. Kulongoski, Senate President Peter Courtney and Speaker of the House Dave Hunt drew up an agreement to lessen the blow to K-12 education, human services and the prison system by using state reserves and emergency funding from the federal government. In a news release issued Thursday, Kulongoski acknowledged the recession has continued longer than

expected, and defended the agreement with Courtney and Hunt as the state’s best available option. “I remain committed to this framework and believe we can continue to protect these critical services while maintaining a responsible level of reserves for the remaining three quarters of the biennium,” he said. As with the cuts adopted in June, much of the savings is achieved through hiring freezes, leaving vacant positions unfilled and the deferral of pay increases for state employees.

Otter’s in good hands

A recommended $13.4 million cut to the Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, on top of a $20.9 million cut earlier in the summer, could mean higher tuition and fewer course options at many schools, but Central Oregon Community College appears likely to avoid significant cuts. Spokesman Ron Paradis said the college’s rapid enrollment — up 83 percent over three years — has created a surge in tuition revenue that essentially offsets a reduction of $450,000 from the state. See Cuts / C6

Small businesses closer to getting help with credit as bill advances Measure would provide tax breaks, loan guarantees, new lending fund By Keith Chu The Bulletin

Suspect identified Sheriff’s detectives tentatively identified the suspect as James Patrick Powers, 47, a registered sex offender from Idaho. Powers was last registered to a Boise, Idaho, address and was convicted in 1981 in California for “Rape with Force & Fear,” the Oregon State Police said in a news release. Sgt. Deke DeMars of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said it’s not clear how much of a head start the suspect had before Buckner was able to free his hands and call 911. “The estimated time between when the suspect left and we were notified was anywhere from 20 to 40 minutes,” he said. At about 1:20 p.m., Oregon State Police troopers spotted the stolen car heading west on Oregon Highway 58, west of La Pine. Troopers pursued the car until the suspect pulled over about seven miles east of Oakridge. The man got out of the car and took off on foot into the woods, carrying a long-barreled gun, according to the OSP news release. See Car theft / C5

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Dr. Deb LaPaugh, owner of LaPaw Animal Hospital in Bend, holds a wounded and drugged otter — fresh out of surgery — that was brought to her by licensed wildlife rehabilitator Kim Farasyn. The otter, which was found about a mile from a water source in La Pine, had fishing line wrapped around its head and an infection in the wounded area. After three surgeries, LaPaugh said, the otter is “doing exceptional” and, despite losing its sight, is healing well. LaPaugh and Farasyn hope to get approval from wildlife officials to send the otter to the Wildlife Images wildlife preserve in Grants Pass by next week.

WASHINGTON — A bill aimed at helping small businesses cleared the U.S. Senate on Thursday, paving the way for a slew of tax incentives and other benefits to become law in coming weeks. The measure provides tax breaks, increased loan guarantees and a new small-business lending fund to let small companies expand despite the tight credit market. It passed the Senate 61-38 and is now headed back to the U.S. House to reconcile differences with a similar bill that passed there. Patricia Moss, CEO of Bendbased Bank of the Cascades, said the bill would provide a new avenue for small businesses to find funding, but it won’t fix the slow economy, which is the real obstacle to small-business growth. “It will create another form of credit access for small businesses, but in itself won’t result in a demand from small businesses for credit,” Moss said. “Anything we can do to help small businesses, we ought to be doing.” Both Oregon senators, Democrats Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, voted to pass the bill on Thursday. See Business / C5

IN CONGRESS

Oregon’s senators, Democrats Jeff Merkley, top, and Ron Wyden, both voted Thursday to pass a bill aimed at helping small businesses.

Correction In a section headlined “Local Briefing,” which appeared Thursday, Sept. 16, on Page C2, the date of Bend Park & Recreation District’s Day of Play and Fun Walk was reported incorrectly. The Day of Play and Fun Walk will take place on Sept. 25. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Winds fuel Cougar Mountain Fire Blaze that started Wildfire east of Prineville The Cougar Mountain Fire grew to 2,000 acres Thursday. on Wednesday has grown to 2,000 acres Pendleton By Kate Ramsayer

Streets in downtown Bend will be closed from 10 tonight through midnight Sunday for the Bend Fall Festival. All cars will need to be moved from the streets marked below.

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

While the temperatures might be dropping, fire season is still on in Central Oregon. The Cougar Mountain Fire, east of Prineville and 17 miles south of Dayville, was about 2,000 acres as of Thursday evening, fueled in part by windy weather. The fire started Wednesday at about noon, said Kevin Baker with the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center. It spread through grasses, sagebrush and juniper on U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands. “The winds (Wednesday) pushed it,” he said. It burned actively that first day, Baker said, and although the weather on Thursday

Enterprise

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The Bulletin

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Pendleton Bend Burns O R E G O N

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BEND CITY COUNCIL

Trash hauler’s bid to get franchise exemption denied By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Mitchell Madras Sisters Prineville Bend

Baker City Dayville John Day Ontario MILES

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helped firefighters control the fire, it still grew as winds gusted up to 16 miles an hour. Crews are still investigating how the fire started, he said. However, lightning did come through the area on Monday, and between 15 and 20 fires have started since then.

“Most of the lightning that came through, the bulk of it went to the east of us,” Baker said. The fire was not threatening any structures, he said, but officials have asked archery hunters and others camping in the area to leave. See Fire / C6

Bend City Councilors decided this week not to grant a local businessman an exemption to the city’s franchise agreements with two garbage companies. Randy Mahaney, who owns Clean-Up Industries, wanted the exemption so he could continue cleaning up construction sites and hauling the debris to the landfill. But councilors sided with the city’s two trash haulers, Bend Garbage & Recycling and Cascade Disposal, saying they felt Clean-Up Industries was violating the municipal garbage franchise ordinance and was

impacting revenues for the two companies. In particular, Cascade Disposal and Bend Garbage & Recycling had problems with Mahaney leaving drop boxes at construction sites and allowing other people to fill the containers with trash or other debris before he hauled it off. This practice, representatives of the garbage companies said, was similar to Mahaney providing Dumpster services, which is something that is protected under the franchise ordinance. They said they did not have a problem with Mahaney or his employees filling the boxes themselves. See Trash / C6


C2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Car seat safety event to be held in Madras

Police seek help finding Bend woman

A child car safety event will be held in Madras on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., according to a news release. The event, which will be held at the Jefferson County Fire District station at 765 S.E. Adams Drive in Madras, is being conducted by State Farm as part of a national event to promote the proper use of child car seats. During the event, parents will be able to bring in their child’s car seat for a free safety inspection by car seat technicians.

A woman who disappeared Thursday in southeast Bend is missing and may be in danger, according to Bend Police. Jo Ann “Gloria� Fitter, 79, was driving east on Southeast Reed Market Road at around 9:30 a.m. Thursday, following her husband to an automotive repair shop. She never arrived, and was last seen near the intersection with Southeast 15th Street. Police and Fitter’s husband searched the area for several hours, but have been unable to locate her or find any leads. Fitter is 5 feet, 2 inches tall and approximately 145 pounds, with white hair just over her ears. At the time of her disappearance, she was wearing black slacks, a white blouse with a light print on it, and white tennis shoes. She was driving a tan 2003 Buick LeSabre with Oregon license plate ZNN 648 and a “Life Flight� sticker in the lower left corner of the rear window. Police ask anyone who sees Fitter’s vehicle or someone matching her description to call dispatchers at 541-693-6911.

Pets can get low-cost vaccines, microchips In honor of World Rabies Day, the Bend Spay and Neuter Project will hold a low-cost microchip and vaccine clinic Saturday at Bend Pet Express, according to a news release. The pet clinic will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabies vaccines will be administered for $5. Microchips will cost $25, and all other pet vaccines will cost $15.

Klamath Basin getting $10M in aid The Associated Press KLAMATH FALLS — The Klamath Basin is getting $10 million in federal aid for water conservation and drought relief efforts. Interior Secretary

Ken Salazar said the money will be provided through the Bureau of Reclamation to help save water for local tribes and areas served by the Klamath Reclamation Project.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon State Police investigator Ray Downey sifts through the burned remnants of City Hall in Mill City. Investigators have determined that the Monday night fire, which destroyed most of the building and injured a city worker, was caused by arson.

Sheriff cites arson in Mill City blaze Fire leveled city hall, injured a city worker The Associated Press MILL CITY — The Linn County sheriff says a fire that destroyed the city hall building in Mill City was arson. Sheriff Tim Mueller said the ongoing investigation shows the fire began in the building’s office area. Fire debris evidence is being sent to the Oregon State Police crime lab to test for accelerants. He says the investigation continues. One city worker suffered seri-

ous injuries in the Monday night blaze in the town southeast of Salem. Joy Cronin was reported in stable condition at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland. Mayor Roel Lundquist says Cronin noticed a light on in the building late Monday and was burned in an explosion as she approached an entrance. State Police arson detectives and federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms personnel have assisted Linn County sheriff’s detectives.

U.S. sees its bloodiest day of fighting at Civil War Battle of Antietam in 1862 The Associated Press Today is Friday, Sept. 17, the 260th day of 2010. There are 105 days left in the year. The Jewish Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, begins at sunset. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 17, 1862, in the bloodiest battle day in U.S. history, Union forces fought Confederate invaders in the Civil War Battle of Antietam in Maryland; more than 3,600 men were killed. ON THIS DATE In 1787, the Constitution of the United States was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. In 1920, the American Professional Football Association — a precursor of the National Football League — was formed in Canton, Ohio. In 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II, more than two weeks after Nazi Germany had launched its assault. In 1944, during World War II, Allied paratroopers launched Operation Market Garden, landing behind German lines in the Netherlands. (After initial success, the Allies were beaten back by the Germans.) In 1948, the United Nations mediator for Palestine, Count Folke Bernadotte, was assassinated in Jerusalem by Jewish extremists. In 1949, more than 120 people died when fire gutted the Canadian passenger steamship SS Noronic at a pier in Toronto. In 1959, groundbreaking took place for Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. In 1978, after meeting at Camp David, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed a framework for a peace treaty. In 1980, former Nicaraguan president Anastasio Somoza was assassinated in Paraguay. In 1984, Progressive Conservative leader Brian Mulroney took office as Canada’s 18th

T O D AY IN HISTORY prime minister. TEN YEARS AGO A U.N. refugee worker (Mensah Kpognon) was killed and a second (Sapeu Laurence Djeya) kidnapped in a raid in Guinea (the abducted staffer was later released). In Sydney, Australia, swimmer Tom Dolan of the United States won the 400-meter individual medley. FIVE YEARS AGO Two passengers were killed and more than 80 people hurt when a Chicago Metra commuter train derailed while changing tracks at high speed. Insurgents assassinated a Kurdish member of parliament, his brother and their driver in an ambush north of Baghdad. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama abruptly canceled a longplanned missile shield for Eastern Europe, replacing a Bushera project that was bitterly opposed by Russia with a plan he contended would better defend against a growing threat of Iranian missiles. An 18-year-old man armed with an ax, knives and Molotov cocktails attacked his high school in Ansbach, Germany, injuring nine students and a teacher before being shot and arrested. Police in New Haven, Conn., charged Raymond Clark III, a Yale animal lab technician, with murdering graduate student Annie Le. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Pro Football Hall of Famer George Blanda is 83. Actor David Huddleston is 80. Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) is 77. Retired Supreme Court Justice David Souter is 71. Singer LaMonte McLemore (The Fifth Dimension) is 71. Retired Marine Gen. Anthony Zinni is 67. Basketball Hall of Fame coach Phil Jackson is 65. Singer Fee Waybill is 60. Actress Cassandra Peterson (“Elvira, Mistress

15, in the area of Forest Road 1815 and Horse Butte Road in Bend. DUII — Anthony Glenn Head, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:59 a.m. Sept. 15, in the 63400 block of U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:46 a.m. Sept. 15, in the 7500 block of Southwest Falcon Crest Drive in Redmond.

POLICE LOG

of the Dark�) is 59. Comedian Rita Rudner is 57. Muppeteer Kevin Clash is 50. Movie director Baz Luhrmann is 48. Singer BeBe Winans is 48. Actor Kyle Chandler is 45. Director-producer Bryan Singer (“X-Men�) is 45. Rapper Doug E. Fresh is 44. Actor Malik Yoba is 43. Rock musician Keith Flint (Prodigy) is 41. Actor Matthew Settle is 41. Rapper Vinnie (Naughty By Nature) is 40. Rock singer Anastacia is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer Marcus Sanders (Hi-Five) is 37. Actress-singer Nona Gaye is 36. Singer-actor Constantine Maroulis is 35. NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson is 35. Pop singer Maile Misajon (Eden’s Crush) is 34. Country singer-songwriter

Stephen Cochran is 31. Rock musician Chuck Comeau (Simple Plan) is 31. Country singer Desi Wasdin (3 of Hearts) is 27. Rock musician Jon Walker is 25. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The great tragedy of life is not that men perish, but that they cease to love.� — W. Somerset Maugham, English author and dramatist (1874-1965)

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 7:40 p.m. Sept. 15, in the 2200 block of Southwest 22nd Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:28 p.m. Sept. 15, in the area of Northwest Eighth Street and Northwest Poplar Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:49 p.m. Sept. 15, in the 2000 block of Southwest Timber Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:47 p.m. Sept. 15, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 12:46 p.m. Sept. 15, in the 1500 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 1:43 p.m. Sept. 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northeast Negus Way. Theft — A tailgate was reported stolen from a vehicle at 12:45 p.m. Sept. 15, in the 1500 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Computer hardware was reported stolen at 9:01 a.m. Sept. 15, in the 2000 block of Southeast College Loop. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:52 a.m. Sept. 15, in the 300 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 11:23 a.m. Sept. 15, in the area of Southeast Knight Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:18 p.m. Sept. 15, in the area of Northeast Blackbear Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:08 p.m. Sept. 15, in the area of Northeast Third and Juniper streets. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 15, in the area of Northeast Third Street.

Tuesday 12:09 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 21078 Clairaway Ave. 1:44 p.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 642 N.E. Third St. 2:46 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 60847 Granite Drive. 5:08 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 623 S.E. Sixth St. 10:25 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, Northeast Butler Market Road. 13 — Medical aid calls. Wednesday 3:54 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 1828 N.W. Awbrey Road. 15 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-4477178 — or check the website at www.humanesocietyochocos .com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www .redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:25 p.m. Sept.

Australian shepherd and Australian cattle dog mix — Young female, black and brown; found near Southwest 16th Street and Southwest Kalama Avenue. Yorkshire terrier — Adult male, brown and silver, yellow and black collar; found near Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Domestic short-haired cat — Young male, gray tabby; found near Southwest Xero Lane. Rottweiler mix — Male puppy, black and tan, blue collar; found near Southwest 20th Street and Southwest Glacier Avenue.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 C3

O Portland buys iconic sign City gets emergency approval for complex deal so wording can be changed in time for Thanksgiving event

“It hasn’t been as easy as people would think. It wasn’t a matter of just giving the sign away and the city taking it.”

By Tom Hallman Jr.

— Portland Commissioner Randy Leonard

The Oregonian

PORTLAND — The city of Portland took ownership of the iconic “Made in Oregon” sign Wednesday after city commissioners declared an emergency allowing them to approve a complicated deal among the city, the sign’s owner and the owner of the Old Town building under the sign. The emergency? Starting work immediately so the lettering can be changed to read “Portland Oregon” in time to light the sign at a ceremony the day after Thanksgiving. Commissioner Randy Leonard, who has spent nearly a year on the project, asked fellow commissioners to declare the matter an emergency. Otherwise, he said, the City Council couldn’t vote until a Sept. 29 meeting — too late to get the neon sign ready for the celebration. “It hasn’t been as easy as people would think,” Leonard said. “It wasn’t a matter of just giving the sign away and the city taking it.” The sign, built by Ramsay Signs in 1941 to advertise White Satin Sugar, was changed over the years, becoming “Made in Oregon” in 1997. After the University of Oregon leased and renovated the building under

The Associated Press file photo

The “Made in Oregon” sign in Portland has changed over the years. It was originally built in 1941 as an ad for White Satin Sugar. the sign for a satellite campus, it sought in 2008 to change the sign to carry a big “O.” That idea died last year when Leonard and the city’s Historic Landmarks Commission objected. Leonard began rounds of negotiations, at one point driving to Anacortes, Wash., to talk face to face with sign owner Darryl Paulsen of Ramsay Signs. Leonard said sticking points were maintenance agreements, easement issues to give the city access to the sign — and finding a way to pull off a deal without taxpayers footing the bill. The final document — 104 pages and filled with plenty uses of “whereas” and “therefore” — was so long that a City Hall copier broke down making copies for all involved, said Amy Ruiz, the

planning and sustainability adviser for Mayor Sam Adams. Under the agreement, Ramsay Signs will donate the sign to the city and be paid $2,000 a month for 10 years to maintain it. Art DeMuro, who owns the building under the sign, will give the city the $200,000 needed to change the lettering. Money to maintain the sign will come from a parking lot and commercial space under the Burnside Bridge that DeMuro will lease from the city. Before the vote, Adams said

residents have asked him why it’s taken so long for the city to make a deal. DeMuro told the commissioners that people continually ask him about the sign’s future, and that his kids even get questions from classmates. “It’s nice to have it resolved,” he said. The vote was 4-0, with Commissioner Dan Saltzman absent. Commissioner Amanda Fritz said she hadn’t expected to support the plan given a tight city budget. But she did, noting the deal doesn’t burden taxpayers, takes no money from the city’s budget and protects a sign the city didn’t have the money to buy outright. After the vote, Leonard said he’d let Fritz flip the switch the day after Thanksgiving. But Fritz, acknowledging Leonard’s efforts, said they’d do it together. And, yes, Rudolph’s nose will be red.

Man pleads guilty to election fraud SALEM — Oregon Attorney General John Kroger says an 80-year-old Portland man has pleaded guilty to repeatedly voting in the name of his dead son. Kroger says Lafayette Frederick Keaton pleaded guilty Wednesday in Marion Coun-

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PORTLAND — The parents of Kyron Horman have gone on Oprah Winfrey’s show to repeat their belief the boy’s stepmother was involved in his disappearance three months ago. Kaine Horman and Desiree Young were on the popular daytime talk show Kyron HorT hu r s d ay. man, a secThey have ond-grader done a series of from Portland, interviews and has been appearances to missing for keep their son’s three months. case in front of the public. Investigators say Terri Horman was the last person known to have seen the second-grader at his school in Portland. Police have not identified any suspects, and no charges have been filed. Kaine Horman has filed for divorce from Terri Horman and has joined his former wife, Young, in questioning the stepmother’s behavior after the disappearance. Stephen Houze, the attorney for Terri Horman, would not comment on the show.

Beanbag shooting of girl followed policy, police chief says The Associated Press

RIVER

CHARLESTON — Hallmark Fisheries of Charleston is recalling several packaged crab meat products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The organism can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. No illnesses have been reported. The crab meat is sold under the brands Hallmark, Peacock, Quality Ocean International and Yaquina Bay in 5pound cans, 1-pound vacuum packs, 1-pound plastic tubs and 8-ounce plastic tubs. It was distributed in Washington, Nevada, Oregon and California, primarily to food service companies. For more information, call 541-888-3253, Monday through Friday.

ty Circuit Court in Salem to two counts of making a false statement in violation of state elections law. He’s to be sentenced Nov. 18. Keaton earlier pleaded guilty to theft of government funds and Social Security fraud, and is to be sentenced Nov. 15 on the federal charges.

New charges in Salem murder case SALEM — The girlfriend of a son accused of killing his parents on their Dallas farm has been indicted on two counts of aggravated murder by a Polk County grand jury. The Statesman Journal reports that 46-year-old Cindy Lou Beck had been originally charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder and one count of hindering prosecution. She will be arraigned Thursday. Prosecutors says 20-year-old Andrew Jondle killed his parents on their farm and allegedly stole money, jewelry and credit cards before Beck helped him dispose of his bloody clothes hours after the slaying. — From wire reports

JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY

The Associated Press

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Kyron’s parents tell Oprah his stepmom was involved in his disappearance

PORTLAND — Portland Police Chief Mike Reese says an officer followed police guidelines and policies when he used a beanbag shotgun last November against a 12-year-old girl. Reese says his department is reviewing its policies on using the devices. The officer involved, Christopher Humphreys, is on disability leave.

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C4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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A ‘post-partisan’ presidential pick

T

he coming midterm elections will, of course, be a referendum on Congress’ (and indirectly the president’s) handling of the recession, and the expansion of both govern-

ment and the nation’s debt. But it’s also an opportunity to recall a momentous election two years ago, when voters chose a supposedly “post-partisan” president. That myth barely outlasted the president’s inaugural address, and this week’s selection of Elizabeth Warren to oversee the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau demonstrates, in retrospect, how ludicrous it really was. The consumer bureau was created by this summer’s Dodd-Frank Wall Street overhaul legislation, and its purpose is to prevent unsavory behavior by institutions that provide mortgages, loans, credit cards and similar services. The law directs the president to appoint the bureau’s director to a fiveyear term contingent upon the consent of the Senate. There are ways around consent requirements, of course. The most notable of these is the “recess” appointment. Bill Clinton made 139 recess appointments, and George W. Bush made 179, according to the Congressional Research Service. Obama himself announced in March that he’d make 15, and he will no doubt make many more. But the president, notably, chose not to install Warren at the top of the consumer bureau by means of a recess appointment. Such a move would have been far too temporary for the president’s purposes, according to The New York Times. The bureau’s first director will oversee the all-important rule-making process by which a law becomes operational, and this could take some time. A recess appointment would last only until the end of next year. Instead, according to The Times, the president essentially gave her the job in the breech, designating her an assistant to the president and allowing her to avoid a highly contentious, and perhaps doomed, battle in the Senate. The law gives the Treasury Department custody of the consumer bureau until a permanent director emerges, which means that Warren will simply answer to the president and to Treasury head Timothy Geithner. Warren, thus, received a sort of super recess appointment. Why would the president seek to circumvent the Senate? To some extent, he did so for the same reasons his predecessors did: Partisan squabbling in the Senate often stalls appointments. But Warren isn’t your garden-variety presidential nominee. She is, rather, a uniquely polarizing — if highly qualified — candidate for the job. Not only did she come up with the idea for the consumer bureau, but, perhaps more importantly, she’s as much a crusader as a policy expert. As a union official told The New York Times in July, “Symbolically, it does seem incredibly important to pick somebody (to run the agency) who not only invented the idea, but someone who doesn’t claim to be a neutral.” You can see why financial institutions and many congressmembers don’t consider Warren the best person for the job. We wish presidents of all parties would take the Senate’s consent func-

Why would the president seek to circumvent the Senate? To some extent, he did so for the same reasons his predecessors did: Partisan squabbling in the Senate often stalls appointments. But (Elizabeth) Warren isn’t your gardenvariety presidential nominee. She is, rather, a uniquely polarizing — if highly qualified — candidate for the job. tion more seriously, the inevitable squabbling notwithstanding. But even a less confrontational move — say, the simple recess appointment of a less polarizing candidate than Warren — would at least have suggested that Obama gives more than a stray thought to his supposed commitment to be, ahem, “post-partisan.” Instead, the president chose to thumb his nose at the process and placate those for whom Warren is, above all, a symbol. As Rep. Barney Frank explained this summer: “We didn’t get a public option and other things we wanted. That wasn’t his (Obama’s) fault. The economic recovery bill, the stimulus, it wasn’t as big as it should have been. That wasn’t his fault. He couldn’t get the votes. With regard to appointing Elizabeth Warren, that’s his decision. No one can stop him from making it.” And no one will. But that isn’t to say that no one notices — and cares about — such actions. A New York Times/CBS News poll released yesterday asked people how they thought things were going in Washington. While most, 53 percent, said they were “dissatisfied but not angry,” a sizable group (20 percent) described themselves as angry. And why were they mad? The most frequently cited reason — and well above even unemployment — was partisanship. And they’re getting increasingly fed up as time passes. Back in April, partisanship was only the third most frequently cited reason for anger. The president isn’t entirely to blame for the problem. Far from it. He’s remarkable, rather, for pulling in voters with a promise of bipartisanship, then swinging almost immediately in the opposite direction, as if words and actions have nothing to do with one another. For those who believed him in 2008, this must be a terrible disappointment.

My Nickel’s Worth Leash dogs The “dog people” are at it again. I have a dog, and when the sign says “dogs on a leash,” I put my dog on a leash. On a recent Saturday, my wife and I walked the river trail. Entering and exiting, there are very large signs, “Dogs on a leash, no bikes.” We encountered 10 dogs, five on leash, five not on leash, and four bikes. We only saw one pile of dog feces. On Sunday, I decided to run on the track at High Desert Middle School. Another sign, “Dogs on leash.” A lady was walking on the track with a yellow Lab, not on leash. The dog was running everywhere. I passed one pile of dog feces on the way to the track. This is where children play. On Tuesday, I had softball practice at Kiwanis Park. It was one of the few times someone didn’t have to pick up dog feces so we wouldn’t step in it. I applaud the Forest Service and its dog rules. I don’t want someone’s dog running up to me even if it’s wagging its tail. An acquaintance of ours was recently bitten by a dog on a leash in Bend. The case is in litigation. Maybe you have a nice dog, but how do I know that? Keith Jensen Bend

Carey made difference In reference to Lily Raff’s column regarding Peggy Carey: Yes, she achieved those degrees and professional achievements. But let us not fail to note what is so terrific and unique to Peggy Carey. She made us feel special,

always remembering our names, made us feel powerful when we battled our ailments, made us cry at the start of the “Heaven Can Wait” walks, gave us hope when we couldn’t find our own, made us laugh at the “Heaven Can Wait” walks, helped us to feel real with her humility and feel so lucky to call her a friend. The people of Vail are the lucky ones now. Terese Jarvis Bend

Wyden carousel Jim Huffman is my choice for the United States Senate. He is thoughtful, pragmatic and straightforward. You will always know where he stands. Sen. Ron Wyden’s proposed Oregon Eastside Forest Restoration, Old Growth and Jobs Act of 2009 is a perfect example of why Wyden’s reign needs to come to an end. He has been playing the same game for too long. ’Round and around he goes. First, he proposes an idealistic plan that appears to be the perfect compromise for all constituencies, yet is unworkable. In this case, he proposes new restrictions on forestland usage and simultaneously envisions a slew of new jobs managing these lands and harvesting timber. Wyden touts the bill as a jobs bill on the eastern side of the Cascades to voters hungry for jobs, and as an environmental bill on the western side where voters punch the ballot for anything “green.” Second, eventually he will compromise and vote for a plan that is detrimental to the economy and live-

lihoods of the citizens of Central Oregon. He will justify this by bringing home from Washington new federal funds/handouts that he will assure us will make it all OK. And third, when unhappy voters complain about fallout from the programs, Wyden will answer voters by referencing the original plan he sponsored but couldn’t get the Senate to support. Just replay the health care fiasco and you will spot the pattern ... or watch it again when tax cuts are discussed. Let’s get off the carousel. Patricia Apregan Bend

Get rid of Wyden Ron who? Oh, yeah, he is the one who hasn’t had a real job for 30 years and has been in Congress helping to bring us to this brink of disaster. No, I am voting for Jim Huffman. Why? Because, among other things, he is a constitutional lawyer and a strict adherent to same. On the other hand, Sen. Ron Wyden voted for national health care legislation, bailouts, government takeover of auto companies/ banks and bills establishing ever more intrusive regulation of our day-to-day lives, to name a few. Our founding fathers never intended that being in Congress would be a career. I think it is about time Wyden left Congress and found out what the real world in which we live is all about. Bob Roth Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Recession has brought customers to area thrift stores W JANET hat’s been bad news for most local retailers the last couple of years has actually been good news for at least one small group, the folks who run the area’s thrift shops. In Bend, that good news has been shared by about eight thrifts scattered across the community. Among them is the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon’s Possibilities thrift, located near Bi-Mart and Lithia Motors on Northeast Second Street. You should know upfront that my daughter Mary works at the Possibilities store — it functions not only as a money-raiser for OFCO but as an employer for 37 men and women in our community with intellectual disabilities. A down economy translates into more customers at Possibilities, says Vera Farrell, program manager. A relative newcomer to Central Oregon, she brings a background in social services to her first attempt at retailing. Both are

necessary at Possibilities. Tuesday was both typical and unusual at the thrift. Farrell says the store served 720 paying customers, well above the 400-500 it usually serves. That no doubt was due, in part, to the fact that Tuesday is seniors day, during which senior citizens can purchase items at a discount. In fact, under Farrell’s guidance every day is something special at Possibilities. There’s a monthly bag sale, designed to get merchandise off the shelves and out the door. It’s a particularly popular event: Farrell says people begin lining up half an hour or more before the store opens. And each day features some sorts of items for sale at reduced prices — books, music and the like on Mondays, clothing on Tuesdays and so on. It’s that push to get items in, on display and then out quickly that helps make Possibilities a success. Given the

STEVENS number of people through the store each day, items that don’t sell relatively quickly may never sell at all without a boost from Farrell and her crew. Even that isn’t always successful, however, though unsold items do not go unused. All-cotton T-shirts, as an example, are bundled and sold to Mt. Bachelor Inc. as rags used in machinery maintenance. Possibilities and all the other relatively small thrifts in Bend must operate with an eye on the 800-pound gorilla in Bend’s thrift community. Goodwill Industries operates in a bright, airy building designed to meet its needs; its fleet

of trucks is a common sight at local grocery stores. Compete the smaller stores do, however. Their prices are often lower than Goodwill’s for one thing, no doubt in part because their overhead is lower. At Possibilities there are those daily specials. Other thrifts also devise ways to draw customers in. The down economy not only has brought in more customers, Farrell says, it’s boosted donations, as well. Just as people have less to spend on clothing, furniture, books and other household items, more of them are losing their homes or being forced to move out of the area. That’s meant an uptick in donations as families pack up and prepare to leave. Those donations not only mean more items to sell, they’re good for the environment. Thrifts are, after all, great big recycling centers of a sort, places where still usable items get a new lease on life

in the hands of new families. Possibilities and the other thrifts in Bend do more than provide inexpensive shopping or give those with more possessions than they need a place to put them to good use. They also support a broad range of worthwhile programs. The Opportunity Foundation serves the intellectually disabled in our community; the Humane Society of Central Oregon takes care of lost or unwanted pets. Thrifts help support the Bend Community Center, St. Vincent de Paul and others. Without them, those agencies would have to find more money elsewhere in the community. In a time when charitable donations are down, that could translate into reductions in programs that serve people here who face real obstacles in their daily lives. Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 C5

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N   Georgia "Gail" Wilferd, of Prineville Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Funeral Service on Monday, Sept. 20, 2010, at 1:00 PM held at The Prineville Presbyterian Church, and a graveside service to follow at Juniper Haven Cemetery.

Jerome "Joe" Petzold, of Hines June 12, 1939 - Sept. 6, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A celebration of Jerome's life will be held Friday, September 17 from 4-6PM at the Elks Lodge #1680, 118 N. Broadway Ave., Burns, OR.

Thelma Jane Fine, of Madras July 22, 1916 - Sept. 11, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Graveside Service: Saturday, September 18, 2010 at 10:00 am at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park. Memorial Service: Saturday, September 18, 2010 at 11:00 am at United Methodist Church.

Thomas "Tom" McCauley, of Bend Mar. 16, 1942 - Aug. 17, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Military Honors, graveside at Willamette National Cemetery 11800 Mt. Scott Blvd, Portland, Oregon, on Friday, September 17, 2010, at 2:00 PM Contributions may be made to:

Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th St., Bend, OR 97702-9694.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Irene Marie Hensley January 25, 1919 - Sept. 9, 2010 Irene Marie Hensley passed away on September 9. She was 91. A celebration of her life will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Bend on Sunday, October 10, at 1 p.m. Mrs. Hensley was born on January 25, 1919 in Seward, Irene Marie Nebraska, Hensley the third of the six children of Walter and Anna Ott. Her father was a Lutheran elementary school teacher/principal. Most of her childhood was lived at a country parish in Scribner, NE. Irene graduated from high school in West Point, NE. In 1939, realizing they had no real financial future in NE, Irene and her older sister, Lois, joined a ‘drive-out’ car group and moved to Santa Ana, CA, where they both secured jobs as housemaids. In 1941, Irene met and married Wayne Hensley and they moved to Portland, OR so Wayne could get a job in the war effort in the Kaiser shipyards. Their son, Douglas, was born in 1942. In 1944, they purchased a small farm near Forest Grove, OR, and began raising strawberries. In 1947, their son, Timothy, was born and in 1950, daughter, Constance, completed their family. Irene worked in the fields beside Wayne and over the years, their farm became a successful operation. Mt. Olive Lutheran Church in Forest Grove was the focus of their social life and soon Irene began taking on various volunteer jobs in Sunday school and the Lutheran Women’s Missionary League. Over the years, she attended conventions throughout the United States and eventually became President of the Northwest District of the LWML, which covered OR WA and ID. Irene also became very involved in Good Shepherd Lutheran Home of the West, which helps special-needs children and adults. In 1984, Wayne and Irene retired from farming and moved to a 10-acre place in Tumalo, OR. Irene enjoyed visits from her grandchildren, David, Steven and Heather, the children of Timothy, and Andrew and Allison, the children of Constance. Gardening, and church work at Trinity Lutheran in Bend, gave her much pleasure. Wayne passed away in 2007 and Irene moved into Bend. Irene is survived by her older sister, Lois Schultz of Santa Ana, CA, her younger sisters, Sally Hidy of Forest Grove, OR and Dorothy Schmidt of Santa Ana and her brother, Norman Ott of Mesa, AZ. Rejoicing in her Home Coming are oldest son, Douglas of Bend; middle son, Timothy and wife, Karen of Bend, and children, David and Steven Hensley and Heather and Alex Platanias, and Mary and Nolan Harris, and Gaetano Amico and Elizabeth Amico; and daughter, Constance HensleyJones and her husband, Dennis of Redmond; and children, Andrew Jones and Allison and Aaron Harris.

Claudia Scott Cushman Jan. 12, l942 - Sept. 13, 2010 Claudia Scott Cushman passed away on September 13, 2010, after a two year battle with Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma. She was 68. She was born January 12, l942, in Las Vegas, Nevada, to Walter and Margaret Scott and spent her youth in both Nevada and Southern California. For several years, Claudia owned and managed the McKenzie Company, a major office equipment and prod-

ucts supplier based in Newport Beach, California. She is survived by her husband, Glenn C. Cushman and two sons, Charles Cushman of Bend, Oregon and Mark Cushman of Medford, Oregon. Her parents preceded her in death. A private family service will be held at a later date. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com.

Inventor of The Club anti-theft device dies New York Times News Service Jim Winner, a businessman who developed and marketed The Club, the popular anti-auto theft device, died Tuesday in an automobile accident in Clarion County in western Pennsylvania. He was 81 and lived in Hollywood, Fla., and Clark, Pa. Winner was the chairman of Winner International, a company based in Sharon, Pa., that he founded in 1986 to market The Club, and that now sells a variety of safety and security

Business Continued from C1 In a news conference on Thursday at the U.S. Capitol, Merkley said a recent tour of Oregon counties reinforced his belief that small businesses need more borrowing power to grow and adapt. “We can’t go forward if we’ve had our credit lines cut in half,” was the message from small businesses, Merkley said. Merkley proposed the $30 billion small-business lending fund that’s the bill’s centerpiece. The fund allows banks with less than $10 billion in assets to borrow from the federal government at interest rates as low as 1 percent. The banks, in turn, would be required to increase lending to small businesses, or face increasingly higher interest rates as a penalty.

Bill’s provisions The small-business bill includes a conglomeration of other provisions aimed at increasing small businesses’ profits and ability to find funding to expand: • Increasing Small Business Administration loan limits in a number of categories. The smallest loans will increase from $35,000 to $50,000, while larger loans will increase from $1.5 million to $5 million. • Sending $900 million to state lending programs. Funds would be allocated based on state population and other factors. The Senate Finance Committee on Wednesday did not have an estimate of how much each state would receive under the fund. • Letting businesses write off equipment purchases and other capital expenditures on their taxes. The provision, sometimes called bonus depreciation, would cost about $5.5 billion. • Letting small-business owners deduct the cost of health insurance for themselves and their families in 2010, which currently isn’t allowed. It would cost an estimated $2 billion. The bill’s terms for banks that access the federal money are fair, Moss said. While she’s waiting to see a final product, she said her bank would be “interested in participating in any program that provides better access to small businesses.” The federal funds wouldn’t solve the bank’s need to secure additional capital, as required by a federal consent order, Moss said.

Giant Loop’s story Harold Olaf Cecil said he’s been searching without success for about $100,000 he needs to expand Giant Loop LLC, a Bend company that sells saddlebags and other motorcycle accessories. “I’ve made it through the first two years of getting our business through the startup phase on cash flow alone,” Cecil said. “We could be growing this company even faster and be truly achieving our potential even faster if we had some capital.” Cecil, who co-owns Giant Loop with Dave Wachs, said

Car theft Continued from C1 The Oregon Department of Transportation closed the highway between mileposts 39 and 47 as police flooded the area to search for the suspect. DeMars said detectives from the Sheriff’s Office were assisting with the search on

products. A device that hooks to a car’s steering wheel and prevents it from being turned, The Club can be Jim Winner defeated by deter m i ned thieves, but Winner understood that it could be sold for its power as a psychological deterrent as well as an actual one.

HUBZone help One little-noticed provision of the small-business bill would fix a common complaint about federal contracts by local companies. Currently, many federal contracts give preference to companies located in Historically Underutilized Business Zones, which are created once a decade based on unemployment rates. Deschutes County didn’t qualify as a HUBZone during the last update, so local companies either can’t bid on many contracts, or have relocated to neighboring counties that are HUBZones, despite Deschutes County’s 14.8 percent unemployment rate. The bill would fix the problem by changing the federal contracting process so agencies consider HUBZone status, but don’t have to. That will put HUBZone companies on the same level as other categories that have federal contracting preferences, including companies owned by women and disabled veterans. All it takes is changing the word “shall” to “may” in a section of federal law.

circumstances related to Bend’s housing market plunge two years ago hurt his personal credit, but Giant Loop has a two-year track record of paying its bills on time and growing at a breakneck pace. The company hired its first full-time employee this year, he said, and now has 50 U.S. dealers and seven foreign countries that carry Giant Loop products. But without more capital, it’s hard to take the next step, Cecil said. “I cannot scale up my production and begin to realize efficiencies of scale,” he said. “I can’t extend credit to distributors overseas.” Cecil unsuccessfully asked for an increase on the company’s credit card limit, as a temporary way to increase its credit line, he said. Now he’s hoping that an application for a Small Business Administration loan will solve his problem.

’Less than stellar’ Frozen credit markets have hampered local companies, said Economic Development for Central Oregon Director Roger Lee. That’s beginning to thaw, Lee said, but no thanks to recent SBA programs, which have fallen short of what businesses hoped for. “Our own experience with an appropriations grant administered by the SBA has been less than stellar,” Lee said. “Perfect example of legislative intent being lost in administration and bureaucratic implementation.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Thursday evening. Buckner was not injured in the incident. DeMars said he was able to provide a description of the suspect, which has been turned over to detectives but not released to the public. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 17

SATURDAY

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

78

50

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

81/53

76/51

86/54

64/48

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

82/57

75/57

80s

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 74/47 Redmond Prineville 79/50 Cascadia 81/51 78/61 Sisters 77/49 Bend Post 78/50

76/59

67/38

76/47

66/56

76/46

77/48

Hampton 74/47

Fort Rock

66/45

73/55

Bend

Boise

78/50

79/54

70s

88/54

80s

Redding

78/41

Sunny to partly cloudy with warm temperatures.

70s

63/32

84/45

87/43

80s

Crater Lake

Idaho Falls Elko

84/56

78/49

Silver Lake

75/44

Missoula

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

57/40

Eugene

78/48

70/40

Helena

74/59

Burns

40s

50s

Portland

Reno

84/51

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

66/58

88/62

90s

LOW

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

LOW

Last

New

First

Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7

Oct. 14

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . .not available . . . . . . 66/56/r. . . . . . 65/54/sh Baker City . . . . . . 78/49/0.00 . . . . . . 84/52/s. . . . . . 73/45/sh Brookings . . . . . . 66/56/0.18 . . . . . 59/52/sh. . . . . . 60/53/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . .80/NA/0.00 . . . . . 85/50/pc. . . . . . 72/44/sh Eugene . . . . . . .not available . . . . . . 73/55/r. . . . . . 70/51/sh Klamath Falls . . . 78/40/0.00 . . . . . . 72/46/s. . . . . . 64/45/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 79/36/0.00 . . . . . 80/47/pc. . . . . . 67/43/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 72/47/0.00 . . . . . 77/46/sh. . . . . . 61/36/sh Medford . . . . . . . 79/56/0.00 . . . . . 77/57/sh. . . . . . 73/57/sh Newport . . . . . .not available . . . . . . 64/55/r. . . . . . 63/52/sh North Bend . . . . . 72/59/0.00 . . . . . . 65/54/r. . . . . . 64/53/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 84/51/0.00 . . . . . 90/57/pc. . . . . . 79/52/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 79/58/0.01 . . . . . 85/57/pc. . . . . . 75/52/sh Portland . . . . . .not available . . . . . 74/59/sh. . . . . . 72/56/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 73/54/0.00 . . . . . 81/51/sh. . . . . . 67/47/sh Redmond. . . . . . .76/55/trace . . . . . 79/49/pc. . . . . . 66/43/sh Roseburg. . . . . . .81/60/trace . . . . . 80/58/sh. . . . . . 72/53/sh Salem . . . . . . . .not available . . . . . . 72/56/r. . . . . . 70/52/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 74/52/0.00 . . . . . 77/49/sh. . . . . . 63/39/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 79/61/0.03 . . . . . 81/58/sh. . . . . . 71/52/sh

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74/59 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 in 2008 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 in 1970 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.32” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.59” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.70” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.98 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.26 in 1954 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

68 31

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

67 32

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:15 a.m. . . . . . .6:33 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:39 a.m. . . . . . .8:12 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:03 a.m. . . . . . .8:29 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .7:16 p.m. . . . . . .7:09 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:41 a.m. . . . . . .7:41 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:12 p.m. . . . . . .7:11 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

60s

71/59

77/47

77/46

75/45

Vancouver

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:47 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:12 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:48 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:10 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:30 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:10 a.m.

Partly cloudy.

69 37

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Seattle

Partly to mostly cloudy today with a chance of showers. Eastern

HIGH

NORTHWEST

47/30

77/48

LOW

70 42

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 84° Ontario • 36° Lakeview

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

Showers will be likely along and west of the Cascades today. Expect partly sunny skies to the east.

Central

La Pine

60s

HIGH

82/52

80/55

Oakridge Elk Lake

Expect cloudy skies with periods of rain.

81/56

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

Tonight: Cloudy, rain.

Today: Partly cloudy, chance of showers.

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,108 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,026 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,669 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 25,932 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101,895 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 967 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,521 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 66/56

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 47/30

S

Saskatoon 47/28

Seattle 71/59

Yuma, Ariz.

• 25°

San Francisco 66/58

Truckee, Calif.

• 2.17” Lansing, Mich.

Salt Lake City Las 88/62 Vegas 101/72

Cheyenne 80/47 Denver 86/54 Albuquerque 90/58

Los Angeles 70/57 Phoenix 106/81

Honolulu 88/72

Tijuana 75/59 Chihuahua 89/62

La Paz 99/77 Anchorage 62/43

Juneau 69/40

Trash Continued from C1 Councilors grappled with the issue for more than an hour Wednesday. They ultimately decided not to grant Mahaney, who has been in business for 10 years, an exemption to the rules. Instead, they agreed to clarify what services CleanUp Industries and other businesses can provide under the ordinance. Assistant City Attorney Gary Firestone said Thursday councilors will have a wide range of options for how they do this. They can decide that someone throwing away a gum wrapper in one of Mahaney’s drop boxes is too much, or they can determine that as long as Clean-Up Industries fills most of the container that it’s not a violation of the franchise. “The one thing that’s clear is that if he or his employees are the only people putting things in the container, then he can transport the container,” Firestone said. “Then (the councilors) will address: Can they do anything beyond that?” Firestone said the soonest the council would revisit the ordinance would be in mid-October. The franchise agreements Bend Garbage & Recycling and Cascade Disposal have with the city guarantee the companies are Bend’s sole trash haulers. The companies pay 4 percent of gross revenues to the city for this privilege. In fiscal year 2010-11, the city will earn about $482,000 from these fees. Bend Garbage & Recycling’s franchise covers the areas of Bend north of Greenwood Avenue and Cascade Disposal the parts of the city south of Greenwood. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Mazatlan 90/82

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 62/42

Winnipeg 49/33 Thunder Bay 53/34

Halifax 62/47 Portland Boston 65/51 68/56

To ronto 66/49 Green Bay 67/48 Buffalo New York 76/61 66/52 Detroit Chicago 69/57 Philadelphia 74/61 Washington, D. C. 80/61 Columbus 85/61 Omaha Des Moines 75/53 79/57 76/59 Louisville 84/60 Kansas City St. Louis 83/68 Charlotte 80/60 Nashville 93/62 87/61 Atlanta Oklahoma City Little Rock 91/70 92/69 93/67 Birmingham 93/70 Dallas 95/76 New Orleans 92/75 Orlando Houston 91/72 93/76

Rapid City 68/44

Boise 88/54

• 106°

S

Bismarck 54/37

Billings 51/43

Portland 74/59

S

St. Paul 67/48

Miami 90/79 Monterrey 87/74

FRONTS

Gov. Ted Kulongoski has announced a proposal for another 8 percent cut to Oregon’s budget. State agencies slashed their budgets by 9 percent in June; now they’re facing more cuts, totaling about $377.5 million. Examples: Agency

Original $577.1M

Department of Human Services

$158,237,033 $104,429,955

$262,666,988

Department of State Police

$10,368,293

$6,760,041

$17,128,334

Department of Corrections

$51,891,893

$33,833,092

$85,724,985

Department of Environmental Quality

$1,313,730

$856,540

$2,170,270

Department of Education

$15,612,898

$10,179,481

$25,792,379

Community Colleges & $21,119,172 Workforce Development

$13,769,529

$34,888,701

Department of Agriculture

$652,106

$425,168

$1,077,274

Department of Forestry

$1,842,254

$1,201,134

$3,043,388

Department of Transportation

$521,233

$273,047

$794,280

Total

Source: Oregon Budget and Management Division

Cuts Continued from C1 While student-to-teacher ratios are not at an ideal level, Paradis said the college was able to add 32 new positions this year to accommodate the larger student body. The Oregon State Police would lay off 17 people in its Forensic Services division. While the move would save $815,523, it is also anticipated to force the agency to stop providing services to police agencies investigating non-felony property crime cases. The Oregon Department of Revenue proposes to trim $4.4 million by laying off 131 people and closing its nine field offices, including one in Bend. Spokeswoman Rosemary Hardin said while taxpayer assistance services would no longer be available in person at the field offices, the department is continuing to expand its online assistance programs. Savings achieved by eliminating the field offices is likely to be offset by diminished tax collec-

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .69/60/0.21 . 71/54/pc . . 69/47/pc Rapid City . . . . . .85/44/0.00 . . .68/44/c . . . 57/44/c Savannah . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 89/71/pc . . . 89/70/s Green Bay. . . . . .63/53/0.26 . 67/48/pc . . . 60/44/c Reno . . . . . . . . . .86/47/0.00 . . .84/51/s . . 80/51/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .67/59/0.21 . .71/59/sh . . 69/56/sh Greensboro. . . . .89/64/0.00 . 89/61/pc . . . 87/61/s Richmond . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . 88/60/pc . . . 84/60/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .61/50/0.00 . 68/46/pc . . . 60/44/c Harrisburg. . . . . .68/54/0.13 . 78/56/pc . . . 78/54/s Rochester, NY . . .65/46/0.47 . 65/50/pc . . 74/52/pc Spokane . . . . . . .69/55/0.01 . 74/54/pc . . 70/54/sh Hartford, CT . . . .73/46/0.00 . .75/51/sh . . . 74/54/s Sacramento. . . . .87/56/0.00 . 81/56/pc . . 80/57/sh Springfield, MO. .77/64/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . 88/65/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .66/44/0.00 . .57/40/sh . . 66/42/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .76/67/0.01 . . .80/60/s . . 87/63/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . 92/74/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .87/75/0.00 . . .88/72/s . . . 88/74/s Salt Lake City . . .87/54/0.00 . . .88/62/s . . . 89/59/s Tucson. . . . . . . .101/71/0.00 103/71/pc . . 102/72/s Houston . . . . . . .94/69/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 94/75/pc San Antonio . . . .91/73/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . 92/73/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .83/69/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . 92/70/pc Huntsville . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 90/63/pc . . . 90/59/s San Diego . . . . . .72/62/0.00 . 72/61/pc . . 73/62/pc Washington, DC .90/67/0.00 . 85/61/pc . . . 83/61/s Indianapolis . . . .84/70/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . 83/58/pc San Francisco . . .65/55/0.00 . 66/58/pc . . . 67/59/c Wichita . . . . . . . .74/65/0.00 . 89/66/pc . . 90/64/pc Jackson, MS . . . .95/70/0.00 . 95/67/pc . . . 95/66/s San Jose . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . 77/59/pc . . . 79/63/c Yakima . . . . . . . 78/58/trace . 81/55/pc . . 72/52/sh Madison, WI . . . .65/55/0.03 . 72/54/pc . . 67/47/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .89/53/0.00 . 84/50/pc . . 84/52/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .106/76/0.00 . .107/75/s . . 107/72/s Jacksonville. . . . .87/64/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . . 89/68/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . . .69/40/s . . . 64/41/s Kansas City. . . . .72/59/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 85/66/pc Amsterdam. . . . .63/46/0.84 . .59/50/sh . . 59/47/sh Mecca . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .106/83/s . . 105/81/s Lansing . . . . . . . .67/57/2.17 . 70/51/pc . . 70/46/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . . 87/66/s Mexico City. . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .73/57/t . . . .68/57/t Las Vegas . . . . . .97/68/0.00 . .101/72/s . . 102/71/s Auckland. . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .56/48/r . . 59/50/sh Montreal. . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . . .64/43/s . . . 67/48/c Lexington . . . . . .83/68/0.19 . . .80/57/s . . . 85/62/s Baghdad . . . . . .102/73/0.00 . .104/74/s . . 108/77/s Moscow . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .63/52/sh . . 58/47/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .66/58/0.00 . 80/59/pc . . 71/53/sh Bangkok . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . . .88/78/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .75/56/sh . . 77/56/pc Little Rock. . . . . .95/70/0.00 . 93/67/pc . . . 94/68/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .83/68/sh . . . .78/67/r Nassau . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .92/78/t Los Angeles. . . . .66/58/0.00 . 70/57/pc . . 69/58/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .87/78/s . . . 87/77/s New Delhi. . . . . .87/77/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .83/75/r Louisville . . . . . . .88/71/0.04 . . .84/60/s . . 89/63/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .61/47/sh . . 61/49/sh Osaka . . . . . . . . .84/72/1.10 . . .83/71/s . . . 84/71/s Memphis. . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . . .90/71/s . . . 95/71/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .67/45/sh . . 66/48/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . .58/50/sh . . . 59/51/c Miami . . . . . . . . .90/80/0.14 . 90/79/pc . . . .90/80/t Budapest. . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .64/53/sh . . 66/51/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . . 66/48/c Milwaukee . . . . .67/59/0.00 . 70/56/pc . . 66/52/sh Buenos Aires. . . .61/52/0.00 . . .55/39/s . . . 63/43/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .63/47/s . . . 64/47/s Minneapolis . . . .56/50/0.00 . . .67/48/c . . 61/43/pc Cabo San Lucas .93/75/0.00 . 97/79/pc . . 96/79/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .73/70/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . . .82/68/t Nashville . . . . . . .88/74/0.08 . . .87/61/s . . . 91/61/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .88/70/s . . . 88/68/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . 83/62/pc . . . .83/63/t New Orleans. . . .90/79/0.00 . 92/75/pc . . . 92/75/s Calgary . . . . . . . .43/41/0.15 . 47/30/pc . . 45/36/sh Santiago . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . .64/38/s . . . 67/39/s New York . . . . . .72/57/0.43 . . .76/61/c . . . 76/60/s Cancun . . . . . . . .79/75/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .89/77/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . .83/69/t . . 73/60/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .74/54/0.28 . 77/61/pc . . 77/58/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . 62/45/pc . . 63/52/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .78/65/0.00 . . .78/59/s . . 73/61/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .91/65/0.00 . 89/65/pc . . . 81/66/s Edinburgh . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . . .51/38/c . . 54/43/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 83/70/pc Oklahoma City . .87/70/0.00 . . .92/69/s . . 92/68/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .72/55/0.22 . .67/49/sh . . . 68/49/c Shanghai. . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .89/78/s . . . 90/78/s Omaha . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . 79/57/pc . . 69/54/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .84/53/s . . . 83/51/s Singapore . . . . . .88/79/0.55 . . .88/78/t . . . .88/77/t Orlando. . . . . . . 90/73/trace . 91/72/pc . . 91/71/pc Hong Kong . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .61/51/sh . . 58/50/sh Palm Springs. . .105/66/0.00 . .105/70/s . . 106/72/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .81/65/s . . . 84/66/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .67/49/s . . . 68/50/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 78/60/pc . . 78/58/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .96/56/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 84/64/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .91/77/t . . 90/76/pc Philadelphia . . . .85/59/0.16 . 80/61/pc . . . 79/60/s Johannesburg . . .84/57/0.00 . . .81/53/s . . . 82/53/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .86/75/s . . . 83/71/s Phoenix. . . . . . .106/79/0.00 . .106/81/s . . 107/82/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . 62/57/pc . . 62/56/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . . .82/71/t . . 84/72/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .68/59/0.25 . 71/50/pc . . . 81/55/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . .75/61/sh . . 75/58/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .57/54/0.00 . 66/49/pc . . 67/54/sh Portland, ME. . . .64/43/0.00 . .65/51/sh . . . 64/56/s London . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . .63/47/s . . . 61/48/c Vancouver. . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .66/56/sh . . 64/56/sh Providence . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . . 69/56/s Madrid . . . . . . . .81/66/0.14 . . .78/61/t . . 77/58/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .68/55/0.16 . .64/53/sh . . 64/49/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .94/68/0.00 . 90/63/pc . . . 88/60/s Manila. . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/77/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .63/46/0.13 . .60/48/sh . . 59/45/sh

Fire

Budget reductions revised

Additional $377.5M

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .94/73/0.00 . 94/71/pc . . 94/70/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .72/62/1.76 . 67/48/pc . . 79/55/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .70/43/0.17 . 70/52/pc . . . 73/55/s Albuquerque. . . .91/64/0.00 . 90/58/pc . . . 90/59/s Anchorage . . . . .52/44/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . . 61/43/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 91/70/pc . . . 91/70/s Atlantic City . . . .81/55/0.06 . 80/61/pc . . . 75/61/s Austin . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . 93/70/pc Baltimore . . . . . .84/60/0.01 . 83/59/pc . . . 82/60/s Billings. . . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . .51/43/sh . . . 56/43/c Birmingham . . . .92/73/0.03 . 93/70/pc . . . 94/65/s Bismarck . . . . . . .69/41/0.00 . . .54/37/c . . 54/42/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .83/56/0.00 . . .88/54/s . . 81/51/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .70/53/0.00 . .68/56/sh . . . 67/57/s Bridgeport, CT. . .71/49/0.62 . . .76/56/c . . . 72/58/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .65/50/0.44 . 66/52/pc . . 70/52/pc Burlington, VT. . .64/44/0.32 . 66/48/pc . . 73/52/pc Caribou, ME . . . .58/41/0.00 . 63/38/pc . . . 67/49/s Charleston, SC . .88/67/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . . 89/70/s Charlotte. . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . 93/62/pc . . . 90/62/s Chattanooga. . . .87/73/0.02 . 90/63/pc . . . 91/59/s Cheyenne . . . . . .80/43/0.00 . . .80/47/s . . 71/47/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .69/62/0.16 . 74/61/pc . . 73/50/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .85/67/0.01 . . .80/55/s . . 83/59/pc Cleveland . . . . . .77/63/1.12 . 66/52/pc . . . 78/55/c Colorado Springs 82/56/0.00 . . .83/51/s . . . 83/49/s Columbia, MO . .73/63/0.00 . . .80/62/s . . 86/63/pc Columbia, SC . . .92/64/0.00 . 93/68/pc . . . 92/66/s Columbus, GA. . .92/67/0.00 . 94/70/pc . . . 94/69/s Columbus, OH. . .80/64/0.31 . . .75/53/s . . 80/56/pc Concord, NH . . . .70/37/0.00 . 68/46/pc . . . 72/50/s Corpus Christi. . .91/73/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . 89/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .93/75/0.00 . 95/76/pc . . 94/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .82/66/0.34 . . .76/54/s . . 81/57/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .88/48/0.00 . . .86/54/s . . . 84/55/s Des Moines. . . . .68/58/0.00 . 76/59/pc . . 68/55/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .75/59/0.93 . 69/57/pc . . 75/52/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . .62/39/sh . . . 53/37/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/72/0.03 . 91/69/pc . . 92/68/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . 62/36/pc . . . 64/35/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . . .57/38/c . . 57/37/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .78/41/0.00 . . .81/44/s . . . 82/46/s

tions, Hardin said, as many of the field employees pursue collection of unpaid taxes and work with delinquent taxpayers to achieve compliance. The department estimates that closing the field offices will cost the state $4.1 million in unpaid taxes per year. State Rep. Judy Stiegler, DBend, said she was looking forward to meeting with her fellow legislators in Salem next week to go over the proposed cuts. “We’ll take a serious look at what the governor did, what he had to do within his authority, allotment authority,” she said. “I think the Legislature will take a look at it to ensure we keep our schools open, we keep our community safe and we protect our vulnerable citizens. That’s why we have emergency funds.” Stiegler’s two opponents in the upcoming election, Republican Jason Conger and independent candidate Michael Kozak, could not be reached for comment. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Continued from C1 Firefighters and equipment, including seven handcrews, engines, air tankers and helicopters were fighting the fire Thursday, working on the south flank of the fire. Today’s forecast for the area calls for rain, Baker said, which should help firefighters prevent the fire from spreading farther.

INTERNATIONAL

But he said people should still be careful while out in the forest. “We are not out of fire season,” Baker said. “People should still watch their campfires, and be careful out there. Conditions are still right for burning, and it will be until the snow flies.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin .com.

“We are not out of fire season. People should still watch their campfires, and be careful out there. Conditions are still right for burning, and it will be until the snow flies.” — Kevin Baker with the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center


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College Football Inside Can Quizz get back on track in Corvallis? See Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

BASEBALL

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Madras’ Ceciliani wins minor-league award from Mets

Jeter a cheater, or just an actor?

A record-setting season has landed Darrell Ceciliani a high honor in the New York Mets organization. Ceciliani, a baseball standout from Madras, was among 11 Mets prospects Darrell to receive a Ceciliani 2010 Sterling Award. The awards — for the most valuable player at each of the Mets’ minor-league affiliate clubs, as well as for the organization’s overall player and pitcher of the year — were presented in a ceremony Wednesday night at Citi Field in New York before the Mets’ game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. A center fielder in his second year of professional baseball, Ceciliani won the Sterling Award for the Class A (short season) Brooklyn Cyclones. His .351 batting average this season was the highest single-season mark in Cyclones history; he also became the first Cyclones player ever to win the New York-Penn League batting title. The Madras native and 2008 graduate of Madras High School set Cyclones franchise records this season in a number of offensive categories, including hits (95), runs scored (56) and triples (12). At 20 years old, Ceciliani was the youngest player on the 2010 Brooklyn roster. —Bulletin staff report

The Yankee fooled an umpire on a pitch that didn’t hit him, but isn’t that part of baseball? By Anthony Rieber McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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hould we call him Derek Cheater now? That was the question buzzing around the Internet and sports talk radio on Thursday after Jeter pretended to get hit with a pitch in the Yankees’ 4-3 loss to the Rays in St. Petersburg, Fla., on Wednesday night. Jeter hopped around and held his hand and may have even said “Ouch” or “Owie” a few times, convincing umpires that he had been struck by a pitch that actually hit the knob of his bat. The best part of the performance was the little glance Jeter stole at plate umpire Lance Barksdale to see if his act had worked. It had. Jeter’s decision to fake getting hit was made in a split-second. Our debate about whether it was cheating can last until time itself

Chris O’Meara / The Associated Press

New York Yankees’ Derek Jeter, right, screams after a seventh-inning pitch that hit his bat, but not his arm. Jeter admitted after the game to faking the injury to get on base. comes to an end, or until the Cubs win another World Series, and we may still not agree. But here’s one take: Was it cheating? Yes. Was it wrong? No. See Jeter / D4

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

Summit rebounds, blasts Redmond Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

FOOTBALL Bush: Giving up Heisman not an admission of guilt METAIRIE, La. — Reggie Bush said Thursday that his decision to relinquish his Heisman Trophy is “not an admission of guilt,” just the best way to end the controversy. “It’s me showing respect to the Heisman Trophy itself and to the people who came before me and the people coming after,” Bush said after Saints practice. “I just felt like it was the best thing to do, the most respectful thing to do because obviously I do respect the Heisman. I do respect all the things it stands for.” The Heisman Trophy Trust had discussed reviewing Bush’s eligibility for the award after an NCAA report concluded that Bush and his family had improperly accepted cash and gifts from sports agents while Bush was playing for Southern Cal. — The Associated Press

INSIDE MLB AL

NL

Indians ...........3 Angels ...........2

D’backs ..........3 Reds...............1

Twins .............8 White Sox ......5

Mets...............6 Pirates ...........2 Cardinals .......4 Padres ...........0 Giants .......... 10 Dodgers .........2

Roundup, see Page D3

INDEX

Bend runners Stephanie Howe, left, and Katie Caba, right, hope to challenge Bend’s Kami Semick, Eugene’s Lauren Fleshman, and other top national runners in the XTERRA Trail Run National Championship on Saturday in Bend.

It’s time to hit the trail

The Bulletin

REDMOND — Summit High got its scoring groove back Thursday, blasting Redmond 50 in the Storm’s Intermountain Conference girls soccer opener. Summit junior Kristen Parr scored twice in the first 20 minutes of the match, sparking the visiting Storm to a 3-0 lead by halftime. Summit (1-0 IMC, 20-1 overall) dominated time of possession the entire game and

scored twice on set pieces in the second half. Holly Stormberg gave the Storm a 4-0 lead in the 68th minute off a Tashia Davis corner kick, and Eve Hess made it 5-0 in the 78th by converting a free kick. “It was a good way to start the season opener,” Summit coach Jamie Brock said about her team’s first league game. “But we definitely have a lot more to improve.” See Summit / D4

Bend runners will compete at two national championships to be staged in their hometown this weekend and next

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wo national championship events in the span of eight days. Central Oregon has certainly become a trendy destination for competitive trail runners from across the country. On Saturday, for the third year in a row, Bend will host the annual XTERRA Trail Run National Championship (21 kilometers), starting and finishing in the Old Mill District. Just a week later, the USA Track & Field 50-kilometer Trail National Championships will be staged on high-elevation singletrack, starting and finishing at Mt. Bachelor’s Sun-

MARK MORICAL

rise Lodge. The two events will bring some of the best trail runners from across the country to Central Oregon. But, as we have discovered over the last several years, many of the best trail runners in the country live right here in Bend. Bend’s Max King — yes, we know, he wins lots of races — is a favorite in both events for the men. Bend’s Kami Semick — yes, she also wins lots of races — is also a favorite for high placings in both the XTERRA and 50K national events. See Trail / D6

Bend’s Kami Semick, left, races in the 2008 XTERRA Trail Run National Championship in Bend. She finished second in 2008 and third in 2009, and is a favorite, along with Eugene’s Lauren Fleshman, for a high placing in this year’s race. The Bulletin file

Scoreboard ................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 NFL ........................................... D4 College football .........................D5 Adventure Sports.............. D5, D6

By Beau Eastes

Inside • More information on the XTERRA and the USATF trail run national championships, and a map of the XTERRA course, Page D6

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Sarah Mackenzie (7) and Summit’s Claire Navarra (2) battle for the ball during the second half Thursday in Redmond.

LOCAL GOLF

Washington golfer takes control of PNGA Mid-Am Bulletin staff report REDMOND — The runnerup of the 2007 U.S. Mid-Amateur championship took sole possession of the lead Thursday in the second round of the Pacific Northwest Golf Association’s 2010 Mid-Amateur Championship. Dan Whitaker, a 29-year-old from Cle Elum, Wash., shot a 4under-par 68 Thursday to move to 6 under for the 54-hole PNGA Mid-Am at Juniper Golf Course. Whitaker, who lost in the championship match of the 2007 U.S. Mid-Am at Oregon’s Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, holds a twostroke lead over Tom Brandes. See Mid-Am / D5

About the event Where: Northwest Golf Association Mid-Amateur Championship Where: Juniper Golf Course, Redmond Format: 54 holes, stroke play When: Concludes today Who: Golfers age 25 and older from within the PNGA. Handicap index limited to 8.4 Admission: Free for spectators

Inside • Thursday’s scores, Page D2


D2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Football: Redmond at Hood River Valley, 7 p.m.; Bend at Sprague, 7 p.m.; Mazama at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Madras, 7 p.m.; Vernonia at Culver, 7 p.m. Boys soccer: Corvallis at Bend, 4 p.m.; Crescent Valley at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Summit at Churchill, 5:30 p.m.; Culver at Central Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Corvallis, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Crescent Valley, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Gilchrist at Prospect, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Paisley, 4:30 p.m.

5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 1:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Boise Open, second round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 8:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300 practice, ESPN2. Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300 qualifying, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — High school, Columbus Carver (Ga.) at Lagrange (Ga.), ESPN2. 5 p.m. — College, Kansas at Southern Mississippi, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school, Klamath Union at Summit, COTV. 7 p.m. — College, California at Nevada, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at New York Mets, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

SATURDAY GOLF 4 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, third round, Golf Channel. 1:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Boise Open, third round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Iowa State at Kansas State, FSNW. 9 a.m. — College, Arkansas at Georgia, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Kent State at Penn State, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, Marlyand at West Virginia, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Florida at Tennessee, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, USC at Minnesota, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, Arizona State at Wisconsin, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m. — College, BYU at Florida State, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Nebraska at Washington, ABC. 1:30 p.m. — College, Baylor at Texas Christian, VS. network. 2:30 p.m. — College, Louisville at Oregon State, FNSW. 3:15 p.m. — College, Portland State at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet. 4 p.m. — College, Clemson at Auburn, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College, Mississippi State at LSU, ESPNU. 5 p.m. — College, Texas at Texas Tech, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Notre Dame at Michigan State, ABC. 7:30 p.m. — College, Iowa at Arizona, ESPN.

Saturday Cross country: Redmond at South Salem Invitational, 12:15 p.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County, Madras, La Pine at Three-Course Challenge in Seaside, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Molalla Invitational, 11:30 a.m. Boys soccer: Crescent Valley at Bend, 11 a.m.; Corvallis at Mountain View, 11 a.m.; Sisters at Henley, noon; Culver at Riverside, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Crescent Valley, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at Corvallis, 11 a.m.; Summit at Central Catholic, noon; Henley at Sisters, noon Volleyball: Summit at South Eugene tournament, 8 a.m.; La Pine at Lakeview tournament, 9 a.m.; Culver at Redmond JV tournament, TBA

GOLF Local PNGA MID-AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday at Juniper Golf Course, Redmond Par: 72 Second Round Dan Whitaker (Cle Elum, Wash.) 70-68—138 Tom Brandes (Bellevue, Wash.) 70-70—140 Tim Pilgrim (Seattle, Wash.) 70-74—144 Eric Peterson (Nampa, Idaho) 69-76—145 Marc Rhoades (Boise, Idaho) 74-73—147 Bob Wheeler (Eagle, Idaho) 73-74—147 Michael Kloenne (West Linn) 78-70—148 Billy Anderson (Eugene) 74-74—148 Sean Packer (Bonney Lake, Wash.) 75-73—148 Karl Smith (Gig Harbor, Wash.) 71-78—149 Steve Belt (McMinnville) 74-75—149 Chris Bae (Seattle, Wash.) 74-75—149 Kent Brown (Colville, Wash.) 73-76—149 Jim Sparkman (Moses Lake, Wash.) 75-75—150 Dwight Hietala (Bend) 73-77—150 Brian Phillips (Snoqualmie, Wash.) 76-75—151 Ron Janney (Colbert, Wash.) 73-79—152 Michael Dolder (Snohomish, Wash.) 72-80—152 Patrick Weeks (Vancouver, B.C.) 76-76—152 Kim Schwencke (Bend) 73-79—152 Craig Larson (Tacoma, Wash.) 77-76—153 Matthew Schuth (Dexter) 79-75—154 Cameron Laker (Vancouver, B.C.) 75-79—154 Steven Savage (Surrey, B.C.) 75-80—155 Jack Kelly (Seattle, Wash.) 76-79—155 Stephen Hartnett (Boise, Idaho) 79-76—155 Bill Winter (Portland) 78-78—156 Kevin Burnett (Bellevue, Wash.) 79-77—156 David Dines (Burnaby, B.C.) 76-81—157 Jim Shindler (Milwaukie) 76-81—157 Edward Jonson (Bainbridge Isl., Wash.) 80-77—157 Greg Kero (Olympia, Wash.) 78-79—157 Mark Johnson (Mtlake Terrace, Wash.) 77-81—158 Ben Janes (Corvallis) 76-82—158 John McDermott (North Bend, Wash.) 77-81—158 Paul Brown (Vancouver, B.C.) 79-80—159 Jeff Ward (Bend) 82-77—159 Stein Swenson (Bend) 80-80—160 Per Hansen (Vancouver, B.C.) 79-81—160 James Decker (Scottsdale, Ariz.) 79-82—161 Ryan Roskowski (Bend) 85-77—162 Keith Crimp (Ellensburg, Wash.) 81-82—163 Marty Loberg (Bow, Wash.) 86-77—163 Alex Foster (Beaverton) 79-85—164 Roger Eichhorn (Bend) 84-81—165 Cory Benner (Bend) 82-84—166 Carey Watson (Sunriver) 82-84—166 Scott Coffman (Washougal, Wash.) 87-80—167 Jim Tebbs (Bend) 82-87—169 Andrew Ferranti (Beaverton) 87-83—170 Jon Carroll (Eugene) 95-86—181 Kevin Larsson (Burnaby, B.C.) 90-92—182

7:30 p.m. — College, UNLV at Idaho, ESPNU. 8:20 p.m. — College, Wake Forest at Stanford, ESPN2. 9:30 p.m. — College, Houston at UCLA (sameday tape), FSNW.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at St. Louis Cardinals, Fox. 6 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

RODEO 5 p.m. — Professional Bull Riders, Springfield Invitation, VS. network.

SOCCER 4:30 a.m. — Barclay’s Premier League, Stoke City at West Ham United.

AUTO RACING 8 p.m. — IndyCar, Indy Japan 300, VS. network.

SUNDAY GOLF 4 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, final round, Golf Channel. 1:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Boise Open, final round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Miami Dolphins at Minnesota Vikings, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, New England Patriots at New York Jets, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Denver Broncos, Fox. 5:15 p.m. — NFL, New York Giants at Indianapolis Colts, NBC.

AUTO RACING 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300, ESPN. 4 p.m. — NHRA, O’Reilly Auto Parts Nationals, final eliminations (same-day tape), ESPN2.

BASKETBALL Noon — WNBA, finals, game 5 (if nescessary), Seattle Storm at Atlanta Dream, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles, TBS. 1 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW. 5 p.m. — MLB, Detroit Tigers at Chicago White Sox, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Sisters at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9. 7 p.m. — Mazama at Mountain View, KICE-AM 940.

SATURDAY FOOTBALL 2:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Louisville, KRCO-AM 690, FM 96.9. 3:15 p.m. — College, Portland State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

IN THE BLEACHERS

PGA Tour FEDEX CUP LEADERS Through Sept. 12 Rank Name Pts 1. Matt Kuchar 4,935 2. Dustin Johnson 4,299 3. Charley Hoffman 3,449 4. Steve Stricker 3,372 5. Paul Casey 3,015 6. Jason Day 2,633 7. Luke Donald 2,597 8. Ernie Els 2,343 9. Martin Laird 2,294 10. Phil Mickelson 2,249 11. Jim Furyk 2,121 12. Geoff Ogilvy 2,121 13. Justin Rose 2,105 14. Adam Scott 2,083 15. Hunter Mahan 2,058 16. Ryan Palmer 1,988 17. Retief Goosen 1,976 18. Bubba Watson 1,948 19. Zach Johnson 1,896 20. Kevin Na 1,837 21. Tim Clark 1,757 22. Ben Crane 1,732 23. K.J. Choi 1,725 24. Jeff Overton 1,669 25. Camilo Villegas 1,621 26. Ryan Moore 1,610 27. Robert Allenby 1,604 28. Nick Watney 1,584 29. Kevin Streelman 1,575 30. Bo Van Pelt 1,572

Money $4,753,727 $4,336,622 $2,289,646 $4,062,735 $3,283,194 $2,757,327 $2,855,234 $4,311,361 $1,639,528 $3,685,233 $3,459,622 $2,214,545 $3,441,331 $2,364,902 $3,402,391 $2,678,611 $2,700,589 $3,051,998 $2,624,868 $1,862,224 $3,205,431 $2,694,500 $1,952,462 $3,334,856 $2,827,398 $2,166,698 $2,619,997 $2,057,289 $1,181,724 $2,630,258

TENNIS WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— CHALLENGE BELL Thursday Quebec City Singles Second Round Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Sofia Arvidsson (8), Sweden, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2. Christina McHale, United States, def. Valerie Tetreault, Canada, 6-4, 6-3. Alexa Glatch, United States, def. Stephanie Dubois, Canada, 7-5, 6-2. GUANGZHOU INTERNATIONAL Thursday Guangzhou, China Singles Second Round Jarmila Groth (1), Australia, def. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-1, 6-4. Edina Gallovits, Romania, def. Ayumi Morita (4), Japan, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-0.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Miami 1 0 0 1.000 15 New England 1 0 0 1.000 38 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 10 N.Y. Jets 0 1 0 .000 9 South W L T Pct PF Houston 1 0 0 1.000 34 Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 24 Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 38 Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 24 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 10 Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000 15 Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 24 Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 14 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 21 Denver 0 1 0 .000 17 Oakland 0 1 0 .000 13 San Diego 0 1 0 .000 14 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

PA 10 24 15 10 PA 24 17 13 34 PA 9 9 38 17 PA 14 24 38 21

East W L T Pct Washington 1 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Giants 1 0 0 1.000 Dallas 0 1 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 Carolina 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 Green Bay 1 0 0 1.000 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 San Francisco 0 1 0 .000 St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Chicago at Dallas, 10 a.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m. Miami at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Seattle at Denver, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game New Orleans at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m.

PF PA 13 7 31 18 7 13 20 27 PF PA 14 9 17 14 9 15 18 31 PF PA 19 14 27 20 14 19 9 14 PF PA 17 13 31 6 6 31 13 17

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games Carson-Newman 37, Concordia-Selma 7 N.C. State 30, Cincinnati 19 Samford 38, Newberry 35 Tennessee Tech 43, Lane 0 Today’s Games SOUTH Kansas (1-1) at Southern Miss. (1-1), 5 p.m. FAR WEST California (2-0) at Nevada (2-0), 7 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST North Texas (0-2) at Army (1-1), 9 a.m. Kent St. (1-1) at Penn St. (1-1), 9 a.m. New Hampshire (1-1) at Rhode Island (0-2), 9 a.m. Liberty (2-0) at Robert Morris (1-1), 9 a.m. Sacred Heart (1-1) at St. Francis, Pa. (0-2), 9 a.m. Connecticut (1-1) at Temple (2-0), 9 a.m. Maryland (2-0) at West Virginia (2-0), 9 a.m. Georgetown, D.C. (2-0) at Yale (0-0), 9 a.m. Stony Brook (1-1) at Brown (0-0), 9:30 a.m. Fordham (1-1) at Columbia (0-0), 9:30 a.m. Princeton (0-0) at Lehigh (1-1), 9:37 a.m. Merrimack (0-1) at Bryant (2-0), 10 a.m. Dartmouth (0-0) at Bucknell (0-2), 10 a.m. Cornell (0-0) at Wagner (0-1), 10 a.m. Towson (1-1) at Villanova (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Duquesne (2-0) at Delaware (2-0), 3 p.m. UCF (1-1) at Buffalo (1-1), 4 p.m. Holy Cross (1-1) at Harvard (0-0), 4 p.m. Lafayette (0-1) at Penn (0-0), 4 p.m. Maine (1-1) at Syracuse (1-1), 4:15 p.m. SOUTH Arkansas (2-0) at Georgia (1-1), 9 a.m. Webber International (2-1) at Jacksonville (1-1), 9 a.m. Georgia Tech (1-1) at North Carolina (0-1), 9 a.m. Vanderbilt (0-2) at Mississippi (1-1), 9:20 p.m. Davidson (0-2) at Campbell (1-1), 10 a.m. Jacksonville St. (2-0) at Georgia St. (1-1), 10 a.m. Florida A&M (1-1) at Howard (0-2), 10 a.m. Elon (1-1) at Richmond (0-1), 10 a.m. Mars Hill (2-1) at Charleston Southern (1-1), 10:30 a.m. East Carolina (2-0) at Virginia Tech (0-2), 10:30 a.m. S. Carolina St. (1-1) at Benedict (0-3), 11 a.m. N.C. Central (1-1) at Appalachian St. (2-0), 12:30 p.m. Alabama (2-0) at Duke (1-1), 12:30 p.m. BYU (1-1) at Florida St. (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Florida (2-0) at Tennessee (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Savannah St. (0-2) at Bethune-Cookman (1-0), 1 p.m. Troy (1-1) at UAB (0-2), 1 p.m. Jackson St. (2-0) at Grambling St. (0-1), 2 p.m. Alcorn St. (0-0) at MVSU (0-2), 2 p.m. Nicholls St. (0-2) at South Alabama (0-0), 2 p.m. Indiana (1-0) at W. Kentucky (0-2), 2 p.m. E. Kentucky (0-2) at Chattanooga (0-2), 3 p.m. Georgia Southern (1-1) at Coastal Carolina (0-2), 3 p.m. W. Carolina (0-2) at Gardner-Webb (1-0), 3 p.m. N. Carolina A&T (0-2) at Hampton (1-1), 3 p.m. Virginia St. (2-0) at Norfolk St. (1-1), 3 p.m. Clemson (2-0) at Auburn (2-0), 4 p.m. Akron (0-2) at Kentucky (2-0), 4 p.m. Mississippi St. (1-1) at LSU (2-0), 4 p.m. Navy (1-1) at Louisiana Tech (1-1), 4 p.m. Middle Tennessee (1-1) at Memphis (0-2), 4 p.m. Tarleton St. (0-2) at Northwestern St. (0-2), 4 p.m. William & Mary (1-1) at Old Dominion (1-1), 4 p.m. Lamar (1-1) at SE Louisiana (1-1), 4 p.m. Furman (1-0) at South Carolina (2-0), 4 p.m. E. Illinois (0-2) at Tenn.-Martin (0-2), 4 p.m. Austin Peay (1-1) at Tennessee St. (1-1), 4 p.m. Presbyterian (0-2) at The Citadel (1-1), 4 p.m. Union, N.Y. (0-1) at Wofford (1-1), 4 p.m. MIDWEST N. Illinois (1-1) at Illinois (1-1), 9 a.m. Iowa St. (1-1) vs. Kansas St. (2-0) at Kansas City, Mo., 9 a.m. Massachusetts (2-0) at Michigan (2-0), 9 a.m. Ohio (1-1) at Ohio St. (2-0), 9 a.m. Ball St. (1-1) at Purdue (1-1), 9 a.m. Taylor (1-1) at Butler (1-1), 10 a.m. Morehead St. (1-1) at Dayton (1-1), 10 a.m. Sam Houston St. (0-1) at W. Illinois (1-1), 11 a.m. Colorado St. (0-2) at Miami (Ohio) (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Southern Cal (2-0) at Minnesota (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Arizona St. (2-0) at Wisconsin (2-0), 12:30 p.m. Cent. Michigan (1-1) at E. Michigan (0-2), 1 p.m. Northeastern St. (0-0) at North Dakota (0-2), 2 p.m. Stephen F.Austin (1-1) at N. Iowa (1-0), 2:05 p.m. NW Oklahoma (0-1) at South Dakota (1-1), 2:05 p.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (1-1) at Youngstown St. (1-1), 3 p.m. Marshall (0-2) at Bowling Green (0-2), 4 p.m. San Diego St. (2-0) at Missouri (2-0), 4 p.m. Morgan St. (1-1) at N. Dakota St. (1-1), 4 p.m. Illinois St. (1-1) at S. Dakota St. (0-1), 4 p.m. SE Missouri (1-1) at S. Illinois (1-1), 4 p.m. Toledo (1-1) at W. Michigan (1-1), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (1-1) at Michigan St. (2-0), 5 p.m.

St. Joseph’s, Ind. (0-3) at Valparaiso (0-2), 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Alabama A&M (1-1) at Texas Southern (0-2), 10 a.m. Air Force (2-0) at Oklahoma (2-0), 12:30 p.m. Washington St. (1-1) at SMU (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Baylor (2-0) at TCU (2-0), 1:30 p.m. Alabama St. (2-0) at Prairie View (1-1), 2 p.m. Murray St. (0-2) at Cent. Arkansas (2-0), 4 p.m. Tulsa (1-1) at Oklahoma St. (2-0), 4 p.m. Northwestern (2-0) at Rice (1-1), 4 p.m. Fla. International (0-1) at Texas A&M (2-0), 4 p.m. Cal Poly (2-0) at Texas St. (1-1), 4 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (0-1) at Arkansas St. (0-2), 5 p.m. Texas (2-0) at Texas Tech (2-0), 5 p.m. New Mexico St. (0-1) at UTEP (1-1), 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Drake (1-1) at Montana St. (1-1), 12:05 p.m. Hawaii (1-1) at Colorado (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Nebraska (2-0) at Washington (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Idaho St. (1-1) at N. Colorado (1-1), 12:35 p.m. Louisville (1-1) at Oregon St. (0-1), 2:30 p.m. Portland St. (1-1) at Oregon (2-0), 3:15 p.m. Montana (1-1) at E. Washington (1-1), 4:05 p.m. Utah (2-0) at New Mexico (0-2), 5 p.m. S. Utah (1-1) at San Jose St. (0-2), 5 p.m. Fresno St. (1-0) at Utah St. (1-1), 5 p.m. Boise St. (1-0) at Wyoming (1-1), 5 p.m. Weber St. (1-1) at Sacramento St. (1-1), 6:05 p.m. UC Davis (0-2) at San Diego (0-2), 6:05 p.m. Iowa (2-0) at Arizona (2-0), 7:30 p.m. UNLV (0-2) at Idaho (1-1), 7:30 p.m. Houston (2-0) at UCLA (0-2), 7:30 p.m. Wake Forest (2-0) at Stanford (2-0), 8:15 p.m.

Pac-10 PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT Conf. W L Stanford 1 0 USC 0 0 Arizona 0 0 Arizona State 0 0 California 0 0 Oregon 0 0 Oregon State 0 0 Washington 0 0 Washington State 0 0 UCLA 0 1 Today’s Game California at Nevada, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games USC at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m. Nebraska at Washington, 12:30 p.m. Arizona State at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. Washington State at SMU, 12:30 p.m. Louisville at Oregon State, 2:30 p.m. Portland State at Oregon, 3:15 p.m. Iowa at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. Houston at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. Wake Forest at Stanford, 8:15 p.m.

Ov’ll W 2 2 2 2 2 1 0 1 1 0

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2

Top 25

Betting Line

COLLEGE Today SOUTHERN MISS 4 5.5 California 2.5 2.5 Saturday GEORGIA 3 2.5 W. VIRGINIA 13 10.5 K-Kansas St 5.5 3.5 PURDUE 17 16.5 ILLINOIS 7.5 7

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 13 6 5 44 33 23 New York 12 8 5 41 32 27 Toronto FC 7 10 7 28 22 27 Kansas City 7 9 6 27 22 24 Chicago 6 8 8 26 28 30 Philadelphia 6 12 6 24 27 39 New England 7 13 3 24 24 38 D.C. 5 16 3 18 16 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles 14 5 5 47 36 18 Real Salt Lake 12 4 8 44 37 16 FC Dallas 10 2 12 42 31 19 San Jose 10 7 6 36 25 23 Colorado 9 7 7 34 29 24 Seattle 9 9 6 33 26 29 Chivas USA 7 12 4 25 25 29 Houston 6 12 5 23 28 38 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game FC Dallas 2, New York 2, tie Saturday’s Games Chicago at Real Salt Lake, 1 p.m. Seattle FC at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Houston, 5:30 p.m. New England at Colorado, 6 p.m. D.C. United at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Kansas City at Chivas USA, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA playoffs WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— FINALS Seattle 3, Atlanta 0 Sunday, Sept. 12: Seattle 79, Atlanta 77 Tuesday, Sept. 14: Seattle 87, Atlanta 84 Thursday, Sept. 16: Seattle 87, Atlanta 84 Seattle wins its second WNBA Championship

DEALS Transactions

No. 1 Alabama (2-0) beat No. 18 Penn State 24-3. Next: at Duke, Saturday. No. 2 Ohio State (2-0) beat No. 12 Miami 36-24. Next: vs. Ohio, Saturday. No. 3 Boise State (1-0) did not play. Next: at Wyoming, Saturday. No. 4 TCU (2-0) beat Tennessee Tech 62-7. Next: vs. Baylor, Saturday. No. 5 Texas (2-0) beat Wyoming 34-7. Next: at Texas Tech, Saturday. No. 6 Nebraska (2-0) beat Idaho 38-17. Next: at Washington, Saturday. No. 7 Oregon (2-0) beat Tennessee 48-13. Next: vs. Portland State, Saturday. No. 8 Florida (2-0) beat South Florida 38-14. Next: at Tennessee, Saturday. No. 9 Iowa (2-0) beat Iowa State 35-7. Next: at Arizona, Saturday. No. 10 Oklahoma (2-0) beat No. 17 Florida State 47-17. Next: vs. Air Force, Saturday. No. 11 Wisconsin (2-0) beat San Jose State 27-14. Next: vs. Arizona State, Saturday. No. 12 Miami (1-1) lost to No. 2 Ohio State 36-24. Next: at Pittsburgh, Thursday, Sept. 23. No. 13 Virginia Tech (0-2) lost to James Madison 2116. Next: vs. East Carolina, Saturday. No. 14 Arkansas (2-0) beat Louisiana-Monroe 31-7. Next: at No. 22 Georgia, Saturday. No. 15 Georgia Tech (1-1) lost to Kansas 28-25. Next: at North Carolina, Saturday. No. 16 Southern Cal (2-0) beat Virginia 17-14. Next: at Minnesota, Saturday. No. 17 Florida State (1-1) lost to No. 10 Oklahoma 4717. Next: vs. BYU, Saturday. No. 18 Penn State (1-1) lost to No. 1 Alabama 24-3. Next: vs. Kent State, Saturday. No. 19 LSU (2-0) beat Vanderbilt 27-3. Next: vs. Mississippi State, Saturday. No. 20 Utah (2-0) beat UNLV 38-10. Next: at New Mexico, Saturday. No. 21 Auburn (2-0) beat Mississippi State 17-14, Thursday. Next: vs. Clemson, Saturday, Sept. 18. No. 22 Georgia (1-1) lost to No. 25 South Carolina 17-6. Next: vs. No. 14 Arkansas, Saturday. No. 23 West Virginia (2-0) beat Marshall 24-21, OT, Friday. Next: vs. Maryland, Saturday, Sept. 18. No. 24 South Carolina (2-0) beat No. 22 Georgia 17-6. Next: vs. Furman, Saturday. No. 25 Stanford (2-0) beat UCLA 35-0. Next: vs. Wake Forest, Saturday.

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Sunday BROWNS 1.5 2 PACKERS 13 13 Ravens 1.5 3 TITANS 5.5 5 Eagles 3.5 6 COWBOYS 9 7.5 PANTHERS 3.5 3.5 FALCONS 7 6.5 VIKINGS 5.5 5.5 RAIDERS 4 3.5 BRONCOS 3.5 3 Texans 3 3 CHARGERS 8.5 7 Patriots 1.5 2 COLTS 5.5 5.5 Monday Saints 4.5 5.5

Connecticut 5 6.5 TEMPLE OHIO ST 31.5 30.5 OHIO U PENN ST 21 21 Kent St N. CAROLINA 1.5 1.5 Georgia Tech MISSISSIPPI 13.5 12 Vanderbilt VIRGINIA TECH 17.5 19.5 E. Carolina MISSOURI 16.5 14 San Diego St OKLAHOMA ST 7.5 7 Tulsa Alabama 23 24 DUKE COLORADO 10 12.5 Hawaii FLORIDA ST 9 10 Byu MIAMI (OHIO) 7.5 7.5 Colorado St Florida 16.5 14 TENNESSEE Usc 14 11.5 MINNESOTA SMU 21 23 Washington St WISCONSIN 15.5 14 Arizona St Nebraska 4 3.5 WASHINGTON OREGON ST 16.5 20 Louisville OKLAHOMA 18 17.5 Air Force C. Michigan 10 10 E. MICHIGAN TCU 21 21.5 Baylor Marshall 2.5 3 BOWLING GREEN Navy 3.5 3 LOUISIANA TECH C. Florida 8 7.5 BUFFALO KENTUCKY 24 24.5 Akron W. MICHIGAN 4 3.5 Toledo AUBURN 6 7 Clemson Texas 3.5 3 TEXAS TECH Northwestern 7.5 6.5 RICE LSU 8.5 8 Mississippi St Utah 22.5 22.5 NEW MEXICO Fresno St 6.5 5 UTAH ST MICHIGAN ST 3 3.5 Notre Dame Boise St 23.5 23 WYOMING UTEP 15.5 15 New Mexico St IDAHO 7.5 7 Unlv Iowa 1.5 1.5 ARIZONA Houston 3 3 UCLA STANFORD 17 17 Wake Forest Indiana 12 12 W. KENTUCKY ARMY 5.5 5.5 North Texas ARKANSAS ST 3 4 UL-Monroe TEXAS A&M 28 28 Florida Int’l Middle Tenn St 5.5 4.5 MEMPHIS Troy 4 3.5 UAB k-Kansas City, Mo. (C) — Cincinnati opened as favorite

Underdog Chiefs Bills BENGALS Steelers LIONS Bears Buccaneers Cardinals Dolphins Rams Seahawks REDSKINS Jaguars JETS Giants 49ERS

Kansas NEVADA Arkansas Maryland Iowa St Ball St N. Illinois

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Announced the seven-game suspension and fine of Washington OF Nyjer Morgan stemming from the game on Aug. 21 at Philadelphia was rescinded. The eight-game suspension and fine of Morgan related to the Sept. 1 bench-clearing incident at Florida was upheld. American League TEXAS RANGERS—Signed a four-year player development agreement with Round Rock (PCL) through the 2014 season. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Announced the Myrtle Beach (Carolina) franchise will move to Lynchburg, Va., beginning in 2011 and has agreed on a four-year player development contract with the franchise. HOUSTON ASTROS—Acquired RHP Enerio Del Rosario from Cincinnati for cash considerations. Designated INF Oswaldo Navarro for assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Announced RHP Brian Bass has cleared waivers and accepted an outright assignment to Indianapolis (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Promoted John Vuch to farm director and Michael Elias to manager of amateur scouting. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ORLANDO MAGIC—Signed F Malik Allen. TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed F Ronald Dupree. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed TE Ernest Wilford. Waived WR John Matthews. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed G Brian De La Puente and CB Kennard Cox to the practice squad. Released CB Cord Parks and LB Joe Pawelek from practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed D Paul Mara to a oneyear contract. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Signed coach Joel Quenneville to a contract extension through the 201314 season. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Signed C Brendan Morrison to a professional tryout contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHICAGO FIRE—Named Julian Posada president. RED BULL NEW YORK—Acquired D Carey Talley from D.C. United for a 2011 conditional second round draft pick. SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Placed MF-F Pat Noonan on the disabled list. COLLEGE NCAA—Announced Middle Tennessee State QB Dwight Dasher must sit out four games and repay a $1,500 loan to become eligible again. The NCAA student-athlete reinstatement staff ruled that Dasher violated preferential treatment rules by receiving a loan from someone in the community. ARKANSAS—Named Don Houlton assistant gymnastic coach. ST. AUGUSTINE’S—Named Tim Valentine women’s assistant basketball coach. SAN FRANCISCO—Named Dr. Gary Nelson interim athletic director. SOUTH ALABAMA—Named Paul Johnson men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 13,053 1,774 2,877 739 The Dalles 4,589 827 4,816 1,203 John Day 2,300 476 3,733 2,723 McNary 3,299 434 3,339 860 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 660,082 63,421 380,450 146,786 The Dalles 421,437 46,337 257,051 99,490 John Day 351,178 42,043 187,585 71,732 McNary 300,430 27,250 158,622 57,084

Cycling • French anti-doping boss to work with probe: The head of France’s anti-doping agency is ready to collaborate fully with a U.S. federal investigation into seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong. Pierre Bordry said Thursday he will hand over Armstrong’s “B” samples from the 1999 Tour to Jeff Novitzky if the Food and Drug Administration agent makes an official request. French sports daily L’Equipe reported in 2005 that Armstrong’s backup samples from 1999 contained EPO — a banned blood-boosting hormone. Armstrong was cleared by an independent panel. • Cavendish wins stage: Mark Cavendish won a hard-fought sprint finish Thursday to take the 18th stage of the Spanish Vuelta, while Vincenzo Nibali retained the overall lead. The British rider finished the 92.5-mile ride from Valladolid to Salamanca in 3 hours, 27 minutes, 11 seconds. Juan Jose Haedo of Argentina was one second behind in second place, and Manuel Cardoso of Portugal was third with the same time. Nibali leads overall by 38 seconds over Ezequiel Mosquera, with a total time of 74 hours, 47 minutes, 6 seconds. Friday’s stage is 143.7 miles from Piedrahita to Toledo, with the 21-stage race finishing Sunday.

Boxing • Mayweather face more felony charges: Undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. was hit Thursday with three more felony charges in a domestic violence case that already had him facing a theft charge. Clark County (Nev.) District Attorney David Roger significantly raised the ante in the case, alleging that Mayweather hit and threatened the life of his ex-girlfriend, Josie Harris, and threatened to beat two of their children during a pre-dawn argument at the woman’s home a week ago. Mayweather, 33, is one of boxing’s most recognizable figures, with a record of 41-0 and 25 knockouts. The welterweight goes by the nickname “Money” and earned more than $20 million in May in one fight in Las Vegas against “Sugar” Shane Mosley. Mayweather remained free on $3,000 bail pending arraignment Nov. 9 following his arrest last Friday on a felony grand larceny charge.

Tennis • Nadal to end year at No. 1: Rafael Nadal has clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking for the second time in three years. The 24-year-old Spaniard, who won the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 2010, also finished at the top of the ATP rankings in 2008. “It has been an incredible season — one of my best ever, if not the best,” Nadal said Thursday in a statement. “I worked very hard to get back to the top and it feels really good to know I will end the year as No. 1.” Nadal leads the rankings with 12,025 points, almost 5,000 more than second-ranked Novak Djokovic, who has 7,145. Roger Federer is third with 6,735. Nadal has won nine major titles in his career and is one of seven men to complete a career Grand Slam. He leads the ATP tour with six titles this year and has a record of 59-7. Since April, he has won 43 of his 46 matches.

Football • Chargers WR Jackson can play in Week 5 if traded: The NFL and the players union have agreed that San Diego Chargers holdout wide receiver Vincent Jackson can play in Week 5 if he’s traded by next Wednesday. The agreement helps clear the way for Jackson to be traded, provided the Chargers can agree to terms with another team. The agreement essentially rolls what could have been a six-game suspension into four games. Jackson currently is serving a three-game NFL suspension for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. Additionally, the Chargers placed him on the roster exempt list, meaning he’d be suspended for three games once he signed with San Diego. Jackson’s side felt he shouldn’t have to serve that suspension if he was traded.

Basketball • Storm hold off Dream 87-84 to win 2nd WNBA title: The Seattle Storm are champions again. Seattle completed its undefeated march through the postseason, beating the Atlanta Dream 87-84 on Thursday night for a three-game sweep in the WNBA finals. The Storm won each of its seven postseason games for its second WNBA title. The Storm also won the 2004 championship. Swin Cash scored 18 points to lead a balanced offense as Seattle overcame 35 points by Atlanta’s Angel McCoughtry. Lauren Jackson, who had 26 points in each of the Storm’s first two wins in the series, had 15 points and nine rebounds and was selected MVP of the finals.

Golf • South African leads Austrian Open: George Coetzee of South Africa took advantage of ideal conditions to shoot 7-under 65 on Thursday and take a one stroke lead in the Austrian Open. Playing early in the morning before gusting winds made conditions tougher at Diamond Country Club, Coetzee made eight birdies and only one bogey to bolster his hopes of retaining his European Tour card. Jose Manuel Lara, of Spain, is second after a 66. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NL ROUNDUP Cardinals 4, Padres 0 ST. LOUIS — Jake Westbrook pitched eight effective innings and St. Louis beat San Diego in the opener of a key four-game series. Albert Pujols hit a run-scoring double in the Cardinals’ four-run sixth inning, snapping a zero-for-nine skid, and Yadier Molina added a two-run single. San Diego AB R Cunningham lf 4 0 Eckstein 2b 3 0 M.Tejada ss 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 Ludwick rf 4 0 Headley 3b 4 0 Torrealba c 4 0 Venable cf 3 0 Stauffer p 2 0 Thatcher p 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 a-Durango ph 1 0 C.Ramos p 0 0 A.Russell p 0 0 Frieri p 0 0 c-Stairs ph 1 0 Totals 33 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 3

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .315 .271 .266 .306 .263 .265 .277 .229 .154 --.000 .273 ----.000 .224

St. Louis Schumaker 2b Jay rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf Y.Molina c B.Ryan ss Westbrook p b-Winn ph McClellan p Greene 3b P.Feliz 3b Totals

H BI BB 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 4 5

SO 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 9

Avg. .270 .315 .306 .309 .271 .259 .224 .111 .271 .500 .220 .217

AB 2 4 4 2 4 3 4 3 1 0 2 2 31

R 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 7 0 St. Louis 100 003 00x — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for R.Webb in the 7th. b-struck out for Westbrook in the 8th. c-struck out for Frieri in the 9th. E—Greene (6). LOB—San Diego 9, St. Louis 8. 2B—Jay (19), Pujols (35). RBIs—Pujols (105), Holliday (95), Y.Molina 2 (57). SB—Y.Molina (8). Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 5 (Stauffer 2, Ludwick, Cunningham, Stairs); St. Louis 4 (Westbrook, Rasmus 2, P.Feliz). GIDP—Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez, Rasmus. DP—San Diego 1 (Ad.Gonzalez, M.Tejada, Ad.Gonzalez, Eckstein); St. Louis 2 (Pujols, B.Ryan), (Westbrook, B.Ryan, Pujols). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stauffer L, 4-4 5 6 4 4 2 2 76 1.99 Thatcher 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.36 R.Webb 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 13 2.83 C.Ramos 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 14 12.38 A.Russell 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.45 Frieri 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 2.03 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wstbrk W, 2-3 8 6 0 0 3 3 110 3.26 McClellan 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 2.00 Stauffer pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Thatcher 3-0, R.Webb 3-2, A.Russell 2-0. IBB—off Stauffer (Holliday). WP— C.Ramos. Balk—C.Ramos. T—2:37. A—38,252 (43,975).

time since May 6. Dodgers starter Ted Lilly (8-11) was done after 3 1⁄3 innings for his shortest outing of the season. Russ Mitchell homered for his first career hit leading off the fifth for Los Angeles. He had been zero for 15. Los Angeles Furcal ss Theriot 2b Blake 3b Kemp cf Loney 1b Mitchell lf Re.Johnson rf Barajas c Lilly p Troncoso p a-Hu ph Jef.Weaver p Sherrill p Belisario p Dotel p b-Lindsey ph Link p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 14

Avg. .303 .275 .251 .248 .276 .059 .278 .232 .041 .000 .200 .200 ----.000 .125 ---

San Francisco Renteria ss F.Sanchez 2b Whiteside c A.Huff 1b Ishikawa 1b Posey c C.Ray p Burrell lf Schierholtz rf Uribe 3b J.Guillen rf 1-C.Ross pr-lf Rowand cf J.Sanchez p S.Casilla p c-Fontenot ph-2b Totals

AB 5 4 0 4 1 5 0 4 1 4 3 0 4 2 0 1 38

R 2 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 10

H 4 2 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 15

Avg. .284 .290 .232 .294 .267 .325 --.268 .250 .252 .306 .259 .226 .132 --.287

BI 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 8

Los Angeles 100 010 000 — 2 4 0 San Francisco 104 120 02x — 10 15 1 a-singled for Troncoso in the 5th. b-grounded out for Dotel in the 8th. c-singled for S.Casilla in the 8th. 1-ran for J.Guillen in the 7th. E—Uribe (8). LOB—Los Angeles 3, San Francisco 7. 2B—Furcal (21), F.Sanchez 2 (18), Posey (21). 3B—Renteria (2), A.Huff (5). HR—Mitchell (1), off J.Sanchez; A.Huff (25), off Lilly; Posey (14), off Lilly; J.Guillen (2), off Jef.Weaver. RBIs—Mitchell (2), F.Sanchez 3 (41), A.Huff 3 (84), Posey 2 (61), J.Guillen 2 (9). S—Theriot. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Loney, Furcal); San Francisco 5 (Burrell, Posey 3, Schierholtz). Runners moved up—Posey. GIDP—Rowand. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Blake, Theriot, Loney). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly L, 8-11 3 1-3 7 6 6 0 3 68 3.83 Troncoso 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 15 4.76 Jef.Weaver 1 1-3 3 2 2 0 1 22 5.02 Sherrill 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 6.42 Belisario 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 5.29 Dotel 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.99 Link 1 3 2 2 0 1 18 5.40 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchz W, 11-8 7 4 2 1 0 12 90 3.21 S.Casilla 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.15 C.Ray 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.50 Inherited runners-scored—Troncoso 2-1, Sherrill 10, Belisario 1-0. HBP—by Lilly (J.Guillen, J.Sanchez). WP—J.Sanchez. T—2:37. A—38,434 (41,915).

Giants 10, Dodgers 2

Diamondbacks 3, Reds 1

SAN FRANCISCO — Aubrey Huff hit a three-run homer, Buster Posey had a solo shot and the Giants moved into first place in the NL West with a win over the Dodgers. Jonathan Sanchez (11-8) struck out a career-high 12 as the Giants took a half-game lead on the Padres. San Francisco is in sole possession of first place for the first

CINCINNATI — Rodrigo Lopez held the NL’s top offense in check for seven innings, getting his first win in more than two months, and Arizona slowed Cincinnati’s playoff push. Arizona S.Drew ss K.Johnson 2b C.Young cf Ad.LaRoche 1b Mar.Reynolds 3b Montero c

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3

R 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 3 2 1 0

Avg. .276 .275 .258 .261 .205 .277

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Tampa Bay New York Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Division Minnesota Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland West Division Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 88 88 82 73 58 W 88 79 72 60 60 W 82 72 71 55

L 57 58 64 73 88 L 58 67 74 85 86 L 63 73 75 91

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct .607 .603 .562 .500 .397 Pct .603 .541 .493 .414 .411 Pct .566 .497 .486 .377

GB — ½ 6½ 15½ 30½ GB — 9 16 27½ 28 GB — 10 11½ 27½

Thursday’s Games Cleveland 3, L.A. Angels 2, 11 innings Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 5

0 1 0 0 0 3

WCGB — — 6 15 30 WCGB — 9 16 27½ 28 WCGB — 15½ 17 33

L10 5-5 2-8 6-4 3-7 8-2 L10 9-1 3-7 4-6 4-6 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 6-4 2-8

Str W-1 L-1 W-4 L-3 W-3 Str W-5 L-3 L-2 W-2 W-1 Str W-7 L-2 L-1 L-7

Home 45-27 49-25 42-30 39-33 33-41 Home 48-23 40-31 47-28 33-38 32-42 Home 48-26 44-30 38-34 33-41

Away 43-30 39-33 40-34 34-40 25-47 Away 40-35 39-36 25-46 27-47 28-44 Away 34-37 28-43 33-41 22-50

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta Florida New York Washington Central Division Cincinnati St. Louis Houston Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh West Division San Francisco San Diego Colorado Los Angeles Arizona

Today’s Games N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 10-13) at Baltimore (Millwood 3-15), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 3-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 12-9), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Cecil 12-7) at Boston (Lackey 12-10), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (C.Carrasco 0-0) at Kansas City (Davies 8-9), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 10-10) at Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 3-1), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Bre.Anderson 5-6) at Minnesota (Blackburn 9-9), 5:10 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 14-6) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-11), 7:10 p.m.

Church lf G.Parra rf R.Lopez p Heilman p J.Gutierrez p Totals

3 4 2 0 0 32

1 1 0 0 0 3

0 2 0 0 0 6

1 0 0 0 0 2

0 1 0 0 0 9

.197 .254 .082 .000 ---

Cincinnati Stubbs cf O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Gomes lf Bruce rf R.Hernandez c J.Francisco 3b Janish 2b Volquez p Bray p a-Edmonds ph Ondrusek p Burton p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0

SO 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .249 .269 .320 .262 .274 .303 .293 .275 .167 --.271 .000 ---

Arizona 000 030 000 — 3 6 0 Cincinnati 100 000 000 — 1 8 0 a-flied out for Bray in the 7th. LOB—Arizona 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B—G.Parra (15), Votto (31), Gomes (23). RBIs—S.Drew (53), K.Johnson (62), G.Parra (27), Gomes (80). SB—Stubbs (25). S—R.Lopez. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 4 (Mar. Reynolds, Ad.LaRoche 2, K.Johnson); Cincinnati 3 (Bruce, J.Francisco, O.Cabrera). Runners moved up—O.Cabrera. GIDP—Janish. DP—Arizona 2 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche), (Ad.LaRoche). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO Lopez W, 6-14 7 8 1 1 0 4 Heilman H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gtrrez S, 10-12 1 0 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Volquez L, 3-3 6 2-3 6 3 3 2 7 Bray 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 0 1 Burton 1 0 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Bray 1-0. J.Gutierrez (R.Hernandez). WP—Volquez 2. T—2:38. A—22,090 (42,319).

NP ERA 98 4.98 16 4.21 11 5.33 NP ERA 85 4.99 5 4.33 12 4.15 12 0.00 HBP—by

Mets 6, Pirates 2 NEW YORK — Mike Pelfrey earned his 15th win, pitching seven strong innings and hitting a tiebreaking single to help the Mets finish a four-game sweep.

AB 4 3 5 3 3 4 4 2 2 0 1 0 0 31

L 61 64 72 73 84 L 64 70 76 78 81 98 L 64 64 66 75 88

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 4

R H 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6 10

BI 0 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

SO 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .277 .297 .297 .249 .233 .191 .245 .210 .333 ----.000 .125 .000 --.000 .255

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .285 .268 .295 .287 .262 .293 .081 .200 .125 --.260 .167 .000

Pittsburgh 010 100 000 — 2 6 0 New York 000 201 12x — 6 10 0 a-singled for C.Snyder in the 7th. b-flied out for Gallagher in the 7th. c-singled for P.Feliciano in the 8th. d-flied out for J.Thomas in the 9th. 1-ran for Carter in the 8th. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, New York 11. 2B—Alvarez (16), Pagan (30), Duda 2 (3). 3B—Cedeno (3). RBIs—Bowker (12), Cedeno (32), Pagan 2 (67), I.Davis (69), Duda 2 (3), Pelfrey (3). SB—Pagan (34). S—Pelfrey. SF—I.Davis. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 5 (Morton 2, Cedeno, N.Walker 2); New York 6 (Pelfrey, Jos. Reyes 2, I.Davis 2, Duda). Runners moved up—Tabata, Alvarez, Cedeno, J.Feliciano. GIDP—D.Wright. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Cedeno, N.Walker, G.Jones); New York 1 (Pagan, R.Tejada, I.Davis). Pittsburgh IP Morton 5 Ledezma L, 0-3 1-3 Gallagher 2-3 Resop 1 S.Jackson 2-3 J.Thomas 1-3 New York IP Pelfrey W, 15-9 7

H 5 1 1 1 1 1 H 6

Pct .585 .565 .503 .503 .425 Pct .565 .517 .479 .462 .445 .329 Pct .565 .562 .548 .490 .401

GB — 3 12 12 23½ GB — 7 12½ 15 17½ 34½ GB — ½ 2½ 11 24

Thursday’s Games Arizona 3, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets 6, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 4, San Diego 0 San Francisco 10, L.A. Dodgers 2

Pittsburgh AB R A.McCutchen cf 4 0 Tabata lf 4 0 N.Walker 2b 4 0 G.Jones 1b 3 1 Alvarez 3b 3 1 Bowker rf 4 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 C.Snyder c 0 0 a-Presley ph 1 0 Resop p 0 0 S.Jackson p 0 0 J.Thomas p 0 0 d-Moss ph 1 0 Morton p 2 0 Ledezma p 0 0 Gallagher p 0 0 b-Doumit ph-c 2 0 Totals 32 2 New York Jos.Reyes ss J.Feliciano rf Pagan cf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Thole c Duda lf R.Tejada 2b Pelfrey p P.Feliciano p c-Carter ph 1-J.Arias pr Parnell p Totals

W 86 83 73 74 62 W 83 75 70 67 65 48 W 83 82 80 72 59

R 2 1 0 1 2 0 R 2

ER 2 1 0 1 2 0 ER 2

BB 4 0 0 2 1 1 BB 4

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 SO 4

NP ERA 92 8.61 6 6.38 9 6.02 29 4.12 14 10.24 11 6.75 NP ERA 111 3.84

WCGB — — 9 9 20½ WCGB — 7 12½ 15 17½ 34½ WCGB — ½ 2½ 11 24

L10 8-2 4-6 4-6 7-3 4-6 L10 4-6 3-7 6-4 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 7-3 5-5 8-2 3-7 3-7

Str W-4 L-2 L-3 W-4 W-2 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 W-3 L-4 Str W-2 L-2 W-1 L-2 W-1

Home 45-27 52-23 35-36 44-27 35-36 Home 45-30 44-27 39-36 36-38 33-42 33-39 Home 44-28 42-32 51-24 41-31 35-40

Away 41-34 31-41 38-36 30-46 27-48 Away 38-34 31-43 31-40 31-40 32-39 15-59 Away 39-36 40-32 29-42 31-44 24-48

Today’s Games Arizona (I.Kennedy 9-9) at Pittsburgh (Burres 3-3), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Marquis 2-8) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 12-13), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 9-11) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 9-8), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 13-10) at Florida (Sanabia 4-2), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 12-5) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 11-12), 5:05 p.m. San Diego (Latos 14-6) at St. Louis (Lohse 3-7), 5:15 p.m. Colorado (Jimenez 18-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 10-12), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 11-11) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 5-5), 7:15 p.m.

Feliciano H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 2 7 2.89 Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.60 Inherited runners-scored—Gallagher 1-1, J.Thomas 2-2. IBB—off J.Thomas (D.Wright), off Pelfrey (C.Snyder, C.Snyder). Balk—Resop. T—3:01. A—28,790 (41,800).

AL ROUNDUP Twins 8, White Sox 5 CHICAGO — Delmon Young hit his 18th homer, Carl Pavano got his 17th win and Minnesota beat fading Chicago to complete the three-game sweep. Paul Konerko hit a solo homer in the third against Pavano (17-11) after being drilled in the face by a pitch in the first inning. Minnesota AB R H Span cf 4 1 0 O.Hudson 2b 5 1 2 Mauer c 5 2 2 Cuddyer 1b 3 1 1 Delm.Young lf 5 2 3 Thome dh 3 0 1 3-Plouffe pr-dh 0 0 0 Valencia 3b 3 0 1 1-Tolbert pr-3b 0 0 0 Repko rf 4 1 1 Hardy ss 4 0 1 Totals 36 8 12 Chicago Pierre lf Vizquel 2b-3b Rios cf De Aza cf Konerko 1b Man.Ramirez dh 2-Beckham pr-dh Quentin rf Pierzynski c Al.Ramirez ss Morel 3b a-Teahen ph Lillibridge 2b b-Kotsay ph Totals

AB 5 4 5 0 3 2 0 5 5 4 2 1 0 1 37

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 8

BB 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 5

SO 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .265 .276 .331 .272 .300 .283 .125 .333 .239 .206 .272

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 5 7

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .274 .283 .286 .000 .323 .293 .252 .236 .271 .282 .222 .259 .274 .235

Minnesota 030 030 002 — 8 12 1 Chicago 001 103 000 — 5 9 1 a-struck out for Morel in the 7th. b-flied out for Lil-

libridge in the 9th. 1-ran for Valencia in the 8th. 2-ran for Man.Ramirez in the 8th. 3-ran for Thome in the 9th. E—Valencia (4), Konerko (6). LOB—Minnesota 9, Chicago 14. 2B—Mauer (42), Hardy (19), Morel (1). HR—Delm.Young (18), off Buehrle; Konerko (37), off Pavano; Pierzynski (8), off Pavano; Al.Ramirez (17), off Pavano. RBIs—Cuddyer 2 (74), Delm.Young 2 (102), Thome (57), Tolbert (17), Repko (8), Hardy (38), Pierre (40), Rios (84), Konerko (105), Pierzynski (53), Al.Ramirez (63). SB—Pierre 2 (58), Al.Ramirez 2 (12). SF—Cuddyer, Tolbert. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 5 (Span 2, Hardy, Delm.Young, Repko); Chicago 7 (Quentin 5, Vizquel 2). Runners moved up—Man.Ramirez. GIDP—Valencia. DP—Chicago 2 (Morel, Vizquel, Konerko), (Rios, Rios, Pierzynski, Morel). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavno W, 17-11 5 8 5 5 2 1 95 3.60 Mijares H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 2.67 Guerrier H, 23 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 15 3.52 Crain H, 20 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.56 Fuentes H, 1 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 23 3.21 Capps S, 13-15 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.45 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buhrle L, 12-11 5 8 6 6 2 1 99 4.16 Linebrink 2 1 0 0 0 2 23 4.08 Thornton 1 0 0 0 2 1 26 3.14 Putz 1 3 2 2 1 1 21 3.02 Pavano pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Mijares 1-0, Guerrier 2-1, Fuentes 1-0. IBB—off Putz (Thome). HBP—by Pavano (Konerko), by Fuentes (Pierre), by Buehrle (Cuddyer). WP—Putz. T—3:25. A—27,180 (40,615).

Indians 3, Angels 2 (11 innings) CLEVELAND — Trevor Crowe scored from third base on a two-out error by third baseman Alberto Callaspo to give Cleveland a win in 11 innings over Los Angeles. Los Angeles Willits cf H.Kendrick cf-2b B.Abreu lf Tor.Hunter rf H.Matsui dh Callaspo 3b Napoli 1b Frandsen 2b Bourjos cf Br.Wood ss J.Mathis c a-Conger ph Bo.Wilson c Totals

AB 4 0 4 5 5 4 4 4 0 4 2 1 0 37

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 2 3 13

Avg. .270 .273 .250 .288 .272 .272 .245 .276 .198 .155 .195 .167 .211

Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf Hafner dh J.Brown 1b J.Nix 3b Crowe lf Sutton 2b Marson c b-Duncan ph Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 5 4 5 4 3 1 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 6 2 6

Avg. .241 .263 .286 .268 .226 .233 .249 .143 .197 .235

SO 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 7

Los Angeles 000 000 200 00 — 2 6 1 Cleveland 002 000 000 01 — 3 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for J.Mathis in the 8th. b-reached on error for Marson in the 11th. E—Callaspo (11). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Cleveland 10. 2B—Choo (29), Crowe (20), Marson (14). HR— H.Matsui (20), off Carmona; Napoli (25), off Carmona. RBIs—H.Matsui (78), Napoli (66), Choo (72), Marson (19). SB—B.Abreu (21), Brantley (10), Crowe (16), Marson (8). CS—J.Nix (2). S—Brantley, A.Cabrera. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (H.Matsui, B.Abreu, Tor.Hunter); Cleveland 5 (J.Brown 3, Marson, A.Cabrera). Runners moved up—Willits, Sutton. GIDP—Tor. Hunter, Callaspo, J.Brown. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Napoli, Bo.Wilson, Frandsen); Cleveland 2 (A.Cabrera, Sutton, J.Brown), (A.Cabrera, Sutton, J.Brown). Los Angeles IP E.Santana 8 Walden 1 Jepsen 1 Cassevah L, 0-1 2-3 Cleveland IP

H 4 0 1 1 H

R 2 0 0 1 R

ER 2 0 0 0 ER

BB 3 1 2 0 BB

SO 5 2 0 0 SO

NP 113 20 15 10 NP

ERA 3.93 2.00 4.56 3.94 ERA

Carmona 7 4 2 2 1 8 103 3.81 J.Smith 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 15 4.46 Sipp 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 4.19 C.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 1.81 J.Lewis 1 0 0 0 1 3 19 3.56 R.Perez W, 5-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.47 Inherited runners-scored—Sipp 1-0. IBB—off Jepsen (Choo, Hafner). HBP—by E.Santana (J.Nix, A.Cabrera). WP—E.Santana. T—3:14. A—14,000 (45,569).

LEADERS Through Thursday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .361; MiCabrera, Detroit, .333; Mauer, Minnesota, .331; ABeltre, Boston, .328; Konerko, Chicago, .323; Cano, New York, .322; Butler, Kansas City, .312. RUNS—Teixeira, New York, 104; MiCabrera, Detroit, 101; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 101; Jeter, New York, 99; JBautista, Toronto, 97; Cano, New York, 96; AJackson, Detroit, 95. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 118; JBautista, Toronto, 111; Guerrero, Texas, 107; ARodriguez, New York, 107; Konerko, Chicago, 105; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 102; Teixeira, New York, 101. HITS—ISuzuki, Seattle, 189; Hamilton, Texas, 183; Cano, New York, 181; ABeltre, Boston, 178; MYoung, Texas, 172; MiCabrera, Detroit, 169; AJackson, Detroit, 166. DOUBLES—MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 44; ABeltre, Boston, 42; Mauer, Minnesota, 42; Markakis, Baltimore, 41; VWells, Toronto, 41; Hamilton, Texas, 40; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 40. TRIPLES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 12; AJackson, Detroit, 10; Span, Minnesota, 9; Pennington, Oakland, 8; Granderson, New York, 6; Maier, Kansas City, 6; Podsednik, Kansas City, 6. HOME RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 47; Konerko, Chicago, 37; MiCabrera, Detroit, 34; Hamilton, Texas, 31; DOrtiz, Boston, 30; Teixeira, New York, 30; ABeltre, Boston, 28. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 58; RDavis, Oakland, 44; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 43; Gardner, New York, 41; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 40; Figgins, Seattle, 39; ISuzuki, Seattle, 39. PITCHING—Sabathia, New York, 19-6; Price, Tampa Bay, 17-6; Lester, Boston, 17-8; Pavano, Minnesota, 17-11; CBuchholz, Boston, 16-7; Cahill, Oakland, 16-7; PHughes, New York, 16-8; Verlander, Detroit, 16-8; ESantana, Los Angeles, 16-9. STRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 218; FHernandez, Seattle, 214; Lester, Boston, 208; Verlander, Detroit, 190; Liriano, Minnesota, 189; Sabathia, New York, 179; Morrow, Toronto, 178. SAVES—RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 43; Soria, Kansas City, 38; Papelbon, Boston, 36; NFeliz, Texas, 36; Gregg, Toronto, 31; MaRivera, New York, 30; Aardsma, Seattle, 29. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—CGonzalez, Colorado, .341; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .325; Votto, Cincinnati, .320; Prado, Atlanta, .314; Holliday, St. Louis, .309; Braun, Milwaukee, .306; Pujols, St. Louis, .306; AdGonzalez, San Diego, .306. RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 101; CGonzalez, Colorado, 100; Weeks, Milwaukee, 98; Prado, Atlanta, 97; Votto, Cincinnati, 96; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 95; Werth, Philadelphia, 94. RBI—CGonzalez, Colorado, 106; Pujols, St. Louis, 105; Votto, Cincinnati, 104; Howard, Philadelphia, 100; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 95; Holliday, St. Louis, 95; McGehee, Milwaukee, 94; Uggla, Florida, 94. HITS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 182; Prado, Atlanta, 176; Braun, Milwaukee, 173; Holliday, St. Louis, 167; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 165; Pujols, St. Louis, 165; Votto, Cincinnati, 163. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 44; ATorres, San Francisco, 43; Holliday, St. Louis, 42; Loney, Los Angeles, 40; Prado, Atlanta, 39; Braun, Milwaukee, 38; Byrd, Chicago, 37. TRIPLES—Fowler, Colorado, 12; SDrew, Arizona, 10; Victorino, Philadelphia, 10; AEscobar, Milwaukee, 9; CGonzalez, Colorado, 8; JosReyes, New York, 8; Morgan, Washington, 7; Pagan, New York, 7; ATorres, San Francisco, 7. HOME RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 39; ADunn, Washington, 35; Votto, Cincinnati, 34; CGonzalez, Colorado, 32; MarReynolds, Arizona, 32; Fielder, Milwaukee, 30; Uggla, Florida, 30. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 51; Pagan, New York, 34; Morgan, Washington, 33; HRamirez, Florida, 32; Victorino, Philadelphia, 32; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 31; JosReyes, New York, 29. PITCHING—Halladay, Philadelphia, 19-10; Jimenez, Colorado, 18-6; Wainwright, St. Louis, 18-11; CCarpenter, St. Louis, 15-7; THudson, Atlanta, 15-8; Pelfrey, New York, 15-9; Arroyo, Cincinnati, 15-10. STRIKEOUTS—Halladay, Philadelphia, 210; Lincecum, San Francisco, 208; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 201; Hamels, Philadelphia, 201; Wainwright, St. Louis, 199; JSanchez, San Francisco, 188; JoJohnson, Florida, 186; Jimenez, Colorado, 186. SAVES—BrWilson, San Francisco, 43; HBell, San Diego, 42; FCordero, Cincinnati, 36; Wagner, Atlanta, 33; Marmol, Chicago, 31; LNunez, Florida, 29; Capps, Washington, 26.

‘Claw and antlers’ signal good for Texas Rangers By Stephen Hawkins The Associated Press

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

This Aug. 19, 2010, file photo shows Texas Rangers fans gesturing the sign of deer antlers during a game in Arlington, Texas. The “Claw and Antlers” have become symbols for the AL West leaders. wrapped up a three-game sweep of the New York Yankees last weekend, one fan was waving the traditional broom — with a set of antlers attached to it.

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did it. And we continued to do it,” German said. “Now it’s at a point everybody kind of looks forward to doing it,” Young said. “Our team has always done something like this, but this thing is probably the one where the public has gotten to see it more often. ... Mostly it’s about us and trying to find a way to pull for our teammates.” Texas had its final off day of the regular season Thursday. The Rangers had a season-high 10-game lead in the AL West and their magic number was eight heading into a 10-game trip against all of their division foes. With the Rangers having so much success this year in pursuit of their first division title since 1999, there have been plenty of opportunities to flash the claw. Then Cruz one day flashed the antlers instead of just saying “deer” like he had in the past. The claw and antlers became so prominent among Texas players early in the season that eventually a T-shirt was made for them. Then the fans caught on to what was happening. They started flashing the symbols along with the players and the T-shirts went public. When the Rangers

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ARLINGTON, Texas — There are antlers on broomsticks. There are the T-shirts worn by Texas Rangers players and fans featuring a claw on the front and the head of a deer whose antlers are formed by a pair of spread-open hands on the back. And there is the head of a 10point buck mounted over AL MVP candidate Josh Hamilton’s locker in the clubhouse. All are part of an unlikely “Claw and Antlers” craze that has become part of the playoff chase for the AL West leaders. “It’s one small thing that we do that kind of builds some camaraderie,” Rangers veteran Michael Young said. “It started early and we’ve been doing it ever since.” When Nelson Cruz slid into second base just ahead of a tag Wednesday night for a double, he had the customary fist pump when the umpire signaled him safe. Cruz then looked toward the dugout with a smile and flashed a “claw” over his head, a quick hand gesture with curled fingers in response to the same from his teammates. Then the slugger spread both hands open and held one on each side of his head to form “antlers.” The claw symbolizes a good play. The antlers represent speed (think “run like a deer,” a phrase used often by Hamilton and Cruz over the last couple of years when they talked about fast players or hustling plays.) Utility infielder Esteban German was familiar with the claw from the Dominican Winter League and initially tried to introduce it to the Rangers during spring training in 2009. It didn’t really catch on. “But this year I tried it again. Most of the guys knew me so when we did something good, we

Even pitchers like C.J. Wilson have gotten into the act. After a spectacular defensive play in an earlier series against the Yankees, Wilson got up and quickly flashed the antlers, returning the gesture to teammates in the dugout. Wilson fielded a high chopper on the run and then dived into first base to get Derek Jeter, who had to hurdle over the pitcher to avoid stepping on him. “Any time a pitcher gets involved with something, you know it’s pretty good,” catcher Matt Treanor said. “I think it’s just a real simple way that the guys on the bench can really show their appreciation to a guy while he’s out on the field. ... It’s just that immediate appreciation by showing that.” Rangers manager Ron Washington started to notice the claw early in the season when Vladi-

mir Guerrero and Elvis Andrus were going through incredible offensive stretches and kept flashing the sign. Then Hamilton started doing it. “They come up with this stuff,” said Washington, sporting one of the blue T-shirts given to him by his players. “It’s their game, it’s their fun. It makes them feel good

about each other. ... Yeah, you’ve got to have fun. It’s a game. A tough game, but it’s a game.”

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D4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N F L C O M M E N TA RY

Complete the catch, eliminate the gray area By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

W

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Kristen Parr (4) dribbles the ball past Emmalee Cron (10) while attempting to score during the first half of an Intermountain Conference match against Redmond on Thursday in Redmond.

Summit Continued from D1 After Tatum Randall put the Storm ahead 3-0 in the 30th minute, Summit struggled to stay sharp. The Panthers (1-1-1 IMC, 1-1-1 ) recorded their two best scoring opportunities in the second half, one of which was only stopped after an outstanding save by Storm goalkeeper Kristine Fjelde, a Norwegian foreign-exchange student. “The first half was better than the second half,” said Brock, whose squad advanced to the

Class 5A state quarterfinals last season. “We were able to finish again (after Tuesday’s shutout), which was good.” Parr put Redmond in a 1-0 hole in the 10th minute after beating her defender and earning a one-on-one opportunity with the Panthers’ keeper. “I knew I could get past her,” Parr said about her defender. “I had the space and knew we need to get some momentum.” Parr, the IMC’s 2009 co-player of the year as a sophomore, scored again seven minutes later, this time off a Stormberg pass, handing Summit a 2-0

advantage. Randall made it 3-0 just 13 minutes later off an assist from Parr, and the rout was on. “We need to get better,” said Panther coach Hector West. “We’ll improve and move on.” Junior goalie Lauren Wellman played well in the second half for Redmond, recording six saves. West also pointed out the play of senior defender Tasha Foster. The Panthers played better after the break, forcing two corner kicks in addition to their two shots on goal. Redmond has been up and down this season,

falling to Mountain View 5-0 in its season opener last week before exploding for a 9-0 victory over Crook County on Friday. The Panthers continue IMC play on Wednesday with a rematch against Mountain View. For Summit, the Storm travel to Portland on Saturday to play a nonleague match against Central Catholic. Summit resumes IMC play on Tuesday with a home match against Crook County. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

PREP ROUNDUP

Panthers beat Cowgirls in volleyball Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Down two games to none, Redmond staged a furious rally Thursday night and upset four-time defending state champion Crook County, 23-25, 10-25, 2523, 25-15, 18-16 in Intermountain Conference volleyball action. With the score tied 16-16 in the fifth and final game, Kelsey Davidson produced two solid serves for the Panthers, while Aubrey Nitschelm recorded the match-winning kill to push Redmond past the Cowgirls. “We were down 2-0, but the girls didn’t get down,” Panther coach Lisa Pom-Arleau said. “They didn’t fold and came out fired up (in the third game).” Crook County (2-1 IMC) was just two points away from pulling off the three-game sweep. With the score tied 23-23, though, Redmond notched a block to go ahead 24-23 before Justine Callen registered the gamewinning kill, sending the match to a fourth game. The Panthers (2-2 IMC) then won game four by 10 points before claiming victory in a thrilling game five. “Game five was amazing,” Pom-Arleau said. “It was point for point the whole way. They went up 4-1 but we tied it up 7-7. After that they’d score a point and we’d score a point.” Karli Christensen led Redmond with 11 kills and seven blocks, while Jesslyn Albrecht added 32 assists and 10 blocks. Nitschelm contributed nine kills and two aces from the service line and Jessica Nurge produced 21 digs in the win. “This was a confidence booster,” PomArleau said. “We’re going to beat teams like Crook County and Summit and Mountain View. We’re going to be competitive.” Both teams continue IMC play on Tuesday. The Cowgirls are at Mountain View while the Panthers play Summit on the road. Also on Thursday: VOLLEYBALL Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25 Yamhill-Carlton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-17-19 ——— Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25 Central. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-20-18 INDEPENDENCE — Sisters continued its 2010 volleyball win streak with a pair of nonleague victories. “We just wanted to get our offense going and we did,” said Outlaw coach Diane Bremer, whose squad has now won seven matches to open the season. Sisters benefitted from Marisa Calavan’s accurate serving in the first match of the night as well as forceful strikes from out-

Jeter Continued from D1 Jeter himself called it “part of the game.” Rays manager Joe Maddon, who was ejected for arguing the umpires’ mistake, said, “If our guys had did it, I would have applauded that.” The only way it would have been considered cheating and wrong is if A-Rod had done it.

side hitter Chelsea Reifschneider. Libero Sydney Stoneback kept Sisters ahead of Yamhill-Carlton with her defensive work, Bremer noted. In the second match of the night, the Outlaws again came out strong, limiting Central to just 10 points in the first game. Lizzy Carhart led the visiting squad in blocks. The Outlaws look to make it eight straight wins as they open Sky-Em League play at Sweet Home on Thursday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-5-17 MADRAS — Hannah Mikkelson kept the La Pine front line on its toes as she hammered 11 kills for Madras in the three-game home sweep. Shani Rehwinkel led the White Buffaloes with six aces and Sierra Studnick served three aces and recorded seven digs in the nonleague contest. La Pine returns to the court Saturday at the Lakeview Tallman tournament, while Madras opens its TriValley League season Thursday against La Salle. East Linn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25-25 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-14-27-21 CULVER — The Bulldogs were missing two of their key players for the Tri-River Conference match, and without outside hitter Kelsi Stafford (injury) and setter Cheyenne Dobkins (illness), the home team fell in four games to East Linn. “This was a tough loss,” Culver coach Randi Viggiano said with a sigh. “We couldn’t find our rhythm.” Freshman Gabrielle Alley recorded eight kills and three aces for Culver (2-2 TRC). The Bulldogs play in a tournament on Saturday at Redmond, then travel to Western Mennonite on Tuesday. Also on Thursday: GIRLS SOCCER North Marion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 AURORA — By controlling play in the middle of the field, La Pine was able to play North Marion to a 0-0 tie for the majority of the first half. However, the Huskies squeezed in a late goal in the 40th minute to take a 1-0 lead seconds before halftime. After that, it was all North Marion. The host team scattered four goals throughout the second half, despite a strong effort by Hawks goalkeeper Katie Ebner, who logged seven saves in the second half alone. La Pine (0-2 overall) kicks off Sky-Em League play on Tuesday with a home match against Elmira. Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRINEVILLE — Following two shutout losses to start the season, the Cowgirls won their first match of the year. “We’re all so excited,” said Crook County co-coach Cassey

(Kidding.) Seriously, if A-Rod had done this it would have been portrayed as some sort of character flaw, not a brilliant maneuver by a heady player. Which it was. Already some have wondered how what Jeter did was different from Rodriguez shouting “Ha!” at Blue Jays third baseman Howie Clark in another famous incident. It isn’t, really. Both players were trying to get an advantage. A-Rod

Hehn. “A win always feels good.” Miranda Smith scored two goals, one in each half, and fellow sophomore Sammi Curry added the third. Brenda Olivera scored the lone goal for Madras in the 57th minute. On Tuesday the Cowgirls (1-2-0 overall) play at Summit and the White Buffaloes (0-2-1) travel to La Salle. BOYS SOCCER Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Redmond ran its record to 3-0 this season with the Intermountain Conference road win over the Storm. Summit struck first, scoring in the first minute when Jacob Fritz went up to challenge a lofted service on a free kick, distracting Redmond’s goalkeeper and allowing Jesse Sanderson to slot the first goal of the match. But the Panthers clawed back, scoring in the 25th minute on a through ball that set up Shane Buerger to beat Summit’s keeper, and then again in the final minute of the first half on a left-footed volley at the far post by Johny Estrada. “What we take away from this one is how physical the game was and we kept our composure,” said Panthers coach Jason Clark. “In years past we would have melted down. The boys have matured and it shows.” Redmond travels to Mountain View on Wednesday, a team they beat 4-2 in the Panthers’ season opener. Summit, which is still searching for its first victory (0-3-0), plays at Churchill of Eugene today. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MADRAS — Captain Jose Medina opened scoring in the 10th minute on a pass from Madras teammate Eduardo Lopez and set the tone for the remainder of the nonleague match. Medina followed Derrick Pacheco’s goal in the 15th minute with another score one minute later, and Lopez closed the first half with Madras’ fourth goal. The White Buffaloes — who have racked up 19 goals in the last three games — continued to tack on goals in the second half as Lopez, Edward Zacarias and Michael Giron got in on the scoring action. On Thursday Madras entertains La Salle, last season’s Class 4A state champion. Wednesday’s results: CROSS COUNTRY Culver���s Quinn leads Bulldogs SILVERTON — Culver’s Preston Quinn led a local contingent of runners at the Silver Creek Falls meet, placing 37th in the boys race. Triston Boise finished the race in 44th place to pace Madras, which was also at the meet. In the girls competition, the White Buffaloes’ Lauren Short took 82nd and her teammate, Frankie Vasquez, placed 84th.

was trying to unnerve another player. Jeter was trying to fake out the umpires. In both cases, the object was to help the team. And in both cases, it worked. Want some examples from other sports? Fine. In football, if an offensive lineman holds a defensive lineman but no penalty is called, he is lauded for having good technique. Same thing in basketball. If you foul a guy, and no foul is

called, are you supposed to say, ‘My bad’ ” and give the guy two free throws? On the playground, yes. In the NBA, no. Hockey? Players routinely get away with causing mayhem against other players’ bodies. Soccer? How many times during the World Cup did players fake injuries to get the refs to call fouls on the opposing team? Golf? Yes, we know, golfers are supposed to turn themselves

ith NFL rules, there’s often a catch whether someone actually made a catch. Ask Calvin Johnson. When the Detroit receiver came down in the end zone with the football in the final seconds of the Lions’ opener at Chicago, the victory celebrations began for the visitors. A little too soon, it turned out. Replays show Johnson seemingly so eager to celebrate that he doesn’t complete the catch according to NFL rules. Yes, it sure looks like he’s done the job and the Lions have roared back to beat the Bears, but, no, the finishing touch is missing. And that’s all that matters to the officials, who look to see if in the original momentum of going to the ground, the receiver comes to a complete stop on the ground with the ball. As long as he is still moving, the continued momentum, or his rolling over, are part of the process of making the catch. “What we try to do with the rule is eliminate the gray area,” NFL director of officiating Carl Johnson said. “That way, it is very clear for our officials to officiate. I was on the field for nine seasons and that is the way we have officiated that play since I have been in the league. “All our officials look at is when the action ends, does he have the ball?” Unlike a runner breaking the plane of the goal line for a touchdown — another rule that sparks controversy — a receiver in the end zone is required to secure the ball, get two feet inbounds and, if he goes to the ground, have complete control of the ball in doing so. Calvin Johnson did everything but the latter, according to the rule. As Carl Johnson suggests, maybe the Detroit wideout should have “handed the ball to the official. Some players automatically do that and then go celebrate with their teammates.” The clamor over whether it should have been a touchdown is not lost on Carl Johnson, who took over this year from the retired Mike Pereira. Nor is it lost on Pereira. “I am not surprised at the uproar,” Carl Johnson said. “It reminds me of the tuck rule, which a lot of people didn’t know when it became a headline. But it was properly ruled on the field. Now, when it happens, it’s a nonevent because the fans know it.” Pereira also references the tuck rule, the first thing that made Tom Brady famous back in 2002. “Yes, it’s the same as with the tuck rule, and that was not one of the most understood rules in the game,” said Pereira, now

the officiating analyst for Fox. “The networks slow down the play in such slow motion it seems like he has it forever. You see that in real time it’s nearly simultaneous that the ball bounces out very shortly after he hits the ground.” Cris Carter, one of the NFL’s leading all-time receivers with 1,101 catches, was known for his ability to make spectacular grabs. He also prided himself on knowing the rules, and he’s not so sure some of today’s top pass catchers are so knowledgeable. Carter notes there are two sets of rules, one for the 100 yards of the field and one for the 10 yards of the end zone. If a player doesn’t know all of those rules, he is doing himself and his team a disservice. “To be a craftsman, you have to know all those things,” Carter said. “That’s why they bring the referees at practices and in training camps, so you know what they are trying to do.” Carter said when he played, he’d notice teammates nodding off during meetings with the officials. “They probably don’t know the rules as well as they should have. I think (Calvin Johnson) doesn’t know the rule and when he pulls the ball away from the DB, you should hand it to the ref,” Carter said. “When you are in the end zone, the only thing without argument is when the ball does not move and you then hand it to the ref.” Arguments over such catches and non-catches have existed for decades. Soon after the 1999 NFC title game in which Tampa Bay’s Bert Emanuel was denied a critical catch on a late drive when the tip of the ball touched the ground, the NFL’s competition committee tweaked the rule about possessing the ball on a reception. In the San Diego-Oakland opener last season, the Raiders’ Louis Murphy had a catch similar to Johnson’s ruled a drop. Lots of uproar — temporarily. “Yeah, it seemed like a big thing in Week 2 and then as the season went on, it kind of was sent to the wayside,” Pereira said. Carter doesn’t think the catch rule will be re-examined. Pereira believes the competition committee will discuss it. “The committee is very thorough and a lot of issues are discussed and I know they will get back to it and talk about it this year,” Pereira said. “I would not be confident they will come up with any real change.” That would disappoint Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio, who believes the Lions were robbed. “There’s a common sense part that’s missing in this league,” Del Rio said. “When I saw Detroit play ... how that’s not a catch, that’s incredible.”

Charles Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson (81) catches a pass in the end zone over Chicago Bears cornerback Zackary Bowman in the second half of an NFL football game in Chicago, Sunday. The play was ruled incomplete.

in for mind-numbingly minor infractions. But we’re talking about real sports here. And we’re talking about Derek Jeter, which is part of why this story has taken on a life of its own. Doubt it would be such a big deal if Ramiro Pena had done it. Even FoxNews.com got involved, offering its readers a poll headlined “Is Derek Jeter a cheat?” Can’t wait to hear what Rush Limbaugh or Keith Olbermann

think, once they’re done debating whether it’s OK to harass female reporters in locker rooms. Jeter has long been characterized as a guy who would do anything to win — except take performance-enhancing drugs, which is cheating on a whole different level. That’s cheating that is wrong. And usually illegal. What Jeter did? Don’t give him a hard time. Give him an ESPY. Or maybe an Emmy.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD

Beavers RB Rodgers is looking to turn it up a notch at home

CYCLING High Desert BMX Sept. 11 Results 5 and under Novice — 1. Max Paskewich. 2. Bowie Helzer. 3. Banyan Howell. 6 Novice — 1. Isaiah Phillips. 2. Wyatt Pickens. 3. Peyton Pitts. 7 Intermediate — 1. Reilly Johnson. 2. Zane Strome. 3. Suddy Helzer. 9 Intermediate — 1. Jacob Cook. 2. Jason Taylor. 3. Diesel Vecqueray. 10 Expert — 1. Conner Buck. 2. Olivia Armstrong. 3. Trace Turner. 13 Intermediate — 1. Treavor Matthews. 2. Christian Phillips. 3. Cammeron Griggs. ——— Sept. 13 Results 13 Girls — 1. Olivia Armstrong. 2. Shyanne Bighaus. 3. Jaydra Kinsey. 26-30 Cruiser — 1. Ryan Armstrong. 2. Jonathon Norton. 3. Derek Camacho. 36-40 Cruiser — 1. Kelli Norton. 2. Sunny Harmeson. 3. Rick Vecqueray.

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

CORVALLIS — Nobody is taking the talk about Jacquizz Rodgers’ “slump” too seriously. Oregon State’s prolific running back, universally known as Quizz, was held to just 75 yards rushing and a 1-yard touchdown dash in the opener against TCU at Cowboys Stadium. The Beavers hung with the Horned Frogs but ultimately lost 30-21. With a bye last weekend, Quizz has three straight games with less than 100 yards rushing dating back to last season. He rushed for 64 yards and a score in the regular-season finale at rival Oregon, a 37-33 loss, before gaining 63 yards with a TD in Oregon State’s 44-20 loss to BYU in the Las Vegas Bowl. He hopes to reverse the trend this Saturday when the No. 25 Beavers (0-1) host Louisville (1-1) at Reser Stadium. “I’m just ready to get back on the field,” Rodgers said earlier this week. “I can’t do nothing about the past.” Quizz averaged nearly 111 yards rushing last season with a school-record 21 touchdowns, tying him for third in the nation. He has 2,768 yards rushing so far at Oregon State, fifth on the school’s career list. At 5-foot-7, Quizz is elusive. Former USC coach Pete Carroll used to complain that Quizz would hide behind Oregon State’s offensive line and pop out in unexpected places — usually for big gains. And he’s not just a threat on the ground. Quizz caught 78 passes for 522 yards and a score last season. He even threw a 1-yard touchdown pass out of the wildcat formation last season — a play the team calls the “Wild Beaver.” As a result, Quizz has often been mentioned as a Heisman Trophy candidate. He had a hard time in the receiving department against nowNo. 4 TCU, though, and didn’t catch a single pass. Beavers coach Mike Riley suggested that Rodgers’ production

5 & under Novice — 1. Max Paskewich. 2. Luke Larsen. 3. Bowie Helzer. 6 Novice — 1. Wyatt Pickens. 2. Tanner Wescott. 3. Hudson PifferiniCarter. 7 Intermediate — 1. Zane Strome. 2. Suddy Helzer. 3. Jaidyn Camacho. 10 Expert — 1. Conner Buck. 2. Jaxson Norton. 3. Diesel Vecqueray. 14 Intermediate — 1. Randy Chisolm. 2. Tyler Ducharme. 3. Austin Reid. ——— Sept. 15 results 26-30 Cruiser — 1. Ryan Armstrong. 2. Derek Camacho. 3. Lowell Snyder. 5 & under Novice — 1. Max Paskewich. 2. Bowie Helzer. 3. Banyan Howell. 6 Intermediate — 1. Zane Strome. 2. Durgan McKean. 3. Jaidyn Camacho. 8 Intermediate — 1. Diesel Vecqueray. 2. Reilly Johnson. 3. Suddy Helzer. 10 Intermediate — 1. Olivia Armstrong. 2. Griffin McKean. 3. Noah Hensley. 13 Expert — 1. Dustin Robertson. 2. Sage Green. 3. River Stredwick

Drag boat races cut short on Haystack Bulletin staff report The Columbia Drag Boat Association’s High Desert Showdown at Haystack Reservoir near Culver ended early Sunday due to high water and winds. Rising water in the reservoir wreaked havoc on the electronics needed to time the boats running on the quarter-mile. Results from earlier qualifying passes were used to determine the winners of the various classes. Teams from Oregon, Washington, California and British Columbia raced in classes ranging from River Racer (12 sec-

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

onds and slower) to Pro Mod (7 seconds and slower). Bend’s Al Zemke was the only winner from Central Oregon. Zemke won the Stock Eliminator Class (11 seconds and slower). The CDBA is replacing some vital track components to fix the problems that occurred last weekend. The next CDBA race is the Northwest Nationals, set for Dexter Reservoir in Lowell, Sept. 25-26. For more information, visit www.cdbaracing.com.

Oregon State guard Grant Johnson (70) helps clear a hole for running back Jacquizz Rodgers, center, during the Beavers’ loss to TCU earlier this month. After being held to 75 yards rushing in the game, Rodgers will be aiming for a breakout performance against Louisville on Saturday.

Next up • Louisville at Oregon State • When: Saturday, 2:30 p.m. • TV: FSNW • Radio: KICE-AM 940 was down simply because the course of the game dictated it: The Beavers were having trouble converting on third down and only ran some 51 plays. But just because Quizz hasn’t put up his usually gaudy numbers yet this season doesn’t mean he won’t — which is exactly what concerns Louisville. “With his size he’s hard to bring down. ... kind of reminds me of the Demps kid who’s at Florida (Gators’ leading rusher Jeffery Demps), kind of built the same

Oregon rebuilds tarnished reputation in offseason

way, has the same type of speed and can hide because of his size, but he has enough speed to run away from people,” Cardinals first-year coach Charlie Strong said. When asked how to slow Rodgers down, Louisville linebacker Dexter Heyman scratched his chin quizzically and mused: “Answers to the quiz.” “He’s so small, he hides behind those big guys,” Heyman said. “He’s really strong and so it’s really hard to bring him down, you’re not going to be able to arm tackle a guy like Quizz or his brother.” James Rodgers is a flanker for Oregon State and Quizz’s older brother. He has made a catch in 30 straight games — the fourthbest streak in the nation. But he was also slowed somewhat by the Horned Frogs with four receptions for 75 yards and a score. The Beavers, who popped into

Mid-Am

the rankings at No. 25 despite the loss to TCU and the off week last weekend, will try to snap their three-game losing streak (since last season’s Civil War) against the Cardinals, who have lost nine straight road games. And they’ll no doubt be looking to silence all those whispers about Quizz. “If we run well, we have a better chance of winning,” coach Riley said. “So that’s a big factor. We’ve got to have a good ground game to go with everything else we do. We’re obviously working hard on that.”

Continued from D1 Brandes, a Bellevue, Wash., golfer who played as an amateur in the 2010 U.S. Senior Open in July, shot a 2-under 70 Thursday to move to 4 under. Another Washington golfer, Seattle’s Tim Pilgrim, is a distant third at even par. Bend’s Dwight Hietela is in 14th place at 6 over par after two rounds, the lowest score of the nine Central Oregonians in the 52-golfer field. The field for the PNGA MidAm, which is being played in

BendSpineandPain.com

Central Oregon for the first time since 2006, is limited to golfers in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and British Columbia age 25 or older with a handicap of 8.4 or better. The final round is expected to begin today at 7:30 a.m., and the leaders are scheduled to tee off at 10:30 a.m. Spectators are welcome, and admission is free.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

(541) 647-1646

541-388-4418

SEPTEMBER 18TH & 19TH 2010

A Celebration of the Harvest Season

Saturday 11 am - 10 pm Sunday 11 am - 6 pm

By Anne M. Peterson

the team. Strong safety The Associated Press Eddie Pleasant said the EUGENE — The OrDucks have been all over egon Ducks have rethe map emotionally in paired a reputation sulthe past nine months. lied in the offseason by “It’s been hectic in a keeping their focus on Next up good and a bad way. We the field. lost our quarterback, • Portland The defending Pac-10 you know, and he was State at champions are ranked a great player for us Oregon No. 5 this week after and he did a lot of great routing New Mexico • When: things,” Pleasant said. 72-0 in the opener and “But we had to move Saturday, thumping Tennessee 48on ... and DT (Darron 3:15 p.m. 13 on the road. Thomas) is doing a But there were ques- • TV: Comcast great job right now. It’s SportsNet tions surrounding the been a roller coaster but Ducks after a tumultu- • Radio: we all ride it together, ous offseason, during we all bought in and KBND-AM which their starting everything’s going good 1110 quarterback got kicked so far.” off the team, their star Indeed, things are gorunning back spent a couple of ing extremely well for the Ducks nights in jail and their placekick- right now. Sophomore Thomas er got into a street brawl. won the starting job over fifth“It feels great to get back to year senior Nate Costa in fall playing football and not having camp and has thrown for 422 to deal with those other things,” yards and four touchdowns so tight end David Paulson said this far. James returned from his susweek. pension to run for 142 yards and a Oregon ended last season on a touchdown against Tennessee. high note, even though they lost The Ducks have also seen to Ohio State in the Rose Bowl. some unexpected stars emerge. Quarterback Jeremiah Masoli Backup running back Kenjon was already getting Heisman Barner ran for four touchdowns Trophy buzz as a dual-threat in the opener against the Lobos. quarterback, and running back He is averaging 18 points a game, LaMichael James won the Pac- tied for best in the nation. 10’s Freshman of the Year award Sophomore cornerback and after running for a conference re- punt returner Cliff Harris record 1,546 yards. turned a pair of punts for touchBut the rosy prospects for this downs against New Mexico, then season began to dim in January, ran an interceptions 76 yards for when a campus fraternity house a score against the Volunteers. was robbed and Masoli was imThe Ducks play host to Portplicated. Then James was jailed land State, of the FCS Big Sky after an altercation with his ex- Conference, on Saturday before girlfriend. Both athletes went on the Pac-10 season opens the next to plead guilty to charges con- weekend at Arizona State. Ornected to the allegations. egon was picked in the preseason Oregon coach Chip Kelly sus- to repeat as league champions, pended Masoli, who compounded despite the offseason tumult. his situation by reportedly lying After what Oregon has been about it, for the upcoming season, through since January, it is all but while James was suspended for assured they won’t overlook the the opener. Masoli was dismissed Vikings. They don’t really want from the Ducks a few weeks later any more drama. when he was stopped for a traf“We’re just focusing on getting fic violation and marijuana was better every day,” Paulson said. found in the car. Masoli now plays “You only get 12 chances to play for Mississippi. a game and you can’t take any of Several other players were also them lightly. You have to be presuspended or dismissed from pared for every one of them.”

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A D V EN T U R E S P O R T S

D6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event. 97

Bend Parkway

The half-marathon course starts Mt. Bachelor and finishes in Bend’s Old Mill Village District and takes runners along the Deschutes River Trail and other trails and dirt roads ve Dri Haul southwest of Bend. ur y t Road n Ce Entrada Lodge

Farewell Bend Park

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XTERRA Trail Run Nationals course

Br oo ks wo od

Continued from D1 A favorite to win the XTERRA women’s race is defending champion Lauren Fleshman, of Eugene. Fleshman, a five-time NCAA distance-running champion at Stanford University, now runs professionally for the Nike Oregon Track Club. She won the U.S. 5,000-meter championship in 2006 and 2010. Some of Fleshman’s toughest competition this Saturday is expected to come from Semick and a couple of other Bend runners: Katie Caba, who finished fourth in last year’s XTERRA National Championship, and Stephanie Howe, who placed eighth. More than 500 trail runners are expected to be on the starting line Saturday at the XTERRA race, which is the culmination of the 2010 XTERRA Trail Run Series. The series included races divided into 10 different regions around the United States, and 30 regional champions from various age groups have registered for Saturday’s race. The entry list as of midweek included runners from 23 states and five different countries. While that adds some national and international flair, the race could end up as a battle among Bendites. “I think we just have a lot of world-class runners in Oregon, and right here in Bend,” says Caba, 39. “Some of these runners are the best in the country. It’s a national championship, but I’m running against the people I’m always running against.” Howe, 27, is an elite-level nordic skier who in May won the Pole Pedal Paddle, Central Oregon’s popular annual multisport endurance race. But she says she considers herself more naturally a runner. Though she expects to see many familiar faces, Howe is eager to run against some new competition on Saturday. “It makes it more exciting when you’re not racing the same people every weekend,” Howe says. “It gets me more excited and more nervous … and you can meet other people.” Both Howe and Caba are considering racing in the 50K nationals on Sept. 25, but neither runner has committed. “It just depends on how well I recover,” Howe says. “It’s hard on your body and it’s getting close to ski season. It’s kind of a bummer for people who want to do both. But it’s kind of amazing there’s so many opportunities right here.” Adds Caba: “I think we can definitely get spoiled as runners here to have such great races here.” King, 30, and Semick, 44, expect to have no problem racing in both the XTERRA and the USATF 50K nationals. Both elitelevel runners are using the two Central Oregon events as training races for more ambitious goals. Semick is gearing up for the Portland Marathon on Oct. 10 and the

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Meadow Camp

XTERRA Trail Run National Championship When: This Saturday, 9 a.m. start; first finishers expected around 10 a.m. Where: Start/finish at Bend’s Old Mill District Who: More than 500 runners from around the world, ranging in age groups from 10-14 to 80 and older Courses: A 21-kilometer course will serve as the national championship race, but separate 10K and 5K races will also be staged; the relatively flat 21K championship course will start and finish in the Old Mill District and take runners on trails southwest of Bend along the Deschutes River Registration: The last chance for runners to register is today at Fleet Feet Sports Bend from noon to 6 p.m; no race-day registration; entry fees are $45 for the 21K, $35 for the 10K, and $30 for the 5K; all races are open to anybody; runners who have already registered can also pick up their race packets at Fleet Feet today Contact: www.xterraplanet.com

USATF 50K Trail Run National Championship When: Saturday, Sept. 25, 8 a.m. Where: Start and finish at Mt. Bachelor’s Sunrise Lodge Course: A mix of singletrack and dirt roads in the high country; includes 4,000 feet of elevation gain; course runs along Flagline and MetoliusWindigo trails Registration: www.ultrasignup.com; $50 without a T-shirt and $70 with a T-shirt; open to anybody Contact: www.superfitproductions 100K World Championship in Gibraltar on Nov. 7. But she is happy to avoid traveling to races this weekend and next. “It seems like Bend has been a biking town for so long, and now we’re getting some prestigious running events,” Semick says. King is preparing for the Baltimore Marathon on Oct. 16, and he is also helping out a fellow trail runner who has made a long trip to compete here on Saturday. Fujio Miyachi of Japan, who is trying to get trail running established as a sport in his home country, is staying with King in Bend this weekend. Miyachi finished fifth last year at the XTERRA Trail Run World Championship in Hawaii, where King won. “He’s trying to get trail running up and going in Japan,” King says. “I don’t think it’s all that popular there. But road running is huge there.” King won last year’s XTERRA national race with a time of 1 hour, 6 minutes, 46 seconds.

He finished more than six minutes ahead of his closest competition. A victory on Saturday would mark his third consecutive XTERRA national title. Overall winners of the XTERRA Trail Run National Championship will receive $1,000 and round-trip airfare to the XTERRA Trail Run World Championship, to be held Dec. 5 at Kualoa Ranch, Hawaii. Aside from the elite-class entries, other runners will compete for national titles in a total of 25 age-group divisions at the XTERRA Nationals. John Keston, of Sunriver, is the race’s oldest entry at age 85. But not only can Keston run, he can sing — he is scheduled to perform the national anthem before the start of Saturday’s event. “I just love to run,” Keston says. “If there’s a race in the area that I feel I’m prepared for, I’ll try to do it.”

org; 541-335-1346.

BIKING COG WILD MOUNTAIN BIKE SHUTTLES: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30 p.m., the shuttle to Swampy Lakes Sno-park leaves from Cascade Lakes Brewery; Wednesday shuttles also available to Sunriver (3 p.m.) and Swampy Lakes (5:30 p.m.); cost is $10 per rider and bike; to reserve a spot, call 541-3857002 or visit www.cogwild.com. HIGH DESERT BMX: Regular races are Mondays and Wednesdays, with registration and open practice from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., races begin at 6:30 p.m.; 541-815-6208 or www.highdesertbmx.org. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com. WOMEN’S ONLY CYCLOCROSS SKILLS CLINIC: Open to all ability levels; learn on the bike skills; Monday, Sept. 20, at 6 p.m. at Summit High School; $15; 541848-3691 or jocoaching.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS CAMP: Participants will ride a mixture of singletrack and double track, practice various courses and preview the Cyclocross Nationals venue; ages 10-23; Sept. 18 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sept. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; one day is $55, both days are $100; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23. Riders will be grouped based on age and ability; Sept. 20-Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY MASTERS CYCLOCROSS: Instructed by Marcel Russenberger, local cycling icon and professional Swiss cyclist from 1982-1990; adults with novice to intermediate cycling abilities are welcome and participants can use a ’cross bike or a mountain bike; Mondays at 5 p.m., Sept. 20 to Oct. 18; Bend’s Cascade Middle School; $75; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.

HIKING INTERMEDIATE HIKES FOR FALL FOLIAGE: Oct. 14-15; 2 intermediate hikes with an overnight stay at Belknap Hotsprings Resort; trip geared toward those ages 50 and older; cost $310 per person includes van transportation; one night lodging at Belknap; guided tour of gardens, 2 meals and guide fees; registration deadline Sept. 29; contact Silver Striders Guide Service; 541 383 8077; strideon@silverstriders.com or www.silver striders.com.

PADDLING FLATWATER KAYAK SAFETY CLASS: Basic safety including proper clothing, equipment and rescue skill development; paddlers will practice assisted and self-rescue techniques; one-day two-hour clinic offered Sept. 18; $45; kayaks, PFDs, paddles and safety equipment provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe at 541317-9407 or john@tumalocreek. com; www.tumalocreek.com. LEARN TO STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD: Learn forward strokes, turning and balancing techniques on the Deschutes River; Sundays and Mondays, through Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to noon and noon to 2 p.m. at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend; $45; includes gear and additional hour-long board rental after class to practice new skills; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. BASIC SKILLS KAYAK CLASSES: Saturdays through Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2-6 p.m.; four hour class will teach new paddlers basic skills through short lawn session discussing gear and safety, followed by three hours in the Deschutes River; $65; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. MOONLIGHT CANOE TOURS: Sept. 18-19 and 23-25, 7-11 p.m.; paddle around the mountain lakes; $65; transportation, canoe equipment, instruction, guides provided; ages 8 and older; www. wanderlusttours.com/summer/

mooncanoe.html; 541-389-8359. HALF-DAY CANOE AND KAYAK TRIPS: Available daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; guided by local naturalist guides; transportation, instruction, equipment and all food and drinks provided; $44-$65; 541-389-8359; www.wanderlusttours.com.

RUNNING XTERRA UNIVERSITY INFORMATIONAL SESSION: Saturday, Sept. 17, at 12:30 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports in Bend; Xterra U will be led by Rod Bien of Fleet Feet Sports and cover tips for the course, aid-station location, day-of-race nutrition and hydration; www.fleetfeetbend.com. PILOT BUTTE CHALLENGE: Saturday, Sept. 25, 9 a.m. at Pilot Butte State Park; a one-mile timed nature trail run/fitness walk from the base to the summit of Pilot Butte with a 493-foot elevation gain, beginning on the east side of Pilot Butte; e-mail Susan at susan.skavlan@state.or.us. PILOT BUTTE GIANT GALLOP 5K WALK OR RUN: Fundraiser sponsored by the parent, teacher, student, organization (PTSO); Saturday, Oct 2, 9:30 a.m. at the Pilot Butte Middle School Track; race starts at the track, then goes up the Pilot Butte State Park Trail to the top of the butte and back down the trail to the track; pre-register by Sept. 25 for $20 with a shirt or $15 without a shirt; 541-355-7400 or michael.hecker@bend.k12.or.us FLEET FEET NO BOUNDARIES 5K & 10K PROGRAMS: Training programs run eight weeks and culminate with the Turkey Trot on Nov. 25; next session starts Oct. 2; meets Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. advice and support, a daily training schedule, weekly group training sessions, clinics on proper footwear, nutrition and injury prevention, training gear, etc.; $75; Fleet Feet Sports, Bend; 541-3891601; shannah@fleetfeetbend. com; www.fleetfeetbend.com. DIRTY SECOND HALF MARATHON: Sunday, Oct. 3, 9 a.m., at Seventh Mountain Resort; 13.1-mile course includes singletrack and dirt roads; www.superfitproductions.com.

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F

‘Star Wars: The Clone Wars’ returns

Inside

The animated series gears up for its third season on the Cartoon Network, Page E2

FAMILY

Father-son bonding key to boys’ growth

INSIDE Dear Abby Woman suffering from verbal abuse must escape relationship, see Page E2

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF

By Niesha Lofing McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Mike and Brandon McNealy spent almost every night for two months this summer under or in a beaten-down 1979 Lincoln Continental. The Wilton, Calif., duo bought the jalopy through Craigslist, got it running and then set out to ready it for the demolition derby at the California State Fair. McNealy, a heavy-equipment mechanic for the state, and his 16-year-old son stripped the car’s interior and installed a steel roll cage. They put in a custom exhaust system and a floor shifter, rewired the car and replaced its stock gas tank with a racing one. Hundreds of hours of side-by-side labor did more than just help Brandon win best-looking car, first place in his heat and fifth place overall in the demolition derby. It helped to strengthen the relationship between father and son. “When we’re out there, just the two of us, he’ll talk more about his girlfriends and stuff that ordinarily he wouldn’t share with me,” McNealy said. “It’s a great way to spend time together and pass knowledge from one generation to the next.” See Bonding / E6

Study examines sledding injuries A new study, published in Pediatrics, examined the dangers of sledding. An average of 20,820 people ages 19 and younger were treated for sledding-related injuries in emergency rooms in the United States from 1997 to 2007. About 4 percent of the ER visits resulted in hospitalization. Kids ages 10-14 accounted for 42.5 percent of the injuries, and boys of all ages accounted for 60 percent of those injured. Fractures accounted for 26 percent of injuries, followed by abrasions and contusions at 25 percent. Head injuries, at 34 percent, were the most common. Head injuries were more likely to occur from collisions than from falls, jumps or flips. Those who sustained traumatic brain injuries were more likely to be using snow tubes than other kinds of sledding devices.

A little fatherly advice

U.S. study sees cost of child care on the rise

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

Bend Fall Festival This annual party held in downtown Bend has plenty of fun for kids, from hay rides to a pumpkin-painting competition. The festival, held Saturday and Sunday, is totally free.

Harvest Celebration Redmond offers its own festival this weekend, serving up historic activities and games, plus live music on Saturday and Sunday in Centennial Park.

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

A recent study shows that since the year 2000, the cost of child care has been increasing at a rate twice as fast as the median income of families with kids. The new report from the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies is based on information from a survey conduced in January. Oregon ranked among the least-affordable states for center-based infant care. The state is No. 6 of the least affordable, based on the average annual cost of full-time care for infants ($9,936) and the state median income for a two-parent family ($73,193). Only Massachusetts, New York, Minnesota, Colorado and California ranked as less affordable. Oregon was also the state with the secondhighest discrepancy between the cost of child care in urban areas versus rural areas. The cost of caring for an infant in a center in an urban area was more than twice that of the cost in rural areas (urban is defined as areas with more than 50,000 people). — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

Photos by Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Laura George, of Bend, holds her 19-month-old daughter, Emme, at Kiddoz in Bend on Tuesday. They are part of a local group of 15 families who have adopted — or who plan to adopt — children from Ethiopia.

Adopting ... and

adapting

Central Oregon families join support group to share experiences adopting children from Ethiopia

William Shakespeare put it simply, and perhaps best, when he wrote, “It is a wise father that knows his own child.” Here is some advice from the National Fatherhood Initiative on ways dads can connect with children. BONDING WITH SONS: • Play ball: Teach him a sport you’ve always loved or help him practice one he enjoys. Offer praise. • Catch a game: Take him out to the ballgame or watch one at home. Teach him about the sport and share stories from your youth. • It’s all about skills: Impart skills you feel are important for every man to know: changing a car’s oil or tire, baiting a hook, grilling a burger. Tackle a home improvement project together. WAYS TO BE A GREAT DAD TODAY: 1. Look at your children and call out the most positive thing you notice. 2. Love your children by touching them gently and speaking to them softly. 3. Listen to what your children are saying and not saying. 4. Leave a legacy by giving your children a memory. 5. Laugh with your children.

Teaching kids about money will pay off

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

W

hen Bend resident Laura George goes to the grocery store with her daughter, Emme, she knows she has to be prepared to tell the story of their family. Everywhere they go, people smile and look, sometimes giving double or triple takes. Often strangers approach mom and daughter with comments or ask questions. The George family stands out because 19-month-old Emme is black, while her parents, Laura and husband Mike, are white. Laura George mostly doesn’t mind the extra attention because she knows most people have good intentions, even if sometimes she wishes she could just run and get milk without being noticed. On most days, she is happy to share the story of how they came to adopt Emme from Ethiopia on July 4 last year. “As humans, we have a need to have the story make sense in our minds,” said George, who calls herself an ambassador for adoption and diversity. Although Emme usually stands

TOP: Baby sitter Aryana Rhine, 18, of Bend, plays with Tomas Nishikawa, 2, at Kiddoz on Tuesday. LEFT: Abeni, 20 months, was adopted by the Kuba family of Bend. Mom Carrie Kuba says the local group is vital for her daughter.

out among Bend’s fairly homogeneous population, that may be changing a little. The Georges belong to a local support group for families that have adopted or plan to adopt from Ethiopia. The group,

called Central Oregon Family and Friends of Ethiopian Ethnicity, or COFFEE, has grown from about five families last year to 15 families now. Most are families who have recently adopted, although a few are still in the adoption process. Carrie Kuba thinks the group is vital for her 20-month-old daughter, Abeni. “She will be able to grow up with other children who understand completely where she’s coming from,” Kuba said. When Redmond resident Camille Smicz traveled to Ethiopia to bring home her twin boys in fall 2008, one of the families she met at the embassy happened to be from Bend. See Adopting / E6

By Maggie Galehouse Houston Chronicle

Nobody likes a spoiled brat. And the air of entitlement wafting around this type of kid — which only grows thicker as the child grows older — is linked directly to money. Teaching children how to respect and manage money begins with an allowance. “The only rule of thumb is a dollar per year of age,” says financial expert and human resources professor Janet Stern Solomon, “but I wouldn’t start at $5 for a 5-yearold in this economy.” It’s too much. Solomon wrote “Bratproofing Your Children: How to Raise Socially and Financially Responsible Kids” with her husband, Lewis, in 2007. Since then, a national financial slump has rendered money management an essential skill for people of any age. For children, an allowance should be a fixed amount at regular intervals; the amount and frequency depends on the age and maturity of the child, Solomon says. Younger kids should get a small amount each week; teens might get a larger sum once a month. Saving is a big piece of the financial lesson. See Money / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Wife suffering verbal abuse must find some way to flee Dear Abby: I have been married to “Emile” for eight years. We have been together for the last 15. Emile has always been demeaning and sarcastic to me. When he gets upset about something he blames me. I am so depressed and hurt that all I can think of is “going away” permanently. I don’t think I’d ever harm myself, but I feel more desperate and hopeless every day. I’m down so low I don’t know how to come back up. Please advise. — No Tears Left In Las Vegas Dear No Tears Left: Has no one told you that the effects of constant put-downs can be as debilitating as being physically abused? After 15 years of having your self-esteem chipped away, I’m pleased that you finally found the strength to ask for help. If you have family, arrange to visit them — a LONG visit. If you can afford to separate from your husband, pick up the phone and call the National Domestic Violence Hotline ((800) 799-7233) and ask for help to safely get away. I’m not exaggerating when I say your mental health depends on it. Dear Abby: I live in a suburban neighborhood where the homes are very close together. My back yard is too small to have a clothesline. Because I love the smell of my bed sheets after they have dried outside, I hang them out to dry by pinning them to the chain link fence that surrounds the perimeter of my back yard. My girlfriends say they would be offended if they were my neighbors. I say it’s environmentally friendly, and because I’m hanging out only linens and not underwear, nobody should be offended. Who is correct? — In The Breeze In Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Dear In The Breeze: Many neighborhoods have codes and restrictions that dictate what can and cannot be done within their boundaries. Review the documents to ensure you are not breaking any rules. If you’re

DEAR ABBY not, you have had no complaints from the neighbors, and your laundry isn’t becoming soiled from flapping against the chain link fence or freezing solid in January — it’s all right with me. Dear Abby: A few months ago, we got a new neighbor. When I was out walking my dog one day, my neighbor was doing the same. At first I thought this person was female, but as we got to talking I began to doubt myself. First off, my neighbor is petite, has a boyish haircut, no breasts, dresses like a guy and speaks in a voice that could be male or female. I stood there and decided I’d ask for a name, thinking it would solve my problem. Wrong! The person’s name is “Chris.” Abby, I don’t know what to do. I feel bad for not knowing this person’s gender. Is there any way I can find an answer without Chris knowing? I don’t want to refer to this person as a “he” if she’s a “she,” and vice versa. – Girl Next Door, Missoula, Mont. Dear Girl Next Door: Refer to your neighbor as Chris. Asking other neighbors what they have learned about Chris could create more problems than it would solve. My advice is to continue being kind and neighborly to Chris. The more you get to know this person, the more likely the answers will present themselves. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Lots of changes ahead for ‘Clone Wars’ By Tish Wells McClatchy Newspapers

ORLANDO, Fla. — Dave Filoni, 36, supervising director of “Star Wars: The Clone Wars,” promises lots of character development in its third season, which begins today on the Cartoon Network. “In the opening scroll of 2005’s ‘Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith,’ it says, ‘There are heroes on both sides. Evil is everywhere,’” Filoni said in a recent interview. “I can say that this season, we’re going to get into that a lot more. I think it’s a necessary point of the clone wars. And the audience will have a much better understanding of what the clone war really is when we’re done with Season 3.” Filoni talked about the new season at Celebration V, the mega Star Wars convention held in Orlando in August. In the series, the good guy Jedi commanders — ObiWan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker — and their clone troops fight against the ‘droid armies of the evil renegade Jedi Count Dooku. Other major characters include Anakin Skywalker’s apprentice, or “padawan,” Ahsoka Tano, and the clone leaders, Captain Rex and Commander Cody. It was filmmaker George Lucas’ idea to create Tano. “George came right in and said, ‘I want Anakin to have a padawan. We’re going to use this girl here, we’ll call her Ahsoka.’ It was just something he

Lucasfilm / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Ahsoka Tano, the young apprentice, or padawan, of Anakin Skywalker in “Star Wars: The Clone Wars.”

‘Star Wars: The Clone Wars’ When: 6 p.m. today Where: The Cartoon Network wanted to explore.” Filoni adds, “We see her evolve and mature.” Filoni points out that there was ‘always a strong female presence in the Clone Wars.’ He cites Duchess Satine Kryze, who is faced with an almost impossible task of reforming a warlike society on Mandalore. “She is the elected ruler of what was a warlike society that is trying, for its own survival, not to be what they were — to fight against this instinct to be warriors.” He’s very fond of the clones, especially Captain Rex, who reports to Anakin Skywalker. “Rex, to me, is the other pivotal charac-

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1-2-3 MAGIC! EFFECTIVE DISCIPLINE FOR THE 2- TO 12-YEAR OLD

ENCOURAGING vs. DISCOURAGING PARENTING

Sept. 27 - Oct. 4, 2010, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Ponderosa Elementary School $50 in district, $68 out of district

November 8, 2010, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Ponderosa Elementary School $25 in district, $34 out of district

DEALING WITH ANGER - THEIRS AND OURS

PARENTS WHO STRUGGLE TO SAY “NO”

October 18 - 25, 2010, 6:30 - 8:30 pm Ponderosa Elementary School $50 in district, $68 out of district

November 15, 2010, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Ponderosa Elementary School $25 in district, $34 out of district

Prior Registration Required. Please contact: BMPRD, 541-389-7275 For class content info, call Beth Bellamy, Instructor, at 541-617-8835

ter in that we don’t know what happens to Rex. We hit right off the bat with the clones this year and I’m very happy with it.” He and Lucas have discussed going further into the individual personalities of the clones. “Anakin factors into that with Rex because he’s different for a Jedi, so you have to think that his clone

commander, his captain, would be different by being a friend of his.”

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www.aspenacademybend.com • 541-231-9845 BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 9/17/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:02) The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Rudy Maxa Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Inside Edition (N) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Expeditions Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Rudy Maxa Expeditions Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Wife Swap Haller-Wren/Spencer ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A missing young man. (N) ’ Å Outlaw Pilot ’ ‘14’ Å Medium It’s a Wonderful Death ‘14’ CSI: NY Vacation Getaway ‘14’ Å Flashpoint Acceptable Risk (N) ‘14’ Wife Swap Haller-Wren/Spencer ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 (N) ’ Å Human Target ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å The Good Guys Silvio’s Way ’ ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Smothered: The Censorship Struggles of the Smothers Dateline NBC A missing young man. (N) ’ Å Outlaw Pilot ’ ‘14’ Å Hellcats I Say a Little Prayer ’ ‘PG’ Nikita 2.0 ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Hometime ‘G’ Paint Paper Sew With Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Smothered: The Censorship Struggles of the Smothers

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 High School Blitz News Jay Leno News Letterman Inside Edition (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Back Care Basics: Yoga News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Back Care Basics: Yoga

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Justice The First 48 ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Mayhem ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds The Angel Maker ‘14’ Criminal Minds Paradise ‘14’ Å The Glades Second Chance ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 American Justice ’ ‘PG’ Å (3:30) ›› “Sudden (5:45) › “Death Wish 4: The Crackdown” (1987, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Kay Lenz, John P. Ryan. › “Death Wish V: The Face of Death” (1994, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Lesley- › “Death Wish V: The Face of Death” (1994, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Lesley102 40 39 Impact” Å Vigilante targets L.A. drug rings on girlfriend’s behalf. Å Anne Down. N.Y. vigilante avenges girlfriend’s murder. Å Anne Down. N.Y. vigilante avenges girlfriend’s murder. Å Animal Cops Phoenix ’ ‘PG’ Å Blood Dolphins Return to Taiji ‘14’ Blood Dolphins ’ ‘14’ Å Blood Dolphins (N) ’ ‘14’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Blood Dolphins ’ ‘14’ 68 50 12 38 Animal Cops Phoenix ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous” (2005) Sandra Bullock, Regina King. Å Miss Con. 2 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Your Chance to Dance Episode 107 Your Chance to Dance Episode 108 Home Videos Home Videos The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Young Guns II” (1990) American Greed Robbing Hollywood’s A-List; Soaking the Rich at Auction The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å Paid Program Youtholgy 51 36 40 52 The Apprentice ’ ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Rick’s List Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Chappelle’s Chappelle’s 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Primal Quest High School Football Klamath Union at Summit (Live) Outside Film Festival HS Football 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb ›››› “WALL-E” (2008, Adventure) Voices of Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight. Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark Survivorman ’ ‘PG’ Å Man, Woman, Wild Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Man, Woman, Wild Tennessee ‘PG’ Beyond Survival With Les Stroud (N) Man, Woman, Wild Alaska ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football Kansas at Southern Mississippi (Live) College Football California at Nevada (Live) 30 for 30 NASCAR Now College Football 22 24 21 24 (4:00) High School Football Columbus Carver (Ga.) at Lagrange (Ga.) (Live) Cheap Seats Cheap Seats UWF Wrestling UWF Wrestling AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: 2006 Liakhovich vs. Briggs Boxing Boxing 23 25 123 25 MLB Baseball From Oct. 27, 1986. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Friday Night Lights Full Hearts ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Rory’s Dance ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Fashion cakes. Chopped Champions Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Chefs vs. City All Star Phoenix Good Eats Rachael’s Vac. 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Cougars Access Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. Bensinger Seahawks MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Huskies (4:00) › “Dude, Where’s My Car?” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Grandma’s Boy” (2006, Comedy) Doris Roberts, Allen Covert. ››› “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008, Romance-Comedy) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell. Sons of Anarchy 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Curb/Block Yard Crashers House Crashers House Hunters Hunters Int’l Income Property My First Place 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Organized Crime: A World History Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels The Potato ‘PG’ Gangland A Killer’s Revenge ‘14’ Gangland Valley of Death (N) ‘PG’ Gangland Shoot to Kill ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Targeted ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Corcoran Prison Politics Lockup Riverbend Lockup: Holman Lockup: Holman Lockup Angola Penitentiary. 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann 2010 MTV Video Music Awards ’ ‘14’ World of Jenks World of Jenks Jersey Shore All in the Family ‘14’ › “Half Baked” (1998) Dave Chappelle, Guillermo Diaz. Premiere. ’ 192 22 38 57 2010 VMA Pre-Show ’ SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush Victorious ’ ‘G’ My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob UFC Fight Night Florian vs. Gomi ’ ‘14’ (9:23) Entourage (10:04) Entourage The Abyss ‘MA’ (10:46) Entourage Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene (5:38) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Å (DVS) Stargate SG-1 Solitudes ‘PG’ Å Warehouse 13 Vendetta ’ Å Warehouse 13 Age Before Beauty Warehouse 13 13.1 ’ Å Haven Duke helps Audrey. (N) Warehouse 13 Around the Bend ’ 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis Aurora ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan. Å (11:15) My Boys (11:45) My Boys 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “The Man With the Golden Arm” (1955) Frank Sinatra, Eleanor Parker. Dried-out (9:15) ››› “Baby Doll” (1956, Drama) Karl Malden, Carroll Baker, Eli Wallach. A man (11:15) ›› “College Confidential” (1960) ››› “The Moon Is Blue” (1953, Comedy) William Holden, David Niven. A playboy 101 44 101 29 pursues a woman saving herself for marriage. heroin addict returns to wife and habit in Chicago. Å spends the day with the child-bride of his rival. Steve Allen, Jayne Meadows. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Narcosis ’ ‘14’ Bones The Man in the Mud ’ ‘14’ › “10,000 B.C.” (2008) Steven Strait, Camilla Belle. Premiere. Å › “10,000 B.C.” (2008, Adventure) Steven Strait, Camilla Belle. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Juvenile ’ ‘14’ (4:30) › “Batman & Robin” (1997, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger. Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Sym-Bionic Titan Generator Rex Star Wars: The Clone Wars (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures: Scariest Ghost Adventures Gettysburg ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å 179 51 45 42 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Andy Griffith All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith NCIS Light Sleeper ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Murder 2.0 ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. Å ››› “Casino Royale” (2006) Daniel Craig. Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit I Love the New Millennium 2003 ‘14’ I Love the New Millennium 2004 ‘14’ I Love the New Millennium 2005 ‘14’ I Love the New Millennium 2006 ‘14’ I Love the New Millennium 2007 ‘14’ Unplugged ‘PG’ I Love Money ’ 191 48 37 54 I Love the New Millennium 2002 ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:45) › “Waking Up in Reno” 2002 ’ ‘R’ Å (6:20) ›› “Revenge of the Nerds” 1984 ‘R’ Å ›› “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” 1982 ‘R’ Å ››› “Friday” 1995, Comedy Ice Cube. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:05) ›› “Maximum Risk” 1996 Fox Legacy (5:22) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (7:52) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (10:22) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Moto: In Out Check 1, 2 ‘14’ The Daily Habit New Pollution Insane Cinema: Cle ‘PG’ Å Moto: In Out Check 1, 2 ‘14’ The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Insane Cinema: Cle ‘PG’ Å Props ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ryder Cup Top 10 Golf Videos Top 10 Golf Videos Top 10 Golf Videos Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: Albertsons Boise Open, Second Round Longhirst Hall Highlights (N) The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Fairfield Road” (2010, Drama) Jesse Metcalfe, Natalie Lisinska. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) ›› “Hotel for Dogs” 2009 Emma (6:15) The Town: ›› “The Uninvited” 2009 Elizabeth Banks. A ghost warns a Real Time With Bill Maher Actor Jon ›› “Terminator Salvation” 2009, Science Fiction Christian Bale. Humanity fights back Real Time With Bill Maher Actor Jon HBO 425 501 425 10 Roberts. ’ ‘PG’ Å HBO First Look young woman about her father’s fiancee. Å against Skynet’s machine army. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Hamm. ’ ‘MA’ Å Hamm. ’ ‘MA’ Å Freaks-Geeks (5:45) Freaks and Geeks ‘PG’ Å Freaks-Geeks (7:15) Freaks and Geeks ‘PG’ Å Freaks-Geeks (8:45) Food Party ››› “F/X” 1986, Suspense Bryan Brown, Brian Dennehy. ‘R’ Dinner-Band Hell Girl ‘14’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›› “Mouse Hunt” 1997, Comedy (6:10) ›› “Robert Heinlein’s The Puppet Masters” 1994 Donald Sutherland. A sleepy ››› “The Hangover” 2009, Comedy Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. Three pals must find ›› “From Hell” 2001, Suspense Johnny Depp, Heather Graham. A Scotland Yard MAX 400 508 7 Nathan Lane. ’ ‘PG’ Å Midwestern town is taken over by parasitic aliens. ‘R’ Å a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ Å investigator searches for Jack the Ripper. ’ ‘R’ Å Dog Whisperer ‘G’ American Beaver ‘PG’ Border Wars Lost in the River ‘14’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ American Beaver ‘PG’ Border Wars Lost in the River ‘14’ Nat Geo Amazing! ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel in, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Speargun Hunter Hunting, Country On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ›› “What Just Happened?” 2008 Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Kevin Nealon: Now Hear Me Out (iTV) Weeds Bliss ’ The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å ››› “Chéri” 2009 Michelle Pfeiffer. iTV. An older woman Inside the Super Boxing ShoBox: The New Generation SHO 500 500 ’ ‘14’ Å Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å ‘MA’ Å teaches a courtesan’s son about love. ‘R’ Six World Boxing (Live) Monterey Motorsports Reunion (N) Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Intersections Test Drive: Buick Trackside At... Mobil 1 The Grid Test Drive Monterey Motorsports Reunion Barrett-Jackson Special Edition SPEED 35 303 125 (4:10) Serendipity (5:45) › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ (7:35) ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” ’ (9:12) ›› “The Fast and the Furious” 2001 Vin Diesel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Martin Lawrence Martin Lawrence STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) › “Crocodile Dundee in Los Ange- ››› “Elegy” 2008, Drama Penélope Cruz, Ben Kingsley, Dennis Hopper. A student › “Bangkok Dangerous” 2008, Action Nicolas Cage, Shahkrit Yamnarm. A hit man ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer, Ben KingsTMC 525 525 les” 2001 Paul Hogan. ’ ‘PG’ awakens sexual possessiveness in her professor. ’ ‘R’ Å becomes an unlikely mentor to a street punk. ’ ‘R’ Å ley. A couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ Buck Stops Here Bucks Tecomate Bucks Elk Fever Dangerous Game Tred Barta The Daily Line (N) Bucks Tecomate Elk Fever Dangerous Game Tred Barta The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å ›› “You’ve Got Mail” 1998, Romance-Comedy Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Parker Posey. ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 17, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P  â&#x20AC;&#x2122; G  M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. WILLIE NELSON: The prolific country-folk musician performs, with Ryan Bingham and the Dead Horses; $46 or $79 in advance, $48 or $83 day of show, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www .bendconcerts.com.

Courtesy Lionsgate and Crest Animation

Kate (voiced by Hayden Panettiere), left, and Humphrey (voiced by Justin Long) are the stars of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alpha and Omega.â&#x20AC;? See the full review in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel Scott Hammers / The Bulletin file photo

Eli Gasper and Jasmin Erickson paint pumpkins in the family harvest area at the Bend Fall Festival on last year. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event will take place downtown Bend on Saturday and Sunday.

SATURDAY COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Breakfast accompanied by live music from Lindy Gravelle and a military keynote speaker; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Council on Aging RSVP program; $5; 8:30-10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-8817. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See a variety of makes and models, including motorcycles; with a salute to veterans and a canned food drive to benefit St. Vincent de Paul; free for spectators; 9 a.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-4109978 or www.ccrodders.com. PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food, music and more; free; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-9663 or www.projectconnectco.org. TREE PLANTING: Plant trees in Camp Polk Meadow, with an introduction to the land presented by the Deschutes Land Trust; meet at the lodge; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-389-8359 or www.wanderlusttours.com. RUN FOR CONGO WOMEN: Walk from the falls to the Old Mill District; proceeds benefit Women for Women International; donations accepted; 9:30 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541-330-1621, patricia@ bendbroadband.com or http:// runforcongowomen.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Event includes arts, crafts, food, a silent auction and more; auction proceeds benefit the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-8905. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.bendfallfestival.com. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Three Quarters Short, Raven Alan St. John, Maresa and Co. and others, food, raffles, a silent auction, kidney donor information and more; proceeds benefit John Whitehurst, who has kidney failure; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-788-6010 or WesternRecreation@live.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 11 a.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. HARVEST CELEBRATION: With historic

541-390-2821. PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-6336804.

Story times, library youth events for Sept. 17-23 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: â&#x20AC;˘ BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday. â&#x20AC;˘ TODDLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. â&#x20AC;˘ PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. â&#x20AC;˘ SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. â&#x20AC;˘ SPARK BOOK CLUB: Grades 6-8; Focuses on the Oregon Battle of the Books for middle school; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: â&#x20AC;˘ PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. â&#x20AC;˘ WE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: â&#x20AC;˘ PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. â&#x20AC;˘ SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. â&#x20AC;˘ TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: â&#x20AC;˘ FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. â&#x20AC;˘ TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday and 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: â&#x20AC;˘ BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday.

activities and games, live music, vendors and more; noon-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL: With games, a clown, hayrides, hot dogs and more; free; 1-3 p.m.; Sisters Church of the Nazarene, 67130 Harrington Loop; 541-389-8960. KENDAMA TOURNAMENT: Contestants compete in the ball-andcup game, in divisions determined by expertise; $5 for beginner through advanced divisions, $2 novice division; 1 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-633-7205. LATIN AMERICAN GUITAR CONCERT: Rich Hurdle performs a selection of music from Latin America to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane;

â&#x20AC;˘ TODDLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. â&#x20AC;˘ PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. â&#x20AC;˘ TEEN THURSDAYS: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday.

SUNDAY VOLLEYBALL FOR BABIES: Volleyball competition; proceeds benefit March of Dimes and Bend Beach Volleyball; $100 or $60 per team, free for spectators; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; sand volleyball courts, across from Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 541-4193004 or marbell1@yahoo.com. SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Event includes arts, crafts, food, a silent auction and more; auction proceeds benefit the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-8905. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-3890995 or www.bendfallfestival.com. HARVEST CELEBRATION: With historic activities and games, live music, vendors and more; noon4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. POLO IN THE COUNTRY: Professional polo game; bring a blanket or chairs; proceeds benefit five local charities; $10, free ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m., gates open at noon; Camp Fraley Ranch, 60580 Gosney Road, Bend; 541-312-8113. PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-633-6804.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: â&#x20AC;˘ FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. â&#x20AC;˘ TEEN TUESDAYS: Grades 6-12; 3:30 to 5 p.m. Tuesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: â&#x20AC;˘ FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday. â&#x20AC;˘ PAJAMA PARTY: 6:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: â&#x20AC;˘ ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: â&#x20AC;˘ TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) changes in fall â&#x20AC;˘ WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

TUESDAY

CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: â&#x20AC;˘ STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 10 a.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

No family event listings.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; & PADDLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MUSIC SERIES: Includes kayak, canoe and boat gear demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by electro-acoustic band The Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients and watch the video â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mind Powerâ&#x20AC;?; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

541-312-1034 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. HARVEST FESTIVAL DINNER: Featuring barbecue and potatoes, live music and historical presentations by Talking Tombstones actors; event will take place across from the park; $25; 5:30-9 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ashes play the Salt City Shakers; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-330-1183 or www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. NORSEMAN CHOIR: The Eugenebased Scandinavian choir performs; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend;

THURSDAY No family event listings.

F DVD  W

Catch up with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Princeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By Amy Hitt The Washington Post

The basics: The magic continues in this sixth installment of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potterâ&#x20AC;? franchise, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a doozy, featuring the death of a major character. The lowdown: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Princeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: PG

Cost: $28.98 (Blu-ray $35.99)

more romance here, and Harry learns details about Voldemortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past. This is a good time to catch

up on the Harry Potter plot, as the next film is slated to open Thanksgiving 2010 and the final

one in summer 2011. The extras: This release boasts a bunch of special features, including the trailer for Part 1 of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deathly Hallows,â&#x20AC;? deleted scenes, a cast guide to the production and a year-inthe-life documentary about J.K. Rowling.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Alpha and Omegaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: PG for rude humor and some mild action. What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: An alpha wolf is transported to a new wilderness with a nonalpha wolf with an idea that they will repopulate the park, which will never do. The kid attractor factor: Cute canines have adventures and make a few â&#x20AC;&#x153;matingâ&#x20AC;? jokes. Good lessons/bad lessons: Class differences can be overcome when â&#x20AC;&#x153;puppy loveâ&#x20AC;? is involved. Violence: Dogfights. Language: Disney clean. Sex: Mating jokes, but vague ones. Drugs: None. Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advisory: Harmless and kid-friendly in every way.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Easy Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic elements involving teen sexuality, language and some drug material What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: A teenager invents a promiscuous reputation for herself to fit in and uses that rep to help others become more visible in high school. The kid attractor factor: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gleeâ&#x20AC;? without the singing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sassy, sexually curious kids learn hard life lessons in the crucible of high school. Good lessons/bad lessons: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Infamyâ&#x20AC;? is not the same thing as â&#x20AC;&#x153;fame.â&#x20AC;? Violence: None to speak of. Language: Some profanity. Sex: Basically, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the subject here. Drugs: References, materials. Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advisory: The subject matter should give parents of kids 13 and younger a pause. Its frankness makes it more appropriate for older teens.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Flippedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: PG for language and some thematic material. What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: Tweens meet and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite click as a couple, or even as friends. The kid attractor factor: Kids have the lead roles, and the story is told from their points of view. Good lessons/bad lessons: Tests of character often start out

as simple tests of friendship. Violence: None. Language: A couple of profanities. Sex: No. This is more about the innocence of seeking that first kiss. Drugs: Adults have a few too many highballs. Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advisory: The warm, sentimental period piece may click more with grandparents than with kids, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect movie to take the grandkids to. OK for those 8 years and older.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Macheteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: R for strong bloody violence throughout, language, some sexual content and nudity What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: An illegal immigrant on the run from drug lords finds himself hunted by people on both sides of the border. The kid attractor factor: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pure exploitation, with over-the-top violence, sex and gore. Think â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piranhaâ&#x20AC;? without the fish or the 3D. Good lessons/bad lessons: Some folks stirring up the immigration debate might be doing it for political or racial reasons. Violence: Almost constant, much of it involving hacking bodies with a big blade Language: Profanity. Sex: Lots of nudity, no explicit sex scenes Drugs: Surprisingly, none Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advisory: This aims at older teens who can get into R-rated movies, and if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re old enough to get the joke, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scar them for life.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Going the Distanceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rating: R for sexual content including dialogue, language, some drug use and brief nudity. What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about: A young couple, kept apart by the tough job market, struggle to make a longdistance romance work. The kid attractor factor: Drew and Justin. Justin and Drew. Good lessons/bad lessons: Long-distance romances canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last forever. Violence: None. Language: A lot of profanity Sex: Yes, just explicit enough to count. Drugs: Pot â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and alcohol. Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advisory: These two arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t teens anymore. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an adult romance with juvenile touches.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Sept. 17, 2010: This year, you might be more creative and open than in recent years. You attract people and relationships like you are a cook flipping pancakes. Clearly, your life presents many unthought-of options. If you are single, the question is not whether you will experience a romantic tie but who will be your choice for that type of relationship. If you are attached, you gain a new perspective on your sweetie. Together you are quite the force to be dealt with. CAPRICORN can be more fun than many other signs. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Tap into your instincts, and you won’t go wrong. Because of your unusual ideas and processing abilities, you might need to take the lead. Others cannot represent concepts that they don’t have a full grasp of. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Keep reaching out. You will want to digest different ideas and get to the basis of a problem. How you handle a matter and the end results could be dynamic. Look to meetings to help create even better ideas and/or gain more support for yours. Tonight: Try a new spot. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH A partner always plays a strong role in your choices and actions. A discussion points to a new direction. Investigate your options with a greater awareness of

the impact you have. Deal directly with each person on an individual level. Tonight: A close encounter. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer to others and understand the dynamics between you and another person. You have the ability to reach out for new information and ideas. Just give up rigid thinking, and you’ll open up to a broad base of opportunities. Tonight: So many options ... LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH A steady pace and understanding can help you. You know what the possibilities are; pick and choose your priorities. A partner comes through for you, explaining what you thought was impossible. Go along for the adventure, and watch the whole plan unfold. Tonight: Even works. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Allow greater creativity, and with it perhaps more spontaneity and fun. Let your sense of humor emerge. Many people seek you out, trying to find out what really is on your mind. Schedule a late lunch as the day merges into the weekend. Tonight: Let your hair down. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to anchor in and complete a project. Clearly, your sense of direction will help you with associates. You find that everyone is more optimistic than in the recent past. Tonight: Keep conversations moving. Visit with those on your path home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your imagination knows no limits, and you feel more in the mood to share than you have in

a while. Others share their flights of fancy as well. See what gives between you and another person. Tonight: Making the most of the moment, people and fun. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be aware of the costs of continuing on your present path. You might want to attempt another form of getting down to basics with those close to you. Encourage a brainstorming session. Tonight: Treat yourself; treat others. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Allow greater creativity into your thinking. You can be very dry and logical, which works most of the time. Why not be frivolous and a little more creative? See the ideas that trigger from being involved with a full-on brainstorming session? Tonight: Talking up a storm. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might want to understand more of what is going on within before jumping to any conclusions or making a decision. The less said and the less done right now the better. Don’t delude yourself about a financial matter. If your processing is on and you see a green light now, it will be there later. Tonight: Take some personal time. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Meetings point to a new direction. You see a situation in a different light. Know that anything is possible, especially if you can gain a key person’s or two’s support. Know what works for you. Emphasize what is positive within your immediate circle of friends. Tonight: Christen the weekend. TGIF! © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Adopting

Bonding

Continued from E1 After Smicz returned home, she received an e-mail from the leader of the local Rainbow Club — a group for adoptive families — who messaged four or five local families that had adopted from Ethiopia. That is how the COFFEE group got started. Each family has its reasons for choosing Ethiopia. The time frame for adoption from the country is relatively short, typically a year or two, and the cost can be less than adoption in some other countries. (However, the adoption process remains a long, difficult and expensive one.) Some families also appreciated the reputation of the country’s orphanages, which are known for being more loving and hands-on than those in some other countries. According to the U.S. State Department, adoptions from Ethiopia have surged in recent years. In 1999, just 42 children from Ethiopia were adopted to the U.S. In 2009, the number grew to 2,277.

Continued from E1 Technology changes. The economy changes. But some things never change. Some fathers still take time out with their sons — fishing, playing sports or video games, tinkering on cars. Even in challenging times, these unshakable dads are forging family ties, modeling manhood and fatherhood, and delivering life’s most important lessons. “The bonding between a father and son is important in terms of relationships and how they’ll (boys will) generalize and translate to relationships with other males,” said Rob Goldman, a psychologist who works for the Suffolk County Probation Department in New York. It’s also beneficial in helping keep boys out of trouble. There’s a correlation between children who wind up in the juvenile justice system and incarcerated dads or fathers who abandon their children, he said. “It’s very, very important to be engaged and enrolled in their children’s lives,” Goldman said. “If they feel the caretaker isn’t there for them, the child is going to have relationships that can be very de-

Photos by Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

From left to right: Ashton Ranstad, who is waiting for her referral; Sara Adams with her daughter, Stella, 2; Carrie Kuba with her daughter, Abeni, 20 months; Laura George with her daughter, Emme, 19 months; and Aryana Rhine, 18, who was baby-sitting Tomas Nishikawa, 2, and his adopted brother and sister Kobe, 3, and Jade, 5.

AFRICA

Ethiopia

The journey COFFEE members chose to adopt for different reasons. For George and her husband, the choice came after a five-year struggle with infertility. “For us, it was a transition,” George said. “For so many years, we were just stuck on trying to conceive.” She felt she had to mourn the biological child she could never have before she could move on and look at other options. Now she sees this as part of her journey to becoming a mother. She believes Emme is “the one soul meant to be my child.” Emme’s birth mother handed Emme over and formally relinquished her rights to the little girl. George said that was a rarity; many of the children are simply abandoned. George sees this as a courageous act by the mom to risk shame and provide safety for her child. “I have immense love in my heart for her, which only grows each day,” said George. She would like to go back someday and do something to help this mother and thank her. The Georges took Emme home when she was 5 months old. “It’s a moment you dream of and want for so long,” George said. She calls it magical and surreal. Camille Smicz and husband Ron had a biological daughter, Piper, now 5, but struggled to have any more. Smicz always pictured herself with a large family, but the infertility treatments felt manufactured, and were emotionally and financially draining. The couple decided to adopt. They had asked to adopt one or two children, but had no idea they would end up with twin boys, now 2. Bend resident Andrea Abramson and husband David have a biological daughter Madison, now 9. They went back and forth for a few years about whether to have another. Eventually they decided they wanted to adopt because it just felt like the right decision. In October of last year, they brought home Trace, now 5. They didn’t want to adopt a young child, still in diapers, and wanted their daughter to have a sibling relatively close in age. Both of Trace’s parents died, and he has memories of living in Ethiopia. “We’re still in the stage of learning about who Trace is,” said Andrea Abramson. Trace managed to master English in about three months and is still adjusting, said his father, and the kids are learning from each other. Madison is helping Trace

Variety of Arts & Crafts

Atlantic Ocean

wanted her recognized as such and not as an orphan. Kuba says Abeni is high-spirited with an explosive personality. She is joyful, playful and feisty. And for now, the TV movie aspects are starting to fade and Kuba feels their family life is settling down.

The group Greg Cross / The Bulletin

become calmer, and he is helping her become more assertive. It’s as if “they’ve been siblings all their lives,” said David Abramson. “He adds so much to our lives,” said Andrea Abramson. “It hasn’t always been smooth. But the thing is, we can’t imagine life without him.” Bend residents Sara Adams and husband Andy have two boys, now ages 9 and 7. Sara Adams wanted another child, and her husband asked her to pray about the idea of adoption. It was an idea she had never strongly considered, but after a little prayer she then knew it was the right choice. They had been to Kenya on a mission trip together and “fell in love with African people and culture,” which is how they ended up choosing Ethiopia.

The Kubas Sometimes Kuba feels as if she and her family were living some kind of made-for-TV movie. Her biological daughter, Bella, has an extremely rare disease that required a kidney transplant (which she received from her dad). Doctors didn’t think the little girl, now 6, would live very long, although now she is doing great. Because the disease was a genetic disorder, Carrie Kuba and husband Martin didn’t want to give birth to any more children, even though they wanted their family to grow. They decided to adopt from Ethiopia, in particular because Carrie Kuba had friends from the country. The Kubas were excited to receive a referral for a little girl, but the little girl died before the adoption could take place. “It was hell. It was horrific,” said Kuba. The girl had died of kidney failure. Although still in mourning for the girl, they proceeded with adoption plans and six weeks later were referred another daughter, whom they named Abeni. She was just 4 months old when the Kubas brought her home. Kuba says when they were in Ethiopia, they made sure the little girl had their last name. “She was our daughter” and they

Kuba, who has a master’s degree in multicultural education, says it was imperative for Abeni to be around kids like herself. “These kids need to be around other kids that look like them,” said Kuba. Adams agrees that the group helps make the color differences the norm for her daughter. She will grow up seeing “other black babies with white moms and have that be OK.” While the parents may have different styles or personalities, the children bring them together. Smicz helps organize many of the events and activities. She wants to learn about Ethiopian culture and share that with her kids. They have read books together and eaten Ethiopian food. They have learned about the country’s history and celebrate some of the holidays and traditions together. She recently traveled to an Ethiopian festival in Portland, where the kids experienced traditional games, music, food and dress.

own, I’m so sorry.” Several parents mentioned a comment they often hear, one they really dislike. Strangers walk up to their children and say, “You are so lucky.” George wants people to think about what that kind of comment could do to a child’s selfesteem, making the kids feel as if they were being thrown away. Besides, in the parents’ minds, the parents are the lucky ones. Smicz says she appreciates when people want to acknowledge how beautiful her children are, but sometime people can be intrusive and frequently touch them or pat their heads. At the fair recently, a woman told Smicz, “Your children look so odd and out of place.” Smicz could only stare in response. She knows that the way she responds to these questions and comments sets an example for her kids. When people ask her, “Oh, are they your children?” she knows they are really trying to ask if she gave birth to the children. But Smicz thinks the only right response is to say “Yes.” She knows her kids are listening and she can’t hesitate to say, “Yes, these are my children.” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Money Continued from E1 “You might give a younger child $5 in singles each week, so they can set a few dollars aside,” Solomon says. When you get right down to it, money management doesn’t require real cash at all. In her book, “The No-Cash Allowance,” author and blogger Lynne Finch outlines the system she and her husband designed for their own children. Under Finch’s system, the child controls a virtual pool of money and keeps an ongoing account on paper or online. The money and responsibilities increase as the child gets older. “I wanted my kids to have an allowance,” Finch explains, “but I didn’t want them to think it was for whatever they wanted.” It’s OK to commiserate with your children if they ask for advice on a purchase, Finch says. And it’s important to sympathize with them after a bad purchase.

Allowance advice Kids are never too young: Even a 3-year-old understands that if a coloring book costs $4 and he has only $3 to spend, he’s out of luck. Keep chores and grades out of it: Chores and decent grades are part of the price of living with the rest of the family, a basic expectation. But parents might consider docking a child’s allowance for failing to meet a basic expectation. The amount depends on the child: Come up with an allowance based on what your child wants to buy. If your 7-year-old likes Pokemon cards and a pack costs $10, a $7 weekly allowance would get him two packs every three weeks. But let them control their own small financial destiny. “If they don’t make mistakes now, they’re going to make mistakes later,” Finch says. “When they learn to drive a car, eventually you have to give them the keys.”

Complications and diversity Adoption is a transition for families. For some families, this meant biological siblings had to learn how to share attention. Kuba says it has been a big adjustment for her daughter Bella, who was “used to having her parents at her beck and call.” But ultimately, Kuba thinks this is a good adjustment. She likes watching their sisterhood adjust and develop over time. “I think both of them have pretty interesting perspectives on the world.” Smicz says the transition was tricky for their daughter because her twin brothers draw attention. But she is adjusting. The families also have to adjust to how people in the community react. A few have received negative or racist comments, but those are the exception. While George doesn’t mind people coming up and talking about her family, she would like people to be thoughtful. Asking “Is she adopted?” is OK with George. She doesn’t like comments like the one she received from one woman who said, “Oh, you couldn’t have a child of your

SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL

Silent Auction Benefiting Sisters High School Arts Dept.

September 18 & 19 Sat 10:00–5:00 • Sun 10:00–4:00

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2010 9:30 AM —12:30 PM

Oak Street Downtown Sisters Special Appearances by: Author Barbara Knight & Mingle Game Creator - Tony Aceti

Wine Tasting

structive and erratic for them.” That’s one of the reasons Mike Luery, 55, decided to take his son on a cross-country trip to see the 30 major-league baseball stadiums. Every summer for five years, the pair set out on a 7- to 10-day expedition, picking a region of the country and hitting as many ballparks as possible. “Trying to get a teenage boy to open up about school or girls at the dinner table, you get shut out,” said Mike Luery, who wrote a book, “Baseball Between Us,” about the experience. “We could keep the lines of communication up by talking baseball. He’d get so caught up in it he’d loosen his guard a little bit. All of a sudden we’re talking about who he’s taking to senior prom.” Sons’ interest in their fathers increases in middle to late childhood, as boys tend to move beyond Mom and grow more interested in the world around them, said Peter Gray, an anthropology professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who wrote “Fatherhood: Evolution and Human Paternal Behavior.” “As sons are entering the reproductive ages, ratcheting up the significance of their relationships and status, the potential guides that their fathers can serve as is hugely important,” Gray said.

100% of

For more information: Auction Proceeds Richard Esterman 541-549-8905 Benefit the Special thanks to The Bulletin

Art Dept.

OFFERED IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST ASSOCIATION FOR COLLEGE ADMISSION COUNSELING


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 F1

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robberson.com

robberson.com

Mon. - Fri. 8am - 7pm Sat. 8am - 6pm Sun. 11am - 6pm Pizza Hut

McDonalds

Albertsons Revere

4th Street

3rd Street

N

16,998

1

AT

2006 GMC SIERRA 2500

Stk# 9623, VIN: JM1CR2WL8A0381386 MSRP $19,260 - $750 Factory Rebate - $1,512 RFS Discount

*

• 3rd Row Seating • 28 MPG!! • Climate Control • Premium Alloy Wheels

*

3RD ROW SEATS!

NEW 2010 MAZDA6 i Sport • AWD • Third Row Seat WAS $ 25,998

$

• Leather • Running Boards

21,977

• 4WD • Running Boards WAS $ 25,998

$

$

• MP3 (Single Disc) • Premium Wheels

22,977

1

AT

VIN: 167747, STK# UT9966M

VIN: J09207, STK# UT9870P

Stk# 9435, VIN: 1YVHZ8BH1A5M23274 MSRP $22,205 - $4,207 RFS Discount

2008 FORD F350

• 30 MPG!! • Satellite Radio • Stability Control • Full Power Options

17,998

*

30

MILES PER GALLON!

NEW 2010 Mazda MX-5 Miata Grand Touring • Running Boards • 4WD WAS $ 33,998

robberson.com

$

• Bed Liner • Custom Bumper

27,977

• V8, Turbo Diesel • 4WD WAS $ 42,998

VIN: C73012, STK# UT9766P

$

37,977

VIN: E33971, STK# UT9953T

robberson.com

robberson.com

800-588-1084

$

• Bed Liner • Towing Package

SERVICE DEPARTMENT Mon. - Fri. 7am - 11:30pm Sat. 8am - 5:30pm

382-4521

ROBBERSON FORD Underwood

541-

$

20,977

VIN: B65437, STK# UT9942T

2008 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER

SAFETY RATING!

SALES HOURS

$

2009 FORD F150 SUPERCREW

23,998

Stk#9859; VIN: D46724 MSRP $27,415-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$1,417 RFS Disc.

19,977

Bend, Prineville and www.Robberson.com Main Showroom: 2100 NE 3rd St. Bend • Preowned: On Butler Market & 2nd St.

East

Bend River Promenade

Butler Mkt. Rd. Izzy’s

y

$

$

rk wa

1 AT

• Leather • Running Boards

3rd St.

NEW 2010 FORD ESCAPE 4X4

MILES MILES PER PER GALLON! GALLON!

• Leather • Privacy Glass

Pa

Stk#9730; VIN: 108841 MSRP $27,090-$1,000 Factory Rebate-$1,092 RFS Disc.

AT

*

NEW 2010 MAZDA5 Sport • 4WD • Third Row Seat WAS $ 23,998

VIN: E49117, STK# UT9887P

29

14,998

1

2007 FORD EXPLORER XLT

VIN: JM1BLSG9A1330764

MILES PER GALLON!

• 305 Horsepower • 29 Miles Per Gallon MPG! • Premium Leather Seating • Shaker Custom Sound Package

$

18,977

VIN: 602234, STK# UT9796P

14,998

24,998

2010 MAZDA3

• Single Compact Disc • Alloy Wheels

$

MILES MILES PER PER GALLON! GALLON!

33

Stk#9863; VIN: W120181 MSRP $18,180 - $2,000 Factory Rebate $500 FMCC Rebate* - $682 RFS Disc. *Must Finance With FMCC OAC, Rebate in Lieu of Special APR

$

17,977

WAS $ 23,998

2008 FORD ESCAPE

34 MILES PER GALLON!

1 AT

$

• AWD • Privacy Glass

VIN: 208810, STK# UT9762M

NEW 2011 FORD FOCUS

$

• OnStar • Oversize Off-Road Tires

*

35

Stk# 9911, VIN: JM1DE1HZ4B0106465 MSRP $14,730 - $232 RFS Discount

ENTIRE STOCK!

1 AT

14,498

1

OFF MSRP!

MSRP - $1,000 Factory Rebate - $3,000 RFS Disc.

$

14,977

X

ROBBERSON PRE-OWNED SUPERSTORE

North

*Sale prices in lieu of FMCC special APR. **Must qualify and finance with FMCC, On Approved Credit. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures may vary from actual vehicles. Not all buyers will qualify. Must be present at dealership to purchase advertised vehicle. No dealers or brokers. Special APR in lieu of rebates. Sale vehicles may have scratches or dents. Offer good through 9-20-10. Thanks for buying at Robberson and reading the small print.

1

AT

Stk# 9277, VIN: JM1NC2FF6A0207112 MSRP $31,150 - $6,152 RFS Discount

24,998

• Hard Top Convertible • Bose Sound System • 6-Speed Manual • Leather Seating

POWER HARD-TOP CONVERTIBLE!

Come in for a test drive today!

ROBBERSON MAZDA 2100 NE 3rd St., Bend 800-588-1084 • 541-382-4521 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Illustrations may not be identical to actual vehicles. Ask about our creative financing plans. *On approved credit. Sale price in lieu of special financing. Minimum 680 Beacon Score, must finance w/MAC. License, title, and doc not included in price. Offers good through 9-20-10.

*


F2 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 205

208

Items for Free

Pets and Supplies

Hide-A-Bed Couch, sleeps good, FREE, please call 541-420-1459.

AKC German Shepherd pups, Beautiful, $675 509-406-3717

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Estate Sales

Fundraiser Sales

French Flea Market at Pomegranate Saturday, Sept. 18, 10am-4pm Bend’s most fabulous flea market! Antiques, vintage, & artisan goods. 120 NE River Mall Ave., near Macy’s. See pomegranate-home.com

HUGE

SALE!

Saturday, September 25th 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM upper parking lot Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Rd., just off Neff Rd., to benefit Central Oregon Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

282

Sales Northwest Bend

FRI.-SUN., 9-5 P.M. Lots of tools and all household 400 Home Garage Sale for Glen Gives Charity, 2500 NW Awitems. 146507 Bills Rd. in brey Glen Dr. Sat 9-3. In case Jackpine Village, Gilchrist. of rain, watch for signs. Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802

DELAWARE AVENUE ART YARD SALE. Come support local artists. Browse from Between the Covers (Bond St.) to Hill St. for new art, recycled objects, found objects and much, much more. Sat. Sept 18, 9-3 541-419-6178 Garage Sale IN THE ALLEY @ 2454 NW Hosmer Lake Dr, near Mt. Wash. & Skyliner Rd Fri/Sat, Sept. 17 & 18, 9 til 3 Garage Sale Sat 9-5. Antiques, Shark steam cleaner, weight set & bench, golf clubs & bag, desks, children’s clothes toys, bikes, trikes, more! 1315 NW 6th (at Drake Rd.) Huge Downsizing Sale! Sat. 9-3., 65520 76th St., PLUS SIZE WOMEN’s CLOTHES, tools, bamboo fishing rods, games, antique glassware, cookware, books, fridge, freezer, much more!

AKC Reg. Cavalier King Charles Puppies! 8 weeks, 1st shots /worming done, health guarantee. 3 Ruby, 2 Black/Tan! Trained to doggie door and potty pad. Happy, healthy, ready for their forever loving home. $600. 541-693-4494

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Australian Shepherd, beautiful black tri female, 5 yrs., $200, 541-548-3660.

English Mastiff AKC Pups, Fawn, w/black face, 3 large females, family raised, parents on-site, born 7/11, 541-206-2421,541-820-4546

Mini Aussie, red tri, male, DOB: 6/2/10, AKC reg., shots, dewormed, very lovable, learns quickly, $250, 541-633-0555.

Border Collie pups, black/white, tri,smooth/short coat, wormed, shots, $250. 541-948-7997

Frenchie-Faux Bulldog Puppies, $1000 OBO or trade. Also, Japanese Chin Puppies, $300, 541-447-0210. GERMAN SHEPHERD white, 6 yrs, male, healthy, athletic, intelligent, free to good home. 541-420-7056. Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. $250, 541-977-4686. Ready 10/8. Females $950, males $900. 541-852-2991. CHIHUAHUA Blk/tan TINY female, 5 mo., only 2.14 lbs Golden Retriever Pups AKC gorgeous!! Sweet, trained, Reg. 9 weeks old. 4 Males needs older best friend to left. $400. 541-350-6482 warm your lap. $300 to best GREYHOUNDS forever home 541-207-4466 Adoptable Ex-racing. Coming from Portland. At the Central Oregon Saturday Market across from Bend Public Library. 9/18, 10-4 www.gpa-nw.org Griffin Wirehaired Pointers Chihuahua Hybrid Pup, $250, 1st 3 males, 11 weeks, all shots, shots, well socialized, ready for $800, 541-934-2423. forever homes. 541-419-6445 KITTENS! Playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Nice Chocolate Labs AKC, 1 feadult cats also avail. Adopt a males, 2 males, born 5/18, kitten & take home an adult dew claws removed, 2 sets of mentor cat free. Sat/Sun 1-5 shots, mom is OFA certified PM, call re: other days. for good hips, elbows nor389-8420, 598-5488. Info/ mal, dad OFA certified exc. photos at www.craftcats.org. hips, elbows normal, $550 ea. 541-548-4700. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants, end of Season Sale! EveryChow Chow, AKC Male, 3 yrs, thing 50% Half off! black, smooth coat, strong 541-408-3317 champion bloodline. Mom & Dad both champions, great LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & conformation. Wonderful blacks, champion filled lines, temperament. $400 or $200 OFA hips, dew claws, 1st with special agreement on shots, wormed, parents on contract. Call 541-480-7934 site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. Lab Pups, Yellow, full bred, males, $250, females $300, 389-8420 www.craftcats.org 541-447-1323. Labradoodles, Australian DOBERMAN PINSCHERS Imports - 541-504-2662 AKC born 8/8/10. www.alpen-ridge.com 541-848-0196

ENGLISH BULLDOGS, 3 yr old AKC registered male & female, great with kids. $2200 for pair. 541-390-4051.

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MINI AUSSIES AKC, mini, toys, red merles, black tri's some with blue eyes, family raised, very social, great personalities. 598-5314/598-6264 Parson Russell Terriers, purebred, tri-colored, tails & dew claws done, 1st shots, 9 wks, socialized males & females $350. 541-410-2068. Pomeranian Puppy, purebred 13 wks, shots, paper-trained, small, buff/white, black nose, sweet disposition, must see, adorable! 541-383-8195 POMERANIANS - 5 beautiful, lovable pups ready for adoption. Semona, 541-948-9392 POODLES. AKC Toy, tiny toy, & teacup; also Pom-aPoos, joyful! 541-475-3889

Poodles (Toy), Yorkiepoos, and Cockapoos, variety of colors. Shots, wormed, vet-checked house-raised. $325-$375. 541-567-3150;503-779-3844 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

2 Wingback chairs, $75 each; Loveseat, $150; 4 Oak dining chairs, $20 ea. 541-923-5088 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bed, Dbl size, mattress, box springs, good cond., $150, 541-550-0444. Bed, queen, matress, frame, boxsprings,exc. cond., stored in plastic, $175, 541-550-0444 Chairs, Mr. & Mrs., $75 please call 541-388-3870 for more information. China cabinet, 2 glass shelves, drawers, $150; 541383-3951 before 6 p.m. DAYBED with pop-up trundle, mattresses included, $100. Please call 541-549-3503. Dining room set, oak, with 5 chairs, $175; 541- 383-3951 no calls after 6 p.m. EWave wine chiller, holds 13 bottles. Good for storing whites and reds. Measures 19 x 20 x 22. Excellent condition. $75 541-389-4342

Wanted: Active senior man is looking for a free or cheap Golden Retriever or Golden mix dog. I need a walking partner to replace my golden Fridge, 25 cu.ft., side-by-side, $125, please call that passed away. I have 541-388-3870. great grandkids so must be good with children. Call GENERATE SOME excitement in 541-536-3986 your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to Working cats for barn/shop, advertise in classified! companionship, FREE, fixed, 385-5809. shots. Will deliver! 389-8420

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

210

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. Oak dressers: 30½”Hx64”L $150; 30½H’x66”, $125. 541- 383-3951 before 6 p.m. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Twin beds, $30 ea.; 2 fabric floral chairs, $35 ea. No calls after 6 p.m. 541- 383-3951

Kenmore Washer, very good condition, and runs great! $75. Call 541-549-3503

Lhasa-Poo pups darling black & white little teddy bears, 1st shots, wormed, health exam. $300.541-923-7501,279-9901

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Log Furniture Sale, 20% off all Beds, Tables and Lamps, 541-419-2383.

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240

Crafts and Hobbies Crafters Wanted Open Jury Sept. 25th, Oct. 5th, Oct. 23rd, Highland Baptist Church, Redmond, Tina , 541-447-1640 www.snowflakeboutique.org

241

Bicycles and Accessories

Cycling Apparel Sale New mens & womens Save 50-75%! Sept. 17th 8 am-4 pm Sept. 18th 8 am-12 pm, Mother's Juice Cafe, 1255 NW Galveston CASH ONLY! 760-518-4085

Schwinn High Timber Alum. 26’ mtn bike, Shimano equipped, front shock, rear rack, like new! $150. 541-480-5950

242

Find It in

Exercise Equipment

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Precor S3.45, 4 Station Professional weight/strength

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

training equip.- cost $4600 at Mt. Bachelor Fitness, asking $1900,can see at precor.com, Tina, 541-312-1986 Schwinn DX900 exercise bike, Bowflex Power Pro workout sys.$250 both. 541-389-3890

246

Antique Oak Roll-Top Desk. Excellent condition and price. $425. 541-389-5564

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

10 ga.shotgun, SxS, 32" FxF. $300. 541-389-8215

215

30.06 SAVAGE, right hand bolt, 3x9 scope, sling, like new, only fired six rounds. $285 FIRM. 541-633-0333

Headboard, oak, 3-pc middle mirror, sides w/ cupboards & drawers, $250, 541-598-7986

Large TV stand, $50; wood corner TV stand, $45; 541383-3951 before 6 p.m.

English Bulldog AKC, female 8 mo., house trained, serious inquiries only, great price -$1595 firm. 541-604-6653.

American Brittany Male Pup, 9.5 weeks, AKC Litter reg.,champion lines, wormed, dew claws removed, 2 sets shots, vet checked, $600, 541-447-5448.

210

Furniture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances

Coins & Stamps

Attn Hunters/Sportsmen: Rule gas-powered winch, pulls 3500 lbs, all accessories, US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & never used, $475. Currency collect, accum. Pre 541-389-0049 after 3pm. 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Browning BAR .270 WSM coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Shorttrac with Leupold 3x9 dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex scope. Only fired twice. & vintage watches. No colOBO. 916-251-6749 lection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

WANTED TO BUY

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Multi-Family: Sat. 7-1, Sport- 2-Family Yard Sale, Sat., 8-1. Paintball supplies, guitar, ing Goods, furniture, clothes, furn, clothing, depth finder, household, electronics, bike, much more! 20646 Sierra Dr. & more,282 NW Jefferson.

Barb’s Sale 9/18 thru 9/26, 11-3, then every weekend thru Oct. Clothes: infant to adult some new, glassware, appliances, motorcycle, JD Gator, horse stuff & misc. added to daily! 5780 NW 66th in Tetherow Crossing. 541-410-8640.

Garage Sale - Many antiques, piano. Thurs 2-6, Fri 8-5. 7835 SW Canal / Old BendRedmond Hwy 541-548-2404

Tetherow Neighborhood Sale, Big 3 FAMILY SALE: Almost off of Century Dr. on the way new clothes, shoes, tools, to the mountain, first time in books, DVD’s, glassware, our golf community. Sat. only Christmas items. You want it from 8-2. Bikes, upright pi- we have it, 62934 Marsh ano, antiques designer Orchid off Empire or Purcell. clothes, furniture, oak gun Follow signs. Fri. 8 a.m. cabinet & books. To much Estate Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun., too list. Don’t miss this one. 9-6, 63070 Cole Rd., off 284 Butler Mkt. Rd., 100’s of pieces of antique & depresSales Southwest Bend sion era glassware, Fireking, Pyrex, McCoy, Hull, Shawnee, A Big Multifamily Garage Sale. ATV’s, 2 Honda 80’s, Honda 60957 Snowbrush Dr. River 80 CR dirtbike, 4-wheeler Canyon Estates off Brooktires,tools, woodworking,tons swood Ave. 8am -4pm Fri. & of stuff, too much to list. Sat. No early birds please! Huge Garage Sale, Sat. 9-6. 20055 SW Sorrento Pl. Lots of stuff! Collectibles, kids clothes, toys, much more!

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

MIDLIFE CRISIS YARD SALE Must minimize! Friday 09/17 & Sat 09/18 from 9am to 4pm 60148 Navajo Rd

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Multi Family Garage Sale, Sat. only, 9am-1pm. Household, clothing and kids items. 61269 SW Brookside Lp.

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Saturday Only-8 to 1 Only. Almost new clothes, tools, shoes, tools, books, glassware, Christmas items. 815 SW Silverlake Blvd. Everything must sell Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Fri. and Sat. 9 to 4. Golf clubs, water ski & boat accessories, antiques, truck toolbox, snow blower, bar stools, many other household items. 2969 NE Lotno Dr. Fri. & Sat. 9 a.m., outdoor equip., household items, tubs toilets & furn. Kevin Dr., off Butler Mkt, follow signs. Garage Sale: Fri., Sat, 9-4, Sun. 9-1, 4-Seasons Mobile Park, Space 1A, 1.5 mi. N. of Cooley Rd. on Hwy. 97. Garage Sale! Sat. 8-2, 21382 Kristin Ct. Row boat, air hockey table, massage table, kid bikes, household, more! HUGE ESTATE SALE Fri. and Sat. 7-3, 3307 NE Stonebrook Loop. 60+ years whole household must go! Huge Moving Sale!! Tons of clothes infant to adult, furniture, bedding, curtains, household & much MORE. Only 2 miles east of 27th, off of Torkelson Rd (follow signs) Fri, Sat, Sun 9 - 3. 541.388.0415 MOVING SALE INDOORS. Sat. 8-4. Unique holiday decorations, kid’s stuff & a lot more. 2590 NE Ravenwood Drive, between 8th & Butler Market. Moving Sale / Open House! Fri-Sat, 8-4. Couch, chair w/ ottoman, TV hutch, dining set w/hutch, bakers rack, patio set, bdrm furn, curio cab. 1456 NE Covington Ln #1 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Multi Family Sale: 22885 Buckskin Ct., near Bend Airport. Fri. & Sat, 8-4, car & util. trailers, Stihl chainsaws & tools, livestock feeders, panels & equip., upright freezer, tack, row boat, pavers.

Big Garage Sale Sat 9-5, Sun 10-5. Something for everyone! 20192 Roats Lane, off east end of Murphy Rd. GARAGE SALE Sat. 9/18, 9-3. 4 studded 14” tires, ski boots, boys clothes, household 20736 Blacksmith Circle. Multi-Family Sale: Emptied Our Motoromes! Lots of RV & other Stuff, Bend Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Sat. 9-3, No early birds please!

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Rod & Jan Carter

MOVING SALE 429 AIRPARK DR. Friday, Sept. 17 • Saturday, Sept. 18 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday ( Take Pettigrew Rd. off Bear Creek or Reed Market and go to Airpark follow about one half mile to sale site.) 1969 Ford F100 Pickup; 54" LED TV with large stand 2007; Burgundy leather sofa-scratches; Large Winchester Gun Safe; Berkline Dark blue leather recliner; Nice refrigerated wine cooler; Hardrock maple dining set with two leaves and four chairs and fitted pads; Antique Spinning wheel; "Rod Frederick" antelope print; Maple dresser and chest and nightstands; Large open office desk; file cabinets; Medium knee-hole office desk; Oak bookcase; Walnut finish bookcases; Nice large treadmill by Proform; Lots and lots of Theology books; other books; Few linens and clothes; Great burl wood console/entry table Two Ionic breeze units; Artwork and prints of old planes; Hand loaded ammo-357/44/308/38; Few kitchen items; Rifle/ pistol shooting stand; Wheelbarrow; few garden tools; Ladder and hand tools; Downhill and cross country skis and boots; Oil recirculator for towed vehicles; Presented by:

Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days ~

541-382-5950 eves

END OF SEASON CLEAN OUT SALE! Fri-Sat, 9-3. Antiques, furniture, home decor, housewares, patio furn, patio gazebo, misc shop items, aluminum fishing boat w/ 9hp motor, electronics, bikes. Too much to list - come get a bargain! Hwy 126 to Cline Falls Rd, rt past Eagle Crest, follow signs. CASH ONLY! Estate Sale: Sat. & Sun, 9-4, 3737 SW Cascade Vista Ct. , lots of fantastic items, something for everyone! ESTATE SALE - Two homes, 32+ years accumulation. Friday and Saturday, 8 am to 4 pm, 2929 NW 39th Street, Redmond. 541-788-2291 Garage Sale: Fri. 9/17, 9 a.m.3 p.m., 2552 SW 32nd St. off Umatilla, lots of great stuff, something for everyone. Garage Sale - Fri & Sat 8-4. 2955 NW 9th Lane. 1999 Jeep, plus fishing, tools, clothes and other misc items. Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9:30-4, 2105 NW Redwood Ave, Mostly baby clothes, Gear, & books, maternity, household, cash only, no early birds Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

MEGA GARAGE SALE!! Friday & Saturday, 8–4. Sale of all sales! 70 years accumulations plus 3 households! Tools, guns, sporting, household, clothes, utility trailers, snowmobile & trailer, 110 Honda trail bike, endless list! 5677 NW Odin Falls. Moving Sale - 2347 SW 30th St, 8 am to 1 pm Saturday. Tools, picnic set, bike, house items, BBQ and much more. CASH! 548-4042 Saturday, 9/18 Huge Parking Lot Sale! Redmond Christian Church, 8am, 536 SW 10th St. Something for everyone!

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

ESTATE

SALE!

2766 Tennessee, Prineville FRI. & SAT. 9-4 Attic Estates & Appraisals atticestatesandappraisals.com


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 F3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 246

260

266

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Heating and Stoves

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Soapstone Fireview Heater for 1500 sq ft room. Gas, has ceramic table to sit on & double wall chimney. Works well; attractive. 541-382-7995

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Sept. 22nd, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352 Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Saturday Sept. 25th, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information.

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Ruger Mini 14. Stainless Steel Synthetic Stock. 2 clips. 80 rounds. Excellent Condition. $499. 503-910-4506. In Prineville.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Savage Model 16, .325, Winchester Short mag, stainless bull barrel, 3X9 scope, $500 OBO, 541-647-8931.

GPS, Garmin 205W, $40, please call 541-388-3870 for more info.

Semi-Autos Rifles, 2 AR’s, 3 AK’s,Colt SP-1, $1000; Olympic Arms, new, $700, Krinkov $1200; Chinese under folder, $800, Romanian, new,$600, all prices FIRM, 541-410-4069

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

S&W .38 SPL+P, model 442 airweight, new in case, $500 541-388-2268.

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802

Weatherby Vanguard, .243, 4X12 scope, $500, 541-647-8931. Winchester Pre 1964 Model 70’s, 2 270’s, 1 buil 1952, 1 built 1948; Reminton Mountain Rifle, Model 700 - 280; UltraLite Arms Model 20 Built by Mel Forbes, .243 Cal, weighs, 4.75 lbs,; Reminton Game Masters Model 760, 1 270, 1 30.06; Savage Model 99, 250-3000, Brass Shell counters; Winchester Model 97, 12 ga; Steven Savage Model 311, Series H, 12 GA, 2.75, 3”, double trigger, call 541-977-6160.

247

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

262

Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures HP Fax Machine, new but not in original box. Inc. Users Guide. 640 Series. 50-page fax memory and paper tray. 10 page doc feeder. 50 speed dials.$30. 541-389-4342

Ate baseball net. Used, but in 263 exc. cond., Push button conTools nections for easy set-up & take-down. $200. Combine 10” professional tile saw, Supewith Jugs Soft Toss machine riorbuilt w/stand. $190. for $275. 541-389-4342 541-480-5950. Jugs Soft Toss machine for Complete of set of carpet/vibaseball. Used very lightly, nyl tools with Roberts tool in exc. cond. $100. Buy tobox. $180. 541-480-5950. gether with Atec baseball net for $275. 541-389-4342 Craftsman 10” Radial Arm Saw, excellent condition, $100. 253 Call 541-647-0978

TV, Stereo and Video

TV 52” Samsung, big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $500. 541-480-2652.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments CONN Alto Saxophone, good working condition, $450 OBO. 541-389-1046.

260

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

announcements I, Toby Cundell, as of 8/6/2010, am not responsible for any debts of Christy Maciel Cundell. You’re invited to an ECKANKAR worship service. A Time to Share in God’s Love for Soul. Sun. Sept. 25, 3 p.m., Wille Hall in new COCC campus center, 541-728-6476 www.eckankar.org

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $145 per cord rounds; $165 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment 1 gallon perennials and Idaho Fescue @ $3 each. 541-389-5355

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

Lost and Found 265

Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Logs sold by the foot and also Log home kit, 28x28 shell incl. walls (3 sided logs) ridge pole, rafters, gable end logs, drawing (engineered) all logs peeled & sanded $16,000 . 541-480-1025.

266

Heating and Stoves Heatilator by Dover, propane, for inside use, incl all piping, $500 obo. 541-323-1872 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

FOUND Cat Sun 9/12, Purcell/ Butler Mkt Rd, white w/black /tan markings. 541-788-3555 Found: Garmin electronic device, Drake Park, 9/14. Call to identify. 541-647-4940 Found on Sat. on Newport Ave., prescription glasses, call to identify. 541-388-4282

LOST:

REWARD,

476

Farm Market

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Employment

300 400 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

421

Schools and Training

1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

325

CAREGIVERS NEEDED In-home care agency presently has openings for Caregivers, part/full-time, in Madras area. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more information, 541-923-4041 from 9am6pm, Monday-Friday.

CMA with phlebotomy skills. Full time with benefits. 3+ years experience. Send resume with cover sheet to 541-385-5578.

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., If no answer, please leave msg., I will return your call. Redmond, 541-548-2514

PREMIUM HORSE ORCHARD GRASS HAY. In barn. $145/ton. Call 541-382-8389 Top Quality Barn Stored Orchard Grass Hay, 75 lb., 2 sting bales, $155/ton. Kennor Farm, call 541-383-0494.

333

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies EGGS, laying hens, miniature goats, Mast Farms, 541-388-8725 (p.m.’s best) Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

358

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities Administrative Assistant for Freight Dispatcher: We are looking for a motivated person to start work immediately as an administrative assistant in a busy freight brokerage company. The right person will be able to follow directions quickly and work independently to complete assigned tasks. Duties will include scheduling appointments, contacting shippers and truckers, and general typing and office work. Must have good computer skills and good communication skills. Please send resume to hr@taurusfreight.com.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR, U Pick: Free Stone Canning peaches Monroes, by Sat. 9/20-O’Henry; Bartlett Pears, Gala Apples, necterines, asian pears

Adult Care

Building/Contracting

Drywall

NOTICE: Oregon state law Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs requires anyone who No Job Too Small. Free Exact contracts for construction Quotes. 541-408-6169 work to be licensed with the CCB# 177336 Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Excavating Automotive Service is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB Auto Body & Paint, 30 yrs. exp., license through the honest & professional, all CCB Consumer Website work guaranteed, low rates, www.hirealicensedcontractor.com Hourly Excavation & Dump Call Rick, 541-771-1875 or or call 503-378-4621. The Truck Service. Site Prep Land John at 541-815-0397. Bulletin recommends Clearing, Demolition, Utilichecking with the CCB prior ties, Asphalt Patching, GradBarns to contracting with anyone. ing, Land & Agricultural DeSome other trades also velopment. Work Weekends. M. Lewis Construction, LLC require additional licenses Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 and certifications. "POLE BARNS" Built Right! FIND IT! Garages, shops, hay sheds, BUY IT! arenas, custom decks, Child Care, Reg. fences, interior finish work, SELL IT! Tiny Town CC ~ Annette & concrete. Free estimates The Bulletin Classifieds CCB#188576•541-604-6411 M-F, 6am-6pm 12 wks-5 yrs. FT $25/PT $15 Pre-pay Handyman Bend N. 541-598-5031 Bath and Kitchens tinytowncc@gmail.com I DO THAT! Cabinet Works - Quality Remodeling, Handyman, Debris Removal that Lasts! Refacing, refinHome Inspection Repairs, ishing. custom cabinets, meProfessional & Honest Work. JUNK BE GONE dia centers. 20+ yrs exp. CCB#151573Dennis 317-9768 l Haul Away FREE CCB #168656 541-788-7349 For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Gentle home cleaning, all sur face types. 20+ yrs exp. Lo cal refs. Call 541-626-3700

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS • DOORS •WEATHERIZATION and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

476

Employment Opportunities

Medical Partners In Care has an opening for a part-time (24 hours per week / 12-hour shifts) CNA to work in their Inpatient Unit (Hospice House). Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a resume via email to HR@partnersbend.org or by regular mail to:

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Do you have PM exp & Cummins electronic troubleshooting skills? Central Oregon Truck Company, is looking for an experienced mechanic to join our team. We have 170 newer Kenworth and Peterbilt tractors and over 200 flatbed, curtain van and roll top trailers. We’re looking for someone who can hit the ground running. Must have your own tools and be able to work weekends. 40 hour work weeks with occasional overtime required. We are a progressive company and will offer competitive wages, a comprehensive benefit package as well as a great place to work! Please send your resume as well as a copy of your valid Oregon driver’s license to: centraloregontruck@gmail.com. Freight Dispatcher Trainee: We are looking for a person with great communication and sales skills to join our team at a busy freight brokerage company. Job duties include developing new customers, negotiating rates with shippers and truckers, providing superior customer service to our customers and monitoring the position and status of all trucks and loads under your direction. Successful applicants will need to be good working under pressure and multitasking in a busy environment. Please send resume to hr@taurusfreight.com.

The Ranch is accepting applications for Vacation Sales Agents and Front Desk Clerks. Duties include but are not limited to making reservations by phone and e-mail utilizing the Navis system. Will use sales techniques to increase revenue and cross sell all Ranch amenities, welcome and check in/out guests, provide concierge services, and cash handling. This candidate will assist front desk clerks as needed, communicate effectively and efficiently whether it be written or verbal, stay calm and collected being able to manage difficult guest situations. The ideal individual will have the following experience: Previous hospitality and/or sales experience, knowledge of Parr Springer Miller Systems, Navis, Microsoft Office, Multi-line Phone Systems and Outlook. Must be able to work nights, holidays and weekends. Part time and full time positions available. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Medical Assistant For Back Office. Experience Required. We are looking for an energetic, dependable and outgoing person to join our team. We offer a superior salary, excellent benefit package and a 4 day work week. Typing and computer skills beneficial. Dermatology experience a plus. Outstanding patient care, team player and attention to detail a must. Position involves a variety of job duties in a fast-paced work environment. Fax your resume with cover letter to 541-323-2174 or email Jodi@centraloregondermatology.com

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR.

Applicants must have an active OR State CNA license and must be able to work days, nights and weekends. All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment drug test and criminal background check.

Partners In Care is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Finance & Business

500

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Sales - ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 People. No Experience Necessary. Transportation & Lodging Furnished. Paid Training. Work & Travel Entire USA. Start Today! www.protekchemical.com 877-936-7468. (PNDC)

528

Loans and Mortgages BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

Operate Your Own Business

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

H Madras/ Culver & La Pine

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Bring Containers Open 7 Days per week 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Only. 541-934-2870

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Masonry

Remodeling, Carpentry

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

Heating & Cooling

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Central Oregon Stove

Fertilizer included with monthly program

541-815-2406 CCB# 87690 Stove Installation & Repair Gas Piping.

Home Improvement

Domestic Services

476

Employment Opportunities

541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

PERSONAL AIDE SERVICES LLC Experienced male caregiver will help with any personal aide needs, chores and errands, 541-961-5830.

476

Front Desk

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

is your Employment Marketplace Call

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Bluegrass straw, 800-lb bales, $25ea. Premium oat hay, mid size 800-lb bales, $40 ea. Prem. orchard grass, mid size 800lb $50 ea. 541-419-2713

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

The Bulletin

Hay, Grain and Feed

Pom-Chihuahua mix, 2 375 yrs. old., “Sadie”, sable color, ~10 lbs. Meat & Animal Processing last seen at intersec- Angus Beef, grass & grain fed, tion of Century Dr. & $1.75/lb hanging weight plus and wrap. Butcher OctoReed Market, 9/8, her cut ber 2nd., please call family misses her very 541-504-1899. much and really wants 383 her back. Call Produce and Food 785-342-5650.

Lost sunglasses, dark green, near Rumors restaurant in Redmond Wed. 9/8. Reward. 541-508-6321.

Employment Opportunities

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response Since 1978

If you want a low price, that is N O T us, if you want the highest quality, that IS us! www.brgutters.com 541-389-8008 • 800-570-8008 CCB#103411

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

MASONRY

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Get your business GRO W

IN G

With an ad in

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

The Bulletin Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Pet Services

Tile, Ceramic

Serious On-site Horse Care with full-service sitting, exercise, training, healthcare, & other options. Call EquiCare, 928-301-3889

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


F4 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 638

650

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

MUST FIND TRAINS ROMANTIC 2 Bdrm 1 bath duplex, very quiet, clean, W/D on site, new heat sys, w/s/g pd. Cat nego. $550. 541-815-9290

Townhouse-style 2 bdrm., 1½ bath apt., w/d hookup, no pets/smoking, $625, w/s/g Newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2-car garage, A/C, 2883 NE Sedapd, Clean! 120 SE Cleveland. lia Loop. $1000 mo. + dep., 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355 no pets. 541-389-2192,

Secure 10x20 Storage, in 640 SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr Apt./Multiplex SW Bend access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., 616

Want To Rent Lease Condo? 3 bdrm 2 bath, Dec-May, Bend area. Family wants option to buy w/lease. $500/mo. 503-663-6460 or eric@ytm-law.com Mature woman wants to trade housework, farmwork etc. for studio apt in Redmond or Bend area. 503-679-7496 Wish to lease equestrian facility for 20+/- horses w/ various accommodations, incl. living quarters & indoor arena. 541-350-8438

630

Rooms for Rent Awbrey Butte. Incredible views. 5 min. walk to COCC. Deck, hot tub, A/C, woodstove. 375/mo. Gary 541 306-3977. Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626. Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Available now: 3/4 acre, fenced 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dogs okay. $1055 per mo. $1600 dep. Garbage svc. incl. 63416 Vogt Rd. Call 541-420-1274

fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 1St Mo. 1/2 off, like new, 2/1.5, W/D, walk-in closet, mtn. views, W/S/yard paid, no smoking, 61361 Sally Ln, $725+$725 security, 1 yr. lease, 541-382-3813 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $555. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Fall Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

Summertime Special! Chaparral &

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 661

745

865

880

881

Houses for Rent Prineville

Homes for Sale

ATVs

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Prineville 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV Parking, pets neg., $825 + dep., landscaped front & back, 541-420-2485

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe. piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1450. 541-593-6410.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

541-385-5809 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services

Houses for Rent Prineville

1 Bdrm, 1 bath, laundry room, large attached garage, fenced yard, water/sewer/ TV paid. $595. Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

A neat & clean 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1077 sq.ft., gas heat, dbl garage w/opener, fenced yard, rear deck, RV parking, $895. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

2 Bdrm 2 bath duplex, garage w/opener, w/d hkup, close to schools, avail now. 593 Bailey Rd. $550/mo, 1st/last. 541-419-6612; 541-923-2184

800

Allegro

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Beaver Contessa 42’ 2009. Quad Slide. Tag Axle. 425 HP Cat. Many Options. 632 Boats & Accessories MILES. VIN #049428 Estate Sale $259,500. 12’ Fiberglass Navy Boat, new 541-480-3265 DLR. #8308 tires on trailer & working lights. $400. 541-388-1533

870

2005 YZ 250F

Well taken care of Too many extras to list Sacrifice at $1650! 541-536-4730

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO!

818-795-5844, Madras

Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809 Short Sale…Our company may be able to help. We have a record of getting results for homeowners in over their heads. First you need answers. Find out why homeowners thank us for the assistance we have given them. Hunter Properties LLC 541-389-7910 Serving all of Central Oregon

748

Northeast Bend Homes

A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat LOW RENT and prime location! pump., dbl. garage, quiet - 3,000 sq. ft. warehouse cul-de-sac, only $119,900, w/two offices & bath. FarmRandy Schoning, Broker, ers Coop complex in RedJohn L Scott, 541-480-3393 mond - Call 541-548-8787

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * Houses for Rent * Home Inspectors * NW Bend Etc. 2 bdrm, 1 bath in West Hills, The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to garage, w/d, gas furnace, yard care incl., great neigh- reach prospective B U Y E R S SELLERS of real esborhood. $700, 1 yr lease. No AND tate in Central Oregon. To pets. 541-389-7965. place an ad call 385-5809 2 bdrm, 1 bath, stove, refrig, W/D, new energy efficient furnace & heat pump. ½ way btwn Bend/Redmond. $950. 738 541-318-5431;541-548-1247

Houses for Rent NE Bend

385-5809

The Bulletin Classified ***

La Pine nice 2 bdrm, 2 bath, outbldg, appliances, about an acre. Avail Sept. 7, 50877 Fawn Loop off Masten Rd. $650 mo. 541-745-4432

Menta Park in Madras currently Rimrock has 3 & 4 bdrm. duplexes. Apartments Rural Development subsiClean, energy efficient nondized rent is based on insmoking units, w/patios, 2 come; must have farm inon-site laundry rooms, storcome to qualify. Call Melinda age units available. Close to at 541-548-6326. ProfessionMultiplexes for Sale schools, pools, skateboard Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 ally managed by Guardian park, ball field, shopping cenbath, NW Crossing, $2995, FSBO: 4-Plex Townhomes, Management. Se Habla Ester and tennis courts. Pet incl. cable, internet, garbage panol. NE Bend, all rented w/long friendly with new large dog & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. term renters, hardwood floors, The Bulletin is now offering a run, some large breeds okay Call Robert at 541-944-3063 great neighborhood near hosMORE AFFORDABLE Rental with mgr. approval. pital, $399,000, 541-480-8080 rate! If you have a home or Walk downtown! Sustainably 244 SW RIMROCK WAY apt. to rent, call a Bulletin built! Solar water, in-floor 541-923-5008 744 Classified Rep. to get the heat, low utils, garage, 3 www.redmondrents.com new rates and get your ad Open Houses bdrm 3 bath, 250 St Helens started ASAP! 541-385-5809 SW REDMOND: 2 bdrm., 1.5 Pl., $1700 mo. 541-388-8382 19571 E Campbell Rd. bath, 1270/sf. apt (and) 3 634 3,071 sq ft home in 1st on the bdrm., 3 bath 1554/sf apt. 654 Hillsites off Century Drive on Built 2004, appl. inc/ W/D, Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Houses for Rent way to Mt. Bachelor in West W/S/G pd, no pets/smoking, Bend. Open Sat, 11-3 & Sun, credit check req., HUD ok, SE Bend 12-3. $439,000. Call Theresa For appt/info: 541-504-6141 1 bdrm $550. Ramsey, 541-815-4442 A 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1340 sq ft, 646 John L. Scott Real Estate new carpet & paint, woodAlpine Meadows stove, family rm, dbl garage, Apt./Multiplex Furnished 541-330-0719 RV parking, .5 acre. $895. Professionally managed by 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Norris & Stevens, Inc. Nice 1 bdrm., secluded, in NE Bend, close to Forum Shop- SPOTLESS 3600+ sq. ft. home $100 Move-In Special ping Center. No pets/smokBeautiful 2 bdrms in quiet on 1/2 acre in gated coming. $500 + elec. Tastefully complex with park-like setmunity, 3 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath, furnished. 541-420-1118 or ting, covered parking, w/d 3 fireplaces, hardwood, 3-car 541-419-6760. hookups, near St. Charles. garage & cook kitchen, $550/mo. 541-385-6928. community pool/tennis. Avail. Oct. 1st. $1495/mo. Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 541-312-8486. 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G 745 paid, on-site laundry, small 656 Homes for Sale pet on approval, reduced to 541-322-7253 $525/mo. 541-389-9901. Houses for Rent PUBLISHER'S SW Bend NOTICE * FALL SPECIAL * All real estate advertising in 2 bedroom 1 bath manufacthis newspaper is subject to 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 tured home, with heat pump, the Fair Housing Act which Carports & A/C included. $565/mo + security deposit. 648 makes it illegal to advertise Pet Friendly & No App Fee! No pets. W/S/G paid. "any preference, limitation or Houses for Call 541-382-8244. Fox Hollow Apts. discrimination based on race, Rent General (541) 383-3152 color, religion, sex, handicap, 659 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. familial status, marital status 2500 sq.ft. home on 2.5 acres, or national origin, or an inHouses for Rent nice neighborhood, $2000 tention to make any such For Rent By Owner: 3 bdrm., Sunriver mo. 4 bdrm, 2½ bath Hot preference, limitation or dis2.5 bath, w/garage, hardtub, 3-car garage. Landscape crimination." Familial status wood downstairs, new carA COZY 2+2, garage, w/ maint. incl. 541-333-2110. includes children under the pets, $795/mo., please call decks & lots of windows, hot age of 18 living with parents 541-480-8080. tub (fees paid), wood stove & or legal custodians, pregnant gas heat, furnished, near $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! women, and people securing Lodge $875. 541-617-5787 Limited numbers available custody of children under 18. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. This newspaper will not 660 W/D hookups, patios or decks, knowingly accept any adverMountain Glen, tising for real estate which is Houses for Rent 541-383-9313 in violation of the law. Our La Pine Professionally managed by readers are hereby informed Norris & Stevens, Inc. that all dwellings advertised LaPine, 1680 sq. ft. Mfg. home in this newspaper are availon 1 acre fenced. 3 bdrm, 2 636 able on an equal opportunity bath 3-car garage, RV cover basis. To complain of disApt./Multiplex NW Bend and extra storage. Off of crimination call HUD toll-free paved road. $800 a month, Private Studio apt. - furn. or at 1-800-877-0246. The toll $800 deposit. Pets OK outfree telephone number for unfurn. near river, pool & hot side w/deposit. Avail. Now. the hearing impaired is tub, private entrance & yard, The Bulletin is now offering a For appt. Call 541-728-1008 1-800-927-9275. wood heat, pet OK, $625 inLOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE cludes util., 541-617-5787. RENT to OWN, Ultimate Value! Rental rate! If you have a 16170 Snowberry - 2 Bdrm, home to rent, call a Bulletin SHEVLIN APARTMENTS 1.5 bath, 1 acre, horses, pets, Classified Rep. to get the Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granirrigation, 2-car shop. $650/ new rates and get your ad ite, parking/storage area, mo. Agent, 541-815-7025 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688. 650 661

638

CHECK YOUR AD

Boats & RV’s

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this 860 happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your Motorcycles And Accessories ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we 1972 Honda Trail 90; new tires, tubes, and battery. Runs can. Deadlines are: Weekgood. $800. 541-475-2872. days 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq ft, woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $650. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

652

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

***

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004

• Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4295

541-504-9284

HARLEY DAVIDSON FAT BOY - LO 2010, 500 mi., black on black, detachable windshield, back rest, and luggage rack, $15,900, call Mario, 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707.

750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

763

Recreational Homes and Property Famous Upper Big Deschutes River! Boat dock, 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1800 sq.ft., 4-car carport, 3 cedar decks, hot tub, pool table. Fish/hunt: deer, elk, ducks & geese from home! Many lakes/streams close by, winter sports, miles to La Pine, 15; Bend, 39. $548,000. Financing available. 83-year-old owner has to move. 541-408-1828, Jim.

764

Farms and Ranches 35 Acre irrigated, cattle and hay farm, close to Prineville, with a pond and excellent private well. 76 yr. old Widower will sacrifice for $395,000. 541-447-1039

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda 1984,

Lots Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., private homesite, great view, gated community $350,000 OWC. 541-549-7268.

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mtn. Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Owner paid $375,000, now $149,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Magna

V45

exc. cond., runs great, $2500, call Greg, 541-548-2452.

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613 CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, 640 Acres, $175,000, road accessible, solar energy area, By Owner 503-740-8658

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595!

Call Bill 541-480-7930.

865

ATVs

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Will Finance - Dbl wide 2 bdrm 2 bath, fireplace, fenced yard, located in Terrebonne. $6,900; or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ Wooden Sail Boat, trailer, great little classic boat. $750 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $2200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

PRICE REDUCED! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 27K mi., 1 owner, garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, 2 TV’s, rear camera exc. cond. $69,000. 541-536-7580

Travel 1987,

Queen

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 24’ SeaRay 1977 - looks almost new! Cutty cabin, cook, sleep, porta-potty, Ford 351 motor, Merc outdrive, 3 props, Bimini top, exc. shape w/ trailer, surge brakes, new tires, all licensed. $7,500. See 452 Franklin Ave. Bend. 541-382-3705 after 12 p.m. or 541-408-1828.

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

875

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302 Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Dodge Diesel 4x4, 1992, 5-spd, canopy AND Komfort 5th wheel, 1983, AC, slps 6, ½ bath, $6500. 541-330-1962

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $38,500. 541-815-4121

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013. Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767. Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $75,000. 541-848-9225.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

“WANTED”

881

Travel Trailers Aladdin 16’ Camp Trailer, very clean, electric water pump & catalytic heater, $500/best offer. 541-323-1872

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2001 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916. New Vision Ultra 32' 1999, 2 slides No smoking/pets $13,900. 541-788-4728

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

slideout, Canopies and Campers

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

CanAm Max XT 650, 2008, 2 seat, winch, alloys, brush guards, low hrs. $6495. 541-549-5382;541-350-3675

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas en- Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, genclosed, less than 20 hours on erator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood boat, must sell due to health cabinets, basement storage, $34,900. 541-389-1574. very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

775

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

773

Acreages

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $18,500. 541-548-3985.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

771

15’ Bayliner Capri 1989, 50 HP outboard, $1600, 541-923-1575.

882

Fifth Wheels

Komfort 29’ #29TSG 2001. 2 slides, A/C, fiberglass. Exc. cond. Must see! $11,995. VIN-024665. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

Motorhomes

Kountry Star 36’ w/tip-out, washer/dryer, elec./gas water heater, new awning, skirted & set up. Sacrifice, $7,500. 541-389-2943

1988 Class 22’ Mallard, very clean, 70k+ miles, Ford 460, expensive wheels, exc. rubber, microwave - TV, custom large 2-door 3-way reefer 4KW Onan generator, 3-stage catalytic heater, plus factory furnace. air, awning, tow pkg, $7,500. LaPine (541) 408-1828.

Terry, 26’ 2004, 1 owner, non-smoker, no pets, very clean, walkaround queen bed, drinking water purifier, AC, many upgrades, tandemn axle, power tongue jack, 2 propane tanks, awning, stabilizer jacks, spare wheel & tire. $8500. 541-330-5039

880

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Aluminum canopy, 6’, in good shape $275 OBO, call 541-504-1686.

Fleetwood Caribou Model 11K, 1997, 3-way refrig, stove with oven, microwave, wired for cable, TV & AC, kept covered, original owner, asking $8900. 541-420-0551

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Lance 880 10’9” truck camper, 1995, extended cabover, many comfort & convenience features. $7850. 541-382-9107 Leer Canopy, red, fits 1999-2006 Ford Superduty, pickups, $600, 541-588-0192


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

932

933

940

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Chevy Cobalt LS 2006, 17K, remote start,low profile sport rims, extra studless snows w/rims, $8500, 541-410-5263.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

935

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781 Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $4,000! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

Pickups *** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

CHEVY 1500 Z71 SWB 4x4 1993. V-8. Auto. A/C. Silverado. 1 owner. Exc. cond. Black.$6850. VIN 140664. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2900 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-4677.

Sport Utility Vehicles

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Cabriolet 1981,

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $11,500. 541-420-2715

Chevy Avalanche V71 2005 4x4 60k mi., red heated, leather seats - you name the extras, it has ‘em all! Premium wheels, boards, moonroof, On-Star, etc. New tires. Orig. senior owner. First $16,950. Contact Bob, 541-508-8522 or Casey 541-647-9404.

Smolich Auto Mall Cool September Deals

Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 2006

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Mercedes 300SD 1981, Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Smolich Auto Mall

(Private Party ads only)

Cool September Deals

Smolich Auto Mall

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle , 2 drop gates, 1 on side, 7’x12’, 4’ sides, all steel, $1400, call 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Cool September Deals

Dodge Caliber 2008

Only $21,455

4 Dr., Low 47K Miles VIN #754569

Only $10,987

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $20,500, 541-576-2442

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto, A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, ski racks, step up bars, pwr. windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $5295, call 541-429-2966

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Front Axle, for Ford 4x4 pickup, complete hub to hub, Warn locking hubs, 1968?, $250,541-433-2128

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab 2007, SLT 4 door, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. 32, 000 miles. Loaded!

$30,125 ProTech cross body truck tool box, heavy gauge alum alloy with sliding tool tray, exc cond, $400. 541-647-0978

Nissan Quest 2004 Loaded, DVD, & Bunch more, the kids will LOVE it. You really should check it out! Vin #349878

Only $11,833

Mercury Grand Prix, 1984, Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. Call 541-382-8399

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Wanted: Studded tires & wheels for ‘08 Suzuki Vitara, P225/65R17, 541-382-2194

932

Antique and Classic Autos

VIN#J590169

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,900. 541-408-2111

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

975

Automobiles Audi A4 2008 Silver, 31,000 miles, below Bluebook, $24,500, 541-389-8181

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Fiat 1800 1976, 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & humming birds, white soft top & hard top, $6500, OBO 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Subaru Outback 2003 5-spd manual, tow/winter pkg, 123K hwy mi, great cond, all maint rec’ds. $8500. 541-280-2710

SUBARUS!!! Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

’02 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON

’00 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 4X4

4x4, Regular Cab, Manual, Very Nice Truck!

Very Nice Car, Good Gas Mileage

Loaded, Leather, Premium Wheels, Super Nice

VIN:A15336

VIN:745152

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 185K hwy. mi. $6900 541-410-7586.

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5750. 541-593-4016

’00 VW GOLF GL HATCHBACK ’04 FORD RANGE EDGE

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARU SEPTEMBER SALE! VIN:117521

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON ’05 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN

Low Miles, Auto, Very Nice!

Auto, Low Miles, Alloy Wheels, Super Clean

Limited, 3.0L, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof, Heated Seats, very Nice!

VIN: 309985

VIN: 229172

VIN: 304808

Auto, Low Miles, Very Nice!

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $999. Call 541-388-4167.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Buick LeSabre 2004,

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford F150 1982, 6 cyl, 4 spd, new battery, good tires + set of mounted studs, canopy. $950 OBO. 541-389-4411

Just 3K Miles!! VIN #158726

so nice, custom, 113,000 highway mi., white, cloth interior, one look worth 1000 words, $5400. Please call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Only $24,973

Ford F-250 1970, Explorer Model, 2WD,remanufactured 360 V-8, auto trans., pwr. steering, pwr. brakes, clean & nice, recent “Explorer Green” paint job, runs & drives great, $1700 OBO, 541-633-6746.

541-322-7253

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

GMC Yukon SLT 2003

DLR 0225

Buick Lucerne 2008 4 Dr., A Must See Vehicle. Better Than NEW! Vin #132596

Only $17,544 Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

NISSAN 366

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., diesel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. Toyota SR5 1985, 5spd 4WD, runs grt, 311K, Michelin M/S tires, $550. 541-318-2981 Toyota Tacoma 2005, 57K, 4WD, Tow Pkg, Great Condition. $18,900. 541-923-1580

’07 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Volvo XC90 T6 AWD 2004, 73K, auto, AWD, black on black, regularly serviced, leather, NAV, LOADED, in great cond. $16,500. 310-614-2822.

940

Vans Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12CD, wheels, sunroof, white, looks new, also 1995 Buick LeSabre Limited, 108K, leather, so nice & easy, $7500/both, will separate, Call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Certified Pre-Owned

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON

AWD, loaded, moonroof, leather & only 16,200 miles.

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON Auto, All Weather Pkg, Low Miles, Heated Seats, Very Clean

VIN: 718659

VIN:307453

Certified Pre-Owned

’08 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X Auto, Low Miles, Very Clean 6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:704170

VIN:514934

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.0 LIMITED ’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i Wagon Wagon, Auto, Moon Roof, Leather, Low Miles, Very Nice

All Weather Pkg, Heated and Power Seats 6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:380591

VIN:332431

Infiniti G35 X 2005

VIN:528438

Sedan, Manual, Low, Low miles, Extra Clean 6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

All Weather Pkg, Heated Seats, Very Nice!

’07 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX TR

All Weather Pkg., Heated Seats, Power Seats, Manual, Super Low Miles 43K

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Certified Pre-Owned VIN: 311976

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.0 LIMITED ’08 SUBARU FORESTER

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED

LL Bean, Moonroof

Loaded, Moonroof, Heated Seats

Wagon, Auto, Moon Roof, Leather, Navigation, Low Miles, Very Nice Car

541-598-3750

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

’06 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5i

VIN:304770

VIN#M304987

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

VIN: 383429

Wagon, Low Miles, Automatic

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Manual, Low Miles, Very Clean!

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

$21,995

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:521582

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:710825

Cool September Deals

541-598-3750

Extended Cab, Canopy, 5-Speed, Premium Wheels, Tow Pkg.

Manual, Low Miles

Auto, Very Clean, Very Nice Car!

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford F250 1983, tow

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

VIN:203215

’08 SUBARU IMPREZA SEDAN ’04 TOYOTA TACOMA 4X4 ’08 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5 SEDAN

Cool September Deals

Jeep Wrangler Hard Top 2010

VIN:219087

VIN:517656

DLR 0225

Dodge ½ Ton 4WD Pickup, 1997. Canopy; new motor, torque converter & radiator, $4000 or best offer. Call 541-536-3490.

Limited

Leather

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

541-598-3750

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $19,800 OBO. 541-388-2774.

Premium, Leather, loaded, only 31,000 miles.

DLR 0225

smolichmotors.com

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Subaru Forester 2007, Great shape, great swow car, 111K easy hwy mi. Reduced, $11,400 OBO. 541-508-0214

541-598-3750

Smolich Auto Mall

VIN#J132979

Chevy

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

$9295.

NISSAN

$13,995.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

975

Automobiles

VIN#G608574

Leather, moonroof, tow pkg.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852.

975

Automobiles

Mercury Sable LS 2004

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Soft & Mini tops for ‘06 Jeep Wrangler, brand new, all hard ware, $750, 541-548-9130

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

975

’06 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5 SEDAN ’05 SUBARU LEGACY GT ’05 SUBARU OUTBACK SEDAN Dodge Ram 2001, short

931

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

loaded, leather, clean good cond.,exc. snow car, snow tires avail. $9500, 541-408-6033.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Automobiles

Mercedes E320 4Matic 2001,

925 Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K miles, $9650. 541-598-5111.

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

4X4, Only 36K Miles!! Vin #136103

smolichmotors.com

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

DLR 0225

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:304808

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:715412

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:317617

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON 2.5XT ’09 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON ’06 SUBARU LL BEAN WAGON 2.5i Cadillac ETC 1994, loaded, heated pwr. leather seats, windows, keyless entry, A/C, exc. tires, 2nd owner 136K, all records $3000. 541-389-3030,541-815-9369

***

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 93K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

All Weather Pkg, Auto, Power Seat, Low Low Miles

Turbo, Limited, Leather, Loaded, Manual, Very Clean, Low Miles 6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:301669

Certified Pre-Owned VIN: 348526

VIN: 357332

CALL 888-701-7019

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error Lincoln Continental 2000, can occur in your ad. If this loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, happens to your ad, please exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ contact us the first day your trade for comparable truck, ad appears and we will be 541-408-2671,541-408-7267 happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. Lincoln Continental If we can assist you, please Mark VII 1990, HO Encall us: gine, $400; Chrysler Cor385-5809 doba 1978, 360 cu.in., The Bulletin Classified $400, 541-318-4641. ***

Auto, Loaded, Very, Very Clean! Only 21K for Miles!

CLICKSubaruofBend.com We don’t sell cars, we help you buy them! • No Credit • Bankruptcy • Repossession Ok • We Can Help You!

VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through September 19, 2010.


F6 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Deschutes County, Oregon. LEGAL NOTICE A-29 (10x16) rented by: Which currently has the address of 51599 Ash Road, La Scott Schmidt of Portland Pine, Oregon 97739. and Kimberly Winsett of NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: Portland, Sept. 24, 2010, READ THESE PAPERS 9:00 a.m., 63273 Nels AnderCAREFULLY! son Rd. 541-389-1664. You must "appear" in this case LEGAL NOTICE or the other side will win ADOPTION: Loving, warm, automatically. To "appear" educated family will give you must file with the court a your baby the best in life. Exlegal paper called a "motion" penses paid. Please call or "answer." The "motion" or Roslyn, 1-800-336-5316. "answer" must be given to the court clerk or adminisLEGAL NOTICE trator within 30 days of the DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON date of first publication REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS specified herein along with the required filing fee. It Notice is hereby given that must be in proper form and Deschutes County, Oregon is have proof of service on the requesting sealed proposals plaintiff's attorney or, if the from qualified proposers to plaintiff does not have an provide a local and long disattorney, proof of service on tance telephone/recording the plaintiff. system for the Deschutes County Adult Jail and Work If you have questions, you should see an attorney imCenter located in Bend, Ormediately. If you need help egon. in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Proposals Bar's Lawyer Referral Service Proposals must be received at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free by Captain Ruth Jenkin, Desin Oregon at (800) 452-7636. chutes County Adult Jail, HERSHNER HUNTER, LLP 63333 West Highway 20, By/s/Nancy K. Cary Bend, Oregon 97701 by Nancy K. Cary, OSB 902254 10:00 A.M. Friday, October Of Attorneys for Plaintiff 29, 2010. Proposals re180 East 11th Avenue ceived after the designated P.O. Box 1475 time and date will be reEugene, Oregon 97440 turned unopened. Telephone: (541)686-8511 Fax: (541)344-2025 Opening of the proposals will ncary@hershnerhunter.com be at the Deschutes County First Publication Date: Jail, at 10:00 A.M., October Sept. 3, 2010. 29, 2010. An informational pre-proposal conference will be held at 10:00 A.M., Friday, October 1, 2010 in the MAC Room, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 West Highway 20, Bend, Oregon 97701. Attendance is recommended but not mandatory. The County may reject any proposal not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all proposals upon a finding of the County it is in the public interest to do so. Each proposal submitted must contain a statement as to whether the proposer is a resident bidder, as defined in ORS 279.029. Copies of the Request for Proposals document are available by calling Lt. Brook Van der Zwiep at the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office (541) 322-4812 or emailing a request to: brookv@deschutes.org. Copies of the proposal are also available electronically by request. The County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not in compliance with prescribed procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause all proposals upon a finding by the Board it is in the public interest to do so. The County reserves the right to change the terms and conditions of the RFP prior to the award of the contract. The County will notify potential contractors of all changes. Proposer will not base its proposal on any past practices that are not clearly defined/described within the RFP. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY STATE OF OREGON, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, ASSIGNEE OF BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER; Plaintiff, v. GINA R. MANN; DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, LaPine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein; Defendants. Case No. 10CV0493AB SUMMONS TO: DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, La Pine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein. IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: You are hereby required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above case within thirty days after the first date of publication of this summons, and if you fail to appear and defend, the plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint. The object of the complaint and the demand for relief are: The plaintiff seeks to foreclose its trust deed on the subject real property described in the complaint as described below in the amount of $143,053.50, plus interest, late charges, costs, advances, and attorney's fees, and to cause the subject property to be sold by the Sheriff of Deschutes County, foreclosing the interests of all defendants in the real property with the proceeds applied to satisfy Plaintiff's lien. The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), and the West 30 feet of Lot Four (4), Block Two (2), C. L. & D. RANCH TRACTS, recorded June 20, 1963, in Cabinet A, Page 106,

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of Trust Administration of MORRIS L. CASE, Deceased, Case No. 09PB0068ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned is the Trustee for the Morris L. Case Trust of which Morris L. Case was the Trustor. All persons having claims against the trust estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Trustee at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the trustee, or the lawyers for the trustee, Ryan P. Correa. Dated and first published on Sept. 3, 2010. DAVID BEARDSLEY Trustee HURLEY RE, P.C. Attorneys at Law 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702 Phone: 541-317-5505 / Fax: 541-317-5507 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell personal property from unit(s) listed below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Oregon Self Storage Facilities Act (ORS 87) The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 18th day of September at 11:00 a.m., on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Bend Sentry Storage, 1291 SE Wilson, Bend, Sate of Oregon, the following: #69 Polly McElmurry #89-96 Dale Jurgensen LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AUCTION One (1) storage unit will be auctioned on Sat., Sept. 18th, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. All Star Storage, 136 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR. PH. 382-8808. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS JULIE JOHNSON has been appointed Personal representative of the Estate of JOAN C. GAINES, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 10 PB 0101 MA. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following named attorney for the Administrator. Date of first publication: September 10, 2010. HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701

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LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC AUCTION The following units will be Sold at public auction on Saturday Sept. 25, 2010 at 11:00 am at Bear Creek Storage, 60 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend, Oregon 97701 for non-payment of rent and other fees. Auction to be held pursuant to rules and procedures available at the office. Units To Be Sold: # 45 Desiray Bonnette # 25 Kim Bingham #231 Daniel Catlin #118 Janet Howell #206 Lilian Herman ALL SALES CASH ONLYNO CREDIT CARDS OR CHECKS

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: Tl0-66416-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DANA L. SORUM AND LINDA R. SORUM, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08-02-2007, recorded 08Â13-2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-44558 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 130447 THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2SE1/4NW1/4) OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE WILAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, LYING WEST OF CANAL BLVD. Commonly known as: 7835 SW CANAL BLVD REDMOND, OR 97756-9425 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 03/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $5,415.26 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary lias declared ill obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $752,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 02-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 01-06-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELIT-

YASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 26, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3724679 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-66363-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, THADDEUS J. LAIRD, HUBERT C. LAIRD as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 04-07-2006, recorded 04-13-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No, at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No, 2006-25323 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 158835 LOT THIRTY (30) OF RENWICK ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, Commonly known as: 1788 SE KAREN A COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 05/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,532.69 Monthly Late Charge $65.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $216,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from 04-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 01-04-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including »reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors m interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 23, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC, P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST SECASAP# 3724671 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0473959757 T.S. No.: OR-252167-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ANGEL QUINN as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 5/18/2007, recorded 5/22/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-28932 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241841 LOT 11, TERRANGO GLEN EAST, PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20969 MARSH ORCHID COURT BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $274,139.65; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,521.68 Monthly Late Charge $62.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $274,139.65 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the

trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3649723 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-65612-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN N. HOWE AND JODI A. HOWE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, AND CARL T. HOWE as Grantor to RE/MAX EQUITY GROUP INC., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE' ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-25-2006, recorded 06-01-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-38167 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206917 LOT TWO (2), DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING, PHASE I Commonly known as: 19805 WETLAND COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 04/01,7010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAY-

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Marriage of: Justin Hedevang Andersen Petitioner, and Jennifer Lynn Dufrain Respondent. Case No. 10 DS 0365 ST SUMMONS SUMMARY DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO JENNIFER LYNN DUFRAIN, Respondent. Petitioner has filed a petition asking for summary dissolution of your marriage and related relief. If you do not file the appropriate legal paper with the court in the time required (see below), Petitioner may ask the court for a judgment against you that orders the relief requested. NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear," you must file with the court a legal paper called a "Response" or Motion." This response must be filed with the court clerk or administrator within thirty (30) days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and you must show that the Petitioner's attorney (or the Petitioner if he or she does not have an attorney) was served with a copy of the "Response" or "Motion." The location to file your response is at the court located at: 1100 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon 97701. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll free at (800) 452-7636. If special accommodation under the Americans with Disability Act is needed, please contact your local court at the address above; telephone number: 541-388-5300. NOTICE OF STATUTORY RESTRAINING ORDER PREVENTING THE DISSIPATION OF ASSETS in DOMESTIC RELATIONS ACTIONS REVIEW THIS NOTICE CAREFULLY. BOTH PARTIES MUST OBEY EACH PROVISION OF THIS ORDER TO AVOID VIOLATION OF THE LAW. SEE INFORMATION ON YOUR RIGHTS TO A HEARING BELOW. TO THE PETITIONER AND RESPONDENT: PURSUANT TO Section 2, Chapter 414, Oregon Laws 2004 and UTCR 8.080, Petitioner and Respondent are restrained from: (1)Cancelling, modifying, terminating or allowing to lapse for nonpayment of premiums any policy of health insurance, homeowner or renter insurance or automobile insurance that one party maintains to provide coverage for the other party or a minor child of the parties, or any life insurance policy that names either of the parties or a minor child of the parties as a beneficiary. (2) Changing beneficiaries or covered parties under any policy of health insurance , homeowner or renter insurance or automobile insurance that one party maintains to provide coverage for the other party or a minor child of the parties, or any life insurance policy. (3)Transferring, encumbering, concealing or disposing of property in which the other party has an interest, in any manner, without written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for necessities of life. (A)Paragraph (3) does not apply to payments by either party of: (I)Attorney fees in this action; (II)Real estate and income taxes (III)Mental health therapy expenses for either party or a minor child of the parties; or (IV)Expenses necessary to provide for the safety and welfare of a party or a minor child of the parties. (4)Making extraordinary expenditures without providing written notice and an accounting of the extraordinary expenditures to the other party. (A)Paragraph (4) does not apply to the payment of either party of the expenses necessary to provide for the safety and welfare of a party or a minor child of the parties. AFTER FILING OF THE PETITION, THE ABOVE PROVISIONS ARE IN EFFECT IMMEDIATELY UPON SERVICE OF THE SUMMONS AND PETITION UPON THE RESPONDENT. IT REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL A FINAL DECREE OR JUDGMENT IS ISSUED, UNTIL THE PETITION IS DISMISSED, OR UNTIL FURTHER ORDER OF THE COURT. PETITIONER'S/RESPONDENT'S RIGHT TO REQUEST A HEARING Either petitioner or respondent may request a hearing to apply for further temporary orders, or to modify or revoke one or more terms of the automatic mutual restraining order, by filing with the court the Request for Hearing form specified in Form 8.020.2 in the UTCR Appendix of Forms.

MENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $ 1,886.93 Monthly Late Charge $63.88 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $243,946.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 03-01-2010 until paid: plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12-20-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.1 10. Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest m the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the

grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred),, together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND

POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 09, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 By: Sophia Ochoa ASAP# 3695541 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxx8884 T.S. No.: 1236742-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kim Victor and Joy C. Victor, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Co., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Whidbey Island Bank, A Washington Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 06, 2004, recorded April 13, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-20524 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 48 of Greens at Redmond, phases 4 and 5, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 4048 SW Tommy Armour Lane Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,990.39 Monthly Late Charge $81.86. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $256,943.40 together with interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 28, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-338950 09/17/10, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6512 T.S. No.: 1256658-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sheri Feasel, A Married Woman, as Grantor to Stewart Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Scme Mortgage Bankers, Inc., A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated August 25, 2006, recorded August 31, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-59998 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 8 of Canyon Point Estates Phase 1, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1532 NW Redwood Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,955.25 Monthly Late Charge $97.76. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $249,787.67 together with interest thereon at 8.125% per annum from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 28, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-338901 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 17, 2010 F7

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Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Rick Montoya Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3648317 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0475742052 T.S. No.: OR-219131-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TAWNYA M. DUFFIELD, AS SOLE OWNER as Grantor to DESCHUTES TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 10/24/2007, recorded 10/26/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-56993 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245968 LOT 40-2 OF EMPIRE CROSSING, PHASE 1 AND 2, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Com-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602198039 T.S. No.: OR-251510-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WILLIAM R. HOUSEBERG AND BILLIE JO HOUSEBERG, HUSBAND AND WIFE AND LORRAINE E. ZASH, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor to CHICAGO TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ASSURITY FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated 12/16/2008, recorded 12/23/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-49805 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 125209 LOT NINETEEN (19), BLOCK TWENTY- EIGHT (28), OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT 2, RECORDED MARCH 18, 1970, IN CABINET A, PAGE 365, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17174 BLUE HERON DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $138,099.95; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,049.91 Monthly Late Charge $31.83 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $138,099.95 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses

of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/7/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3642459 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.No.:T10-66414-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LESTER M. FRIEDMAN, KATLIN M. FIEDMAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10-21-2005, recorded 10-28-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-73796 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 101750 LOT TWELVE (12), BLOCK FIVE (5), WEST HILLS 5TH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1990 NW VICKSBURG AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 05/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAY-

MENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,860.54 Monthly Late Charge $74.49 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $325,075.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from 04-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 01-06-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 .County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 26, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 ASAP# 3724673 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010, 10/08/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patrick M. Gisler, as grantor, to West Coast Trust as trustee, in favor of West Coast Bank, as beneficiary, dated October 4, 2005, recorded October 7, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2005-68636, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated by this reference herein. Real property commonly known as 19555 Pinehurst Road, Bend, OR 97701. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. 6001774: Failure to make full annual payments pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note, Trust Deed and accompanying loan documents . The existing payment defaults and the current default amounts owing upon the Promissory Note as of December 14, 2009 are: Outstanding payment balance $62,550.75 Late charges $8,131.58 Total $70,682.33 By reason of these defaults , the beneficiary has and does hereby declare all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principle Balance:$669,662.77 Accrued Interest:$57,673.61 Late Charges:$8,131.58 Total: $735,467.96 * *Total does not include accrued interest at the rate of $134.39 per diem from December 14, 2009, additional late charges, expenditures, or trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. On January 11, 2010 Patrick M. Gisler filed a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy petition as Bankruptcy Case No. 10-10299-LBR in the United States Bankruptcy Court District of Nevada. The case was transferred to the Oregon Bankruptcy Court on April 12, 2010 and is now known as Bankruptcy Case No. 10-33202-elp7. On July 30, 2010, the Oregon Bankruptcy Court entered an Order granting the beneficiary, West Coast Bank, relief from the automatic stay to continue the foreclosure. On May 14, 2010, the trustee indefinitely postponed the original sale by oral proclamation. This Amended Notice of Sale is being issued pursuant to ORS 86.757(9). WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2010, at the hour of 2:00 p.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470 Dated:24th, August, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Erich M. Paetsch Successor Trustee State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original amended trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Erich M. Paetsch

Exhibit "A"

Being a portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, Section 25, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the East Quarter corner to Section 25, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, the true point of beginning; thence South 00° 04' 42" West, 1227.84 feet along the East line of said Section 25 to the Northeasterly right-of-way of Highway 20; thence North 67° 21' 57" West, 1110.29 feet along said right-of-way; thence North 00° 04' 16" East, 802.65 feet to the East-West mid-section line of said Section 25, the centerline of Pinehurst Road; thence South 89° 53' 19" East, 1025.35 feet to the true point of beginning.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0307678640 T.S. No.: OR-251869-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHARLES R. BEEM JR. AND DEBORAH L. BEEM, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC.. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/5/2006, recorded 4/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-24833 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111287 LOT 55 IN BLOCK Q OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60195 NAVAJO RD BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $329,194.23; plus accrued

interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,040.06 Monthly Late Charge $52.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $329,194.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.375% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed,

together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7913 T.S. No.: 1293580-09.

Sell an Item

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monly known as: 63163 DE HAVILAND STREET BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $209,768.32; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,515.76 Monthly Late Charge $66.49 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $209,768.32 together with interest

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to a certain trust deed ("Trust Deed") made, executed and delivered by Theodore R. Lynch and Karyn L. Lynch, as grantor, to AmeriTitle, as trustee, in favor of GFP Enterprises, Inc., its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated November 7, 2008, and recorded on November 10, 2008, as Document No. 2008-45120, in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said trust deed was assigned to Donald R. Pollard by that certain Assignment of Deed of Trust by Beneficiary dated June 30, 2009, and recorded on July 9, 2009, as Document No. 2009-29029 in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property ("Property") situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot Twenty-one (21), Block Eight (8) of HIGHLAND ADDITION, recorded March 3, 1916, in Cabinet A, Page 211, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Arrearage in the sum of $279,619.06 as of June 3, 2010, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on November 7, 2009. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Payoff in the sum of $279,619.06 as of June 3, 2010, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on November 7, 2009. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 4, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Stephen L. Magidow, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For The Plaza Home Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 19, 2007, recorded July 25, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-40871 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 31, block 9, unit no. 1, Oregon Water Wonderland, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 55365 Big River Drive Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,295.45 Monthly Late Charge $146.75. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $440,720.95 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any DATED: June 3, 2010 other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: Michelle M. Bertolino, Successor Trustee August 18, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could afFarleigh Wada Witt fect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right 121 SW Morrison, Suite 600 to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a Portland, OR 97204 fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on Phone: 503-228-6044; fax: 503-228-1741 or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after 1000 1000 1000 the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written eviLegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices dence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee LEGAL NOTICE other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE the date of the sale is November 28, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing ad- PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS dress are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This inobligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in strument makes reference to that certain Line of Credit Instrument dated July 27, 2005, and rewriting and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this corded on August 5, 2005, as instrument number 2005-51280, in the Official Records of Desmatter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact inchutes County, State of Oregon, as modified by that certain Modification of Deed of Trust dated formation for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and September 5, 2008 and recorded on September 8, 2008, as instrument number 2008-36908, in meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact informathe Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, and as further modified by that certain tion for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE Modification of Deed of Trust dated June 17, 2009 and recorded on June 25, 2009, as instrument BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 number 2009-26840, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein Mark http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-WestAnderson is the Grantor, and AmeriTitle is the original Trustee, and Bank of the Cascades, an Orern Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 egon state chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lot Nine (9), ENCHANTMENT ON THE DESCHUTES, recorded on October 15, 2003, in Cabinet G, Page 75, Deschutes County, Oregon. R-338591 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08 Also commonly described as: Not Yet Assigned, Bend, OR 97701. The tax parcel number is: 241137. The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the 1000 1000 1000 Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices than the appointment of Jeffrey C. Gardner, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the underLEGAL NOTICE signed certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been disTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx8862 T.S. No.: 1260696-09. missed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Jeffrey C. Gardner, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rick C. Upham, as Grantor to Western Title & EsPortland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS crow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and For Aspen Mortgage Group, as Beneficiary, dated January 27, 2005, recorded February 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Inuncured defaults by Mark Anderson (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust strument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-06596 covering the following described real property Deed and the written documents for Loan No. 100020792, including the promissory note dated situated in said County and State, to-wit: and effective as of July 27, 2005, as amended September 5, 2008, and as further amended June Lot 39, block 30, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc., Unit 5, 17, 2009 (the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property deDeschutes County Oregon. scribed above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. The Loan secured by the Trust Deed matured on October 5, Commonly known as: 56430 Celestial Drive Bend OR 97707. 009, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus BenBoth the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the oblieficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Borrower to Lender. Borrower has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $128,068.39 (the gations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $118,683.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including June 14, 2010 of $5,501.68 plus pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary purBeneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $3,883.71. Interest on suant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $922.09 Monthly Late account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after June 14, 2010, at a rate that is currently 6.0% percent per annum or $19.50953 per diem. ALL Charge $46.10. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, sum of $151,988.95 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from June 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 29, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments; grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, toDeliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real gether with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execuProperty are paid current. Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including tion of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and exa lien filed by Enchantment on the Deschutes Homeowners Association, Inc. of $576.00 and a pense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any judgment for child support payable to Janice G. Anderson; Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire from the public record. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligasums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of June 14, 2010: $118,683.00. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations tion or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes pluas of June 14, 2010: $5,501.68. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs to June 14, 2010: $3,883.71. TOTAL DUE: $128,068.39. Accordingly, the ral, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $128,068.39 as of June 14, 2010, "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and 18, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to reattorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and quire you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to eiinterest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time ther a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 29, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held on November 8, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice pein accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps of the riod. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, at 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your 97701 in Deschutes County, Oregon. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may conset for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal tact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org noted in this Notice. DATED June 15, 2010. By: Jeffrey C. Gardner, OSB 980549, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western ReconveyTelephone: (503) 228-2525. Facsimile: (503) 295-1058. Email: jgardner@balljanik.com. ance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE R-339248 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08 USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.


F8 Friday, September 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees

and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3644189 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010, 10/01/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No,: T10-65381-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LESLIE GIACCI as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 0926-2006, recorded 10-04-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-66877 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated m said County and State, to-wit: APN: 204036 LOT 42, WESTSIDE MEADOWS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2950 NW CHARDONNAY LANE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real properly to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 08/01 '2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES .AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,154.78 Monthly

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-09-283904-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LINDA D. FRANTZ & DAVID P. FRANTZ as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOAN CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/18/2006, recorded 1/25/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-05724,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100370 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 2 OF EDGECLIFF, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1886 NE SNOWBIRD COURT BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,216.43 Monthly Late Charge $93.49 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $282,000.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 1/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/27/2010 at the hour of 1:00 pm, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/27/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/27/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/20/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3704919 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010

Late Charge $75.37 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $268.000.00 together with interest thereon as the rate of 6.75% per annum from 07-01-2009 until paid; plus all seemed late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant 10 the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12-16-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM. Standard of Time, as established by section ] 87.110. Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OH 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and

the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named m Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN

TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 BY: MARIA DE LA TORRE ASAP# 3695539 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010 PUBLIC NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 87 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 9/27/2010. The sale will be held at 10:00 a.m. by BUTCH’S PLACE 1515 N. HWY. 97 REDMOND, OR 1992 Ford F250 VIN = 2FTHF26H1NCA73534 Amount due on lien $6465.00 Reputed owner(s) Denise Vargas Donald & Patricia Wells

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx4136 T.S. No.: 1242146-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3326 T.S. No.: 1251637-09.

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patrick Todd, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc., A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 02, 2007, recorded July 09, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-38002 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 80 of Shevlin Ridge Phase 4, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3322 NW Morningwood Court Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,454.16 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $1,039,831.84 together with interest thereon at 5.429% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Craig R. Pairan, A Married Man As His Sole and Separate Property, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated October 20, 2005, recorded October 28, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-73840 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 49 in block 1 of Newberry Estates Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 52311 Ammon Road La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,311.43 Monthly Late Charge $56.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $196,194.91 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 28, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a R-338896 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08 longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. 1000 1000 1000 You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact inLEGAL NOTICE formation for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact informa- Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patrick M. Gisler, as grantor, to West Coast tion for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE Trust as trustee, in favor of West Coast Bank, as beneficiary, dated October 4, 2005, recorded BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 October 7, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-West2005-68638, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned ern Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 county and state, to wit: Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated by this reference herein. Real property commonly known as Bareland, Bend, OR 97701, R-338899 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08 real property tax identification number 16-11-25-00-00702; 132175, Code 2-007. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street 1000 1000 1000 address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligaLegal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices tions secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. 6001775: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE upon the maturity date of December 5, 2007. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby deLoan No: xxxxxx9962 T.S. No.: 1256179-09. clares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jonathan W. Birky and Anne K. Birky, Husband Principal balance $210,000.00 And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic RegistraInterest $6,700.50 tion Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, Total $216,700.50* dated April 14, 2006, recorded April 19, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in *Total does not include interest at the rate of $21.58 per diem from December 14, 2009, late book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a 2006-26788 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, specific date is available upon request. to-wit: On January 11, 2010 Patrick M. Gisler filed a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy petition as Bankruptcy Case No. Lot 14 in block 11 of Desert Woods II, 10-10299-LBR in the United States Bankruptcy Court District of Nevada. The case was transferred Deschutes County, Oregon. to the Oregon Bankruptcy Court on April 12, 2010 and is now known as Bankruptcy Case No. Commonly known as: 10-33202-elp7. On July 30, 2010, the Oregon Bankruptcy Court entered an Order granting the 20888 West View Drive Aka beneficiary, West Coast Bank, relief from the automatic stay to continue the foreclosure. On May 20888 Southeast Westview Drive Bend OR 97702. 14, 2010, the trustee indefinitely postponed the original sale by oral proclamation. This Amended Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obliNotice of Sale is being issued pursuant to ORS 86.757(9). gations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to 2010, at the hour of 2:10 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsethe front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of quent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the ex$1,467.07 Monthly Late Charge $73.35. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared ecution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing following, to-wit; The sum of $294,065.83 together with interest thereon at 4.250% per annum obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by from August 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, forethe trustee. closure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporathan five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed tion the undersigned trustee will on December 28, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Desthe principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's chutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said deed. trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired af- In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor ter the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the respective successors in interest, if any. foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due Erich M. Paetsch had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any P.O. Box 470 other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under Salem, OR 97308-0470 the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular Dated:24th, August, 2010. includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any /s/Erich M. Paetsch other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the Erich M. Paetsch words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: Successor Trustee August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original amended trustee's or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after notice of sale. the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evi- /s/Erich M. Paetsch dence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a Attorney for said Trustee fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before Exhibit "A" the date of the sale is November 28, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a Minor Partition MP 78-15, Parcel 2, more particularly described as follows: longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current Being a portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter, Section 25, Township 16, South, obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this described as follows: matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and Beginning at the East quarter corner of Section 25, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the Wilmeet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact informalamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 89°53'19" West, 1025.35 feet along tion for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE the East-West midsection line; thence South 00°04'16" West, 30.00 feet to the South right-of-way BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 of Pinehurst Road, the True Point of Beginning; thence South 00°04'16" West, 772.65 feet to the http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-WestNortheasterly right-of-way of Highway 20; thence North 67°21'57" West, 160.55 feet along said ern Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 right-of-way; thence South 22° 38' 03" West, 20.00 feet; thence North 67° 21' 57" West, 158.17 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird feet to the West line of the Northeast quarter corner Southeast quarter, Section 25; thence North 00°04'16" East, 668.94 feet to the South right-of-way of Pinehurst Road; thence South 89°53'19" R-338900 09/17, 09/24, 10/01, 10/08 East, 302.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning.


MUSIC: Willie Nelson is back at the amphitheater, PAGE 3

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

E V E N T S : Bend Fall Festival takes over downtown, PAGE 20


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

Cover illustration by Sean Meehan, courtesy Cat Call Productions

FINE ARTS • 12

EVENTS • 20

• COVER STORY: “Little Shop of Horrors” hits the Tower stage • Local artists chosen for exhibitions • BendPAC casting “Nerve” • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• Bend Fall Festival returns

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING

• “Sunset Boulevard” shows in Portland • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 24 • Review of “NHL 11” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

OUT OF TOWN • 21

MUSIC • 3 • Willie Nelson plays Les Schwab Amphitheater • Phil Keaggy plays two shows • Silver Moon hosts authentic rockabilly • Bend Roots Revival kicks off Thursday • McMenamins celebrates with music • D.R.I. plays the Domino Room • Feedback digs the Sisters Folk Festival

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

541-382-1811

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • Take a look at recent releases

RESTAURANTS • 10

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

CALENDAR • 16

• “The Town,” “Easy A,” “Wild Grass,” “The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest,” “Alpha and Omega” and “Devil” open in Central Oregon • “Just Wright,” “Letters to Juliet” and “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

• A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on • Talks and classes listing

• A review of Thai Thai in Bend

COMING NEXT WEEK

Bend Roots Revival picks up in new home


GO! M A GAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

PAGE 3

music

No stopping Th e legendary Willie Nelson is ‘on the road again’ to Bend By David Jasper Country great Willie Nelson is seen here with his beloved Martin guitar, nicknamed Trigger. Nelson will perform tonight at Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend. Submitted photo

T he B ullet in

I

t would be understandable if, at age 77, Willie Nelson wanted to slow down a bit. As his show tonight at Les Schwab Amphitheater attests — along with the 19 other concerts he’s playing this month — he has no intention of doing so. Oh, he’ll break for a couple of weeks in October and November, but then he’s right back — you guessed it — on the road again. Nelson isn’t doing much press, but according to the biography supplied to us by the folks at his publicity company, he tours tirelessly in his bus, Honeysuckle Rose III, so named after he “rode his first two buses into the ground.” Clearly, Nelson knows what he likes. Perhaps that’s why he’s never given up his beloved guitar — named Trigger (that’s Trigger as in Roy Rogers’ horse) — despite the hole worn into it from decades of playing country music. Though he’s explored reggae on 2005’s “Countryman” and jazz (with Wynton Marsalis) on 2008’s “Two Men With The Blues,” country has always been Nelson’s mainstay. Continued next page

If you go What: Willie Nelson with Ryan Bingham and the Dead Horses When: 6:30 tonight, gates open at 5 p.m. Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: $48 (general) and

$83 (reserved), plus fees. Tickets available at all Ticketmaster outlets, including The Ticket Mill (541-318-5457) in Bend, www.ticketmaster.com and 800-745-3000, until 2 p.m. On-site box office by gates opens at 4 p.m. Contact: 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

m u s i c Guitar wiz Keaggy is in La Pine, Redmond Simply put, Phil Keaggy is worth the drive. If you live in Redmond or La Pine, where Keaggy is playing this weekend, that’s certainly true. And even if you live in Bend, 20 or 30 miles is nothing to see one of the world’s very best guitar players perform. Keaggy isn’t a household name on the level of, say, Hendrix, but in certain circles, he’s revered. He began his career in the late ’60s with the psychedelic band Glass Harp, then transitioned into a solo career in the 1970s. Along the way, he became a Christian and an overtly Christian artist, and in 1978 — after a series of tragedies in his personal life — he made “The Master & The Musician,” a landmark album and a link between meditative folk, jazz, prog and classical music that has influenced an army of guitarists (and Christian musicians) since. Not that Keaggy expected the record to reverberate through the years. “It was a very solitary project,” he told The Bulletin in 2008. “I was just getting this music out of my system, is what was happening. I had no idea that … the album would really resonate with some people.” But it did, and it is just part of the man’s magical career, which includes dozens of albums, scores of collaborations, and more chops than musicians who fill venues hundreds of times bigger. Keaggy will roll through Cen-

Phil Keaggy Submitted photo

tral Oregon this weekend on a tour that comes just before the release of “Interdimensional Traveler,” his new album with fellow Glass Harp member John Sferra. There are a few tracks for your perusal at www .philkeaggy.com. Phil Keaggy; 7 p.m. Saturday at Redmond High School (675 S.W. Rimrock Way), 7 p.m. Sunday at La Pine High School (51633 Coach Road), doors open 6:30 p.m.; $20 general, $25 VIP, groups of 10 available for $150; for ticket outlets, group sales and more information, call 541-633-6804.

Saturday, September 25 Noon - 9pm Village Green Park, Sisters Live Music 10+ Breweries $5.00/mug $1.00/4 oz. Pour Info. 541.549.0251 www.sisterscountry.com

Sponsored by:

Special Thanks to

Ruby Dee rockabillys into Silver Moon As a guy whose college apartment was around the corner from a rockabilly bar, I can tell you that one thing we don’t get enough of in Bend is real, pure, honky-tonkin’ rockabilly music. Enter Ruby Dee and The Snakehandlers, a genuine rockabilly quartet from the People’s Republic of Austin, Texas, where you have to be pretty good to even survive as a rockabilly band. They’ll perform in Bend on Wednesday night as they tour behind their new “Live in Austin, Texas” tour. Ruby Dee’s a singer-songwriter who spent time in the Northwest before moving to Austin, but has a voice that twangs as authentically as any you’ll hear. Her Snakehandlers band is as tight as a two-sizes-too-small cowboy hat, complete with shuffling beats, vibrant guitars and bass lines that’ll walk all over you and slap you silly. The band’s sound is joyous, but its trip to Silver Moon is somber, because they’ll be honoring Kipp Crawford, a Portlandbased drummer who was killed last year while riding his bicycle in what police believe was an assault and robbery. Crawford played with the Snakehandlers for two years before they moved to Texas, and the band will donate 50 percent of their merch proceeds to a scholarship fund in Kipp’s name. Ruby Dee has also written a song remembering Crawford, and she’ll unveil it in Bend. Continued next page

From previous page Hence the title of his collection of country standards, “Country Music,” released in April. Born in 1933 in Abbott, Texas, and raised by his paternal grandparents, who encouraged his musical leanings, Nelson began writing songs as a child and playing in bands as a teen, according to his bio. By the mid 1950s, after a stint in the Air Force, Nelson began working as a DJ in Fort Worth, Texas. At the same time, he was performing in clubs and writing songs. After he began selling some, including “Family Bible,” a 1960 Claude Gray hit, Nelson moved to Nashville. He quickly became known for his songwriting talent, penning “Crazy,” a 1961 hit for Patsy Cline. That same year, the Nelson-penned “Hello Walls” squatted at the top of the charts for nine weeks for Faron Young. As an artist in his own right, Nelson had two topten hits himself in 1962, “but struggled for a breakthrough the remainder of the decade,” according to his bio. Fed up with Nashville and his label (RCA Records) and its “insistence on lush, stringladen arrangements,” according to his bio, Nelson moved back to Texas in 1972. With that, his luck, and his music, began to evolve. He released two well-received albums, “Shotgun Willie” (1973) and “Phases & Stages” (1974). His next album, 1975’s “Red Headed Stranger” was a concept album about a man on the run from the law. Despite low expectations, its rise to popularity — and that of Nelson buddies such as Waylon Jennings — led one journalist to label it a movement: “outlaw music,” also known as “outlaw country.” More hits followed, including the Nelson-Jennings duet “Good Hearted Woman” and, from 1978’s “Waylon & Willie,” “Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys.” Nelson’s star continued to rise. He began appearing in movies such as “The Electric Horseman” (1979) and “Honeysuckle Rose” (1980), and the hits kept coming: the rollicking “On the Road Again” in 1981, the haunted ballad “Always on My Mind” in 1982, and the schmaltzy duet with Julio Iglesias, “To All the Girls I’ve Loved Before” in 1984. Success continued through the decade, seeing Nelson

“You hear all kinds of ideas about country music: This is country, or this is, or that was and this ain’t. And it’s all a matter of opinion.” — W i l l ie N e ls o n collaborate with Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson on “Highwaymen” in 1985, the same year he founded Farm Aid to help America’s farmers through tough times. In 1993, the same year he released the album “Across the Borderline,” on which he covered songs by Paul Simon, Lyle Lovett and Peter Gabriel, Nelson was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. While he could have rested on his laurels, not a year since has gone by without the release of at least one Nelson album. Some years, such as 2001 and 2004, saw the release of several albums, including compilations and bestofs. The point is, if you’re a Nelson completist, you’re going to be spending a lot of money and had better have strong shelves for CD storage or, if digital’s your thing, a Trigger-sized hard-drive for the mp3s (that’s Trigger as in horse). Of the 15 songs on “Country Music,” for which Nelson worked with T-Bone Burnett, reviewer Stephen Thomas Erlewine writes in All Music Guide, “The not-sounspoken joke behind the title of Willie Nelson’s 2010 album is that it’s been so long since he’s played straight country music, Nelson needs to clearly label it when he does.” But in a press release from Rounder Records, Nelson sounds more than a little pleased with what he’s accomplished on this record, which includes Nelson’s take on “Freight Train Boogie,” “Pistol Packin’ Mama” and “Nobody’s Fault but Mine.” “You hear all kinds of ideas about country music: This is country, or this is, or that was and this ain’t. And it’s all a matter of opinion. But in my opinion, this is the original country music. So I’m really excited for people to hear it,” the press release quotes him as saying. “There are so many great songs in every category — pop, country, bluegrass, whatever. There are a lot of great standards to choose from. Fortunately I’ve lived long enough to know them all, I think. I just love singing those songs.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 5

music

Alpaca Days September 25-26 Saturday 9-5 Sunday 10-4

ATMOSPHERE IS COMING TO BEND! That’s right! The Minneapolis indie-hip-hop giants will bring their To All My Friends Tour to Bend’s Midtown Ballroom on Tuesday. We talked to Slug, at right, about his new baby and new music, but ran out of room for it in print. Read the story and get all the show details at www.bendbulletin.com/frequency.

Courtesy Molly Mady

From previous page Learn more about the band at www.rubydeemusic.com. Ruby Dee and The Snakehandlers; 9 p.m. Wednesday; $5; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com.

Bend Roots kicks off, town-wide, Thursday It’s mid-September, and that means one thing to Central Oregon’s music fans: The Bend Roots Revival is right around the corner. You’ll want to pick up next week’s GO! Magazine for full coverage of the festival, which celebrates all that is awesome about the local music scene, and is moving locations this year. But! You’ll also want to read ahead here, so you’re prepped for Thursday night’s kickoff/preview night, featuring a bunch of solid acts at various venues across town. Here’s the schedule. Note that all venues are in Bend. Note also that times have been lovingly scheduled so you can hop from place to place, thus maximizing your pre-funk: • 10 Barrel Brewing (1135 N.W. Galveston Ave.), Blaze and Kelly, 4-6 p.m., free. • Parrilla Grill (635 N.W. 14th St.), The Bend Roots Family Party and songwriter-in-the-round, 6-9 p.m., free. •The Victorian Cafe (1404 N.W. Galveston Ave.), Night of the Dead with Rising Tide, 7:30-9:30 p.m., free. • Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend), Emma Hill and her Gentlemen Callers, John Shipe, 8:3011:30 p.m., $5. • The Summit Saloon & Stage (125 N.W. Oregon Ave.), Ransom Band, Greg Botsford, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., free.

For more info, and a peek at next weekend’s Roots schedule, visit www.bendroots.net.

D.R.I. brings crossover to Bend When you do this job, you are exposed, by bands, to a lot of genre names, not to mention genre mashups. You know, like electro-folk. Or polka-punk. So it’s not every day I hear of a genre I haven’t heard before. But here’s one: crossover thrash. Crossover thrash is sort of a combination of thrash metal and hardcore, and if you really want to split hairs, go read the “Terminological ambiguity” section of the Wikipedia entry on crossover thrash. It’s hilarious. But that’s not what’s important here. What’s important is that the term “crossover” was coined by D.R.I., the very same group of Texas-turned-Bay Area punks that will play the Domino Room on Sunday night. D.R.I. (aka Dirty Rotten Imbeciles) formed way back in 1982, and their first EP clocked in at 22 songs over 18 minutes. That’s just how fast these dudes shred. Over the years, the band has taken long breaks and changed members umpteen times, but they remain one of the most influential punk/ metal bands of the past three decades. And, they’re still out there on the road kicking out the crossover jams for their old-school fans and patch-wearing punks who didn’t even exist when D.R.I. named its third album “Crossover,” inspiring a genre, a Wikipedia page, and this brief. D.R.I., with Tuck And Roll and We Are 86’d; 8 p.m. Sunday, doors open 7 p.m.; $13 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door. Advance tickets available at Ranch Records (541-389-6116)

Red Oak Farms Alpacas 53315 Bridge Drive La Pine, Oregon 541-536-6190 • • • •

Live Music Spinners Demo Arts & Crafts Oak Pit BBQ

Music by Bella Via Saturday 1-4 Rock - Blues - Jazz

in Bend and through Ticketswest at www.ticketswest.com, 800-992-8499, and the Safeway at 642 N.E. Third St., in Bend; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.random presents.com.

Bring in this coupon for a free raffle ticket! Alpaca Days 2010

McMenamins picks up the live music pace McMenamins Old St. Francis School (700 N.W. Bond St., Bend) has a massive week of live music coming up, so let’s get to the details: • On Saturday, it’s Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day, with Irish rovers, Irish dancers, the Tune Dawgs and local blues-rock band Eric Tollefson and The World’s Greatest Lovers headlining the night. Entertainment will get going around 2:30 p.m., and it’s all free. • Sunday brings Oktoberfest, which runs all day in the McMenamins complex. But at 1 p.m., the music starts, with High Five Polka, Boxcar String Band and, to cap the night, Bend-based Americana quintet the Moon Mountain Ramblers. It’s free. • Wednesday night’s free concert in Father Luke’s Room will feature the Truth & Salvage Company, a sunny, harmony-happy roots-rock band that combines California cool with Southernrock swagger. They’ll play at 7 p.m. Check ’em out at www .truthandsalvageco.com. • Finally, Thursday night’s free Father Luke’s show will feature Rindy & Marv Ross, the core duo behind the ’80s hit-making band Quarterflash, as well as The Trail Band. Rindy and Marv spent some formative years in Bend before moving to Portland to find fame with Quarterflash, and now they’re back. They’ll play at 7 p.m. For more info, visit www .mcmenamins.com. — Ben Salmon

BEND’S Intimate, Affordable, Local

THEATRE OCTOBER 19 JO DEE MESSINA Country star up close & personal

OCTOBER 22 JIGU! Thunder Drums of China SEPTEMBER 17–25 ...... LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS 28.....................................CATGUT TRIO 29....................................... BLIND PILOT

OCTOBER 2......................................LOVE LETTERS 5............................... COWBOY JUNKIES 6...................................... GREG BROWN

Tickets & Info

TowerTheatre.org Ticket Mill 541.317.0700


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

music

FOLK

MAGIC Sisters festival shows its stripes yet again with a stellar lineup

T

hanks to another obligation, I was unable to make it to the Sisters Folk Festival’s first two days last weekend. Bummer. The beautiful thing about Sisters’ long-running, three-day folkstravaganza, though, is the depth and strength of its lineup. You can show up any day, wander into one of the event’s signature white tents, and catch something worth catching. It’s that commitment to quality that makes SFF unquestionably one of the cornerstones of Central Ore-

gon’s music scene. And it’s a commitment to diversity that will ensure it remains that way. In recent years, SFF’s organizers have strayed a bit from the folk genre, but stayed generally within the broader umbrella of American roots music. In 2010, that meant booking the Western swing band Hot Club of Cowtown, Irish-American veterans Solas, and up-and-coming indie-pop throwbacks Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside. Some of the fest’s hardcore fans have grumbled, but if they stop and

Courtesy Lynn Woodward / LynnWoodwardPhotography.com

Texas troubadour Slaid Cleaves plays the main stage at Sisters Folk Festival on Sunday.

Feedback B Y BEN SALMON look around, they’ll see that the majority of people at the festival are in their 40s, 50s or beyond. They’re admirable, avid music fans, but if SFF wants to be healthy for the long run, it will have to widen its scope to include acts that may hold more appeal for a younger generation. Take Po’ Girl, for example. The gender-split, multi-racial quartet makes dusky, cosmopolitan roots music built with just about anything

that’ll make noise; when I walked into the Sisters Art Works stage, the band was playing clarinet, accordion, guitar and keys to a standing roomonly crowd that clearly had fallen in love with them the day before and returned for more. It was easy to see why, after watching Awna Teixeira skillfully handle the accordion and sing in her distinctive voice, and Allison Russell introduce a Leonard Cohen cover in French, and the band basically invent Balkan banjo-funk on “One Little City.” By the time that song’s final note faded, I was halfway to Angeline’s Bakery to check out Chris Kokesh, best known for her work in Misty River, but playing SFF with a bluegrass outfit called Brokentop. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 7

music Upcoming Concerts

Courtesy Lynn Woodward / LynnWoodwardPhotography.com

Cosmopolitan Canadian folk group Po’ Girl performs at Sisters Folk Festival on Sunday afternoon. From previous page I arrived to find Angeline’s quirky little backyard half full; the audience had gathered all on one side under the shade, leaving half the seats empty and exposed to the bright, warm sun. Kokesh and Brokentop sounded terrific. The band’s music was simple and sublime, with each of the three vocalists in perfect form, and all four pickers working in harmony. They did a few originals (Eugene folkie Beth Wood joined in for Kokesh’s “Planting a Garden in October”) and a bunch of covers of artists like Jonathan Byrd, Mississippi John Hurt and Dock Boggs, the latter two led by guitarist Dale Adkins, a goateed fellow with a fine voice who plays Dan Tyminski to Kokesh’s Alison Krauss. With my bluegrass jones sated, I made my way across town to the Village Green main stage to catch The Makepeace Brothers and then one of my favorite artists at this year’s fest, Slaid Cleaves. To paraphrase SFF artistic guru Brad Tisdel, who introduced the band, most of the Makepeaces really are brothers, and their name really is Makepeace. Four of the five members of the band are clearly related by blood, if their facial features and consistent bedhead are any indication (Conor Gaffney, bass player, is unrelated). They’ve been through the region a couple times recently, thanks in part to their connection with Breedlove Guitar Co., which sponsors the band.

The Makepeaces are engaging performers, without question. They’re funny in a smirky, I’mpretty-adorable-aren’t-I? sort of way, which is OK with me and was really OK for a row of young ladies dancing near the back of the tent. As for their music, it’s hip-shaking, breathy acoustic pop, something like Jason Mraz and Jack Johnson meets The Eagles and Paul Simon, played with a slew of acoustic guitars and some interesting percussion, including a double-sided cajon, or box drum. (Note: They even made a dirty joke about the cajon. And it’s not the one you’re thinking of.) All that said, the brothers’ music got a tad same-y and earnest for me after about 45 minutes, so I didn’t boo when they began to tear down and make way for Cleaves, one of the best among Texas’ bounty of acclaimed songwriters. He wore a purple button-down shirt and dark slacks that I thought looked like church clothes, so I smiled when he knowingly began his Sunday set with a couple of gospel tunes, one by Woody Guthrie (“This Morning I Am Born Again”) and one original that covered the world of religions and sounded quite Hank Sr.-ish, a fact Cleaves acknowledged up front. That one is so new, Cleaves flubbed several lines at the end, a mistake he blew off with characteristic wit. From there, though, it was smooth sailing as he played a set of frequently requested “workplace disaster songs,” in-

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cluding the devastatingly gorgeous “Lydia” (about coalminers’ deaths) and “Breakfast in Hell,” an epic, true story with a brawny audience-participation part. Along the way, Cleaves worked in some yodeling, his best-known song (“Broke Down”), and a relatively poppy tune called “Cry” from his latest album “Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away.” The set was wonderful, if too short because Cleaves’ accompanist and straight man Michael O’Connor had a plane to catch. To their credit, the duo took the stage very quickly after The Makepeace Brothers, and wasted no time in between songs. Still, I wish we could’ve heard more. But I probably would’ve felt that way even if they’d played 90 minutes. Instead, I scooped up my wife and daughter, who were wandering around town, and we headed back to the car, swimming against the sea of smiling faces that seemed to fill every sidewalk. I’m not the first to say it, nor will I be the last, but: Sisters is a magical place during the folk festival. Ben Salmon can be reached at bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

Sept. 23-26 — Bend Roots Revival (local music), Century Center, Bend, www.bendroots.net. Sept. 24 — Against Me! (agitarena rock), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Sept. 29 — Blind Pilot (indie folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. pdxchangeprogram.com. Oct. 1 — Tomorrows Bad Seeds (reggae), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. Oct. 5 — Cowboy Junkies (Americana), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 5 — The Devil Makes Three (whiskey-grass), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Oct. 6 — Greg Brown (folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Oct. 9 — Valient Thorr and Red Fang (hard rock), Domino Room, Bend, 541-788-2989. Oct. 10 — David Grisman Quintet

(bluegrass), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Oct. 12 — Judy Collins (pop), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 13 — Boulder Acoustic Society (indie folk), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Oct. 15 — Matt Hopper (indierock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. Oct. 19 — Jo Dee Messina (country), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 20 — The White Buffalo (folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. Oct. 22 — JIGU! Thunder Drums of China (drum troupe), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 27 — Laura Veirs and Weinland (indie folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.pdxchangeprogram.com.


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 19330 Pinehurst Road

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

DJ Weatherman, MoWo, 10 pm h A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p

The Decoy 1051 N.W. Bond St., 5410318-4833

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

Grover’s Pub 939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

Madhappy Lounge 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Tim Coffey, 7 pm j Rhythm Rhino, 9 pm dj

McMenamins Old St. Francis 700 N.W Bond St., 541-382-5174

The Melodramatics, 9:30 pm r/p Eric Tollefson & band, 7 pm r/p (P. 5)

Blues Jam, 8 pm, signups 7:30 pm j

Oktoberfest, 1 pm (P. 5)

TUESDAY

Atmosphere, 8 pm, $25-$28 Emerald City, 9 pm r/p

Emerald City, 9 pm r/p

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5:30 pm

Taj Palace 917 N.W. Wall St., 541-330-0774

WEDNESDAY

r/p

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

THURSDAY

Canaan Canaan, 5-7 pm r/p DJ Steel, 9 pm dj Gypsy Fire Bellydance, 7 pm

Truth & Salvage Co., 7 pm r/p (P. 5)

Rindy & Marv Ross, 7 pm r/p (P. 5)

Ladies Night w/Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj Ruby Dee/Snakehandlers, 9 pm, $5 c (P. 4)

Emma Hill/Gentleman Callers, 8:30 pm $5 r/p

j

24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

p

Metal Punk

h

Silver Moon Brewing Co.

The Summit Saloon & Stage

m

Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

Players Bar & Grill

Strictly Organic Coffee Co.

h

Josh Hart Project, 7 pm b

a

51 N.W. Greenwood Ave. 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

f

a

DJ Folk

Bend Jazz Collective, 7-10 pm j

Midtown Ballroom Northside Pub

dj

Tim Coffey, 8 pm j

D.R.I., 8 pm, $13-$15, p (P. 5) Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

c

Blues Country

Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p Adam Carlson Quartet, 7-10 pm j

Domino Room

Jackson’s Corner

MONDAY

b

DJ Harlo, Cloaked Characters, noon r/p

Bendistillery Tasting Room

211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

SUNDAY

MUSIC TYPE:

Bill Keale, 6 pm w

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

The Blacksmith Restaurant

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

Dillon Schneider & John Allen, 3-5 pm

Open mic with Dan Chavers, 6-8 pm

j

DJ Steel, 9 pm dj

Ransom Band, 9 pm, $3-$5 r/p

Jam night, 7 pm

Third Street Pub 314 S.E. Third St., 541-306-3017

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Billy Wilson, 6 pm r/p Reno & Cindy Holler, 7-10 pm r/p Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

Phil Keaggy, 7 pm, $20-$25 r/p (P. 4) DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj Party Time Band, 7-11 pm, $4-$6 r/p

Poor Man’s Roses, 7-9 pm c

Poor Man’s Roses, 7-9 pm c

The Substitutes, 9 pm r/p

The Substitutes, 9 pm r/p

Redmond High School 675 S.W. Rimrock Drive, 541-923-4800

Twins J.J. 535 S.W. Sixth St., 541-504-2575

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

VFW Hall 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, 541-548-4108

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 1 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

SISTERS Soji Station 425 W. U.S. Highway 20, 541-549-8499

SUNRIVER Owl’s Nest 1 Center Drive, 541-593-3730

LA PINE Phil Keaggy, 7 pm, $20-$25 r/p (P. 4)

La Pine High School 51633 Coach Road, 541-322-5360

MADRAS Meet Market Pub 107 N.E. Cedar St., 541-475-1917

DJ Medina, 9:30 pm dj

DJ Medina, 9:30 pm dj

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

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PAGE 9

music releases JJ Grey and Mofro GEORGIA WARHORSE Alligator Records JJ Grey’s new album is named after a tough little grasshopper indigenous to the American Southeast. Grey himself is from northern Florida, and his music continues to have a distinctly Southern feel. “Georgia Warhorse” builds on the warm, organic sound Grey

and his band, Mofro, developed over their first four albums. The repertoire includes blasts of hard-edged rock (“All,” “The Hottest Spot in Hell”). Grey is best, however, when he veers toward Memphis-style soul (“The Sweetest Thing,” a duet with reggae great Toots Hibbert) and gutbucket blues (the title song). — Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Katy Perry Usher VERSUS Jive Label Group “Usually, I’m a one-kind-ofgirl kind of guy, but now I’m a free to get at every girl kind of guy,” Usher Raymond reveals on “Love Em All,” the opening track and pacesetter of “Versus,” his EP-sequel to March’s platinum-selling “Raymond v. Raymond.” Since 2004’s “Confessions,” the louche and libidinous crooner has mined the tumult of his personal life. Carefully revealing details but shrouding the specifics in a haze, Usher left fans guessing about his alleged infidelities with ex-flame Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas of

Little Big Town

Here and there Nov. 12-13 — Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; 888-624-6228 or www. chinookwindscasino.com.

among them — when they’re not all singing together in heavily compressed, anodyne harmony. Redolent of Southern gospel and feather-light countryrock, it’s a comfort zone for this group, employed consistently in the choruses, which can be arrestingly sharp, and often elsewhere. (The breakthrough 2005 hit, “Boondocks,” is the apogee of this tendency.) But piled on top of plangent guitars, the convergence can become grating, with all the emotion of archery, or some other sport that prizes accuracy above all. That’s true here especially on the songs written by the group (which make up a majority), save for “Little White Church,” which pops with acidic handclaps and needling

harmonies between Fairchild and Schlapman. (Fairchild also surprises with a brief run of echoing herself, in whisper, late in the song, which for this group qualifies as innovation.) But it takes an outside hand to fully untangle Little Big Town’s wires. “Shut Up Train,” written with Hillary Lindsey and Luke Laird, is the highlight here, letting Fairchild sink or swim while her bandmates chime in only for occasional support. Mostly, she swims. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

TEENAGE DREAM Capitol Records When Katy Perry’s not hard at work making incredibly vapid pop music — see her first hit, “I Kissed a Girl,” or this summer’s loathsome smash “California Gurls” — she can be a rather interesting artist. The 25-year-old sex bomb/pop starlet’s second album, “Teenage Dream,” mixes both the highs and lows of her artistic canon while also proving she does indeed have something to offer beyond her teen dream curves,

Fantasia BACK TO ME J Records Considering all her alleged-affair and attempted-overdose gossip, Fantasia’s new album, “Back to Me,” could easily be overlooked. However, her third effort is so strong, packed with potential hits beyond the already-hot “Bittersweet,” that it should serve as her pillar in the current storm. “Back to Me” is light-years ahead of her post-“American Idol” efforts — thanks to high profile help from Ne-Yo, who co-wrote the catchy, immediate anthem “Man of the House,” and even Ashford & Simpson, who work on the old-school “Collard Greens

and Cornbread.” But it really shines with Fantasia’s renewed focus on what she wants to sing about — her dramas and overcoming them. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

SE Bridgeford Ave.

THE REASON WHY Capitol Records Nashville “Rain on a Tin Roof” was buried deep on Julie Roberts’ magnificent 2004 debut album, the 10th track of 11, and maybe only the seventh best. But it had teeth as an ambivalent declaration of love for a fickle man and sung with a weighty sigh. A version of that song appears late on “The Reason Why,” Little Big Town’s fourth album. But where Roberts’ version was damp and lonely, this one is uncommitted, and almost comfortable, as if there’s not a single cloud looming in the sky. So it goes with Little Big Town, a country group that almost always chooses politesse over tension, letting its precise, sometimes clinical harmony stand in for feeling. The group comprises two women, Karen Fairchild and Kimberly Schlapman, and two men, Phillip Sweet and Jimi Westbrook, with vocals distributed in roughly equal measure

TLC, and his marriage to and subsequent divorce from Tameka Foster. Yet on “Versus,” the ambiguity is absent. Freshly single, Usher does everything but buy a waterbed and announce, “Mothers, lock up your daughters.”

“Lay You Down” channels ’90s-era Prince, with Usher unctuously cooing about wanting to be the “one who keeps your body warm.” On the Michael Jackson-referencing “Lingerie,” he rhapsodizes about sexy nighties. Occasionally, Usher flashes why he remains on R&B’s Alist. Bun B adds welcome grit on the Billy Ocean-homage “Get in My Car,” and Justin Bieber earns the Tiger Beat covers on the “Somebody to Love Remix.” Though the title of “Versus” may allude to his divorce proceedings, it holds a double meaning — Usher’s at his best in head-to-head competition. — Jeff Weiss, Los Angeles Times

which are lovingly displayed on the album’s cover. The standout track here is “Firework,” a Pat Benatar-worthy anthem that hits its crescendo in its gigantic chorus and is bigger than anything Perry has tackled to date. Elsewhere, she angrily and honestly dresses down a boyfriend’s drug problem on “Circle the Drain,” a surprisingly mature offering that has little in common with the idiotic, single-entendre embarrassment “Peacock” or lightweight schlock like “Hummingbird Heartbeat.” But with production from pop maestros Dr. Luke and Max Martin, “Teenage Dream” always goes down easy, especially when Perry recalls a wild night of debauchery on “Last Friday Night,” which works as a companion piece to Ke$ha’s similar “TiK ToK.” Vapid or not, these songs sound like hits, and that’s the only currency that really matters in pop music these days. — Adam Graham The Detroit News

SE Armour Rd

NOW OPEN!

SE Wilson Ave

541-306-3200 • 380 Bridgeford Blvd., Bend, OR 97701 (Suite c/ off Wilson or 9th Street)


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

restaurants

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

The patio seating at Thai Thai in the NorthWest Crossing neighborhood has Asian pop music playing from the main dining area inside.

Thai variations Thai Thai in NorthWest Crossing offers a mildly spiced alternative for Asian food lovers By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

I

f you like Thai food that doesn’t explode through your sinuses, food that is fresh and mildly spiced, then Thai Thai — a new Asian restaurant in NorthWest Crossing — might be just the kind of place you’re looking for. “We don’t make it spicy,” said Vivah Vachiraseneekul, the head chef and co-owner. “You have to ask for it.” It’s hard to find fault with a restaurant that is true to its intention, even though it’s my opinion that Thai food loses authenticity if it is not peppery hot. At Thai Thai, not only is the produce gardenfresh, the portions are generous and the service, while not sophisticated, is very friendly and willing to accommodate almost every request. The decor has been enhanced with the addition of Thai

artwork and photographs, and Asian pop music is piped even to the outside patio dining area. On June 1, Vachiraseneekul and partner Corey Bock took over the space originally built for the 38 Degrees Mediterranean Bistro. Although Thai Thai is the third new restaurant to fill the room since 38 Degrees closed in mid2008, they have high hopes of success for what they consider a neighborhood restaurant. “So far, we’re exceeding expectations,” said Bock, who also works in The Bulletin’s information technology department.

Regional variations Thai cuisine is distinguished by the use of ingredients that are spicy, sweet, sour and salty. And there are subtle regional variations. Continued next page

Thai Thai Location: 745 Mount Washington Drive, Suite 200, Bend Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Friday, noon to 9 p.m. Saturday Price range: Appetizers $5.50 to $7.50, main dishes $5.95 to $11.95; lunch specials $6.95 Credit cards: MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Many choices Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: Yes Reservations: Requested for large parties

Contact: 541-633-7222 or www.thaithaibend.com

Scorecard OVERALL: B+ Food: B+. Fresh ingredients served with mild spices and varied styles of preparation Service: A-. Unsophisticated but friendly and willing to accommodate requests Atmosphere: B. Thai art and photos enhance an oft-used restaurant space Value: A. Dinner prices are lower than at Thai restaurants in downtown Bend.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

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restaurants From previous page As the capital and largest city of Thailand, Bangkok — which was Vachiraseneekul’s home before she moved to the United States a decade ago — is a melting pot of these different elements: the hearty chilies of Chiang Mai in the north, the light sauces of Surin in the northeast, the coconut curries of Hat Yai in the south. I point this out because there may be differences in the way dishes are prepared at Thai Thai. Bock attributed this to a staff of cooks raised in various parts of Thailand. An example: Larb Gai, a minced chicken salad, is not served in the same manner in Bangkok as it is in the Laos border area of Thailand. In its metropolitan form, it can be a model lettuce wrap; diners may scoop the saute of chicken, onion and mint into a large green leaf, rolling it up and eating it with their fingers. When I ordered Larb Gai at Thai Thai, the same ingredients were served as a single large plate. Yet even though the presentation was not what I am used to, the flavor was much the same. The chicken — blended with white and green onions, carrots and cilantro, tossed in a light chile-lime sauce — was presented on a bed of iceberg lettuce and other salad greens, including arugula, spinach, red cabbage and mint. “The woman who likes to cook this dish is from northeastern Thailand,” Bock explained. “Vivah or another cook might not make it the same way.”

Ordering with stars When I first visited, my dining companion and I ordered everything “two stars” on a scale of five. We were disappointed to find virtually no piquancy to our curries and stir-fries. When I returned alone for lunch, I requested a “four-star” meal, yet one dish was notably spicier than the other. A tureen of soup achieved my desired level of spiciness; but the chicken salad, prepared by the cook from the northeast, was still much too mild, compelling me to add several dashes of chili oil. The soup — Tom Yum Goong, a hot-and-sour shrimp soup — was delicious. My bowl featured five large prawns in a tomato-based broth, with lots of sliced mushrooms, thick tomato wedges, onions and cilantro. It did seem to have an inordinate amount of lemon grass and bay leaves for a small bowl of soup; although they add marvelous flavor, they can’t be eaten and

Next week: Rockin’ Daves Bagel Bistro Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

could easily be strained out before serving.

Better than average Other than being too mild, our dinner at Thai Thai was a better-than-average experience. We started with vegetable spring rolls, the ingredients — rice noodles, lettuce, carrots, mint and basil leaves, and shrimp (tofu is an option) — wrapped in translucent rice paper. The dish was fresh and tasty, but we wished that the rolls had not been pre-cut into separate pieces. This is finger food, and we couldn’t keep the ingredients from falling out as we dipped the rolls into a traditional Thai peanut sauce. Satay skewers of grilled marinated chicken were tender and delicious. They were served with peanut sauce and a vinegary cucumber sauce. I enjoyed the papaya salad, made with julienned cuts of green (young) papaya fruit and carrots. It was served together with green beans, tomatoes, shrimp and crushed peanuts in a light lime-chili sauce. A portion of red curry, which we ordered with pork, was simmered in coconut milk together with kaffir lime leaves, red and green bell peppers, bamboo shoots and basil leaves. I would have been happy with fewer shoots and more other vegeta-

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Spicy basil eggplant with chicken is one of the dishes served at Thai Thai in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing. bles, such as spinach and mushrooms, but the curry added good flavor to a dish of steamed rice. So, too, did a plate of farmfresh, stir-fried green beans with tofu and carrots, presented in a mild garlic sauce. Catering to students and faculty at nearby Summit High School, Thai Thai has begun offering $5.50 weekday lunches to patrons who present school identification. The offer, said Bock, extends to Central Oregon Community College and other local schools. Keeping the process simple, student meals are for selected items, are served on paper plates, and are ordered and picked up at the counter. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES A corner deli and bakery plans to celebrate its grand opening in downtown Redmond during the city’s Harvest Block Festival

Oktoberfest Dinner Menu • September 20th–25th Join us for traditional German entrées and Oktoberfest beers!

www.pinetavern.com

from 6 to 9 tonight. Soup 2 Nuts 2 Go will specialize in gourmet sandwiches and designer salads, according to owner Rozy Arno. She said the deli, which is located in the Landaker Building at Southwest Sixth Street and Evergreen Avenue, will emphasize local ingredients and sustainable practices. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Friday. 457 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-5611. The Old Mill Brew Werks has announced an Oct. 1 opening in Bend’s Phoenix West Building, former location of the Old Mill Bistro and Phoenix Cafe. In addition to a range of happy-hour specials and hard-to-find beers, the restaurant’s owners are promising a range of weekday breakfasts — including quiches, pastries and granola parfaits — and lunches of soups, salads and sandwiches. 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670.

RECENT REVIEWS Krista’s at Widgi Creek (B+): A clientele composed mainly of

golfers and Widgi Creek residents supports this friendly bar and grill with a big outdoor deck next to the golf club’s putting green. The menu features salads, sandwiches and pizzas that are simple but well prepared. Open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (or later) every day. 18707 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3824449, www.widgi.com. (Seasonally closed Nov. 1 to March 1, depending on weather.) Cafe Alfresco (B+): Farmfresh produce is prepared with a variety of pastas, although the kitchen tends to be heavyhanded with seasoning. Service is friendly and efficient; prices are moderate. The renovated two-story house has a lovely secluded garden for al fresco dining. Open 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to close every day. 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541923-2599, www.facebook.com/ cafealfresco.redmond. Pine Tavern (B): A dinner with disappointing food and service was followed by a superb salmon-salad lunch on the lovely riverside patio, begging the question: Would the real Pine Tavern please stand up? The restaurant has been a Central Oregon institution since 1936. Brunch 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (summer only); lunch starting at 11:30 a.m. Monday to Saturday; dinner 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. every day. 967 N.W. Brooks St. (at Oregon Avenue), Bend; 541-382-5581, www.pinetavern.com. Rimrock Cafe (B+): The cafe at Bend’s High Desert Museum may not be gourmet, but the soups, salads and sandwiches served here are fresh, tasty and generous in portion. Seating is indoors and outdoors, with chipmunks always ready to beg for a patio meal. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day. 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, www.highdesertmuseum.org.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

fine arts

FEED ME!

Latest Cat Call show hopes to satisfy your craving for dark musical comedy By Eleanor Pierce • The Bulletin

A

plant appears mysteriously in an unexpected full eclipse of the sun. An unwitting flower shop employee buys it, and later discovers that the plant, a sort of cartoon Venus fly trap on steroids, thrives on blood. You know where this one is going. Wait, you don’t? Then you must’ve missed the campy musical comedy “Little Shop of Horrors,” starring Steve Martin and Rick Moranis. The 1986 film was based on an off-Broadway musical comedy of the same name by composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman. The musical was inspired by a low-budget 1960 film, which incidentally featured a young Jack Nicholson in a small, creepy part. Catch up on the story of the mysterious plant — or rediscover it — with the latest incarnation of the musical, which opens tonight at the Tower Theatre (see “If you go”). The play is the latest offering by Cat Call Productions, the theater startup that last year staged a well-received production of the dark musical “Cabaret.” The company, founded by Tifany and Kael LeGuyonne, has the stated goal of putting on one professionalquality, but locally-cast, production each year. Continued next page

Courtesy Michelle Mejaski / Cat Call Productions

“Little Shop of Horrors” stars (counter clockwise from middle front) Rick Johnson; Michael Stumpfig; Rebekah Sharpe; Blaine Cameron; Tara Johnson, Kahlia Aposhian and Jolie Miller. At front left are Jermaine Golden (lying down) and Evan Smith.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

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fine arts From previous page Again this year, director Deb De Grosse cast local choir teacher Rick Johnson in a starring role. Johnson plays Seymour, a nervous, socially-inept flower shop worker who’s hopelessly in love with his co-worker, the naive, blond bombshell Audrey, played by Rebekah Sharpe. The flower shop is located in a nasty part of town, the downand-out Skid Row. In one of the opening numbers, the catchy do-wop lament “Skid Row,” Seymour, Audrey and the riffraff that hang out in the street outside the shop lay out their tales of woe. This isn’t Petula Clark’s downtown: “Downtown, where the cabs don’t stop,” they sing. “Downtown, where the food is slop/ Downtown, where the hop-heads flop in the snow … Down on Skid Row.” Audrey’s so beaten down by her life, she doesn’t even defend herself against her abusive boyfriend, Orin Scrivello, played by newcomer Michael Stumpfig. Seymour was an orphan when the flower shop’s owner, Mr. Mushnik, took him in — but Mushnik, played by Blaine Cameron, is no altruist. “He took me in gave me shelter, a bed, crust of bread and a job,” Seymour sings. “Treats me like dirt and calls me a slob/Which I am, so I live downtown.” Selling flowers in a neighborhood like this isn’t easy. Things are so bad that Mushnik’s considering closing the shop. That’s when Audrey convinces Seymour to bring out a “strange and interesting plant” he’s been cultivating in secret. She thinks perhaps an exotic plant — Seymour calls his specimen Audrey II — might drum up some business. It does. Almost immediately, a passerby stops in to marvel at the plant. Before leaving, he figures he might as well pick up $100 of roses while he’s at it. Suddenly, the vitality of the plant becomes important; so far it’s been lackluster at best. After Mushnik and Audrey part for the evening, Seymour sings to the plant, begging to find out what the sagging thing wants. When Seymour accidentally pricks his finger, the inanimate plant comes to life, leaning what unmistakably look like lips close to the open wound. “A few drops won’t hurt,” Seymour says, letting his blood drip into Audrey II’s craw. “As long as you don’t make a habit of it.” If only. Before long, the rapidly growing Audrey II’s appetite logs a body count. At the same time Audrey II is

Two local artists picked for exhibitions

Courtesy Michelle Mejaski / Cat Call Productions

Tara Johnson, from left, Kahlia Aposhian and Jolie Miller play The Ronnettes in “Little Shop of Horrors.” The trio of street urchins alternately take part in the action of the play and comment on it.

If you go What: “Little Shop of Horrors,” by Cat Call Productions When: 8 p.m. tonight, Saturday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sept. 24-25; 4 p.m. Sunday Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $25 Contact: 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org

growing, and growing more infamous, all of Seymour’s dreams and fantasies seem to be coming true. After Audrey’s sadistic, motorcycle-riding dentist boyfriend goes missing, Audrey opens up to a relationship with Seymour. The shop is doing better than anyone ever imagined, and Mushnik wants to adopt Seymour. When Audrey II begins to speak to Seymour, he indicates that Seymour’s luck is no coincidence. Throughout the play, three “street urchins,” Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon, played by Jolie Miller, Tara Johnson and Kahlia Aposhian, alternately take part in the action and comment on it. “They’re really a Greek chorus,” De Grosse said. In ancient Greek plays, a chorus of a dozen or more characters would be used to offer commentary or summary to help audiences understand the action in a scene. Sometimes the chorus would act as the general population in a scene, while the main drama focused on the major characters, often gods and goddesses. This chorus is a singing and dancing machine, helping to propel the story forward with a mouthy, sassy delivery and plenty of skin — not to mention voice. The Ronnettes, as the producers

have taken to calling them, have some serious vocal talent. In fact, the strong singing throughout and the live music are a major strength of this production. The play has a visual personality, as well. The dingy skid row scenery contrasts with the eye-popping cast of characters. Audrey and The Ronnettes wear barely-there versions of 1960s fashion in comic book colors. Audrey II’s animation adds more to the sci-fi sensibility. The plant is vocalized by the bigvoiced Jermaine Golden (who also makes a few stage appearances) and the cast of puppets are animated by Evan Smith. “I really wanted to go with that four-color cartoon graphic novel sense to it,” De Grosse said. Also the head of Mountain View High School’s theater department, she was inspired in part by watching movies over her summer break. “I’d kind of gone on a retro, scifi bender this summer,” she said. Going with that theme, the production’s camp factor is pushed to the forefront. The gas-huffing dentist, for instance, is bizarrely hilarious. But chafing against the humor is a certain darkness, one that fans of the 1986 movie (which had a much different ending than the musical) may not remember. “It’s not the most cheery musical ever,” De Grosse said. “It’s really about greed. What would you be like if you got everything you wanted in the world? How would it change you?” Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@ bendbulletin.com.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

Local painters Sue Favinger Smith and Cindy Briggs were recently selected to have paintings in large regional exhbitions. Favinger Smith’s oil painting “Grasslands in Winter” has been accepted into the Oil Painters of America’s Western Regional Exhibition. According to a press release, the painting was selected from among hundreds of entries produced by painters in the Western U.S., Canada and Mexico. The exhibition will be held in Jackson, Wyo., from Oct. 6 through Nov. 20. Briggs’ watercolor painting “Fetta di Vita!” was accepted into the National Watercolor Society 90th Annual Exhibition, one of 100 paintings accepted. The show runs from Oct. 31 through Dec. 11 in San Pedro, Calif. Contacts: www.suesmith fineart.com and www.cindy briggs.com.

‘Nerve’ casting call set for next week The Bend Performing Arts Center will conduct casting

for the play “Nerve,” by Adam Symkowicz, from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at BendPAC (1155 S.W. Division St.). According to Brad Hills of BendPAC, the play is a dark comedy about falling into a relationship on the first date. “Elliot has never had an online date before … at least not one that showed up. Susan has had far too many but would prefer not to discuss them. When they meet in a bar one night, all their personality flaws are revealed, along with a puppet, some modern dance and a desperation that may or may not be love,” Hills said in a press release. One man and one woman of any ethnicity and between the ages of 25 and 45 will be cast. The auditions will be readings from the play, samples of which will be available at the theater or via e-mail by request. All members of the community are invited to audition. This play will be the first production staged in The Balcony Scene, the intimate lobby area of the BendPAC. Contact: 541-977-5677 or brad@innovationtw.org. — Eleanor Pierce


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fine arts

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LLE

AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring works by children from the J Bar J Ranch; through September; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring works by the station’s summer art students; through September; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Shine,” solar printmaking and small paintings by local artists; through Sept. 24; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. AZURA STUDIO: Featuring acrylic paintings by Charles H. Chamberlain; through September; 856 N.W. Bond St., Unit 3, Bend; 541-388-1846. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer ; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Some Like It Hot”; through Nov. 1; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BICA GALLERY: The Bend Independent Contemporary Art Gallery features “Painted,” works by Scott Conary and Lisa Wachs; through Sept. 25; wine events offered every Saturday from 3-5 p.m.; 2748 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 130, Bend; 541-788-4623 or www.bicagallery.com. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-

1299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. EASTLAKE FRAMING: Featuring photography by the Cascade Camera Club; through September; 1335 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-389-3770. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Ann Bullwinkel, Ellen Dittebrandt, Joanne Donaca and Gary Vincent; through Sept. 27; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT FRAMEWORKS!: Featuring “Small Greetings,” greeting cards and small works by several artists; through September; 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertframeworks.com. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF BEND: Featuring “6XA6,” fine-art block prints, etchings and monoprints by six artists; through Sept. 28; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF SISTERS: Featuring works by Kimry Jelen; through September; 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “James B. Thompson: The Vanishing Landscape,” paintings and prints of the American West; through Jan. 3; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com.

CEN

ART EXHIBITS

O L O F BA

CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL of BALLET

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin file photo

A chain art picture, done by artists Euijin Gray, Allison Murphy, Briana Murphy, Regan Goodrich and Ashley Doty, will be on display at Thump Coffee through September. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Gemstones,” acrylic paintings by Karen Bandy; through September; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Randi Julianus;

Directors: Zygmunt Sawiel Sarah Chase Sawiel

through September; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “In Nature’s Light,” works by Lindsay Scott; through September; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. OREGON YERBA MATE: Featuring mixed-media collage and fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; through

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November; 528 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-504-8870. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring works by member artists; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring oil paintings by Carol Armstrong; through Oct. 1; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring “My Oregon,” paintings of the Oregon Territory; through September; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www.riverbendfineartgallery.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring works by the painting group “Wooden Walls”; through September; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “New Directions,” pastels by Laura Jo Sherman; through Sept. 25; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “The Dog Show,” canine imagery; through Sept. 24; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the “97707 Art Exhibit,” works by property owners and residents of the 97707 zip code; through Oct. 29; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring works by Deborah DeWit, Greg Wilbur and Alice Van Leunen; through Oct. 17; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December ; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www. wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Yallah! Artivism for Peace,” a skateboarding and street art fundraisier for TheBedouins.org; through September; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Of Earth & Sky,” oil paintings by Janice Druian and monoprints and ceramics by Nancy Dasen; through September; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Jack Lake Trailhead

Fall River Fish Hatchery

F

rom the trailhead, hikers can check out lush forests and more desolate areas damaged by the

2003 B&B Complex fire. Follow the Canyon Creek Trail to Trail No. 4010 then Trail No. 4014, also known as the Old Summit Trail, for a 5-mile loop. Be prepared to be awed by up-close views of Three Fingered Jack. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: From Sisters, take U.S. Highway 20 west. Turn right onto Forest Road 14, toward Camp Sherman. When the road comes to a Y, stay to the left, which is Forest Road 1419. After about two miles, when the road curves right into Camp Sherman, stay straight onto Forest Road 1420. After about a mile, there will be signs for a detour leading left. Follow the detour or do what we did and stay straight on 1420 for another mile or so, then turn left onto the unpaved Forest

Road 1425. After about 1.5 miles, road 1425 ends. Turn left onto Forest Road 12, which is paved. After about 100 yards, make your first right turn onto another paved road, Forest Road 1230. Follow signs to Jack Lake Trailhead; the last five miles or so are rough. Difficulty: Easy to moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass required, or $5 day-use pass. There is no pay box at the trailhead, so be sure to grab your pass in town. Contact: 541-383-5300

Betsy Q. Cliff / The Bulletin file photo

A fisherman plies the water near the Fall River Fish Hatchery.

encircles fish ponds and several private residences. Fishing near the

1420 1425

facility. — Bulletin staff

If you go Fall River Fish Hatchery

LL FA

Fall River Falls

Fall River headwater springs

La Pine State Recreation Area

12

Camp a am Sherman m

1217

To Bend

1210

1419

1216

.

12

n Rd ingto

42

R RIVE

Deschutes National Forest

Vandevert Rd.

Deschutes River South Century Dr.

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

Jack Lake Trailhead

To Salem, Eugene 97

20

Hunt

Getting there: From Bend, drive south on U.S. Highway 97. Exit at Vandervert Road, heading west. Turn left at South Century Drive and follow as it winds west. Turn left into hatchery. Cost: Free Contact: 541-593-1510

1230

1234

hatchery can yield decent-size rainbow trout, most of which are grown at the

Suttle Lake

126

Little Deschutes River

Blue Lake

Road 12 temporarily closed to through traffic

14

Black Butte

14 12

MILES

To La Pine Greg Cross / The Bulletin

s River

14

Metoliu

F

all River Fish Hatchery is a 40-acre site with a sprawling lawn, which

M T. JEFFERSON WILDERNESS

0

1

2

126

To Sisters 20

Greg Cross / The Bulletin


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER THE BULLETIN 17, 2010 • FRIDA

this w KENDAMA TOURNAMENT

MCMENAMINS OKTO

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

What: Contestants compete in the ball-and-cup game, in divisions determined by expertise. Forrest Baney, from left, Noah Weedman and Caleb Campbell play kendama. When: 1 p.m.

Where: Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend Cost: $5 for beginner through advanced divisions, $2 novice division Contact: 541-633-7205

RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE

TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY What: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models. Halie Clark, right, and Andy Babiracki wait outside an RV while their parents shop at the 2008 show. When: 9 a.m. today and Saturday, 10

a.m. Sunday Where: Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond Cost: Free Contact: 541-948-3626

TODAY

SATURDAY

RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Terri Daniel reads from her book “Embracing Death: A New Look at Grief, Gratitude and God”; free; 4-7 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-549-4004. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Debra Gwartney talks about her book “Live Through This”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. WILLIE NELSON: The prolific countryfolk musician performs, with Ryan Bingham and the Dead Horses; $46 or $79 in advance, $48 or $83 day of show, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www. bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page 3) “CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a man-eating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 12)

Sept. 18 COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Breakfast accompanied by live music from Lindy Gravelle and a military keynote speaker; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Council on Aging RSVP program; $5; 8:30-10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-8817. TEDDY BEAR POKER RUN: Ride to area hospitals and deliver teddy bears for children; followed by a raffle and poker run that ends at Coyote Ranch in Redmond; proceeds benefit Central Oregon ABATE; $5 per hand with teddy bear, $10 per hand without; 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. ride; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-923-3809 or 541-815-3600. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See a variety of makes and models, including motorcycles; with a salute to veterans and a canned food drive to benefit St. Vincent de Paul; free for spectators; 9 a.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-9978 or www.ccrodders.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Glen Gives; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Awbrey Glen parking lot, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541-318-8805. PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food, music and more; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-

What: Featuring food, beer and live music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, pictured, Boxcar String Band and High Five Polka. When: All day, music starts at 1 p.m. Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. 9663 or www.projectconnectco.org. RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626. TREE PLANTING: Plant trees in Camp Polk Meadow, with an introduction to the land presented by the Deschutes Land Trust; meet at the lodge; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-389-8359 or www.wanderlusttours.com. RUN FOR CONGO WOMEN: Walk from the falls to the Old Mill District; proceeds benefit Women for Women International; donations accepted; 9:30 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541330-1621, patricia@bendbroadband. com or http://runforcongowomen.org. SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Event includes arts, crafts, food, a silent auction and more; auction proceeds benefit the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-8905. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www. bendfallfestival.com. (Story, Page 20)

BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Three Quarters Short, Raven Alan St. John, Maresa and Co. and others, food, raffles, a silent auction, kidney donor information and more; proceeds benefit John Whitehurst, who has kidney failure; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-788-6010 or WesternRecreation@live.com. HARVEST CELEBRATION: With historic activities and games, live music, vendors and more; noon4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL: With games, a clown, hayrides, hot dogs and more; free; 1-3 p.m.; Sisters Church of the Nazarene, 67130 Harrington Loop; 541-389-8960. KENDAMA TOURNAMENT: Contestants compete in the ball-and-cup game, in divisions determined by expertise; $5 for beginner through advanced divisions, $2 novice division; 1 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-633-7205. HALFWAY TO ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Featuring live music by Eric Tollefson and The World’s Greatest Lovers and the Tune Dawgs, and Irish dancers; free; 2:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. (Story, Page 5) LATIN AMERICAN GUITAR CONCERT: Rich Hurdle performs a selection of music from Latin America to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1034 or

www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DIAMONDS & DUST: Annual event includes dinner, live music, live and silent auctions, and more; proceeds benefit Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center; $60; 5 p.m.; Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center, 60575 Billadeau Road, Bend; 541318-7400 or www.healingreins.org. HARVEST FESTIVAL DINNER: Featuring barbecue and potatoes, live music and historical presentations by Talking Tombstones actors; event will take place across from the park; $25; 5:30-9 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Smokin’ Ashes play the Salt City Shakers; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-3301183 or www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Debra Gwartney talks about her book “Live Through This”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. NORSEMAN CHOIR: The Eugenebased Scandinavian choir performs; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-390-2821. PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541633-6804. (Story, Page 4)


AY, SEPTEMBER THE BULLETIN 17, 2010 • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

week

PAGE 17

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

BERFEST

POLO IN THE COUNTRY

SUNDAY

PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES

WEDNESDAY School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com

“LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a man-eating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SUNDAY Sept. 19 MCMENAMINS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring food, beer and live music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Boxcar String Band and High Five Polka; free; all day, music starts at 1 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 5) V