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Extremists send their message to Mideast negotiators

STUDYING COLLIER GLACIER

Secrets in the OSU grad student Cody Beedlow leads a team of researchers collecting data on the Cascades glacier, in hopes of finding out why it’s shrinking

ICE

Deschutes Sheriff’s Office gets a $450K makeover

Warring factions rally around a common goal: sinking the talks

Remodel will provide space for detectives, offices for commanders

By Edmund Sanders

By Erin Golden

Los Angeles Times

The Bulletin

HEBRON, West Bank — The fate of the U.S.-sponsored peace talks launched Thursday in Washington could hinge in part on how things play out in this hotly disputed West Bank city, where extremists on opposite sides suddenly find they share a common purpose: to sabotage the process. The militant PalestinInside ian movement • As talks Hamas, which begin, hasn’t openly Clinton urges attacked West leaders to Bank settlers seek “future in about two of peace,” years, renewed its campaign Page A3 of violence this week with two drive-by shootings. It claimed responsibility for killing four settlers near Hebron on Tuesday and injuring two others a day later near Ramallah. Jewish settlers around Hebron responded by throwing rocks at Palestinians and setting fire to a field. On Thursday, they demonstrated their contempt for what they termed the “fancy ceremonies” in Washington by rolling out bulldozers and cement mixers to resume construction in defiance of Israel’s 10-month moratorium. The developments serve as a reminder that before Israeli and Palestinians negotiators can tackle big-picture issues such as the borders of a Palestinian state, the status of Jerusalem and refugees, the peace process will have to survive some daunting short-term challenges. See Mideast / A3

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has begun a $450,000 remodel project that will allow the office to take over space formerly used by other agencies. This week, the Deschutes County Commission gave its stamp of approval to a contract between the Sheriff’s Office and Kirby Nagelhout Construction. The work will be focused on a 6,404-square-foot area on the second floor of the facility on Highway 20 in north Bend, which until recently had been occupied by Deschutes County 911 and the FBI. Capt. Marc Mills said the Sheriff’s Office moved into the building in 1996, and within a few years, it was also home to the county’s 911 dispatch center and the local FBI office. Over time, the Sheriff’s Office expanded and outgrew its section of the building, forcing the Detectives Division to move to another facility across town, near the courthouse. Mills said the distance has created some problems for his staff, though the location has allowed detectives to provide help to courthouse staff on a few occasions and allowed them to work closely with the District Attorney’s Office, located down the street. See Remodel / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE HURRICANE: Eastern Seaboard braces as Earl hits N. Carolina, Page A3

INDEX Abby

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Business

B1-6

Calendar

E3

Local Movies Obituaries

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F1-8

Oregon

C3

E4-5

Science

A2

Crossword E5, F2

Sports

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Editorial

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B4-5

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E5

TV listings

E2

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 246, 70 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

Glaciers of North and Middle Sister Shown below are rough outlines of the glaciers flanking North and Middle Sister, including Collier Glacier, where Oregon State University researchers conducted research on Saturday. Based on a 1994 Geo-Graphics Three Sisters Wilderness Map, the outlines are overlayed on a 2005 satellite photo. Research being conducted by OSU aims to better measure the shrinking glaciers of the Cascades.

Collier Cone 7,534 ft.

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Monday morning, Cody Beedlow woke up in a familiar place

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Little Brother

North Sister

Collier Glacier

— 8,000 feet up on Oregon’s largest glacier, nestled in a tent covered with fresh-fallen snow and surrounded by scientific instruments. Beedlow, a 28-year-old native of Corvallis and a graduate student at Oregon State University, has been making the 8- to 9-mile trek up to Collier Glacier, nestled between North Sister and South Sister, nearly every month for the last two years as part of an extended project to find out more about why the glacier is shrinking. There’s no question Collier Glacier has been getting smaller over the last 100 years or so. Pictures taken by the Mazamas mountaineering club in the 1920s show the glacier more than a mile farther down the slope than it extends today. Pictures taken

Sisters

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10,094 ft. Thayer Glacier

North Sister

20

Middle Sister

Renfrew Glacier

Middle Sister 10,053 ft.

Hayden Glacier

South Sister

Bend

Diller Glacier

THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS

Mount Bachelor

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

since then have produced what Beedlow describes as a “time-lapse photography” record of the glacier retreating toward higher altitude. Getting an answer about why the glacier is shrinking is more complicated. Is it melting at lower altitudes as a result of overly warm summers? Or is because of in-

adequate snowfall in winter, reducing the ice accumulation that builds up at higher altitudes and creeps downhill over time? And how do temperature, wind, humidity, solar radiation and other variables factor in to what’s happening in both summer and winter? See Glacier / A4

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BERLIN — When a German banker and former government official spoke publicly here about a “Jewish gene,” attacked Islam as a source of violence and stunted development, and espoused genetic theories that evoked the fright of the Nazi past, the political leadership here quickly condemned him as racist and called for him to be fired.

But Thilo Sarrazin has not emerged as the marginalized hate-monger the initial condemnation suggested. Instead, he has set off a painful public discussion that highlights one of the nation’s most vexing challenges: How to overcome what is widely seen as a failed immigration policy that has done little to support and integrate the nearly 20 percent of the population who have an immigrant background. See Germany / A5

Measures of progress reevaluated Los Angeles Times

Germany wrestles with its own immigration debate New York Times News Service

EDUCATION

By Jason Song, Jason Felch and Doug Smith

On the Web Explore the Collier Glacier on Google Earth: http://bit.ly/cUVrEn

By Michael Slackman

“We had (the remodel) budgeted for last year, and it was made possible from savings in prior years’ budgets.” — Jim Ross, Sheriff’s Office business manager

46

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Comics

Family

Courtesy Oregon Historical Society

In this historical photo, taken from atop Little Brother (marked B on the map) circa 1910, the glacier is shown reaching more than a mile farther than it does today.

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Classified

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Submitted photo

Taken facing south from the south flank of Collier Cone (marked A on the map below) on Saturday, this photo shows the Collier Glacier at its smallest, in late summer. The glacier, shown here just below the peak near the center of the image, is shown in historical photos reaching down at least to the glacial lake in the foreground.

A street scene in the Turkish enclave of Berlin, where a debate on immigration policy is under way. Gordon Welters New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — Five families from across the San Fernando Valley set up camp for three nights by the front door of Wilbur Avenue Elementary School in 2009, intent on getting a spot for their children in one of the best-regarded schools in Los Angeles. Others hired someone to hold their place in line. This spring, the school in affluent Tarzana began using a lottery for applicants from outside the neighborhood. Within hours, more than a dozen children were on the list. What these determined families could not have known is that Wilbur’s record was among the worst in L.A. for boosting student performance in math and English. See Education / A5


A2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Think the answer’s clear? The doctor says: Look again Dr. Donald Redelmeier finds surprising truths in quirky topics

Los Angeles Times

By Katie Hafner New York Times News Service

Presidential elections can be fatal. Win an Academy Award and you’re likely to live longer than had you been a runner-up. Interview for medical school on a rainy day, and your chances of being selected could fall. Such are some of the surprising findings of Dr. Donald Redelmeier, a physician-researcher and perhaps the leading debunker of preconceived notions in the medical world. In his 20 years as a researcher, first at Stanford University and now at the University of Toronto, Redelmeier, 50, has applied scientific rigor to topics that in lesser hands might have been dismissed as quirky and iconoclastic. In doing so, his work has shattered myths and revealed some deep truths about the predictors of longevity, the organization of health care and the workings of the medical mind. “He’ll go totally against intuition, and come up with a beautiful finding,” said Eldar Shafir, a professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University who has worked with Redelmeier on research into medical decision making. Redelmeier was the first to study cell phones and automobile crashes. A paper he published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 1997 concluded that talking on a cell phone while driving was as dangerous as driving while intoxicated. His collaborator, Robert Tibshirani, a statistician at Stanford, said the paper “is likely to dwarf all of my other work in statistics, in terms of its direct impact on public health.”

Crash studies As an internist who works at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto, Canada’s largest trauma center, Redelmeier sees a large number of patients in the aftermath of crashes. As a result, one of his abiding preoccupations is with vehicle crashes. He found that about 25 more people die in crashes on U.S. presidential Election Days than the norm, which he attributes to increased traffic, rushed drivers and unfamiliar routes. He also discovered a 41 percent relative increase in fatalities on Super Bowl Sunday, which he attributed to a combination of fatigue, distraction and alcohol. After publication of the findings on the Super Bowl, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration embarked on a campaign with the slogan “Fans don’t let fans drink and drive.” In preparation for a recent interview in his modest office in the sprawling hospital complex, Redelmeier had written on an index card some of his homespun philosophies. “Life is a marathon, not a sprint,” he read, adding, “A great deal of mischief occurs when people are in a rush.” To that end, he studied the psychology around changing lanes in traffic. In an article published in Nature in 1999, Redelmeier and Tibshirani found that while cars in the other lane sometimes appear to be moving faster, they are not. “Every driver on average thinks he’s in the wrong lane,” Redelmeier said. “You think more cars are passing you when you’re actually passing them just as quickly. Still, you make a lane change where the benefits are illusory and not real.” Meanwhile, changing lanes increases the chances of collision about threefold. Often he works from a hunch. In the Canadian Medical Association Journal in December, Redelmeier examined University of Toronto medical school admission interview reports from 2004 to 2009. After correlating the interview scores with weather archives, he determined that candidates who interviewed on foul-weather days received ratings lower than candi-

Activity can offset genetic tendency to obesity, study finds

Sami Siva / New York Times News Service

In 20 years as a physician-researcher, Dr. Donald Redelmeier has released findings that point to an increase in fatal crashes on U.S. presidential Election Days and Academy Award winners living an average of three years longer than the runners-up. dates who visited on sunny days. In many cases, the difference was significant enough to influence acceptance. Redelmeier’s work on longevity began 10 years ago, when he was watching the Academy Awards and noticed that the celebrities on stage “don’t look anything like the patients I see in clinic,” he said. “It’s not just the makeup and the plastic surgery and wardrobe. It’s the way they move; it’s their gestures. They seem so much more vivacious. It seemed so much more than skin deep and might go all the way to longevity.” His findings: Academy Award winners live an average of three years longer than the runnersup. A potential explanation could be an added measure of scrutiny, a public expectation of healthier living. Redelmeier isn’t one to forget about his past research. With the Academy Award study, for instance, he regularly updates the database. “It’s important for him to know this wasn’t some statistical blip we happened to stumble across,” said Sheldon Singh, a cardiologist at Sunnybrook Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Toronto who co-wrote the Academy Awards paper. And in a paper coming out in the September issue of Chance, a statistics journal, Redelmeier and Tibshirani show that on Elec-

tion Day 2008, more fatalities occurred than on two control days, the Tuesdays before and after the election. This paper is a follow-up to an earlier one published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. “Part of the satisfaction for Don is knowing the results stand the test of time,” Singh said.

A different approach Redelmeier’s unusual approach goes hand in hand with some pronounced personality quirks. His e-mails, which are legendary among their recipients, are written as lists, with a number assigned to each thought. Redelmeier does this, he said, to focus on the content of a message rather than get distracted by grammar, punctuation and syntax. “I remember the first time I got one, I was a little offended,” Singh said. “I’d never gotten an e-mail not written in a paragraphed format. Yet he addressed everything I needed to know.” Redelmeier takes the results of his research seriously. He rides his bike to work, and when he does drive, he resists “small temptations to change lanes.” Not everyone has unconditional admiration for Redelmeier’s work. Tibshirani, for instance, has reservations about some of Redelmeier’s choices, and declined to collaborate on the Academy Awards study.

Another Redelmeier philosophical pearl is “Do not get trapped into prior thoughts. It’s perfectly OK to change your mind as you learn more.” In patient care, he said, he frequently does just that. Tibshirani said he once accompanied Redelmeier on rounds at the hospital. “I watched him talk to patients, and they love him,” he recounted. While Redelmeier enjoys his patient interactions, he appears incapable of resisting the lure of a good research topic. Several years ago, he compared medical school class presidents to a control group of others in the class and found that the presidents died an average 2.5 years earlier than those in the control group. The type who would run for class president, he concluded in the resulting paper, “may also be the type who fails to look after their health or is otherwise prone to early mortality.” The idea came to him one day in a hallway at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine, where he had stopped to admire a century’s worth of class photos showing mostly white men. “Some people might say, ‘What an old boys’ network,’” Redelmeier said. “But I thought, ‘My goodness, what a homogeneous population, akin to identical white mice, which thereby controls for all sorts of differences.’” Thus was born another Redelmeier classic.

LOS ANGELES — Even people with a strong genetic predisposition to obesity can offset their risk of being overweight by being physically active, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal PLoS Medicine. British researchers examined the effect of 12 genetic variants associated with a higher risk of obesity among 20,430 people in the U.K. Researchers calculated a genetic predisposition score for each volunteer that ranged from 0 to 24, representing the number of obesity-related variants they had inherited from their parents. (Most of the scores were between 10 and 13). The volunteers also reported their levels of physical activity. Armed with that information, the researchers determined that each DNA variant carried a 16 percent increased risk of obesity among those who were sedentary. But for people who got at least one hour of physical activity per day, the increased risk per variant was only 10 percent — a reduction of 40 percent. In terms of actual weight gain, each obesity-related gene variant in inactive volunteers was associated with an additional 1.3 pounds in body mass for someone about 5 feet 6 inches tall. In people who exercised, the extra body mass was 0.8 pounds, according to the report. Previous studies have shown that physical activity can offset the effect of genetics, but most have focused on only a single gene known as FTO (short for fat mass and obesity). But many more DNA variants have been linked to obesity in the last three years, said Ruth Loos, program leader at Cambridge University’s Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and the study’s senior author. Gil Atzmon, a geneticist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, said the findings show DNA doesn’t necessarily mean destiny. “The message from this is if you have a genetic predisposition for some things, you can change your lifestyle and contribute to better health,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

TS  MIDEAST TALKS

OIL RIG FIRE CAUSES ANXIETY, BUT NO SPILL

Clinton calls on leaders to work for a ‘future of peace’

QUALITY FOR LESS!

By Scott Wilson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration formally inaugurated its foray into Middle East peacemaking on Thursday, bringing together the Israeli and Palestinian leaders for face-to-face talks and securing their pledge to meet every two weeks to pursue an end to the decades-old conflict. At a State Department ceremony, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton evoked a history of failed efforts to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, warning that these negotiations will be no easier. Her husband’s Democratic administration and that of Jimmy Carter invested extensive time and prestige to bring about an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, as did Republicans George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. Although some came close, none succeeded. Clinton encouraged Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas, who flanked her at the head of a large, U-shaped table, to work through the “sabotage” and other challenges that will probably batter the talks in the year ahead.

Aiming too high? Some of Israel’s veteran peace process practitioners say the latest talks should aim for an interim solution, because the gaps between the Israeli and Palestinian positions are too wide. “We should have a Plan B,” said Oded Eran, director of the Institute for National Security Studies at Tel Aviv University. “If you do not accept the status quo — which I do not — and you cannot obtain an agreement on all the core issues, then the alternative is to go for a partial solution, while keeping the ultimate political objectives of both sides in mind.” — New York Times News Service

“By being here today, you each have taken an important step toward freeing your peoples from the shackles of a history we cannot change and moving toward a future of peace and dignity that only you can create,” Clinton said.

Charles Dharapak / The Associated Press

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, right, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hosts the relaunch of direct negotiations Thursday at the State Department in Washington.

Mideast Continued from A1 Among them are the Sept. 26 expiration of Israel’s construction moratorium and a spike in Palestinian violence. Hebron, home to more than 150,000 Palestinians and 400 Jewish settlers, is often at the center of the storm, and it is once again. Residents are bracing themselves and warn that violence could spread to other parts of the West Bank. “The talks have renewed the cycle of violence,” said Khaled Amayreh, a Palestinian journalist and analyst. “Things are heating up.” The next month will test the resolve of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, analysts say. Friction and violence at the launch of peace talks is nothing new. The question is whether the leaders will press ahead despite provocations or use them as justification to walk away. The two leaders agreed in their first direct talks on Thursday to meet again in the Middle East in two weeks, and then to reconvene roughly every two weeks thereafter. U.S. envoy George Mitchell cited a “constructive and positive mood” in the meeting. However, the unresolved conflicts also were apparent. Netanyahu raised the attacks on Israelis in the West Bank this week. Abbas called on Israel to end all settlement activity. “In every conflict, the closer the sides have gotten to an agreement, the more the peace spoilers started coming out of the woodwork,” said professor Tamar Hermann, senior fellow at the Israel Democracy Institute, a research group. “But this is a transitional phase and if we give in to it, we will miss the opportunity.” The settlement construction issue could offer the first glimpse of how committed both sides are to talks. Netanyahu has resisted Palestinian demands to extend the freeze, while Abbas has threatened to quit talks unless

the freeze continues. Both men are under tremendous domestic pressure to stick to their positions, and equally strong pressure from the U.S. and international community to bend. Analysts have said that the two sides need to find a way to finesse the issue in coming weeks so they can move on to other, equally weighty topics. Netanyahu’s position will demonstrate how serious his intentions are, wrote Eitan Haber, Israeli analyst and former adviser to assassinated Prime Minister Yitzak Rabin, on the Ynet news site Thursday. “Americans and Palestinians will view the freeze as a test case.” At the same time, if Netanyahu refuses to budge, Abbas will face a similar dilemma over whether to reverse his stance or abandon what many experts believe could be the last round of negotiations for some time. Deadly attacks against Israeli settlers upped the ante for both men. Netanyahu rejected immediate calls for him to quit talks and return home. David Wilder, spokesman of the Jewish Community in Hebron, blasted the U.S.-brokered peace process as an attempt to “sink Israel. ... These attacks cannot continue, and the only way to stop them is to stop acquiescing to Obama and the terrorists who want to destroy us.” The killings also hardened the resolve of many Israelis against pressure to extend the construction moratorium, a move they argue could now be seen as rewarding terrorism. For Abbas, the killings meant being forced onto the defensive just as negotiations began. They bolstered Netanyahu’s demand that talks begin on the issue of security, rather than on borders or settlements, which are Palestinian priorities. Hamas leaders promised the violence would only continue, calling the first two attacks the start of a “series of operations” to be carried out by its militant wing.

Gerald Herbert / The Associated Press

Boats spray water on an oil and gas platform that caught fire in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana on Thursday, forcing its 13 crew members overboard and sending waves of anxiety along a coast that has just begun to recover from the Deepwater Horizon disaster. But no oil spilled, and by early evening the workers had all been rescued, and the fire had been put out.

Hurricane Earl smacks North Carolina By Mike Baker The Associated Press

BUXTON, N.C. — The last ferry left for the mainland and coastal residents hunkered down at home as Hurricane Earl closed in with 105 mph winds Thursday on North Carolina’s dangerously exposed Outer Banks, the first and perhaps most destructive stop on the storm’s projected journey up the Eastern Seaboard. The hurricane’s squalls began to lash the long ribbon of barrier islands Thursday night. Gusts above 40 mph made signs shake and the heavy rain fall sideways in Buxton, the southeastern-

most tip of the Outer Banks. Hurricane Earl’s winds were slowing, from 140 mph early Thursday to 105 mph, Category 2 strength, by late Thursday. But forecasters warned that it remained powerful, with hurricane-force winds of 74 mph or more extending 70 miles from its center, and tropical stormforce winds of at least 35 mph reaching more than 200 miles out. “It’s interesting to me to just see what Mother Nature can do,” said Jay Lopez, 36, of Frisco, as the wind howled through Buxton. National Weather Service

meteorologist Hal Austin said the eye of the hurricane was expected to get as close as 55 miles east of the Outer Banks by about 2 a.m. today.

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A4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Higher health insurance costs being passed on to workers New York Times News Service As health care costs continue their relentless climb, companies are increasingly passing on higher premium costs to workers. The shift is occurring, policy analysts and others say, as employers feel more pressure from the weak economy and the threat of even more expensive coverage under the new health care law. In contrast to past practices of absorbing higher prices, companies chose this year to keep their costs the same by passing the entire increase in premiums for family coverage onto their workers, according to a survey released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit research group. Workers’ share

Remodel Continued from A1 “It’s been difficult for our patrol deputies to coordinate and collaborate closely,” he said. “And downtown parking has been an issue since we got there.” In addition to workspace for the 10 full-time detectives and two volunteers who work with them, the renovated space at the Sheriff’s Office will include new offices for Sheriff Larry Blanton and members of his command staff. Mills said there will also be more room for human resources and finance records. Officials have been planning the remodel for some time, after receiving word that both 911 and the FBI wanted to move on. The FBI relocated to another office in southwest Bend in June, and the 911 dispatch center relocated to a new building on Poe Sholes Drive, not far from the Sheriff’s Office, last month. Jim Ross, business manager for the Sheriff’s Office, said the money for the project was set aside in the sheriff’s services section of the budget, which also covers administrative expenses. The money in that fund comes from two taxing districts. District

of the cost of a family policy jumped an average of 14 percent, an increase of about $500 a year. The cost of a policy rose just 3 percent, to an average of $13,770. Workers are now paying nearly $4,000 for family coverage, according to the survey, and their costs have increased much faster than those of employers. Since 2005, while wages increased just 18 percent, workers’ contributions to premiums have jumped 47 percent, almost twice as fast as the rise in the policy’s overall cost. “The long-term trend is pretty clear,” said Drew Altman, the chief executive of the Kaiser foundation. “Insurance is getting stingier and less comprehensive.”

1 is the special taxing district that covers the entire county and helps fund jail, search and rescue operations, and courthouse security. District 2 is funded by taxpayers in areas outside of Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Sunriver and Black Butte Ranch. Patrol, jail and work center operations are funded out of separate parts of the budget. Ross said the Sheriff’s Office has been able to save money and build up its contingency fund over the last few years. Officials aim to keep enough in reserve to fund two months of operations — about 16 percent of the total operating budget. The contingency fund is at about $5.6 million for the current fiscal year, which is about 18 percent of the total budget. “We had (the remodel) budgeted for last year, and it was made possible from savings in prior years’ budgets,” Ross said. Mills said the Sheriff’s Office is using inmate crews to help with some of the work, mostly hauling materials out of the building. He said the project should be wrapped up by December. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

C OV ER S T OR I ES “That’s the nature of this kind of research — you’re kind of at the mercy of the mountain. I get turned back a lot. There’s been a lot of trips I’ve tried to make out there and the mountain just says no, whether it’s scary avalanche conditions or too much snow or monsoon-like rain.” — Cody Beedlow

Glacier Continued from A1 The answers could help Beedlow develop a formula that can predict the advance and retreat of glaciers, and the glacial runoff that feeds streams and irrigation systems. Beedlow’s project is a continuation of work began by Peter Clark, a professor of geosciences at OSU and Beedlow’s adviser. Along with a prior graduate student, Clark made several trips to Collier Glacier between 1989 and 1994, but his self-admitted lack of mountaineering skills and the unavailability of modern instruments limited what he could do. In the years since then, little research has been conducted on the glacier. “It kind of fizzled because of logistical issues; he never had any good winter measurements up there,” Beedlow said. “He wasn’t able to get up there — he’s not a skier, so he tried dogsleds, cross-country skis, snowshoes, and really was not very successful at trying to obtain winter balance measurements.”

Mountaineering pro Clark said Beedlow is far better prepared for the challenges of working in an alpine environment than he was 20 years ago. “The dogsled attempt might have worked if we’d had decent snow, but it was a very poor snow year, so the conditions were not good for sledding. We made two miles in one day,” Clark said. “We did get in once on snowshoes, but then a fierce storm came in, and we had to hightail it out of there. Bottom line is, you need to be an experienced mountaineer such as Cody is.”

Submitted photo

Along with four assistants, Beedlow spent three days and three nights on the glacier last weekend, measuring snow depths and densities, mapping the boundaries of the ice, and downloading a month’s worth of weather data from a weather station he’s installed on the mountain. Beedlow’s weather station, built in his garage and carried in piece by piece in backpacks, would have been unimaginable when Clark was working on the glacier. Powered by a lithium polymer battery about the size of a Hershey bar — a type originally put to use in radio-controlled cars

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and planes, but increasingly seen in laptop computers — the weather station can run for about four months, recording reams of weather data on flash drives. Snow measurements are conducted in cruder fashion, with marked PVC pipes that Beedlow has driven into the ice. Although Beedlow won’t be able to draw any conclusions until later this fall, a cool spring and summer means there’s a good chance the glacier will add mass this year. Even before the surprise snowstorm Monday morning, there was a lot more snow still on the glacier through the summer this year than last summer.

“We got really good storms in April and May, June was very cold, almost winter/springlike, and that allowed snow to stick on the surface of the glacier a bit longer,” he said. One year in which the glacier adds mass will not change the longer-term trend, Beedlow said, noting that Clark’s five years of monitoring showed just one year where the glacier added mass.

Challenging work Clark said it’s extremely satisfying to have a student capable to taking up where he left off nearly 20 years ago. “Absolutely. It’s especially great to see him thrive on this because it allows him to combine his mountaineering interests with his scientific interests — a great match for him,” Clark said. Beedlow said he’d love for a future OSU student to carry on his research once he graduates, but acknowledged it’s a challenging project to do right. He’s carried a 60- to 65-pound backpack for every trip up the mountain, climbing the glacier with ropes and crampons and keeping an eye open for hidden crevasses. Even in the summer, work can be treacherous. Monday, he and his team woke up to the sound of an avalanche thundering down a nearby slope and decided they’d best get off the mountain. “That’s the nature of this kind of research — you’re kind of at the mercy of the mountain. I get turned back a lot,” he said. “There’s been a lot of trips I’ve tried to make out there and the mountain just says no, whether it’s scary avalanche conditions or too much snow or monsoon-like rain. It’s really quite humbling; the mountain really has a way to put you in your place.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com

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Oregon State University graduate student Cody Beedlow uses a hand drill to place PVC pipes in the ice on Collier Glacier over the weekend. The pipes allow him to track snow accumulation and ice loss in between his monthly trips to the glacier. Beedlow, 28, has been making the 8to 9-mile trek up to Collier Glacier for the last two years. He’s trying to find out why the glacier is shrinking.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Germany

Education

Continued from A1 It is a policy that has also stoked anti-Islamic sentiment and hostility. Sarrazin’s book, “Germany Does Away With Itself,” which laments the growing number of Muslim immigrants, contending that they are “dumbing down” society, was released Monday and is already in its fourth printing, with sales expected to exceed 150,000 copies, according to his publisher. The sensation of Sarrazin’s book and his unrepentant posture have also provoked something less tangible but perhaps more troublesome for policymakers here eager to keep the radical right from gaining a foothold as they have in other parts of Europe. Under the cover of speaking truth to power, Sarrazin has tried to legitimize hate speech, his critics say.

Continued from A1 On average, the children started out as high achievers but year after year lost ground on the state’s standardized tests, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of scores from the 2002-03 through 2008-09 school years. Nearly 90 percent of schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District saw more academic progress. Several other respected elementary schools also had poor results. At the same time, some of the biggest gains came on campuses in low-income areas, schools often considered failing by state and federal standards. The school whose students improved most? Maywood Elementary, southeast of downtown L.A., where virtually every student qualifies for free or reduced-price lunches and almost half are still learning English.

Ethnic underclass One of the most telling signs of the growing distance between native Germans and immigrants, officials here said, is the observation that the grandchildren of immigrants are less likely to integrate into society and less likely to apply for citizenship compared with members of previous generations, creating an ethnic underclass in education and employment. Residents from immigrant families are twice as likely as ethnic Germans to be unemployed. “This issue is now more important for Germany than the economy,” said Wolfgang Nowak, former senior adviser to the previous chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder, and the head of Deutsche Bank’s International Forum. Nowak argues that Sarrazin has done his country a favor by forcing the topic to the top of the political agenda and crashing through the barriers of political correctness. “The condemnation of his book is an automatic reflex of a generation raised after Hitler,” he said. Even some who found his approach offensive said that Sarrazin had “addressed a problem that will remain long after the waves of outrage have subsided: the enormous integration deficit of the Muslim minority in Germany, or at least of disturbingly large parts of it,” said an article in the center-left newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung.

Many critics In a newspaper interview published the day before the book was released, Sarrazin also spoke of a Jewish gene, a reference to recent studies showing that Jews share many genes inherited from the ancestral population that lived in the Middle East long ago. He was criticized by everyone, including the chancellor, Angela Merkel. His party wants to kick him out, and the bank is considering firing him. On Thursday, the board of the bank voted to ask Germany’s president to dismiss Sarrazin from the board, and Merkel applauded the decision. Sarrazin’s stance, and the traction it has gained, has alarmed many, in part because he is not a member of the extreme right but a longtime member of the centerleft Social Democrats and the former top financial official for the city of Berlin, one of the centers of the immigrant community. “If he were an extremist, no one would pay attention,” said Hatice Akyuen, a writer who has debated Sarrazin and condemned his theories of the innate inferiority of immigrants. “He is a Social Democrat. You cannot do what he is doing, not in this country. You cannot give this kind of thinking a democratic base.” Akyuen, whose father came to Germany from Turkey in 1969 to work as a miner, said that the debate often came down to the difference between integration, which she said immigrants and their families accept, and assimilation, which they reject.

No practical plan Germany has had a difficult time coming to terms with its immigrant population. Next year will be the 50th anniversary of the guest-worker program for migrants, mostly Turks. Originally, the plan was for the workers to return, although that idea evaporated in the 1970s when Germany allowed workers’ families to move here, said Gunter Piening, an official who deals with integration and migration issues for Berlin. “The German philosophy was, ‘We are not a migration country,’” he said. “There were migrants, but there was no migrant policy.” It was only in 2005 that Germany acknowledged that it had become a destination country, a shift that was not accompanied by a practical plan, Piening said. That has slowly begun to change, he said.

The API Parents — and even principals — don’t know this because the district doesn’t measure progress in this way, although it could. Schools such as Wilbur shine under the current measure of academic success — the all-important Academic Performance Index — based on students’ achievement level on standardized tests. But, as state data show, such measures largely reflect students’ advantages outside school, not what the school itself is contributing to their learning. The API obscures the fact that students at Wilbur had the potential for further growth that went unrealized. Instead, they tended to slip every year while those at other esteemed schools made great strides. It also obscures the gains in schools in impoverished areas. A similar story is playing out across the country. “We’re measuring who is in schools rather than how ef-

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 A5

One school’s story

Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

Four-year-old Neena Trummell clings to her father’s leg as they tour Wilbur Avenue Elementary School in Tarzana, Calif. Despite its desirability, the school is among the worst in Los Angeles when it comes to boosting student performance in math and English. fective the schools are,” said Helen Ladd, a professor and testing expert at Duke University.

The ‘value-added’ approach The Times used an approach — known as “value-added” — that, while also based on standardized tests, looks at how much students improve year to year. The analysis was based on test scores in grades 2 through 5 at 450 of Los Angeles’ approximately 500 elementary schools. It substantially changes the picture of which schools are succeeding and which are not. The approach generally doesn’t penalize schools for things beyond their control — students’ poverty, English-language ability, previous achievement or other factors commonly used to explain schools’ success or failure. That’s because each student’s progress is measured against his or her own past performance. Value-added has many critics who consider it unreliable and a narrow gauge of performance. It looks, in this instance, only at math and English scores, and it ignores many other factors that parents consider when choosing a school. Most of the controversy over value-added, however, has

centered on whether it should be used to assess individual teachers. The Times recently published findings from a value-added analysis of more than 6,000 teachers in L.A. Unified, which noted that it matters much more which teacher a child gets than which school he or she attends. But parents don’t usually pick a school for a single teacher; this analysis points to schools where teachers overall tend to be more successful at raising scores year after year. Troubled by the exclusive focus on achievement under the federal No Child Left Behind law, the Obama administration has made analysis of student progress a priority for both teachers and schools. Several states are moving in that direction. “I’m much less interested in absolute test scores and more interested in how kids are improving,” U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told the Times. The results of such a shift are sure to be surprising. “It’s really shocking. I had no idea,” said Nicole Miller, one of the Wilbur campers, upon hearing how the school fared in the Times analysis. “I would have definitely taken a really good look at other schools had I known those numbers.”

Esperanza Elementary’s name in Spanish means “hope,” though the school would seem to have little reason for it. Its API score is 670, far short of the state goal of 800. For six years, it has also failed to meet federal benchmarks, putting it at risk of takeover or closure. But when the school, west of downtown Los Angeles, is judged by the progress students make in math and English, Esperanza ranks among the top 20 percent of district elementary schools, the analysis found. This is despite some tough challenges: Students at Esperanza are mostly low-income and still learning English. “We’re under constant scrutiny, and we’re under a lot of pressure to improve,” said Principal Felicia Michell. Though the district has chosen not to use value-added, Mi-

chell long ago saw the benefit of even the most basic test score analysis. Several years ago, she began holding meetings with teachers in which she projected their students’ test scores on a wall and asked the instructors to discuss why some of the teachers were doing better than others. Initially resistant, teachers began to recognize areas where they needed help. “You start to question yourself, and that’s the whole point of this,” said Lynda Ayala, a veteran first-grade teacher at Esperanza. Such self-scrutiny appears to be paying off, the Times analysis found. Yet, by official measures, Esperanza’s gains don’t count.

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A6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


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Auto News A chance to be an automotive time traveler, see Page B3.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,200.01 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +23.17 +1.06%

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CLOSE 10,320.10 DOW JONES CHANGE +50.63 +.49%

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1,090.10 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +9.81 +.91%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.63 treasury CHANGE +1.94%

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$1251.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$5.20

STOC K S R E P O R T

CENTRAL OREGON TOURISM

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

Summer season finishing strong

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

Sunriver golf tournament draws hundreds of visitors By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Mortgage rates dip For yet another week, fixedrate mortgages reached record lows, as did the five-year adjustable rate, according to Freddie Mac’s Primary Mortgage Market Survey released Thursday. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.32 percent with an average 0.7 point for the week that ended Thursday, down from last week when it averaged 4.36 percent. Last year at this time, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 5.08 percent. The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage this week averaged a record low of 3.83 percent with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.86 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.54 percent. The five-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage averaged 3.54 percent this week, with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.56 percent. A year ago, the fiveyear adjustable-rate mortgage averaged 4.59 percent.

With a boost from the Pac Am golf tournament, the outlook for tourism-related businesses on summer’s last traditional holiday weekend looks good. The Northwest Dodge Dealers Pacific Amateur Golf Classic, which wraps up Saturday, has brought more than 600 golfers to Central Oregon. All but about 35 live outside the region, according to a report in

The Bulletin on Tuesday. Many of the out-of-town golfers will likely stay through the Labor Day weekend, said Alana Audette, president and CEO of the Central Oregon Visitors Association. They could help drive up lodging tax collections, which have generally been on the upswing in recent months. Room-tax receipts increased in July compared with July 2009 in the city of Bend and unincorporated Deschutes County, according to

figures released Thursday. For this weekend, Sunriver Resort and lodging businesses in southern Deschutes County should be up between 3 and 11 percent this weekend, Audette said, and the rest of the area will likely see an increase between 3 and 5 percent for the weekend, according to COVA’s survey of lodging businesses. Audette expected a bump from the Pac Am, which is taking place about a month earlier this year for the first time in its 14year history. In previous years, golfers teed up in late September or early October. See Tourism / B5

The school of

SUSTAINABILITY M.L. Vidas stands Thursday in front of her NorthWest Crossing home that she designed in conjunction with SolAire Homebuilders. The Bend house has many green features, including solar panels to generate electricity and heat the home’s water, and an irrigation-free yard with only plants native to Central Oregon.

Discounts help bolster back-to-school sales Back-to-school season started off on sale, with retailers receiving new merchandise in August, and then marking it down to get it out the door. That led to a decent 3.3 percent increase in revenue at retail stores open at least a year, according to a summary of 27 retailers by Thomson Reuters, above the 2.5 percent increase that analysts expected. A 3 percent increase and above “represents a healthy U.S. consumer,” said Jharonne Martis, director of consumer research for Thomson Reuters. — From wire reports

Correction A Business Calendar listing that appeared Tuesday, Aug. 31, Wednesday, Sept. 1 and Thursday, Sept. 2, on Page B6, was incorrect. “LEED Certification — What Does it Mean?” has been canceled. Components of the class will be included in a new class, “Green Building Certification Programs,” scheduled for Sept. 9. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age Fuel, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$2.92 • Chevron, 1745 N.E. Third St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Chevron, 1400 N.W. College Way, Bend . . . . . .$3.00 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 1001 Railway Ave., Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.08

DIESEL • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.88 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.06 • Chevron, 1501 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond . . . . . . . . . .$3.20 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

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Jeff Wick The Bulletin

COCC class helps professionals gain foundation in green building principles

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$19.638 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.279

Beef recall heats up fight over standards By William Neuman New York Times News Service

Public health officials have linked recalled ground beef to illnesses from a rare strain of E. coli, the first such linkage to that strain in this country, adding fuel to an already fierce debate over expanding federal rules meant to keep the toxic bacteria out of the meat supply. Cargill Meat Solutions recalled 8,500 pounds of hamburger Saturday after investigators determined that it was the likely source of a bacterial strain known as E. coli O26, which had sickened three people in Maine and New York. Under federal rules, it is illegal to sell ground beef containing a more common strain of the bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, which has been responsible for thousands of illnesses, many deaths and the recall of millions of pounds of beef over the years. But federal regulators are considering whether to give the same illegal status to at least six other E. coli strains, including O26, which can also make people violently sick. The meat industry has opposed such a change, saying it is not needed. Among the arguments the industry has used was one stubborn fact: No outbreak in this country from the rarer strains of E. coli had ever been definitively tied to ground beef. That is an argument the industry can no longer make. See Beef / B5

Burger King agrees to $4B purchase offer By Michael J. de la Merced New York Times News Service

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

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oing green isn’t just about recycling newspapers, plastic jugs and cardboard anymore. Incorporating sustainable building practices also proved to be a survival strategy that helped builders, architects and others involved in construction get through what has been described as the worst downturn since the Great Depression. M.L. Vidas has always been an advocate of sustainable practices. She’s been an artist most of her life, and she loves nature and the outdoors. Like a lot of people, she started out recycling newspapers, plastic and cardboard, and supporting Earth-friendly causes. But after

earning a master’s degree in architecture from the University of Oregon, she turned her attention to green building practices, which she said have helped her company, Sustainable Design Services, survive and prosper during tough times for the building industry. While she learned much about green building practices at UO, Vidas said a class called Sustainable Building Advisor offered through the continuing education program at Central Oregon Community College opened her eyes to an array of green building principles that she has incorporated into her building designs, including the design of her own home in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood. See Sustainable / B2

If you go What: Informational meeting on COCC’s Sustainable Building Advisor class When: Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m. Where: Boyle Education Center, COCC’s Bend campus Details: The informal meeting is designed to share information about the in-depth training planned for this year’s class, which will begin Oct. 15 and meet one Friday and Saturday each month through June 4, 2011. The meeting will be followed at 6:30 p.m. by a free meeting for people to learn more about LEED sustainable building certification. Information: For more information or to register, call 541-383-7270 or visit http://noncredit.cocc .edu/building/default.aspx

Burger King agreed Thursday to sell itself to an investment firm with roots in Brazil in a deal valued at $4 billion, including the assumption of debt. The deal is the largest leveraged buyout of a fast-food chain ever, according to the market researcher CapitalIQ, and the second for Burger King in the past eight years. Burger King’s potential new owner, 3G Capital, decided on Burger King as a potential investment several months ago and began a series of friendly discussions with the fast-food chain’s management, people with direct knowledge of the talks said. See Burger King / B2 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

State lacking in technical training, Oregon labor commissioner says Avakian argues that employers will locate here only if there’s a skilled work force By David Holley The Bulletin

During a luncheon with the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County, Oregon Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian said young people today aren’t being trained to replace Oregon workers who are retiring from fields like construction or metal work, a situation he described as a potential crisis. Avakian blames dwindling numbers of metal and wood shop classes in Oregon middle and high schools as the cause. A decade ago, the average age of an apprentice was 19, Avaki-

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Brad Avakian speaks to members of the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County about employment in Oregon at the King Buffet in northeast Bend on Thursday. an said. Today it’s 26, he said. He wants the Oregon Legislature to pass a bill next session

that directs the state superintendent of public instruction to restore those programs. “It won’t be an easy bill to pass, but there’s great support for it,” said Avakian, a former legislator who was appointed to the commissioner’s office in 2008 and re-elected later that year. Avakian spoke to the group of about 20 as a way to inform them about current issues related to employment in the state, and to familiarize them with the operations of the office he heads, the Bureau of Labor and Industries. The bureau regulates four different areas of employment: protecting civil rights, wage and hour issues, assisting employers with understanding federal employment laws and regulating statewide apprenticeship programs. See Avakian / B5


B2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Sustainable Regulators failed to see, stop problems, Bernanke says By Ariana Eunjung Cha The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Regulators fell short in using their powers “forcefully or effectively” to stop risky practices by banks and were slow to identify and address abuses in the U.S. financial system that led to global economic crisis, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told a panel investigating the financial crisis on Thursday. In a lengthy analysis delivered before the congressionally appointed committee, Bernanke said government regulators did not do enough to protect consumers in the marketplace and to force large financial institutions to curtail risky practices. Bernanke said the single most important lesson from the crisis was that the problem of financial institutions that are “too big to fail” must be solved. He said that the U.S. government should be prepared to close down even the nation’s largest firms if they pose a broader threat to the financial system. The financial overhaul signed into law earlier this summer gives regulators that power.

Continued from B1 Everything about the house reflects elements she learned through the Sustainable Building Advisor course — from the passive solar panels on the roof that heat water to another set of solar panels that generate electricity, to the size of the windows, alignment with the sun, width of the roof overhang, the concrete stones in sidewalk that allow rain and stormwater to percolate into the soil, and the plants native to Central Oregon that decorate her front yard with little watering even in summer. She can leave for several weeks at a time without watering her yard at all with native plants like bunch grass, globe mallow, Oregon sunshine, wax currant, spice bush, rosy pussytoes and of course the venerable sagebrush.

Expanding knowledge “We’ve got more than 90 people who have completed the class in Central Oregon,” said Vidas, who completed the class herself in 2006 and is now a consultant contracting with the college to arrange course instructors, who are leading experts in their fields, she said. “We have had quite a variety of people who have completed the course, from the manager of a brewpub, to practicing architects to facility managers, real estate people, land use planners and builders,” Vidas said. She said many people who have completed the class over the past four years have expanded their work or started new businesses as a

C OV ER S T OR I ES result of the course. Peter Grube, sustainable building adviser for SolAire Homebuilders in Bend, said he took the class a couple of years ago to enhance his knowledge about green building practices, and it helped him land his current job. “When people come talk to us, they are already interested, if not dedicated to green building principles,” Grube said. “It is literally bringing people through the door — bringing prospects to SolAire.” During these challenging times, Grube said SolAire Homebuilders has experienced a slowdown, like a lot of construction companies in Central Oregon, but he said the company’s green building expertise helps. “We are still here. We are still building. We are doing OK,” he said. “I’ve noticed our clients are more and more sophisticated about green building. They are participating with us to push the green building envelope,” Grube said. “That’s where the sustainable building course really helped us achieve higher levels of sustainable building. “I learned that building a home for the best sustainability begins by bringing the homebuyer together with the designer and builder to produce the best possible practices, including the most sustainable use of the site, and the best solar orientation, so the building takes the best advantage of the sun during the winter, and is protected from overheating in the summertime,” Grube said. He said the sustainable building practices also include factors such as using local building materials as much as possible, instead of shipping in materials from long distances, which he said wastes energy and

pollutes the environment. “The goal is to reduce the carbon footprint of the house and the whole building process,” Grube said. In addition, he said efficient use of water and energy and the durability of construction also are important components that contribute to the long-term sustainability of a home or other building. “People are still living in houses built more than 200 years ago or longer on the East Coast and over in Europe,” Grube said. That longevity is more sustainable than some of the homes built on the West Coast that last 50 years or less, he said.

Covering it all Vidas said the solar hot water panels on her home save energy, and her plumbing fixtures are all high water efficiency. The heating system is radiant hydroponic in-floor heat, installed in the slab — all sustainable building practices. The photovoltaic solar panels that produce electricity on Vidas’ rooftop provide more than 30 percent of the family’s electric needs during the year, although there are some days in Central Oregon when they produce zero electricity because snow covers the panels. Vidas said the class covers everything from sustainable design and site assessment to green materials, native plants, environmental health, building maintenance issues, and energy efficiency and construction practices. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Burger King Continued from B1 The investment firm plans to expand Burger King’s presence internationally, especially in Latin America and Asia. “The iconic Burger King brand, its solid franchisee network and great product offerings make this a perfect fit for 3G Capital,” Alexandre Behring, 3G’s managing partner, said in a statement. Yet in North America, where Burger King derives nearly 70 percent of its revenue, the chain has struggled. Last week, the company forecast weak demand in its new fiscal year and cautioned that uncertainty regarding the costs of wheat and beef could affect its results. Analysts point to weaknesses like Burger King’s menu, which is less varied than McDonald’s. Burger King’s customers, largely younger men, have also suffered more from the economic slowdown. On Thursday, Behring and Burger King’s chairman and chief executive, John Chidsey, spoke to Burger King employees in Miami about the deal, assuring them that 3G would continue to invest in the company. Under the terms of the deal, 3G will pay $24 a share for Burger King, or $3.26 billion, a 46 percent premium to Burger King’s share price before reports emerged that the fast-food giant was in sales talks. While some analysts questioned the price of the deal, Burger King’s stock had climbed as high as $22.06 as recently as April. 3G believes that the public markets have undervalued the company. Shares in Burger King jumped more than 25 percent Thursday, closing at $23.59. One week before Burger King agreed to a sale, the volume of call options to buy the company’s stock jumped to 37,427, about 20 times the average of the previous four weeks, Bloomberg News reported. 3G expects to begin its tender offer no later than Sept. 17 and to close the deal in the fourth quarter this year. Burger King has the right to solicit higher offers through Oct. 12 under what is known as a “go shop” period.


B USI N ESS

A N A unique opportunity to be an automotive time traveler By Keith Martin New York Times News Service

IRVINE, Calif. — When a car you have traveled 1,000 miles to drive is a rear-engine MercedesBenz from 1935 and a universal joint inside the transaxle shatters, a trip to the local auto parts store is not going to solve the problem. Fortunately, the car in question was one of three prewar models made available for journalist test drives by the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center here in Southern California. So, as the reporters gathered for dinner late on a Thursday afternoon, a team of mechanics from the center began disassembling the 130 to replace the universal joint — a task that required removing the rear bodywork along with the engine and the transaxle. The cars represent a littleknown part of Mercedes history. When the companies founded by Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz merged in 1926, there were enough designers and engineers — Ferdinand Porsche among them — available to pursue various configurations of engines and gearboxes, with the goal of producing an affordable entry-level Mercedes, said Michael Kunz, manager of the Classic Center. Compared with traditional front-engine cars, these models proved expensive to make, however, and sales were meager. The entire series went out of production in 1939.

Heckmotors The three cars I drove (the Germans describe the layout as Heckmotor, or rear engine) included a 1935 130 Cabrio-Limousine, a 1934 150 Sport Roadster and a 1936 170 H Cabrio-Limousine. A fourth car, a 1951 170 S Cabriolet A — an example of the company’s first premium-class model in the postwar era — was included for comparison. In the United States today, two mainstream rear-engine cars are available in showrooms, the Porsche 911 and the Smart Fortwo. In general, rear-engine cars have not found favor because the weight of the engine at the extreme back end results in lessthan-ideal handling. Early designs were often described with terms like evil or diabolical to explain what happened when a rear-engine car entered a turn at too high a speed. Mercedes has a tradition of providing restoration, service and sales of its classic cars, and since 1993 has operated the MercedesBenz Classic Center in Fellbach, Germany, near the Mercedes factory in Stuttgart. The models I drove had long been on display, in nonrunning condition, at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart. As a demonstration of its restoration capabilities, the Irvine center, open since 2005, had them shipped to the United States. Making the cars drivable was not without challenges, as many of the parts for the 4-cylinder engines and gearboxes were unique to the cars. Cosmetically, the cars were in good but not concours condition. They had been restored in the 1950s, but time had taken its toll on the paint and interiors. The showroom of the Classic Center, where we ate dinner as the 130 was repaired, was adjacent to the restoration facility. So, between courses, the writers sauntered over to supervise the technicians, and offer unsolicited advice and opinions.

New York Times News Service photos

Mercedes-Benz models, from left: rear-engine 1934 130 Cabrio-Limousine, mid-engine 1934 150 Sport Roadster and rear-engine 1936 170 H Cabrio-Limousine. Mercedes-Benz is the only automaker to restore its museum cars on a regular basis and then make them available for outsiders to drive.

Cautious test drives The Classic Center’s lead mechanic, Nate Lander, is a graduate of the auto restoration program at McPherson College in Kansas. Lander was also an apprentice at the Stuttgart center before coming to Irvine. Within three hours, the transaxle was disassembled and the failed universal joint removed. Upon inspection, it was determined to be similar to a joint from a postwar Mercedes 170. With a little work, the later part was adapted to fit. By 8 the next morning, the car was completely reassembled; it was the first of the Heckmotor cars I drove. Not wanting to cause a repeat of the breakdown, I drove the car gingerly at first. With an 1.3-liter 4-cylinder engine producing just 25 horsepower, the acceleration of the 2,160-pound car could best be called leisurely. Top speed is reported to be 57 mph. The convertible roof of the 130 opened completely, and as a city car it proved to be a visual delight and an attention-getter, even in car-jaded Southern California. As I drove through the streets of Laguna Beach on a trip that included runs along the Pacific Coast Highway, the car kept up with traffic. Although I shifted the nonsynchronized 3-speed (with overdrive) transmission carefully, my riding partner, a mechanic from the Classic Center, flinched slightly each time I manhandled the gears. The second car I drove, a 1934 150 Sport Roadster, was the rarest and most interesting of the group — one of just 11 built and the only one known to exist today. Unlike the rear-engine 130 and the 170 H models, the engine in the 150 was forward of the transaxle, making it a mid-engine car. This configuration, still popular among sports-car makers today, can be found in models like the Porsche Cayman, Ferrari F458 and Lamborghini Gallardo. Positioning the engine near the center of the car promotes more surefooted handling — unlike the tail-heavy rear-engine cars. Somewhat whimsical in appearance, the Sport Roadster carries a third headlight, mounted in the center of the front body panels. The long rear deck, necessary to cover both the mid-mounted

engine and the gearbox behind it, give the vehicle the odd proportions of a Shriner parade car. I felt as if I should have been wearing a fez. With slightly over 50 horsepower from its water-cooled 1.5-liter 4-cylinder engine, performance was more than adequate, if not overwhelming. I was surprised that Mercedes would put this only remaining example into the hands of auto writers. I imagined my co-pilot from the Classic Center having a Taser ready for writers who became too frisky behind the wheel. My final test of a rear-engine car was of the luxurious 170 H Cabrio-Limousine. With a 1.7-liter engine, its 38 horsepower was enough to let the 2,480-pound car hold its own in California congestion. It had a luxuriously appointed interior, shifted easily and despite its added center-mounted headlight, looked the most modern of the group. Even so, the 170 H was a market failure: just 1,507 were sold, compared with 71,000 for the front-engine 170 produced at

the same time.

Commitment to heritage After my day as an automotive time traveler, I came away appreciative of the opportunity to drive cars more than 75 years old on modern highways. Even today, these cars can provide adequate transportation in urban areas. While many automakers pay lip service to brand heritage (this is less of a selling point in today’s economy than during the go-go days some five years ago), Mercedes was the first company to restore its museum cars on a regular basis and then make them available for outsiders to drive, Kunz said. In this case, the message that was sent about Mercedes’ commitment to preserving its heritage was more important than the experience of driving a handful of underpowered, hard-to-shift cars. Living a day in a 75-year-old past was an uncommon opportunity, and a welcome one, even including one brittle universal joint.

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The chassis of a 1934 Mercedes-Benz 150 Sport Roadster. The 150’s rear engine, situated forward of the transaxle, still popular among sports-car makers today, can be found in models like the Porsche Cayman, Ferrari F458 and Lamborghini Gallardo.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 B3


B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds AccretvH n Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivIden ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed h Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan Allete AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AFTxE AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AIntGr62 AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr gn AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium

6.05 +.04 0.48 20.37 +.53 0.54 21.09 +.29 1.28 54.53 -.09 12.72 +.04 10.93 +.27 1.20 50.02 +.45 35.93 +1.56 1.02 8.83 +.03 1.76 37.76 -.08 0.20 13.42 +.10 25.24 -.02 1.12 25.15 +.65 4.60 -.05 6.31 +.04 23.05 +.15 0.27 26.52 +.53 1.68 27.40 +.05 11.50 -.24 8.85 +.07 2.14 -.01 0.18 13.13 +.11 5.85 -.09 0.05 16.78 +.18 1.76 50.61 +.34 0.70 35.16 -1.42 0.42 6.64 -.05 2.56 +.03 1.04 +.02 0.72 18.81 +.27 0.75 37.99 +.59 6.30 +.22 10.46 +.59 6.17 -.06 0.23 16.86 +.60 35.33 +1.30 31.91 +.91 2.00 +.01 0.15 11.01 +.10 0.04 20.96 +.18 0.52 41.04 +1.44 13.16 +.26 29.42 +.57 0.36 32.30 +.20 0.25 3.63 +.10 0.24 56.29 +.81 3.64 +.11 15.30 +.79 5.93 +.17 0.06 3.57 +.07 6.26 +.17 23.15 +.05 0.04 16.09 +.68 5.55 +.12 11.56 +.28 21.81 -.06 1.17 +.14 0.04 28.41 +.49 69.39 +1.23 6.03 +.05 4.39 +.14 2.25 -.04 29.21 +.92 0.18 65.06 +.60 0.11 71.71 +1.09 1.96 77.19 +2.44 4.91 +.02 0.40 8.55 +.18 1.00 66.15 -.05 4.64 -.01 0.18 26.60 +.40 50.09 +2.44 3.68 +.28 46.46 +1.25 0.86 9.40 -.21 0.56 42.39 +.45 0.34 31.80 +.60 2.74 +.06 0.12 10.83 +.31 3.95 163.50 -.26 29.81 +.41 1.40 70.70 +.89 58.12 +.13 3.08 +.09 17.26 +.31 13.93 +.20 0.60 23.50 +.20 0.72 44.04 +.64 0.75 38.08 -.49 0.20 63.67 +.39 1.76 36.60 -.01 60.59 +1.16 3.63 +.02 1.20 14.24 0.48 8.36 -.02 2.06 24.50 +.08 1.58 35.63 -.30 69.94 +1.58 2.05 +.02 24.48 +.65 0.80 52.36 +.77 3.99 +.09 17.34 +.32 0.80 28.62 -.05 2.20 +.06 39.42 +.35 2.32 +.23 0.40 6.29 +.14 0.66 5.25 +.09 15.16 +.09 .53 +.09 0.24 26.36 +.76 0.48 19.00 -.15 1.52 22.79 +.13 0.15 6.49 -.07 20.65 +.17 3.16 113.21 +.32 3.02 +.03 135.21 +2.72 .55 -.04 26.99 +.13 24.43 +.61 1.54 28.46 -.43 37.24 -.87 0.50 5.59 -.05 1.31 49.00 +.40 1.07 +.15 9.19 +.35 1.35 30.68 +.09 5.60 28.28 +.46 5.40 +.10 0.44 13.76 +.72 1.68 35.86 -.25 0.08 10.08 +.01 0.72 40.88 -.19 0.65 29.15 -.59 0.56 20.66 +.69 35.92 +.26 1.93 23.05 +.30 18.87 +.30 7.50 +.22 2.27 -.01 6.85 -.01 28.41 +.54 47.84 +.59 0.84 23.26 +.22 24.32 -.02 11.54 +.68 0.72 46.17 +.42 0.32 28.08 +.11 0.24 44.67 +.47 52.51 -.08 5.41 +.17 0.06 44.66 +.76 15.78 +1.51 21.44 +.50 0.36 50.24 +1.45 4.28 +.10 0.88 29.19 +.69 0.18 43.85 +1.84 0.49 54.95 +.73 16.52 +.30 2.61 17.68 +.09 .87 -.03 40.01 -.31 1.52 -.02 .76 -.02 1.00 6.94 +.02 0.60 37.80 +.64 7.32 +.20 0.60 91.30 -1.16 3.00 55.00 -.25 0.40 21.71 +.42 44.67 +1.28 1.12 10.08 +.16 252.17 +1.84 0.68 28.85 +.16 0.28 10.79 +.08 11.21 -.06 0.62 20.24 -.06 5.42 +.16 .44 +.01 0.75 31.17 +.73 80.87 -.78 0.40 24.28 +.29 0.60 31.54 +.19 37.84 +.01 6.74 +.17 1.40 15.41 +.26 3.55 16.19 +.28 0.12 21.94 +.69 0.12 16.78 -.01 42.40 +.95 8.47 -.02 24.58 +.38 1.03 +.07 3.66 -.03 0.24 14.60 +.60 18.82 -.06 14.73 +.53 8.83 +.27 0.60 49.64 +.78 18.20 +.31 0.60 28.69 +.12 9.60 -.46 .58 +.03 0.04 12.53 0.64 37.62 +.06 0.18 16.31 +.30 0.52 12.39 +.14 2.41 50.54 +.05 27.67 +.22 26.31 +1.04 1.09 12.91 +.10 47.38 +2.01 28.27 +.30 17.74 +.24 6.11 +.17 1.34 28.93 -.03 25.97 -.34 2.72 +.10 6.53 -.04 23.88 +.67 29.32 +.49 1.40 57.06 +.31 1.36 39.69 +.32 216.94 +2.85 27.62 +1.00

Nm AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoLatin BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioDlvry lf Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo rs BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch h CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CEC Ent CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CPI CRH CSG Sys CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapellaEd CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapFedF Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex

D 21.05 +.05 3.57 108.35 -.15 2.92 +.05 0.80 34.27 +.49 10.17 +.42 1.00 21.10 -.25 24.76 +.65 0.88 29.92 +.61 1.50 +.02 0.84 31.96 +.03 0.60 23.12 +.09 1.83 31.30 +.12 29.60 +.88 0.42 5.53 +.17 1.74 70.20 +.06 1.74 58.90 +.30 26.96 +1.16 43.31 +1.23 37.97 +.69 7.15 +.45 36.57 +.41 4.21 +.06 1.50 42.25 +.05 0.10 13.78 -.02 2.20 -.10 22.70 -.12 82.61 +.77 0.60 39.71 +.21 0.68 37.16 +.52 0.40 58.70 +.94 33.87 +1.23 1.34 65.60 -.06 0.58 12.79 +.09 0.51 18.21 -.13 0.60 12.98 +.09 0.81 12.43 +.10 0.33 12.71 -.10 0.88 13.50 +.33 0.04 13.28 +.07 2.81 -.02 1.80 46.39 +.34 1.04 3.90 -.05 2.80 56.32 +.59 0.36 25.27 +.15 1.96 49.55 +.83 1.09 +.02 0.04 2.18 +.09 40.20 +.34 21.71 +.33 66.46 +.14 8.62 +.07 0.22 19.31 -.16 89.43 -1.00 20.05 -.58 0.72 78.61 +.64 1.00 16.10 +.47 0.32 16.12 +.40 0.48 45.22 -.11 7.75 +.10 1.16 44.00 +.53 .33 +.00 15.09 +.51 4.06 +.27 1.00 5.94 +.15 0.72 45.65 -.62 1.48 70.27 +.75 38.49 +1.18 0.20 23.98 +.38 5.81 +.32 0.92 30.30 +.57 14.78 +.19 0.28 26.35 -.02 81.19 +.28 0.30 29.38 +.66 0.60 33.46 +.80 32.87 +.88 35.06 +1.22 2.45 +.12 5.32 +.32 3.88 +.19 55.25 -.06 21.29 +.36 0.60 18.00 +.46 1.51 +.13 1.39 -.01 5.05 -.10 0.38 23.88 +.03 1.44 31.08 -.25 1.28 11.08 +.01 33.91 +.36 4.00 149.30 +2.73 0.95 13.28 0.35 3.98 +.03 1.36 10.70 +.11 0.40 10.23 -.21 0.60 12.57 -.37 11.88 +.08 21.26 +.18 1.68 63.39 +1.10 7.36 +.14 .81 +.05 6.76 -.26 2.99 +.01 1.06 +.02 46.73 +1.00 0.04 6.90 +.26 2.00 86.42 +1.95 5.31 +.18 0.22 10.86 -.10 7.38 +.28 0.70 26.31 -.49 0.60 11.59 +.18 1.53 17.18 -.21 13.84 +.40 0.44 19.25 +.19 16.72 +.62 6.52 -.05 1.28 +.04 0.56 18.18 +1.55 0.40 20.93 +.93 1.28 26.43 +.02 0.32 32.71 +1.63 0.60 21.87 +.29 1.76 5.60 +.41 14.81 +.56 0.52 26.86 +.28 1.10 17.44 +.01 0.56 15.13 +.17 0.34 9.39 -.01 6.61 -.21 0.31 19.87 +.49 0.28 11.07 +.39 1.20 58.27 +.05 12.59 +.04 0.05 13.93 +.46 0.80 26.17 +1.80 0.10 63.73 +1.68 0.42 41.70 +.24 45.63 +1.96 0.92 55.65 +1.77 0.25 23.59 +4.73 .53 -.02 0.16 18.67 +.10 17.73 +.69 0.80 13.07 +.42 0.20 14.95 +.36 33.65 +.77 0.40 93.20 +.49 14.27 +.39 1.00 67.23 +.86 0.04 33.02 -.55 38.48 +.39 1.00 29.06 +.10 4.60 262.45 +6.17 0.84 17.80 -.04 26.90 -.10 31.38 +1.42 5.22 +.13 5.28 172.70 -1.18 0.26 21.88 +.05 1.00 21.69 -.37 0.87 16.70 +.44 19.04 +.22 0.96 52.86 +.91 0.26 19.80 +.03 0.34 7.18 +.10 0.35 28.31 +.33 16.74 +.67 0.50 26.57 +.46 0.72 30.11 -.40 0.12 28.90 +.12 42.12 -.03 7.09 +.08 4.63 +.08 1.02 12.51 +.03 0.60 7.53 +.15 0.63 8.44 +.09 12.79 -.21 16.48 +.48 0.04 6.81 +.20 3.70 -.06 12.95 +.02 2.48 +.04 1.80 47.32 -.14 0.28 25.54 +.53 38.63 +.34 1.10 37.32 +.35 1.08 63.47 +.51 0.30 33.78 +.41 1.08 61.37 +.40 12.26 +.06 41.92 -.01 64.70 +1.54 3.34 +.02 0.20 39.52 +.49 0.04 5.36 +.16 2.00 25.56 -.26 0.24 5.30 +.01 1.96 11.81 +.01 .67 +.02 0.78 30.94 +.38 6.56 +.37 4.40 -.02 .48 +.01 14.60 +.22 22.17 -.01 18.25 +.44 0.68 29.62 +.27 21.43 +.65 0.40 33.81 +.91 0.72 32.61 -.05 22.37 +.40 23.83 +.76 0.40 38.70 +.05 41.46 -.15 1.76 68.54 +.38 0.04 9.93 0.74 24.65 +.57 25.21 +.31 0.36 5.79 +.10 .50 +.01 13.33 +.95 0.20 28.45 +.40 6.93 +.06 7.94 +.21 53.03 +.30 .38 +.01 3.24 27.25 -.25 4.78 +.18 0.43 8.18 +.05

Nm Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner CerusCp Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBiot ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco CitiTrends Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC Clarient h ClaudeR g ClayChinSC ClaySInsid ClayYldHg ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cogent CognizTech Cohen&Str CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColSprtw CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao Compellent CompTch CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil Conolog hlf ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Credicp CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Cryptologic Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn Cyclacel CyprsBio CypSemi Cytec DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiamMgmt DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s

D 0.86 16.20 -.45 0.80 28.21 +.11 20.57 -.04 0.78 15.06 -.06 1.56 12.60 +.05 24.43 +.37 0.01 15.75 +.18 9.63 -.07 10.93 +.39 2.90 36.17 +.17 5.85 +.09 59.96 +.54 17.27 +1.50 8.80 +.21 76.61 +.88 3.13 +.13 27.30 +.26 29.73 +1.00 3.18 +.22 36.05 +.28 24.96 +1.26 2.40 -.07 0.30 21.38 +.14 2.88 77.45 +.68 23.10 +.51 0.16 8.90 +.28 46.31 +1.49 0.63 3.94 -.04 15.64 -.42 3.37 -.06 15.96 +.70 12.30 -.02 9.60 -.60 5.13 +.04 1.54 58.94 +.21 5.15 -.24 9.41 +.56 0.55 11.33 +.47 1.85 51.68 -.05 4.99 -.23 9.91 +1.53 5.73 +.09 4.10 +.11 3.59 +.29 0.23 14.62 +.34 164.19 +4.78 12.98 +.04 0.74 35.30 +1.40 1.48 55.63 -.22 1.27 20.90 -.10 0.68 62.69 +.83 2.80 -.04 12.80 -.01 0.32 67.98 +.55 2.44 -.01 1.60 27.70 +.11 0.72 15.47 +.33 0.48 26.67 +.36 16.89 +.51 20.52 +.26 23.54 +.53 2.13 26.25 -.05 3.88 +.03 .78 -.02 61.52 +1.14 0.40 50.96 +.61 3.53 +.09 1.20 0.03 27.30 +.29 0.28 26.73 +.32 0.93 18.77 +.08 7.73 +.17 15.24 +.23 62.83 +.64 6.81 +.16 0.56 65.86 +.91 2.20 65.85 +.48 17.10 +.42 0.60 38.16 +.72 7.97 -.05 0.36 29.00 -.15 1.76 57.38 +.07 17.30 +.07 11.08 -.15 60.92 +1.17 0.40 20.08 -.10 0.37 7.37 +.16 43.18 +1.32 4.68 +.24 2.12 74.83 -.09 12.51 -1.25 0.60 16.45 +.05 0.72 51.73 +2.80 1.31 0.38 18.08 +.14 0.38 16.97 +.08 0.20 36.32 +.79 0.94 37.03 +.39 0.48 13.77 -.03 2.00 25.49 +.37 20.55 +.55 27.90 +.82 26.11 +1.29 0.69 72.02 -.56 17.80 +2.79 1.17 -.13 18.83 +.18 0.60 41.97 +.31 7.59 +.22 21.86 +.18 21.36 +.16 0.40 26.99 +.02 0.80 21.96 -.05 13.93 -.17 62.45 +.83 48.50 +.45 1.50 +.03 4.40 2.20 54.43 +.37 .64 +.10 0.40 33.91 +.16 2.38 48.25 +.01 17.25 +.29 0.96 30.98 +.41 23.50 +.33 43.00 +1.02 10.52 +.16 .40 -.01 0.06 41.26 +.45 1.08 43.83 +1.01 0.42 17.88 +.92 1.09 51.63 +1.22 2.30 25.43 +.84 34.15 +.13 1.09 22.40 -.07 0.24 82.03 +1.12 17.89 +.09 5.17 +.11 0.56 35.17 +.18 0.20 16.45 +.13 1.57 37.32 +.19 22.80 +.10 11.21 +.21 0.82 58.59 +.80 7.08 -.09 0.16 6.79 +.07 38.75 +.33 1.50 14.90 +.09 20.94 +.61 0.72 37.25 +1.10 0.80 46.66 +.97 0.92 36.30 +.82 1.70 109.87 +2.04 1.85 45.32 +.24 54.62 -.68 13.17 +.32 .16 +.00 7.69 -.13 12.88 +.01 40.93 -.10 28.58 +.25 1.16 -.16 .39 -.02 43.01 +1.75 22.45 -.16 1.80 52.63 +.15 1.05 81.80 +1.92 127.77 +.21 94.40 -.10 117.53 +.23 1.54 +.04 3.39 +.10 11.51 +.62 0.05 50.32 +.53 0.28 4.81 +.04 16.11 +.31 0.40 3.95 0.78 9.56 +.05 1.21 25.86 -.13 0.15 10.98 +.27 0.60 41.33 -.73 23.71 -.96 2.24 47.43 -.40 11.09 +.32 0.08 38.46 +.46 1.28 44.22 +1.50 7.86 +.03 63.99 +.11 0.20 40.14 +.60 10.89 +.27 47.57 +1.80 8.23 -.07 1.20 67.75 +1.22 0.36 12.83 -.33 5.87 -.13 12.36 +.24 0.44 24.09 +.59 10.84 +.16 .71 -.01 1.00 17.65 +.05 15.48 +.38 40.58 +2.34 1.38 -.03 2.73 +.09 0.20 29.36 +.80 3.92 +.21 0.93 63.56 -1.33 1.66 24.15 +.04 2.01 26.84 +.16 33.64 +.33 10.43 -.11 0.08 11.35 +.40 0.64 62.94 +.64 9.36 +.63 13.10 +.28 2.38 67.68 +.14 0.18 40.75 -.81 0.36 12.48 -.04 0.50 60.81 -.10 0.03 9.14 +.21 12.28 -.02 25.98 +.86 1.08 27.82 +.42 2.12 62.46 +2.00 30.02 +2.45 0.16 23.37 +.78 38.02 +3.82 15.25 +.64 38.54 +.44 7.51 26.67 +.72 5.66 28.00 +.23

Nm

D

DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.20

0.15 7.35 3.41 4.83 8.17 5.17 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 0.50 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.24 0.98 0.68 1.40

0.92

Nm 43.95 -1.25 32.88 -1.23 24.32 -.95 50.18 -1.32 25.19 +1.57 34.08 -.29 14.50 -.40 20.39 +.53 35.03 +1.15 48.08 +1.70 38.77 +1.28 14.51 -.46 45.87 +1.30 28.88 +.76 15.54 +.38 39.44 +.50 35.36 +.47 .22 -.00 18.43 +.08 33.91 +.40 7.99 +.09 29.86 +.67 9.39 -.11 57.46 +.60 8.80 +.07 28.70 +.68 48.05 +.56 46.90 +.95 43.58 -.28 13.54 +.36 64.91 +1.85 43.49 +.65 16.09 +.30 1.41 +.04 17.10 +.38 48.46 +.79 25.88 +.29 38.05 +.34 6.32 +.18 30.86 +.61 22.66 +.79 37.20 +.65 4.41 +.02 54.95 +.56 1.59 -.05 4.40 -.02 42.09 +.09 25.97 +.51 10.41 +.08 17.28 -.16 11.83 +.11 67.81 +.81 2.31 -.01 8.48 +.20 1.72 5.10 +.05 10.28 +.09

E-F-G-H E-House 0.25 17.59 +.85 ETrade rs 13.61 +.55 eBay 24.06 +.03 EMC Cp 19.57 +.42 EMCOR 24.24 +.13 ENI 2.51 41.49 +.38 EOG Res 0.62 89.49 -.45 EQT Corp 0.88 34.05 +.07 eResrch 7.52 EagleBulk 4.97 +.07 EagleMat 0.40 24.16 +.73 EaglRkEn 0.10 6.17 +.08 ErthLink 0.64 8.61 +.03 EstWstBcp 0.04 15.64 +.35 Eastgrp 2.08 37.55 +1.08 EastChm 1.76 64.15 -.10 EKodak 4.00 +.22 Eaton 2.32 76.06 +1.20 EatnVan 0.64 27.48 +.48 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.35 +.03 EVRiskMgd 1.80 13.58 -.27 EV TxAd 1.29 15.23 +.12 EV TxDiver 1.62 11.38 EVTxMGlo 1.53 10.54 +.06 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.63 +.10 Ebix Inc s 18.76 +.18 EchelonC 8.07 +.20 Ecolab 0.62 49.15 +.54 Ecopetrol 1.34 38.98 -1.45 EdisonInt 1.26 34.61 -.12 EducMgt n 8.27 +.21 EducRlty 0.20 7.23 +.12 EdwLfSci s 60.42 +1.48 8x8 Inc h 1.58 +.16 ElPasoCp 0.04 12.11 +.24 ElPasoPpl 1.60 32.46 +.60 Elan 4.53 +.11 EldorGld g 0.05 19.46 +.20 ElectArts 16.36 +.25 EBrasAero 0.38 26.78 +.49 EMS 49.65 +.13 EmersonEl 1.34 49.13 +.57 EmployH 0.24 15.17 +.10 EmpIca 9.31 -.02 Emulex 9.95 +.17 EnbrEPtrs 4.11 55.15 +.60 Enbridge 1.70 51.18 +.38 EnCana g s 0.80 28.19 +.08 EncoreEn 2.00 18.18 -.67 EndvrInt 1.20 +.01 EndvSilv g 3.81 +.18 EndoPhrm 28.15 +.29 EndurSpec 1.00 37.29 -.16 Ener1 3.26 +.06 Energen 0.52 44.21 -.04 Energizer 66.40 +.58 EngyConv 4.37 +.09 EnrgyRec 3.43 +.11 EngyTEq 2.16 35.43 +.29 EngyTsfr 3.58 47.08 +.43 EgyXXI rs 20.60 -.20 EnergySol 0.10 4.95 +.14 Enerpls g 2.16 23.53 +.22 Enersis 0.68 22.85 +.01 EnerSys 23.20 +.35 ENSCO 1.40 42.79 -.74 Entegris 4.02 +.02 Entercom 6.71 +.79 Entergy 3.32 79.93 -.40 EntPrPt 2.30 38.07 +.51 EntGaming .25 +.02 EnterPT 2.60 44.38 -.01 EntropCom 8.27 +.33 EnzonPhar 10.58 +.17 Equifax 0.16 30.42 +.19 Equinix 95.95 +2.25 EqLfPrp 1.20 53.94 +.38 EqtyOne 0.88 16.82 +.45 EqtyRsd 1.35 48.10 +.26 EricsnTel 0.28 10.38 +.11 EssexPT 4.13 109.82 +.70 EsteeLdr 0.55 58.36 +.28 EtfSilver 19.64 +.31 EthanAl 0.20 15.50 +.99 Euronet 15.20 +.46 EverestRe 1.92 80.50 EvergE rs 1.74 EvrgrSlr h .68 -.01 ExcelM 5.31 +.02 ExcoRes 0.16 13.99 +.02 Exelixis 3.50 +.18 Exelon 2.10 41.72 +.06 ExeterR gs 6.75 +.30 ExideTc 4.27 +.01 Expedia 0.28 25.38 +.89 ExpdIntl 0.40 42.03 +1.08 Express n 12.98 -.11 ExpScrip s 43.79 -.06 ExprsJet 6.68 ExterranH 22.93 -.02 ExtraSpce 0.33 15.95 -.03 ExxonMbl 1.76 61.06 +.15 EZchip 24.04 +1.44 Ezcorp 19.16 +.58 F5 Netwks 91.11 +.37 FBR Cap 3.51 +.07 FEI Co 17.25 +.25 FLIR Sys 26.28 +.12 FMC Corp 0.50 64.49 +.66 FMC Tech 65.91 +1.12 FNBCp PA 0.48 7.95 -.03 FSI Intl 2.79 -.06 FTI Cnslt 33.75 +.22 FactsetR 0.92 77.11 +.75 FairIsaac 0.08 23.60 +.19 FairchldS 8.24 +.17 FalconStor 3.55 +.20 FamilyDlr 0.62 43.50 +.22 Fastenal 0.84 48.97 +1.79 FedExCp 0.48 81.72 +.35 FedRlty 2.68 81.87 +.24 FedSignl 0.24 5.62 +.12 FedInvst 0.96 21.53 +.05 FelCor 4.33 +.22 Ferrellgs 2.00 26.08 -.56 Ferro 11.67 +.07 FibriaCelu 17.32 +.92 FidlNFin 0.72 14.68 -.02 FidNatInfo 0.20 27.25 +.81 FifthStFin 1.26 10.31 +.21 FifthThird 0.04 11.72 +.06 Finisar rs 13.61 +.34 FinLine 0.16 14.26 +.76 FstAFin n 0.24 15.66 +.11 FstBcpPR .43 -.05 FstCashFn 25.16 +.44 FstCwlth 0.04 5.20 -.08 FFnclOH 0.40 16.27 +.27 FstHorizon 0.75 10.71 +.13 FstInRT 4.60 +.02 FMidBc 0.04 11.68 +.20 FstNiagara 0.56 11.39 -.19 FstSolar 134.89 +4.72 FT RNG 0.08 15.61 +.16 FirstEngy 2.20 37.46 +.01 FstMerit 0.64 17.85 Fiserv 52.52 +.87 FlagstB rs 2.47 +.02 Flagstone 0.16 10.19 -.13 Flextrn 5.48 +.30 Flotek h 1.55 +.12 FlowrsFds 0.80 25.85 +.08 Flowserve 1.16 96.97 +2.81 Fluor 0.50 47.42 +1.08 FocusMda 19.38 +.02 FEMSA 0.32 50.99 +1.09 FootLockr 0.60 12.44 +.11 ForcePro 4.19 +.14 FordM 11.71 +.10 FordC pfS 3.25 47.28 +.34 ForestCA 12.10 +.38 ForestLab 29.19 +1.54 ForestOil 28.00 +.48 FormFac 7.19 +.24 Fortinet n 21.83 +.85 Fortress 3.52 FortuneBr 0.76 47.12 +.67 Fossil Inc 49.91 +1.11 FosterWhl 22.99 +1.00 FranceTel 1.77 20.74 +.07 FrankRes 0.88 101.06 +.70 FrkStPrp 0.76 11.93 -.08

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

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D 0.16 11.88 +.80 .99 +.06 1.20 76.96 +.77 .05 22.09 +.09 7.45 +.08 0.75 7.89 +.05 12.30 +.15 1.40 27.54 +.49 1.10 -.06 0.12 8.65 -.01 6.74 +.16 5.36 +.52 8.22 -.01 1.12 28.81 +.17 0.20 4.87 +.20 4.47 -.01 4.52 +.08 23.61 +.18 8.50 +.24 30.23 +2.22 0.84 13.12 +.20 0.48 4.79 +.09 1.68 16.35 +.31 0.14 14.29 +.09 1.28 25.71 +.14 18.50 +.22 7.10 +.07 0.16 13.48 +.72 0.40 17.43 +.22 0.20 50.75 +.98 1.50 27.63 -.04 29.65 +.36 .28 29.21 +1.92 1.52 +.07 16.11 +.07 4.83 +.33 23.95 +.30 1.68 58.95 +1.17 0.48 15.15 +.14 14.80 +.36 0.32 4.42 -.21 1.12 36.17 +.11 3.15 +.05 .41 +.01 17.95 +.25 0.18 14.67 +.31 0.44 18.30 +.18 1.64 43.74 +.45 11.35 +.13 70.80 +.42 22.57 -.02 15.12 +.99 0.21 13.99 +.05 4.89 +.05 0.18 6.04 -.08 2.01 +.01 28.41 +.87 33.15 +.13 0.52 14.31 +.06 1.98 38.95 +.17 1.77 -.04 0.40 6.06 +.03 3.77 +.01 5.13 +.35 0.08 39.06 +.27 16.41 +.21 1.62 -.01 0.40 13.86 +.31 0.16 14.50 +.31 0.18 43.80 +.39 4.81 +.06 1.40 139.78 +.04 1.08 72.11 +.56 13.72 +.02 10.13 +.60 463.18 +2.85 1.64 26.15 +.07 26.88 +.61 0.80 29.18 +.39 15.40 +.40 2.16 110.84 +1.25 1.42 +.04 6.69 +.10 17.30 +.27 0.92 23.05 +.35 3.26 +.02 3.27 +.22 2.14 +.02 0.07 5.27 +.05 0.83 18.90 -.07 31.33 +.49 9.38 +.17 26.70 +.23 12.47 +.27 1.80 74.22 +1.66 1.68 57.90 -.17 11.60 +.20 27.32 +.59 1.16 +.05 8.45 +.02 0.52 18.97 -.10 0.64 34.29 +1.16 8.95 -.14 40.41 +1.29 0.58 25.82 -.01 1.86 36.74 +.27 0.81 167.36 +.92 0.86 25.68 +.78 2.77 -.09 1.72 25.48 +.03 1.70 50.36 +.29 26.75 +.15 28.68 +.72 23.40 +.52 0.36 30.13 +.40 7.91 +.03 25.79 +.91 1.27 1.00 44.17 +.10 1.42 -.06 46.20 +.51 0.40 26.14 +.52 34.06 +1.26 6.11 0.07 10.52 +.42 1.00 43.45 +.28 12.20 +1.94 0.82 22.96 +1.08 0.30 10.45 +.03 0.20 21.77 +.33 1.00 43.02 +1.35 4.65 29.52 +.16 1.24 24.33 -.15 5.17 +.10 3.22 -.01 2.76 47.31 +.48 0.92 21.99 +.25 6.81 +.25 1.20 24.02 +.10 24.73 +.09 17.18 +.23 21.73 +.15 0.08 15.21 +.14 4.17 +.02 5.79 +.09 1.80 46.70 +.43 10.01 +.27 0.24 39.04 +.24 .52 +.02 54.75 +.14 1.00 56.19 -.19 2.17 -.05 0.20 4.90 +.03 1.28 46.99 -.18 9.47 +.38 0.40 54.89 +1.78 49.33 +.37 0.32 39.68 +.47 17.95 +.17 20.16 +.67 24.16 +.20 1.70 32.54 +.32 0.41 33.60 +.70 0.75 20.24 +.47 0.60 26.84 +.51 1.08 +.01 14.80 +.23 0.95 29.41 +.74 45.00 +.27 2.32 52.60 +.12 29.36 +.08 34.00 +.20 1.21 42.01 +1.13 0.32 17.03 -.17 0.84 43.99 +.39 16.13 -.36 54.06 +1.20 1.80 20.76 +.49 0.04 13.85 +.20 0.28 5.38 +.11 3.88 +.20 0.60 11.82 +.28 29.87 +.32 49.81 +.26

Nm HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon HutchT Hyatt n Hyperdyn

D 0.48 34.61 +.36 0.04 5.68 +.21 0.40 9.59 -.01 20.98 +1.27 3.11 +.14 39.44 +.98 1.16 +.02

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25.66 +.44 0.06 18.58 +.41 0.53 43.10 +.12 15.95 +.22 0.50 23.46 0.54 7.26 +.10 9.60 +.16 1.76 22.38 -.02 2.13 24.95 +.05 0.33 5.55 3.87 +.21 12.24 +.05 0.81 22.25 +.02 2.58 70.82 +.27 0.42 26.86 +.22 0.96 32.16 +.35 0.60 22.15 +.33 0.30 20.23 +.15 0.48 16.41 +.05 0.16 9.61 -.03 0.39 49.66 +.02 0.25 13.35 +.08 0.75 49.95 +.43 0.38 12.53 -.03 1.37 41.29 +.18 2.26 38.86 +.47 0.21 12.37 +.01 0.44 15.53 +.07 1.20 56.58 -.27 0.68 69.87 +.03 19.28 +.32 1.04 49.55 +.37 1.67 45.49 +.18 2.56 107.55 -.20 0.87 55.96 +.01 0.68 40.71 +.41 0.94 78.54 +1.01 2.24 109.86 +1.03 3.83 108.27 -.14 0.59 41.54 +.07 5.39 111.59 -.14 0.64 41.03 +.47 5.64 110.13 -.08 1.09 56.17 +.50 0.36 33.06 +.34 1.22 47.15 +.34 1.18 52.72 +.48 3.74 104.88 -1.12 3.79 97.89 -.41 1.13 84.20 -.02 1.38 52.01 +.29 0.69 38.95 +.47 0.50 46.79 +.78 1.22 86.04 +1.17 0.94 75.55 +.93 8.10 87.60 +.14 81.84 +.97 1.83 62.73 +.81 1.42 55.86 +.32 1.20 57.24 +.43 0.71 48.50 +.50 1.07 60.42 +.62 1.04 58.79 +.53 3.36 105.02 +.03 0.44 69.12 +.99 0.77 63.20 +.69 2.97 117.15 -.16 2.89 39.71 -.06 1.14 64.46 +.66 0.74 20.62 +.11 1.81 53.25 +.66 0.08 11.65 +.26 0.63 51.25 +.46 0.56 55.85 +.60 1.02 35.59 +.29 3.84 +.14 1.00 45.38 +.88 55.58 +1.46 .29 +.02 22.83 +.30 15.72 +.17 0.60 32.22 +.95 .99 +.06 1.36 44.26 +1.48 44.76 +.87 14.96 +.57 18.56 +.43 5.62 +.18 3.00 +.07 16.92 +.87 13.25 +.35 2.43 +.45 13.99 -.05 1.36 27.54 -.31 2.82 37.56 -.08 9.02 +.22 7.16 +.03 33.79 +.74 1.52 -.01 0.54 59.77 +.07 0.28 34.31 +.62 15.93 +.23 0.57 8.04 +.29 .98 +.03 14.60 +.56 21.86 +.35 5.66 +.32 7.11 +.11 2.72 49.66 -.31 0.63 18.28 +.14 16.58 -.10 100.65 +1.24 0.42 16.34 +.18 25.61 +.26 0.04 14.01 +.46 16.78 -.04 11.28 +.22 11.31 +.55 2.60 125.04 -.73 4.84 +.05 1.08 47.67 +.28 0.24 15.37 +.33 0.50 21.99 +.41 19.69 +.52 0.16 23.76 +.49 60.18 -.32 9.03 +.22 0.48 10.59 +.30 13.60 +.38 12.99 -.01 23.87 +.85 44.00 +.38 277.32 +3.26 0.44 19.28 +.28 1.03 11.84 0.31 4.57 +.05 13.59 -.17 0.69 8.41 +.01 9.22 +.31 0.25 21.03 +.51 21.92 +.75 8.12 +.12 6.81 -.15 0.59 21.92 +.02 58.03 +.38 18.83 +.12 .67 +.01 33.24 +1.46 6.45 +.12 24.47 +.36 9.91 +.30 0.20 38.16 +.42 1.80 32.58 +.25 1.68 25.29 +.04 0.28 11.40 +.47 0.38 24.22 22.15 +1.06 .92 +.11 36.81 +.81 6.34 +.19 1.90 +.06 16.65 +.03 0.04 9.49 +.13 0.33 29.30 +1.17 9.81 +.54 0.30 23.09 -.21 6.00 +.01 27.00 +1.64 42.53 +.49 1.93 +.03 2.16 58.61 +.32 0.52 28.30 +.49 0.20 16.97 +.57 0.20 79.67 +1.47 40.89 -.23 0.70 62.50 +2.34 28.28 +.65

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D

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1.92 1.62

0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.36 4.36

0.10

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1.16 0.38

1.60 0.46

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1.45 2.52 0.25

4.50 0.44 1.44

4.39 +.24 23.20 -.20 41.38 -1.05 11.66 +.21 24.31 +.14 9.44 +.12 10.21 -.03 8.45 +.34 29.77 +.78 19.18 -.21 1.59 +.07 36.24 +.85 12.47 +.48 25.96 +.07 50.02 +.12 11.43 +.07 2.98 8.09 +.05 26.62 +.54 3.96 +.21 8.44 +.06 7.93 +.08 33.06 +.44 65.89 +.50 15.59 +.29 68.42 +.47 61.25 +1.06 11.95 -.10 32.68 +.22 9.17 +.08 17.00 +.24 38.00 -.05 12.29 +.43 12.54 +.08 19.43 +.12 2.67 -.02 49.31 +.91 2.86 -.07 12.46 -.08 14.34 +.63 30.35 -.03 4.26 +.14 20.38 +.32 5.90 +.04 8.21 -.24 8.91 69.91 +.64 28.37 +.65 7.65 +.50 15.22 +.92 3.39 +.07 19.50 +.17 4.24 +.12 2.03 -.02 7.72 +.64 74.56 +.56 3.90 -.05 37.73 +.93 29.72 +1.48 37.41 +.19 30.07 +.68 21.70 +.67 4.48 +.04 8.02 +.11 24.77 -.65 32.07 -.63 10.34 -.07 77.39 +1.29 27.01 +.50 20.58 +.49 31.23 +.58 13.98 +.24 43.16 -.38 22.69 +.45 1.10 +.02 1.47 +.01 7.07 +.18 37.22 +.59 10.06 -.01 1.27 -.01 4.15 +.12 28.57 +.35 28.58 +.34 11.49 +.21 47.91 +.89 60.85 +.46 31.59 +.25 44.99 +.37 37.31 +1.37 32.08 +.59 34.31 +.11 4.44 +.48 25.75 +1.48 23.21 -.05 11.82 +.55 25.00 +.28 30.22 +.60 29.24 +.03 4.35 -.24 7.22 +.01 9.65 +.39 4.74 +.34 4.46 +.06 3.46 -.38 70.32 +.39 2.93 +.18 36.25 +.06 15.78 +.50 33.14 -.03 36.00 +.23 79.90 +1.70 7.40 +.40 21.94 +.70 98.87 +.87 34.36 +.65 22.37 +.92

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MCR MIN h MMT MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagelPt Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MMTrip n MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee

2.80 87.28 -.21 0.04 16.14 +.24 10.17 +.37 0.24 5.60 +.18 1.00 27.59 +.38 0.63 19.51 -.15 6.98 -.24 10.99 +.34 7.16 +.22 0.76 7.52 +.05 0.71 9.60 -.06 0.58 7.01 -.03 0.54 6.93 +.03 7.98 +.05 9.51 +.26 10.38 +.44 7.43 +.38 2.43 +.06 0.88 48.80 +1.48 31.54 +.72 2.00 43.62 +.38 1.80 32.40 +.44 0.20 20.71 +.52 45.22 +.11 2.93 49.68 +.50 1.83 +.13 3.19 -.02 1.20 83.40 +1.63 3.75 -.09 27.95 +.59 32.66 -.48 0.24 2.19 -.01 0.08 9.83 +.33 5.75 +.05 0.74 46.81 +1.89 0.52 12.21 +.32 1.00 31.87 +.32 22.75 -.60 0.11 53.57 +.72 0.08 31.36 +.01 31.12 +.47 0.42 44.93 +.36 0.45 53.37 +.87 0.18 77.69 -1.16 2.56 33.82 +.15 0.16 34.71 +1.11 0.80 24.30 -.03 0.04 6.98 +.19 21.48 -.93 4.70 +.30 1.60 77.15 +1.50 16.81 +.57 0.30 11.31 +.30 2.00 24.36 +.79 0.24 31.00 +.23 9.97 +.02 0.60 204.73 +3.65 0.75 21.66 +.45 2.12 -.01 0.84 16.57 +.21 3.01 +.23 1.04 40.52 +.16 13.56 +.34 2.20 75.02 +.48 0.94 29.35 +.85 0.72 59.50 +.71 14.56 -.06 47.25 +.09

Nm MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata Medifast Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MergeHlth MeridBio Meritage Mesab Metabolix Metalico Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MobileMini MobileTel s Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys MonroMuf Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap7 MS Cap8 MSChina rt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Movado Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO MyersInd Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NN Inc NRG Egy NV Energy NYMAGC NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NatAmUnv NBkGreece NatCineM NatCity pfA NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NRurU45 NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NatusMed Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Neogen s Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTc h NetSuite NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NGenBiof h NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor Nidec NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvPI2

D 0.90 55.37 +1.34 0.92 23.16 +.52 24.50 +.18 7.97 +.64 20.68 +.52 44.52 +.28 6.02 -.01 0.80 10.31 +.05 11.74 -.12 0.24 29.47 +.86 17.21 -.45 28.42 +.06 48.22 +.08 0.90 32.38 +.18 4.41 +.50 16.93 -.14 0.36 20.27 +.43 9.58 +.22 69.89 +1.49 1.52 35.35 -.27 0.92 31.17 +.76 2.55 -.03 0.76 19.43 +.74 18.97 +.13 1.70 28.16 -.85 11.18 -.58 3.26 -.08 0.62 22.42 +.04 0.28 8.13 -1.29 0.74 40.13 +.59 9.37 +.15 0.14 9.45 +.17 1.37 28.55 +.19 6.83 +.10 38.50 +.03 14.93 +.36 0.52 23.94 +.04 2.43 -.03 23.41 -.01 2.46 58.46 -.04 .57 +.03 0.09 17.59 +.29 7.24 96.30 +1.91 0.20 28.44 +1.03 6.97 +.16 9.11 10.32 +.17 4.80 -.04 14.53 +.10 21.19 +.04 48.09 +1.81 0.61 18.88 +.30 1.12 44.75 +.02 17.67 14.44 -.46 17.36 +.57 0.36 42.00 -1.21 1.12 54.35 +.36 11.52 -.14 0.36 16.04 -.09 0.42 22.83 +.88 0.20 25.68 +.27 1.65 24.73 +.03 1.61 24.63 +.01 .63 -.01 6.82 +.32 0.20 58.35 -.12 7.86 +.13 10.24 -.54 1.99 +.06 0.07 2.67 +.09 1.10 57.08 +.81 0.26 6.84 +.42 17.44 -.01 16.10 +.10 54.50 -.02 13.62 +.29 22.14 +.19 0.60 15.06 +.02 .81 37.00 -.24 8.46 +.11 21.59 +.55 0.44 13.07 +.05 0.40 25.71 +.03 1.20 29.35 +.26 16.86 +.10 0.14 23.92 +.54 14.37 +.27 6.55 +.29 18.75 +.26 0.24 5.00 +.28 2.78 +.15 0.72 17.06 +.46 1.66 24.31 -.05 11.65 +.52 1.38 44.50 -.16 7.17 42.47 -.25 0.40 39.79 +.60 0.04 6.09 -.06 1.52 25.18 +.22 1.49 24.95 -.03 0.40 13.19 +.33 1.84 39.05 -.12 2.16 26.64 +.32 12.48 -.02 0.24 5.54 -.02 45.01 +1.47 14.20 +.80 1.71 +.06 30.73 -.11 11.39 12.90 +.12 24.87 +.26 43.07 +1.16 39.90 -.30 20.84 +.68 138.00 +3.09 2.63 -.06 16.97 +.48 .93 +.08 19.76 +.18 1.43 +.04 0.24 3.65 +.04 5.65 -.09 23.07 +.24 11.50 -.12 4.86 +.14 .18 -.01 6.42 +.12 1.36 37.72 -.37 100.50 +.42 2.01 +.02 1.00 16.04 -.05 7.77 +.23 0.28 12.32 -.21 2.59 +.03 0.20 15.73 +.26 50.01 +.77 0.60 61.53 +1.21 8.98 +.03 10.37 +.23 0.15 13.26 +.26 0.15 14.90 +.21 0.20 19.60 +.25 2.00 54.64 +.02 0.92 17.67 -.03 1.86 43.57 -.11 0.17 21.72 -.91 1.08 72.96 +1.10 17.55 +.22 21.81 +.08 0.20 33.02 -.31 0.72 72.67 +1.49 0.56 9.04 +.14 5.58 -.04 1.55 27.30 +.31 0.80 32.76 +2.44 1.44 57.13 +1.11 3.30 +.04 1.36 28.47 -.43 1.03 29.21 -.43 15.20 +.24 1.12 47.22 -.18 3.01 +.04 1.88 57.67 +1.10 0.40 3.45 +.11 0.40 11.17 +.17 7.31 +.03 1.99 53.00 -.30 6.16 +.06 2.32 -.02 5.84 +.08 24.45 +.79 1.41 87.85 +.10 1.60 38.10 -.30 1.12 16.77 -.01 0.50 26.97 -.13 30.60 +.49 15.44 +.27 1.44 38.44 +.48 0.70 18.08 +.26 0.47 10.12 -.06 0.75 8.14 +.04 0.75 8.61 +.07 0.89 15.12

D

NuvQualPf 0.58 7.82 +.07 NuvQPf2 0.65 8.28 +.01 Nvidia 9.57 +.17 NxStageMd 16.57 +.29 O2Micro 6.02 -.01 OCZ Tech 2.00 +.06 OGE Engy 1.45 39.55 -.23 OM Group 26.72 -.08 OReillyA h 49.65 +.78 OSI Sys 31.54 +.40 OasisPet n 17.87 +.40 OcciPet 1.52 77.84 +.98 Oceaneer 52.31 +.50 OceanFr rs .93 -.04 Och-Ziff 0.85 14.06 +.91 Oclaro rs 11.22 +.33 OcwenFn 9.17 +.05 OfficeDpt 3.92 +.19 OfficeMax 11.31 +.64 OilSvHT 2.60 102.87 +.52 OilStates 43.12 +.45 Oilsands g .52 +.03 OldDomF s 25.06 +.07 OldNBcp 0.28 9.63 +.08 OldRepub 0.69 12.96 +.04 Olin 0.80 18.66 -.20 OmegaHlt 1.44 22.23 +.21 Omncre 0.13 20.55 +.65 Omnicom 0.80 36.05 +.24 OmniVisn 21.39 +.06 OnSmcnd 6.54 +.12 1800Flowrs 1.60 +.04 ONEOK 1.84 44.04 -.19 OnyxPh 25.46 +.58 OpenTxt 44.80 +.03 Opnext 1.43 Oracle 0.20 22.48 -.14 OrbitalSci 13.37 -.01 Orbitz 5.68 +.55 Orexigen 5.43 +.84 OrientEH 9.60 +.08 OrienPap n 4.25 +.03 OriginAg 7.42 +.19 OrionMar 12.03 -.35 OrmatTc 0.20 28.67 +.29 OrsusXel .25 +.11 Orthovta 1.82 +.15 OshkoshCp 25.57 -.03 Osteotech 6.40 -.01 OvShip 1.75 34.49 +1.01 OwensM s 0.71 27.36 +.32 OwensCorn 27.55 +.55 OwensIll 27.23 +.73 OxfordInds 0.44 23.01 +1.63 Oxigene h .30 +.01 PDL Bio 1.00 5.78 +.06 PF Chng 0.42 46.21 +2.11 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.70 -.08 PGT Inc 2.30 +.01 PHH Corp 18.97 +.03 PMC Sra 7.20 +.15 PMI Grp 3.30 +.06 PNC 0.40 54.11 +.92 PNM Res 0.50 11.79 -.01 POSCO 1.43 103.46 -1.70 PPG 2.20 68.92 +.76 PPL Corp 1.40 27.65 -.20 PSS Wrld 19.04 +.05 Paccar 0.36 44.40 +.98 PacerIntl 5.44 +.03 PacCapB .82 +.04 PacEth h .57 -.01 PacSunwr 4.04 +.04 PackAmer 0.60 23.70 +.52 Pactiv 32.20 +.10 PaetecHld 4.25 +.01 Palatin .18 +.01 PallCorp 0.64 36.72 +.83 PanASlv 0.05 25.05 +.56 Panasonic 0.11 12.88 -.10 PaneraBrd 85.21 +2.26 Pantry 20.32 +.72 ParamTch 17.93 +.13 ParaG&S 1.34 +.04 ParkDrl 3.91 +.04 ParkerHan 1.08 63.70 +1.50 PartnerRe 2.00 76.32 +.52 PatriotCoal 11.06 -.04 Patterson 0.40 26.19 +.49 PattUTI 0.20 15.49 +.19 Paychex 1.24 26.00 +.50 PeabdyE 0.28 45.61 +.77 PeetsCfeT 36.34 +1.32 Pegasys lf 0.12 23.15 +.66 Pengrth g 0.84 9.92 +.01 PnnNGm 29.65 +.79 PennVa 0.23 14.69 -.10 PennWst g 1.80 18.60 -.08 PennantPk 1.04 10.22 +.05 Penney 0.80 21.41 +.66 PenRE 0.60 11.33 +.27 Penske 12.82 +.43 Pentair 0.76 31.40 +.36 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.72 -.01 PepBoy 0.12 9.94 +.58 PepcoHold 1.08 18.35 PepsiCo 1.92 64.97 +.08 PerfectWld 24.34 -.78 PerkElm 0.28 22.20 +.13 Perrigo 0.25 57.90 -.09 PetChina 3.97 111.59 +.01 Petrohawk 15.78 +.31 PetrbrsA 1.18 31.83 +.71 Petrobras 1.18 35.99 +.92 PetroDev 28.47 -.65 PtroqstE 6.13 +.09 PetsMart 0.50 33.79 +.71 Pfizer 0.72 16.40 +.12 PhmHTr 7.59 61.84 +.35 PharmPdt 0.60 24.04 +.47 Pharmacyc 7.61 +.26 Pharmerica 8.70 +.76 PhilipMor 2.32 53.29 +.32 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.94 +.25 PhlVH 0.15 50.33 +2.41 PhnxCos 1.99 +.14 PhnxTc 4.15 +.10 PiedNG 1.12 27.95 +.02 PiedmOfc n 1.26 18.50 -.42 Pier 1 7.65 +1.11 PimIncStr2 0.78 10.08 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.82 +.04 PinnclEnt 10.69 +.34 PinnaclFn 8.94 -.20 PinWst 2.10 40.76 -.14 PionDrill 5.82 +.01 PioNtrl 0.08 61.25 +.87 PitnyBw 1.46 19.81 +.07 PlainsAA 3.77 61.27 -.03 PlainsEx 24.64 -.13 Plantron 0.20 28.33 +.21 PlatUnd 0.32 40.73 -.07 Plexus 24.28 +.82 PlumCrk 1.68 35.56 +.20 Polaris 1.60 57.26 +1.34 Polo RL 0.40 79.91 +1.07 Polycom 28.47 -.29 PolyOne 10.58 +.01 Polypore 28.90 +.44 Poniard h .47 +.04 Pool Corp 0.52 19.40 -.07 Popular 2.75 +.05 PortGE 1.04 20.27 -.28 PostPrp 0.80 27.00 +.38 PostRock n 4.40 +1.41 Potash 0.40 148.55 +2.60 Potlatch 2.04 33.23 -.13 PwrInteg 0.20 29.52 +1.21 Power-One 11.32 +.54 PwshDB 22.80 +.16 PwShCurH 22.31 -.07 PS Agri 26.50 +.20 PS Gold 44.42 +.21 PS BasMet 20.79 +.23 PS USDBull 23.91 -.02 PS USDBear 25.88 PwShHiYD 0.34 8.00 PSS&PHQ 11.78 +.17 PSFinPf 1.31 17.97 +.03 PSETecLd 0.11 15.93 +.11 PSHYCpBd 1.58 17.98 -.01 PwShPfd 1.02 14.42 PShEMSov 1.66 27.73 PSIndia 0.11 22.64 -.19 PwShs QQQ 0.26 45.26 +.50 PSS&PBW 0.26 20.92 +.11 Powrwav 1.86 +.02 Pozen 6.79 -.07 Praxair 1.80 86.15 -.50 PrecCastpt 0.12 121.61 +1.66 PrecDrill 6.58 +.04 PrmWBc h .39 +.02 PriceTR 1.08 46.65 +.63 priceline 311.28 +4.44 PrideIntl 26.00 +.80 PrinFncl 0.50 24.79 +.33 PrivateB 0.04 11.78 +.31 ProAsr 54.93 -.04 ProShtDow 50.49 -.25 ProShtQQQ 42.34 -.48 ProShtS&P 51.34 -.49 PrUShS&P 32.67 -.62 ProUltDow 0.46 43.04 +.42 PrUlShDow 26.95 -.26 ProUltMC 0.06 44.04 +1.14 ProUltQQQ 56.28 +1.28 PrUShQQQ 17.42 -.40 ProUltSP 0.40 36.00 +.65 ProUShL20 31.96 +.68 PrUSCh25 rs 36.15 -.80 ProUSEM rs 44.22 -.17 ProUSRE rs 21.76 -.59 ProUSOG rs 62.44 -1.10 ProUSBM rs 32.60 -.69 ProUltRE rs 0.51 44.65 +1.04 ProUShtFn 20.89 -.36 ProUFin rs 0.17 52.67 +.95 PrUPShQQQ 57.88 -1.93 ProUltSemi 0.17 25.03 +.84 PrUPShR2K 48.42 -1.67 ProUltO&G 0.21 28.79 +.48 ProUBasM 0.13 31.74 +.65 ProShtR2K 40.81 -.42 ProUSR2K 20.40 -.47 ProUltR2K 0.02 27.86 +.61 ProSht20Tr 40.71 +.42 ProUSSP500 31.50 -.90 ProUltSP500 0.41 133.46 +3.63 ProUltCrude 9.24 +.20 ProUSSlv rs 27.96 -.91 ProUShCrude 14.86 -.32 ProSUltSilv 68.48 +2.08 ProUShEuro 22.50 -.07 ProctGam 1.93 60.07 +.27 ProgrssEn 2.48 43.65 -.18 ProgrsSoft 28.20 +.94 ProgsvCp 0.16 20.55 +.21 ProLogis 0.60 11.26 +.01 ProspctCap 1.21 9.43 +.08 ProspBcsh 0.62 31.03 +.40 Protalix 7.88 +.20

Nm

D

ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PureBio PMOT PPrIT

0.56 19.94 -.05 0.72 6.41 +.06 0.44 11.65 -.22 0.70 53.51 +.72 33.50 +.06 1.37 32.62 -.21 3.20 102.49 +1.86 8.61 +.20 1.88 -.03 0.80 12.24 +.06 0.71 6.77 -.05

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QuestCap g QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QuinStrt n QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfG RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk RaeSyst Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaptorPh n RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RightNow RINO Intl RioTinto s RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Rudolph rue21 n Rural/Met RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrEMSmC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SPLeIntTB SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SWS Grp SXC Hlth SabaSoftw Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salary.com Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi Sapient SaraLee Satcon h Satyam lf SauerDanf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc SchoolSp Schulmn Schwab SciGames ScolrPh Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeaChange SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SeahawkDr SealAir Sealy Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g

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D 2.40 95.36 +1.80 44.22 -.44 6.70 +.42 3.66 -.08 .99 +.01 33.92 +.77 27.18 +.34 3.49 +.04 0.16 13.15 -.26 18.45 +.18 3.63 -.06 4.95 -.06 11.33 +.12 6.13 +.14 4.06 +.18 0.84 53.08 -.77 16.37 -.17 1.60 59.63 -.12 17.87 +.17 1.20 43.36 +.54 0.62 45.14 +1.27 50.86 +.73 11.68 +.76 14.42 -.24 0.30 40.97 +.84 14.83 +.43 3.73 -.23 9.42 +.20 7.98 +.08 8.58 +.12 1.12 33.06 +1.05 3.32 +.03 0.28 29.06 +.14 0.20 29.21 +.84 27.64 +1.81 .28 1.82 36.84 -.06 1.43 31.80 +.16 0.60 23.77 +.34 0.02 11.53 +.03 33.78 +.23 9.17 -.15 1.00 21.32 +.22 20.00 +.03 12.41 +1.07 4.34 +.20 11.85 -.02 0.30 11.53 +.07 0.80 37.65 +.52 0.52 32.35 +.38 0.55 28.90 +.15 0.75 27.12 +.17 0.42 31.81 +.58 1.00 53.55 +.44 0.17 14.22 +.14 0.59 29.68 +.37 0.31 21.41 +.19 1.26 31.48 0.20 9.49 +.29 3.81 +.06 1.36 57.35 +.60 0.36 18.74 +.33 0.29 4.56 +.07 1.61 +.04 0.52 24.66 +.98 0.20 49.93 +.72 1.32 19.26 -.17 0.04 36.43 -.07 1.02 19.86 +.20 0.30 14.52 +.16 0.16 6.55 -.02 7.70 -.12 .78 -.01 66.50 -.06 0.60 29.90 +.68 0.06 5.06 -.09 0.15 13.97 +.21 36.27 +.43 0.12 4.99 +.02 14.75 +.40 11.98 +.11 3.78 +.06 3.00 149.41 +2.49 0.60 45.72 +1.08 21.46 +.45 .43 -.01 8.22 -.02 1.44 25.16 +.49 0.40 32.07 +.05 .39 -.01 0.60 34.59 +.51 5.76 +.04 11.19 +.07 10.74 +.09 3.67 9.22 +.17 8.48 +.22 0.04 23.95 +.30 1.51 -.02 22.63 +.61 22.13 10.30 +.26 0.35 10.11 +.17 4.43 +.45 0.04 8.39 +.08 8.27 +.08 7.55 +.10 27.92 -.20 26.90 +4.68 12.57 +.30 13.97 -.11 0.20 10.68 -.01 26.35 +.24 1.13 47.69 +.88 20.96 -.28 23.36 +.28 0.04 2.29 +.07 1.61 +.05 1.00 28.44 +.30 0.92 21.37 +.98 0.20 15.10 +.02 15.07 +.14 0.82 17.30 -.08 9.69 +.38 3.52 -.04 0.88 9.50 +.13 0.71 29.42 +.22 0.60 41.45 +.56 37.39 +.34 8.72 -.01 18.19 +.22 0.47 9.47 -.11 8.85 +.29 11.35 +.47 22.40 +.23 26.81 -.09 0.25 16.36 +.07 1.55 47.19 +.55 6.08 +.52 2.11 26.64 +.59 1.00 52.55 +.31 4.68 +.17 3.97 +.07 0.32 22.44 +.54 1.66 44.87 +1.39 38.40 +.74 0.10 3.75 -.08 0.40 36.85 +1.07 1.27 25.75 +1.00 1.90 22.26 +.08 1.12 11.95 -.04 11.20 3.12 -.09 1.65 14.15 +.09 0.85 7.28 0.68 13.95 -.01 1.63 23.60 +.12 4.78 68.69 +.10 1.35 14.15 +.10 0.45 30.23 +.21 13.52 +.25 0.08 7.49 +.28 0.44 18.86 +1.69 0.54 10.67 +.12 28.79 +.56 0.68 35.68 +.22 4.33 +.07 27.48 +.47 34.15 +.40 9.79 +.53 20.08 +.67 0.50 33.85 -.11 8.84 .31 -.00 21.06 +.61 11.95 +.19 16.08 +.46 18.64 -.13 8.79 +.10 0.72 51.51 +.40 0.30 32.68 +1.08 0.48 24.04 +.29 14.43 +.58 0.08 18.41 +.31 13.09 -.01 44.21 +.34 39.65 +1.13 9.12 -.03 1.16 36.00 +.30 33.72 +.67 2.10 81.87 +.86 32.88 +.80 14.99 +.31 1.00 41.71 +.52 1.00 42.05 +.92 17.37 +.47 1.04 1.60 54.70 +.72 0.85 31.40 +.64 0.52 35.17 +1.05 0.02 11.39 +.54 19.28 +.28 8.39 +.36 17.93 +.28 0.40 19.78 -.17 0.64 51.35 +.06 2.44 69.36 +.81 3.23 49.21 +.44 0.28 14.34 -.49 0.50 21.34 -.36 1.37 +.03 68.22 -.61 0.56 71.41 +1.18 6.38 +.23 1.60 36.52 +.34 0.84 48.19 -.56 2.80 +.01 7.65 61.25 +1.76 54.00 -.33 1.44 50.22 -.09 41.39 -.41 .26 1.64 -.01 14.00 -.01 29.56 +.56 27.91 +.80 0.32 18.39 +.28 7.16 +.18 0.16 70.72 +1.52 18.75 +.70 0.26 5.37 -.03

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Tourism

lected in the city increased nearly 1 percent over 200809, to $2.96 million, according to figures from Visit Bend, the city’s tourism promotion agency. The amounts collected in Bend increased seven straight months, from December to June, when compared with the same months the previous fiscal year. The trend continued in July, with receipts increasing 12 percent over the previous July, according to figures released Thursday by Visit Bend. Lodging tax collections in Deschutes County dropped about 7 percent for the 200910 fiscal year, to $2.97 million, from the prior year. Monthly collections, however, showed gains in five of 12 months, when compared with the same months the year before. The increase continued in July, showing 8 percent higher room taxes collected in unincorporated Deschutes County over last July, according to the information released Thursday. “It’s been a good (season),” Audette said, “a good July and August.”

Continued from B1 Hotel, motel and other lodging businesses traditionally do not sell out on Labor Day weekend, she said. Schools in some California districts started classes in August, although most public schools in Central Oregon begin next week. Golfers and other visitors in town for the holiday weekend should find plenty of activities. Along with the usual events — farmers markets, museum and art exhibits, and musical performances — the Sunrise to Summit race will take place Saturday on Mount Bachelor; The Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew Festival, featuring craft beer and select bourbons, will be held today and Saturday at the Des Chutes Historical Museum in Bend; Black Butte Ranch will hold its annual art show today and Saturday; and Sisters will host a Western and Native American Arts Festival on Saturday and Sunday. Nationally, AAA predicts a nearly 10 percent increase this year over last in the number of people — about 34.4 million people — who will travel more than 50 miles from their homes during the holiday weekend. In Oregon, the travel industry is a vital part of the state’s economy, according to Dean Runyan Associates. Last year, total direct travel spending in the state brought in $7.7 billion — which represented a 7.5 percent decrease from 2008, according to Dean Runyan Associates’ Oregon Travel Impacts study released in April. At the national level, spending in the tourism industry began to climb earlier in the year, according to the U.S. Travel Association. While economic indicators have softened recently, the organization predicts continued growth, on average, for the industry through the rest of this year, according to its August travel outlook. But it also predicts travel will weaken in December. After the devastation brought by the economic crisis, tourism in Central Oregon started to recover in the second half of the 2009-10 fiscal year, which ended June 30, judging by the amount of lodging taxes collected. Room taxes, a gauge of the industry’s health, collected in the city of Bend and unincorporated Deschutes County plummeted by 14 percent and 9.5 percent, respectively, in the 2008-09 fiscal year compared with 2007-08. For the 2009-10 fiscal year, however, total room taxes col-

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Beef

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 B5

of toxic E. coli illegal in ground beef until it has developed a rapid test that can detect those strains in packing plants. Such tests are not expected to be ready until at least late next year. The beef industry argued against declaring the additional E. coli strains illegal in an Aug. 18 letter that the American Meat Institute, a trade group, sent to the agriculture secretary, Tom Vilsack. Giving the strains illegal status could “cause more harm than good,” the letter said, by forcing costly testing when resources would be better spent on measures to prevent bacteria from getting into the meat in the first place. It said that measures the industry had taken to combat the most common strain of E. coli were also effective against the other strains, and it urged the agency to conduct further studies before making a decision. Finally, the letter pointed to the absence of beef-related outbreaks involving the rarer strains and concluded that they did not represent a public health emergency. James Hodges, the meat institute’s executive vice president, said that a single outbreak did not alter the industry’s position. “We have never said it wasn’t a potential public health problem,” Hodges said. “The debate is what’s the appropriate regulatory program.”

Continued from B1 “It might act as a catalyst,” James Marsden, a professor of food safety and security at Kansas State University, said about the outbreak and recall. “Clearly it’s back on the front burner, that’s for sure, and clearly USDA is under pressure.”

Appropriate response The U.S. Agriculture Department has been trying for several years to decide what to do about the additional strains of E. coli. The issue now falls in the lap of the Obama administration’s new head of food safety at the department, Dr. Elisabeth Hagen, who was appointed last month. Hagen has yet to say publicly what she plans to do. But in a written statement provided to The New York Times, she said, “In order to best prevent illnesses and deaths from dangerous E. coli in beef, our policies need to evolve to address a broader range of these pathogens, beyond E. coli O157: H7.” She added, “Our approach should ensure that public health and food safety policy keeps pace with the demonstrated advances in science and data about foodborne illness to best protect consumers.” The agency has said that it is reluctant to make additional forms

Michael Martin, a spokesman for Cargill, said the company was working to determine what had gone wrong.

Outbreaks The ground beef in the recall was produced June 11 at a Cargill packing plant in Wyalusing, Pa., and eventually sold through BJ’s Wholesale Club stores in eight East Coast states, according to the USDA. Later in June, a person in New York state fell ill with E. coli O26. In July, two people in Maine became sick, in separate incidents. Typical symptoms of E. coli infection are bloody diarrhea and stomach cramps, but severe cases can lead to kidney failure and sometimes can be fatal. Officials said none of the three people in this case was hospitalized. There have been occasional outbreaks of the rarer types of E. coli associated with beef in other countries but not here. In 2007, state investigators in North Dakota suspected that ground beef might have been the cause of an outbreak involving one of the rare E. coli strains, but they were unable to reach a definitive conclusion. Attention to the additional strains of E. coli increased this spring when there was a nationwide recall of romaine lettuce that had been linked to one of the rarer types of the bacteria.

THE 2010

Avakian Continued from B1 Asked about how the bureau responds to undocumented workers, Avakian said employment wage and hour laws protect people who are documented and undocumented. “When somebody works for somebody else, then they must be paid for the work that they did,” Avakian said. In that situation, immigration status is irrelevant to the bureau, he said. Additionally, unless the state fully funds education, Avakian said, it won’t be able to reach former employment levels, and won’t be able to attract new businesses with jobs. High taxes are not a top reason keeping business from moving to the state, he said, adding that he doesn’t believe Oregon’s taxes are high. “They want a trained work force,” Avakian said. “Until we invest in public education, we are not going to attract businesses.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

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NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 14 16 20 70 ... 35 19 ... 22 18 9 23 16 ... 16 81 10 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1252.50 $1251.50 $19.638

Pvs Day $1245.00 $1246.30 $19.359

Market recap 72.96 32.76 46.50 11.31 44.40 2.16 35.56 121.61 19.39 47.13 72.48 37.65 24.66 7.16 11.12 22.12 14.51 25.10 2.51 16.39

+1.10 +2.44 -.24 +.64 +.98 -.03 +.20 +1.66 +.30 +.60 +1.60 +.52 +.98 +.18 +.01 +.31 -.20 +.44 +.04 +.03

+10.4 -12.8 +3.2 -10.9 +22.4 -23.1 -5.8 +10.2 -8.9 -1.2 +17.6 -5.9 +6.9 +19.3 -17.1 -1.7 -25.0 -7.0 +19.5 +3.5

Prime rate Time period Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent 3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm BurgerKing SPDR Fncl

4624786 1447403 1265305 736664 639889

3.88 +.03 109.47 +1.01 13.28 +.07 23.59 +4.73 14.22 +.14

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MS eafe11 BurgerKing HWinstn g Compellent ChNBorun n

Last 20.00 23.59 12.20 17.80 9.91

Chg %Chg +4.60 +4.73 +1.94 +2.79 +1.53

+29.9 +25.1 +18.9 +18.6 +18.3

Losers ($2 or more) Name Methode KronosWd CollctvBrd IFM Inv n DrxSOXBr

Indexes

Last

Chg %Chg

8.13 31.49 12.51 5.40 37.36

-1.29 -13.7 -4.50 -12.5 -1.25 -9.1 -.46 -7.8 -2.53 -6.3

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g VantageDrl BootsCoots NovaGld g RexahnPh

22113 21591 20909 20310 20176

Name

4.81 1.48 2.99 7.31 1.27

Cisco Intel Microsoft PwShs QQQ BrcdeCm

+.06 +.08 +.01 +.03 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

Chg %Chg

Name

MtnPDia g Talbots wt TanzRy g SwedLC22 Ever-Glory

4.02 2.40 6.08 8.29 2.59

+.52 +14.9 +.27 +12.7 +.52 +9.4 +.62 +8.1 +.16 +6.6

PostRock n IndBkMI rs Sycamre rs Rdiff.cm Vitacost n

Losers ($2 or more) EstnLtCap NTS Rlty ChiMetRur HallwdGp DGSE

Last

Last

Chg %Chg

3.16 -.56 -15.1 3.65 -.35 -8.8 2.29 -.18 -7.3 35.25 -2.70 -7.1 2.51 -.14 -5.3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 20.52 18.28 23.94 45.26 5.60

+.26 +.14 +.04 +.50 +.41

Chg %Chg

4.40 +1.41 +47.2 2.43 +.45 +22.7 26.90 +4.68 +21.1 2.40 +.41 +20.6 6.72 +1.12 +20.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

EmmisC pf CarverBcp SuprtlH pfA Aetrium BBC pf II

Diary 2,147 877 106 3,130 163 13

584698 521943 470096 378931 353542

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

19.60 -3.30 -14.4 3.71 -.52 -12.3 8.00 -.71 -8.1 2.67 -.22 -7.6 9.84 -.76 -7.2

Diary 285 181 47 513 15 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,649 943 143 2,735 58 29

11,258.01 9,252.93 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 1,994.20 1,656.23 Amex Index 2,535.28 1,958.04 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 991.97 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,212.82 Wilshire 5000 745.95 552.27 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,320.10 4,342.03 396.87 6,966.25 1,933.53 2,200.01 1,090.10 11,443.72 632.26

+50.63 +58.62 -.49 +55.27 +11.12 +23.17 +9.81 +111.57 +7.27

YTD %Chg %Chg +.49 +1.37 -.12 +.80 +.58 +1.06 +.91 +.98 +1.16

52-wk %Chg

-1.04 +5.91 -.29 -3.04 +5.95 -3.05 -2.24 -.91 +1.10

+10.44 +17.70 +7.65 +6.41 +14.37 +10.93 +8.66 +10.69 +12.40

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

326.57 2,537.76 3,631.43 5,371.04 6,083.85 20,868.92 32,417.33 20,412.28 3,082.48 9,062.84 1,775.73 2,986.66 4,563.00 5,587.81

+.32 s +.24 s +.21 s +.09 s ... +1.19 s +.24 s +.21 s +.17 s +1.52 s +.63 s +.13 s +.80 s +.07 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9107 1.5389 .9484 .002011 .1468 1.2812 .1286 .011873 .076570 .0325 .000844 .1377 .9856 .0312

.9085 1.5446 .9501 .002006 .1467 1.2798 .1286 .011839 .076664 .0325 .000834 .1372 .9843 .0312

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.31 +0.14 -0.7 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.64 +0.04 +2.4 GrowthI 21.69 +0.25 -1.6 Ultra 18.92 +0.24 -2.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 15.98 +0.15 -3.3 AMutlA p 22.86 +0.14 BalA p 16.44 +0.08 +2.6 BondA p 12.39 -0.01 +7.7 CapWA p 20.61 +0.01 +4.6 CapIBA p 47.50 +0.10 +1.0 CapWGA p 32.39 +0.15 -3.3 EupacA p 37.16 +0.14 -3.1 FdInvA p 32.11 +0.27 -1.2 GovtA p 14.69 -0.03 +7.0 GwthA p 26.41 +0.22 -3.4 HI TrA p 10.93 +0.02 +8.2 IncoA p 15.61 +0.04 +2.9 IntBdA p 13.61 -0.01 +5.4 ICAA p 24.80 +0.18 -3.4 NEcoA p 22.06 +0.15 -1.9 N PerA p 24.98 +0.16 -2.6 NwWrldA 49.54 +0.18 +5.0 STBA p 10.14 -0.01 +2.2 SmCpA p 33.18 +0.27 +5.2 TxExA p 12.53 +6.8 WshA p 24.37 +0.15 +0.1 American Funds B: GrwthB t 25.49 +0.21 -3.8 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 27.00 +0.09 -4.4 IntlEqA 26.32 +0.10 -4.5 IntEqII I r 11.17 +0.04 -5.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.23 +0.15 -6.9 MidCap 27.49 +0.45 +7.6 MidCapVal 17.99 +0.22 +0.1 Baron Funds: Growth 41.93 +0.53 +1.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.04 -0.01 +8.9

DivMu 14.83 TxMgdIntl 14.30 +0.05 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.62 +0.10 GlAlA r 17.89 +0.06 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.71 +0.06 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.97 +0.06 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 44.13 +0.46 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 25.19 +0.33 AcornIntZ 35.30 +0.14 ValRestr 41.53 +0.46 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.80 +0.05 USCorEq2 9.22 +0.11 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 29.96 +0.19 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.31 +0.19 NYVen C 28.85 +0.19 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.63 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.19 +0.08 EmMktV 32.47 +0.14 IntSmVa 14.61 +0.09 LargeCo 8.63 +0.07 USLgVa 17.26 +0.21 US SmVa 20.17 +0.25 IntlSmCo 14.48 +0.07 Fixd 10.37 IntVa 16.32 +0.09 Glb5FxInc 11.62 2YGlFxd 10.30 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 62.89 +0.46 Income 13.40 -0.01 IntlStk 31.42 +0.21 Stock 92.48 +0.97 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.11 +0.13 NatlMunInc 10.01

+5.1 -6.4 -0.4 +0.3 -0.2 +0.5 -0.7 +2.2 +5.0 -2.6 -1.9 +1.4 -3.3 -3.1 -3.8 +6.9 +6.0 +3.9 -2.2 -0.9 +1.8 +2.8 +2.9 +1.1 -2.8 +6.4 +1.6 -0.6 +5.9 -1.4 -3.1 -3.2 +8.9

Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.16 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.02 FPACres 24.84 Fairholme 32.02 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.75 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.18 StrInA 12.57 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.36 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.67 FF2015 10.54 FF2020 12.61 FF2025 10.40 FF2030 12.34 FF2035 10.15 FF2040 7.08 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.30 AMgr50 14.17 Balanc 16.65 BlueChGr 37.28 Canada 51.01 CapAp 21.71 CpInc r 8.81 Contra 58.40 ContraK 58.43 DisEq 19.89 DivIntl 26.53 DivrsIntK r 26.55 DivGth 23.42 EmrMk 22.90 Eq Inc 38.36 EQII 15.85 Fidel 27.26 FltRateHi r 9.55 GNMA 11.92 GovtInc 10.91 GroCo 69.90 GroInc 15.52 GrowthCoK 69.94

+0.13 -3.0 +2.6 +0.11 +1.6 +0.24 +6.4 +0.04 +1.9 +0.16 -0.2 +6.7 +0.16 +0.06 +0.04 +0.06 +0.07 +0.08 +0.07 +0.05 +0.11 +0.06 +0.10 +0.51 +0.51 +0.28 +0.03 +0.54 +0.55 +0.20 +0.07 +0.08 +0.28 +0.03 +0.38 +0.16 +0.25 -0.01 -0.02 +1.06 +0.17 +1.07

+1.9 +1.8 +1.2 +0.7 +0.3 -0.5 -0.5 -1.2 +3.2 +2.8 -1.8 +5.2 +1.3 +6.3 +0.4 +0.5 -5.3 -5.2 -5.1 -1.1 +1.3 -1.2 -2.2 -3.5 +3.6 +7.0 +6.6 +1.3 -3.1 +1.5

HighInc r 8.66 +0.01 +7.1 Indepn 19.66 +0.30 -1.3 IntBd 10.70 -0.01 +7.9 IntmMu 10.47 +5.5 IntlDisc 28.73 +0.03 -5.3 InvGrBd 11.89 -0.02 +7.6 InvGB 7.45 +8.2 LgCapVal 10.92 +0.10 -2.9 LatAm 52.53 +0.35 +1.3 LevCoStk 22.79 +0.35 -0.6 LowP r 32.78 +0.21 +2.6 LowPriK r 32.82 +0.20 +2.7 Magelln 60.67 +0.73 -5.6 MidCap 23.72 +0.44 +1.5 MuniInc 12.96 +6.9 NwMkt r 16.05 +10.8 OTC 44.31 +0.71 -3.1 100Index 7.71 +0.06 -2.8 Ovrsea 28.10 +0.09 -9.1 Puritn 16.20 +0.10 +2.0 SCmdtyStrt 10.57 +0.09 -4.4 StIntMu 10.81 +3.2 STBF 8.48 +3.4 SmllCpS r 15.79 +0.24 -0.9 StratInc 11.22 +7.0 StrReRt r 8.94 +0.03 +5.1 TotalBd 11.02 -0.01 +7.9 USBI 11.62 -0.01 +7.3 Value 58.57 +0.77 +2.9 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 49.81 +0.60 +17.3 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 38.72 +0.35 -0.9 IntlInxInv 31.85 +0.06 -4.7 TotMktInv 31.46 +0.30 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 38.72 +0.35 -0.9 TotMktAd r 31.47 +0.31 First Eagle: GlblA 41.14 +0.34 +2.9 OverseasA 20.35 +0.17 +4.6 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.11 -0.01 +6.3 FoundAl p 9.63 +0.04 -0.3

HYTFA p 10.38 +8.8 IncomA p 2.05 +4.4 USGovA p 6.83 -0.01 +5.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +8.6 IncmeAd 2.04 +4.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.07 +4.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.11 +0.09 +0.3 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.19 NA GlBd A p 13.41 +0.04 +8.5 GrwthA p 15.85 +0.11 -5.7 WorldA p 13.17 +0.08 -5.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.43 +0.04 +8.2 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 35.15 +0.29 -4.6 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.04 +0.07 -6.2 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.64 +0.06 -4.2 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.70 +0.03 +3.6 Quality 18.05 +0.08 -6.1 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.07 +0.01 +7.3 HYMuni 8.80 -0.02 +11.4 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.01 -0.01 +8.2 CapApInst 31.02 +0.40 -5.9 IntlInv t 52.39 +0.25 -3.7 Intl r 52.98 +0.25 -3.4 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.45 +0.16 -4.0 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 29.43 +0.16 -3.9 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.70 +0.31 -2.4 Div&Gr 17.36 +0.13 -1.0 Advisers 17.55 +0.12 +0.6 TotRetBd 11.33 -0.01 +7.6 HussmnStrGr 13.35 +0.02 +4.5 Invesco Funds A:

Chart p 14.34 +0.11 -4.5 CmstkA 13.72 +0.12 +0.1 EqIncA 7.74 +0.21 +0.3 GrIncA p 16.69 +0.15 -2.7 HYMuA 9.65 +10.0 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.32 +0.08 -2.1 AssetStA p 21.92 +0.07 -1.6 AssetStrI r 22.10 +0.08 -1.5 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.62 +7.2 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.61 -0.01 +7.3 HighYld 7.88 +0.01 +7.6 IntmTFBd 11.19 +5.0 ShtDurBd 11.01 +2.7 USLCCrPls 17.76 +0.18 -2.3 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 44.60 +0.18 +4.9 PrkMCVal T 19.81 +0.20 +0.1 Twenty T 56.70 +0.51 -7.9 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.97 +0.07 +2.5 LSGrwth 11.56 +0.09 +1.0 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 20.04 +0.26 +1.1 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.31 -0.04 +7.6 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.63 -0.04 +7.4 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.08 +0.01 +5.0 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.62 +0.27 +2.2 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.88 +0.02 +8.2 StrInc C 14.42 +0.01 +7.4 LSBondR 13.83 +0.02 +8.1 StrIncA 14.35 +0.02 +8.0 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.30 -0.01 +8.8 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.90 +0.10 -2.7 BdDebA p 7.52 +0.01 +6.5 ShDurIncA p 4.64 +5.2

MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.14 +0.05 +1.7 ValueA 20.16 +0.14 -2.2 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.25 +0.14 -2.1 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.77 +0.01 +7.3 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.80 +0.06 -3.9 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 17.06 +0.04 +9.5 PacTiger 21.19 -0.01 +10.2 MergerFd 15.89 +0.02 +2.3 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.61 -0.01 +10.6 TotRtBdI 10.61 -0.01 +10.7 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.33 +0.06 +2.3 GlbDiscZ 27.70 +0.07 +2.5 QuestZ 17.19 NA SharesZ 19.29 +0.09 +0.5 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 37.90 +0.39 +0.4 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.05 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.11 +0.15 -1.7 Intl I r 17.27 +0.09 +2.6 Oakmark r 36.29 +0.36 -2.0 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.55 +0.02 +6.8 GlbSMdCap 13.24 +0.12 +3.7 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 37.05 +0.36 -7.2 DvMktA p 30.70 +0.05 +6.7 GlobA p 53.14 +0.44 +0.2 GblStrIncA 4.22 +11.8 IntBdA p 6.56 +0.01 +5.4 MnStFdA 28.26 +0.27 +0.5 RisingDivA 13.60 +0.08 -1.9 S&MdCpVl 26.76 +0.41 +0.7 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.34 +0.07 -2.5 S&MdCpVl 23.02 +0.36 +0.2 Oppenheimer C&M:

RisingDvC p 12.31 +0.08 -2.4 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.33 +5.6 RcNtMuA 7.31 -0.01 +8.8 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.42 +0.05 +7.0 IntlBdY 6.56 +0.01 +5.6 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.49 -0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 12.34 +0.01 +9.8 ComodRR 7.93 +0.06 +0.8 HiYld 9.08 +0.01 +8.8 InvGrCp 11.65 -0.02 +10.7 LowDu 10.57 +4.0 RealRtnI 11.37 -0.01 +7.1 ShortT 9.91 +1.6 TotRt 11.49 -0.01 +8.6 TR II 11.11 -0.01 +8.0 TRIII 10.20 -0.01 +8.8 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.57 +3.7 RealRtA p 11.37 -0.01 +6.8 TotRtA 11.49 -0.01 +8.2 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.49 -0.01 +7.7 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.49 -0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.49 -0.01 +8.5 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 41.53 +0.20 +7.4 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 34.74 +0.36 -2.3 Price Funds: BlChip 31.78 +0.41 -3.0 CapApp 18.54 +0.13 +2.1 EmMktS 31.09 +0.15 +3.3 EqInc 20.88 +0.20 +0.4 EqIndex 29.47 +0.27 -1.1 Growth 26.79 +0.34 -2.6 HlthSci 25.76 +0.28 -1.6 HiYield 6.57 +0.01 +7.7 IntlBond 9.95 -0.01 +2.5 IntlStk 12.61 +0.06 +0.1

MidCap 50.07 MCapVal 20.83 N Asia 17.69 New Era 41.68 N Horiz 27.13 N Inc 9.71 R2010 14.34 R2015 10.91 R2020 14.85 R2025 10.74 R2030 15.24 R2040 15.20 ShtBd 4.88 SmCpStk 28.54 SmCapVal 30.05 SpecIn 12.17 Value 20.47 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.69 VoyA p 19.98 RiverSource A: DEI 8.59 DivrBd 5.05 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.53 PremierI r 16.55 TotRetI r 11.21 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.84 S&P Sel 17.18 Scout Funds: Intl 28.53 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.16 AmShS p 36.12 Sequoia 118.34 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.27 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.32 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.68 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.50 IntValue I 25.05

+0.81 +0.28 +0.08 +0.43 +0.39 -0.01 +0.08 +0.07 +0.11 +0.09 +0.13 +0.14

+5.4 +0.5 +9.6 -4.5 +6.1 +7.5 +2.8 +2.2 +1.7 +1.2 +0.8 +0.3 +2.9 +0.39 +5.9 +0.23 +1.9 +0.01 +6.0 +0.21

+0.12 -2.1 +0.28 +1.3 +0.07 -1.8 -0.01 +7.5 +0.10 +0.8 +0.18 +1.5 +0.07 +4.5 +0.31 -0.4 +0.15 -0.9 +0.19 -1.2 +0.23 -2.9 +0.23 -3.1 +1.06 +7.7 -0.01 +8.9 +0.09 -4.8 +0.17 -3.5 +0.09 -0.9 +0.10 -0.6

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.86 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.33 CpOpAdl 64.09 EMAdmr r 34.98 Energy 102.81 500Adml 100.76 GNMA Ad 11.06 HlthCr 48.64 HiYldCp 5.59 InfProAd 25.79 ITsryAdml 11.85 IntGrAdm 53.89 ITAdml 13.98 ITGrAdm 10.28 LtdTrAd 11.20 LTGrAdml 9.79 LT Adml 11.36 MuHYAdm 10.75 PrmCap r 59.48 STsyAdml 10.88 ShtTrAd 15.98 STIGrAd 10.83 TtlBAdml 10.85 TStkAdm 27.15 WellslAdm 51.74 WelltnAdm 49.97 Windsor 38.87 WdsrIIAd 39.98 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.24 CapOpp 27.74 DivdGro 12.85 Energy 54.74 EqInc 18.28 Explr 59.14 GNMA 11.06 GlobEq 15.70 HYCorp 5.59 HlthCre 115.24 InflaPro 13.13 IntlGr 16.93 IntlVal 29.08

+0.02 +3.1 +7.3 -7.6 +2.7 -8.3 -0.9 +6.7 -3.1 +7.7 -0.05 +5.6 -0.03 +9.4 +0.22 -0.3 +6.4 -0.01 +10.8 +3.1 -0.06 +14.1 +6.5 +7.6 +0.49 -3.5 +2.9 +1.3 -0.01 +4.7 -0.02 +7.4 +0.26 -0.2 +0.04 +6.9 +0.19 +1.8 +0.41 -2.6 +0.34 -3.8

+0.74 +0.12 +0.94 +0.92 -0.01 +0.35

+0.11 +0.32 +0.09 +0.50 +0.13 +0.97 -0.01 +0.11 +0.84 -0.02 +0.07 +0.11

+4.2 -7.7 -1.4 -8.3 +1.6 +3.2 +6.6 +0.2 +7.6 -3.2 +5.6 -0.4 -5.0

ITIGrade 10.28 LifeCon 15.61 LifeGro 19.72 LifeMod 18.11 LTIGrade 9.79 Morg 14.99 MuInt 13.98 MuLtd 11.20 MuShrt 15.98 PrecMtls r 21.45 PrmcpCor 11.82 Prmcp r 57.31 SelValu r 16.39 STAR 17.63 STIGrade 10.83 StratEq 15.40 TgtRetInc 10.95 TgRe2010 21.23 TgtRe2015 11.63 TgRe2020 20.39 TgtRe2025 11.49 TgRe2030 19.48 TgtRe2035 11.65 TgtRe2040 19.09 TgtRe2045 12.05 USGro 15.38 Wellsly 21.35 Welltn 28.93 Wndsr 11.52 WndsII 22.52 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 100.74 Balanced 19.68 EMkt 26.58 Europe 24.32 Extend 33.94 Growth 26.67 ITBnd 11.60 MidCap 17.15 Pacific 9.73 REIT r 17.49 SmCap 28.48 SmlCpGth 17.39 SmlCpVl 13.56

-0.01 +10.7 +0.04 +4.3 +0.13 +1.4 +0.09 +3.2 -0.06 +14.0 +0.20 -1.8 +6.3 +3.0 +1.3 +0.29 +5.0 +0.13 -2.4 +0.48 -3.6 +0.19 +2.8 +0.08 +1.5 -0.01 +4.6 +0.19 +0.8 +0.02 +4.5 +0.08 +3.5 +0.05 +2.8 +0.11 +2.2 +0.07 +1.5 +0.13 +0.9 +0.09 +0.3 +0.14 +0.2 +0.09 +0.2 +0.18 -6.6 +0.01 +6.8 +0.11 +1.7 +0.12 -2.7 +0.19 -3.9

STBnd

10.68

TotBnd

10.85 -0.02 +7.3

TotlIntl

14.05 +0.04 -2.5

TotStk

27.14 +0.26 -0.3

Value

18.46 +0.15 +0.2

STBdIdx

10.68

+0.92 -1.0 +0.10 +2.9 +0.09 +2.6 +0.10 -6.2 +0.43 +3.9 +0.29 -1.9 -0.02 +11.2 +0.24 +4.8 +0.02 +0.5 +0.23 +19.8 +0.37 +3.6 +0.27 +3.3 +0.14 +3.9

TotBdSgl

10.85 -0.02 +7.4

TotStkSgl

26.21 +0.26 -0.2

+4.1

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9.08 +0.03

NS

33.98 +0.43 +4.0

FTAllWldI r

84.00 +0.31 -2.0

GrwthIst

26.68 +0.29 -1.8

InfProInst

10.51 -0.01 +5.7

InstIdx

100.10 +0.91 -0.9

InsPl

100.10 +0.90 -0.9

InsTStPlus

24.54 +0.25 -0.2

MidCpIst

17.21 +0.24 +5.0

SCInst

28.53 +0.37 +3.8

TBIst

10.85 -0.02 +7.4

TSInst

27.16 +0.27 -0.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

83.23 +0.75 -0.9 +4.2

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

10.92 +0.02 -1.1

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.87 -0.02 +10.9


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS: Learn the basics of site building using WordPress 3.0; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. SOCIAL MEDIA MEASUREMENT: Learn to measure your social media effectiveness and how to write targeted posts; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. THE FRESH WEB: A brief review of Web news for the week ending Sept. 3; free; noon-12:30 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

TUESDAY WRITING JOB DESCRIPTIONS THAT MEAN SOMETHING: Sponsored by the Central Oregon Employer Council and the Schwabe, Williamson and Wyatt law firm, the seminar will address what information needs to be included in a job description, what analysis processes are most effective and more. Registration required; $50; 7:30 a.m.-noon; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-388-6024 or Denise .A.Pollack@state.or.us. BE A TAX PREPARER: Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering an accelerated 80-hour course to prepare students for the Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners’ preparer exam. Cost does not include required text, which is about $50. Registration required. Call 541-383-7270. Class continues Tuesday evenings and Saturday mornings through Nov. 16; $389; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend.

WEDNESDAY BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Jim Lee, executive director of Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living, and Brian Newton, manager with Jones & Roth CPA and Business Consultants, will lead a discussion on running and governing a successful nonprofit; free for chamber members; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave.; 541-3890803. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVICE

PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol service permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-9234358, ext. 104, or www.cofood summit.yolasite.com.

THURSDAY

BE A TAX PREPARER: Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering an accelerated 80-hour course to prepare students for the Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners’ preparer exam. Cost does not include required text, which is about $50. Registration required. Call 541383-7270. Class continues Tuesday evenings and Saturday mornings through Nov. 16; $389; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend. REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506.

GREEN BUILDING CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS: Learn about the full range of features required for a home to be considered green and energy efficient. Distinguish between the region’s three most prominent green building certification programs: Earth Advantage New Homes, Energy Star Homes and LEED for Homes. Presented by Bruce Sullivan of Earth Advantage; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Neil Kelly, 190 N.E. Irving Ave., Bend; 541-382-7580. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY TRAINING INFORMATION MEETING: Learn more about Central Oregon Community College’s nutritional therapy training. For more information or to RSVP, go to http://noncredit .cocc.edu/nutrition or call 541383-7270; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

FRIDAY Sept. 10 CENTRAL OREGON FOOD SUMMIT: Sponsored by Wy’East Resource Conservation and Development, Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, OSU Extension Service, NeighborImpact and the Northwest Health Foundation, this conference will allow diverse sectors to collaborate and discuss building a sustainable Central Oregon food system. Mark Winne, author of “Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty,” will be the keynote speaker; $20 includes lunch; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon

SATURDAY Sept. 11

D I SPATC H E S $50. Registration required. Call 541383-7270. Class continues Tuesday evenings and Saturday mornings through Nov. 16; $389; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend. LEED EXAM PREP INFORMATION SESSION: Learn more about the specifics of LEED exams and how this industry qualification can be a career benefit; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 15 HUMAN RESOURCES ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL OREGON, LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW UPDATE: Hear an overview and analysis of new employment-related laws and regulations, and a review of significant state and federal court labor and employment cases affecting employers in Oregon; $25 for HRACO members, $35 for nonmembers; 7:30-11 a.m.; AmeriTel Inn, 425 S.W. Bluff Drive, Bend.

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

Sept. 14

Sept. 16

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISER INFORMATION SESSION: Learn more about Central Oregon Community College’s nine-month, in-depth program for building professionals, the “Sustainable Building Adviser” course, which begins in October; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. BE A TAX PREPARER: Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department is offering an accelerated 80-hour course to prepare students for the Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners’ preparer exam. Cost does not include required text, which is about

HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps needed to open a business. Cost includes handouts. Registration is required. Go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7290; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Gain a fresh perspective on today’s market and learn how Schwab’s expertise can help you enjoy more control over your finances. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Registration required by Sept. 14; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or www.schwab.com.

TuckMo Subs and Sandwiches, locally owned by Mark and Jamie Carothers and managed by their sons, Tucker and Morgan, has opened in Bend at the corner of U.S. Highway 20 and Dean Swift Road. TuckMo serves hot sandwiches as well as soups, salads and a house, no-bean tri-tip steak chili. TuckMo also offers a unique children’s menu, and features flat-screen TVs, music and free Wi-Fi. TuckMo is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends. For more information, visit www.tuckmo.com The public is invited in for a free compact sub and medium fountain drink at the shop’s “Opening Taster Event” on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Tumalo Farms, a local artisan cheese maker, earned four awards at the 2010 American Cheese Society’s annual competition. The decorated cheeses, Antigo, Remembrance, Capricorns and Classico, were chosen from more than 1,400 entries. The local offices of Eastern Oregon University and Linfield College have moved from their previous location on the Central Oregon Community College campus to 265 N.W. Franklin Ave., Suite 101. In their new downtown location, EOU and Linfield will continue to advise more than 200 local students completing their bachelor’s degrees online and on evenings and weekends. Students are encouraged to visit or call 541385-1137 (EOU) or 541-3882986 (Linfield) for an appointment. Visit www.eou.edu or www.linfield.edu/dce for more information. Visit Bend has introduced the “Excellence in Tourism Award,” an annual award which will be

granted by the Visit Bend board of directors to an organization or individual who makes extraordinary contributions to Bend tourism. The award will be announced annually by the Visit Bend board and presented to the winner each February, with nominations closing on Nov. 1. The award recipient will receive a $1,000 credit that can be used to purchase advertising in any of Visit Bend’s marketing publications. For more information, go to www.visitbend.com/ award or contact Valerie Warren at 541-382-8048 or valerie@visit bend.com. Academy Mortgage Corp., with two branches in Bend, has achieved the No. 1 Independent Lender Ranking for consumers purchasing homes in the United States for the six-month period that ended June 30. Academy Mortgage also has earned toptier rankings for FHA, resale and builder loans for the same period. Eureka, Calif.-based George Petersen Insurance Agency, with an office in Bend, has purchased Santa Rosa, Calif.-based NorthWest Insurance Agency Inc. Both companies specialize in midmarket business with an array of similar products, services, industry emphases and insurance underwriters. Brian Firebaugh, of the Woodside Ranch Homeowners Association board of directors, has announced a new WRHA website at www.woodsideranch.net.

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Inside

WASHINGTON Vancouver woman attacked with acid, see Page C2. OREGON No cause found for football team’s ailment, see Page C3. Coastal jetties in need of $1.2 billion repairs, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

A D WAT C H The Bulletin will fact-check campaign ads leading up to the November election.

Wyden claims true, if slightly off the mark The candidate: U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. The ads: “Different like Oregon” and “Respect.” The first TV spot, “Different,” features Wyden, in photographs and a few clips, while a narrator discusses Wyden’s background and ways that the senator is different from other D.C. politicians. In “Respect,” a Washington County farmer is featured saying nice things about Wyden.

C

La Pine mulls animal control options After incorporation, city relies on less strict state laws By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A frightening situation earlier this summer convinced Gail CaldwellKnabe that La Pine is overdue for a leash law. On July 22, Caldwell-Knabe was at

White School Park with her 15-yearold son, Zach, and their 2-year-old black lab, Izzy. Zach and two 12-yearold girls from Zach’s 4-H group, both with their dogs, were practicing for the dog show at the Deschutes County Fair, when out of nowhere, two pit bulls came running across the park. One grabbed Izzy by the neck, the other by her hindquarters. A passer-by pulled one of the pit bulls off and held it down, while one of the 4-H advisors pepper-sprayed the second, causing it to run off. CaldwellKnabe called 911, in a panic.

“I was screaming, I’m sorry to say, I was so scared and yelling at my son not to get involved in the attack because I thought he could be hurt,” she said. “I was afraid they were going to rip our dog in half right in front of all of us.”

More must be done While Izzy survived the attack with a vet bill of under $200 and the owner of the pit bulls has been cited, Caldwell-Knabe said dogs running free are still a significant problem in

La Pine. Two days after the attack on Izzy, Caldwell-Knabe spotted a different pit bull roaming the parking lot of a La Pine laundromat, and was too frightened to get out of her car. She said the situation has improved over time — 10 years ago, she’d see packs of dogs roaming the streets — but more needs to be done. And she suspects it could set up quite a fight, pitting people like her against those who have grown accustomed to a more relaxed, rural approach toward animal control. See Control / C2

Getting ready for the kids

Screen shot from “Different like Oregon.” The claims: The script varies a little between the two ads, but each includes a line, or on-screen text to the effect that Wyden “voted no on the $700 billion Wall Street bailout” and “was one of the few senators to fight against bonuses for CEOs.” Our verdict: Wyden is correct on both counts, although his second claim understates the support for reining in CEO bonuses at companies that received TARP money. Wyden voted against the Wall Street bailout, officially the Troubled Asset Relief Program, twice: He was one of 25 senators to vote against the bill on Oct. 1, 2008, and one of 42 in early 2009 to vote for a resolution that would have blocked funding for the second half of the program. Wyden is correct to say that he led the fight against CEO bonuses. He introduced an amendment to the federal stimulus bill in February 2009 that would have put tougher CEO bonus restrictions in place than President Barack Obama proposed or the restrictions that were ultimately passed. The amendment, co-sponsored by Sens. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, and Blanche Lincoln, D-Ark., passed unanimously. The amendment was later removed from the bill by Democratic leaders without a vote and replaced by less-restrictive bonus limits.

ELECTION

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sage Elementary fourth-grade teacher Grant Faulconer unpacks boxes of books Thursday afternoon. Teachers and staff have spent recent weeks getting the Redmond School District’s new building ready to open on Tuesday. The school, which will have about 500 students this year, has a staff assembled from schools across the district.

Redmond’s Sage Elementary to welcome its first students

Screen shot from “Respect.” However, many senators spoke out against bonuses going to TARP executives and at least seven different proposals to limit CEO bonuses were introduced. Even conservative Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions spoke out against bonuses taken by TARP recipients, as part of what Bloomberg News called a “populist backlash hitting the halls of Congress.” Wyden’s campaign manager, Jake Weigler, argued that because only Wyden’s proposal and another by Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., passed the Senate, it’s fair to say that Wyden was one of a few “to fight” against the bonuses, rather than just talk about them. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

By Patrick Cliff

BACK TO SCHOOL

The Bulletin

REDMOND — School begins on Tuesday in Redmond, and staff at Sage Elementary are rushing to have everything in place at the new school by then. School officials say they could open the school today, but there are still small details being finished. On Thursday, a crew was caulking the rubber playground mats together. Teachers, who were allowed in the building about two weeks ago, are putting the final touches on their rooms. And in spots around the building, some wires still dangle, waiting to be put above the

ceiling panels. Sage will be the first major project related to the district’s $110 million bond to open. The bond will also pay for a new high school, set to open in 2012. At the end of last year, the district closed the aged Evergreen Elementary making room for Sage, which about 500 students will attend. See Sage / C5

CROOK COUNTY

Sheriff’s employee on leave after taking cash By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A Crook County Sheriff’s Office employee was cited on suspicion of first-degree official misconduct after she allegedly took $40 from the office’s petty cash fund and returned it days later. Office Manager Lauri Toll, 46, has worked for the Sheriff’s Office since 2005. Her responsibilities included managing the front-office staff, paying the bills, payroll and handling personnel issues. She also served as Sheriff Rodd Clark’s administrative assistant. She is currently on paid administrative

leave and is scheduled to appear in Crook County Circuit Court on Sept. 22. “The bottom line is it’s public money, and it belongs to the public,” said Crook County Sheriff Rodd Clark. “They don’t have access to it, and the employee can’t either, or it becomes official misconduct.”

Dependable employee Clark said Toll has been a dependable and good employee. “She’s a very busy person in her position,” he said. The Oregon State Police Criminal Investigations Divi-

sion detectives from the Bend office investigated the allegation beginning in July, according to information from OSP. Toll managed the petty cash, which was kept in a lockbox in her office. She took the money and returned it a couple of days later, according to a news release from OSP. First-degree official misconduct is a Class A misdemeanor. The maximum penalty is one year in jail and a $6,250 fine. Toll declined to comment. Toll worked for Crook County in the county treasurer’s office before she was hired to work for the Sheriff’s Office, according to

Clark. He said in the five years she’s worked at the office there have been no other issues with her. Clark said he wanted OSP to investigate so there was no second-guessing. “Keeping things above board for the public is what our charge is,” Clark said. “It’s our responsibility. Time will tell if she’s found guilty of this or not, but this is the process we have and how we deal with things in this country.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Sage Elementary is the Redmond School District’s newest school. Set to open Tuesday, the school was built with money from the $110 million bond district voters passed in 2008. The 70,000square-foot building is in southwest Redmond.

Bend-La Pine charter school has new home By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

For nine years, when the bells rang or an announcement was made on the intercom at Pilot Butte Middle School, there was one group of people who paid no attention: the staff and students of Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School. REALMS has occupied various parts of Pilot Butte Middle School since its inception in September 2001, but operated independently of the middle school with different schedules and in its own classes.

Now Bend-La Pine’s only charter school has a place to call its own, and administrators and teachers are taking advantage of their new space.

Strengthen identity “Having a campus of our own will strengthen our school culture and identity,” REALMS Director Roger White said. White said the school had been lucky to grow at Pilot Butte Middle School. But space was always a concern. See REALMS / C5


C OV ER S T ORY

C2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:27 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 500 block of Southwest Fifth Street. DUII — Natasha Marie Rich, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:25 p.m. Sept. 1, in the 700 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Unauthorized use — A trailer was reported stolen at 8:20 a.m. Sept. 1, in the 800 block of Northeast Hemlock Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:08 a.m. Sept. 1, in the 100 block of Southwest Ninth Street. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:20 a.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Northeast Crest Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:40 a.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Northeast Ochoco Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:55 a.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Northeast Lookout Avenue.

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:14 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Northeast Oregon Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:58 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:49 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of Sixth Street and U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:31 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 372 near milepost 13 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:57 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of State Highway 242 and West McKinney Butte Road in Sisters. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:48 a.m. Sept. 1, in the 8100 block of 11th Street in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:04 a.m. Sept. 1, in the 2600 block of Northwest Lynch Lane in Redmond. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:25 a.m. Sept. 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 88. DUII — Michael Joseph Fager, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:35 p.m. Sept. 1, in the area of

U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 155.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 11:04 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 571 N.E. Franklin Ave. 12:32 p.m. — Trash fire, 425 S.W. Bluff Drive. 7:38 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 62876 Butler Market Road. 10:50 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 64158 Tumalo Rim Drive. 12 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www .humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

German shepherd mix — Adult male, tri-colored; found near Lake Drive in Sisters.

King R ichard crowned in 1189 The Associated Press Today is Friday, Sept. 3, the 246th day of 2010. There are 119 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 3, 1939, Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand declared war on Germany, two days after the Nazi invasion of Poland. ON THIS DATE In 1189, England’s King Richard I (the Lion-Hearted) was crowned in Westminster Abbey. In 1609, English explorer Henry Hudson and his crew aboard the Half Moon entered present-day New York Harbor and began sailing up the river that now bears his name. (They reached present-day Albany before turning back.) In 1783, representatives of the United States and Britain signed the Treaty of Paris, which officially ended the Revolutionary War. In 1940, Artie Shaw and his Gramercy Five recorded “Summit Ridge Drive” and “Special Delivery Stomp” for RCA Victor. In 1943, the British Eighth Army invaded Italy during World War II, the same day Italy signed a secret armistice with the Allies. In 1967, Nguyen Van Thieu was elected president of South Viet-

T O D AY I N HISTORY nam under a new constitution. Motorists in Sweden began driving on the right-hand side of the road instead of the left. In 1970, legendary football coach Vince Lombardi, 57, died in Washington, D.C. In 1976, America’s Viking 2 lander touched down on Mars to take the first close-up, color photographs of the planet’s surface. In 1978, Pope John Paul I was formally installed as leader of the Roman Catholic Church. (However, he died less than a month later.) TEN YEARS AGO The presidential candidates squabbled over debate schedules as Republican George W. Bush announced he had accepted three prime-time sessions. Democrat Al Gore rejected the plan, saying the formats proposed by Bush could limit the audience and amount of face-to-face debate time. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush ordered more than 7,000 active duty forces to the Gulf Coast as his administration intensified efforts to rescue Katrina survivors and

send aid to the hurricane-ravaged region in the face of criticism it did not act quickly enough. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist died in Arlington, Va., at age 80, after more than three decades on the Supreme Court. ONE YEAR AGO Vice President Joe Biden told a Brookings Institution gathering that the Obama administration was fiercely determined to get a health care overhaul, although he conceded it likely wouldn’t happen without “an awful lot of screaming and hollering.” A private funeral service was held in Glendale, Calif., for pop superstar Michael Jackson, whose body was entombed in a mausoleum. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS “Beetle Bailey” cartoonist Mort Walker is 87. Rock musician Donald Brewer (Grand Funk Railroad) is 62. Actor Steve Schirripa is 53. Actor Charlie Sheen is 45. Olympic gold medal snowboarder Shaun White is 24. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “It is awfully important to know what is and what is not your business.” — Gertrude Stein, American author (1874-1946)

Woman in acid attack recounts agonizing pain The Associated Press PORTLAND — Bethany Storro had just bought a pair of sunglasses and was celebrating a new job when a woman walked up to her with a cup and said: “Hey pretty girl, do you want to drink this?” The woman then splashed acid in the cup on Storro, 28, who stumbled in pain and fell to the ground screaming. She felt agonizing pain as the skin on her face bubbled and sizzled, and portions

Control Continued from C1 “I do think that’s why some people like it here in La Pine — more lenient attitudes toward these things,” she said. Interestingly enough, since the incorporation of the city in 2006, La Pine has fewer animal control laws than it did before. Deschutes County ordinances regulating barking dogs and the requirement that dogs be under their owner’s voice control were no longer enforced, and with no city animal control ordinances, La Pine reverted to less-restrictive state laws. Mayor Kitty Shields said adopting city ordinances, including an animal control ordinance, is high on the city’s to-do list, but still probably some months away. “We’re in limbo here, where we don’t have our own ordinances,” she said. “It’s just unfortunate that things like this are just simply going to have to wait. We don’t have the ordinances or the

of her blouse disintegrated. Police are seeking a black woman with a ponytail in the Monday attack as Storro, with her head wrapped in white bandages, told a news conference Thursday how only days before, she had been celebrating a new job and a recent move to Vancouver, Wash., from Idaho. But she insisted that she would not let the attack in Vancouver wreck her life, and laughingly marveled how her eyesight was

means to enforce.” Capt. Tim Edwards of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said state animal control laws cover the most serious animal offenses, from animal neglect to animals that attack people or destroy property. “As far as dogs wandering around town, if they’re not bothering anybody and not chasing people or chasing cars or scattering garbage, we probably don’t have anything we can enforce there,” he said. Rick Allen, La Pine’s interim city manager, said La Pine may not be ready for a leash law, but could adopt the county’s animal control ordinance into city law. Doing so would make matters easier for deputies who provide police services in La Pine, he said, and would be consistent with the laws prior to incorporation. A more stringent leash law could be a difficult sell, Allen

spared just minutes after she bought those sunglasses. Doctors at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland performed surgery on Storro’s face Wednesday night, removing dead skin from the deeply injured areas. After the attack, the woman ran off. A passer-by called police using Storro’s cell phone. Dr. Nick Eshraghi, a burn surgeon who operated on Storro, said it was an acid as strong as hydrochloric or sulfuric acid.

said, due to the city’s inability to enforce it without its own police department or animal control officers. An ordinance that can’t be enforced would only give people “false hope,” he said. Allen said there’s definite disagreement between La Pine residents as to how tightly dogs should be controlled, especially given the area’s traditionally relaxed approach to the issue. “One person’s well-behaved dog is a nuisance to the next person. More and more people are taking their dogs with them everywhere. Bend has struggled with that. Where do you let dogs? Do you let them in the parks? Can they come to concerts?” Allen said. “Animal control in general is just highly charged with emotion.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 C3

O The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Waves roll into the Oregon Coast on a daily basis, but over time they have begun to break down jetties built to help protect inland channels. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, work costing approximately $1.2 billion is needed to repair jetties on the Oregon Coast. Sen. Ron Wyden is calling for the release of money from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund, which has more than $5 billion available, to pay for jetty repairs along the coast. The fund, according to Tom Towslee, state communications director for Wyden’s office, was set up by Congress to pay for dredging and maintenance of harbor channels and jetties. “It’s not being used. There’s $5 billion sitting there,” Towslee said. The corps’ calculations are based on what it would cost to build up each of the 11 jetties on the Oregon Coast to their original length. Matt Rabe, spokesman for the corps, said the process to repair the jetties, which were originally constructed by the corps from 1880 to 1970,

Matt Rabe / The Associated Press

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reinforces the north jetty at Tillamook Bay with 1,000 boulders weighing between 30 and 50 tons. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, work costing approximately $1.2 billion is needed to repair jetties on the Oregon Coast. would take years. He also said the cost could increase over time. A fully intact jetty funnels water out to sea in a contained area, naturally dredging the channel and keeping it at a depth that allows boats to travel in and out of harbors. A jetty also provides a definable, reliable and stable

O  B Natural gas pipeline firm sues over delays

Tax-exempt status at risk for nonprofits CORVALLIS — The Internal Revenue Service says more than 100 Oregon nonprofit organizations are in danger of losing their tax-exempt status. The Corvallis Gazette-Times reported that a list published online by the IRS shows many of the organizations are no longer in existence. But some still operate and may need to take advantage of a onetime relief filing. Tena Fitzmorris, a tax preparer in Halsey, told the Corvallis newspaper that nonprofits should check their status with

Chaplain killed grew up in Oregon PORTLAND — An Army chaplain killed in Afghanistan grew up in Hood River where he graduated in 1986 from the Baptist Christian private school that is now called Horizon Christian. The Oregonian reports 43year-old Capt. Dale Allen Goetz is the 124th service member with ties to Oregon to die in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was one of five soldiers from Fort Carson, Colo., killed Monday in a roadside bombing. His home was in White, S.D., where he leaves a wife and three children. Goetz was a pastor there until joining the Army in 2002. His career included a stint at Fort Lewis, Wash.

Motorcycle rider dies at motorsports park ALBANY — A motorcycle rider practicing jumps at Albany Motorsports Park was killed in a Wednesday night crash. The Linn County Sheriff’s Office says the cycle ridden by 37-year-old Kip Harrison Davis flipped end over end several times on a series of bumps known as “whoop-tee-do’s.” The Albany man died at the scene. The sheriff’s office says Davis was an experienced rider who practiced several days a week at the track. — From wire reports

Umatilla prosecutor says he is innocent of alleged sex crime The Associated Press PENDLETON — A prosecutor in Eastern Oregon who has temporarily stepped down as Umatilla County district attorney while facing an investigation into sex crime allegations says he is innocent. Dean Gushwa told the East Oregonian that a woman made the accusation about an incident she claimed happened eight months ago. But Gushwa also told the Pendleton newspaper he trusts the justice system will find him innocent. The Oregon Department of Justice is investigating the allegations against Gushwa, 53, who announced last week he was stepping down temporarily after the East Oregonian learned about the case. No charges have been filed.

Personal turmoil The newspaper said Gushwa’s personal life during the past 1½ years has been marked with some turmoil. During the first half of 2009, Gushwa and his wife, Jeanette Delourdes Gushwa, separated, though neither discussed it publicly. Late in 2009 or in early in 2010, Gushwa and his wife divorced. A judge sealed the record at the request of both parties.

On Jan. 31, the Pendleton police responded to an incident involving Gushwa and a woman at Crabby’s Underground Saloon in downtown Pendleton. Police also referred that case to the DOJ. Pendleton police Lt. Bill Caldera said he understood the Justice Department found nothing criminal. The newspaper said it has asked for a copy of that report. Last week, Gushwa said he asked the Justice Department to appoint someone to take his place during the investigation. Tony Green, Justice Department spokesman, said the agency hasn’t replaced Gushwa but is supervising the Umatilla County district attorney’s office from Salem “with regular visits and communications.” Green said he couldn’t discuss how the DOJ investigates these kinds of cases. Pendleton police took the report of the accusation on Aug. 16 and immediately referred the case to the state, which began looking into it on Aug. 18. Caldera said his department is not privy to the state’s investigation. But he emphasized no charges have been filed.

Officials: Intense training regimen may be a factor By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A team of state epidemiologists doubts that 24 McMinnville High School players who were hospitalized with swelling to their upper arms took a creatine supplement, but the investigators were unable to determine a single cause of their ailment. The players fell ill last month following workouts in a sweltering weight room during firstyear football coach Jeff Kearin’s “total immersion” football camp. Three players required emergency surgery to their triceps to relieve pain caused by high pressure that impeded blood flow. Five other players had muscle pain and creatine kinase levels 100 times the normal levels. The enzyme creatine kinase is released by muscles when they are injured and is not to be confused with the creatine supplement. Athletes and military recruits have shown high levels of cre-

“If this exercise had been given to Olympic weightlifters, would they have been able to handle it? Probably.” — Dr. Katrina Hedberg, lead investigator atine kinase after exercise. Dr. Katrina Hedberg, lead investigator in the incident, said the intensity of the workout likely played a part in the injuries, and advised in the report that “intense, short-duration, repetitive resistance exercise involving a single muscle compartment can lead to serious health complications.” “If this exercise had been given to Olympic weightlifters, would they have been able to handle it? Probably,” Hedberg said in a telephone interview. But the report doesn’t cast blame on any particular factor, and raises doubts that the players were using a creatine supplement, though the players were not specifically tested for the supplements.

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COOS BAY — A natural gas pipeline company developing a project in Coos Bay has filed a federal lawsuit against the state, claiming officials are wrongfully delaying the project. The complaint filed by Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP in U.S. District Court names Louise Solliday, director of the Oregon Department of State Lands, and Richard Whitman, director of the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development. The lawsuit claims the delays result from “pervasive opposition” to liquefied natural gas projects among state officials. The Department of State Lands is requiring pipeline developers to gather more than 200 signatures from landowners whose property may be affected before it grants a permit.

the IRS. She said some may have overlooked IRS warnings in the mail during turnover in staff.

entrance into a bay. “Without these jetties, there would be no coastal economy,” Towslee said. “These ports mean tourist money, commercial fishing money. No one could get in or out of these ports without jetties, and these towns on the coast rely on these port towns for income.”

A project to restore the north jetty at Tillamook Bay has been under way since fall 2009; construction is set to wrap up in September. The jetty was 5,700 feet long when it was built in 1917; storm damage has since reduced its length by nearly 300 feet. When the project is completed, the jetty will be 100 feet longer. More than 1,000 30- to 50-ton boulders are being added, and a “bull nose,” or broader tip, is being installed at the end of the jetty to better handle waves resulting from storms. A crane is being used to lift boulders from the bottom of the ocean floor. The boulders, which are considered relic stones, were part of the original jetty construction. The Tillamook project was paid for with money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Rabe said Tillamook’s south jetty and two Coos Bay jetties also need repairs due to decades of storm damage. The major project most likely to draw the corps’ attention next, Rabe said, involves repairs to the three jetties at the mouth of the Columbia River. Rabe estimated that the work would cost $500 million and require 20 years.

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By Daniel Savickas

smolichmotors.com • smolichmotors.com

Coast sees swell of jetty repairs

Football team can’t find cause of player ailments


C4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Unsuitable place for DMV office

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alk to Bend planners and it quickly becomes clear that the state didn’t do much in the way of homework before it leased property in south Bend for a new Department of

Motor Vehicles office. Now, if it can break the lease, it should do so and look elsewhere. DMV plans to move to a space in the Brookswood Meadow Plaza in December for, officials hope, a good long time. Neighbors aren’t happy with the plan, noting the residential area is ill-suited for the kind of traffic the office will bring. Neighborhood traffic aside, the location has other problems. As planners note, it’s south of about 90 percent of the Bend residents who will use it, located well off the beaten path and surrounded by private residential streets. Signage may make finding it somewhat simpler, but it will be a challenge for many who must go there. Too, the city is unlikely to grow much in that area: The city’s proposed land use plan does not include expanding the urban growth boundary in that direction. Moreover, state officials who rented the site apparently were under the impression that not only would urban expansion move in that direction, but a new Murphy Road interchange with the Bend Parkway would be built soon, making traffic more manageable. That’s not likely to happen, the city says. No money has been

As planners note, it’s (the DMV’s location) south of about 90 percent of the Bend residents who will use it, located well off the beaten path and surrounded by private residential streets. Signage may make finding it somewhat simpler, but it will be a challenge for many who must go there. set aside, and given the state of local and state budgets for the foreseeable future, none will be coming anytime soon. At best, such an interchange is as many as 10 years away. All in all, the new location sounds like a bad choice for DMV. The state should look for a way out of the lease it has signed. It’s not as if there is a shortage of rentable space in Bend these days, including centrally located space with ample parking and only businesses for neighbors.

Abbreviations A-OK for political parties S

ome of Oregon’s minor political parties must have a low opinion of voters’ intelligence. They’ve filed suit against Secretary of State Kate Brown because she plans to use three-letter party abbreviations on the November ballot. Too confusing, the lawsuit claims. The switch from full party names to abbreviations is hardly a matter of mere convenience. Because Oregon law changed in 2009, candidates may now have ballots show they have been nominated by more than one party. In theory, a candidate could have as many as three parties listed after his or her name. The upshot of the change is that it should give minor parties a bit more clout in the election. If, say, the Pacific Green Party joined the Democratic Party in nominating U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden for re-election, Wyden could list both parties after his name. It was the state Democratic Party that was unhappy with the prospect of so-called fusion voting, or multiple party listing, when the bill allowing it was up for discussion in the 2009 Legislature. They worried that a handful of minor-party candidates could demand concessions from nominees of the two major parties in exchange for minor-party nomination. Now it’s the minor parties, or at least a handful of them, that are unhappy. They don’t like the abbre-

Among examples given in their lawsuit are the PGP abbreviation chosen for the Pacific Green Party and LBT for the Libertarian Party. The former, they argue, might be confused with “some sort of street drug,” while the latter might be mistaken for a sandwich.

viations Brown has chosen, arguing that they will confuse voters. Among examples given in their lawsuit are the PGP abbreviation chosen for the Pacific Green Party and LBT for the Libertarian Party. The former, they argue, might be confused with “some sort of street drug,” while the latter might be mistaken for a sandwich, though we don’t recall many sandwiches doing much nominating in this state. We’ll agree that Brown’s abbreviations don’t exactly roll off the tongue, and we’ll leave it to the judge to decide if her decision to use abbreviations at all is legal. Meanwhile, Brown assures there will be a key to abbreviations at the bottom of the ballot. Surely Oregon’s voters are smart enough to look down and figure out just what each one means.

Why Huffman belongs in U.S. Senate By Robert Perry Bulletin guest columnist

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t’s easy to get caught up in the “hoopla” of political campaigns — promises and platitudes carefully crafted by professional consultants and communicated to the electorate via campaign literature, radio and television commercials. Few voters take the time to review voting records of incumbents to assess whether the candidate comes close to representing their views and desires — instead of the wishes of their party leaders and powerful lobbyists. Here’s a case in point. Our senior U.S. senator, Ron Wyden, has “represented” Oregonians in either the U.S. House of Representatives or Senate for 30 years — ever since he was age 31. Given his reelection success rate, one would surmise that most people believe Wyden does a pretty good job representing their interests. I’ll let you be the judge as we put a magnifying glass on Wyden’s voting record. Wyden has voted for every pay increase Congress has given itself. Now you might find it incredible that we have allowed a system where our elected representatives can vote themselves raises. But it’s even more telling that Wyden has always voted for a raise. Wyden proclaims to all that will listen: “I am an independent voice for Oregon and the nation.” Let’s test this proclamation. According to The Washington

IN MY VIEW Post, Wyden voted on the “liberal” side more than 96 percent of the time. The National Taxpayers Union has a different classification for Wyden. For scoring a dismal 15 percent rating, Wyden earns the dubious title of “big spender.” Don’t be fooled by Wyden’s current campaign platitudes about wanting to “simplify our income tax system.” Instead, focus on the high tax/high spending voting record. In the words of the famous Christmas newspaper editorial, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus.” His name is Ron Wyden. He’s playing Santa with our money, our children’s and our grandchildren’s money. I am convinced that Wyden does not represent the will of the majority of Oregonians. His record shows he supports same-sex marriage, despite Oregon voters defeating this unpopular ballot measure in 2004. And in 2006, Wyden voted against a constitutional ban on samesex marriage. He also ignores the wishes of the majority on the issue of illegal immigration. He voted against SA 4214 strengthening our southern border and against SA 4202, a bill to help drug enforcement efforts along our southern border. In 1997, Wyden voted “no” on limiting welfare for illegal immigrants. Following up this

vote, he voted “yes” to give illegal aliens full Social Security benefits — joining the likes of Pelosi, Reid and Obama. He also joined the same threesome in voting against making English our official language. To make matters worse, in 2008 he voted “yes” on continuing federal funds for declared “sanctuary cities.” This next “no” vote is an affront to all patriotic Americans. In June 2006, Wyden voted against a constitutional ban on desecrating the American flag. When Wyden first joined Congress in 1980, the U.S. population was 226 million, and federal spending was just over $900 billion. Fast forwarding to 2010, our population has grown 36 percent to 308 million, and federal spending has skyrocketed 400 percent to $3.7 trillion. That’s 36 percent population growth versus 400 percent federal spending growth. Wow! Compare Wyden’s voting record with how you feel about these issues. If he represents your philosophies, by all means vote for him. If he does not represent your thinking, this election gives you a wonderful alternative. His name is Jim Huffman. Jim has never run for political office before. He’s a professor of constitutional law. I’ve spoken with Jim, and I’m very impressed. He offers a sincere, common-sense approach to the issues and would truly represent us as our next United States senator. Robert Perry lives in Redmond.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Saying goodbye to a longtime pediatrician isn’t easy S JANET

aying goodbye to the family pediatrician is, I’m discovering, like saying goodbye to a dear friend. You may not have seen her every week or even every month, but over the course of your children’s lifetimes she’s become a rock of support, common sense and good advice. At least that’s how I feel about Mary Brown of Central Oregon Pediatric Associates. We met Dr. Brown 26 years ago, when my oldest was a newborn. I’d seen her and her youngest daughter before, however, because her pediatrics clinic and her husband’s obstetrics clinic shared the building that the pediatricians now occupy alone. Her daughter was not much older than my Anna, a baby in diapers who could occasionally be seen crawling the halls behind the public spaces of the doctor’s office. Pediatricians are a special breed of

doctor, I’ve discovered in the years since I first met Dr. Brown formally, a few hours after Anna was born. They must be endowed with supreme patience to be able to deal with patients who cannot speak for themselves and with parents who frequently have far too much to say. They need to be able to calm the nerves of the first-time parent for whom an infant’s every sneeze is a precursor of pneumonia or worse. And they must put up with visits from those same nonverbal infants and nervous parents that sometimes must seem, from the doctor’s point of view, entirely unnecessary. I used to think, when my two girls were small, that the perfect gift would be a Third World pediatrician who could live upstairs and be at my beck and call, so often did I lug kids to the COPA office. Short of that, a lifetime supply of amoxicillin to dispense at will would

STEVENS

have been nice. I got neither, of course, but I did get to know Mary Brown and her associates really, really well as a result. It used to drive the girls’ father a bit nuts to be told nearly every time we called to call back in 24 hours if the child was still sick. He wanted his babies seen, and seen now. He wanted them well. Immediately. The pediatricians knew something he didn’t, however. Many kids, maybe most, get sick and well again within that 24-hour period. The fever disappears,

and the listless kid of Thursday is the energetic toddler into everything by the next morning. My experience with Mary Brown hasn’t been completely typical, I suspect. My youngest daughter has an intellectual disability that was identified when she was 3 — after Dr. Brown watched her odd gait as she toddled down the hall at COPA and said something like “It’s time to get to the bottom of this.” Her comment came at the end of a period when my Mary was never quite off the bottom of the milestone chart but never near the midline of what could be expected from a child her age. She’d had a series of health problems, none of them particularly serious but more of them than most of her peers. No doubt Mary Brown suspected, as we had for some time, that all was not completely right. She sent us off to the specialists

at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland and after a day of testing we were told our Mary had Williams Syndrome, a genetic condition. When we came home and went to see Dr. Brown, she and I cried together, but her advice about what to do next was calm and sound. Since then, for 21 more years, she’s shared my Mary’s triumphs and her problems with both of us. And always, her advice has been calm and sound. Now my Mary is 24, and it’s time we moved on. We met her new internist today, a woman who seems to have the same warm, caring quality that Mary Brown has. I hope so. Leaving Dr. Brown is wrenching for me, as it has been for my daughter. We will miss her.

Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 C5

O Frank Gabriel Phillips

Jack Edward Reynolds

Sept. 28, 1911 - August 31, 2010

Nov. 17, 1926 - August 24, 2010

Frank Gabriel Phillips was born September 28, 1911, in Los Angeles, CA. He was the son of Joe and Marie Phillips. He passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on August 31, 2010, just four weeks from his 99th birthday. Frank was the oldest of seven children and spent his youth in the mountains and valleys of Bishop, CA, where he worked sheep and cattle. He met Gloria Helen Garvalia in Bishop, and they were married March 4, 1951. During their time in Bishop, Frank served on the police force and as Manager for Imperial Gas. They had three daughters and moved their family to Redmond in 1962. Frank owned the Redmond Laundromat for several years. He and his family owned a ranch northwest of Redmond where he raised sheep, cattle and mules. He returned to Bishop every year to enjoy Bishop Mule Days. Frank was a lover of life itself. He was an active member of St. Thomas Catholic Church and Knights of Columbus. He enjoyed camping, hunting, fishing. He loved to cook for friends and family and was an avid painter. He dedicated his life to the service of the Redmond Community. Frank was a 4-H leader for many years, received the Honorary FFA Award in 1989 and was proud to serve as Grand Marshall of the Deschutes County Fair in 2002. Frank was named the Community Service Man of the Year in 1974 for his service in multiple organizations. He was on the Deschutes County Planning Commission, Redmond School Board, Potato Festival, Redmond Chamber of Commerce, Camp Fire Board, Lions Club, Opportunity Center Foundation and Central Oregon Basque Club. Those who grew up in Redmond will remember him as the best Santa ever! He is survived by his wife, Gloria, and two of his daughters, Phyllis and Jim Hinton, and Emilie and Brad Bonney, all of Redmond. He was proud of his five grandchildren and their families, Brian and Katie, Chad and Lauren, Amber and Aaron, Katie and Rachel. He adored his four greatgrandchildren. He is also survived by his siblings, Emily Jasper of Long Beach, CA, Eleanor Mazon of Tucson, AZ, and Joe Phillips of Bakersfield, CA. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Peggy Ann, his parents, two sisters and one brother. Mass will be 1 p.m., Friday Sept. 3 at St. Thomas Catholic Church, 1720 NW 19th St., Redmond. Contributions may be made to St. Thomas Catholic Church, or Hospice of Redmond, 729 SW 23rd St., Redmond, OR 97756. Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements. 541-548-3219.

Jack E. Reynolds, died in Bend at the age of 83 years. Jack was born in Dallas, Texas, to Austin and Carmen Reynolds. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII as a Seaman 1st Class. He taught middle school 8th grade Science in Springfield, OR, and also was a sports coach in track and field. He was a member of the National Education Association. His memberships also included the Eugene Elks and Eagles Lodges. Jack's other interests included fishing, dancing and socializing. He moved to Bend in 2002, where he made his home close to his family. He is survived by his son, Chris and daughter-in-law, Nenette Reynolds of Bend; brother, Gerald, Tampa, FL; sister, Sue Cook, Fairbanks, AK and three grandchildren, Lydia, Joanne and Luke. He was preceded in death by his son, Michael V. Reynolds. Please submit online condolences for the family at www.deschutesmemorialchap el.com

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. D E A D L IN E S: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Arlene Rae Purvis July 24, 1931 - August 25, 2010 Arlene Rae Purvis of La Pine died August 25th of heart failure, she was 79. Arlene was born on July 24, 1931, to Clyde and Bernice Cota in Colfax, Washington. She was a kind generous woman, who loved family and friends. Survivors include her first husband, Dan LaMaine, daughter and son, Linda and John; brother, Dale Cota, sister, Sharon Reynolds; stepson, Mike Purvis; grandaughter, Jessi; grandson, Edward, as well as great-great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by her husband of 35 years, Robert Purvis; daughter, Terry Bridenhagen; step-daughter, Diane Purvis. Memorial services to be held in La Pine and Portland. In La Pine at Baird Memorial Chapel, on Finley Butte Road, 2 p.m. Sat. September 4; in Portland, at the bridge on NW corner of 88th and Foster, September 10, 1 p.m.

REALMS Continued from C1 The new facility, at 63175 O.B. Riley Road on the northern end of Bend, is unique. With six acres and several buildings at the school’s disposal, there is room for projects that weren’t a possibility at Pilot Butte Middle School. “We can really focus on environmental stewardship, do things with this campus that the kids are excited about,” White said. He said students have in the past mentioned wanting to collect rainwater to use on the flower and plant beds, build chicken coops, add solar power and compost their lunch waste. Now, that’s all a possibility. “They have that ownership to do what they want to do,” White said.

Sage Continued from C1 About half of Sage’s staff came from Evergreen, and the rest came from other district schools. Though the staff is newly assembled, it has been united by the common purpose of working to open the school on time, said Kelly Hicks, a fourthgrade teacher who was at John Tuck Elementary last year. “This is new for all of us,” Hicks said, taking a break from organizing her room. Not all has gone smoothly for the Also district as it inside worked to open Sage. • Playing an The district active role in had to redraw your child’s elementa r y education, boundarPage E1 ies because Sage is in a different part of the city, and that upset some parents whose children’s bus rides lengthened. And construction was supposed to be done about two months ago, but it finished a few weeks ago, according to Chief Operations Officer Doug Snyder. Even with that delay, the school will be ready to open with the rest of the district on Tuesday. The building also came in about $6 million under the $20 million budget, more than onethird of the district’s $15 million in bond savings. Crews at the building this week are completing small projects, like the padding under the playground, Snyder said. “We’re into the finishing touches,” he added. Over its roughly 90 years as a school, staff at Evergreen had to improvise how to use available space. Former locker rooms, for example, became gym storage areas. Over the years, some classrooms were unusable, forcing the school to hold classes in portable buildings outside Evergreen. Gina Dietz, who teaches first grade, said she was thrilled to be in the new building. “I was in a portable last year,” Dietz said with a laugh. “This building — it’s great.” The two-story building is divided, as many new schools in Central Oregon are, into groups of four classrooms. In all, there are 24 classrooms in the 70,000square-foot building. Sage has plenty of obvious upgrades over Evergreen, including an open playing field, expansive playground and an up-to-date heating system. Not only has the staff had to adjust to the new surroundings but also to new colleagues, according to Principal Carolyn Espinosa.

In 2009-10, the school doubled its sixth-grade student body. It will do so again this year, so that the sixth and seventh grades are twice the size of the eighth grade. This year there will be about 114 students at REALMS; next year the school plans to enroll about 135 students. The school has waiting lists for all grades, although White noted the lists for the seventh and eighth grades are short.

Hoping to expand White hopes to expand the main building of the new school next summer to help with the growth. As it stands, the school will have six classrooms and a computer lab; one of the classrooms, in a small house tucked away from the main building, will house the art studio and serve as the yoga studio as well. In the new location, REALMS

To check what school your children will attend, visit: www.redmond.k12.or.us Click on Bus Routes/ Boundaries and enter your current address. At the end of last year, Espinosa organized a meet-andgreet for the staff. Then, once most of the work was completed in August, the staff gathered at Sage for meetings and games, including a scavenger hunt. At those meetings, the staff took time to get familiar with the building and grounds. But Espinosa and the rest of the staff are under no illusions that everything will run perfectly on the first day of class. On Thursday, several teachers walked around the outside of the building, confirming just where the students would line up in the morning. Teachers have spent much of their days, and some nights, scrambling to organize their rooms. In between classrooms, boxes waited to be unpacked and desks to be sorted. Some teachers had bought plants to decorate their rooms, according to Espinosa. But this week, the rooms were taking shape, with the usual elementary school decorations: alphabets, cartoon animals and rugs for story time. Staff members, Espinosa said, are finalizing details taken for granted at old schools, including the best directions to the gym or playground. After about a month, Espinosa plans to review all the plans and make adjustments as necessary. “We still stand in the hall and say, ‘Where are we?’” Espinosa said. As Espinosa walked through the new building, she kept pointing out new details with excitement. The music room has a movable wall to block it from the stage opening onto the gymnasium. The new conference room will give teachers a place to meet. In the gym, the freshly finished floor reflects the bright ceiling lights. “It’s pretty amazing,” said Espinosa, who planned Sage while still principal at Evergreen. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a school administrator to see a school from the ground up.” Hicks, who was at Tuck last year, said it may take her some time to get over the excitement of opening the new building. She expects that excitement to carry over into the classrooms. “I think it inspires us even more to do what’s best for the kids,” Hicks said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

teachers have big plans. A science teacher plans to use the open land for birding with students, and another is hoping to start a garden. Lynda Beauchamp, a math teacher who has worked at REALMS since it opened in 2001, said she’ll incorporate building into her curriculum. “Now that we’re in this space for the long term, we can do these things,” she said. “Before, it didn’t feel reasonable.” And she believes the new facility will help students feel they are part of something. “Pilot Butte was a fantastic neighbor, but we were the little school in the big school,” she said. “Sometimes it felt like we were in their space. It’ll be awesome for them to have this experience.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Former Waldorf The new facility was previously used by The Waldorf School of Bend, which moved to a space on Rocking Horse Road at the south end of town. To get the building ready for REALMS students to start school on Tuesday, White said parents had volunteered between 300 and 400 hours of work, painting, laying sod and doing other chores around the new campus. REALMS’ new location will also help the school grow. The school is in its second year of a three-year plan to double the size of its student population.

2010 Labor Day Deadlines For Monday, Labor Day, September 6, 2010 and Tuesday, September 7, 2010 PAID OBITUARIES .................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/6 .............................. Friday 9/3 1 p.m. Tuesday 9/7 ............................. Friday 9/3 1 p.m. DEATH NOTICES....................................DEADLINE

Monday 9/6 ........................... Saturday 9/4 noon Tuesday 9/7 .......................... Saturday 9/4 noon


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 3

SATURDAY

Today: Mostly sunny and warm.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

80s

90

47

STATE

90s

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

LOW

85/52

84/51

92/52

71/48

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

94/54

86/44

Willowdale 92/53

Mitchell

Madras

88/49

88/52

Camp Sherman 85/44 Redmond Prineville 90/47 Cascadia 86/48 89/48 Sisters 87/46 Bend Post 90/47

Oakridge Elk Lake 87/46

78/35

Sunriver 89/44

87/43

Burns 91/45

89/43

85/42

Hampton 85/44

Fort Rock

Vancouver

70s Chemult 85/41

80s

68/54

City

79/55

Missoula 88/46

Helena

Eugene 87/52

Bend

91/56

Idaho Falls

90s Redding

Elko

103/64

85/49

70s

94/42

92/46

Silver Lake

81/50

Boise

90/47

94/56

Christmas Valley

80s

Reno

86/42

Mostly sunny and warm today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

90s

Crater Lake 72/41

95/56

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

74/56

89/62

100s

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Moon phases New

Sept. 8

First

Full

Last

Sept. 14 Sept. 23 Sept. 30

Friday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 83/52/0.00 . . . . . 66/54/pc. . . . . . . 66/52/c Baker City . . . . . . 79/33/0.00 . . . . . . 89/50/s. . . . . . 80/44/pc Brookings . . . . . . 86/56/0.00 . . . . . 64/51/pc. . . . . . 60/49/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 82/37/0.00 . . . . . . 90/49/s. . . . . . 82/43/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 86/54/0.00 . . . . . . 87/52/s. . . . . . . 76/49/c Klamath Falls . . . 88/50/0.00 . . . . . . 87/44/s. . . . . . . 77/39/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 84/52/0.00 . . . . . . 90/47/s. . . . . . . 79/45/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 81/35/0.00 . . . . . 89/43/pc. . . . . . . 75/34/s Medford . . . . . . . 97/54/0.00 . . . . . . 95/57/s. . . . . . . 84/49/s Newport . . . . . . . 75/50/0.00 . . . . . 64/51/pc. . . . . . . 62/50/c North Bend . . . . . . 75/54/NA . . . . . 65/53/pc. . . . . . . 60/49/c Ontario . . . . . . . . 82/47/0.00 . . . . . . 92/59/s. . . . . . . 88/54/s Pendleton . . . . . . 83/46/0.00 . . . . . . 92/57/s. . . . . . . 78/48/s Portland . . . . . . . 88/54/0.00 . . . . . . 83/56/s. . . . . . 74/54/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 78/41/0.00 . . . . . 86/48/pc. . . . . . . 79/44/s Redmond. . . . . . . 83/39/0.00 . . . . . . 89/48/s. . . . . . . 77/40/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 86/57/0.00 . . . . . . 90/55/s. . . . . . 76/51/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 90/52/0.00 . . . . . . 87/53/s. . . . . . 76/51/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 78/36/0.00 . . . . . 87/46/pc. . . . . . 78/37/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 89/50/0.00 . . . . . . 88/55/s. . . . . . . 71/52/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . .100 in 1998 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 in 1973 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.04” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.49” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.42” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.04 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.53 in 1946 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

72 39

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy and cool. HIGH

70 34

PLANET WATCH

70s

Seattle

Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:31 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:37 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:32 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:36 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:35 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:32 p.m.

Partly cloudy and cool.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:31 a.m. . . . . . .7:09 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:36 a.m. . . . . . .8:53 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:08 a.m. . . . . . .9:03 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .8:15 p.m. . . . . . .8:14 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:27 a.m. . . . . . .8:33 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .8:08 p.m. . . . . . .8:09 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 76/47

89/45

81/37

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 97° Medford • 32° Meacham

LOW

65 32

BEND ALMANAC

83/56

Mostly sunny and warm today. Mostly clear skies tonight. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

77 34

NORTHWEST

83/44

La Pine

HIGH

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny, breezy, unseasonably cool.

A ridge of high pressure will provide another day of sunshine, except for some coastal clouds.

Paulina

86/45

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Lingering clouds at the coast; otherwise, becoming mostly sunny. Central

80s

MONDAY

Mostly sunny, very breezy, significantly cooler.

Tonight: Mainly clear.

HIGH

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,159 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42,020 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 62,177 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 28,060 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,116 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,440 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,889 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

S

Vancouver 68/54

S

Calgary 76/47

S

Saskatoon 72/49

Seattle 79/55 Billings 81/53

Portland 83/56

Thermal, Calif.

Winnipeg 61/43

Rapid City 77/46 Cheyenne 76/48

• 27°

Francisco Yellowstone N.P., Wyo. San 74/56

• 3.34”

Marshall, Minn.

Salt Lake City Las 89/62 Vegas 105/78

Phoenix 111/83

Honolulu 87/73

Tijuana 85/64

Anchorage 60/50

Juneau 56/47

Mazatlan 91/83

S

S

S S

Portland 80/65 To ronto 77/61

Green Bay 66/47 Detroit 77/55

St. Louis 77/54

S Quebec 83/65

Des Moines 72/48 Chicago 70/54

Kansas City 76/54

Buffalo

80/58

Columbus 80/53

Philadelphia 84/63 Washington, D. C. 92/67

Orlando 94/74 Miami 91/79

Monterrey 92/75

FRONTS

Halifax 83/64

Boston 81/70 New York 82/67

Louisville Nashville 81/56 85/56 Atlanta Charlotte 93/65 95/63

Little Rock 86/56 Oklahoma City 83/56 Birmingham Dallas 93/59 89/66 New Orleans 93/72 Houston 93/72

Chihuahua 84/62 La Paz 101/79

S

Thunder Bay 55/43

St. Paul 64/48

Omaha 74/48

Denver 83/53 Albuquerque 86/61

Los Angeles 77/62

S

Bismarck 70/42

Boise 91/56

• 114°

S

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .99/75/0.00 . 84/59/pc . . . 87/64/s Akron . . . . . . . . .92/66/0.00 . . .80/52/t . . 67/48/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .93/67/0.00 . 87/63/pc . . 73/51/pc Albuquerque. . . .92/59/0.00 . 86/61/pc . . . 89/60/s Anchorage . . . . .60/50/0.01 . . .60/50/c . . . .59/48/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .93/65/s . . . 83/59/s Atlantic City . . . .91/70/0.01 . . .80/68/r . . . 78/61/s Austin . . . . . . . . .98/74/0.00 . . .91/68/t . . 92/65/pc Baltimore . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . 90/66/pc . . . 78/58/s Billings. . . . . . . . .71/49/0.00 . . .81/53/s . . . 90/55/s Birmingham . . . .94/68/0.00 . 93/59/pc . . . 85/54/s Bismarck . . . . . . .70/54/0.10 . . .70/42/s . . 74/51/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .84/51/0.00 . . .91/56/s . . 87/50/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .81/70/r . . 79/61/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .89/74/0.00 . . .76/68/r . . 77/59/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .83/72/0.00 . . .80/58/t . . . .65/53/r Burlington, VT. . .91/71/0.00 . 88/67/pc . . . .72/52/r Caribou, ME . . . .84/67/0.00 . . .82/62/t . . . .72/51/r Charleston, SC . .89/69/0.00 . . .95/74/s . . . 91/70/s Charlotte. . . . . . .92/64/0.00 . . .95/63/s . . . 85/57/s Chattanooga. . . .98/65/0.00 . . .90/60/t . . . 80/54/s Cheyenne . . . . . .65/44/0.00 . . .76/48/s . . . 85/54/s Chicago. . . . . . . .83/71/0.54 . 70/54/pc . . 69/52/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .95/63/0.00 . . .81/52/t . . 74/50/pc Cleveland . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .80/57/t . . 68/54/sh Colorado Springs 72/55/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 88/50/s Columbia, MO . .86/69/0.14 . . .75/50/s . . . 76/56/s Columbia, SC . . .94/67/0.00 . . .98/68/s . . . 91/61/s Columbus, GA. . .93/71/0.00 . . .94/68/s . . . 88/61/s Columbus, OH. . .94/67/0.00 . . .80/53/t . . 71/50/pc Concord, NH . . . .96/63/0.00 . 84/63/pc . . . .79/49/r Corpus Christi. . .96/77/0.00 . . .93/74/t . . 94/73/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .83/71/0.18 . . .89/66/t . . . 89/70/s Dayton . . . . . . . .93/67/0.00 . . .77/51/t . . 73/50/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .83/53/s . . . 92/56/s Des Moines. . . . .82/64/0.04 . . .72/48/s . . 74/53/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .83/71/0.06 . 77/55/pc . . 64/52/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .66/54/0.30 . .57/42/sh . . . 60/43/s El Paso. . . . . . . .100/71/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . 89/66/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .64/38/0.00 . . .64/43/c . . . 61/45/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .69/57/0.15 . . .65/41/s . . . 68/45/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .83/40/0.00 . . .83/44/s . . . 83/48/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .77/68/0.06 . .70/53/sh . . . . 65/47/ Rapid City . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .77/46/s . . . 83/53/s Savannah . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .97/73/s . . . 93/68/s Green Bay. . . . . .81/64/0.02 . .66/47/sh . . 65/48/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .93/54/0.00 . . .95/56/s . . . 92/52/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .79/55/s . . 65/53/sh Greensboro. . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .98/65/s . . . 83/56/s Richmond . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . 96/64/pc . . . 84/56/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .71/59/0.02 . . .68/42/s . . . 73/50/s Harrisburg. . . . . .94/67/0.00 . 89/61/pc . . 74/52/pc Rochester, NY . . .88/68/0.02 . . .84/59/t . . . .66/52/r Spokane . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . . 77/47/s Hartford, CT . . . .94/71/0.00 . . .82/67/r . . 75/56/pc Sacramento. . . . .96/61/0.00 . .100/57/s . . . 96/57/s Springfield, MO. .90/69/0.22 . . .75/50/s . . . 78/56/s Helena. . . . . . . . .69/38/0.00 . . .81/50/s . . 83/49/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .90/73/0.33 . . .77/54/s . . . 76/57/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . 91/77/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .87/74/0.00 . . .87/73/s . . . 88/73/s Salt Lake City . . .80/53/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . . 95/61/s Tucson. . . . . . . .102/70/0.00 . .103/75/s . . 101/74/s Houston . . . . . . .94/77/0.00 . . .93/72/t . . 93/71/pc San Antonio . . . .98/78/0.00 . . .91/70/t . . 92/70/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .97/72/0.00 . . .82/55/s . . . 86/61/s Huntsville . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . .90/56/t . . . 82/54/s San Diego . . . . . .71/61/0.00 . . .78/66/s . . . 78/64/s Washington, DC .95/74/0.00 . 92/67/pc . . . 79/59/s Indianapolis . . . .85/70/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . 73/51/pc San Francisco . . .87/65/0.00 . . .74/56/s . . . 68/55/s Wichita . . . . . . . .90/69/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 84/61/s Jackson, MS . . . .92/69/0.00 . 95/64/pc . . . 87/60/s San Jose . . . . . . .96/64/0.00 . . .88/60/s . . . 85/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .82/42/0.00 . . .90/55/s . . . 75/44/s Madison, WI . . . .80/67/0.85 . .64/45/sh . . 66/49/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .91/52/0.00 . 80/48/pc . . . 85/50/s Yuma. . . . . . . . .112/75/0.00 . .110/78/s . . 109/81/s Jacksonville. . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . 94/68/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .55/48/1.07 . . .56/47/r . . 55/48/pc Kansas City. . . . .77/65/0.08 . . .76/54/s . . . 79/59/s Amsterdam. . . . .63/46/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . . 63/46/s Mecca . . . . . . . .109/88/0.00 . .106/85/s . . 107/85/s Lansing . . . . . . . .76/68/0.16 . . .70/51/c . . 64/45/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .80/68/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . 77/64/sh Mexico City. . . . .77/57/0.05 . . .75/57/t . . . .73/57/t Las Vegas . . . . .102/74/0.00 . .105/78/s . . 106/77/s Auckland. . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .55/41/sh . . . 53/38/s Montreal. . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . .83/66/t . . 66/55/sh Lexington . . . . . .95/65/0.00 . . .81/52/t . . . 74/49/s Baghdad . . . . . .113/81/0.00 . .110/78/s . . 112/80/s Moscow . . . . . . .79/48/0.15 . .54/45/sh . . 56/39/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/64/0.00 . . .76/47/s . . . 79/56/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.73 . . .88/78/t . . . .91/79/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .74/58/t . . . .76/57/t Little Rock. . . . . .81/77/0.03 . 86/56/pc . . . 84/55/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . 83/65/pc . . 84/67/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .92/81/t . . . .94/81/t Los Angeles. . . . .66/58/0.00 . . .77/62/s . . . 75/63/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .88/79/s . . . 90/81/s New Delhi. . . . . .93/80/0.03 . . .90/81/t . . . .90/80/t Louisville . . . . . . .98/70/0.00 . . .81/56/t . . . 77/55/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .63/47/sh . . 62/45/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . 94/79/pc Memphis. . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . . .86/60/t . . . 83/59/s Bogota . . . . . . . .68/52/1.32 . .66/49/sh . . 67/48/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . 59/41/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .92/79/t Budapest. . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .66/52/c . . 66/53/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .81/65/t . . 65/54/sh Milwaukee . . . . .83/68/0.02 . .68/52/sh . . 68/53/pc Buenos Aires. . . .54/45/0.00 . .59/51/sh . . . 60/43/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . 74/54/pc . . . 76/55/s Minneapolis . . . .73/60/0.67 . 64/48/pc . . 67/50/pc Cabo San Lucas .93/82/0.00 . 96/81/pc . . 95/80/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .91/68/0.00 . . .89/70/s . . . 92/71/s Nashville . . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . .85/56/t . . . 79/54/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .91/74/s . . . 94/75/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .83/64/sh . . 84/62/pc New Orleans. . . .92/73/0.00 . . .93/72/s . . 90/71/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .70/39/0.04 . 76/47/pc . . 75/48/pc Santiago . . . . . . .59/45/0.11 . 58/39/pc . . . 64/40/s New York . . . . . .94/78/0.00 . . .82/67/r . . 80/56/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .89/78/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .88/63/s . . 87/63/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .96/74/0.00 . . .83/67/r . . . 79/55/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . 74/50/pc . . 67/54/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .85/72/0.00 . .81/72/sh . . 83/71/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .84/71/0.00 . 98/69/pc . . . 85/61/s Edinburgh . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . 68/48/pc . . 70/50/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .87/75/t . . . .88/76/t Oklahoma City . .95/67/0.10 . . .83/56/s . . . 86/60/s Geneva . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . 74/50/pc . . . 73/48/s Shanghai. . . . . . .88/81/0.02 . 92/79/pc . . . .93/79/t Omaha . . . . . . . .73/65/0.01 . . .74/48/s . . . 77/56/s Harare . . . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 84/57/s Singapore . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . .88/79/t . . . .88/78/t Orlando. . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .94/74/s . . 94/75/pc Hong Kong . . . . .90/82/0.17 . . .84/76/t . . . .86/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/36/0.00 . .55/39/sh . . 55/41/sh Palm Springs. . .113/78/0.00 . .112/82/s . . 112/79/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .78/60/s . . 80/61/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .67/55/sh . . 65/56/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .85/70/0.45 . . .72/50/s . . . 71/51/s Jerusalem . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . . .89/65/s . . . 95/70/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .93/78/t . . . .93/79/t Philadelphia . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .84/63/r . . . 78/59/s Johannesburg . . .79/57/0.00 . . .79/53/s . . . 81/54/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .87/77/s . . . 91/79/s Phoenix. . . . . . .108/80/0.00 . .111/83/s . . 108/83/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . .64/58/sh . . 64/59/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .95/80/s . . 95/81/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .84/56/t . . 69/50/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .85/67/s . . . 82/65/s Toronto . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . 61/53/sh Portland, ME. . . .93/67/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . . .76/51/r London . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . 71/49/pc . . 74/54/pc Vancouver. . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .68/54/s . . 64/54/pc Providence . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . .82/70/r . . 80/59/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 86/61/pc . . 90/63/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .66/52/c . . 62/49/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .99/66/s . . . 85/57/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/76/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .61/50/0.76 . .59/46/sh . . . 60/47/c

INTERNATIONAL


S

Utah knocks off No. 15 Pitt as college football season begins, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

COLLEGES

LOCAL GOLF

USA Gymnastics to sanction cheerleading

Still competitive

HARTFORD, Conn. — The national governing body for gymnastics has agreed to sanction college cheer competitions, a step aimed at getting competitive cheerleading recognized as a sport. USA Gymnastics will sanction events held by the National Collegiate Acrobatics and Tumbling Association, a group formed last year by six schools with varsity competitive cheerleading teams, the organizations said Thursday. The college group is changing its name from the National Collegiate Stunts and Tumbling Association, and will now call what its athletes do “team acrobatics and tumbling” rather than “competitive cheerleading.” It’s an effort to end the confusion between the activity of sideline cheerleading and the gymnastic and tumbling competitions that make up competitive cheerleading, said Oregon coach Felecia Mulkey. “What you are seeing is the birth of a new sport,” she said. The partnership comes after a federal judge in Connecticut ruled earlier this summer that competitive cheer had not developed enough to be considered a college sport in meeting federal gender equity requirements under Title IX. — The Associated Press

Top golfers are at a big disadvantage at the Central Oregon Pac Am, but that doesn’t keep them away spectable 4.5. In an all-net competiREDMOND — For a group • Pac Am tion such as the Pac Am, results, with virtually no chance of which is open to amateurs Page D2 winning, the folks in the first with handicaps ranging flight of the Pacific Amateur from scratch or better to seemed to be having a good 30 or higher, the best playtime. ers typically are at a disadvantage. The golfers in Flight 1 are the most But on a picture-perfect day skilled players in the 2010 Northwest Thursday at Eagle Crest Resort’s Dodge Dealers Pacific Amateur Golf Ridge Course, the top players in the Classic. The highest handicap index tournament did not seem to mind. in the group still boasts a highly reSee Pac Am / D5

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

D

Football Inside

PREP FOOTBALL

C.O. teams are set to kick off seasons

Inside

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Playing in Flight 1 of the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic, Paul Battle, of Puyallup, Wash., tees off on No. 18 at Eagle Crest’s Ridge Course in Redmond on Thursday. Players like Battle, who is under a 1 handicap, aren’t likely to win the net competition.

Five local squads play home openers tonight By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

The football season is finally upon us. After months of talking about hybrid leagues, reclassifications and play-in contests, games will actually be played tonight. Five Central Oregon teams are hosting their season openers this evening: Redmond Inside hosts Century • A look of Hillsboro in a at this matchup of Class week’s 6A teams, Bend games for entertains LebaCentral non in a game that Oregon features two 2009 football Class 5A state playoff qualifiers, Eagle teams, Point is at MounPage D5 tain View, Henley of Klamath Falls plays at Crook County, and Culver welcomes Lost River of Merrill. As we await the kickoff of the 2010 prep football season, here are five questions to consider:

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NFL Steelers’ Leftwich hurts knee, Dixon could be new QB PITTSBURGH — All of a sudden, losing Ben Roethlisberger for at least a month isn’t the Steelers’ only quarterback worry. Byron Leftwich, expected to be the fill-in starter, is injured and looks to be out indefinitely. Leftwich, tuning up for his anticipated Sept. 12 start against Atlanta, sprained his left knee in the second quarter as Pittsburgh beat the starterless Carolina Panthers 19-3 on Thursday night. Coach Mike Tomlin said Leftwich would undergo an MRI today, but the quarterback’s teammates sounded discouraged. Backup Charlie Batch called it a “serious” injury, and Dennis Dixon — now the likely starter — said he couldn’t talk to Leftwich because doctors were working on the knee so intensely. “It’s an opportunity, I guess, but it’s unfortunate for Byron for what he went through. But this team has to continue to go forward,” said Dixon, an Oregon product who has started only one NFL game. “I know once he’s going to come back he’s going to give us nothing but tremendous support.” As Leftwich was being helped off, Tomlin immediately lifted Dixon, who completed his only pass for a 23-yard touchdown to rookie Emmanuel Sanders. — The Associated Press

Courtesy of Portland State

Portland State’s Cory McCaffrey, a Sisters High graduate, figures to be a big part of the Vikings’ pistol offense this season.

An Outlaw in the backfield Former Sisters standout Cory McCaffrey will start for Portland State at tailback this season By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Cory McCaffrey had been waiting for the call since December. Oregon’s all-time leading high school rusher— he ran for 8,460 yards in three years at Sisters High — McCaffrey had been used sparingly as a slot receiver during his first two seasons at Portland State University, recording three catches for 19 yards in his freshman and sophomore seasons combined. But when new head coach Nigel Burton was hired to replace Jerry Glanville — the former NFL coach, with his

Next up Who: Portland State at Arizona State When: Saturday, 7 p.m. Watch: Fox Sports Arizona Listen: www.970.am Live stats: www.thesundevils.com “run-n-shoot” offense, went just 9-24 in three seasons at PSU — McCaffrey, now a junior, figured he might have a chance at the position where he was twice named the Oregon Class 4A high

school player of the year. “I’d been waiting for (the position switch) since I heard about our change in offense,” McCaffrey says about Burton and the “pistol” offense he brought from the University of Nevada, where he was the defensive coordinator. “And I’m completely ecstatic about it.” This past offseason, Viking offensive coordinator Bruce Barnum told McCaffrey before a conditioning workout that McCaffrey would be going with the running backs instead of the receivers. Since then, the 5-foot-9, 185pound Sisters graduate has emerged as PSU’s top tailback, earning the starting assignment this Saturday night in the Vikings’ season opener at Arizona State. See Outlaw / D5

1. How good is Mountain View quarterback Jacob Hollister? Last season Hollister, then a sophomore, became Mountain View’s starting quarterback in the fifth week of the season after senior Zach Johnson suffered a shoulder injury in the Civil War game against Bend. Hollister responded by leading the Cougars to victories in his first six starts and passing for 10 touchdowns against just two interceptions. “He’s done a lot of things in the offseason to get ready,” Mountain View coach Steve Turner says about Hollister. “And this year he’s coming into the season as a starter. Last year he wasn’t even sure if he was going to be the JV quarterback.” With Hollister commanding the Cougars’ offense and six returning all-Intermountain Conference players to anchor defense, Mountain View is favored to advance to the postseason for the fifth consecutive year. 2. Can Hack get Summit back on track? Returning to the program he built from the ground up, Summit coach Jerry Hackenbruck has his work cut out for him. The Storm’s first coach when Summit High opened in 2001, Hackenbruck takes over a program that went 0-10 last year and has not had a winning record since 2004, the last season before he stepped down as football coach when he guided the Storm to a 7-3 mark. “Overcoming a difficult season has been the No. 1 thing,” Hackenbruck says about preseason camp. “But the kids have done a great job putting it in the past and looking ahead.” See Football / D5

A D V E N T U R E S P O R T S C O M M E N TA RY

The show must go on Pittsburgh Steelers quarterbacks Charlie Batch, left, and Dennis Dixon discuss a play on the sidelines during Thursday’s preseason game.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 Football .....................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Tennis ....................................... D4 Adventure Sports...................... D6

Drag-boat racing is an expensive sport, but it will return to Central Oregon this month for the High Desert Showdown

I

t’s hard to decide which is more impressive: the high speeds that drag boats can reach on the water or the high costs of competing in the sport. Al Zemke, a drag-boat racer from Bend, estimates that the cost of fielding a team is about $20,000 per year. And that’s after the estimated $50,000 expense of a boat, an engine, an enclosed trailer and a tow vehicle. So it’s no wonder, in a slumping economy,

that the number of dragboat racers in the Northwest has declined in recent years. Still, the 13th High Desert Showdown is scheduled for Sept. 1112 at Haystack Reservoir near Culver. “We’ll have a low boat count just because of the economy,” says Redmond’s Andy Haavisto, vice president of the Columbia Drag Boat Association (CDBA). See Racing / D6

MARK MORICAL

Submitted photo

Andy Haavisto, of Redmond, races his drag boat at the World Finals last year in Chandler, Ariz. Later this month Central Oregon will host the High Desert Showdown drag-boat competition at Haystack Reservoir.


D2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, European Masters, second round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Mylan Classic, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, first round, Golf Channel.

TENNIS 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, Tennis Channel. 10 a.m. — U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — U.S. Open, men’s second round and women’s third round, ESPN2.

AUTO RACING 3 p.m. — IndyCar, Indy Kentucky 300, qualifying, VS. network (same-day tape).

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, Cincinnati Reds at St. Louis Cardinals, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Cleveland Indians at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Arizona at Toledo, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school, Eagle Point at Mountain View, COTV.

SATURDAY GOLF 5 a.m. — PGA European Tour, European Masters, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Mylan Classic, third round, Golf Channel (same-day tape).

TENNIS 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, men’s and women’s third round, CBS. 4 p.m. — U.S. Open, men’s and women’s third round, Tennis Channel.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Miami (Ohio) at Florida, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Western Michigan at Michigan State, ESPN2. 9:30 a.m. — College, Illinois at Missouri, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — College, Purdue at Notre Dame, NBC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Texas at Rice, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, UCLA at Kansas State, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Connecticut at Michigan, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m. — College, New Mexico at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet. 4 p.m. — College, Washington State at Oklahoma State, FSNW. 4:45 p.m. — College, Oregon State vs. Texas Christian, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, LSU vs. North Carolina, ABC. 7 p.m. — College, Cincinnati at Fresno State, ESPN2. 8 p.m. — College, Wisconsin at UNLV, VS. network.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Minneosta Twins, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, Chicago White Sox at Boston Red Sox, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Cleveland Indians at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

AUTO RACING 4 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Great Clips 300, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — IndyCar, Indy Kentucky 300, VS. network.

SUNDAY GOLF 5 a.m. — PGA European Tour, European Masters, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Mylan Classic, final round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Championship, third round, NBC. 4 p.m. — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, final round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 7 a.m. — NHRA, Mac Tools U.S. Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2 (taped). 2 p.m. — NHRA, Mac Tools U.S. Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Emory Healthcare 500, ESPN.

TENNIS 8 a.m. — U.S. Open, men’s third round and women’s fourth round, CBS. 4 p.m. — U.S. Open, men’s third round and women’s fourth round, Tennis Channel.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Delaware State vs. Southern, ESPN. 11 a.m. — College, Tulsa at East Carolina, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m. — College, SMU at Texas Tech, ESPN.

SOCCER 10:30 a.m. — Major League Soccer, Seattle Sounders at New England Revolution, FSNW (taped).

BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Chicago White Sox at Boston Red Sox, TBS. 1 p.m. — MLB, Cleveland Indians at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

ON DECK Today Football: Century at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Lebanon at Bend, 7 p.m.; Eagle Point at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Woodburn, 7 p.m.; Henley at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Central, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Burns, 7 p.m.; Lost River at Culver, 7 p.m. Cross country: Crook County at Wilsonville Night Meet, 7 p.m. Boys soccer: Summit at South Eugene, 7 p.m.; East Linn at Culver, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Crook County, Sisters at Summit Jamboree, 9 a.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove Jamboree, 2 p.m.

SOUTHWEST SMU at Texas Tech, 12:30 p.m. Texas Southern at Prairie View, 2 p.m. ——— Monday, Sept. 6 EAST Navy vs. Maryland at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Boise St. vs. Virginia Tech at Landover, Md., 5 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Betting Line

GOLF Local 2010 PACIFIC AMATEUR GOLF CLASSIC Aug. 31-Sept. 3 54-Hole Net Stroke Play At courses throughout Central Oregon Top two in each flight Flight 1 — 1, Chad Arcaria (Chandler, Ariz.), 222. 2, Michael Dominick (Bayside, Calif.), 224. Flight 2 — 1, Chris Siebers (Portland), 215. 2, Tracy Couch (Coquille), 216. Flight 3 — 1, Abe Cohen (Trout Lake, Wash.), 223. 2, Kirby Reinhart (Cashmere, Wash.), 225. Flight 4 — 1 (tie), Wade Bittle (Leavenworth, Wash.), 206; Brian Sleight (Seatac, Wash.), 206. Flight 5 — 1, Don Goethals (Lake Tapps, Wash.), 204. 2 (tie), Bart Johnson (Puyallup, Wash), 212; Richard Hamilton, 212. Flight 6 — 1, Ronald Johnson (Monroe, Wash.), 204. 2, Edward Stroman (Mill Creek, Wash.), 207. Flight 7 — 1, Bret Mackay (Valencia, Calif.), 209. 2, Phil Woods (Baytown, Texas), 213. Flight 8 — 1, Andrew Pfeifer (Berrien Springs, Mich.), 207. 2, Gary Sosinski (Beaverton), 212. Flight 9 — 1, Don Peterson (Aloha), 210. 2, Steve Tynes (Zachary, La.), 214. Flight 10 — 1, Jim Lobdell (Sherwood), 213. 2, Brad Makowski (Washougal, Wash.), 215. Flight 11 — 1, Gary Berreth (Yacolt, Wash.), 207. 2, Jeffrey Braden (Snohomish, Wash.), 218. Flight 12 — 1, Mike Buhler (Dallas), 210. 2, Charley Spilker (Portland), 216. Flight 13 — 1, Eugene Betts (Eugene), 215. 2, James DuPont (Kamuela, Hawaii), 216. Flight 14 — 1, David Hartwell (Fall City, Wash.), 215. 2, Jeffrey Seldon (Eugene), 217. Flight 15 — 1, Gary Murdoch (Juneau, Alaska), 216. 2 (tie), Marvin Guerra (Chester, Md.), 217; William Davis (Woodland, Calif.), 217. Flight 16 — 1, Bruce Fairey (San Rafael, Calif.), 212. 2, Art Wieda (Sequim, Wash.), 213. Flight 17 — 1, Ken Schwoerer (Villa Park, Calif.), 210. 2 (tie), Stan Kalata (Hidden Valley Lake, Calif.), 211; Lee Musser (APO), 211; Juan Villegas (San Leandoro, Calif.), 211; Gregory Jessen (Antioch, Calif.), 211. Flight 18 — 1, Dave Renfree (Red Bluff, Calif.), 212. 2, Dugie Freeman (Gold Beach), 213. Flight 19 — 1, Peach Waller (Pace, Fla.), 210. 2, Greg Gatlin (Las Vegas), 213. Flight 20 — 1, Norm Warren (Grover Beach, Calif.), 203. 2, Robert Wright (Rio Linda, Calif.), 211. Flight 21 — 1 (tie), Gene Johnson (Brier, Wash.), 218; Rolf Klam (Niceville, Fla.), 218. Flight 22 — 1 (tie), Steve Salisbury (Brookings), 211; Mike Seashols (Bend), 211. Flight 23 — 1, John Fairchild (Salem), 214. 2, Bob Storjohann (Bend), 219. Flight 24 — 1, Larry Polete (Woodland, Calif.), 208. 2, John Marriott (Mulino), 218. Flight 25 — 1, Jerry Gallardo (Grants Pass), 143. 2, Jack Pryde (McCloud, Calif.), 144. Flight 26 — 1 (tie), Ralph Barkey (Lincoln, Calif.), 147; Mike Van Wyck (Blue River), 147. Flight 27 — 1, Jim C. Smith (Port Orchard, Wash.), 205. 2, Devon Bratsman (Rexburg, Idaho), 212. Flight 28 — 1, Bill Clavin (Galt, Calif.), 203. 2, Mike Pavlik (Desert Ridge, Ariz.), 204. Flight 29 — 1, Sally Brands (Rifle, Colo.), 207. 2, Carol Nicolai (Vancouver, Wash.), 211. Flight 30 — 1, Taryn Hutchins (Spokane, Wash.), 216. 2, Jan Davis (Meridian, Idaho), 217. Flight 31 — 1, Tammy Ehrenfelt (Otis), 191. 2, Elaine Crossley (Victoria, British Columbia), 207. Flight 32 — 1, Valerie LaRoche (Idledale, Colo.), 217. 2 (tie), Peg Toft (Kremmling, Colo.), 218; Elizabeth Dean (Couer d’Alene, Idaho), 218.

PGA Tour FedEx Cup Leaders Through Aug. 29 Rank Name Pts 1. Matt Kuchar 3,937 2. Steve Stricker 2,572 3. Martin Laird 1,977 4. Justin Rose 1,860 5. Ernie Els 1,851 6. Dustin Johnson 1,737 7. Hunter Mahan 1,718 8. Jim Furyk 1,691 9. Bubba Watson 1,688 10. Phil Mickelson 1,629 11. Ben Crane 1,607 12. Jeff Overton 1,604 13. Ryan Palmer 1,553 14. Jason Day 1,469 15. Zach Johnson 1,429 16. Tim Clark 1,409 17. Luke Donald 1,356 18. Kevin Streelman 1,335 19. Adam Scott 1,315 20. Retief Goosen 1,306 21. Vaughn Taylor 1,305 22. Rickie Fowler 1,297 23. Paul Casey 1,295 24. Robert Allenby 1,279 25. Bo Van Pelt 1,272 26. Camilo Villegas 1,241 27. Anthony Kim 1,216 28. Rory McIlroy 1,169 29. J.B. Holmes 1,153 30. Carl Pettersson 1,142 31. Bill Haas 1,135 32. Nick Watney 1,134 33. Rory Sabbatini 1,099 34. Heath Slocum 1,097 35. Sean O’Hair 1,048 36. Stuart Appleby 1,045 37. Brendon de Jonge 1,035 38. Ian Poulter 1,001 39. Kevin Na 954 40. Brian Gay 952 41. Ricky Barnes 947 42. Stewart Cink 946 43. Jason Bohn 926 44. K.J. Choi 922 45. Charlie Wi 902 46. Bryce Molder 898 47. Ryan Moore 893 48. Marc Leishman 888 49. Brian Davis 829 50. Fredrik Jacobson 826 51. D.J. Trahan 815 52. Geoff Ogilvy 815 53. Brandt Snedeker 813 54. Scott Verplank 796 55. Angel Cabrera 792

Money $4,244,798 $3,627,735 $1,562,765 $3,357,331 $4,112,611 $2,969,897 $3,327,954 $3,308,872 $2,999,236 $3,409,233 $2,671,250 $3,318,056 $2,502,683 $2,180,077 $2,459,868 $3,101,881 $2,262,234 $1,135,174 $1,974,902 $2,390,839 $1,784,830 $2,281,040 $2,414,694 $2,539,697 $2,554,508 $2,631,273 $2,554,896 $2,486,780 $2,172,438 $1,876,573 $1,702,565 $1,899,601 $1,436,426 $1,610,927 $1,792,913 $1,921,750 $1,843,144 $1,910,114 $1,460,787 $1,344,008 $1,761,842 $1,329,401 $1,817,241 $1,572,912 $1,194,605 $1,383,867 $1,791,323 $1,292,712 $1,507,117 $1,529,227 $1,180,662 $1,593,795 $1,295,940 $1,637,815 $1,149,365

56. Y.E. Yang 57. Padraig Harrington 58. Tim Petrovic 59. Charley Hoffman 60. David Toms 61. Greg Chalmers 62. Charles Howell III 63. Lucas Glover 64. John Senden 65. Tiger Woods 66. Michael Sim 67. Chris Couch 68. Justin Leonard 69. Stephen Ames 70. Matt Jones 71. Spencer Levin 72. Davis Love III 73. Ryuji Imada 74. D.A. Points 75. Josh Teater 76. J.P. Hayes 77. Jimmy Walker 78. Steve Marino 79. John Rollins 80. Webb Simpson 81. Jason Dufner 82. J.J. Henry 83. Chad Campbell 84. Paul Goydos 85. Shaun Micheel 86. Vijay Singh 87. Pat Perez 88. Troy Matteson 89. Steve Elkington 90. Kenny Perry 91. Kris Blanks 92. Tom Gillis 93. Aaron Baddeley 94. Chad Collins 95. Alex Prugh 96. Boo Weekley 97. Garrett Willis 98. Blake Adams 99. Chris Riley 100. Andres Romero

788 772 770 759 748 748 746 743 735 734 723 709 706 698 695 673 665 657 654 652 652 642 636 634 628 617 603 598 597 595 588 581 575 571 565 554 554 549 540 526 526 517 514 512 505

$1,266,351 $1,381,453 $910,964 $895,075 $1,173,398 $883,825 $1,116,746 $1,495,600 $652,913 $1,029,586 $1,129,247 $888,146 $878,288 $880,177 $1,132,186 $754,672 $1,093,992 $741,372 $955,653 $900,723 $821,923 $937,987 $1,269,359 $1,079,186 $666,982 $997,195 $1,035,688 $822,169 $1,059,092 $973,560 $1,032,464 $806,592 $706,738 $938,494 $968,811 $1,018,588 $796,267 $688,892 $797,395 $816,266 $856,139 $856,073 $928,923 $929,122 $772,638

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Preseason Schedule ——— Thursday’s Games Detroit 28, Buffalo 23 Cincinnati 30, Indianapolis 28 N.Y. Giants 20, New England 17 Pittsburgh 19, Carolina 3 Jacksonville 13, Atlanta 9 N.Y. Jets 21, Philadelphia 17 Dallas 27, Miami 25 Tennessee 27, New Orleans 24 St. Louis 27, Baltimore 21 Tampa Bay 24, Houston 17 Cleveland 13, Chicago 10 Kansas City 17, Green Bay 13 Minnesota 31, Denver 24 San Francisco 17, San Diego 14 Oakland 27, Seattle 24 Arizona 20, Washington 10 End of preseason

College Scores and schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Today’s Games EAST Albany, N.Y. 3, Maine 0 Buffalo 31, Rhode Island 0 Delaware 31, West Chester 0 Rutgers 31, Norfolk St. 0 SOUTH Austin Peay 38, Cumberland, Tenn. 6 Florida Atlantic 32, UAB 31 Georgia St. 41, Shorter 7 Indianapolis 38, Kentucky Wesleyan 10 Miami 45, Florida A&M 0 Minnesota 24, Middle Tennessee 17 N.C. Central 59, Johnson C. Smith 0 South Carolina 41, Southern Miss. 13 Tulane 27, SE Louisiana 21 Wake Forest 53, Presbyterian 13 MIDWEST Ball St. 27, SE Missouri 10 Cent. Michigan 33, Hampton 0 E. Kentucky at Missouri St., ppd. Illinois St. 55, Cent. Missouri 54 Indiana 51, Towson 17 Iowa St. 27, N. Illinois 10 Kent St. 41, Murray St. 10 Ohio St. 45, Marshall 7 S. Illinois 70, Quincy 7 W. Illinois 45, Valparaiso 0 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 47, Elizabeth City St. 20 FAR WEST Idaho 45, North Dakota 0

N. Arizona 48, W. New Mexico 0 Nevada 49, E. Washington 24 Utah 27, Pittsburgh 24, OT Southern Cal at Hawaii, late ——— Today’s Games EAST Villanova at Temple, 2 p.m. Sacred Heart at Marist, 4 p.m. MIDWEST Arizona at Toledo, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Cent. Connecticut St. at New Hampshire, 9 a.m. Youngstown St. at Penn St., 9 a.m. Weber St. at Boston College, 10 a.m. Howard at Holy Cross, 10 a.m. Fordham at Bryant, noon William & Mary at Massachusetts, 12:30 p.m. Coastal Carolina at West Virginia, 12:30 p.m. Monmouth, N.J. at Colgate, 3 p.m. Bucknell at Duquesne, 3 p.m. SOUTH Miami (Ohio) at Florida, 9 a.m. Samford at Florida St., 9 a.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Georgia, 9:20 a.m. S. Carolina St. at Georgia Tech, 10 a.m. Chowan at The Citadel, 10 a.m.. North Greenville at Charleston Southern, 10:30 a.m. Lock Haven at VMI, 10:30 a.m. North Texas at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. Kentucky at Louisville, 12:30 p.m. Jacksonville St. at Mississippi, 12:30 p.m. Edward Waters at Bethune-Cookman, 1 p.m. Delta St. at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Appalachian St. at Chattanooga, 3 p.m. Georgetown, D.C. at Davidson, 3 p.m. Savannah St. at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Morehead St. at James Madison, 3 p.m. Bowie St. at Morgan St., 3 p.m. Winston-Salem at N. Carolina A&T, 3 p.m. W. Carolina at N.C. State, 3 p.m. Jacksonville at Old Dominion, 3 p.m. Tenn.-Martin at Tennessee, 3 p.m. South Dakota at UCF, 3 p.m. Richmond at Virginia, 3 p.m. Campbell at Virginia-Wise, 3 p.m. San Jose St. at Alabama, 4 p.m. Arkansas St. at Auburn, 4 p.m. Elon at Duke, 4 p.m. St. Francis, Pa. at Liberty, 4 p.m. Grambling St. at Louisiana Tech, 4 p.m. Memphis at Mississippi St., 4 p.m. Stony Brook at South Florida, 4 p.m. Alabama A&M at Tennessee St., 4 p.m. Bowling Green at Troy, 4 p.m. Northwestern at Vanderbilt, 4:30 p.m. MVSU at Alabama St., 5 p.m. Lamar at McNeese St., 5 p.m. LSU vs. North Carolina at Atlanta, 5 p.m. MIDWEST W. Michigan at Michigan St., 9 a.m. E. Illinois at Iowa, 9:05 a.m. Missouri vs. Illinois at St. Louis, 9:30 a.m. Butler at Albion, 10 a.m. Robert Morris at Dayton, 10 a.m. UCLA at Kansas St., 12:30 p.m. Connecticut at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. Purdue at Notre Dame, 12:30 p.m. Syracuse at Akron, 3 p.m. Lehigh at Drake, 4 p.m. Army at E. Michigan, 4 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Kansas, 4 p.m. W. Kentucky at Nebraska, 4 p.m. Wofford at Ohio, 4 p.m. St. Joseph’s, Ind. at Indiana St., 4:05 p.m. SOUTHWEST Texas at Rice, 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Arkansas, 4 p.m. Sam Houston St. at Baylor, 4 p.m. Utah St. at Oklahoma, 4 p.m. Washington St. at Oklahoma St., 4 p.m. Stephen F.Austin at Texas A&M, 4 p.m. Oregon St. vs. TCU at Arlington, Texas, 4:45 p.m. Texas St. at Houston, 5 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. FAR WEST Northwestern St. at Air Force, 11 a.m. Colorado vs. Colorado St. at Denver, 11 a.m. Western St.,Colo. at Montana, noon Fort Lewis at Montana St., 12:05 p.m. New Mexico at Oregon, 12:30 p.m. Adams St. at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. UC Davis at California, 1 p.m. Montana Western at Idaho St., 2:35 p.m. Sacramento St. at Stanford, 3:30 p.m. Washington at BYU, 4 p.m. Nicholls St. at San Diego St., 5 p.m. Azusa Pacific at San Diego, 6 p.m. S. Utah at Wyoming, 6 p.m. Humboldt St. at Cal Poly, 6:05 p.m. Portland St. at Arizona St., 7 p.m. Cincinnati at Fresno St., 7 p.m. Wisconsin at UNLV, 8 p.m. ——— Sunday, Sept. 5 SOUTH Delaware St. vs. Southern U. at Orlando, Fla., 9 a.m. Tulsa at East Carolina, 11 a.m.

College (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Today Arizona 14.5 16 TOLEDO Saturday MICHIGAN STATE 21 24 W. Michigan FLORIDA 34.5 36.5 Miami-Ohio s-Missouri 13.5 12 Illinois d-Colorado 12 12 Colorado State Northwestern 3 4 VANDERBILT MISSISSIPPI ST 21 21.5 Memphis Texas 28 31 RICE NOTRE DAME 10.5 10.5 Purdue MICHIGAN 3 2.5 Connecticut Kentucky 3 3 LOUISVILLE OREGON 32.5 34.5 New Mexico KANSAS STATE 2.5 (U) 2 Ucla Syracuse 8 8 AKRON BYU 3 2.5 Washington OKLAHOMA ST 14.5 14.5 Washington St ALABAMA 39 37.5 San Jose St. OKLAHOMA 31 33.5 Utah State Army 9 9.5 E. MICHIGAN a-TCU 13 13.5 Oregon State at-LSU 1.5 6.5 N. Carolina FRESNO STATE 2 (C) 2.5 Cincinnati Wisconsin 19.5 20.5 UNLV GEORGIA 27 28.5 UL-Lafayette NEBRASKA 35 37.5 W. Kentucky CLEMSON 23 27 North Texas TROY 14 14 Bowling Green AUBURN 30.5 31 Arkansas State Sunday Tulsa 7 7.5 E. CAROLINA TEXAS TECH 13 13.5 Smu Monday b-Navy 6.5 6 Maryland l-Boise State 2.5 2 Virginia Tech s-St. Louis d-Denver a-Arlington, Texas at-Atlanta b-Baltimore l-Landover, Md. (C-Cincinnati opened as the favorite over Fresno State) (U-UCLA opened as the favorite over Kansas State)

TENNIS U.S. Open Thursday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $22.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Second Round Albert Montanes (21), Spain, def. Carsten Ball, Australia, 6-4, 6-3, 6-1. Mardy Fish (19), United States, def. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 7-5, 6-0, 6-2. Arnaud Clement, France, def. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, 6-3, 5-5, retired. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. Marin Cilic (11), Croatia, 5-7, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, def. Guillaume Rufin, France, 7-6 (3), 6-4, 6-3. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Taylor Dent, United States, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-3, 3-2, retired. Jurgen Melzer (13), Austria, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 1-6, 7-5. James Blake, United States, def. Peter Polansky, Canada, 6-7 (1), 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Juan Carlos Ferrero (22), Spain, def. Ricardo Mello, Brazil, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Thomaz Bellucci (26), Brazil, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Women Second Round Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (22), Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, def. Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-3, 6-3 Yanina Wickmayer (15), Belgium, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 7-5. Vera Zvonareva (7), Russia, def. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Beatrice Capra, United States, def. Aravane Rezai (18), France, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Chang Kaichen, Taiwan, 6-0, 6-0. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-2, 5-7, 7-6 (7). Svetlana Kuznetsova (11), Russia, def. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 6-2, 6-3. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 6-2, 7-5. Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2. Maria Kirilenko (23), Russia, def. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, 4-6, 7-5, 6-0. Alexandra Dulgheru (25), Romania, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Kaia Kanepi (31), Estonia, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 6-4. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Bethanie MattekSands, United States, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. Maria Sharapova (14), Russia, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-2. Peng Shuai, China, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (9), Poland, 2-6, 6-1, 6-4.

BASKETBALL WNBA playoffs WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE FINALS Eastern Conference Atlanta vs. New York Sunday, Sept. 5: Atlanta at New York, 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7: New York at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9: Atlanta at New York, 4:30 p.m., if necessary Western Conference Seattle 1, Phoenix 0 Thursday, Sept. 2: Seattle 82, Phoenix 74 Sunday, Sept. 5: Seattle at Phoenix, noon

Wednesday, Sept. 8: Phoenix at Seattle, 7 p.m., if necessary

Men FIBA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS All Times PDT Preliminary Round Top four in each group advance Two points for a victory, one for a loss x-Advanced to next round Group A At Kayseri, Turkey Team GP W L x-Serbia 5 4 1 x-Argentina 5 4 1 x-Australia 5 3 2 x-Angola 5 2 3 Germany 5 2 3 Jordan 5 0 5 Thursday, Sept. 2 Australia 76, Angola 55 Serbia 84, Argentina 82 Germany 91, Jordan 73 Group B At Istanbul Team GP W x-United States 5 5 x-Slovenia 5 4 x-Brazil 5 3 x-Croatia 5 2 Iran 5 1 Tunisia 5 0 Thursday, Sept. 2 United States 92, Tunisia 57 Slovenia 65, Iran 60 Brazil 92, Croatia 74 Group C At Ankara, Turkey Team GP W x-Turkey 5 5 x-Russia 5 4 x-Greece 5 3 x-China 5 1 Ivory Coast 5 1 Puerto Rico 5 1 Thursday, Sept. 2 Ivory Coast 88, Puerto Rico 79 Russia 73, Greece 69 Turkey 87, China 40 Group D At Izmir, Turkey Team GP W x-Lithuania 5 5 x-Spain 5 3 x-New Zealand 5 3 x-France 5 3 Lebanon 5 1 Canada 5 0 Thursday, Sept. 2 Spain 89, Canada 67 Lithuania 84, Lebanon 66 New Zealand 82, France 70

Pts 9 9 8 7 7 5

L 0 1 2 3 4 5

Pts 10 9 8 7 6 5

L 0 1 2 4 4 4

Pts 10 9 8 6 6 6

L 0 2 2 2 4 5

Pts 10 8 8 8 6 5

Round of 16 At Istanbul Saturday, Sept. 4 Serbia vs. Croatia, 8 a.m. Spain vs. Greece, 11 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 5 Slovenia vs. Australia, 8 a.m. Turkey vs. France, 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 6 United States vs. Angola, 8 a.m. Russia vs. New Zealand, 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7 Lithuania vs. China, 8 a.m. Argentina vs. Brazil, 11 a.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Saturday’s Games Kansas City at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at New England, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Colorado, 6 p.m. New York at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Sunday, September 5 San Jose at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Extended its player development contract with Omaha (PCL) through the 2014 season. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Activated 1B/OF Troy Glaus from the 15-day DL. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLORADO AVALANCHE—Signed F Chris Stewart to a two-year contract. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Agreed to terms with G Carey Price on a two-year contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS—Signed G Antti Niemi to a oneyear contract. OLYMPICS U.S. ANTI-DOPING AGENCY—Suspended retired distance runner Chris Lukezic for two years for refusing to take an out-of-competition doping test. COLLEGE CONNECTICUT—Announced sophomore F Ater Majok has left the men’s basketball team and added G/F Niels Giffey to the basketball roster. HOFSTRA—Added junior G Stevie Mejia to the men’s basketball team. ILLINOIS STATE—Announced freshman basketball G Janelle Cannon has withdrawn from school. MISSOURI—Announced F Tony Mitchell is currently ineligible to play basketball.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 14,242 1,575 3,279 993 The Dalles 6,104 642 2,606 751 John Day 3,888 851 1,918 517 McNary 1,656 276 2,403 617 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 448,238 40,497 333,291 134,120 The Dalles 315,417 30,894 175,656 76,747 John Day 278,057 29,611 120,878 52,579 McNary 236,271 19,372 99,172 40,562

5 p.m. — MLB, San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL Noon — WNBA, Western Conference final, Game 2, Seattle Storm vs. Phoenix Mercury, ABC.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Eagle Point at Mountain View, KICE-AM 940.

SATURDAY FOOTBALL 12:30 p.m. — College, New Mexico at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 4:45 p.m. — College, Oregon State vs. Texas Christian, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Woods looks to keep going in FedEx Cup By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

GOLF: PGA TOUR

NORTON, Mass. — A chart of FedEx Cup standings at the Deutsche Bank Championship showed Tiger Woods at the top, not unusual considering he was won the cup and its $10 million prize every year he has played. This chart was different. It listed the 10 players who are on the bubble at the TPC Boston, starting with Woods at No. 65 through Josh Teater at No. 75. Only the top 70 after this week will advance to the third round of the playoffs at the BMW Championship, where Woods is defending champion. Woods has failed to defend a title when the tournament has changed dates or when he was injured. Never has he not gone back to a tourna-

ment as the defending champion because he was not eligible. “It’s been a different year,” Woods said. It might be showing signs of turning around. One tournament is not enough to declare Woods’ game is back, although his tie for 12th at The Barclays was his best finish since June. Plus, it got him into the second round of the FedEx Cup playoffs. And for the first time since the Masters, when he returned to golf after a five-month layoff, Woods went through an entire press conference without a mention of his broken marriage or how it got to that point. Even so, it remains odd to see

Woods so far down any list. Matt Kuchar is No. 1 in the FedEx Cup standings on the strength of his victory last week to open the four-tournament playoffs. Steve Stricker is No. 2 and the defending champion at the TPC Boston. They are assured of reaching the final round. Woods is only assured of making the weekend because the Deutsche Bank Championship doesn’t start until today, the lone tournament on the PGA Tour schedule that ends on a Monday. “I’m starting to see some progress, which is nice,” Woods said. “Mentally, I’m hitting the ball much better, hence I have more confidence. I’m driving the ball much straighter, hitting the ball a little bit farther, especially with my irons. And those are

all positive signs. It’s just a matter of making it a little bit more natural. And that’s just reps.” Whether the tournament lasts any longer than Labor Day depends on the path of Hurricane Earl — the same name as Woods’ late father. The forecast was for good weather through noon today before it starts getting nasty, with the worst of it late this afternoon and into the night. The tour moved tee times up as much as it could with a 99-man field — 40 minutes — with hopes of getting the round in. Officials will decide this morning whether to play lift, clean and place to protect against the late starters having to return Saturday morning to complete the first round in what could be a swamp.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 D3

S  B

Golf

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP

Utah beats No. 15 Pitt in OT

• Teenager leads at European Masters: Italian teenager Matteo Manassero shot a 7-under 64 Thursday to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the European Masters in Switzerland. “The perfect round of golf,” the 17year-old Manassero said of his bogey-free round. “I didn’t miss many greens and when I did I got up and down each time, so it was just perfect.” Mikko Ilonen used his power to shoot a 65 and earn a share of second place alongside Graeme Storm.

The Associated Press

Cycling • Hushovd wins Vuelta stage: Thor Hushovd of Norway won the sixth stage of the Spanish Vuelta on Thursday, while Philippe Gilbert kept his overall lead for the fourth straight day. Hushovd, who rides for Cervelo, crossed the finish first to take the 93.2-mile leg in 3 hours, 36 minutes, 20 seconds. Daniele Bennati of Italy and Grega Bole of Slovenia crossed the line next in the same time as Hushovd. Gilbert also finished with the same time to maintain his 10second advantage over Spanish duo Joaquin Rodriguez and Igor Anton.

Basketball • U.S. wins again at worlds: Eric Gordon scored 21 points and the United States pulled away after a sluggish first half to beat Tunisia 92-57 Thursday in Istanbul in its final game of pool play at the world championship. With nothing to play for, the Americans sleepwalked through most of the early start, leading the winless team by only four points early in the third quarter before turning it into a rout over the final 15 minutes. The U.S. (5-0), seeded first in Group B, next plays on Monday against Angola, the No. 4 seed from Group A. • Seattle’s Jackson selected MVP: Seattle Storm forward Lauren Jackson was selected the WNBA’s most valuable player for the third time in her career on Thursday night. Jackson was honored before Game 1 of Seattle’s best-of-three Western Conference final against defending champion Phoenix. Also, the Storm’s Brian Agler was named the league’s coach of the year. Jackson, a 6-foot-5 forward from Australia, averaged 20.5 points and 8.3 rebounds while helping the Storm to a 28-6 record — tying the league mark for the most wins in a season.

Sports • IOC says cricket scandal highlights bigger problem: IOC president Jacques Rogge believes the cricket matchfixing scandal shows that illegal betting has become as big a blight on sports as doping. Without taking any stand on the fixing allegations against three Pakistan cricketers, Rogge said Thursday the main problem for sports across the globe was illegal companies betting on incremental parts of a game. “It is far more widespread than it really emerges. Yes, absolutely,” he said. After the doping scandals of the last decades, “now we have a second threat of the same magnitude — illegal betting,” he said. British newspaper the News of the World alleged Sunday that two Pakistani players were paid to deliberately bowl noballs in the opening day of the fourth test against England at Lord’s last week. The captain has also been implicated.

Soccer • FIFA hails Spain, overlooks referee errors at World Cup: FIFA offered high praise for World Cup winner Spain in its official analysis of the event Thursday, and indicated African countries harmed their chances on home soil by employing foreign coaches. The report also criticized goalkeepers for making “inexplicable errors” — possibly because of the Jabulani ball — but glossed over the refereeing errors that helped eliminate some teams. It also questioned whether many players were too tired after long seasons to peak in South Africa. — From wire reports

Steve C. Wilson / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh wide receiver Jon Baldwin (82) can’t make the catch as Utah defensive back Brandon Burton (27) defends during the second half of an NCAA college football game Thursday in Salt Lake City. Utah upset Pittsburgh 27-24 in overtime.

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah was wavering between stifling defense and play sloppy enough to blow an 11-point lead before Brian Blechen saved the Utes. The freshman safety intercepted a pass on the first play of overtime, setting up Joe Phillips for a 21-yard field goal that gave the Utes a 27-24 victory against No. 15 Pittsburgh on Thursday night. “The quarterback rolled out and looked to the flat and we were ready for that play,” Blechen said of his read on Pitt’s Tino Sunseri. “I saw it happening and just went for it.” Blechen bolted in front of Mike Shanahan and grabbed Sunseri’s pass at the Utah sideline, keeping a late collapse at the end of regulation from deteriorating into something worse. It’s a lot easier to deal with blowing a double-digit, fourth-quarter lead when the result is a victory. Pittsburgh had a much more bleak outlook as the Panthers filed out of the locker room toward the bus. Despite having a new quarterback in Sunseri and no run support to help him out in his first start, the Panthers still battled back to be in position to win at the end. “We didn’t play good enough to win. We really didn’t,” Pitt coach Dave Wannstedt said. “Down the stretch Utah made less mistakes than we did.” That was a pretty good summary. The season opener was full of blunders — 12 penalties for Pitt and 11 called on the Utes, turnovers at the most crucial moments and then failing to cash in on some great opportunities. Pitt drove inside the Utah 10 twice, but went backward from there and had to settle for field goals by Dan Hutchins. Utah had second-and-goal from the 2 late in the second quarter, but didn’t score at all because of an interception off a bad pass from Jordan Wynn into the end zone. “We made enough mistakes in this game to lose it — enough to lose two games,” Utah coach Kyle Whittingham said. Wynn passed for 283 yards with three touchdowns, including two to Jereme Brooks.

Wynn’s third TD was a short pass over the middle that DeVonte Christopher broke for a 61-yard touchdown that put Utah up 24-13 with 7:59 left to play. The comfortable margin didn’t even last a minute. The Panthers struck back on a 44-yard pass from Sunseri to Jon Baldwin, who was all alone inside the 10-yard line because of a breakdown in Utah’s secondary. Sunseri went to Baldwin again for the 2point conversion that pulled the Panthers within a field goal at 24-21 with 7:11 left to play. Hutchins ended up having to kick the tying field goal three times. His first attempt went through the uprights, but Whittingham called time out just before the snap and Hutchins had to kick again. Whittingham did the same thing on the re-kick, which was wide and had fans and Utah players celebrating before they learned there was yet another kick to come. This time Hutchins was back on target and tied it at 24. Utah won its 18th straight, and other than the fourth-quarter breakdown, did it mostly with defense. Also on Thursday: No. 2 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Terrelle Pryor tossed three touchdown passes, Brandon Saine rushed for 103 yards and two scores and Ohio State (1-0) rolled over error-prone Marshall in a tuneup for a big date with Miami. Pryor completed 17 of 25 passes for 247 yards and TDs covering 6 and 11 yards to DeVier Posey and 65 yards to Dane Sanzenbacher before 105,040 at Ohio Stadium. No. 13 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Florida A&M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MIAMI — Jacory Harris threw for 210 yards and three touchdowns before sitting out the second half, Leonard Hankerson caught six passes for 115 yards and two scores, and the Hurricanes rolled. It was Miami’s first shutout since Oct. 14, 2006. Damien Berry had a 32-yard touchdown reception for the Hurricanes (1-0), who were up 35-0 after the game’s first 25 minutes.

Bradford is perfect for Rams in win over Ravens The Associated Press ST. LOUIS — One perfect series and done for Sam Bradford. No doubt, facing Baltimore’s second-string defense made it easier for the former Oklahoma star selected drafted first overall. Bradford made another favorable impression in his second preseason start, going six for six for 68 yards and a touchdown to open the St. Louis Rams’ 27-21 victory over Baltimore on Thursday night. A.J. Feeley’s thumb injury gave Bradford his starting shot last week, and the rookie may have done enough to get the nod in the opener against Arizona. The Ravens (3-1) held out all of their starters, plus backup quarterback Marc Bulger in his return to St. Louis after getting released by the Rams (3-1) in April, denying fans a shot to either cheer or boo a player who was the starter from 2003-09. Also on Thursday: Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 GLENDALE, Ariz. — With the controversy swirling ahead of him on the Arizona quarterback depth chart, Max Hall wrapped up his preseason with a big night. The undrafted rookie from BYU completed seven of nine passes for 126 yards and scored on a 6yard run in the Cardinals’ 20-10 victory. Hall directed Arizona to two TDs and a field goal in his three possessions. Derek Anderson, starting for the second week ahead of Matt Leinart, played a series, completing two of three for 47 yards. Leinart played the next two, going three of five for 14 yards. Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Seahawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 OAKLAND, Calif. — Bruce Gradkowski threw two touchdown passes in the first quarter, and Kyle Boller also threw a scoring pass and Swayze Waters kicked two field goals for Oakland. Charlie Whitehurst threw a touchdown pass and former Raider Louis Rankin scored on a 99-yard kickoff return for the Seahawks. Olindo Mare kicked three field goals. 49ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Chargers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 SAN FRANCISCO — Manny Lawson and rookie Taylor Mays each had interceptions and rookie Anthony Dixon ran 46 yards for a first-half touchdown to help San Francisco complete its first unbeaten preseason in 18 years. Vikings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 MINNEAPOLIS — Denver rookie Tim Tebow outplayed Minnesota’s Tarvaris Jackson

NFL PRESEASON in the backup quarterback comparison, but the Vikings forced four first-half turnovers and beat the Broncos. Tebow was 12 for 16 for 167 yards and one touchdown and also ran for 21 yards on four carries. The Vikings held out 20 of their 22 starters. Brett Favre watched in a T-shirt, shorts and sneakers. Giants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Rhett Bomar may have nailed down the job as New York’s backup quarterback, throwing a 60yard scoring pass to Duke Calhoun with 1:49 to play as the Giants rallied to beat New England. Steelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PITTSBURGH — Byron Leftwich, expected to replace Ben Roethlisberger during his suspension, injured his left knee in the second quarter and Pittsburgh beat starter-less Carolina. Carolina’s offense ended the preseason the way it began, with no touchdowns as No. 3 quarterback Hunter Cantwell and No. 4 Tony Pike took all the snaps in a game both teams played with the intent of not getting any key player hurt. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Eagles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick led Philadelphia to a field goal in two series in his first start in four years, and Kurt Coleman scored on two fumble returns, but New York beat Philadelphia. Mark Brunell’s 51-yard touchdown pass to former Pittsburgh Super Bowl MVP Santonio Holmes in the fourth quarter put the Jets ahead to stay. Cowboys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Dolphins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 ARLINGTON, Texas — David Buehler kicked a 31-yard field goal as time expired, lifting Dallas past Miami. The kick capped a convincing night for Buehler, who handled only kickoffs as a rookie last season. He also made field goals of 51, 45 and 40 yards. Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Alvin Pearman had a 5-yard touchdown run with 3:18 left to help Tennessee beat Super Bowl champion New Orleans. Vince Young threw a scoring pass, and Oregon product LeGarrette Blount also ran for a score. Browns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Bears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 CLEVELAND — Montario Hardesty, Cleveland’s highly touted rookie running back whose

career at Tennessee was slowed by knee injuries, hurt his left one in the second quarter of the Browns’ victory. Fellow rookie Colt McCoy got his first pro start and went 13 of 13 for 131 yards in two-plus quarters. Bengals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 INDIANAPOLIS — Cedric Peerman had a 93-yard touchdown run in the third quarter, and reserve Jordan Palmer — starter Carson Palmer’s brother — completed 10 of 14 passes for 115 yards and two touchdowns for Cincinnati. Colts quarterback Peyton Manning didn’t play, and most of Indy’s starters took the

night off. Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Matt Cassel and Brodie Croyle each led touchdown drives and Kansas City won for the first time in the preseason since 2008. Quarterback Aaron Rodgers and a host of other Green Bay starters didn’t suit up for the final tuneup. Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Texans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 HOUSTON — Rudy Carpenter threw two touchdown passes to Arrelious Benn, and Corey Lynch returned one of his two interceptions 91 yards for a score to help Tampa Bay beat Houston. Car-

penter completed 15 of 22 passes for 203 yards and played into the fourth quarter. Tampa Bay rested starter Josh Freeman and backup Josh Johnson. Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 DETROIT — Third-stringer Drew Stanton threw a pair of second-half touchdown passes for Detroit after Matthew Stafford had an interception returned for a touchdown. Jaguars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Falcons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Fullback Brock Bolen scored on a 16yard run, and Josh Scobee kicked two field goals for Jacksonville.


D4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BASEBALL C O M M E N TA RY

The ‘crime spree’ of Nats’ Morgan about to end By Jim Litke The Associated Press

G

ood weather, cheap tickets, convenient parking and even bobblehead giveaway nights can’t spark much interest in a meaningless September game between the Nationals and Marlins, two teams whose payrolls tipped off their lowly intentions to fans even before the season began. But Nyjer Morgan can. Florida’s feisty, 30-year-old center fielder put baseball back on sportstalk’s front burner for at least a day, but not the way Bud Selig envisioned. Then again, it’s not as though the commissioner didn’t see this coming. Either way, he’s the one responsible for sorting it out. Morgan has been on baseball’s version of a crime spree the last two weeks. Already appealing a seven-game suspension for firing a baseball at fans in the stands Aug. 21 in Philadelphia, he nearly set off a brawl with a cheap shot Saturday on Cards catcher Bryan Anderson, then doubled down by starting a melee Wednesday with the Marlins. “He was playing his game,” said Florida manager Edwin Rodriguez, who joined his Washington counterpart, Jim Riggleman, and four others in getting ejected before the night was through. “We were playing ours.” Morgan’s “game” previously meant channeling his intensity and considerable talents into putting up respectable numbers at the plate for the Nationals, and the hapless Pirates before that. But as his production dipped, Morgan increasingly veered off in the direction of provocation. Along the way, he crossed a line between fierce and dangerous. The bench-clearing brawl that began in the top of the sixth had actually been simmering since the night before. That’s when Morgan barreled into Marlins’ catcher Brad Hayes on a play at the plate — he probably could have beaten the tag with a slide — separating Hayes’ shoulder and knocking him out for the remainder of the year. As payback, Marlins pitcher Chris Volstad plunked Morgan in the fourth. He promptly stole second and third, despite the fact that his team was 11 runs down at the time, ruffling the Marlins’ scales one more time. In the sixth, presumably for the sin of showing him up, Volstad threw behind Morgan, who responded by rushing the mound and —as the kids like to say — it was on, baby! Baseball has a code of unwritten rules to cover such situations, and most of the time they’re understood well enough to keep the peace. Morgan’s uncalled-for elbow on St. Louis’ catcher, for example, got him in almost as much trouble with his own manager as it did with the Cardinals. Riggleman called it “unprofessional” and sat him down for a game. But there was no consensus on where the blame for the Florida fight belonged, although everyone agreed that Morgan was at the center of events and — some surprise — proud of it. When teammates finally dragged him out from underneath the pileup, Morgan fired both hands into the air, beat his chest and walked off like he was Stone Cold Steve Austin. Morgan’s file down at headquarters is already bulging. All that remains is for the commissioner to decide how many more games to tack onto the seven already handed Morgan — the recommendation here is at least 10 — plus whether fines and suspensions are warranted for the other participants. Whether it was stress, frustration or something else altogether that pushed Morgan from being a tough competitor into a marginally dirty one, only he knows. But if Selig wants to do some lasting good for baseball — beyond meting out an appropriate sentence to Morgan — he’ll take into account the recent grumbling set off by the release of teams’ financial statements illustrating how little a few of those franchises are interested in winning. Because while we’re on the subject of unwritten rules, if he’s going to whack players for trying too hard, he might want to consider doing the same for franchises that don’t try hard enough. Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ ap.org.

TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

M A JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L NL ROUNDUP

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

Phillies 12, Rockies 11

AMERICAN LEAGUE

DENVER — Chase Utley drove in six runs and hit a grand slam to cap a nine-run seventh inning as Philadelphia overcame a four-run deficit. Utley’s six RBIs tied a career high and came after Ryan Howard and Jayson Werth also went deep during the big inning in which the Phillies had nine hits. Manny Delcarmen (0-1), acquired from Boston earlier in the week, gave up four earned runs on four hits while getting just one out in his NL debut.

East Division New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Division Minnesota Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland West Division Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf Victorino cf Schneider c C.Ruiz c Blanton p Herndon p a-M.Sweeney ph Bastardo p c-B.Francisco ph Durbin p J.Romero p Contreras p g-Do.Brown ph Lidge p Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 40

R 1 1 2 1 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12

H 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15

BI 0 0 6 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .244 .308 .273 .277 .297 .259 .254 .215 .288 .125 .000 .227 --.255 .000 ----.231 ---

Colorado AB E.Young 2b 6 Fowler cf 6 C.Gonzalez lf 5 Tulowitzki ss 5 Helton 1b 5 Mora 3b 4 Mat.Reynolds p 0 R.Betancourt p 0 d-Barmes ph-3b 1 S.Smith rf 4 e-Spilborghs ph-rf 2 Iannetta c 5 J.Chacin p 2 Belisle p 0 b-C.Nelson ph 1 Beimel p 0 Delcarmen p 0 J.Herrera 3b 1 f-Giambi ph 0 1-Rogers pr 0 Street p 0 Totals 47

R 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 11

H 2 3 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 20

BI 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

SO 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .243 .248 .332 .319 .253 .281 ----.235 .256 .271 .203 .063 .250 .500 .000 --.281 .259 .200 .000

Philadelphia 000 111 900 — 12 15 2 Colorado 040 021 301 — 11 20 1 a-was hit by a pitch for Herndon in the 6th. b-singled for Belisle in the 6th. c-singled for Bastardo in the 7th. dwalked for R.Betancourt in the 8th. e-singled for S.Smith in the 8th. f-walked for J.Herrera in the 8th. g-struck out for Contreras in the 9th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 8th. E—Utley (11), Howard (12), E.Young (4). LOB—Philadelphia 8, Colorado 14. 2B—Polanco (24), E.Young (4), S.Smith (16). HR—Howard (25), off Beimel; Werth (19), off Delcarmen; Utley (12), off Mat.Reynolds; Iannetta (8), off Blanton; Fowler (4), off Blanton; C.Gonzalez (31), off Blanton. RBIs—Utley 6 (49), Howard 2 (87), Werth (64), Ibanez (65), M.Sweeney (7), B.Francisco (22), Fowler 3 (31), C.Gonzalez (93), Tulowitzki 2 (57), S.Smith (49), Iannetta 3 (24), J.Herrera (16). SB—Victorino 2 (26). CS—C.Gonzalez (8). SF—Utley. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 5 (Werth, Howard, Rollins 2, Schneider); Colorado 8 (Helton, Iannetta 2, Mora 2, E.Young 2, Spilborghs). Runners moved up—Iannetta. GIDP—Rollins, Polanco, Iannetta. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, Utley, Howard); Colorado 2 (E.Young, Tulowitzki, Helton), (Tulowitzki, Helton). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton 4 1-3 10 6 4 2 3 86 5.25 Herndon 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.37 Bastardo W, 1-0 1 4 1 1 0 2 19 5.79 Durbin 1 4 3 3 0 1 28 3.86 J.Romero H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.69 Contreras H, 11 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 14 3.09 Lidge S, 19-24 1 1 1 0 1 1 21 3.57 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Chacin 5 1-3 5 3 1 2 3 100 3.69 Belisle H, 17 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.84 Beimel 0 3 3 3 0 0 12 3.29 Delcarmn L, 0-1 1-3 4 4 4 0 0 15108.00 Mat.Reynolds 2-3 2 2 2 0 1 19 2.45 R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.99 Street 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.19 Beimel pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Herndon 2-0, Contreras 1-0, Belisle 2-1, Mat.Reynolds 2-2. HBP—by Belisle (M.Sweeney), by J.Chacin (Polanco, Blanton). WP— Beimel. PB—Iannetta. T—3:51. A—30,179 (50,449).

Mets 4, Braves 2 ATLANTA — David Wright homered, Johan Santana won for the first time in four starts and New York snapped Atlanta’s five-game winning streak. The Mets, who had dropped three straight, broke a 13game stretch in which they scored three runs or less against the NL East-leading Braves. New York AB L.Castillo 2b 5 Duda lf 5 Beltran cf 5 Carter rf 4 Pagan rf 0 D.Wright 3b 3 I.Davis 1b 2 J.Arias ss 3 R.Tejada ss 0 H.Blanco c 4 J.Santana p 2 Dessens p 0 a-Lu.Hernandez ph 1 P.Feliciano p 0 b-Thole ph 0 c-Hessman ph 1 Parnell p 0 Takahashi p 0 Totals 35

R 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 3

SO 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .238 .000 .213 .262 .294 .292 .248 .333 .178 .233 .177 --.250 --.298 .143 .000 .063

Atlanta AB R O.Infante 2b 4 0 Heyward rf 3 0 Prado 3b 4 0 D.Lee 1b 4 0 McCann c 4 1 1-Ankiel pr 0 0 M.Diaz lf 4 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 Me.Cabrera cf 3 1 T.Hudson p 1 0 Moylan p 0 0 O’Flaherty p 0 0 d-Conrad ph 1 0 M.Dunn p 0 0 Totals 32 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 2

SO 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .345 .282 .316 .248 .285 .232 .234 .255 .262 .215 ----.246 .000

New York 200 001 100 — 4 8 1 Atlanta 010 000 010 — 2 7 2 a-grounded out for Dessens in the 7th. b-was announced for P.Feliciano in the 8th. c-struck out for Thole in the 8th. d-popped out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. 1-ran for McCann in the 9th. E—J.Arias (1), O.Infante 2 (14). LOB—New York 8, Atlanta 6. 2B—I.Davis (26). 3B—Beltran (2). HR— D.Wright (22), off T.Hudson; McCann (20), off J.Santana. RBIs—Beltran (15), D.Wright (87), J.Arias (1), Prado (61), McCann (71). S—J.Arias, T.Hudson. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (H.Blanco 3, Hessman 2); Atlanta 2 (O.Infante, D.Lee). GIDP—L.Castillo, Heyward. DP—New York 2 (L.Castillo, I.Davis), (I.Davis); Atlanta 1 (O.Infante, Ale.Gonzalez, D.Lee).

W 84 82 76 69 49 W 77 73 66 56 54 W 75 65 65 52

L 50 51 58 64 85 L 57 60 68 77 80 L 58 68 69 82

Pct .627 .617 .567 .519 .366 Pct .575 .549 .493 .421 .403 Pct .564 .489 .485 .388

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1½ 8 14½ 35 GB — 3½ 11 20½ 23 GB — 10 10½ 23½

Thursday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 5, Oakland 0 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Detroit 10, Minnesota 9, 13 innings Cleveland 6, Seattle 3

WCGB — — 6½ 13 33½ WCGB — 9 16½ 26 28½ WCGB — 17 17½ 30½

L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 4-6 3-7 3-7

AL ROUNDUP Tigers 10, Twins 9 (13 innings) MINNEAPOLIS — Gerald Laird hit a solo home run in the 13th inning for Detroit. Ryan Raburn added three hits and two RBIs after entering the game in the sixth inning for the injured Miguel Cabrera and Jose Valverde (2-3) pitched a career-high three innings of relief to help the Tigers avoid a threegame sweep. Laird, who entered the game in the 11th inning, homered off Nick Blackburn (8-9). Blackburn was scheduled to start the series opener against Texas on Friday night. Detroit A.Jackson cf Rhymes 2b Damon dh Mi.Cabrera 1b C.Wells lf-rf Boesch rf a-Inge ph-3b Jh.Peralta 3b-1b Kelly lf-1b b-Raburn ph-lf Avila c d-Laird ph-c Santiago ss Totals

AB 6 6 6 3 4 3 4 6 3 4 5 1 7 58

R 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 10

H 3 2 1 0 1 0 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 19

BI 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 10

BB 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 2 13

Avg. .305 .315 .266 .336 .355 .268 .254 .252 .234 .255 .218 .205 .268

Minnesota Span cf A.Casilla 2b-ss Mauer c Cuddyer 1b Delm.Young lf Valencia 3b J.Morales dh Repko rf Hardy ss c-Thome ph Tolbert 2b Totals

AB 6 7 6 7 6 5 6 5 2 1 1 52

R H 1 0 0 2 1 1 3 3 2 1 1 3 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 15

BI 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 8

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 1 0 11

Avg. .265 .275 .324 .276 .305 .338 .250 .213 .255 .268 .235

Detroit 110 010 041 010 1 — 10 19 2 Minnesota 020 130 110 010 0 — 9 15 2 a-grounded out for Boesch in the 8th. b-homered for Kelly in the 8th. c-struck out for Hardy in the 10th. d-sacrificed for Avila in the 11th. E—Inge (7), Rhymes (2), Hardy (8), A.Casilla (3). LOB—Detroit 15, Minnesota 10. 2B—Inge (26), Avila (10). 3B—A.Jackson (9). HR—Kelly (5), off S.Baker; Jh.Peralta (14), off R.Flores; Raburn (11), off Guerrier; C.Wells (1), off Crain; Laird (5), off Blackburn. RBIs— Rhymes 2 (10), Mi.Cabrera (108), C.Wells (8), Boesch (62), Jh.Peralta (64), Kelly (17), Raburn 2 (46), Laird (23), A.Casilla (15), Delm.Young (93), Valencia 2 (26), J.Morales 2 (3), Repko (7), Hardy (27). SB—Damon (9). S—Laird, Hardy. SF—Valencia, Hardy. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 9 (Jh.Peralta, Rhymes 3, Boesch, C.Wells 3, Santiago); Minnesota 5 (Span 2, Hardy 2, Valencia). Runners moved up—Damon 2, Mi.Cabrera, Delm. Young. GIDP—J.Morales. DP—Detroit 1 (Kelly, Santiago, Bonine). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander 6 10 6 3 1 4 104 3.61 Bonine 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.94 Figaro 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 5 8.10 Coke 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.77 Weinhardt 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 17 8.38 B.Thomas 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.26 Valverde W, 2-3 3 2 1 0 1 4 38 3.10 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S.Baker 2 3 2 2 2 3 46 4.60 Manship 4 4 1 1 0 3 65 2.38 Rauch H, 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 21 3.26 R.Flores 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 6.75 Guerrier BS, 6 2-3 3 3 1 0 1 18 3.58 Crain BS, 2-3 2 3 1 1 1 4 40 2.76 Duensing 2 4 1 1 1 0 33 2.09 Blackbrn L, 8-9 1 1 1 1 0 2 19 6.04 Inherited runners-scored—Coke 1-1. IBB—off Duensing (A.Jackson). WP—Verlander. PB—Avila. T—4:47. A—39,551 (39,504).

Red Sox 6, Orioles 4 BALTIMORE — Adrian Beltre homered to spark a five-run second inning, and Boston salvaged a .500 road trip. David Ortiz drove in two runs and J.D. Drew had three hits for the Red Sox, who moved within 6½ games of idle Tampa Bay in the AL wild-card race. Boston dropped two of three on the road against the Rays, then lost in Baltimore on Tuesday before winning two straight. AB 4 5 4 4

R 0 0 0 1

Home 46-22 43-26 40-26 36-29 28-40 Home 42-23 38-27 43-25 30-35 29-39 Home 43-26 38-27 34-32 31-37

Away 38-28 39-25 36-32 33-35 21-45 Away 35-34 35-33 23-43 26-42 25-41 Away 32-32 27-41 31-37 21-45

East Division Atlanta Philadelphia Florida New York Washington Central Division Cincinnati St. Louis Houston Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh West Division San Diego San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles Arizona

Today’s Games Toronto (Morrow 10-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-0), 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay (Garza 13-7) at Baltimore (Millwood 3-14), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 12-9) at Boston (C.Buchholz 15-5), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Bonderman 7-9) at Kansas City (Greinke 8-11), 5:10 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 2-2) at Minnesota (Blackburn 8-8), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Kazmir 8-12) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 12-8), 7:05 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 11-13) at Seattle (French 3-4), 7:10 p.m.

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana W, 11-9 5 3 1 1 1 3 65 2.98 Dessens H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 2.10 P.Feliciano H, 13 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.10 Parnell H, 6 1 2 1 0 1 1 20 2.67 Takahashi S, 3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.92 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hudson L, 15-6 7 8 4 3 1 4 103 2.30 Moylan 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 14 3.29 O’Flaherty 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.09 M.Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—O’Flaherty 2-0. WP— T.Hudson. PB—H.Blanco. T—2:46. A—24,895 (49,743).

Boston Scutaro ss J.Drew rf V.Martinez c D.Ortiz dh

Str W-6 W-1 W-2 L-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-1 L-4 W-1 L-2

H BI BB 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1

SO 0 0 1 1

Avg. .274 .257 .290 .262

W 78 76 67 66 57 W 78 69 62 62 57 44 W 76 74 69 68 55

L 56 58 65 68 77 L 55 62 71 71 77 89 L 56 60 64 66 79

Pct .582 .567 .508 .493 .425 Pct .586 .527 .466 .466 .425 .331 Pct .576 .552 .519 .507 .410

GB — 2 10 12 21 GB — 8 16 16 21½ 34 GB — 3 7½ 9 22

WCGB — — 8 10 19 WCGB — 5½ 13½ 13½ 19 31½ WCGB — 2 6½ 8 21

Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 2 Philadelphia 12, Colorado 11

A.Beltre 3b Lowrie 2b Lowell 1b Nava lf E.Patterson lf Kalish cf Totals

3 4 4 4 0 3 35

1 1 1 1 0 1 6

1 0 2 0 0 1 9

1 0 1 0 0 1 5

1 1 0 0 0 1 6

1 1 1 0 0 0 5

.321 .273 .241 .252 .224 .238

Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Markakis rf Wigginton 1b Scott dh Pie cf Wieters c 1-Lugo pr Reimold lf a-C.Patterson ph C.Izturis ss J.Bell 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 0 3 0 4 4 34

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 8 4 1 11

Avg. .259 .287 .251 .286 .289 .251 .256 .202 .266 .231 .214

Boston 050 000 100 — 6 9 1 Baltimore 000 004 000 — 4 8 1 a-sacrificed for Reimold in the 9th. 1-ran for Wieters in the 9th. E—Lowell (2), Wigginton (17). LOB—Boston 9, Baltimore 5. 2B—Kalish (5), B.Roberts (11), Markakis (41), Wieters 2 (18). HR—A.Beltre (25), off Bergesen. RBIs—D.Ortiz 2 (82), A.Beltre (92), Lowell (21), Kalish (10), Markakis (46), Wigginton (65), Wieters 2 (46). S—C.Patterson. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (A.Beltre, Scutaro, Lowrie); Baltimore 5 (Scott, C.Izturis, Reimold, J.Bell 2). Runners moved up—D.Ortiz, Lowrie, Wigginton 2. GIDP—J.Drew, V.Martinez, Pie. DP—Boston 1 (Scutaro, Lowrie, Lowell); Baltimore 2 (B.Roberts, C.Izturis, Wigginton), (B.Roberts, C.Izturis, Wigginton). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mtsuzka W, 9-4 5 2-3 6 4 4 1 6 94 4.29 Atchison H, 5 2 0 0 0 0 3 22 3.97 Okajima H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 5.67 Papelbon S, 35 1 2 0 0 0 2 22 2.81 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergsn L, 6-10 5 1-3 8 5 2 5 4 114 5.47 VandenHurk 1 0 1 1 1 0 13 3.60 Albers 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 17 4.26 Simon 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.93 Inherited runners-scored—Atchison 1-0, VandenHurk 1-0, Albers 2-1. IBB—off Bergesen (A.Beltre). HBP—by VandenHurk (A.Beltre). T—3:06. A—26,954 (48,290).

Yankees 5, Athletics 0

L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 2-8 8-2 3-7 6-4 4-6 L10 3-7 5-5 6-4 5-5 6-4

Str L-1 W-3 W-2 W-1 L-2 Str W-4 L-5 W-3 L-3 W-1 L-1 Str L-7 W-2 L-3 L-2 W-3

Home 49-19 40-25 33-32 39-25 34-31 Home 41-27 41-23 35-33 33-35 30-39 30-36 Home 38-26 42-27 43-22 40-29 33-36

Away 29-37 36-33 34-33 27-43 23-46 Away 37-28 28-39 27-38 29-36 27-38 14-53 Away 38-30 32-33 26-42 28-37 22-43

Friday’s Games N.Y. Mets (Dickey 9-5) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 6-12), 11:20 a.m. Milwaukee (Capuano 2-2) at Philadelphia (Hamels 8-10), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Li.Hernandez 9-9) at Pittsburgh (Duke 6-12), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Kawakami 1-9) at Florida (A.Miller 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 14-8) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 12-6), 5:15 p.m. Houston (Myers 10-7) at Arizona (D.Hudson 4-1), 6:40 p.m. Colorado (Cook 4-8) at San Diego (Luebke 0-0), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 8-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-8), 7:10 p.m.

four-run sixth to score all three runners without a throw. Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf Hafner dh J.Nix 3b A.Marte 3b J.Brown 1b Crowe lf Valbuena 2b Marson c Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 4 0 4 4 4 4 39

R H 1 1 2 3 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 6 12

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Branyan dh Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b A.Moore c Langerhans lf Woodward ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .217 .277 .295 .276 .252 .220 .205 .245 .175 .191

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 7 3 0 10

Avg. .311 .247 .249 .238 .241 .224 .196 .190 .100

Cleveland 000 004 002 — 6 12 1 Seattle 003 000 000 — 3 7 0 E—J.Nix (12). LOB—Cleveland 7, Seattle 4. 2B— Choo (27), I.Suzuki (25). HR—Choo (16), off J.Wright; Branyan (21), off Tomlin. RBIs—Choo 5 (68), Hafner (41), F.Gutierrez (52), Branyan 2 (48). SB—Crowe (15). CS—I.Suzuki (8). SF—F.Gutierrez. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 4 (Crowe, Hafner 2, Valbuena); Seattle 1 (Langerhans). GIDP—Jo.Lopez. DP—Cleveland 1 (A.Cabrera, Valbuena, J.Brown). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Tomlin W, 3-3 6 7 3 3 0 5 Sipp H, 13 2 0 0 0 0 4 Perez S, 17-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Fister L, 4-11 5 1-3 7 4 4 0 3 Olson 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 2 J.Wright 2 3 2 2 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Olson 2-0. Tomlin (A.Moore). PB—A.Moore. T—2:37. A—17,269 (47,878).

NP ERA 93 4.14 23 4.58 8 1.99 NP ERA 95 3.85 25 5.40 32 4.86 HBP—by

LEADERS

NEW YORK — CC Sabathia pitched one-hit ball for eight innings to earn his major league-leading 19th win, fill-in Curtis Granderson homered twice and New York beat Oakland for a four-game sweep. Sabathia (19-5) gave up Mark Ellis’ clean single leading off the second. Jonathan Albaladejo completed the combined one-hitter in the ninth. Oakland Crisp cf R.Davis lf K.Suzuki dh Kouzmanoff 3b M.Ellis 2b Carson rf c-Cust ph Larish 1b Powell c Pennington ss b-Barton ph Tolleson ss Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 4 3 1 2 1 2 1 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

SO 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .266 .266 .247 .258 .256 .174 .271 .225 .215 .251 .283 .286

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Cano 2b Thames dh a-Berkman ph-dh Posada c Kearns lf-rf E.Nunez 3b R.Pena 3b Gardner cf-lf Totals

AB 4 1 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 4 0 3 31

R 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 5 5

SO 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .266 .295 .249 .269 .321 .304 .214 .265 .269 .286 .221 .284

Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 1 2 New York 010 001 21x — 5 9 1 b-struck out for Pennington in the 8th. c-flied out for Carson in the 9th. E—Blevins (1), Powell (4), Posada (8). LOB—Oakland 6, New York 8. HR—Posada (17), off Braden; Granderson (16), off Blevins; Granderson (17), off Wuertz. RBIs—Granderson 3 (45), Posada (51), Kearns (49). SB—E.Nunez (3). CS—Jeter (5). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (K.Suzuki, R.Davis); New York 6 (Cano, Gardner, Kearns 2, Jeter 2). Runners moved up—Crisp, Swisher, Berkman, E.Nunez. GIDP—Pennington. DP—New York 1 (E.Nunez, Cano, Teixeira). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Braden L, 9-10 5 2 1 1 2 4 79 3.23 Blevins 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 12 3.83 Wuertz 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 19 4.81 H.Rodriguez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 4.34 James 1 3 1 1 1 2 28 9.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabthia W, 19-5 8 1 0 0 3 5 95 3.02 Albaladejo 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.45 Braden pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Blevins 1-0, Wuertz 2-0. IBB—off Wuertz (Posada). HBP—by Braden (Jeter), by Sabathia (Larish), by Albaladejo (K.Suzuki). T—2:45. A—44,644 (50,287).

Indians 6, Mariners 3 SEATTLE — Shin-Soo Choo drove in five runs with a bases-loaded double and a two-run home run for Cleveland. Choo hit a 3-1 fastball from Doug Fister (4-11) against the right-center-field wall in the Indians’

Through Thursday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .361; MiCabrera, Detroit, .336; Mauer, Minnesota, .324; Cano, New York, .321; ABeltre, Boston, .321; Konerko, Chicago, .319; ISuzuki, Seattle, .311. RUNS—Teixeira, New York, 100; MiCabrera, Detroit, 95; Jeter, New York, 95; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 94; Hamilton, Texas, 93; Cano, New York, 92; JBautista, Toronto, 90. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 108; JBautista, Toronto, 103; Guerrero, Texas, 99; Konerko, Chicago, 98; Teixeira, New York, 98; Hamilton, Texas, 97; ARodriguez, New York, 97. HITS—Hamilton, Texas, 181; ISuzuki, Seattle, 173; Cano, New York, 165; ABeltre, Boston, 160; MiCabrera, Detroit, 160; AJackson, Detroit, 156; MYoung, Texas, 156. DOUBLES—Longoria, Tampa Bay, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 41; Markakis, Baltimore, 41; Mauer, Minnesota, 41; Hamilton, Texas, 40; VWells, Toronto, 40; ABeltre, Boston, 38. TRIPLES—AJackson, Detroit, 9; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 8; Pennington, Oakland, 7; Span, Minnesota, 7; Granderson, New York, 6; Maier, Kansas City, 6; Podsednik, Kansas City, 6. HOME RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 43; MiCabrera, Detroit, 33; Konerko, Chicago, 33; Hamilton, Texas, 31; Teixeira, New York, 30; DOrtiz, Boston, 27; Cano, New York, 26; CPena, Tampa Bay, 26; Scott, Baltimore, 26. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 53; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 41; RDavis, Oakland, 40; Gardner, New York, 39; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 37; ISuzuki, Seattle, 35; Figgins, Seattle, 34. PITCHING—Sabathia, New York, 19-5; PHughes, New York, 16-6; Price, Tampa Bay, 16-6; CBuchholz, Boston, 15-5; Lester, Boston, 15-8; Pavano, Minnesota, 15-10; CWilson, Texas, 14-5; Cahill, Oakland, 14-6; Verlander, Detroit, 14-8; ESantana, Los Angeles, 14-9. STRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 200; FHernandez, Seattle, 200; Lester, Boston, 186; Liriano, Minnesota, 178; Morrow, Toronto, 174; Verlander, Detroit, 172; Sabathia, New York, 165. SAVES—RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 40; Soria, Kansas City, 36; Papelbon, Boston, 35; NFeliz, Texas, 34; Gregg, Toronto, 30; MRivera, New York, 28; Aardsma, Seattle, 26. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—CGonzalez, Colorado, .332; Votto, Cincinnati, .325; SCastro, Chicago, .317; Prado, Atlanta, .316; Pujols, St. Louis, .313; Polanco, Philadelphia, .308; Byrd, Chicago, .302. RUNS—BPhillips, Cincinnati, 93; Pujols, St. Louis, 92; Votto, Cincinnati, 91; Weeks, Milwaukee, 91; CGonzalez, Colorado, 89; Prado, Atlanta, 89; Uggla, Florida, 86; Werth, Philadelphia, 86. RBI—Votto, Cincinnati, 97; Pujols, St. Louis, 95; CGonzalez, Colorado, 93; ADunn, Washington, 88; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 87; Howard, Philadelphia, 87; AdLaRoche, Arizona, 87; DWright, New York, 87. HITS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 161; Prado, Atlanta, 160; Braun, Milwaukee, 155; Pujols, St. Louis, 154; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 151; Votto, Cincinnati, 149; Holliday, St. Louis, 148. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 43; ATorres, San Francisco, 42; Holliday, St. Louis, 37; Loney, Los Angeles, 35; Prado, Atlanta, 35; Braun, Milwaukee, 34; ADunn, Washington, 34; KJohnson, Arizona, 34; GSanchez, Florida, 34; ASoriano, Chicago, 34. TRIPLES—Fowler, Colorado, 12; SDrew, Arizona, 9; AEscobar, Milwaukee, 9; Victorino, Philadelphia, 9; CGonzalez, Colorado, 8; JosReyes, New York, 8; Morgan, Washington, 7; Pagan, New York, 7. HOME RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 35; ADunn, Washington, 33; MarReynolds, Arizona, 32; Votto, Cincinnati, 32; CGonzalez, Colorado, 31; Uggla, Florida, 29; Fielder, Milwaukee, 28. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 44; Morgan, Washington, 33; Pagan, New York, 32; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 28; HRamirez, Florida, 28; JosReyes, New York, 28; Venable, San Diego, 26; Victorino, Philadelphia, 26; CYoung, Arizona, 26. PITCHING—Jimenez, Colorado, 17-6; Wainwright, St. Louis, 17-9; Halladay, Philadelphia, 16-10; THudson, Atlanta, 15-6; CCarpenter, St. Louis, 14-5; Arroyo, Cincinnati, 14-8; Nolasco, Florida, 14-9. STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 191; Halladay, Philadelphia, 190; Lincecum, San Francisco, 188; Wainwright, St. Louis, 178; Hamels, Philadelphia, 176; JoJohnson, Florida, 174; Dempster, Chicago, 172. SAVES—BrWilson, San Francisco, 38; HBell, San Diego, 37; FCordero, Cincinnati, 35; Wagner, Atlanta, 31; LNunez, Florida, 29; Capps, Washington, 26; Marmol, Chicago, 25; FRodriguez, New York, 25.

Paul J. Bereswill / The Associated Press

Roger Federer serves to Andreas Beck during Federer’s 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 win at the U.S. Open in New York on Thursday.

Federer beats heat; U.S. teen pulls upset By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Roger Federer is one cool customer. The temperature climbed into the 90s yet again Thursday at Flushing Meadows, and the guy showed up for work wearing a warmup jacket. Then he put in his 1 hour, 41 minutes on court, dismissing 104th-ranked Andreas Beck of Germany 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 with the help of 15 aces, to ease into the third round of the U.S. Open. “It’s about just saving your energy for the really big match coming up, maybe the next one,” Federer said, perhaps mindful that he was pushed to five sets in the opening round at Wimbledon in June before eventually losing in the quarterfinals at a second consecutive major tournament. He dropped all of seven games in the first round of the U.S. Open, and the owner of a record 16 Grand Slam titles is feeling pretty good about things at the moment. “It’s the perfect start, sure. I played Monday; had two days off. I had another easy one physically today, and here I am in the third round feeling like I’m completely in the tournament,” said Federer, a five-time U.S. Open champion and the only man left in the field who has won it. “I got a sense for how the court speed is again. I got the sense of the crowd and the wind now, as well. I played one night, one day,” he continued. “I have all the answers after two matches.” In other words: Let everyone else sweat it out. Like Kei Nishikori, the 147th-ranked qualifier from Japan, who fought cramps in his racketholding right hand and elsewhere while taking a minute shy of five hours to wrap up a 5-7, 76 (6), 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1 victory over 11th-seeded Marin Cilic. His was one of a handful of upsets on Day 4 of a tournament that is quickly accumulating surprises. Beatrice Capra, an 18-year-old from Ellicott City, Md., made like 2009 U.S. Open darling Melanie Oudin and ousted No. 18-seeded Aravane Rezai of France 7-5, 2-6, 6-3. No. 9 Agnieszka Radwanska lost to Peng Shuai, and No. 22 Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez lost to Patty Schnyder. Seeded winners included 2004 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova, 2008 runner-up Jelena Jankovic and 2010 Wimbledon finalist Vera Zvonareva. Top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki, like Federer, didn’t waste any time on court, blanking 84th-ranked Chang Kaichen 6-0, 6-0. At 371st, Capra is the lowest-ranked woman left. She’s also the youngest — and not only is she making her Grand Slam debut, she’s playing in the main draw of a tour-level event for the first time. She said she “watched every second” as Oudin, then 17, reached the quarterfinals 12 months ago. “I really look up to Melanie,” said Capra, who earned a wild card from the U.S. Tennis Association by winning an eight-entrant playoff. “You know, it was really inspiring to me.” One of the women Oudin knocked off in 2009, three-time major champion Maria Sharapova, awaits Capra in the third round. Wearing tuxedo lapels on her deep purple night-match dress, Sharapova beat 68th-ranked Iveta Benesova of the Czech Republic 6-1, 6-2 under the lights. “When I was younger, I used to always look up to her,” Capra said about 2006 U.S. Open champion Sharapova, who is all of 23 now, “and so I think it will be a really good match for me to see where I am compared to that kind of level.” Sharapova was followed into Arthur Ashe Stadium by 2008 Australian Open winner Novak Djokovic, whose 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (6) victory over 52nd-ranked Philipp Petzschner of Germany. Among those winning in the afternoon were Richard Gasquet, a former top-10 player who eliminated No. 6-seeded Nikolay Davydenko 63, 6-4, 6-2; Robin Soderling, a two-time French Open runner-up who beat American Taylor Dent 6-2, 6-2, 6-4; and South Africa’s Kevin Anderson, who outlasted No. 26 Thomaz Bellucci 6-7 (4), 6-4, 5-7, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Americans Mardy Fish and James Blake also won. Blake, a wild-card entry, will take on No. 3 Djokovic in the third round.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 D5

Pac Am Continued from D1 “It’s just fun to play in a competition, even though your chances of winning without any strokes are kind of slim to none,” said Bryan White, a 31-year-old 0.4 handicap from Hillsboro. “But it’s a fun event, and it’s a good way to end the summer.” The top two golfers from each flight after 54 holes of individual net stroke play advanced to today’s final round at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club. The lowest 18-hole net score at Crosswater is crowned the Pac Am’s overall champion. Last year’s overall winner — Bill Bienapfl, of Meridian, Idaho, who was then a 28.6 handicap — shot a net 61 at Crosswater Club. For a scratch golfer to beat Bienapfl last year, he would have had to better the competitive course record at Crosswater: an 8-under-par 64 set by tour pro Brad Bryant at the 2009 Jeld-Wen Tradition. If Fred Funk could not beat a 64 in four years at The Tradition, even though he won the Champions Tour senior major championship twice at Crosswater, what chance does an amateur have? Yet, some of the top players keep com-

Football Continued from D1 The cupboard is not completely bare, as Summit is expected to have back seven players who received some sort of all-IMC recognition last season. Additionally, the Storm open their season with nonconference games against Woodburn and Lakeridge, both of which were 3-7 in 2009. 3. What kind of quarterback will Bend’s J.C. Grim be? Athletically, Grim, a junior, has all the tools. In his first season of high school track this past spring he cleared 6 feet 2 inches in the high jump and went more than 20 feet three times in the long jump. Listed as 6-3, 185 pounds, he looks the part of a high school quarterback. But with Bend returning just two starters from last year’s team that went 8-3 and advanced to the second round of the 5A playoffs, Grim, a first-year starter, will have to learn the position on the fly. “He’s very quiet, but very competitive,” Bend coach Craig Walker says. “He really feels comfortable on a court or on a field. It’s where he’s best at.” Grim and the youthful Lava Bears will be tested early, as Bend’s first four games are against teams that qualified for the postseason in 2009, including 5A state runner-up Jefferson in the second week of the season. 4. Is Crook County ready to make a playoff run? With more than 20 seniors turning out for the Cowboys, including returning all-IMC running back Jordan Reeher, Crook County is in position to earn its first postseason berth since 1997. Playing in the Class 4A Special District 1 with Portland’s Marshall and Roosevelt, who com-

Outlaw Continued from D1 “It looked kind of funny the first time I saw it,” McCaffrey says about the pistol offense, in which the quarterback stands four yards behind the center instead of the conventional seven yards in a shotgun formation. Also in the pistol formation, the tailback lines up three yards behind the quarterback, creating an “I” formation with the quarterback and running back. “But it’s not that different from the West Coast offense,” McCaffrey adds, referring to the pass-first offensive philosophy that emphasizes vertical passing lanes, a system popularized by Bill Walsh’s San Francisco 49er teams in the 1980s. “It’s more like playing out of the (I formation), but out of the shotgun.” Based on Nevada’s success — the Wolfpack produced three 1,000-yard rushers last season and were second in the Football Championship Subdivision with an offensive output of 505.66 yards per game — McCaffrey should see plenty of touches in the Vikings’ new scheme. And ideally for McCaffrey and his teammates, the Vikings will win a few more games. Portland State went just 2-9 last season, the school’s worst record in 27 years. “The biggest challenge so far is learning the blocking schemes,” McCaffrey says about the pistol. “You’ve got to be at the right place at the right time. As far as the running plays go, it’s not too complicated — go where the hole is.” Despite playing out of his accustomed position for the last two years, McCaffrey says his football IQ has improved tenfold from

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Michael Dominick, second from right, putts on No. 18 at Eagle Crest’s Ridge Course in Redmond while playing in Flight 1 of the Pacific Amateur Golf Classic on Thursday afternoon. ing back. “You see a lot of the same guys,” said Paul Battle, a 42-year-old 0.8 handicap from Puyallup, Wash. “You make friends.

bined for four wins the last three seasons, the Cowboys are favored to earn a No. 1 seed for the new play-in games, which will precede the 4A playoffs. “These kids, when they were freshmen and sophomores, they were quite successful,” Crook County coach Woody Bennett says about his current senior class. “Last year was the only year they didn’t have too much success on the football field. They got their noses bloodied a bit.” 5. Will the new playoff system be a nightmare? In addition to the Oregon School Activities Association’s reclassification plan last year, the state’s governing body for high school athletics altered the way teams qualify for the postseason. Unfortunately for anyone trying to follow the qualification process, Class 6A, 5A, and 4A all have different postseason models. In 6A, 21 teams automatically qualify for a 32-team football bracket. From most leagues, the top three teams will advance. For the state’s remaining 22 teams in 6A, 11 play-in games will be staged to determine the other 11 qualifiers for the state playoff bracket. In 5A, no teams automatically qualify for the postseason, but 27 teams earn automatic entry into the second round of play-in games. The 10 Class 5A teams that do not earn byes to the second round of play-in games will compete in a first round of playin games, from which five teams will advance to the second round. The winners of the second round of play-in games will form the 16team state playoff bracket. In 4A, like 5A, no team will automatically qualify for the postseason. Teams representing the 32 football-playing schools in 4A will play 16 play-in games, from which the winners will advance

his time at slot receiver. “For the most part,” McCaffrey says, “ I learned a lot from being in the slot: how to read defenses, pick up blitzes, finding signals and keys when people might blitz — all this lingo I had no idea about in high school.” While he is not adapting to a new position, Culver’s Nevin Lewis, a receiver for the Vikings, is also adjusting to the coaching change at PSU. Lewis, who started three games last year as a true freshman, is slated to start at the “Z” receiver for PSU in 2010. “The learning process has been pretty quick,” says Lewis, who had five catches for 45 yards and one touchdown in 2009. “The biggest change for me is running specific routes. … In the run-nshoot, you read the defense and based your route on it. In the new offense, you have a set route.” Lewis, who also expects to see time at the “X” receiver, could be doing more than just catching the ball for the Vikings. “I’ll get a little action at both (positions),” Lewis says. “The X receiver is more of a wideout, where the Z can come in and run more motion and be in some option stuff.” Despite entering Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe as decided underdogs — the Vikings have never beaten a Pac-10 Conference opponent — McCaffrey says his team is ready for the challenge. “We’re juiced and ready for it to be Saturday,” he says. “We’re so tired of playing our defense for the past three weeks. We’re ready to go get somebody.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

It’s kind of cool. You look forward to it every year.” Battle is playing in his third Pac Am. Like many of the lowest handicaps in the

to a 16-team postseason bracket. The play-in games will be seeded according to how teams finish in their league. The system obviously has some flaws. A team in Class 4A, for example, could finish the regular season 0-9 but win its one play-in game and go to the state playoffs. Likewise, a team in Class 5A could go through the regular season undefeated but then lose a second-round play-in game and miss the postseason bracket. The alleged upside of the new system, though, is that once teams are in the OSAA playoff brackets — 32 teams in 6A and 16 teams in 5A and 4A — all programs will be seeded according to an OSAA-developed power-ranking system. Ideally, the best teams will be set up to meet in the state finals. Will it happen that way? We’ll wait and see. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

field, he is a veteran of his home state golf association’s amateur tournaments. For those competitive golfers, the Pac Am offers a bit more fun than the ultracompetitive state amateurs. “This is much more laid-back here than it is there (in state amateur events),” said Scott Miller, who is a 45-year-old 2.3 handicap from Issaquah, Wash., and a regular in Washington State Golf Association tournaments. “For the most part, everybody you play with here is really very friendly and nice.” Michael Dominick, a 21-year-old 0.9 handicap from Eureka, Calif., agreed. Dominick, who advanced to Crosswater, plays college golf for NCAA Division III Wartburg College, a small liberal arts school in Iowa. And he entered the Pac Am this year for the first time as a final tuneup before heading back to college. Dominick said he would like to see a gross division at the Pac Am in the future, but he added that he still enjoyed playing in the top flight. “If I come back next year — and I definitely will if I have the chance — I would like to see a scratch division,” Dominick said. “But you get to play three nice golf courses. “It’s cool. It’s a little more laid-back.”

White, who is playing in the Pac Am for the third time, said the tournament keeps similarly skilled golfers playing together by having a relatively small number of golfers in each of the event’s 32 flights. And that keeps the tournament competitive and fair within the various flights, each of which includes some 20 golfers. “This year we’ve got one guy who is a plus handicap, two or three of us who are scratch, and there is another five, six guys who are 1 handicaps,” White said. “That’s some pretty good golf. “I’ve played in other events like this where you are paired up with a guy who is a 10 or 12 (handicap), and that can be a distraction, to an extent. But not here. They do a good job of keeping the flights to a manageable size.” So while the top players have little chance of winning the Pac Am’s overall championship, the tournament offers enough highly skilled players to make winning Flight 1 an achievement in itself. “When they redo the pairing … you are playing with guys who are all pretty much the same skill level,” Dominick said. “It’s a lot of fun.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-6177868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

2010 football season openers for Central Oregon teams Tonight’s games; with last year’s record in parentheses: • Century Jaguars (3-7) at Redmond Panthers (0-9), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: Century will be playing its first game in Class 6A since the OSAA’s reclassification last year. … Redmond senior quarterback Mitch Dahlen, who has started since his sophomore year, will likely miss the Panthers’ opener recovering from a summer knee injury. • Lebanon Warriors (5-6) at Bend Lava Bears (8-3), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: The Lava Bears will be breaking in 20 new starters. … Bend’s Craig Walker is entering his 23rd season as the Lava Bears’ head coach. • Eagle Point Eagles (4-6) at Mountain View Cougars (9-2), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: Mountain View allowed 14.2 points per game last season, the second-best mark in 5A. … These

two teams met in the third week of the 2009 season at Eagle Point, where Mountain View won 41-21. • Summit Storm (0-10) at Woodburn Bulldogs (3-7), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: The Storm hope to break a 13-game losing that dates back to the 2008 season. … Woodburn is mired in one of the longest playoff droughts in the state, last appearing in the postseason in 1973. • Henley Hornets (5-6) at Crook County Cowboys (2-8), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: The Hornets have advanced to the Class 4A state playoffs each of the last four years. … Crook County last won a season opener in 2007, a 46-0 victory over Parkrose. • Sisters Outlaws (5-5) at Central Panthers (10-2), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: The Panthers ended their 2009 season in the Class 4A

state quarterfinals, falling to eventual state champion Marist, 30-22 in Marist’s closest game of the season. … The Outlaws missed the playoffs last season but won four of their five final games. • La Pine Hawks (3-7) at Burns Hilanders (5-6), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: La Pine defeated Burns 44-40 at home in last year’s season opener for both teams . … The Hawks ended the 2009 season on a five-game losing streak. … Tonight is La Pine coach Bob Metcalf’s first game as the Hawks head coach. • Lost River Raiders (9-4) at Culver Bulldogs (2-7), 7 p.m. Noteworthy: Lost River made it to the Class 2A state semifinals in 2009 before falling to eventual state champion Scio, 46-3. … The Raiders defeated Culver 21-19 last year in Merrill in both teams’ season opener.


D6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BIKING COG WILD MOUNTAIN BIKE SHUTTLES: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30 p.m., the shuttle to Swampy Lakes Sno-park leaves from Cascade Lakes Brewery; Wednesday shuttles also available to Sunriver (3 p.m.) and Swampy Lakes (5:30 p.m.); cost is $10 per rider and bike; to reserve a spot, call 541-3857002 or visit www.cogwild.com. REBOUND SPORTS PERFORMANCE OUTDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instructed by professional cyclists Brig Brandt and Bart Bowen, these outdoor cycling classes will develop aerobic fitness as well as focus on riding skill and tactics; classes will meet every Wednesday at noon and every Thursday at 5:30 p.m.; info@ reboundspl.com or 541-585-1500. HIGH DESERT BMX: Regular races are Mondays and Wednesdays, with registration and open practice from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., races begin at 6:30 p.m.; 541-815-6208 or www.highdesertbmx.org. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@deschutesbrewery.com. WOMEN’S ONLY CYCLOCROSS SKILLS CLINIC: Open to all ability levels; learn on the bike skills; Mondays, Sept. 6, 13, and 20, at 6 p.m. at Summit High School; $15 per class; 541848-3691 or jocoaching.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS CAMP: Participants will ride a mixture of singletrack and double track, practice various courses and preview the Cyclocross Nationals venue; ages 10-23; Sept. 18 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sept. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; one day is $55, both days are $100; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS: Programs for 2010 include five-day or three-day options for ages 10-23. Riders will be grouped based on age and ability; Sept. 20-Dec. 12, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-335-1346. BIG FAT TOUR: Registration open; for mountain bikers of all skill levels; varying distances of mostly singletrack riding throughout different regions of the High Desert; Oct. 15-17; $25-$139 depending on class, number of days, and day of registration; www.bendsbigfattour.org. TRINITY BIKES WEEKLY SHOP RIDES: Mondays, road rides; 1 1⠄2 -hour ride; meet at Trinity Bikes in Redmond at 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, mountain bike rides; moderate 1 1⠄2- to 2-hour ride at Sisters Trail or Phil’s Trail; meet at shop at 6 p.m., will carpool to trails; www.trinitybikes.com.

CLIMBING PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT AT INCLIMB ROCK GYM: Saturdays from 6 to 9 p.m., children will receive climbing instruction and play games; $15 for one child, $8 for each additional child; pre-registration required; 555 Arizona Ave., Suite 50 in Bend; 541388-6764 or info@inclimb.com.

HIKING GUIDED HIKES: Silver Striders Guide Service, three guided hikes per week, Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m.; hikes geared toward those age 50 and older; $20 per person; 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. INTERMEDIATE HIKES FOR FALL FOLIAGE: Oct. 14-15; 2 intermediate hikes with an overnight stay at Belknap Hotsprings Resort; trip geared toward those ages 50 and

older; cost $310 per person includes van transportation; one night lodging at Belknap; guided tour of gardens, 2 meals and guide fees; registration deadline Sept. 29; contact Silver Striders Guide Service; 541-3838077; strideon@silverstriders. com or www.silver striders.com.

HORSEBACK RIDING TRAIL HORSE 2: Oct. 9-10 in Bend; learn intricate riding maneuvers needed for more advanced obstacles encountered in trail competitions or trail riding; gate opening made simple, navigating deep narrow ditches; introduction to water and diverse terrain, and more; Bent Wire Ranch; 541-388-1779; info@bentwireranch.com.

MISCELLANEOUS THE X-MAN ADVENTURE WEEKEND: At the Bearly There Ranch in Redmond; this Saturday at noon, and this Sunday at 10 a.m.; featuring two events, the Central Oregon Crossfit Challenge and the Sage Brush Skedaddle, a five-mile adventure run with some “ranch� style obstacles; visit www.xdogevents. com or call 541-480-6415. HIGH DESERT SHOWDOWN: Drag boat racing; Sept. 11-12, 9 a.m.; Haystack Reservoir in Culver; www.cdbaracing.com.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC: The following programs are conducted at the Meissner Sno-park and transportation from Bend is included in the tuition: Fall training for ages 14-22 begins Sept. 7, competition team for ages 14-22 begins Sept. 7, development team for ages 11-18 begins Nov. 17, youth club for ages 7-11 begins Dec. 4; times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865.

PADDLING FLATWATER KAYAK SAFETY CLASS: Basic safety including proper clothing, equipment and rescue skill development; paddlers will practice assisted and self-rescue techniques; one-day two-hour clinic offered Sept. 9 and 18; $45; kayaks, PFDs, paddles and safety equipment provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe at 541-317-9407 or john@tumalocreek. com; www.tumalocreek.com. FULL IMMERSION WHITEWATER KAYAK CLASS: Two-day sessions; Sept. 11-12 or Oct. 9-10; meets all day each day; includes a pool session on one week night; for beginning whitewater paddlers; learn basic river running skills and all safety guidelines to get into the sport; gear provided; $225; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. LEARN TO STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD: Learn forward strokes, turning and balancing techniques on the Deschutes River; Sundays and Mondays, through Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to noon and noon to 2 p.m. at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend; $45; includes gear and additional hour-long board rental after class to practice new skills; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. WOMEN’S STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING NIGHTS: Every Monday evening throughout the summer; meet at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend at 5:30 p.m.; board, paddle and PFD rented to participants at half-price ($20) for the two-hour session; wear quick-drying clothes, hat and sunscreen; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. BASIC SKILLS KAYAK CLASSES: Saturdays through Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2-6 p.m.; four-hour class will teach new paddlers basic skills through short lawn session discussing gear and safety, followed by three hours in the Deschutes River; $65;

www.tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. MOONLIGHT CANOE TOURS: Sept. 18-19 and 23-25, 7-11 p.m.; paddle around the mountain lakes; $65; transportation, canoe equipment, instruction, guides provided; ages 8 and older; www. wanderlusttours.com/summer/ mooncanoe.html; 541-389-8359. HALF-DAY CANOE AND KAYAK TRIPS: Available daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; guided by local naturalist guides; transportation, instruction, equipment and all food and drinks provided; $44-$65; 541-389-8359; www.wanderlusttours.com. PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

RUNNING XTERRA UNIVERSITY INFORMATIONAL SESSION: Saturday, Sept. 17, at 12:30 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports in Bend; XTERRA U will be led by Rod Bien of Fleet Feet Sports and cover tips for the course, aid-station location, day-of-race nutrition and hydration; www.fleetfeetbend.com. XTERRA TRAIL RUN NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: Saturday, Sept. 18, 9 a.m.; starts and finishes in Bend’s Old Mill District; includes 21K, 10K and 5K distances; entry fees range from $30 to $45; www.xterraplanet.com. USATF 50K TRAIL RUN NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP: Sept. 25, 8 a.m.; starts and finishes at Wanoga Sno-park; $50 without a shirt or $70 with a shirt; signup at ultrasignup.com. PILOT BUTTE CHALLENGE: Saturday, Sept. 25, 9 a.m. at Pilot Butte State Park; a one-mile timed nature trail run/fitness walk from the base to the summit of Pilot Butte with a 493foot elevation gain, beginning on the east side of Pilot Butte; e-mail Susan at susan.skavlan@state.or.us. FLEET FEET NO BOUNDARIES 5K & 10K PROGRAMS: Training programs run eight weeks and culminate with the Turkey Trot on Nov. 25; next session starts Oct. 2; meets Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. advice and support, a daily training schedule, weekly group training sessions, clinics on proper footwear, nutrition and injury prevention, training gear, etc.; $75; Fleet Feet Sports, Bend; 541-389-1601; shannah@fleetfeetbend. com; www.fleetfeetbend.com. FLEET FEET GROUP RUN: Every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports in Bend; free; www.fleetfeetbend.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Group accommodates 7- to 11-minute-mile pace; Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; locations vary, Bend; 541-317-3568; jenny@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

Racing

Boats of Thunder

Continued from D1 “We’ll be pulling a rabbit out of a hat just to put on a show.� But the show will go on at Haystack, where some racers figure to reach speeds of 170 mph. The High Desert Showdown is one of five races staged by the CDBA each year in Oregon. Three of them take place at Dexter Reservoir in Lowell, near Eugene. The 2010 World Finals of drag-boat racing are set for Nov. 4-7 in Chandler, Ariz. Anyone with any type of boat is invited to compete next weekend at Haystack, and entry is free for first-time racers. Entry fees otherwise range from $100 to $150. Organizers say about 25 boats are expected to race, with drivers coming from Oregon, Washington, California and British Columbia. Timed qualifying with one boat on the course at a time will be held Saturday, Sept. 11, starting at 9 a.m. Head-tohead races will take place on Sunday, Sept. 12, also starting at 9 a.m. Just like cars racing on a drag strip, the boats at Haystack will race side by side over a quarter-mile stretch of the reservoir. Racing classes range from 7-second Pro Modified to the 12-second and slower River Racer. Drivers try to race the quarter-mile as close as they can to their allotted time. If they go faster than that time, they lose. Qualifying on Sept. 11 will determine the race classes, and boats will race head to head on Sept. 12 until eliminated. “I love the thrill of the acceleration and the sound of the motors, and every venue is different,� says Zemke, 68, who has been racing since the late 1970s. Back then, Zemke and friends would race on other Central Oregon waters such as Prineville Reservoir and Lake Billy Chinook, but usually not in any structured competition. “In those days there weren’t too many organized races — it was like street racing,� Zemke recalls. Zemke races a 1977 Dominator, which he bought new in

What: Drag Boat Show-n-Shine When: Friday, Sept. 10, 2-6 p.m. Where: Pump House Bar & Grill, Terrebonne Cost: Free

High Desert Showdown What: Columbia Drag Boat Association races When: Saturday, Sept. 11, and Sunday, Sept. 12, starting at 9 a.m. each day Where: Haystack Reservoir near Culver Cost: Admission for spectators is $10 on Saturday, $12 on Sunday, or $20 for a weekend pass; $2-off coupons available at Bi-Mart; parking is $3 per day or $5 for the weekend Contact: www.cdbaracing.com or 541-923-2323

1977 and sold in 1983 to a Prineville resident. After a long stint living in Southern California, Zemke moved back to Central Oregon in the early 1990s and bought the boat back from the same Prineville man in 2006. “I restored the boat completely and I race it now, and it’s still working,� says Zemke, who last year was champion of the CDBA’s 11-second class. Zemke, a real estate investor, says he continues to race because of the camaraderie he enjoys with other racers and spectators. “It’s still a gentlemen’s sport,� he says. “We don’t race for a lot of money. No money this year, just trophies and bragging rights. We help each other out (with gear and tools). We’re just a bunch of old American hot rodders. These engines just happen to be in boats.� Both Zemke and Haavisto have raced several times at the annual World Finals in Arizona. Haavisto has been racing for eight years; in 2009 he claimed the CDBA championship in the 9second class. Drag-boat racing is a dangerous sport, and crashes, injuries and

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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TRIATHLON MAC DASH: A sprint-distance triathlon and duathlon starting at the Madras Aquatic Center; Saturday, Sept. 11; free triathlon training will be offered each Saturday, 8 a.m. at the Madras Aquatic Center, through Sept. 4; www.roguemultisport.com.

even fatalities are not uncommon. “We have lost several drivers,� Haavisto says of the sport. “We lost another driver about three weeks ago in Oklahoma.� On Aug. 8, a world champion drag-boat racer from Michigan was killed when his boat crashed during the Mid-America Summer Nationals in Oklahoma. The driver was a Top Fuel Hydro racer, a class in which boats can reach speeds of 240 mph, about 70 mph faster than the fastest boats expected at the High Desert Showdown. Haavisto, who says he has raced as fast as 131 mph in a quarter-mile event, explains that he tries not to think of the risk factor when racing. “It never really crosses my mind,� he says. “You want to win your round, and make your pass with the least amount of mistakes as possible.� Rescue personnel are on-site at all CDBA races, including divers in the water and an ambulance on the boat ramp. Wind can often be a factor at Haystack, Haavisto says. Races are sometimes postponed or canceled when the wind becomes strong because it can make the water extremely rough and potentially flip the light boats over during a race. “It’s very dangerous when the water gets rough,� Haavisto says. “That’s why we really rely on our safety people.�

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A S   B  Adventure weekend slated for Redmond The X-Man Adventure Weekend is scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday at the Bearly There Ranch near Redmond. The Central Oregon Crossfit Challenge will be staged Saturday at noon. The event includes four individual challenges designed to take less than 10 minutes each. Each challenge will be scored and prizes will be awarded for overall and age-division winners. The adventure weekend continues on Sunday at 10 a.m. with the Sage Brush Skedaddle, a five-mile adventure run with some ranch-

style obstacles, including log walls, hay bales, and water obstacles. The Bearly There Ranch is located at 4772 West Highway 126, Redmond. For more information, visit www.xdogevents.com or call Brad Carrell at 541-480-6415.

Bend triathletes shine at XTERRA Lake Tahoe INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — Bend’s David Cloninger won the overall title at the XTERRA Lake Tahoe off-road triathlon on Saturday. Cloninger finished the race

— which included a 1.5-kilometer swim, a 22-mile mountain bike ride, and a 6-mile trail run — in 2 hours, 51 minutes, 45 seconds. Cloninger, who competes in the 40-44 age group, was the top finisher out of 130 competitors. Bruce Rogers, also of Bend, finished eighth overall (3:00:18) and was second in the 40-44 age group. Bend’s Andrew Jensen finished 23rd overall (3:13:00) and second in the 20-24 age group. Cloninger and Rogers plan to compete at the XTERRA Triathlon USA Championship in Ogden, Utah, on Sept. 25. — Bulletin staff report

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD CYCLING HIGH DESERT BMX Bend Aug. 30 Results 26-30 Cruiser — 1. Derek Camacho. 2. Rick Vecqueray. 3. Kelli Norton. 6 Novice — 1. Hudson Pifferini-Carter. 2. Bowie Helzer. 3. Banyan Howell. 6 Intermediate — 1. Zane Strome. 2. Suddy Helzer. 3. Gunnar

Sanchez. 8 Expert — 1. Jacob Cook. 2. Diesel Vecqueray. 3. Adam Harper. 12 Intermediate — 1. Tristin Reid. 2. Jaxson Norton. 3. Olivia Armstrong. 13 Intermediate — 1. River Stredwick. 2. Zakkary Campbell. 3. November Burling. —— Sept. 1 Results 13 Girls — 1. Olivia Armstrong. 2. Shyanne Bighaus. 3. Jaydra Kinsey.

26-30 Cruiser — 1. Derek Camacho. 2. Ryan Armstrong. 3. Sunny Harmeson. 5 & under Novice — 1. Max Paskewich. 2. Evan Burnside. 3. Banyan Howell. 7 Novice — 1. William Minshew. 2. Hudson Pifferini-Carter. 3. Harlan Walker. 8 Expert — 1. Jacob Cook. 2. Zane Strome. 3. Jaidyn Camacho. 10 Expert — 1. Conner Buck. 2. Orion Byers. 3. Breana Cook. 12 Expert — 1. River Stredwick. 2. Cammeron Griggs. 3. Tristin Reid.

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F

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE ‘The Cat in the Hat’ is back

Inside

Martin Short joins PBS’ effort to help teach kids science, Page E2

FAMILY

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

INSIDE Dear Abby Lighthearted courtship has become wedded drudgery, see Page E2

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Most minor drinkers visiting ERs are male A new report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration shows that most of the visits to the emergency room made by underage drinkers are male. Of the ER visits for alcohol-related issues, males made up 53 percent of those ages 12-17 and 62 percent of those ages 18-20. The information comes from data from the 2008 report called “Emergency Department Visits Involving Underage Alcohol Use.” Seventy percent of the ER visits involved alcohol alone, while 30 percent involved other substances, such as marijuana, cocaine and anti-anxiety medications.

Parents funding 45% of college education A new report from Sallie Mae — “How America Pays for College 2009” — shows parents funded 45 percent of a student’s college education (36 percent came from a parent’s income and savings; 9 percent came from loans taken out by parents). Scholarships and grants made up 25 percent of the total, followed by student loans (14 percent), student income and savings (10 percent), and relatives and friends (6 percent). Most families, 58 percent, sent students to college without any borrowing. Those who did borrow spent an average of 30 percent more on education than those who didn’t take out loans. Students attending community colleges used more of their own income and savings to pay for college and were less likely to take out loans. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Marika Collins, a kindergarten teacher at Miller Elementary in Bend, meets with Ryan Houston and his 5-year-old son Wyatt during a back-to-school event in her classroom Wednesday afternoon.

parents as partners in teaching BACK TO SCHOOL

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

A

By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

s kids prepare to head back to school, no doubt many are wondering about their new teachers. Will she be strict? Will he give lots of homework? Will she be nice? Will he be horrible? The relationship between student and teacher is important and can shape how a student views school. Another relationship is also key to a child’s education: the one between parent and teacher. As schools start back up, parents may want to take time to think about the kind of relationships they want to form with their students’ teachers and how to form such a bond.

“It matters quite a lot. It really needs to be a partnership,” said Joseph DePierro, dean of the College of Education and Human Services at Seaton Hall University in New Jersey. “It’s absolutely critical.” Bend mom of three Kim Norby has always been active in her kids’ schools and is now the president of the Parent Teacher Association at Pine Ridge Elementary School. She usually starts by introducing herself to the teacher. “My experience has been that most teachers are willing to take the time,” Norby said. She also believes that having strong relationships with teachers is important, because then they know you’re a caring parent and view the parent as part of a team. See Parents / E6

Munch & Movies This is your last chance to enjoy this annual event. Families can see “The Wizard of Oz” in Bend tonight and see “Avatar” in Redmond on Saturday.

Birds of Prey Release Party Celebrate with Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory the release of raptors back into the wild this weekend. Staff members have worked hard to rehabilitate these injured raptors. One bird will be released today, another Saturday.

Labor Day OK, so technically summer isn’t over, but for many families, it sure does feel that way. Take this weekend to enjoy one last blast of summer — float the river, go camping, barbecue or just relax.

K I D C U LT U R E

Warm your little one up to school with fun books Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids. Is your child having a little trouble getting into the swing of school? The following books, which are good for children in preschool to second grade, might help:

‘Is Your Buffalo Ready for Kindergarten?’ By Audrey Vernick “Some people say kindergarten is no place for a buffalo. How crazy is that?” asks the picture book. With bright and colorful illustrations by Daniel Jennewein, this book shows us that even the most unique individual can still have fun in school.

‘Wow! School!’ By Robert Neubecker This brings back all the excitement of the first day of school. Its detailed, Submitted photos large illustrations make it the perfect sit-down book for you and your child to peruse together. Recommendations by Colleen Galvin, community librarian for Sisters Public Library.

Will divorce fix it? 5 questions a troubled couple might consider

Family illness brings Gills back to Bend

By Gregory Ramey Cox News Service

DAYTON, Ohio — “Would my kids be better off if I got a divorce?” That’s one of the toughest questions I have been asked in therapy. I try to help parents work through this complicated question. The answer has lifelong implications for the entire family. Here are the five factors I ask parents to consider:

1.

Is my marriage the source of my unhappiness? Overwhelmed by the stress of work, children and a perceived lack of support from a spouse, many parents feel trapped in unhappy relationships with few prospects for improvement. Recent research by Linda Waite has challenged that assumption, finding that two-thirds of unhappy spouses who stayed together actually improved their marriages over a five-year period. Sometimes couples’ satisfaction was due to actively working on problems, but in other cases marriage partners just became more accepting of their spouses. In other situations, marital satisfaction increased when stressful events such as child-rearing or financial strain decreased. See Divorce / E6

GILLS’ T R AV E L S

Thinkstock

“Would my kids be better off if I got a divorce?” That’s one of the toughest questions a couple can ask, and the answer has lifelong implications for the entire family.

The Gill family, including John and Eva and their two daughters, Hannah and Marlie, left their home in Bend in February to travel the world for more than a year. The Bulletin has been following their travels during this time with occasional updates. The family recently returned to Bend due to an illness in the family. They are not sure how long they will remain in town. They plan to resume their travels at some point. Learn more about the Gills at www.gilladventures.com. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lighthearted courtship has become wedded drudgery

BendSpineandPain.com

DEAR ABBY ny and we get along well — most of the time. He says he’s sorry for his past behavior, but I’m not convinced he really is. I’m afraid he will do the same with me if he has the chance. I have spoken to him about my concerns. He says he is “different” now. I have been hurt by men before, and I really don’t want to have another emotional disaster. What can he do to gain my trust? — Hesitant In San Francisco Dear Hesitant: Probably nothing. Face it — he’s charming, witty and can’t keep his zipper up. Recognize and enjoy him for who he is, but if you’re looking for a lifetime commitment, he’s not “the one.” Dear Abby: I was recently asked by a good friend to be one of his groomsmen at his wedding. Of course, I accepted. His bachelor party was on the Oregon Coast, so I had to fly out for that a few months before the wedding. The ceremony is in St. Louis, so I have to journey there as well. For both events I have had to pay for travel, accommodations, etc. I spent $200 for the tuxedo rental for the wedding as well as additional expenses. By the end of it I’ll have spent more than $1,000. Must I still buy my friend a wedding gift? — Big Spender In Palo Alto, Calif. Dear Big Spender: The answer is yes — but it doesn’t have to be expensive. According to Emily Post, among the basic responsibilities of all adult attendants is to “contribute to attendants’ group gifts to the bride and groom (and usually, give an individual gift as well).”

By Elizabeth Jensen New York Times News Service

Back in the 1950s Theodor Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss, created “The Cat in the Hat” in response to concerns that American children were lagging in literacy. More than half a century later, his floppy-hatted hero is being recruited again to help promote childhood learning: This time, though, it’s keeping kids excited about science. On Labor Day, PBS introduces “The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!,” a daily half-hour program based on Random House’s Learning Library series. Martin Short is the voice of the Cat, who leads his young playmates on fanciful adventures in the natural science world, exploring how bees make honey, why birds migrate and how being slow helps a sloth. In a video shown to the Television Critics Association this month, Short said he saw Harpo Marx in the Cat, a curious choice given that Marx never spoke and the Cat never stops speaking. “It’s a bad choice,” Short said. “What I meant by that is, I always found that Harpo had a kind of unpredictable madness to him. He would jump in the air, sit on a lap, chase someone. The Cat has that kind of childlike exuberance and childlike nature.” Surprisingly for a beloved character who has never slipped out of print since the book was first published in 1957, the Cat has never before been repurposed for an animated series. (Jim Henson Television produced a live ac-

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

tion and puppet series, “The Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss,” for Nickelodeon in 1996 and 1997.) Audrey Geisel, the author’s widow, said by e-mail that there have been “many, many proposals” over the years. “Oh, people are always asking about that, but it never felt just right until now.” Theodor Geisel, who died in 1991, began planning the Learning Library series with his publisher in the late 1980s, said Kate Klimo, a vice president for Random House who worked with Geisel toward the end of his career. “He wanted to take the Cat and deploy him to teach kids science literacy,” Klimo said.

Geisel got as far as enlisting NASA — “He idolized the scientists at NASA,” Klimo said — to hatch a publicity stunt to put an image of the Cat on a Mars probe rocket. Eventually the Learning Library idea was revived, but without NASA. The first of 24 books

was published in 1998, with a more Earth-oriented curriculum. PBS approached Random House in 2004, after Linda Simensky, vice president for children’s programming, saw the books. For the television series the producers added the adventure story line, changed the ethnicity of one child for diversity, and made the search for answers participatory. “It’s about the process of asking questions, which is the very thing that gets put to sleep in kids in the early grades,” Klimo said. Unlike the books, the show isn’t entirely in rhyme. “We felt in a TV show that would be Chinese water torture,” she said. The Cat does rhyme at the end of adventures to reinforce science concepts, she said, because “Rhyme, as Ted learned, fixes things in the mind.” The series will be PBS’s fourth preschool program with a science curriculum, joining “Curious George,” “Sid the Science Kid” and “Dinosaur Train.” Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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Portfolio Entertainment via New York Times News Service

In “The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That” will lead his playmates on adventures in science, exploring how bees make honey, why birds migrate and how being slow helps a sloth.

CENTRAL OREGON

Dear Abby: I have been married to my second husband, “Greg,” for 3½ years. Before we married, Greg took me out on dates, we had wonderful conversations and a satisfying sex life. Now I spend every weekend cleaning, and when I clean the upstairs, Greg goes downstairs. If I clean downstairs, he goes upstairs. He says he loves me, but it seems we have become more like roommates than husband and wife. Greg buys big-ticket items (big-screen TV and a computer, for example) without telling me. In fact, he never discusses anything with me. Do you think he married me only to cook and clean for him? Before you suggest counseling, let me point out one more thing: Greg is a psychologist. — Searching For Normal In Pennsylvania Dear Searching: It appears you married a man who was terrific at sales and poor on followthrough. Because someone is a psychologist does not automatically make that person a good spouse, or parent — or even a particularly effective therapist. You two have a serious communication problem. You need to tell him how you feel, and he needs to tell you why he’s avoiding you and won’t allow you to have a voice in “big” decisions. And I AM suggesting counseling, but not with anyone with whom your husband is affiliated in business. Dear Abby: I have been going out with an older man for a year and a half. He is very nice and makes me laugh. He has a lot of faults, but I can tolerate them except for one — he cheated on both of his ex-wives. He has had affairs with his friends’ wives, his employees and his customers. He even told me he slept with another woman the night before his wedding to his second wife. He likes to flirt, and women like him because he has a great sense of humor. I love his compa-

Dr. Seuss’ Cat tosses hat in TV ring

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Expeditions Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Smart Travels Expeditions Nightly Business

7:00

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Wife Swap Beauvais/Clayton ’ ‘PG’ Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ Medium Allison is mugged. ’ ‘14’ Wife Swap Beauvais/Clayton ’ ‘PG’ Human Target Rewind ’ ‘14’ Å News Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Who Do You Think You Are? ‘PG’ Smallville Salvation ’ ‘PG’ Å Hometime ‘G’ Paint Paper Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

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Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC ’ Å CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Å Flashpoint The Other Lane (N) ‘14’ Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ 20/20 (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Good Guys Small Rooms ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC ’ Å Supernatural Swan Song ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Sew With Nancy One Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman Inside Edition (N) (11:35) Nightline King of the Hill My Name Is Earl South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ Austin City Limits ’ ‘PG’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Austin City Limits ’ ‘PG’

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American Justice ’ ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds True Night ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Birthright ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds In Heat ’ ‘14’ Å The Glades Marriage is Murder ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 American Justice ’ ‘PG’ Å “Master and Com- (5:45) ››› “The Shootist” (1976, Western) John Wayne, Lauren Bacall, James Stewart. People pester old, ››› “McLintock!” (1963, Western) John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Yvonne De Carlo. Cattle baron tries to tame wife. Å ››› “The Cowboys” (1972) John Wayne, 102 40 39 mander” dying gunfighter. Å Roscoe Lee Browne. Å Human Prey Killer Sharks ‘14’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘14’ Blood Dolphins Return to Taiji ‘14’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Blood Dolphins Return to Taiji ‘14’ 68 50 12 38 Human Prey River Killers Hippo. ‘14’ (3:00) Stripes “American Pie Presents: Band Camp” (2005, Comedy) Tad Hilgenbrinck. ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell. Three co-workers unite to help their buddy get a sex life. ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell. 137 44 Are You Smarter? Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Your Chance to Dance Episode 106 Your Chance to Dance Episode 104 The Singing Bee ’ The Singing Bee ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) › “Cannonball Run II” (1984) Burt Reynolds. American Greed Madoff Behind Bars Mad Money House of Cards The global economic breakdown since 9/11. Paid Program Brainpower 51 36 40 52 Big Brother, Big Business Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Rick’s List Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Daily Show Colbert Report Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Scrubs ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Comedy Central Com.-Presents Comedy Central Comedy Central 135 53 135 47 Ghostbusters II Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Primal Quest Inside Golf ‘G’ Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Good-Charlie Sonny With a Chance ‘G’ Sonny-Chance Good-Charlie “Camp Rock 2: The Final Jam” (2010) Demi Lovato. Premiere. ‘G’ Fish Hooks (N) Sonny-Chance Good-Charlie Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Hannah Forever Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Moose Attack! ’ ‘PG’ Å Man, Woman, Wild Utah ‘PG’ Å Man, Woman, Wild Aitutaki (N) ‘PG’ Beyond Survival With Les Stroud (N) Man, Woman, Wild Utah ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football Arizona at Toledo (Live) 2010 World Series of Poker SportsNation (N) NASCAR Now (N) X Games Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) 22 24 21 24 (4:00) Tennis U.S. Open, Men’s Second Round and Women’s Third Round (Live) UWF Wrestling UWF Wrestling AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: Diaz vs. Guerrero Boxing: 2003 Juarez vs. Velasquez 23 25 123 25 MLB Baseball Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Bon Voyage ’ ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Sugar Skyscrapers Chopped Champions Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Chefs vs. City All Star Savannah Rachael’s Vacation Going Green (N) 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Cougars Access Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. Seahawks MLB Baseball: Indians at Mariners 20 45 28* 26 Huskies That ’70s Show ›› “The Da Vinci Code” (2006, Mystery) Tom Hanks. A religious mystery could rock foundations of Christianity. ››› “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente, Chris Cooper. Rescue Me A.D.D. ‘MA’ 131 Holmes on Homes Gone to Pot ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Curb/Block House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters Income Property My First Place 176 49 33 43 Divine Design ‘G’ Get It Sold ‘G’ MonsterQuest ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Deep Freeze ‘PG’ Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Clash of the Cavemen ‘PG’ Wife Swap Slater/Williams ’ ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Boyd/Milorey ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Miami’s prison system. Lockup New Mexico Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Poetry slam. 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Jersey Shore The Letter ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Not So Shore ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore When I Was 17 (10:03) ››› “Girlfight” (2000) Michelle Rodriguez, Jaime Tirelli. ’ 192 22 38 57 Fantasy Factory SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush Victorious ’ ‘G’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ (8:12) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Å (DVS) (9:23) Entourage (10:03) Entourage (10:42) Entourage ’ ‘MA’ Å (11:21) Entourage 132 31 34 46 Hawaii Five-0 Six Kilos ‘PG’ Å ›› “Stephen King’s The Tommyknockers” (1993, Horror) Jimmy Smits, Marg Helgenberger. An unearthly force sweeps through a Maine town. ‘14’ Haven Local hunters begin to die. 133 35 133 45 (3:00) ›› “Stephen King’s The Langoliers” (1995) Patricia Wettig. ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 The Office ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›››› “Titanic” (1997, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. A woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ship. Å 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ › “Así Era Pancho Villa” (1957, Biography) Pedro Armendáriz, Carlos López Moct›› “Pancho Villa y la Valentina” (1960, Drama) Pedro Armendáriz, Elsa Aguirre. Mexi- “Cuando Viva Villa Es la Muerte” (1960, Historical Drama) Pedro Armendáriz, Alma ›› “Burnt Offerings” (1976, Horror) Karen 101 44 101 29 ezuma. Pancho Villa becomes a legendary revolutionary leader. can revolutionary Pancho Villa finds romance. Rosa Aguirre. A profile of Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa. Black, Oliver Reed. Å Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: ATL Say Yes Dress 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Bones Spaceman in a Crater ’ ‘14’ ›››› “Saving Private Ryan” (1998) Tom Hanks. U.S. troops look for a missing comrade during World War II. (11:12) “The Outlaw Josey Wales” 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Embedded ’ ‘14’ Courage-Dog Courage-Dog Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Total Drama Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone Star Wars: Clone King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ 84 Extreme Pig Outs ‘PG’ Å Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Bigfootville ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Alaskan Adventures ‘PG’ Andy Griffith Sanford & Son Sanford & Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith White Collar ‘PG’ Å White Collar By the Book ‘PG’ Å White Collar In the Red ‘PG’ Å White Collar ‘PG’ Å White Collar Company Man ‘PG’ (11:01) White Collar Free Fall ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 White Collar Copycat Caffrey ‘PG’ Greatest Songs of the ’90s Greatest Songs of the ’90s Behind the Music ’ ‘PG’ Å The Short List ’ Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ The Short List ’ 191 48 37 54 Greatest Songs of the ’90s PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ›› “Fools Rush In” 1997 Matthew Perry. Å (6:20) › “10 Things I Hate About You” 1999 ‘PG-13’ ›› “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” 2009 ‘R’ Å (9:35) ›› “Rambo III” 1988, Action Sylvester Stallone. ’ ‘R’ Å The Blues Bros. Fox Legacy (5:19) ›››› “Patton” 1970 George C. Scott. Gen. George S. Patton fights World War II. Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (8:49) ›››› “Patton” 1970 George C. Scott. Gen. George S. Patton fights World War II. Fox Legacy Make It Count ‘G’ Strange Notes The Daily Habit New Pollution Moto: In Out Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Make It Count ‘G’ Strange Notes The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Moto: In Out Strange Notes Props ‘14’ Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Deutsche Bank Championship, First Round From Norton, Mass. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Champions: First Tee Open, First Round PGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Dolly Celebrates 25 Years “The Wish List” (2010) Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:45) ››› “Duplicity” 2009 Julia Roberts. Hard Knocks: Training Camp With the ›› “9” 2009 Voices of Elijah Wood. Animated. Sentient rag dolls ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam Witwicky Eastbound & Down Hung ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 ’ ‘PG-13’ Å New York Jets ’ ‘MA’ Å populate a post-apocalyptic world. Å holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å (5:15) ›› “Cursed” 2005, Horror Christina Ricci. ‘PG-13’ Death Comes Death Comes Freaks-Geeks (8:45) Food Party ››› “Ginger Snaps” 2000, Horror Emily Perkins, Katharine Isabelle. Dinner-Band Hell Girl ‘14’ IFC 105 105 ›››› “Chinatown” 1974, Crime Drama Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, John Huston. (4:05) “Sleeping (5:45) ›› “17 Again” 2009, Comedy Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. A 37-year-old man mi- ›› “Funny People” 2009, Comedy-Drama Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen, Leslie Mann. A gravely ill comic MAX 400 508 7 With the Enemy” raculously transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å mentors a struggling performer. ’ ‘R’ Å A 1930s private eye uncovers corruption and murder. ‘R’ Å Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dangerous Encounters Border Wars Checkpoint Texas ‘14’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dangerous Encounters Border Wars Checkpoint Texas ‘14’ Nat Geo Amazing! NGC 157 157 Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai SpongeBob SpongeBob Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai SpongeBob SpongeBob Rocko’s Life Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Speargun Hunter Hunting, Country On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz. iTV. Jewish-American “The People vs. (4:00) ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008 ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009, Comedy-Drama Clive Owen. iTV. A grieving widower Weeds A Yippity SHO 500 500 Larry Flynt” 1996 Daniel Craig. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ struggles to raise his two sons alone. ‘PG-13’ Sippity ’ ‘MA’ soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Built Ford Tough 225 (Live) Race in 60 Mobil 1 The Grid NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Built Ford Tough 225 SPEED 35 303 125 Fast & Furious ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003, Action Paul Walker, Tyrese. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:25) ›› “Planet 51” 2009, Comedy ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Men Who Stare at Goats” 2009 ’ ‘R’ Å (10:35) ›› “The Taking of Pelham 123” 2009 ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) ›› “Mozart & the Whale” 2005 Josh Hartnett. Two people (6:20) “Falling Up” Joseph Cross. Premiere. A doorman for an › “Punisher: War Zone” 2008, Action Ray Stevenson, Dominic West. Premiere. A ›› “Zack and Miri Make a Porno” 2008, Romance-Comedy (11:45) ›› “Soul TMC 525 525 who have a form of autism become lovers. upscale building falls for a tenant. ’ ‘NR’ Å disfigured mobster seeks revenge against Frank Castle. ’ ‘R’ Seth Rogen, Elizabeth Banks. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Men” 2008 Buck Stops Here Bucks Tecomate Bucks Elk Fever Dangerous Game Tred Barta The Daily Line (N) Bucks Tecomate Elk Fever Dangerous Game Tred Barta The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE A Different Love ‘14’ 20/20 on WE Stranger Danger ‘14’ 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å 20/20 on WE Sex Myths ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Sunset Daze ‘PG’ Sunset Daze ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P  ’ G  M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY “JAMES B. THOMPSON, THE VANISHING LANDSCAPE� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features paintings and prints that explore the transformation of the American West; exhibit runs through Jan. 3; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BIRDS OF PREY RELEASE: See a rehabilitated bird of prey released back into the wild; included in the price of admission; 12:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 1 p.m.; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 3-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “The Wizard of Oz�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. SISTERS WESTERN & NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS FESTIVAL: Event features live music, fine art, displays, demonstrations and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-0251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRISE TO SUMMIT: Runners race from Sunrise Lodge to the summit of Mount Bachelor; registration required to run; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation; $32 to race; free for spectators; 10:30 a.m.; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. COMMUNITY BARBECUE: A day of entertainment, food, games and live music; free; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; American

Fox via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Garrett, played by Justin Long, and Erin, played by Drew Barrymore, star in the romantic comedy “Going the Distance.� See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275. RIDE THE RIVER PARTY: After floating the Deschutes River, join a party with food and drinks, games and music; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-617-3215. SATURDAY COMMUNITY MARKET: Local artists and food vendors sell their wares; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; noon; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. BIRDS OF PREY RELEASE: See a rehabilitated bird of prey released back into the wild; included in the price of admission; 12:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available;

By Roger Moore

donations accepted; 3-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Avatar�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com.

SUNDAY LABOR DAY BREAKFAST: Includes pancakes, frittata, sausage, biscuits and gravy, fruit and more; $7, $4 ages 4-12, free ages 3 and younger; 7-11 a.m.; Crooked River Ranch Volunteer Fire Association, 6971 S.W. Shad Road; 541-923-6776. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. SISTERS WESTERN & NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS FESTIVAL: Event features live music, fine art, displays, demonstrations and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-0251 or

Story times, library youth events for Sept. 3-9 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • Story times resume Sept. 14. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLER STORY TIME: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. • BI-LINGUAL STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • Story times resume week of Sept. 13. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • Story times resume week of Sept. 13.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • STARTING SCHOOL STORY TIME: For children entering kindergarten; 10:15 a.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday.

jeri@sisterscountry.com. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; begins with an hour of spirituals; refreshments available; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. SATURDAY COMMUNITY MARKET: Local artists and food vendors sell their wares; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission, $3-$5 per bag of books; 1-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 2-7 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. DOG WASH AND SWIM: Play with your dog and give it a bath; proceeds benefit the Redmond High School water polo team; $10 per dog; 3 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

MONDAY No family event listings.

TUESDAY No family event listings.

WEDNESDAY

HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger). • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday; included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger).

BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring traditional island dances and music by the Hokulea Dancers; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com.

CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 10 a.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

RWANDA — BEYOND THE GENOCIDE: Jacques Prevert Rumanyika talks about his experience with genocide, Rwanda’s progress, the importance of education and more; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-306-0864 or www.kurerafund.org.

THURSDAY

F DVD  W

Furry creatures unleashing fury: What’s more fun for the fam? The Washington Post “Furry Vengeance� (PG, 91 minutes): This is the kind of kidfriendly comedy that finds its delights in the varying degrees of slapsticky torture inflicted on Dan Sanders (Brendan Fraser), a well-intentioned real estate developer who, at the behest of his maniacal boss (Ken Jeong), is razing acres of forestland to make room for an allegedly environmentally friendly, singlefamily subdivision called Rocky

Warner Bros. Pictures

Watch “Avatar� for free Saturday night at Munch & Movies in Redmond.

Springs. Of course, the cuddly woodland creatures that live in that forest aren’t exactly in favor of the proposal. So they form their own preservation posse and pool their resources — acorns, boulders, a surprising deftness for hot-wiring cars — to unleash all manner of Animal Planet fury on Dan. Contains some rude humor, mild language and brief smoking. DVD extras: Deleted scenes; commentary; featurettes.

Brooke Shields, Brendan Fraser and Matt Prokop star in “Furry Vengeance,� now available on DVD. Summit Entertainment via The Associated Press

The Orlando Sentinel

‘Going the Distance’ Rating: R for sexual content including dialogue, language throughout, some drug use and brief nudity What it’s about: A young couple, kept apart by the tough job market, struggle to make a longdistance romance work. The kid attractor factor: Drew and Justin. Justin and Drew. Good lessons/bad lessons: Long-distance romances can’t last forever. Violence: None Language: Quite a bit of profanity Sex: Yes, just explicit enough to count Drugs: Pot — and alcohol Parents’ advisory: These two aren’t teens any more. This is an adult romance with juvenile touches.

‘Machete’ Rating: R for strong bloody violence throughout, language, some sexual content and nudity What it’s about: An illegal immigrant on the run from drug lords finds himself hunted by people on both sides of the border. The kid attractor factor: It’s pure exploitation, with overthe-top violence, sex and gore. Think “Piranha� without the fish or the 3D. Good lessons/bad lessons: Some folks stirring up the immigration debate might be doing it for political or racial reasons. Violence: Almost constant, much of it involving hacking bodies with a big blade Language: Profanity Sex: Lots of nudity, no explicit sex scenes Drugs: Surprisingly, none Parents’ advisory: This aims at older teens who can get into R-rated movies, and if they’re old enough to get the joke, it won’t scar them for life.

‘Lottery Ticket’ Rating: PG-13 for sexual content, violence, brief underage drinking and language, including a drug reference. What it’s about: A teen wins a Lotto ticket, only to have assorted thugs and hangers-on try to cash in on it. The kid attractor factor: The artist formerly known as Lil Bow Wow, Naturi Naughton, kids spending too much money. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Many a false step is made by standing still,� and lotteries serve “to keep poor people poor.� Violence: Guns, some pretty severe beatings, and blood. Language: Less than a dozen profanities, including one whopper. Sex: Frankly discussed, flirted with. Drugs: Alcohol. Parents’ advisory: Whatever its other adult themes, the graphic (not comic) violence makes this suitable only for 13-and-older.

‘Nanny McPhee Returns’ Rating: PG for rude humor, some language and mild thematic elements. What it’s about: Another dysfunctional family calls on the services of the real “Super Nanny,� Nanny McPhee. The kid attractor factor: Kids behaving badly, then getting what’s coming to them. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Don’t fight. Share. Help each other. Be brave. Have faith.� Violence: Kids brawling, menacing thugs, a German bomb. Language: A lot of talk about “poo� and cow patties and such. Sex: Nary a whit, despite the presence of Maggie Gyllenhaal. Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: If your kids have worn out the “Nanny McPhee� DVD, this is for them. A fairy tale that’s suitable for all ages.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Sept. 3, 2010: This year, you will succeed beyond your expectations. Your circle of friends will expand, adding to the many possibilities. Stay centered and focused on your goals in order to maximize the full power of the planets. You might be better off not spending so much, as you easily can get insecure in this present economy. Yes, stash! You will be happier that way. If you are single, a friendship could evolve into a lot more. This bond could be quite special. If you are attached, your interaction will always need attention, and you bring your unique nurturing qualities. CANCER is always your friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Know that it is appropriate after a week of running around and hard work to feel sluggish. A side effect might be a lack of patience with those who try to be controlling. Someone who might be difficult could be sorry that he or she crossed your path. Tonight: Homeward bound. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Express yourself in ways that do make a difference in how someone might receive your message. Fatigue marks a work-related issue. Perhaps you can counter the effect by a late lunch or an early workday. Tonight: Hang with friends. TGIF. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH At times, everyone is on the

same page. More often, you see power plays, differences of opinion and general differences. You might be happiest close to home or working from home. Tonight: Squeeze in some shopping that you have been postponing. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You might wonder why you don’t feel like this every day. As the Sun rises, you greet the Moon in your sign. Harness this energy and expect a very dynamic few days. Of course you can! Tonight: The world is your oyster. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You simply need to be less available and more focused. Quiet suits you. Effectively clear out work and/or a project or two. Screen your calls and try being “the silent type.” Tonight: You don’t need to explain anything. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Zero in on your primary goals. You don’t want to work all weekend, do you? Someone you know, a child or loved one, might push hard to get you to behave like he or she wants. It is nice to know that you are cared about! Make your own choices. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You might have some difficulty leaving work. Knowing that, be wise and complete your work. Consider saying “no” when this person or that person asks for a favor. Remember, you can do nothing if you don’t honor yourself first. Tonight: A must appearance. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Honor plans to split and

do something very different. Right now many people might think you — yes, you — are a space cadet. Certainly, you are not actively listening to them. Be careful, as one of these people might be the boss. Tonight: Follow your imagination. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH A conversation needs to be had, with your intensity and caring. Don’t allow others to distract you. Your ability to bottom-line a situation proves to be helpful. If you aren’t careful, a discussion could evolve into a power play. Tonight: Enjoy a friend’s company. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Defer to others and understand that those around you also need to feel important. You can do that in your customary style when focused. Know that on a professional matter, no one sees eye to eye. Let go and see what happens. Tonight: Find your friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You are among the very few who can accomplish a good day’s work. You might be overworking an issue in your head, giving others the impression that you aren’t listening. Work on your attentiveness. Tonight: Unwind in your style. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Don’t kid yourself — you are already out the door mentally and into your weekend. You discover that a lot is happening behind the scenes with a friend. Reconsider your choices. Every so often, revitalizing and questioning your desires is important. You change; they change. Tonight: My, aren’t we playful? © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Parents

Tips for parents

Continued from E1 “I think that makes a huge difference in your student’s experience,” she said.

What’s helpful Martha Carter, who teaches language arts at Sky View Middle School, thinks parents shouldn’t hesitate to stop by and introduce themselves. Having open communication can help “lay the foundation to a friendly, team-based approach.” She thinks this is particularly important if a student has special needs or other challenges. Parents can get really focused on buying all the school supplies on the list, but sometimes they forget about other important preparations, says Amy Broemmel, associate professor of education at the University of Tennessee. Even more important than buying a lunchbox is making sure to fill out any necessary medical or other forms. Broemmel says these can provide teachers with critical information. Attending an early parent meeting or open house is a great way to meet the teacher. If parents cannot make it, Broemmel suggests they contact the teacher to say so, which will serve as a sign of the parents’ interest. She encourages parents to talk to teachers early about anything new going on at home, including divorce, death, job loss, a new sibling or even relatively minor issues, such as a child having trouble sleeping. Broemmel also thinks it’s appropriate for parents to alert teachers to a child’s previous history — for example, that two classmates got into a ton of fights the previous year. Paul Abbott, the PTA president at High Lakes Elementary, volunteers in the teachers’ classrooms and stops by to chat in the morning or afternoon. Usually it’s just a casual conversation — what they did over the weekend — but it helps to get to know one another. If the teacher has his or her head down and is working, Abbott doesn’t disturb. Danielle Pillet-Shore, assistant professor of communication at the University of New Hampshire, found something interesting when she studied parent-teacher conferences after video recording them. Both parties typically started off nervous and anxious, and both seemed to want to prove to the other that they were doing a good job. Going into the research, PilletShore assumed teachers would provide criticism and parents would defend their kids. Instead, she found the reverse, and it tended to work really well. The teachers usually asked parents to start off the conversation. Parents who didn’t clam up and instead disclosed their concerns got good responses from teachers. “I saw actually on balance the parent is far more critical of their own child than the teacher is.” The teachers then often offered praise about the child and then proposed ways to deal with the issues. This usually resulted in both parties feeling they were on the same wavelength. Parents who offered Pollyanna praise of their children set up a dynamic in which teachers then had to present some criticism, and the conferences didn’t go as well. Pillet-Shore’s message to parents is: “Don’t feel like you have to praise your own child.”

Preferences Abbott respects the method of communication the teacher prefers. One teacher didn’t like e-

Divorce Continued from E1

2.

Would divorce bring me happiness? Some of the same issues that cause an unhappy marriage can linger after a divorce. I’ve found that many parents, both men and women, misattributed the reasons for their unhappiness, blaming their spouses. They blame their spouses for feeling unhappy or unfulfilled and romanticized that life would be wonderful if they were alone or with a different partner. This research would surprise them. One 10-year study found that divorced men were six times more likely than their married counterparts to experience depression and women were 31⁄2 times more likely to be depressed.

3.

How do children handle divorce? Kids growing up with divorced parents are at a significant risk for serious academic, behavioral and social problems. They are more likely to drop out of school and become pregnant during their teen years.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Parents and students head off to classrooms after finding out what teachers they were assigned to during Wednesday’s back-to-school event at Miller Elementary School in Bend. mail, so Abbott dropped by more often. Another teacher preferred it. “Let the teacher guide you,” said Abbott. The best thing to do is to ask — if not in person, try one method and ask what the teacher prefers. If a teacher has a website, parents should visit it and learn what they can. This is also a good sign that the teacher is tech-friendly and will be more receptive to e-mail. Keeping in touch about once a month is a good basic guideline, according to DePierro. He also believes volunteering with the school is important, even if it’s just a little bit. He knows parents — particularly working parents — are busy, but he encourages them to “make some time available somehow, somewhere.” These parents shouldn’t worry about trying to do it all. “If you’re a supermom, you’re also in danger of becoming helicopter mom. But you can’t be a stranger,” said DePierro. Molly Grove, a science and math teacher at Pilot Butte Middle School, says she likes to hear from parents about a child’s successes as well as challenges. She encourages parents to be on the lookout for items teachers send home, such as parent letters and syllabuses. “Teachers often send these home in hopes of connecting with parents and learning more about students.” Carter thinks e-mail is a great way for parents to alert teachers about upcoming trips, illnesses and requests for help. Pete Horsch, who teaches at Cascade Middle School, encourages parents to set up appointments to talk to teachers. This helps teachers be prepared and better able to focus on the concern at hand. He also likes getting a “heads up” e-mail — for instance, that a student felt lost during a recent class. In Horsch’s experience, parentteacher relationships can fall into different categories, depending on the student. Sometimes it is just about providing information about assignments and events, other times there’s a particular issue involving the student at the heart of the relationship. “ ‘Good’ parent-teacher relationships are as different as the students they are designed to support.”

issues or tiny details, “then you’ve gone over the edge.” Norby thinks parents need to respect teachers’ time. “You don’t want to pressure them too much.” On the other hand, DePierro said, sometimes parents need to become more involved, particularly as students age. Parents who were involved in elementary school may totally back out of the picture by middle and high school. Parents may also want to think about how they bring up concerns. DePierro says some parents make statements that come out in the form of challenges rather than inquiries. Sometimes a child will come home with a complaint. It’s im-

portant parents not jump to conclusions, says Broemmel. The best approach is for parents to listen to the child and then approach the teacher and ask for his or her perspective. “Sometimes we let our emotions take over,” said Broemmel.

Concerns When a parent has a concern about a teacher, the first step is to talk to the teacher directly. “Parents sometimes overreact without getting all the details,” Abbott said. “You always have to give teachers the benefit of the doubt.” Norby says she’s had good luck with her kids’ teachers. But if she ever has something serious to say,

• Try to attend an early open house or other event to meet the teacher before the first day. If you can’t make it, send an e-mail or note saying so and that you look forward to meeting in the future. • Ask about the preferred method of communication. Some teachers prefer e-mail or phone calls. • Get involved. Even if parents don’t have time to volunteer regularly, taking on a small task every once in a while can still mean a lot and help forge a good relationship. • Be respectful of a teacher’s time. For instance, if a parent drops by and the teacher is grading papers, offer to stop by some other time. • Let teachers know about the student. Is your child shy and warms up over time? Is the child dealing with an issue at home, such as parental illness, divorce, job loss or a new sibling?

she thinks it’s good to say it in person. “If you have a serious concern, it’s better to do it one-on-one.” Carter also thinks in-person interaction is key. “At all costs, I would avoid sending e-mails that are critical or attempt to address a topic that is sensitive to teachers, parents and/or students.” She says body language, facial expressions and dialogue can be important in helping address these kinds of issues. If concerns persist, DePierro suggests parents touch base with other parents and find out if anyone else has experienced something similar. Other parents may offer other perspectives. From there, parents may want to take their concerns to the principal.

• Keep teachers updated. As the year progresses, make sure to alert a teacher when something big happens at home, particularly something that will impact the child. • If parents have serious concerns or questions, set up a time to talk in person. Sometimes the tone of an e-mail can come off harsh or critical, and often these interactions are best served face-to-face. • Don’t assume the worst. If a child comes home with a complaint, parents may want to hear a teacher’s perspective before reaching any conclusions. • If concerns aren’t addressed by the teacher, take the concern to the administration. If working with the teacher isn’t working, parents may have to go to the next level. Sources: Local teachers, parents and national experts

Broemmel says if parents believe their children are in a position that will hurt them during the course of the year, they have to act. At that point, the relationship between parent and teacher is in need of serious repair. Most teachers hope it would never come to that step. Carter works hard to “maintain a sense of openness toward my students and their families.” She wants to have good relationships with students and parents. “I hope my parents see me as human, not as infallible.” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

What to avoid While being active and involved is great, parents don’t want to overstep and find themselves being labeled a dreaded helicopter mom or dad. DePierro says the line between active and helicopter is fairly clear. If the parent is calling every day, calling about minor

As adults, they are twice as likely to get divorced as kids who grew up with married parents. Youngsters from divorced families typically have less contact with their parents.

4.

When might divorce be good for kids? One of the few occasions when I do strongly advise parental separation is when the safety of the children is at risk, due to physical or sexual abuse, violence or drug abuse. Kids deserve a safe home, even if that means with separate parents.

5.

How involved would my ex-spouse be in our lives? Many parents experiencing marital problems are under the illusion that their problems with their spouse will end with a divorce decree. Unless one spouse gives up parental rights, you’ll still need to communicate and compromise with someone you may not like. Please remember this as you go through your divorce process. Gregory Ramey, Ph.D., is a child psychologist in Dayton, Ohio. Follow him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/drgregramey.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 F1

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208

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Pets and Supplies

Chihuahua, male, 10 weeks, sweet cute, trained, bought him for $250 3 weeks ago, asking $250; Pomeranians, 1 male, 1 female, purebreds, 5-6 yrs. old, no papers, sold together, from different litters, unaltered, $200/Both, 503-709-8858

Giant Red Malamute/Wolf hybrid puppies, 5 females. Pups will be ready to go September 24th. $400 each with a $200 deposit. View at www.oregonmalamutes.com 541-760-8443.

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. CHI-LAPSO PUPPY absoWanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for lutely sweet, 9 weeks, first old vintage costume, scrap, shots $250. 541-419-6445 silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. HonCHI-POMS, 2 males, 10 wks est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 old, brown and tan, ready to go, parents on site. $250 Wanted washers and dryers, each. 541-598-5076. working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. Chocolate Labs AKC, 4 females, 2 males, born 5/18, 208 dew claws removed, 2 sets of Pets and Supplies shots, mom is OFA certified for good hips, elbows normal, dad OFA certified exc. The Bulletin recommends hips, elbows normal, $550 extra caution when ea. 541-548-4700. purchasing products or services from out of the COCKAPOO MIX PUPPIES. area. Sending cash, checks, Adorable, Happy & Healthy. or credit information may 541 350-1684 be subjected to fraud. For Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, 8 more information about an weeks, males & females, 1 advertiser, you may call the micro-mini, shots,$325-$375, Oregon State Attorney 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 General’s Office Consumer www.dancingdachshunds.com Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. English Bulldog, AKC, female 8 mo., mostly white, chipped, w/shots. Moving have to sell. $1595. 541-604-6653. 4 Heeler/Border Collie mix puppies. $25. Adult red heeler $25. 541-815-4028

English Bulldog AKC male pup, 5 mo., all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

ENGLISH

Mastiff puppies, fawn, 2 males 4 females available. Born July 11, family raised, great with kids, both loving parents on site (Eastern Oregon). Call 541-820-4546 American Bulldog pups. $500, colors vary. Ready 9/15, 541-548-3955

Boxer Pup, AKC. 1st shots, 10 weeks, socialized, ready for loving home, 541-280-6677

Golden Retriever English Cream AKC puppies, shots, wormed, vet checked. $500 & up. (509) 281-0502. Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, born 8/8, $600, 541-408-0839.

Golden Retriever Pups, AKC Reg., 5 males, 1 female, ready for "forever" homes $500. Call 541-788-2005. HAVANESE PUPS, 2 male, non-allergy or Shed, 10 wks $700. 541-653-0747

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES AKC registered, champion lines, show quality. Up to date shots & microchipped $2000.00 541 416-0375 Free Golden Retriever, neutered male, to good home, great dog, 541-678-4060. FREE KITTENS, very playful & cute, to pet homes only, box trained. 541-777-0470 German Shepherd Pup, gorgeous black male, parents on site, $400, 541-536-5538.

German Shorthair Pups, AKC, Champ. bird dogs, parents on site, family pet or hunting partner. $400. 541-330-0277,541-306-9957

S . W .

KITTENS! Playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Nice adult cats also available. Adopt a kitten & take home an adult mentor cat free. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, call re: other days/times. 389-8420, 598-5488. www.craftcats for info/directions/photos. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317 Lab pups, AKC yellow, family raised, hunters or companions. 541-420-9474

Lab Pups, Yellow, full bred, males, $250, females $300, 541-447-1323.

Maltese puppy, AKC, female, bred for temperament and charm, $1200. 541-610-7905 Manx kittens. 7 wks. Will be large. Socialized & healthy. $125. 541-419-4827 Mini Pinscher pup, 1st shots, $200. Call for details, 541-480-7663,541-408-8118

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Ski Equipment

TV, Stereo and Video

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

POODLES-AKC Toy, parti, phantom & other colors; also 1 Pom-A-Poo.541-475-3889

Fainting Couch, SW design, exc. cond., $200, 541-550-0444.

TV 52” Samsung, big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $400. 541-480-2652.

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Fridge - bottom freezer, 22 ft. White, Kenmore 3 years old. Ice maker, exc. condition. Culver. $350. 541-546-4785 Purebred German Shorthair Female unaltered. 2 years. Healthy and active! Not AKC, but has champion lines. Medium/small build. Natural hunting instincts. Free to good home! 541-693-4494 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Fridge,Jen-Aire, stainless,sideby-side, water/ice dispenser, $300; Water Heater, elec., Bradford White, 80 Gal., $200, 541-480-6900

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. HD Kenmore Washer and Gas Dryer - White - Like New $400 - Redmond - 548-2653 Heat Pump, with furnace/air handler, Carrier, 3-Ton, $2500, 541-480-6900

Mattresses

Rescued kittens, white, approx. 12 wks, social, altered, vaccinated, ID chip. Adopt at Bend Pet Express East, 420 NE Windy Knolls (385-5298), Sat., Sept. 4, 12-4, then at CRAFT until placed. Many other cats/kittens also avail. 598-5488, 389-8420, info/ photos at www.craftcats.org.

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. Sofa & Chair, Flexsteel, reddish brown, clean, great cond., can e-mail pics, $399, 541-280-1231.

Shih

Tzu/Maltese

Cross pups

and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 Tablecloth, Brand new oversized 120"x60" coated French charley2901@gmail.com provencal Pattern: Arles which has gorgeous deep Siberian Husky/Golden Rered/yellow colors - comes triever, 1.5 yrs. Beautiful, with 10 matching napkins! spirited & energetic dog $240, 503-358-6190 needs active family. LOVES: snow, water, cats, kids; shots, neutered, dewclaws The Bulletin removed. $100. recommends extra caution 541-350-4460 when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney Yellow spayed 13 month General’s Office Consumer old female lab w/papers. Protection hotline at Swims, fetches, sits, needs 1-877-877-9392. a yard or lots of walks. Current shots. $100. 406-581-7298.

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. Washer/Dryer - Side by side or stacking, $400 OBO. Top of line Hospital Bed, like new, $750 OBO. 541-410-5744

212 Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

SKI WAREHOUSE Sale! 4 Season's Sunriver. One day only, Sunday, Sept. 5th 9:30-2:30. UP TO 75% OFF. SKIS, BOOTS, GOGGLES, CLOTHING. ALL BIKES ON SALE TOO!! OUR WAREHOUSE IS LOCATED AT 56771 LUNAR DR., SUNRIVER. 541-593-2255 or www.4sro.com

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 20 Ga. 870 Remington, youth, vent rib, choke tubes, 2-34” or 3”, $350, 541-279-3504. 9 MM compact, Taurus Millennium, extra magazine, black hawk holster, $325, 541-279-3504. Pine Country Outfitters is now accepting consignments of high quality firearms & accessories, and fishing equipment. We are located next to Cascades Lakes Lodge Brewing Co., on Chandler Ave., in Bend. 541-706-9295

Brand new Browning Citori White Lightning w/cstm case $1300 firm. 907-687-7618

Shih Tsu Female, small, spayed, house trained, 2 yrs., $450, 541-788-0090.

Invisible Dog fence, new, 400’ of wire, $150, call 541-550-0444

LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

55 Gallon corner tank, light, pump, wrought iron stand, $275/OBO. 541-389-9268

AKC

Find Classifieds at

Antiques & Collectibles

BROWNING CITORI 410 English stock $1000 firm. 541-410-6396 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

COLT 223 Aru Match target Nato HBAR, 3-40 round clips. 1000 rounds, $1150. 541-306-7345

255

Computers

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

GUN

SHOW

Sept. 4th & 5th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables $8 Admission OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120 Hi-Point 9mm Semi-Auto carbine, Picante Rails, 7 mags, pouch & case, $350, 541-279-3504. Remington 700 7mm, ADL, synthetic stock, Leupold 3X9 scope, $500. 541-647-8931

257

Musical Instruments BLOW OUT SALE! ALL BAND EQUIPMENT 30 TO 40% OFF. LARGE SELECTION OF FLUTES, CLARINETS, SAXAPHONES, TRUMPETS, GUITARS, DRUMS, AND AMPS. BEND PAWN & TRADING COMPANY, 61420 SO. HWY 97, BEND ( 514 ) 317-5099 Drum Set, Royce, $350, please call 541-550-0444 for more info. Guitar, Fender acoustic, hard shell case & accessories, $200, 541-550-0444.

MOSQUITO jacket & pants, lightweight, effective. $15 ea./ $25 set. 541-388-1533.

Dining Set, beautiful vintage 9 piece, $300, please call 541-388-7883

Mens 26” single speed bicycle Huffy, brand new, $75. 541-923-7384.

Mini Pinscher Puppies for sale, $250 each. Call for more info 541-905-9726 ADORABLE!

Dining Set, Dick Idol, mission style, new, 46”x74”,22” leaf, 8 chairs,$800 OBO 541-388-2348

242

Exercise Equipment

Art, Jewelry and Furs

Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppy, AKC, female, shots/wormed $250. 541-383-4552

Dining Table, Oak, 6 chairs, 1 leaf, exc. cond., must sell, $1200 OBO, 541-408-2749.

Complete Exercise Set, Wider Pro Model 9640, $120, 541-317-0783.

Rare Ann Ruttan original, 6’x4’, $4,750 OBO Please call 541-815-4418.

249

Welder, Stick, w/rod dryer, oven hood, & extra rods, $200, 541-550-0444.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

MUST SELL THIS WEEK! Fully restored 1910 Steinway Model A grand piano. Burled mahogany case. $36,000 OBO. For info 541-408-7953

Window, Vinyl, 4’x2.6’, $40 OBO, please call 541-788-5841

Piano, Yamaha M500, great cond., $1100, call 541-390-9601

Heating and Stoves

WURLITZER SPINET PIANO, $900 obo. 541-330-2490.

260

Misc. Items 4 Truck Tires M&S Kelley Safari LT 215/85R16 $200. Used very little. 541 548-2653 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Saddle, 1800’s Mexican; also Buying Diamonds Large ceremonial horse/ Remington 700 VLS .22-250 /Gold for Cash with Leupold scope and camel blanket; both for deSAXON'S FINE JEWELERS Bi-pod, Price can't be beat! cor, 541-419-9406 541-389-6655 $625. Also have a Browning 100% Leather sofa & loveseat, .410 Over Under Citori Call tan in color, no rips, tears or The Bulletin reserves the right BUYING to publish all ads from The for Price. (541) 390-4572 stains, $250. 541-480-1373 Lionel/American Flyer trains, Bulletin newspaper onto The accessories. 541-408-2191. Rock Island Armory 1911 45 Antique buffet $35; Armoire Bulletin Internet website. cal. w/ holster, 250 rounds, Compound bows! $95 & up. $45; Tape storage cab,$20; $450 OBO. 541-408-4416 swiv. stool, $10; Ladderbk Range finders! Chainsaw! chair, $10. 541-382-4779 $199. ALL LIKE NEW! Sportsman Jamboree 541-280-5006 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Gun, Knife, Coin & Collectibles 215 A-1 Washers & Dryers La Pine Senior Activity Ctr. Coins & Stamps DO YOU HAVE $125 each. Full Warranty. 16450 Victory Way, La Pine SOMETHING TO SELL Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s (proceeds to benefit center) FOR $500 OR LESS? WANTED TO BUY dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Sat., 9/11 9-5;Sun. 9/12,9-3 US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun); Appliances, new & recondiNon-commercial Currency collect, accum. Pre Children 12 & under, Free! advertisers can tioned, guaranteed. Over1964 silver coins, bars, Exhibitor info: 541-536-6237 place an ad for our rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Maytag, 541-385-5418 S&W .40, Hi-Point Pistol, semi"Quick Cash Special" dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex auto, 10 round mags, 8 1 week 3 lines Bar Stools (4), 30” tall, & vintage watches. No colmags+pouch, custom hol$10 bucks swivel seat, brand new, $450 lection too large or small. Bedster, $325; 541-279-3504. or OBO, 541-388-2348. rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 2 weeks $16 bucks! 247 Chest of drawers, vintage, with two matching nightstands, Look at: Bendhomes.com Ad must Sporting Goods armoire entertainment cenfor Complete Listings of include price of item - Misc. ter, $300/set. 541-388-7883 Area Real Estate for Sale www.bendbulletin.com Compound bows! $95 & up. or Range finders! Chainsaw! 241 Call Classifieds at $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-385-5809 Bicycles and 541-280-5006

Accessories

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

New - HP 1215 Color Laser Printer Priced to sell $175 Redmond 541 548-2653 THE BULLETIN requires com263 puter advertisers with mulTools tiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ Air Compressor, Campbell Hassoftware, to disclose the fiedl, 30 Gal., needs pressure name of the business or the switch, $150, 541-550-0444. term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Welder, Stick, $75 OBO, defined as those who sell one please call 541-788-5841 computer. for more info.

Compound bows! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006 Deer, Elk Rifles, Ammo: 6 mm, 257; 270; 7x57; 280R; 308; 30-06. 541-389-1392.

Train Set, HO, complete town, 4 engines, 20 cars, $2500 invested, $500, 541-389-9268

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

266 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Space Heater, for shop, John Deere, $125, please call 541-550-0444.

Prime Seasoned two years, pine, round $130/cord, split $150, two cord minimum No delivery charge in Bend area. 541-536-2136. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment 1 gallon perennials and Idaho Fescue @ $4 each. 541-389-5355

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449

Honda Troy-Bilt 5 hp lawn mower, Like new $175 obo. 541-330-2490. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Bicycle Cable Lock, near Summit High, call 562-666-5749 to identify. Found Chickens, off Ponderosa & Defiance, call to identify, 541-388-2660. FOUND Fishing Rod at Elk Lake. Please call to identify. 541-410-4596. Found: Kids Toy, black & white, fell from bike basket, Wilson/97, 8/28, 541-389-5227. Found Rifle: Sat. 8/28, please call to identify, 541-382-8268. Found: Single car key, 8/31,w/ Fob, SE Business, near Post Office Annex, 541-389-8008. LOST Blue Patagonia down jacket, Les Schwab amphitheater, 8/27. 541-330-6570 LOST KEYS Mar., 2010, thought we would find them when we moved, but we didn’t! Truck fob, child’s picture, name on key chain. 440-653-3779

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $130 per cord rounds; $150 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

LOST - REWARD Men's 3-stone wedding ring, Only 2 years old... still has sentimental value Save a man's life... call the wife... 541-410-0366 LOST side plate cover for Harley Davidson, Bend area; gold hog on side 541-788-8166. Lost Wallet: With pictures, Tribal Coin, Sunriver or Bend, 8/16, 605-490-1765. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178


F2 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. Generator, Diesel, 9.3KW, 220/110, trailer mounted, $1200, 541-317-0783.

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358

476

476

Hay, Grain and Feed

Farmers Column

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., If no answer, please leave msg., I will return your call. Redmond, 541-548-2514

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

PREMIUM GRASS HAY $125/ton , Forage Fescue, on stem, leafy, my horses like it more than orchard grass,26 bales /ton, in Culver, 541-475-4604

Premium quality orchard grass, small bales, no rain. 1st cut $140/ton; 2nd cut $150/ton. Also have alfalfa hay. Culver, 541-546-8747;541-460-0840 Top Quality Barn Stored Orchard Grass Hay, 75 lb., 2 sting bales, $155/ton. Kennor Farm, call 541-383-0494. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st cutting Alfalfa/cow, $75/ton; 2nd cutting Orchard grass, $140/ton; 2nd cutting Alfalfa, $130/ton. Madras, 541-948-0292 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 Bluegrass straw, 800-lb bales, $25ea. Premium oat hay, mid size 800-lb bales, $40 ea. Prem. orchard grass, mid size 800lb $50 ea. 541-419-2713 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3 bales, $25 bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 bales, $45 bale. Volume discounts, delivery avail. 541-480-8648.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Free to loving home: 8-yr old Arabian Gelding; light use only. Call 503-679-7496

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing GRASS FED BEEF, quick sale special. $1.80/lb. hanging weight + cut and wrap. Order now with deposit. Call 388-4687 or 610-6408.

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise in 31 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Utah & British Columbia. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

383

Produce and Food KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, Oregon U Pick: Free Stone Canning peaches - Elberta’s; Nectarines, Plums. Bartlett Pears & Akane Apples

Bring Containers READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Employment

Open 7 Days per week 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Only. 541-934-2870

454

Looking for Employment Exp. Child Caregiver, retired school teacher, tutoring, housekeeping, exc. refs., flexible rates & schedule, 562-310-1402, Bend. Seeking ranch work. Cleaning stalls, you name it. have Class A CDL. 971-241-6126

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 Accounting: Immediate opening for a CPA or CPA Candidate with 2 to 5 years public accounting experience. Please visit www.bendcpa.com/jobs for application information.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Saddle, 1800’s Mexican; also Large ceremonial horse/ camel blanket; both for decor, 541-419-9406

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 31 daily newspapers, six states and British Columbia. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Ag Service Technician: Morrow County Grain Growers is currently seeking a ag service technician for its Wasco CaseIH dealership. Successful candidate must be able to provide own tools & be a committed team player. Exp. in Agriculture preferred. Ag knowledge in Hydraulics, Electronic Diagnostics, A/C, etc. is a plus for candidate! Basic computer & customer service skills are a must. Parts counter specialist: We are seeking an individual interested in building good customer relationships as a Parts Counter Person at our Lexington dealership. Successful candidate will have a knowledge of Automotive, Ag, ATV & Snowmobile parts. Computer & customer service skills are a must. Competitive wage + exc. benefit pkg. for both positions. For additional information: call 800-452-7396. To submit a job application and/or resume, send to: John Ripple, General Manager, Morrow County Grain Growers, Inc., PO Box 367, Lexington, OR 97839, or email to: johnr@mcgg.net Application can be found on our web site: wwww.mcgg.net under careers

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apartment Community Manager, P/T, needed in Madras, 20 hours/week. Must have Apartment Management experience; bi-lingual preferred; tax credit experience a plus. Must be able to pass Criminal Background check. Does not have to live on-site. Pay $10-$12 DOE. If interested & qualified please respond with resume to kpetersen@ princetonproperty.com Fax 503-794-9045 ARBORIST for tree service. Current driver’s license req; CDL a plus. 541-771-5535

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Employment Counselor* La Pine Oregon - Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) is recruiting for an Employment Counselor. Individual will provide customers with technical assistance in the resource room, provide case management focused on achieving individualized employment goals, instruct workshops, determine appropriateness for participation in programs, and enter client related data in case management system. Provides information on services of various COIC and partner programs. Will participate in client home visits. Bachelors Degree in related field or the equivalent combination of education and experience, may be substituted. Starting salary $2,926 per month. Excellent benefits. Application available on the COIC website www.coic.org at local COIC offices or at Administration, 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Faxed applications will be accepted (541) 923-3416. In order to be considered for this position, a completed application must be received by 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, September 7, 2010 in the Redmond Administration office. COIC is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request for individuals with disabilities.

Framer

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

Fundraiser Sales

Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802

Project Connect 2010 Clothing Drive Sept. 18, 2010 9:00am - 4:30pm Deschutes County Fairgrounds WE NEED: • Socks and outdoor shoes •Sweat pants and shirts •Winter gear (especially hats and gloves) •Coats •Sleeping bags! *

Drop site locations: Prineville Family Resource Center Robberson Ford Bend Lithia Motors Newport Market Robberson Ford Sisters US Bank Bank of the Cascades La Pine La Pine Community Kitchen Redmond City Center Church

Clothes will be donated to Project Homeless Connect, a non-profit working to end homelessness by connecting families to resources, education and employment. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Huge Sale - Flea Market Shop or bring a table! $10 donation for vendor space benefits the Sisters’ wrestling teams. Between new Bi-Mart & Soji’s Asian & Western Grill, west end of Sisters on Hwy 20. Sept. 3 thru 6, shop all 4 days! 541-992-0195

282

MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE Sept. 4 - Sept. 6 No early sales 65050 Hwy 20 W - just past PineHurst going towards Sisters. Home and Farm goods, crafters items, told tools, furniture, go-cart , kid stuff. 541.388.2706 Saturday-Monday. 10-5 daily at 35 SW Century Drive. Huge selection of BICYCLE GOODS for pennies on the dollar. Shop/Barn/Garage Sale: Chevy Parts, tack, household, tools, boat motor & more. Thur.-Fri. only 9-4, 20315 Birdsong Ln. off Swalley Rd. Weekend #3 Tumalo Sale! Fri & Sat. 8-4, Sun. 12:30-4, Mon. 8-4. 1989 F250, scroll saw, Roto hammer, nail guns w/nails, right angle drill, dove tail jig, radial arm saw, ladder jacks, siding break & tools; some girl stuff, too! Off W. Hwy 20, right on 5th St., left to 64695 Wood Ave.

290

Sales Redmond Area

WE'VE GOT STUFF YARD SALE! Queen pillow top mattress and box spring, 27" Sony tube TV, Dirt devil carpet cleaner, NEW hammock, X-Box, Small Little Chief smoker, Tons of Books, Tons of Clothes and shoes (womens, mens, and babies), bookcase, New Tobi steamer for clothes, Baby swing and car seats, and much much more. Friday (9/3) from 9-4, and Saturday (9/4) from 9-1 20285 Morgan Loop 541-617-7375

Lots of quality stuff! Scrubs, air conditioners, 12’ alum. boat, lots of household items. Sat & Sun, 8-? 2245 SW 24th. Multi-Family Yard Sale: Sat. Only 9-4, 1003 NW Canyon Dr. Lots of great stuff, something for everyone! Sunday & Monday, 9-2 Large Oak entertainment center, CD players, VCR, tuners, TVs, furniture, golf, tools, 35th & Reindeer, Redmond Yard Sale, Fri., Sat., Sun, 8-4. 1517 NW Redwood Ave. off of 15th St. fishing poles, lawn mowers, roto-tillers, 2 rifles, bikes, tools, & hedger.

Sales Southwest Bend 282

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Southeast Bend

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Sales Northwest Bend

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Fri, Sat, and Sun. 8-4 Tools, clothes, electronics, TV, furniture. 36-A SW McKinley. Household items & antiques! Ask about pickup truck bed cover; truck toolboxes, industrial air hose, large steel office supply cabinet. Fri 9am thru Mon, or until all is gone! 19219 Apache Rd., DRW. Moving-In Sale: Fri.- Sat. 9-4, Downsizing for retirement, our years of collecting can now be your treasures, 19365 Indian Summer Rd, DRW. SAT. SEPT. 4 ONLY, 8-5 My closets are too full of beautiful clothes! HUGE BLOW OUT SALE: clothes, shoes, handbags, most from $1 to $10. We also need room in our garage: lots of exciting stuff you might need! 19696 Mahogany.

Sat. Sept. 4, only 8-5 Treasures for all Collectors, have old Lionel train cars, lots of trains, tracks, transformers signals, etc.; dolls, dollhouse, 42” Sony HD TV and misc. 19708 Mahogany St.

Second Tern Thrift Shop Antiques & Collectibles, curio Annual Labor Day Store cabinet, rocking chair, furn., Wide 1/2 Price Sale. Fri. & assorted other. 751 SE DouSat., 9am-3pm. 17377 Spring glas St., Sat. & Sun. 9-4. River Rd., Sunriver, next to Boondocks Restaurant. 541-593-3367. Show Me the Money Sale! BIG ESTATE SALE! Dad Many collectibles, artwork, lots collected old stuff for 85 of baseballs cards, 1980 years. Garage full of antique Honda Gold Wing, railroad tools, house full of 1930s watch, many household glassware, nic-nacs & more. items, lots of tools. All reaFri.-Sat. 9/3-9/4, 7:30-3:30. sonable offers considered! 21109 Charity Ln, Bend. off Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Ferguson. CASH ONLY! 8-5, 61361 SW Sally Ln. Fri., Sat., Sun, 8-4, Antiques, 286 furniture, books, art supplies & original art, rugs, videos, Sales Northeast Bend household items,lots of stuff, 20959 SE Greenmont Dr.

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Furniture; clothes; books; toys; baby; home & garden. Reasonable offers, no haggling or early birds. 20434 Silver Tip Ct., Sat. & Sun., 9-3

292

Sales Other Areas

Antique furn., Windsor chairs, etc., kitchen appl., freezer, kitchen cabinets w/ sinks & faucets, camping gear, lots of bird cages/supplies, pig supGarage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-4, plies, exercise equip. tools, 61977 SE 27th, Firearms, fish tank & lots of supplies. camping, pickup canopy, furhorse tack, COCC textbooks. niture, household items, more Sat. Sun. Mon. 8-5. 1711 SW Wampler Ln. Powell Butte. Yard Sale-Labor Day 9-4. Dressers, golf clubs, exDON'T FORGET to take your ercise bike, sewing machine, signs down after your gaglass pieces, dishes, misc. rage sale and be careful not 20405 Rae Rd. to place signs on utility poles! 290 www.bendbulletin.com

Sales Redmond Area 2 - FAMILY SALE! 9-2 Saturday. 2054 SW Reindeer, Clothes: teen, costumes, misc. kitchen, etc.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Garage Sale - Dresser, Amish fireplace, lift chair, linens, men’s clothing, misc. Fri-Sat, 8-3, 21328 Pelican Dr.

BIG SALE! Sat.- Sun. 8-4. Lots of household & garage items, bow, camping. 1233 ‘C’ Avenue, Terrebonne.

Fri., Sat., Sun., 9 a.m. Warehouse full of new gift items: vintage furn., antiques, pic. frames, candles, wine racks/ access., tools & hardware, plastic housewares. 15686 Trapper Point Rd., Sisters, follow Locust past airport.

Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-5, 2157 Castle Ave near Butler Mkt. & Purcell, large variety of items.

Fri., Sat. 8-3, HD jackets/boots, Sorel boots, cabin home yard decor, lots of great stuff! The Greens, 3725 SW Ben Hogan.

Garage Sale Fri & Sat, 8-5. Lots of goodies, some brand new! 17501 Killdeer Drive, OWW2 follow signs!

General Now accepting resumes for interim parts manager in Baker City, Oregon for hard working, self-motivated individuals. Inventory management and customer service experience a plus. Please submit resume to Blind Box #161, c/o Baker City Herald, PO Box 807, Baker City, OR 97814. Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449. Medical Wallowa Memorial Hospital, located in Enterprise, OR currently has a full-time position available for a Laboratory Director. Working supervisory position, Mon.-Fri., On Call after hours & weekends. Three years minimum experience as bench MT/MLT. MT & supervisory experience preferred. Excellent Benefits Package. If interested contact Linda Childers, HR Director, (541) 426-5313, or visit www.wchcd.org. EOE

(Experienced)

Needed. Must have commercial & residential exp., valid ODL req., drug testing, Fax or email resume to: 541-617-4545 or brodyb@baxterbuilders.net

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

WI N N I N G TE A M O F S A L E S / P R O M O TI O N PROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERA G E O F $400 - $800 PER WEEK D O IN G S P E C IA L E V E N T, TR A D E S H O W , R E TA IL & G R O C E R Y S TO R E P R O M O TIO N S W H IL E R E P R E S E N TIN G THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant for rural health clinic in John Day, OR and surrounding satellite clinics. Excellent opportunity. www.bluemountainhospital.org OPERATIONS MANAGER Central Oregon Council On Aging is a non-profit dedicated to helping Seniors. Position responsible for supervisory and operations. Strong experience in admin, fiscal/budget and HR. Team oriented and collaborative with willingness to travel. 5 years leadership experience, bachelors degree strongly preferred. Non-profit, senior services or social services agency experience desired. www.councilonaging.org EOE. Submit resumes to admin@councilonaging.org

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

SALES OF BEND Central Oregon’s best car dealership is looking for professional sales people to sell Central Oregon #1 franchise, Subaru. Looking for sales professionals with experience to join our team. Will train the right candidate. We offer the most aggressive pay program in Central Oregon, guaranteed income, profit sharing, medical benefits, and an above average income. No Phone Calls Please. Apply in person at Subaru of Bend, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend, OR.

Sales

Outside Sales Representative - We are seeking an experienced, motivated and energetic sales rep. for the Bend market. Demonstrated success with marketing and developing business-to-business sales required. Five years previous outside sales experience in the Bend market preferred. To view the job description and apply, visit us at www.uidchr.com

SUTERRA-MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN: 5+ years experience manufacturing setting. Fix mechanical, electrical and other operational problems on equipment; requires welding, milling, etc. Apply/review description visit: www.suterra.com; fax: (310) 966-8298

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 F3 634

Finance & Business

500 600 604

Storage Rentals

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

CALL 541-382-9046

630

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 31 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) Well Established business for sale. $50,000. Motivated! Call for more info. Dawn Ulrickson, Broker 541-610-9427 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262

Advertise your open positions.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classifieds

Sales CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

announcements Request for Proposal Oregon Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation is seeking to gain a better understanding of the capabilities of potential partners, programmatic development assistance, and to identify a long term partner to provide the resources and expertise required to deliver a successful Loan Refinancing Assistance Program by soliciting proposals for the development & management of the Loan Refinancing Assistance Program. To get more information and to download the complete RFP go to www.oregonhomeownerhelp.org or contact Dona Lanterman at dona.lanterman@state.or.us or 503-986-2044.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1 bdrm Units with Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios Water, sewer & garbage paid.

507

Loans and Mortgages

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

NEWLY REMODELED QUIMBY ST. APTS.

Real Estate Contracts

528 Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Rentals

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

NEED A SUMMER JOB? If you can answer YES To these questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do ur friends say u talk 2 much? 2. Do u like 2 have fun @ work? 3. Do u want 2 make lots of $$$? 4. R u available afternoons & early evenings?

Rooms for Rent 2 Rooms For Rent in nice 3 bdrm., 2 bath, home w/huge fenced backyard, pets OK, all utils paid, 541-280-0016 Bend, 8th/Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, no smoking $400. 541-317-1879

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 ROOM FOR RENT in mfd home in Bend, $300 mo. Call 253-241-4152. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent 1 Bdrm. Condo in 7th Mtn. Resort, furnished, hot tub, all utils. incl, $800/ mo., offered by Patty McMeen Real Estate, 541-480-2700 2 Luxury Condos Mt. Bachelor Village Resort 2B/2B & 3B/3B, furn., views, deck, BBQ, pool, hot tub, tennis courts, garage. $1300 & $1600 mo.+ dep., Avail. 8/30. No pets. 541-948-1886

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Work Part-Time with Full-Time Pay Ages 13 & up welcome

Apt./Multiplex General

OREGON NEWSPAPER SALES GROUP

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

541-508-2784

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

DON'T LAG, CALL NOW

634

Independent Contractor

1 bdrm $550.

H Supplement Your Income H

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex with park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928.

Operate Your Own Business

2 Bdrm 1 bath DUPLEX, W/D hkup, dishwasher, micro, range, fridge. Attached garage w/opener. W/S/landsacaping pd. $675/mo, lease. 1319 NE Noe. 503-507-9182

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

* FALL SPECIAL *

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts.

& Call Today &

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras/ Culver & La Pine

H

Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2350 NE Mary Rose Pl., #1, $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

TTY 1 800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity

636 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D Hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, detached apt., with W/D, no pets/smoking, 63323 Britta, $700/mo., $1000 dep., 541-390-0296.

Small studio close to downtown and Old Mill. $525 month, dep. $500, all util. paid. no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Duplex - Clean & spacious 2 648 bdrm, 2 bath, dishwasher, fridge, W/D hookup. $650 Houses for mo. plus $500 dep. 442 SE Rent General McKinley, 541-815-7723. MUST FIND TRAINS ROMANTIC A 1928 Cottage, 2+1 large 2 Bdrm 1 bath duplex, very bath, new kitchen & wood quiet, clean, W/D on site, floors, fireplace, large yard, new heat sys, w/s/g pd. Cat lilacs, fruit trees, $900, elec./ nego. $550. 541-815-9290 water paid, 541-617-5787 Townhouse-style 2 Bdrm., 1.5 A COZY 2+2, garage, w/ bath apt. W/D hookup, no decks & lots of windows, hot pets/smoking, $625, w/s/g tub (fees paid), wood stove & paid, 120 SE Cleveland. gas heat, furnished, near 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355 Lodge $950. 541-617-5787

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets, 541-382-3678 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $555. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

A newer 2 bdrm 2 ba duplex on Wickiup Ct. Avail now. Fenced yard, gas heat, single garage. $595 541-322-0183 www.rentalsinbend.com Call about Fall Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

$99 Summertime Special! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly w/new large dog run, some large breeds OK with mgr. approval. Rent Starting at $525-$550. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

Building/Contracting

Drywall

Beyond Expectations Senior Concierge Service: Offering assistance w/non-medical tasks & activities. Created specifically for seniors & their families. Call today,541-728-8905

NOTICE: Oregon state law Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs requires anyone who No Job Too Small. Free Exact contracts for construction Quotes. 541-408-6169 work to be licensed with the CCB# 177336 Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Excavating is bonded and insured. Automotive Service Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the Auto Body & Paint, 30 yrs. exp., CCB Consumer Website honest & professional, all www.hirealicensedcontractor.com Hourly Excavation & Dump work guaranteed, low rates, or call 503-378-4621. The Truck Service. Site Prep Land Call Rick, 541-771-1875 or Bulletin recommends Clearing, Demolition, UtiliJohn at 541-815-0397. checking with the CCB prior ties, Asphalt Patching, Gradto contracting with anyone. ing, Land & Agricultural DeSome other trades also velopment. Work Weekends. require additional licenses Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 To Subscribe call and certifications.

The Bulletin

541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Bath and Kitchens Cabinet Works - Quality that Lasts! Refacing, refinishing. custom cabinets, media centers. 20+ yrs exp. CCB #168656 541-788-7349

Child Care, Reg. Tiny Town CC ~ Annette M-F, 6am-6pm 12 wks-5 yrs. FT $25/PT $15 Pre-pay Bend N. 541-598-5031 tinytowncc@gmail.com

Debris Removal

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A neat & clean 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1077 sq ft, gas heat, dbl garage w/opener, fenced yard, rear deck, RV parking, $995. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803 Available now: 3/4 acre, fenced 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dogs okay. $1055 per mo. $1600 dep. Garbage svc. incl. 63416 Vogt Rd. Call 541-389-8668.

Beautiful fully furnished (optional?) 3/4 bdrm Providence home, 9500 sq. ft. corner lot on culdesac, close to park, schools/shopping. $1275. 503-998-8146. Newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2-car garage, A/C, 2883 NE Sedalia Loop. $1100 mo. + dep., no pets. 541-389-2192,

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 650

658

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Newly remodeled 2 bdrm 1 bath home. W/S/G pd. $750 mo with $750 dep; 1st & last. No pets. Call 541-312-9292

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautiful 6 bdrm 3 bath 3450 sq ft house. $2995/mo, incl cable, Internet, garbage & lawn maint. Min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Spacious 3/2 single-level, all appl., new paint, A/C, fireplace, laundry rm. dbl garage, no smkg. $1050 incl gardener. 541-389-2244

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Amazingly clean, 1250 +/- sq. ft., 2 bdrm, plus office/den. 2 bath. All kitchen appli. Gas fireplace, AC, 2 car garage w/opener, too many extras to list. 541-408-6065

Cute Duplex, SW area, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, private fenced yard, W/D hookup, $700 mo.+ dep., call 541-480-7806.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

Newer 3/2.5,upgrades, gardener, W/D, fireplace, fenced, 1425 sq.ft., 2925 SW Obsidian Ln, $725, W/S/G paid, 541-385-5911, 408-209-8920

3 Bdrm, 1 bath, attached garage, 900 sq.ft., fenced yard, pets OK,$725, 1st, last, security dep., 1406 SW 17th St., avail 10/1, 541-420-7397

SW REDMOND: 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, 1270/sf. apt (and) 3 bdrm., 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, appl. inc/ W/D, W/S/G pd, no pets/smoking, credit check req., HUD ok, For appt/info: 541-504-6141

660

Houses for Rent La Pine Small 2 bdrm. house, quiet neighborhood, adjacent to national forest, no smoking, no indoor pets, $500/mo., $500 dep., 541-306-7727.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville $825 + Dep. 3+2, 2 Car Garage 541-420-2485

662

Houses for Rent Sisters Pets & Horses OK! 2 Bdrm, 2 bath mfd home + hobby/ guest rm? 5-acre irrig pasture, 4 stalls, pen, $1000/mo incl irrig fees. 541-312-4752.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

A clean 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1340 sq.ft., new carpet, new paint, wood stove, family room, An older 2 bdrm manufactured, dbl. garage, RV parking, .5 672 sq ft, woodstove on acre. $895/mo. (541) quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. 480-3393 or (541) 610-7803. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803 LOVELY chalet-style home 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, small La Pine nice 2 bdrm, 2 bath, shed, no garage or fenced outbldg, appliances, about an yard, pets okay. Dep. req. acre. Avail Sept. 7, 50877 $1000 mo. 541-280-2991. Fawn Loop off Masten Rd. $650 mo. 541-745-4432 Newer 3 Bdrm, 2½ bath home, w/dbl. garage, hardwood 687 floors, room for RV parking, Commercial for W/S pd. $975 mo. Call Rob, 541-410-4255. Rent/Lease

2 bedroom 1 bath manufactured home, with heat pump, $565/mo + security deposit. No pets. W/S/G paid. Call 541-382-8244.

541-923-5008

Terrebonne, very well kept, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near school, no smoking, no cats, dogs neg., refs req., 8862 Morninglory, $770, 541-480-2543

Eagle Crest Chalet, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, loft, designer furnished, W/D, resort benefits! $985/mo. + utilities. Avail. Sept. 503-318-5099

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

541-322-7253

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Moving and Hauling

Roofing

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Townsend Antique Transport: We move antiques in-town & out of town, everything padded & strapped, Call 541-382-7333.

Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Home Improvement

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Newer home in Terrebonne mobile home park. $425 & $475. 2 bdrms, w/s/g included. Avail now. Also RV space for rent. www.rentalsinbend.com, 541-322-0183

www.redmondrents.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Adult Care

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. Since 1978

If you want a low price, that is N O T us, if you want the highest quality, that IS us! www.brgutters.com 541-389-8008 • 800-570-8008 CCB#103411

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


F4 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

744

Open Houses OPEN HOUSE Friday, 9/3 • 1-4pm 3093 NW Craftsman Pre-approved by Bank at $330,000. With 3% in buyer closing cost! Hurry to buy!!! Needs a little TLC. Suzanne Stephenson, Broker • 541-848-0506 Hunter Properties, LLC

745

Homes for Sale

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

745

762

Homes for Sale

Homes with Acreage

***

Home On 4 Acres, adjacent to nearly endless public lands, near Prineville & Ochoco Reservoirs, 2 master bdrm. + 1 bdrm., 1920 sq.ft., 12x40 Shop, 30x30 carport, covered patio, gas appl., $219,900, reasonable offers considered, 541-416-0366 or baldegle41@gmail.com

CHECK YOUR AD

860

Boats & RV’s

800

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this 860 happens to your ad, please Motorcycles And Accessories contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be 763 happy to fix it as soon as we 2002 BMW can. Deadlines are: WeekRecreational Homes R1150RT Motorcycle days 12:00 noon for next and Property 7568 miles, original owner, day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunimmaculate condition day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. $6,800 541-318-2940 If we can assist you, please Famous Upper Big Deschutes River! Boat dock, 3 bdrm 2 call us: bath, 1800 sq.ft., 4-car car385-5809 2007 DUCATI Monster 695, port, 3 cedar decks, hot tub, The Bulletin Classified heated grips and vest, rack , pool table. Fish/hunt: deer, *** Famsa bags, fairing, 3800 mi. elk, ducks & geese from $6500 OBO. 541-420-5689. home! Many lakes/streams 749 close by, winter sports, miles to LaPine, 15; Bend, 39. Southeast Bend Homes $548,000. Financing available. 83-year-old owner has 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., to move. 541-408-1828, Jim. Baja Vision 250 2007, living room w/ wood stove, new, rode once, exc. cond., family room w/ pellet stove, 764 $2000. 541-848-1203 or dbl. garage, on a big, fenced 541-923-6283. .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Farms and Ranches Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. 35 Acre irrigated, cattle and CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items hay farm, close to Prineville, you no longer need. with a pond and excellent 750 Call 385-5809 private well. 76 yr. old WidRedmond Homes ower will sacrifice for $395,000. 541-447-1039 Looking for your next 771 employee? HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 CusPlace a Bulletin help tom 2007, black, fully loaded, Lots wanted ad today and forward control, excellent reach over 60,000 condition. Only $7900!!! Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, readers each week. 541-419-4040 Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., Your classified ad will private homesite, great view, also appear on gated community $350,000 HARLEY DAVIDSON bendbulletin.com which OWC. 541-549-7268. CUSTOM 883 2004 currently receives over • Forward controls WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in 1.5 million page views • Quick release windshield SE Bend. Super Cascade every month at • Back rest • Large tank Mountain Views, area of nice no extra cost. • Low miles! homes & BLM is nearby too! Bulletin Classifieds Only $199,950. Randy Get Results! $4295 Schoning, Broker, John L. Call 385-5809 or place 541-504-9284 Scott, 541-480-3393. your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which 762 makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or Homes with Acreage discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, Featured Home! 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home on 1.47 Acres+/- RV familial status, marital status Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, or national origin, or an inSunriver Area, $224,900 Call tention to make any such Bob Mosher 541-593-2203 preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

773

Acreages

HARLEY DAVIDSON FAT BOY - LO 2010,

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

500 mi., black on black, detachable windshield, back rest, and luggage rack, $15,900, call Mario, 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707.

775

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Will Finance - Dbl wide 2 bdrm 2 bath, fireplace, fenced yard, located in Terrebonne. $8,500; or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130.

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

870

875

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $18,500. 541-548-3985.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes Harley FXDWG 1997, wide glide, Corbin seat, saddle bags, low mi., $7500, Call Rod, 541-932-4369.

Suzuki DR350 1993, 14,000 mi., exc. cond., ready to go, $1895, 541-504-7745.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

ATVs

HARLEY HERITAGE SOFTAIL CLASSIC 2006 $12,000 OBO 21,700 miles, just had 20,000 mile service with new tires added. After-market exhaust, passenger footboards and more. Beautiful bike, A Must-See! 541-390-0077.

17’ ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Polaris 350 1993, 4X4 ATV, new tires, battery & starter, runs great, $1500 OBO, 541-923-0442.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new Magna

V45

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 24’ SeaRay 1977 - looks almost new! Cutty cabin, cook, sleep, porta-potty, Ford 351 motor, Merc outdrive, 3 props, Bimini top, exc. shape w/ trailer, surge brakes, new tires, all licensed. $7,500. See 452 Franklin Ave. Bend. 541-382-3705 after 12 p.m. or 541-408-1828.

1988 Class 22’ Mallard, very clean, 70k+ miles, Ford 460, expensive wheels, exc. rubber, microwave - TV, custom large 2-door 3-way reefer 4KW Onan generator, 3-stage catalytic heater, plus factory furnace. air, awning, tow pkg, $7,500. LaPine (541) 408-1828.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

The Bulletin Classifieds

CanAm Max XT 650, 2008, 2 seat, winch, alloys, brush guards, low hrs. $6495. 541-549-5382;541-350-3675 HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, $5,250. Come see! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, & trailer, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

865

Honda 1981 CM200T Twinstar. Like new condition. Red with chrome fenders. Electric start, wind screen. $700.00 541-330-1151

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Where buyers meet sellers.

Your Future Is Here.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $2200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Allegro 28' 2007, 23,000 miles, 2 slides, ford V-10, jacks, camera, side camera's, no smoke, no pets. Very nice condition. Vin # 11411 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

18’ Wooden Sail Boat, trailer, great little classic boat. $750 OBO. 541-647-7135

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very tongue trailer, inboard molow hrs., exc. cond., $3700, tor, great fishing boat, seralso boots, helmet, tires, vice contract, built in fish avail., 541-410-0429 holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on 870 boat, must sell due to health Boats & Accessories $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Whether you’re looking for a home or need a service, your future is in these pages.

FREE MOBILE HOME 14x70 Must be moved. Contact Kelly at 541-633-3068.

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

870

Boats & Accessories

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

BEAVER 37' 1997 Patriot Best in class. 63,450 miles. Immaculate cond. All options. $72,000. 541-923-2593

(Private Party ads only)

The Bulletin Classifieds

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

exc. cond., runs great, $2500, call Greg, 541-548-2452.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Honda 1984,

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 320 acres $88,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

MUST SELL 80-160 acres recreation/investment property, well water and fenced, L.O.P. permits. Remote. 541-548-3408

860

Motorcycles And Accessories Motorcycles And Accessories

541-385-5809 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

2008 Outboard

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

Mercury 75hp 4stroke. Model 75ELPT 4S. Excellent condition. Low hours. New forward controls. $4,950. 541-408-4670

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Dolphin 36’ 1997, super slide, low mi., extra clean, extras, non-smoking $21,500 See today 541-389-8961.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Hey Kids, Draw your favorite thing about fall and

WIN $100 CASH MONEY! ENTER THE

Sponsored By:

Win The Grand Prize: www.potteryloungeofbend.com $100 Cash Money 5 Honorable Mentions: $25 Cash Money Winning Entry will be published in GO! Magazine on Friday, September 17, 2010

Deliver Entries to Contest Sponsor:

The Rules: Open to participants 18 years or younger. Draw your Fall Seasonal design in the box example (extra copies may be picked up at POTTERY LOUNGE). Use bright colors and simple fall designs (avoid faint lines, like pencil or soft pastels).

All entries MUST be delivered to POTTERY LOUNGE by 5:00 p.m. Monday, September 13, 2010

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PRESENTED BY

THE BULLETIN ST. CHARLES IMMEDIATE CARE

SEPTEMBER 18 & 19, DOWNTOWN BEND

NAME:__________________________________________________ PHONE:______________________________ ADDRESS:________________________________________ CITY:______________________ ZIP:_______________ SCHOOL:__________________________ TEACHER:___________________________________ GRADE:_________


THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

PRICE REDUCED! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 27K mi., 1 owner, garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, 2 TV’s, rear camera exc. cond. $69,000. 541-536-7580

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Travel 1987,

Queen

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

torsion suspension, many upgrades, tows like a dream, $4950, 541-480-0527.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302 Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

WINNEBAGO BRAVE 2000 CLASS A 26’, Workhorse Chassis exc. cond., walk around queen bed, micro. gas oven, fridge/freezer, 56K mi. 3 awnings $17,900 OBO. 541-604-0338.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $78,000. 541-848-9225.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Tires, (4) Studded, used 1 season, Magnagrip. P205/55R16 - 895, $200, 541-270-0464

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462. Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

***

CHEVY 1500 Z71 SWB 4x4 1993. V-8. Auto. A/C. Silverado. 1 owner. Exc. cond. Black.$6850. VIN 140664. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K miles, $9650. 541-598-5111.

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers 2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Now asking WHOLESALE for $8750. Frank, 541-480-0062.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle , 2 drop gates, 1 on side, 7’x12’, 4’ sides, all steel, $1400, call 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422. MUST SELL 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000.541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

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Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

MITSUBISHI 1994, 4 cyl., Mighty Max, with shell, exc. tires. $1995 or best offer. 541-389-8433. Ford XLT Ranger, 1995, V6, 5 spd manual, bedliner, lumber rack, tow pkg, 174K, runs great, $3750. 541-815-1523

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., deisel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

BMW 3.0 i X5

2005 AWD, 42.000 miles, leather, power everything, roof rack, panorama sunroof, loaded $25,500. EXCELLENT CONDITION 541-382-2528

’97 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON

’06 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.0 LIMITED

Wagon, Auto, Moon Roof, Leather, Low Miles, Very Nice

Clean Car

Wagon, Auto, Moon Roof, Leather, Navigation, Low Miles, Very Nice Car

VIN:380591

VIN:600057

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

’00 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:635720

Trailer, 74.5”x10’ Long, 13” side rails, new bed, 5000 lb rated, trailer house axles & spare, w/lights, $380; 541-388-3833.

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948

931

VW Super Beetle 1974, Automotive Parts, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Service and Accessories Dularto Carbs, trans, stud-

885

Canopies and Campers

Bigfoot

9.5’

1998,

Hard top for a Corvette, new, $350. Please call 541-388-7883 Snow and Mud Tires 235/70R-16. Set of 4 - $200. Call (541) 923-7589.

ded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $4,000! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

(Private Party ads only)

VIN:517656

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON Auto, All Weather Pkg, Low Miles, Heated Seats, Very Clean

Manual, Low Miles

Leather

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:521582

VIN:307453

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK SEDAN ’08 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5 SEDAN ’00 VW GOLF GL HATCHBACK Very Nice Car, Good Gas Mileage

Manual, Low Miles, Very Clean!

Limited

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:528438

VIN:745152

’99 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON

’07 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X

’08 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X

Manual, Alloy Wheels, Nice Car!

Auto, Very Clean, Very Nice Car!

Auto, Low Miles, Very Clean

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

Certified Pre-Owned

’07 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX TR

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned

’08 SUBARU FORESTER LL Bean, Moonroof

Turbo, Limited, Leather, Loaded, Manual, Very Clean, Low Miles

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:715412

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED

4x4, Regular Cab, Manual, Very Nice Truck!

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:301669

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:514934

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON 2.5XT ’04 FORD RANGE EDGE

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:704170

Sedan, Manual, Low, Low miles, Extra Clean

VIN:304770

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:710825

Wagon, Low Miles, Automatic

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Certified Pre-Owned

’08 SUBARU IMPREZA SEDAN

VIN: 652745

VW Karmann Ghia 1971 convertible - parts or restore $950. 541-350-9630.

Auto, Low Miles, Very Nice!

VIN: 813239

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Ford F250 1983, tow

Certified Pre-Owned VIN: 348526

Manual, Super Clean, Very Low Miles

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

’10 SUBARU IMPREZA WAGON ’06 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5 SEDAN

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VW Cabriolet 1981,

Certified Pre-Owned VIN: 414545

Limited, Loaded, Auto, Moonroof, Very Clean

’05 SUBARU LEGACY GT

All Weather Pkg, Auto, Power Seat, Low Low Miles

Loaded, Leather, Nav., Moon Roof, 6 Pass, Super Clean, Low Miles

VIN: 311976

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Trailer, 4’x8’, tilt bed, tie-downs on 4 corners, new lights, rated, 1200 lbs., $160, 541-388-3833.

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

VIN:304808

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i Wagon 08 SUBARU TRIBECA LIMITED ’09 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON

VIN:219087

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK 3.0 LIMITED

6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

Ford F-250 1970, Explorer Model, 2WD,remanufactured 360 V-8, auto trans., pwr. steering, pwr. brakes, clean & nice, recent “Explorer Green” paint job, runs & drives great, $1700 OBO, 541-633-6746.

Chevrolet Suburban 3/4 Ton 4WD 1988. Silverado, A/C, 8 Passenger, Tow, Snow Tires, MUST SEE! $2850. 541-480-3265 DLR.

SUBARU SUMMER SALE!

Dodge ½ Ton 4WD Pickup, 1997. Canopy; new motor, torque converter & radiator, $4000 or best offer. Call 541-536-3490.

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

935

All Weather Pkg, Heated and Power Seats

Dodge Ram 2001, short

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford F250 1983, tow

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

VIN:203215

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

FORD F-250 1989, 450 auto, 4WD, cruise, A/C, radio w/cassette player, receiver hitch. Recent upgrades: gooseneck hitch, trailer brake controller, ball joints, fuel pump & tank converter valve, heavy duty torque converter on trans., $1899 This weekend only! 541-419-5060

Fiat 1800 1976, 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & humming birds, white soft top & hard top, $6500, OBO 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

881

Komfort 29’ #29TSG 2001. 2 slides, A/C, fiberglass. Exc. cond. Must see! $11,995. VIN-024665. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Travel Trailers

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

FORD F250 XLS 1988, auto, PS/PB, 460 eng., new tires, new shocks, 107,000 miles, very good condition, matching shell. $3,000. (925) 550-1515 or 925-642-6797

CHEVY Cheyenne 1500 1995 long bed, 2WD automatic, V6 AM/FM radio, 96k miles, Chevy Wagon 1957, $3,700. 541-617-1224. 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

541-923-1655

The Bulletin

900

Tires, 1 set of Studded tires $300, one set without studs $180, 541-388-7883.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Randy’s Kampers & Kars TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

933

Pickups

Alpenlite 22’ 1990, new

65K mles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

RV Consignments

933

Pickups

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

34’

“WANTED”

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

Pace Arrow 35’ 2003, Cherry cabinets,white leather furniture, 2 slides, top-ofthe-line, Workhorse chassis, Allision trans., 8.1L Vortec, $87,000, 541-504-4223

Autos & Transportation

Loaded, Moonroof, Heated Seats 6 Year/100k powertrain Warranty

VIN:A15336

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:317617

’99 TOYOTA 4RUNNER 4X4 ’06 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON ’05 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN Auto, Moon Roof, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL, Cruise

Fleetwood Caribou Model 11K, 1997, 3-way refrig, stove with oven, microwave, wired for cable, TV & AC, kept covered, original owner, asking $8900. 541-420-0551

VIN: 215633

All Weather Pkg., Heated Seats, Power Seats, Manual, Super Low Miles 43K VIN:332431

Auto, Low Miles, Alloy Wheels, Super Clean

VIN: 229172

CALL 888-701-7019 CLICKSubaruofBend.com

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

We don’t sell cars, we help you buy them!

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

• No Credit • Bankruptcy • Repossession Ok • We Can Help You!

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through September 5, 2010.

NORTHWEST CROSSING CENTRAL OREGON

HOMES BUILDER CLOSEOUT! BUY TODAY! Open House, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 4 2502 NW Crossing ~ Townhome Never lived in 3 bed/2.5 bath, 1705 sq. ft. Refrigerator, washer/dryer, & blinds included. MLS#2713334 $279,900

VIRGINIA ROSS, CRS, GRI, ABR 541-383-4336

MORRIS REAL ESTATE Independently Owned and Operated


F6 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

935

975

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975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Cool September Deals

Cool September Deals

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $19,800 OBO. 541-388-2774.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Buick Lacrosse 2005,

Chrysler Aspen 2008 AWD, Loaded, 25K Miles! Vin #159199

Only $24,578

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $20,500, 541-576-2442 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer

Top Model, low miles, white, all accessories, need the money, $7900, call Barbara, in Eugene at 541-953-6774 or Bob in Bend, 541-508-8522.

Cadillac Cimarron 1984, 2nd owner, 77K orig. mi., 2 sets tires - 1 snow, exc. shape, 25+ mpg., must sell, $2000 OBO, 541-383-4273.

Ford Taurus LIMITED 2009

The Bulletin Classifieds

Cadillac DeVille 1998, loaded, 130,000

2008, 26k miles, Leather, rear A/C, third seat, tow. Like new and thousands less! KBB Retail ... $31,785 AAA Price .... $26,995

AWD, 33K Miles! Vin #124299

Only $17,988

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $999. Call 541-388-4167.

Honda Accord 2 door Coupe EX 2005. 6 cyl, 98,000 well-maintained miles. Good mileage, great condition, loaded with extras. $12,995. (541) 419-1771

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Smolich Auto Mall Cool September Deals

Nissan Rouge 2008

AWD, 19K, Well Equipped, Moonroof & More! VIN #110180

Only $19,566

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

940

Vans Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12CD, wheels, sunroof, white, looks new, also 1995 Buick LeSabre Limited, 108K, leather, so nice & easy, $7500/both, will separate, Call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $3500 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-4677.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Nissan Cube 2009 A Must See Vehicle, 24K Miles. Vin #105716

Only $16,455

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

VIN##B29136

JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 1999 6 cylinder, automatic, air, skyjacker lift/shocks, Goodrich tires, hard top, $8700 541-728-1758

Cool September Deals

(Photo for illustration only)

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

miles, nice condition, $2750, 541-385-8308.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Smolich Auto Mall

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Cadillac ETC 1994, loaded, heated pwr. leather seats, windows, keyless entry, A/C, exc. tires, 2nd owner 136K, all records $3100. 541-389-3030,541-815-9369

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

***

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the Saab 9-3 SE 1999 first day it runs to make sure Honda Civic LX, 2006, convertible, 2 door, Navy it is correct. Sometimes inauto, CD, black w/tan, all with black soft top, tan instructions over the phone are power, 48K, 1 owner, terior, very good condition. misunderstood and an error $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069 $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. can occur in your ad. If this Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly happens to your ad, please like new, 9K original owner contact us the first day your Call The Bulletin At miles. Black on Black. This is ad appears and we will be 541-385-5809. Honda’s true sports machine. happy to fix it as soon as we Place Your Ad Or E-Mail I bought it with my wife in can. Deadlines are: WeekAt: www.bendbulletin.com mind but she never liked the days 12:00 noon for next 6 speed trans. Bought it new day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for SunSubaru Forester 2007, for $32K. It has never been day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. Great shape, Atlanta GA car, out of Oregon. Price $17K. If we can assist you, please 111K easy hwy mi. Reduced, Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm. call us: $11,900 OBO. 541-508-0214 385-5809 If you have a service to Subaru Legacy L 2000, 92K The Bulletin Classified offer, we have a special mi., new tires, very good *** advertising rate for you. cond., $6400 or trade for ‘90 CHEVY CAMARO 1985 & newer camp trailer, Black with red interior, 305 V8 Call Classifieds! 541-233-8944,541-548-8054 - 700R4 trans, T-top, direc541-385-5809. tional alloy wheels, alarm www.bendbulletin.com SUBARUS!!! with remote pager. $1795. 541-389-7669, must ring 8 Nice clean and fully Infinity G35 X 2005 times to leave message. serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com Chevy Cobalt LS 2006, 17K, remote start,low profile sport rims, extra studless snows w/rims, $8500, 541-410-5263.

AWD, only 16,500 miles, absolutely in like-new condition. KBB Retail ... $23,350

AAA Price ....$21,995 VIN##B29136

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Toyota Camry 1991; 90K miles, new timing belt; $750 OBO; Call 541-318-7104 Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO Engine, $400; Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu.in., $400, 541-318-4641. Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 185K hwy. mi. $8,000 541-410-7586.

Chevy HHR-2LT 2009, Silver metallic, leather, auto, 12K, loaded, brackets/lights/bra/ for tow option,541-549-7875

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150. Volvo V70 XC 2001, exc. cond. loaded,heated leather,AC,sunroof,pwr,5cyl turbo,AWD, gold ext,162K, $5000,503-720-0366

Chrysler Town & Country Limited 1999, AWD, loaded, Mazda SPEED6 2006, a Volvo XC70 2004, AWD, 73K, loaded, moonroof, snow hitch with brake controller, rare find, AWD 29K, Veloctires, $14,995. 541-948-2300 Thule carrier, set of studded ity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun tires, one owner, clean, all roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose maintenance records, no speakers, black/white leather Smolich smoke/dogs/kids. 120,000 $19,995. 541-788-8626 Auto Mall miles. $6,000 OBO. Mercedes 300SD 1981, 541-350-2336. Cool September Deals never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, Ford Crown Victoria sunroof, working alarm sys1993, set up for pilot tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch work, set up for pole, start, power everything, 197K newer eng., well maint., miles, will run for 500K miles runs good, pwr. inverter, easily, no reasonable offer computer stand, 2 spare refused, $2900 OBO, call tires, set studded tires, 541-848-9072. $2000 OBO, 541-233-3038.

VW Golf 2000

Only 79K miles! Vin #294963

Only $7,580 Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

975

Automobiles

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

541-322-7253

Mercury Grand Marquis LS 1998. 67K, 1-owner. V8,garaged, tan, all pwr,CD, leather, exc. cond., studs, $6300, 541-480-2793. MERCURY SABLE 1993 runs great, great work car! 129,000 miles! $1300 OBO! Call 541-788-4296 or 541-788-4298. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

366

VW Passat GLX 4 Motion Wagon 2000, blue, 130K, V-6, 2.8L, AWD, auto, w/ Triptronic, 4-dr., A/C, fully loaded, all pwr., heated leather, moonroof, front/side airbags, CD changer, great cond, newer tires, water pump, timing belt, $5900 OBO, 541-633-6953

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY STATE OF OREGON, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, ASSIGNEE OF BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER; Plaintiff, v. GINA R. MANN; DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, LaPine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein; Defendants. Case No. 10CV0493AB SUMMONS TO: DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, La Pine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein. IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: You are hereby required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above case within thirty days after the first date of publication of this summons, and if you fail to appear and defend, the plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint. The object of the complaint and the demand for relief are: The plaintiff seeks to foreclose its trust deed on the subject real property described in the complaint as described below in the amount of $143,053.50, plus interest, late charges, costs, advances, and attorney's fees, and to cause the subject property to be sold by the Sheriff of Deschutes County, foreclosing the interests of all defendants in the real property with the proceeds applied to satisfy Plaintiff's lien. The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), and the West 30 feet of Lot Four (4), Block Two (2), C. L. & D. RANCH TRACTS, recorded June 20, 1963, in Cabinet A, Page 106, Deschutes County, Oregon. Which currently has the address of 51599 Ash Road, La Pine, Oregon 97739. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. HERSHNER HUNTER, LLP By/s/Nancy K. Cary Nancy K. Cary, OSB 902254 Of Attorneys for Plaintiff 180 East 11th Avenue P.O. Box 1475 Eugene, Oregon 97440 Telephone: (541)686-8511 Fax: (541)344-2025 ncary@hershnerhunter.com First Publication Date: Sept. 3, 2010.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the matter of the Estate of RAYMOND LELAND BARNHART, Deceased, Case No. 09PB0163SF. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS notice is HEREBY GIVEN that SHARON MILLER-HICKSON has been appointed Administrator. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them with proper voucher attached to the administrator SHARON MILLER-HICKSON in care of David W. Smiley, 70 SW Century Drive, Suite 100-333, Bend, OR 97702 within four months after the date of first publication of this notice or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be effected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative or the attorneys for the Administrator SHARON MILLERHICKSON; David W. Smiley. Dated and first published Friday, August 27, 2010, DAVID W. SMILEY, OSB #954164, 70 SW Century Drive, Suite 100-333, Bend, OR 97702 Tel: 541-318-1288 Fax: 541-318-1289 E-mail: david@dwsmiley.com

LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 819

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of Trust Administration of MORRIS L. CASE, Deceased, Case No. 09PB0068ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned is the Trustee for the Morris L. Case Trust of which Morris L. Case was the Trustor. All persons having claims against the trust estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Trustee at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred.

DAVID BEARDSLEY Trustee HURLEY RE, P.C. Attorneys at Law 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702 Phone: 541-317-5505 / Fax: 541-317-5507

CONSOLIDATED TOWING 1000 SE 9TH ST., BEND, OR 2007 FORD ECON VAN VIN = IFTNE14W87DB38612 Amount due on lien $1615.00 Reputed owner(s): TUTTI FRUITI LLC FIRST CITIZENS AUTO FINANCE IN LEGAL NOTICE Request for Comments Proposed Approval of Cleanup at Former Hap Taylor and Sons Office COMMENTS DUE: 5 p.m. on October 1, 2010 PROJECT LOCATION: 62975 Boyd Acres Road, Bend, Oregon PROPOSAL: The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality proposes to approve a cleanup of petroleum in soil at the Former Hap Taylor and Sons Office. DEQ has determined that the site meets state requirements to protect human health and the environment and that no further action is needed at the site. HIGHLIGHTS: : The Site was originally developed in 1993

HOW TO COMMENT: : The project file may be reviewed by appointment at DEQ's Bend Office, 475 NE Bellevue Drive, Suite 110, Bend, Oregon 97701. To schedule an appointment to review the file or ask questions, please contact Marcy Kirk at 541-633-2009. To access site summary information and the staff report in DEQ's Environmental Cleanup Site Information (ECSI) database on the Internet, go to http://www.deq.state.or.us/ lq/ECSI/ecsiquery.asp, then enter 4855 in the Site ID box and click "Submit" at the bottom of the page. Next, click the link labeled 4855 in the Site ID/Info column. Send written comments by 5 p.m., October 1, 2010 to Marcy Kirk, Project Manager at the above address or to kirk.marcy@deq.state.or.us.

consider all public comments received by the close of the comment period before making a final decision regarding the "No Further Action" determination. ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION: DEQ is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Please notify DEQ of any special physical or language accommodations or if you need information in large print, Braille or another format. To make these arrangements, contact DEQ Communications and Outreach (503) 229-5696 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452-4011; fax to 503-229-6762; or e-mail to deqinfo@deq.state.or.us. People with hearing impairments may call the Oregon Telecommunications Relay Service at 1-800-735-2900. Give the phone number (541-633-2009).

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-09-283904-SH

Legal Notice On September 4th, 2010, at 10:00 am at 257 SE 2nd St., Alliance Storage, LLC, will handle the disposition of the entire contents of Units #35 - 5x10 John Tonkin, #415 Kelly Oberst, Fine Carpentry, to satisfy said lein of the above named. LEGAL NOTICE Oregon Clean Water Revolving Fund Program (CWSRF)

State Loan

ACCEPTANCE OF ANOTHER AGENCY'S ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW Three Sisters Irrigation District - Main Canal Piping Project Fish Passage and Channel Restoration The Three Sisters Irrigation District (TSID) in Deschutes County has applied for a CWSRF for portions of the above referenced project as part of their Main Canal Piping Project. The project analyzed within the Environmental Assessment consists of screening the existing canal, installing habitat structures, altering the existing dam, raising channel bed, reconfiguring channel and floodplain dimensions, and removing or burying the existing crib dam within the project area. The Forest Service issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for this project dated 1/11/10. The Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), in accordance with the State Environmental Review Process, (SERP) has determined that the above referenced project qualifies as accepting another agency's environmental determination. The CWSRF project file contains the Environmental Assessment, Forest Service's FONSI, the project is largely unchanged, and Forest Service's determination has occurred within the past 5 years. Accepting Forest Service's FONSI exempts this project from further environmental review. Per Forest Service's FONSI, no significant environmental impacts have been identified and no further environmental analysis is required at this time. DEQ finds that the project, as proposed, is consistent with accepting environmental reviews from another agency set forth in the CWSRF SERP.

Should any new information come to light, this accepting All persons whose rights may Forest Service's FONSI debe affected by the proceedtermination is subject to reings may obtain additional consideration. information from the records of the court, the trustee, or Requests for information about the lawyers for the trustee, this environmental review Ryan P. Correa. should be addressed to: Dated and first published on Sept. 3, 2010.

Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 9/8/2010. The sale will be held at 10:00am by:

by Hap Taylor and Sons and used as the corporate headquarters. Operations on the site included heavy and small equipment repair and maintenance, including vehicle repair and washing. Site investigation and remediation activities conducted in 2007 included decommissioning and replacing dry wells, removing soil underlying the waste oil drain station, soil removal in-between two storage buildings, and soil removal on the southern property boundary. Constituents of concern include total heavy oil range petroleum hydrocarbons. The City of Bend currently owns the site.

Marc Thalaker Three Sisters Irrigation District PO Box 2230 Sisters, OR 97759 Phone (541) 549-8815 Comments on this determination should be addressed to: Oregon DEQ Shanna Bailey 700 S.E. Emigrant, Suite 330 Pendleton, OR 97801 Comments must be received in writing by 5 PM on Monday, October 4, 2010.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LINDA D. FRANTZ & DAVID P. FRANTZ as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOAN CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/18/2006, recorded 1/25/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-05724,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100370 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 2 OF EDGECLIFF, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1886 NE SNOWBIRD COURT BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,216.43 Monthly Late Charge $93.49 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $282,000.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 1/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/27/2010 at the hour of 1:00 pm, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/27/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/27/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/20/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3704919 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, September 3, 2010 F7

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7436068548 T.S. No.: OR-218255-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RICK C. HINMAN as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of M&T MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/30/2003, recorded 6/6/2003, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2003-37888 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 124364 Parcel "D" Block 12 Redmond Heights Addition, Deschutes County Oregon, situate in the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4 SW 1/4) of Section 20, Township 15 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian and now to be more particularly described as follows; Beginning at a 1/2" by 18" iron rod at the Southwest comer of said Block 12, said point also being the Initial Point, the Point of Beginning, and the Southwest corner of Parcel "D"; thence North 00º27'00" West along the East Right of Way line of 35th Street 95.00 feet to a 1/2" by 18" iron rod at the Northwest corner of said Parcel "D"; thence North 89º29'00" East along the South line of Parcel "C" of said Block 12 -113.69 feet to a 1/2" by 18" iron rod on the West line of Parcel "A" of said Block 12; thence South 00º27 W East along the West line of said Parcel "A" 95.00 feet to a 1/2" by 18" iron rod on the North Right of Way line of Wickiup Avenue; thence South 89º29'00" West along the North Right of Way line of said Wickiup Avenue, 113.69 feet to the Point of Beginning.Commonly known as: 3487 SW WICKIUP AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $100,421.79; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $854.53 Monthly Late Charge $35.21 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $100,421.79 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 6/12/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Donna Fitton Signature ByAuthorized Signatory ASAP# 3612054 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No,: T10-65381-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LESLIE GIACCI as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 0926-2006, recorded 10-04-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-66877 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated m said County and State, to-wit: APN: 204036 LOT 42, WESTSIDE MEADOWS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2950 NW CHARDONNAY LANE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real properly to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 08/01 '2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES .AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,154.78 Monthly Late Charge $75.37 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $268.000.00 together with interest thereon as the rate of 6.75% per annum from 07-01-2009 until paid; plus all seemed late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant 10 the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, no-

tice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12-16-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM. Standard of Time, as established by section ] 87.110. Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OH 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named m Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 04, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 BY: MARIA DE LA TORRE ASAP# 3695539 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-65612-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN N. HOWE AND JODI A. HOWE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, AND CARL T. HOWE as Grantor to RE/MAX EQUITY GROUP INC., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE' ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-25-2006, recorded 06-01-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-38167 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206917 LOT TWO (2), DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING, PHASE I Commonly known as: 19805 WETLAND COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IM-

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FM-92318 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CRAIG A. WALKER AND LINDA P. A. WALKER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NORTH COUNTY REAL ESTATE DBA HMC FUNDING, as beneficiary, dated 12/15/2006, recorded 12/27/2006, under Instrument No. 2006Â83906, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon (fka The Bank of New York) as Trustee on behalf of CIT Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK ONE (1) OF BUCKNER ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE SOUTHERLY 1.5 FEET. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1550 NORTHWEST RIMROCK DRIVE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 6, 2010 12 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2009 $ 24,176.79 (09-01-09 through 08-06-10) Late Charges: $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 9,513.32 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 33,690.11 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $198,343.25, PLUS interest thereon at 7.990% per annum from 8/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 8/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3686933 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010

POUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 04/01,7010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $ 1,886.93 Monthly Late Charge $63.88 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $243,946.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 03-01-2010 until paid: plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12-20-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.1 10. Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest m the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred),, together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: August 09, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 By: Sophia Ochoa ASAP# 3695541 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441838760 T.S. No.: OR-218265-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ALANE HARROLD as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/18/2006, recorded 7/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-52297 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 246079 LOT 163 OBSIDIAN ESTATES NO. 4, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2829 SW OBSIDIAN LANE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $217,532.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,540.06 Monthly Late Charge $67.97 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $217,532.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.5% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of

said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 6/12/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3612028 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0477202659 T.S. No.: OR-218256-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL S. GAROUTTE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 5/8/2008, recorded 5/27/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-22904 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 249702 LOT 130, ASPEN RIM, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON TAX ID # 249702 Commonly known as: 19695 HOLLYGRAPE ST. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $406,453.55; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,849.58 Monthly Late Charge $119.66 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $406,453.55 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary

pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon

Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated:

6/12/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3612013 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-109032 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, D'ANNA MARIE ALCOCER-FRASER, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 4/17/2008, recorded 4/21/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-17280, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY TWO (142), OBSIDIAN ESTATES NO. 4, RECORDED OCTOBER 29, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 488, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2946 SW OBSIDIAN LANE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 6 payments at $ 1,653.01 each $ 9,918.06 (03-01-10 through 08-03-10) Late Charges: $ 10.0 0 TOTAL: $ 9,928.06 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 3/1/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $156,540.74, PLUS interest thereon at 12.010% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 10, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110. at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 8/3/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 By:Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3680665 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patrick M. Gisler, as grantor, to West Coast 1000 1000 1000 Trust as trustee, in favor of West Coast Bank, as beneficiary, dated October 4, 2005, recorded October 7, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices 2005-68636, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: LEGAL NOTICE See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated by this reference herein. TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Real property commonly known as 19555 Pinehurst Road, Bend, OR 97701. 09-103459 The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligaA default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Joel A. McCabe and Michele A. tions secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon ReMcCabe, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in vised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay favor of Wilmington Finance, a division of AIG Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March when due the following sums: Loan No. 6001774: Failure to make full annual payments pursuant 15, 2004, recorded March 22, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2004-15163, beneficial interest having been assigned to MorEquity, Inc., as coverto the terms of the Promissory Note, Trust Deed and accompanying loan documents . The existing the following described real property: ing payment defaults and the current default amounts owing upon the Promissory Note as of Lot One Hundred Four, Valleyview, December 14, 2009 are: Deschutes County, Oregon. Outstanding payment balance $62,550.75 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: Late charges $8,131.58 2434 S.W. 34th Drive, Redmond, OR 97756 Total $70,682.33 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obli- By reason of these defaults , the beneficiary has and does hereby declare all sums owing on the obgations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon ligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to to wit: pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,854.85, from August 1, Principle Balance:$669,662.77 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary Accrued Interest:$57,673.61 and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has Late Charges:$8,131.58 declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payTotal: $735,467.96 * able, said sum being the following, to-wit: $230,985.36, together with interest thereon at the rate *Total does not include accrued interest at the rate of $134.39 per diem from December 14, 2009, of 5.53% per annum from July 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees inadditional late charges, expenditures, or trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff curred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREamount as of a specific date is available upon request. FORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 11, 2010, at the hour of On January 11, 2010 Patrick M. Gisler filed a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy petition as Bankruptcy Case No. 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance 10-10299-LBR in the United States Bankruptcy Court District of Nevada. The case was transferred of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, to the Oregon Bankruptcy Court on April 12, 2010 and is now known as Bankruptcy Case No. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the in10-33202-elp7. On July 30, 2010, the Oregon Bankruptcy Court entered an Order granting the terest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the beneficiary, West Coast Bank, relief from the automatic stay to continue the foreclosure. On May time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc14, 2010, the trustee indefinitely postponed the original sale by oral proclamation. This Amended cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligaNotice of Sale is being issued pursuant to ORS 86.757(9). tions thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any 2010, at the hour of 2:00 p.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default ocsaid described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by cution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and exobligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by penses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees the trustee. and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the pluthan five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed ral, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perand the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of son owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is alis capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust lowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that deed. the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their after giving you notice of the requirement .If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser respective successors in interest, if any. may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day noErich M. Paetsch tice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day P.O. Box 470 notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at Salem, OR 97308-0470 least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot proDated:24th, August, 2010. vide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the exist/s/Erich M. Paetsch ence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September Erich M. Paetsch 11, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. FedSuccessor Trustee eral law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your se- State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. curity deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original amended trustee's intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the notice of sale. Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, /s/Erich M. Paetsch you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free Erich M. Paetsch legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR. 16037 S.W. Upper Boones Ferry Exhibit "A" Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, Phone (503) 620-0222, Toll-free 1-800-452-8260 Website: http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org The Fair Being a portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, Section 25, Township 16 South, Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly debt, and any information obtained will be used fir that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained described as follows: by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 6/8/10 By: Beginning at the East Quarter corner to Section 25, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, the true point of beginning; thence South 00° 04' Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone:(360) 260-2253 42" West, 1227.84 feet along the East line of said Section 25 to the Northeasterly right-of-way of Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-103459 Highway 20; thence North 67° 21' 57" West, 1110.29 feet along said right-of-way; thence North 00° 04' 16" East, 802.65 feet to the East-West mid-section line of said Section 25, the centerline ASAP# 3605377 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010 of Pinehurst Road; thence South 89° 53' 19" East, 1025.35 feet to the true point of beginning.


F8 Friday, September 3, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031221237 T.S. No.: 10-09855-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DEBRA J. BRAWNER, BRIAN J. BRAWNER, WIFE AND HUSBAND as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on June 30, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-45373 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 118064 THE NORTH 20 FEET OF TRACT 21, GLEN VISTA, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, EXCEPT THE EASTERLY 227.85 FEET TOGETHER WITH THE EASTERLY 227.85 FEET OF TRACT 21, AND THE WESTERLY 150.0 FEET OF TRACT 20, GLEN VISTA, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63330 OB RILEY RD., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,217.20 Monthly Late Charge $110.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 562,640.13 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.44100 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on December 10, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, TusÂ

tin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 13, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3697552 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602571397 T.S. No.: OR-218348-V Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DON D. TRENT, MARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE INVESTORS CORPORATION A OHIO CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 12/8/2009, recorded 12/28/2009, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2009-54355 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 257255 ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT NINETEEN(19), VISTA DORADO, RECORDED MAY 10, 2007, IN CABINET H, PAGE 323, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2655 NE 3RD ST. REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $119,150.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $615.93 Monthly Late Charge $21.40 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $119,150.00 together with interest thereon

at the rate of 3.5% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 6/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3611344 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FFF-96920 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LEONARD C. MOE AND MARY M. MOE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of FINANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FUNDING CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 3/19/2007, recorded 3/23/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-17093, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 23, T. 16S., R. HE., W.M., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON WHICH IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE EAST 1/4 CORNER OF SAID SECTION 23; THENCE S57º 24' 28" W 225.87'; THENCE S 62º 38' 48" W 11.19' TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 08º 36' 17" W 57.15'; THENCE S 35º 15' 37" W 157.36'; THENCE S 31º 01' 22" W 212.49"; THENCE S 64º 21' 21" W 49.77"; THENCE S 08º 19' 01" W 206.77"; THENCE S 89º 53' 10" W 169.72'; THENCE N 00º 29' 50" W 107.27"; THENCE S 89º 53' 11" W 320.85"; THENCE S 70º 03' 49" W 348.64'; THENCE N 00º 00* 41" W 403.02'; THENCE N 82º 41' 05" E 290.72'; THENCE N 85º 52' 22" E 123.69'; THENCE S 84º 35' 11" E 123.61'; THENCE S 83º 37' 23" E 147.06'; THENCE N 82º 24' 54" E 91.90'; THENCE N 64º 45' 10" E 157.24'; THENCE N 60º 48' 12" E 216.74' TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 7.91 ACRES . The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19189 DAYTON ROAD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 27, 2010 Total Amount Due $ 359,467.92 Accrued Late Charges $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 359,467.92 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 5/25/09, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 7 (A), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 29, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 7/27/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3671235 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601948999 T.S. No.: OR-219137-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL K. DAHL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. A OREGON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 12/21/2007, recorded 12/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-66576 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 252281 PARCEL 2 OF PARTITION PLAT 2006-16, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1160 SW CANYON DRIVE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $310,562.75; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,955.81 Monthly Late Charge $85.03 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $310,562.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.875% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon

Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3644064 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010, 09/17/2010, 09/24/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1000089871 T.S. No.: OR-249689-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STUART N. KITZMILLER AND VICTORIA C. KITZMILLER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 4/26/2007, recorded 5/4/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-25706 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 240177 LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE (143), NORTHWEST CROSSING, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1530 NW LEPAGE PLACE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $415,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,498.38 Monthly Late Charge $103.75 By this reason of said default the

beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $415,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 11/1/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 6/10/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3609832 08/13/2010, 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Patrick M. Gisler, as grantor, to West Coast Trust as trustee, in favor of West Coast Bank, as beneficiary, dated October 4, 2005, recorded October 7, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2005-68638, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: See Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated by this reference herein. Real property commonly known as Bareland, Bend, OR 97701, real property tax identification number 16-11-25-00-00702; 132175, Code 2-007. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. 6001775: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of December 5, 2007. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $210,000.00 Interest $6,700.50 Total $216,700.50* *Total does not include interest at the rate of $21.58 per diem from December 14, 2009, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. On January 11, 2010 Patrick M. Gisler filed a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy petition as Bankruptcy Case No. 10-10299-LBR in the United States Bankruptcy Court District of Nevada. The case was transferred to the Oregon Bankruptcy Court on April 12, 2010 and is now known as Bankruptcy Case No. 10-33202-elp7. On July 30, 2010, the Oregon Bankruptcy Court entered an Order granting the beneficiary, West Coast Bank, relief from the automatic stay to continue the foreclosure. On May 14, 2010, the trustee indefinitely postponed the original sale by oral proclamation. This Amended Notice of Sale is being issued pursuant to ORS 86.757(9). WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2010, at the hour of 2:10 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470 Dated:24th, August, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Erich M. Paetsch Successor Trustee State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original amended trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Attorney for said Trustee Exhibit "A" Minor Partition MP 78-15, Parcel 2, more particularly described as follows: Being a portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter, Section 25, Township 16, South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the East quarter corner of Section 25, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 89°53'19" West, 1025.35 feet along the East-West midsection line; thence South 00°04'16" West, 30.00 feet to the South right-of-way of Pinehurst Road, the True Point of Beginning; thence South 00°04'16" West, 772.65 feet to the Northeasterly right-of-way of Highway 20; thence North 67°21'57" West, 160.55 feet along said right-of-way; thence South 22° 38' 03" West, 20.00 feet; thence North 67° 21' 57" West, 158.17 feet to the West line of the Northeast quarter corner Southeast quarter, Section 25; thence North 00°04'16" East, 668.94 feet to the South right-of-way of Pinehurst Road; thence South 89°53'19" East, 302.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to a certain trust deed ("Trust Deed") made, executed and delivered by Theodore R. Lynch and Karyn L. Lynch, as grantor, to AmeriTitle, as trustee, in favor of GFP Enterprises, Inc., its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated November 7, 2008, and recorded on November 10, 2008, as Document No. 2008-45120, in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said trust deed was assigned to Donald R. Pollard by that certain Assignment of Deed of Trust by Beneficiary dated June 30, 2009, and recorded on July 9, 2009, as Document No. 2009-29029 in the Mortgage Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property ("Property") situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot Twenty-one (21), Block Eight (8) of HIGHLAND ADDITION, recorded March 3, 1916, in Cabinet A, Page 211, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Arrearage in the sum of $279,619.06 as of June 3, 2010, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on November 7, 2009. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Payoff in the sum of $279,619.06 as of June 3, 2010, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on November 7, 2009. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 4, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. DATED: June 3, 2010 Michelle M. Bertolino, Successor Trustee Farleigh Wada Witt 121 SW Morrison, Suite 600 Portland, OR 97204 Phone: 503-228-6044; fax: 503-228-1741 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FSS-98370 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SARAH B. CRESON, SCOTT C. CRESON, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as beneficiary, dated 3/9/2007, recorded 3/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-15269, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK 2, NASU PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 62906 NASU PARK LOOP BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,408.96 each $ 7,044.80 2 payments at $ 1,401.96 each $ 2,803.92 (02-01-10 through 08-06-10) Late Charges: $ 283.80 Beneficiary Advances: $ 42.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 10,174.52 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid ail senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $217,943.23, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 01/01/10 to 7/1/2010, 6.25% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 9, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 8/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee ByCHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3686369 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-98137 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SHEILA M. MYERS, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 8/22/2006, recorded 8/30/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-59680, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR14, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006- AR14 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated October 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK TWENTY-NINE (29) OF BOULEVARD ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 804 NORTHWEST HARMON BOULEVARD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 4, 2010 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 3,995.83 each $ 19,979.15 (04-01-10 through 08-04-10) Late Charges: $ 1,398.53 Beneficiary Advances: $ 33.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 21,410.68 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $685,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 3/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 7, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 8/4/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 981 04 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3682519 08/20/2010, 08/27/2010, 09/03/2010, 09/10/2010


EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

R E S TAU R A N T S : A review of Cafe Alfresco in Redmond, PAGE 10

The Portland band is at the Tower Theatre, PAGE 3

MOVIES: ‘The American’ and two others open, PAGE 25


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

inside

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

Cover photo courtesy Alicia J. Rose

FINE ARTS • 12

OUT OF TOWN • 21

• Art show benefits new charity • Wordy artists sought • Showcase previews performances • “Rent” auditions coming up • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• Portland Opera offers double feature • A guide to out of town events

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

MUSIC • 3

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a Web site, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

• COVER STORY: The Thermals get down at Tower Theatre • Feedback doesn’t dig Dylan show • Curtis Salgado in Black Butte Ranch • If Bears Were Bees plays several gigs • The Physical Hearts at Silver Moon • Fruition heads to McMenamins • Rise Up plans show, concert

GAMING • 24 • Review of “Mafia II” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25 OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8

CALENDAR • 16

• Guide to area clubs

ADVERTISING

• A week full of Central Oregon events

541-382-1811

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

• “The American,” “Going the Distance” and “Machete” open in Central Oregon • “Harry Brown” and “Marmaduke” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• Take a look at recent releases

• Make your plans for later on

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Cafe Alfresco in Redmond

TALKS & CLASSES • 20 • Learn something new

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GO! MAGAZ INE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

PAGE 3

music

The Thermals are, from left, Hutch Harris, Westin Glass and Kathy Foster. Courtesy Alicia J. Rose

Catching on The Thermals have a style T of music that’s loud and fun

By Eleanor Pierce T h e B u llet in

he last time Portland band The Thermals played in Bend was in 2004, when they performed at the Domino Room. It was an after-party for the indie rock mega-show at the Les Schwab Amphitheater featuring the Pixies, Death Cab for Cutie and the Decemberists. At the time, the trio — sometimes described as power-pop, pop-punk, modern rock or indie-punk, to name a few — had released two fairly well-received albums on the label Sub Pop.

In the six years since, the band has changed drummers a handful of times, left Sub Pop for another Northwest label, Kill Rock Stars, and released two more albums. One of those albums, “The Body, The Blood, The Machine,” made many Best-of-2006 lists, including the lists put out by Spin magazine and the music websites Pitchfork and the A.V. Club. The album was a change for the band, which had previously created simple music born of a love of all things loud, fast and fun. C ont i nued Page 5

If you go What: The Thermals with The Autonomics When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $15 plus fees, available through the Tower Contact: 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

music Rise Up gets ready for concert, fashion show Another week, another fun event to benefit the good works of Rise Up International, the local nonprofit that helps impoverished folks in other places and supports the local arts scene. This week, the spot is Boondocks Bar & Grill, Thursday at 7 p.m. Plans include a fashion show featuring Rise Up’s own line of clothing, as well as duds from Vanilla Urban Threads. Jams will be provided by nowformer Bend indie-rockers The Dirty Words (they just moved to Portland last week), local psychedelic Pop-Tarts Yenn, and local pop-punk fun dudes Capture the Flag, plus DJ R2 from Portland. Sounds fun! Rise Up Fashion Show and Concert; 7 p.m . Thursday ; $ 5 ; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Av e., Bend; art@ riseupinternational.com or www.riseupinternational.com.

Seattle’s TJ Grant makes the rounds If gigs in Bend were gold, then If Bears Were Bees would be a rich man. That sentence makes no sense, but that’s OK. Because If Bears Were Bees — the nom de tune of Seattle singer-songwriter TJ Grant — makes perfect sense, assuming you understand fun, passion, emotion and catchy songs. Grant is still young, but already has 10 albums under his belt, including five under the If Bears Were Bees name, where urgent, wordy indie-rock meets

feeling you’re hearing when Salgado sings, you’re right. Learn more about this impressive man and musician at www.curtissalgado.com. Curtis Salgado; 6-9 p.m. Sunday; $18 advance, available at the Black Butte Ranch welcome center or by phone, $20 day of show, $10 ages 6 -1 2 , free 5 and younger; Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard Road, Sisters; 541-595-1510 or www .blackbutteranch.com/concerts.

Portland bands play in Bend

TJ Grant, aka If Bears Were Bees Submitted photo

folk-punk. Think Modest Mouse and Neutral Milk Hotel blended with the fervor of Frank Turner and the fragility of Danny Malone, and you’re in the right ballpark. The Maui Times called him “Fiona Apple with an adam’s apple.” This weekend, Grant will be all over Bend, playing as a solo act. You can catch him today at Bend Brewing Co. (1019 N.W. Brooks St.) at noon, or at 4:30 tonight at Country Catering (900 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend) with Mosley Wotta. On Saturday, Grant will play from 10 a.m. to noon at Rockin’ Daves Bagels (661 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend), and on Sun-

day, he’ll play a dinner gig from 4 to 6 p.m. at 10 Barrel Brewing (1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend). All shows are free. Study up at www.ifbears werebees.com, where you can find MP3s and links to Grant’s MySpace, Facebook and so on.

Salgado closes Black Butte series Black Butte Ranch’s “Live at the Ranch” series has had a fine summer, bringing an eclectic quartet of Northwest musicians — John Nilsen, Misty River and Dan Balmer among them — to the resort northwest of Sisters. Alas, all good things must end

(it’s August and I can see snow in the mountains as I write this), and “Live at the Ranch” will go out with a bang Sunday as renowned Oregon bluesman Curtis Salgado closes out the series. Salgado should be no stranger to, well, anyone really. He’s best known for being John Belushi’s inspiration for the Blues Brothers, but he’s no caricature; Salgado is a real-deal bluesman with a prodigiously soulful voice, stunning harmonica skills, and enough swagger to power 1,000 hip-hop videos. He cut his teeth alongside Robert Cray and Santana and, most recently, survived a tough battle with cancer. So if you think that’s real, gritty

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• When folks hear that a band is twangy, it conjures up images of steel guitars, tears in beers, and about as much soul as a car crash. But The Physical Hearts are different. The Portland-based band plays likable, Americanadelic lullabies, but with a touch of soul influence often missing in that world. The primary culprit is frontman Nathaniel Talbot, who is credited on MySpace as the man behind the “croons” and “hot licks.” Hear for yourself at www.thephysicalhearts.band camp.com, then see them Saturday at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend). 9 p.m. $4. • More rootsy Northwest soul for your earholes! Say hello to Fruition, a band from Portland that uses string-band instrumentation and wonderfully tight harmonies to power its rambling jamgrass train. Check it: www .myspace.com/fruitionstring band. If you dig Hot Buttered Rum, Yonder Mountain String Band, etc., — and let’s be honest, you probably do — you owe it to yourself to check out Fruition when they play three nights in a row next week at McMenamins Old St. Francis School (700 N.W. Bond St., Bend) as part of the venue’s new residency series. They’ll be there Wednesday, Thursday and Sept. 10; each show is at 7 p.m., and each is free. — Ben Salmon

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GO! MAGAZINE •

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PAGE 5

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McConnaughy’s house, features Carrie Brownstein, former member of the disbanded all-female indie rock trio Sleater-Kinney as well as Isaac Brock, frontman for Modest Mouse. What is it about Portland that creates so many successful bands? Among other things, Foster said, she thinks Portland’s gray weather helps. “The weather is conducive to working on music and art,” she said. “In the summer people aren’t very productive.” Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.

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But even on songs that speak to some of the yuckier stuff we lovers have to deal with, like the paranoid single “I Don’t Believe You,” The Thermals tend to keep their sound decidedly danceable, the kind of songs that get stuck in your head. “We like to write songs that are loud and fast and catchy,” Foster said. When Harris started The Thermals, she said “he wanted to write songs that people could sing along to.” The Thermal’s video for “I Don’t Believe You,” available on YouTube, features other wellknown Portland musicians. The video, which was produced on a low budget in director Whitey

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From Page 3 “The Body,” on the other hand, took shape as a concept album telling the story of a young couple fleeing a U.S. that had been taken over by fascist faux-Christians. “‘The Body’s’ story is just vague and gruesome enough to be weirdly terrifying, totally Orwellian, and grander, louder, and more electrifying than anything The Thermals have spit out before,” Pitchfork wrote at the time of the album’s release. The band’s latest album, “Personal Life,” drops Tuesday, just a day before the trio play here in Bend at the Tower Theatre (see “If you go”). The Thermals are coming to Bend as part of the PDXchange program, a concert series that brings popular Portland indie bands to town. This is the fourth in the series, which kicked off in May. The latest Thermals album doesn’t deal with any of the heavy socio-political themes found on “The Body,” but instead delves into the subject of the first songs ever sung (we’d venture to guess): Love. “It’s about love and relationships,” band bassist Kathy Foster said about the album, “but it’s kind of not from this happy perspective.” Foster is one of the original members of the band, along with singer and guitarist Hutch Harris. The band’s latest drummer (they’ve had four, and Foster herself played drums on a couple of albums) is Westin Glass. “It’s the darker side of relationships; the anger and the desperation and all these different things you can feel when you’re with someone and it’s going downhill,” Foster said.

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PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

music

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

John Mellencamp and his band perform while opening for Bob Dylan during a concert at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater last week.

MASTER CRAFTSMEN Mellencamp, Dylan show distinctly different styles in Bend J Feedback ohn Mellencamp deserves more ink than he’ll get in this edition of Feedback. That’s what happens when you open for the world’s greatest living songwriter, a cultural giant named Bob Dylan. Even when you blow Dylan off the stage, as Mellencamp did last weekend at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater, you can expect to get short shrift in post-show discussions. As has been the case

BY BEN SALMON

for almost half a century, folks feel drawn to watch Bob Dylan, to talk about him and parse his every move.

But Mellencamp deserves love, too. Now 35 years into his career, the Indianan, political activist and former Cougar has seen his critical acclaim and commercial success wax and wane, but very few current, active songwriters boast as full a quiver of wellknown tunes. In stark contrast to Friday night’s headliner, Mellencamp’s a people-pleaser, a heartland populist unafraid to pump his

fist and play to the crowd. Under Bend’s sunny but crisply chilly skies, he connected with the 5,000-plus people at the Schwab, kicking off his set with “Little Pink Houses” as folks rose from their blankets and chairs to sing and clap and dance along. From there, he left no stone unturned except “Jack and Diane,” which caused some grumbling in the lengthy food and bathroom lines after the set. He led his

band through sharp renditions of “Paper In Fire” and “Check It Out,” with Lisa Germano’s fiddle prominent in the mix. He conducted the audience in an a cappella singalong of the first verse and chorus of “Cherry Bomb” and did “Small Town” solo on an acoustic guitar, changing up the lyrics to joke that his wife — model Elaine Irwin — was 13 when he wrote the song. Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

PAGE 7

music From previous page He also showed he’s not just a relic of the 1980s, performing a couple of cuts from his new album “No Better Than This,” a stripped-down, rustic folk record that’s been getting rave reviews. The highlight was “Save Some Time To Dream,” with its wise, world-weary message and pretty melody that recalled, at times, Bob Marley’s “Songs of Freedom.” It was expertly delivered, and proof that, as he enters the twilight of his career, Mellencamp the songwriter is as vital as ever. And Mellencamp the performer can still wow with his energy, an impressive feat for a man who’ll turn 59 this fall. He played with fervor, thanked his fans for their support, and executed an array of jumps, kicks and punches, looking like an amalgam of Bruce Springsteen, Jack Nicholson and Jackie Chan. As he closed with a spirited version of “Authority Song,” he looked like he was genuinely having fun, and I couldn’t help but be drawn in. That was exactly what I missed from Dylan’s set, which kicked off right around 8:30 p.m., just as the skies darkened and the temperature dropped. First, though, let’s get two things out of the way: 1) I hold Dylan’s songwriting and recorded works in just as high regard as anyone else. I think he’s arguably the greatest songwriter ever, and one of the most important American cultural figures of the 21st century. Never would I question his place atop pop music’s pantheon. 2) I knew going into the concert that seeing Dylan in 2010 is a mixed bag, and I tried to set my expectations at a reasonable level. As someone said to me on Saturday, Dylan’s shows these days are more about honoring his past than enjoying his present. I get that. Like many folks, I attended not to be blown away, but because it’s Bob freakin’ Dylan, man.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

John Mellencamp puts on a set rich with energy at Les Sc hw ab Amphitheater.

(John) Mellencamp the performer can still wow with his energy, an impressive feat for a man who’ll turn 59 this fall. ... As he closed with a spirited version of “Authority Song,” he looked like he was genuinely having fun, and I couldn’t help but be drawn in. But I guess neither of those caveats were enough to buoy my feelings about his set. Don’t get me wrong, his band sounded solid, alternately tight and ragged in all the right places. Charlie Sexton is a nonchalant wizard on lead guitar, and Dylan himself provided some of the night’s highlights whenever he sat at the keyboard and colored his tunes with gurgling texture. Song selection was strong, too, covering different eras of the

man’s expansive career. He led off with “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35” and “Positively 4th Street,” cranked up the energy mid-set with “Highway 61 Revisited,” and closed the night with the iconic “Like A Rolling Stone,” sprinkling in newer songs throughout the set. But for me, there was no connection there. Nothing I could grab onto. It’s almost as if Dylan’s oeuvre is the skeleton for a great show, and that band fills in the vital organs, pumping blood and brain waves into the night. But in 2010, there simply is no meat at a Bob Dylan show. Blasphemy, I know. Here are my beefs: First, I knew Dylan’s voice wasn’t going to be great. Heck, it wasn’t great in 1966. But it has deteriorated into a howl so rough and atonal, it’s impossible to make out words or melodies unless you already know them. Second, I knew he would interact only minimally with the audience, and he did. Besides singing and introducing the band, he said exactly four words into the microphone: “Well thank you, friends.” Even in between songs, the stage lights darkened, hiding whatever was happening onstage. The guy simply keeps the curtain drawn as much as possible. That’s all fine. Everyone ages, and their skills decline. I understand that. Bob Dylan has been playing for adoring crowds for a long time, and he’s always let his music do the talking rather than between-song banter. I understand that, too. Doesn’t mean I have to like it. But lots of people do. And that’s why Dylan can stay on his Never Ending Tour for as long as he so desires, and his blindly faithful congregation of fans will see him, blissfully unconcerned that it’s not really Bob Dylan they’ve come to see, but the songs of Bob Dylan, and the cult of Bob Dylan. Ben Salmon can be reached at bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

NorthWest Crossing SATURDAY FARMERS MARKET Every Saturday! June 26 - September 25 • 10 am - 2 pm live music • delicious food • fresh produce • artisan cheese and eggs • orchardfresh fruit • herbs • meat • baked goods and so much more!

Location: NorthWest Crossing Neighborhood Center www.nwxevents.com

Upcoming Concerts Sept. 10-12 — Sisters Folk Festival (folk), Sisters, www. sistersfolkfestival.com. Sept. 17 — Willie Nelson (country), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, 541-322-9383 or www. bendconcerts.com. Sept. 19 — D.R.I. (thrash), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Sept. 21 — Atmosphere (hiphop), Midtown Ballroom, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Sept. 22 — Truth & Salvage Company (roots-rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Sept. 23-26 — Bend Roots Revival (local music), Century Center, Bend, www.bendroots.net. Sept. 24 — Against Me! (agitarena rock), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Sept. 29 — Blind Pilot (indie folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. pdxchangeprogram.com.

Oct. 5 — Cowboy Junkies (Americana), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 5 — The Devil Makes Three (whiskey-grass), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Oct. 6 — Greg Brown (folk), Tower Theatre, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Oct. 9 — Valient Thorr and Red Fang (hard rock), Domino Room, Bend, 541-788-2989. Oct. 10 — David Grisman Quintet (bluegrass), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.randompresents.com. Oct. 12 — Judy Collins (pop), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. Oct. 13 — Boulder Acoustic Society (indie folk), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. Oct. 19 — Jo Dee Messina (country), Tower Theatre, Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE: b c

Blues Country

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

h j

Hip-hop Jazz

m p

WEDNESDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328

10 Barrel Brewing 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., 541-678-5228 70 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-388-6999

Country Catering 900 S.E. Wilson Ave., 541-383-5014

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm TJ Grant, with MoWo, 4:30 pm r/p (P. 4) Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p

The Decoy 1051 N.W. Bond St., 5410318-4833

Deschutes Brewery 1044 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-9242 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., 541-389-1813 932 N.W. Bond St., 541-389-8899

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm

Tim Coffey, 7:30 pm j

Blues Quarter, 8 pm b

Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

JC’s 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Tony Smiley, 9 pm r/p

Blues Jam, 8 pm, signups 7:30 pm b

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

Fruition, 7 pm f (P. 4)

700 N.W Bond St., 541-382-5174 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Out of the Blue, 9 pm r/p Allan Byer, 7 pm r/p

2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777 18575 S.W. Century Drive, 541-382-8711

Out of the Blue, 9 pm r/p

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5:30 pm

j

Sweet Harlots, 6:30 pm f The Physical Hearts, 9 pm, $4 r/p (P. 4)

Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

Open mic with Dan Chavers, 6-8 pm

Strictly Organic Coffee Co. 6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

Taj Palace 917 N.W. Wall St., 541-330-0774

Belly Dancing w/Rasha, 7 pm Jam night, 7 pm

Third Street Pub 314 S.E. Third St., 541-306-3017

Tumalo Feed Co. 64619 U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-2202

Fruition, 7 pm f (P. 4)

Broken Stone Trio, 7-9 pm j

portello winecafe Seventh Mountain Resort

Free roll hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

DJ Steele, 9 pm dj DJ Harlo, 9 pm dj

McMenamins Old St. Francis Northside Pub

Lindy Gravelle, 6-9 pm c

Prairie Rockets, 2-3 pm, $6 f Bittercreek, 7:30 pm f

939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Two Thirds Trio, 7 pm j

Sagebrush Rock, 9 pm r/p Bend Jazz Trio, 7-10 pm j

Grover’s Pub

Madhappy Lounge

THURSDAY

Prairie Rockets, 5-7 pm f

Des Chutes Historical Museum Giuseppe’s

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Rise Up Concert, 7 pm, $5 r/p (P. 4)

Boondocks Bar & Grill

550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

r/p

Doug Ryhard, 6 pm r/p TJ Grant, 4-6 pm r/p (P. 4)

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

Bo Restobar

Metal Punk

Pat Thomas, 7 pm r/p

Pat Thomas, 7 pm r/p

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Cafe Alfresco 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., 541-923-2599

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Twins J.J. 535 S.W. Sixth St., 541-504-2575

David Santeangelo, 6 pm r/p Reno and Cindy Holler, 7-10 pm r/p

Lindy Gravelle, 7-10 pm c

Bellavia, 6-9 pm r/p Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj Dance w/Bob & Edi Rae, 5:30 pm, $10 f

VFW Hall 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, 541-548-4108

SISTERS Angeline’s Bakery 121 Main St., 541-549-9122

Brent Alan & His Funky Friends, 7 pm, $5

Sandy Saunders Band, 9 pm b

Reno and Cindy Holler, 6-9 pm r/p Sandy Saunders Band, 6 pm b

DJ Medina, 9:30 pm dj

DJ Medina, 9:30 pm dj

The Lodge at Suttle Lake 13300 U.S. Highway 20, 541-595-2628

Scoots Bar and Grill 175 Larch St., 541-549-1588

MADRAS Meet Market Pub 107 N.E. Cedar St., 541-475-1917

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 1 pm DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

Free roll hold ‘em tournament, 6 pm

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj

DJ music and karaoke w/ Maryoke, 9 pm dj


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 9

music releases

Autolux TRANSIT TRANSIT TBD Records There are bands that write songs, and there are bands that write sounds. The experimental L.A. rock act Autolux is firmly among the latter. Its 2004 debut “Future Perfect” was essentially a group exercise in using technology to re-imagine traditional instruments as a sleek monolith of detached feedback and brutal drumming. Even though six years have

passed, its follow-up “Transit Transit” only elaborates on that idea. By and large, this is a good thing. The band’s tone palette of dark blues and grays remains in place, with a new tilt toward found sounds and empty space — the minimalist drum machine patter of “High Chair” and the glitchy title track is ambitious and evocative. Drummer Carla Azar is still the real star here, even when dialed down in service of color and atmosphere. But Autolux’s main weakness — its refusal to go for the jugular and just write something catchy — still holds it back. Tracks like “Census” and “Kissproof” have some thrilling atonal noise blasts but can’t quite bolster unambitious melodies. Autolux clearly saves its affection for intricacy and sonic margins, but after six years you’d think it’d sound more eager for the spotlight. — August Brown, Los Angeles Times

Blake Shelton ALL ABOUT TONIGHT Warner Music Nashville Blake Shelton is not a stoic like Trace Adkins, a sunbleached hobo like Kenny Chesney or an avatar of rural pride like Jason Aldean. He’s not a guitar hero like Brad Paisley, a moody bruiser like Toby Keith or a repository of living history like George Strait. What a relief that turns out to be. Shelton is among the most versatile of contemporary country singers, an amiable rapscallion one minute and a thoughtful brooder the next. His new EP, “All About Tonight,” is a variety-pack of country styles, each song a different pose for Shelton to try out, with varying success. (It’s his second EP this year, after “Hillbilly Bone” in March.) On “All About Tonight” he’s soused, flirty and convincing: “Tomorrow can wait ‘til tomorrow,” he insists. But “Suffocating,” a slow dirgelike ballad about being stuck in the past, asks more of his voice than it’s prepared to give. That’s because as a singer, he wrings feeling from emphasis and flexibility, not strength. On “Got a

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

Wavves KING OF THE BEACH Fat Possum Records Fun in the sun rarely has been as dramatically dire as it is in the hands of laptop-pop maven Nathan Williams, the squeaky wheel that makes Wavves churn in noisy psychedelic fashion. Previous albums were rich in downbeat melodies, lo-fi production, forlorn lyrics, and dreamy falsettos only a sad, sandbox-bound Brian Wilson would love. Now, Williams has color-

fully brightened his sound and songcraft with major keys and bigger beats. While “Mickey

The Budos Band THE BUDOS BAND III Daptone Records When Staten Island’s The Budos Band went into the studio to record their third full-length album, they say, they worried it would be a psychedelic doomrock record. While “The Budos Band III” avoids that tag, the album’s 11 songs are characterized by an underlying tension and unease, with just a hint of doom. The 10-member instrumental group has always drawn heavily from Afrobeat, jazz, funk, and soul influences to create highly emotional and highly danceable

Here and there Tonight — Dante’s, Portland; 800-992-8499 or www.tickets west.com.

tracks, and “III” is no different. There’s the unmistakable sound of burgeoning Southern soul and New Orleans funk, a cross between the Meters and Booker T. & the MG’s. But this album also sees The Budos Band applying their trademark sound to unusual genres, such as the Eastern European waltz “Nature’s Wrath” and the downright

Dr. John

Little Country,” about seducing a city girl, he pronounces Manolo Blahniks “Milano Blahniks” though you sense he knows perfectly well what he’s doing: The gaffe is funnier. Really, mischief is Shelton’s game — it’s telling that the funniest song here is the one with his fiancee, Miranda Lambert. “Draggin’ the River” is about a couple who fake a car crash in order to steal away for a secret wedding — a tale that would make Tim McGraw and Faith Hill blush. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

Mouse” radiates the grandeur of the girl-group ’60s, the humworthy “Convertible Balloon” could have been used to sell Cokes and smiles during that same period. Still it’s the harshened mellow of sped-up Beach Boys-buoyant anthems with torn-down lyrics that makes Wavves a gray and gold treat. When Williams yelps “misery won’t you comfort me in my time of need” during “Post Acid,” it’s this generation’s version of “Surf’s up.” — A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

TRIBAL 429 Records In his last outing, 2008’s “The City That Care Forgot,” New Orleans pianist-singer-composerhoodoo guru Mac Rebennack, aka Dr. John, focused on the hardships and enduring joys of post-Katrina life in his battered but unbeaten hometown. He hasn’t remotely given up his campaign to keep attention on the injustices and frustrations that New Orleans denizens are still wrangling with five years later, but this time out, he also devotes part of his time to looking at affairs of the heart as only the languagetwisting Crescent City R&B-

funk master can: “You use your trickeration to keep po’ me in debt. … Trick-knowledge-asize me into yo’ net,” he complains in the wickedly sassy “Manoovas.” He also questions why his lover is so contentious in “When

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

scary reinterpretation of the Beatles’ “Day Tripper” in “Reppirt Yard” demonstrate. — Katherine Silkaitis, The Philadelphia Inquirer

I’m Right I’m Wrong” and why he can’t get his mojo working in the strutting “Jinky Jinx.” Sociologically, he’s still railing at the disparities he sees across the land of the free, which probably explains the deep funk, musically and lyrically, that Rebennack displays. Sometimes the message overwhelms the music, but largely the good doctor tends to the sick without letting the well-heeled off the hook. — Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times

Over Ye ars i4n0 Cent Oregornal

Sewing & Vacuum Center 541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. • Bend


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

restaurants

a good

change Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

The outdoor patio seating at Cafe Alfresco in Redmond is a shaded and secluded garden in the Dawson Station complex.

Redmond’s Cafe Alfresco replaces Mustard Seed Cafe with Italian cuisine By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

I

n the world of Central Oregon restaurants, change is a constant. Redmond’s Cafe Alfresco is a case in point. For several years, the Mustard Seed Cafe, in the Dawson Station complex on Northwest Cedar Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets, had been a popular breakfast-and-lunch spot. It was going strong in 2007 when veteran area restaurateur Jeff Porad established a fine-dining restaurant, Brickhouse Steak and Seafood, a few blocks away in the heart of downtown. It didn’t take long for Porad to cast an eye in the Mustard Seed’s direction. By the end of 2008, he and two colleagues (since departed) had purchased the cafe because, as Porad said at the time, “I wanted a good place to go for breakfast.” In February 2010, the winds of change

were blowing once again. Porad and a new partner, Diane Mortenson, closed the Mustard Seed, gave it a thorough renovation and reopened as Cafe Alfresco, an Italian eatery. Alfresco doesn’t do breakfasts, so Porad is again on his own for the morning meal. But according to Mortenson, the cafe’s manager as well as co-owner, the idea of a makeover had been in the works for some time. “We wanted to change it,” she said. “We just didn’t know what we wanted. So we sat on it awhile and felt out Redmond to see what the town needed. We decided Italian would go well.”

Garden seating Former patrons of the Mustard Seed will instantly recognize the new digs. The

Cafe Alfresco Location: 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond Hours: Lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., dinner 5 p.m. to close every day Price range: Lunch $7.95 to $10.95; dinner appetizers $4.95 to $10.95, entrees $9.95 to $15.95 Credit cards: MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Range of choices includes eggplant Parmesan Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: Yes Reservations: Recommended for parties of Alfresco retains the upstairs-downstairs setup, with the upper level frequently used to seat larger parties. The open kitchen is on the ground floor, just steps away from a shaded and secluded garden where diners may be seated near other Dawson Station shops. Mortenson herself assists with table

eight or more Contact: 541-923-2599 or www .facebook.com/cafealfresco.redmond

Scorecard OVERALL: B+ Food: B. Nice selection of pasta dishes but the kitchen tends to be heavy-handed with seasoning. Service: A. Friendly and efficient, with orders taken accurately and delivered with haste. Atmosphere: A. Renovated two-story house with a secluded garden for al fresco dining. Value: B+. Portions are decent and prices are moderate. service, which I have found invariably friendly and efficient. She and her co-workers are quick to seat diners, taking orders accurately and delivering them speedily. The Alfresco’s produce is farm-fresh, Mortenson is proud to point out. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 11

restaurants From previous page She said that “everything is homemade except for the pastas,” including sauces and desserts. While the food is good, it doesn’t knock me out. On an initial evening visit, my companion and I agreed that the chef was too generous with the salt shaker. On a second midday stop, we enjoyed our orders but didn’t find them so memorable that we’d make a special return visit from Bend.

Next week: Krista’s at Widgi Creek Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

Caprese heaven I was delighted to find that the Alfresco has four separate caprese salads on its appetizer menu. Porad’s Brickhouse serves arguably the best traditional caprese in Central Oregon, its thickly sliced heirloom tomatoes layered with buffalo mozzarella cheese and fresh basil leaves, and drizzled with balsamic vinegar. The Alfresco offers the same traditional caprese, but it adds three others. One comes with shrimp and scallops, another with pancetta (Italian bacon) and pesto oil. I opted for the grilled vegetable-and-balsamic caprese. The tomatoes were vine-ripened Roma tomatoes, not heirlooms; they were served with roasted red peppers, zucchini and yellow squash. They came with mozzarella and basil, but the presentation upon a bed of mixed greens with slivers of carrot seemed to be little more than an afterthought. I coupled my caprese with a small plate of fried calamari. Breaded and fried crispy, the morsels of mollusk were served with a tangy red-pepper aioli dressing. I might have enjoyed them much more, had the breading not been so salty. My companion chose an entree of chicken gnocchi with a house salad. The mixed baby greens were tossed with carrots, tomatoes, salami and lots of shredded mozzarella, blended with creamy Italian vinaigrette. She found it satisfactory. She informed me, however, that like my calamari, the pasta was far too salty. And she was surprised that the chicken breast, rather than being chopped and tossed with the gnocchi, was merely pan-fried and placed on top, unsliced. She did enjoy the pasta dumplings, made from potatoes seasoned with Italian herbs. Crimini mushrooms, spinach and halved plum tomatoes were stirred into a garlicky cream sauce with the gnocchi.

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

The fresh vegetable caprese at Cafe Alfresco contains heirloom tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella cheese, basil leaves and balsamic vinegar. And after she had sliced the chicken and added that to the mix, she found the concoction even tastier.

Casual lunch Our subsequent lunch was more casual. I had a meatball sub with a cup of pasta salad. It was a pretty good salad, made with penne noodles, black olives, red peppers, parsley and a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese. I liked the sub’s handmade meatballs, but it’s worth noting that my companion, offered a taste, did not. She immediately objected to an unidentifiable spice. That didn’t bother me; I enjoyed the sandwich, served on a baguette with slices of tomato and shaved red onion, in a hearty marinara sauce with melted mozzarella. My friend enjoyed her grilled veggie pizza, baked in the restaurant’s blazing-hot brick oven. The ingredients were much the same as had been on my dinnertime caprese: zucchini, yellow squash and roasted red bell peppers, along with caramelized red onion and two cheeses, feta and mozzarella. The crust was light and golden, thin but flavorful. Change is often a good thing. Cafe Alfresco isn’t perfect, but it’s an excellent addition to the Redmond dining scene. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES Level 2 Global Food & Lounge is scheduled to open today on the second floor of the Fuel Building in the Old Mill District, above Saxon’s Fine Jewelers. The menu, prepared

by chef Rich Hall, formerly of Marz, will feature a choice of small plates as well as full entrees. Pastry chef Dee Long will offer more than a dozen homemade desserts nightly. Howie and Ada Long are the owners, Jason Twillman the general manager. The space has been vacant since the Old Mill Martini Bar closed in April 2009. Open 3 p.m. to close Tuesday to Sunday. 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 210, Bend; 541-323-5382. Trattoria Sbandati is no longer serving lunches, but it has extended its dinner hours. The little Italian restaurant on College Way near Newport Avenue now offers a la carte dinners from 5 p.m. to close Tuesday through Thursday, with its four-course, reservation-only, fixed-price feast at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 1444 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-306-6825 or www .trattoriasbandati.com.

RECENT REVIEWS Pine Tavern (B): A dinner with disappointing food and service was followed by a superb salmon-salad lunch on the lovely riverside patio, begging the question: Would the real Pine Tavern please stand up? The restaurant has been a Central Oregon institution since 1936. Brunch 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Find Your Dream Home In

Real Estate Every Saturday

Saturday and Sunday (summer only); lunch starting at 11:30 a.m. Monday to Saturday; dinner 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. every day. 967 N.W. Brooks St. (at Oregon Avenue), Bend; 541-382-5581, www.pinetavern.com. Rimrock Cafe (B+): The cafe at Bend’s High Desert Museum may not be gourmet, but the soups, salads and sandwiches served here are fresh, tasty and generous in portion. Seating is indoors and outdoors, with chipmunks always ready to beg for a patio meal. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day. 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, www.highdesertmuseum.org. The Spice Box (A-): This new family-friendly cafe is operated

by three women of East Indian heritage who serve “the same things we have on our Sunday dinner table.” There’s no buffet table here; the short menu features mild vegetarian curries as well as chicken dishes and, occasionally, lamb. Open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday. 133 S.W. Century Drive, Suite 204, Bend; 541-419-2542. Thyme at FivePine (B+): T.R. and Jennifer McCrystal, the same couple who own Jen’s Garden, have revamped the dining room at the FivePine Resort. Some dishes are superb, but preparations are inconsistent; service and ambience are fine but not outstanding. Open 4 p.m. to close every day through late September; same hours Wednesday to Saturday through May. 1011 Desperado Trail (FivePine Resort), Sisters; 541-588-6151, www.thymein sisters.com.

The Ranch is OPEN! It’s Harvest Time! Open 7 Days A Week!

YOU DIG POTATOES! (6 Varieties)

• Hay Rides • Play Areas • Farmers Market • Farm Fresh Beef & Pork

Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

(541) 678-0020

THE PUMPKI PATCH N

will open o n September 25th.

Plus the 10 th Annual DD Ranch 5K Fun Run/Walk will be taking pla ce!

NEW THIS YEAR! The Petting Zoo at the Bend Fall Festival on the 18th & 19th of September

Ranch C OPENafé F ri, Sat. &S 11:00-3 un. :00


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

fine arts

Bridging

divides Art show at Thump Coffee to benefit nonprofit’s work with youth from Middle East

“The Bedouins is about fostering positive interactions between enemies using common passions: skating and art.” — Euijin Gray

By Eleanor Pierce • The Bulletin

I

n the short film “Sour,” which was featured in the 2007 BendFilm Festival, director Nathan Gray tells the story of nine skateboarders from Israel and Jordan who in

the summer of 2006 decided to skate together despite their political differences. The film was made during Gray’s eight-month tour of the Middle East, sponsored in part by Element Skateboards. Gray is now in the process of launching The Bedouins, a nonprofit that plans to work with youth in the Middle East, using skateboarding as a tool to help those from different cultures find common ground. An art show benefiting The Bedouins opens with a First Friday reception tonight at Thump Coffee (see “If you go”). The show features work by close to a dozen local and national artists. Gray’s experience on that 2006 trip stuck with him in many ways. In association with the showing of “Sour” at BendFilm, Gray put together an art show at the now-defunct Old Mill Martini Bar. He originally

had his sights set on another gallery space in the Old Mill, Artery 35, run by graphic designer Euijin (also known as Esther) Kang. She didn’t have room for Gray’s show, but she did help him hang it at the bar. The couple married last year — Euijin is now Euijin Gray — and welcomed their first child, a boy named Teo, this year. “We met through common interests, doing positive things,” Nathan said. The couple’s interest in international affairs goes back, in part, to their childhoods. Euijin, 40, is originally from South Korea, and Nathan, 30, spent several years in Saudi Arabia when he was a child, where his dad worked for an oil company. Continued next page

Some samples of artwork from “Yallah! Artivism for Peace,” from top: A skateboard decorated by San Francisco artist Justin Borsuk; a painting by Euijin Gray; a pair of skateboards decorated by Los Angeles graffiti artist Retna. Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

If you go What: “Yallah! Artivism for Peace” reception When: 5 to 9 tonight Where: Thump Coffee, 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Cost: Free to attend Contact: 541-3880226 or www .thebedouins.org


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

PAGE 13

fine arts Atelier 6000 teams up with Nature of Words

T

ON

Bend Experimental Art Theatre will hold auditions for Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning musical “Rent” from noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 11 at 2nd Street Theater (220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend). The show has been adapt-

AL OREG TR

O

H

BEAT holding auditions for ‘Rent’

SC

Tonight’s First Friday Gallery Walk will feature all of its regular activities, including receptions from about 5 to 9 p.m. in downtown, NorthWest Crossing and the Old Mill District galleries and assorted business, but there will also be a special Performing Arts Showcase at 6:30 p.m. at the Tower Theatre (835 N.W. Wall St., Bend). Sneak peeks of upcoming performances will come from Cat Call Productions, which will bring “Little Shop of Horrors” to Bend later this month; Cascades Theatrical Company; Bend Experimental Art Theatre; Gotta Dance Studio and Company; the producers of “Evil Dead: The Musical;” and improv troupe Triage. A complimentary champagne and wine bar with appetizers by Typhoon! will be provided. Suggested donation is $5, and proceeds benefit the nonprofit Tower Theatre Foundation. Contact: 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

ed to make it more age-appropriate for teens, but themes include AIDS and sexuality. Actors who are interested in participating and are between the ages of 13 and 21 will sing a song from the show a cappella. To prepare for the auditions, be ready to sing a song sung by a character you seek to play. Also be prepared to present the same song as a talking monologue. Rehearsals for the production start Sept. 13 and run Mondays through Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m. The show will be performed Nov. 11-27 at 2nd Street Theater. Tuition for cast members is $375. Teens looking for help learning a song should contact the production’s musical director, Rebekah Sharpe, at 541-543-0915. Contact: 541-419-5710. — Eleanor Pierce

LLE

Performing Arts Showcase tonight

Submitted photo

The cast of “Little Shop of Horrors” will participate in a preview of the show during tonight’s Performing Arts Showcase at the Tower Theatre. Front row, from left: Michael Stumpfig, Rebekah Sharpe and Rick Johnson. Top row, from left: Jolie Miller, Tara Johnson and Kahlia Aposhian.

CEN

In the month of November, Atelier 6000 will host “Broadsides,” a juried exhibition in collaboration with The Nature of Words literary festival. Submissions for the show must be received by Oct. 15. Show organizers are seeking two-dimensional work that combines text and image. “(The) major body/image of original work must be printed by hand or letterpress,” according to a call for entries by A6. Submissions may be part of a set of print editions or can be unique. No digital reproductions will be accepted. Artists of all ages are invited to send in original works; slides will not be considered. Artwork may range from 8-by-10 inches to 26-by-30 inches. Submitted pieces must be ready to hang. The fee is $10 per entry, with a maximum of three entries per artist. Mailed submissions should be sent with reusable packaging and return postage. A6 is located at 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend. Contact: 541-330-8759 or www.atelier6000.com.

O L O F BA

From previous page “The Bedouins is about fostering positive interactions between enemies using common passions: skating and art,” Euijin said. The couple traveled together to the Middle East last year. On that trip, they toured the West Bank, where they saw the Israeli barrier wall that’s under construction and will one day stretch for about 450 miles. Palestinians and Israelis disagree on the name of the wall, with Israelis often referring to it as the “security barrier” or “the good fence,” while Palestinians call it “the apartheid wall” or the “racist fence,” according to recent reporting by National Public Radio. Nathan Gray described how the wall is now covered in graffiti. “Because of artists and just people writing on the wall, it’s been transformed,” he said. Gray, who’s a photographer as well as a filmmaker, said some of his photographs from the latest trip will be a part of the show at Thump, which the couple has named “Yallah! Artivism for Peace.” Gray said “yallah” is a slang term that both Israelis and Arabs use meaning “let’s go.” Other local artists who will have work in the show include Jason Graham (aka Mosley Wotta), Dana MacKenzie and Regan Goodrich. The work includes mixedmedia art, photography, drawing and several decorated skateboard decks. One set of decks was

FEATURING Pastels by

Laura Jo Sherman THROUGH SEPTEMBER VISIT US ON FIRST FRIDAY

CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL of BALLET

Directors: Zygmunt Sawiel Sarah Chase Sawiel

Home of the “Nutcracker Ballet”

Now Enrolling For Fall Session

541-389-9306

1155 SW Division Bend 97702 www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING 834 NW Brooks Street Bend, Oregon 97701 Behind the Tower Theatre

541.382.5884

Nathan Gray (with his son, Teo) is one of the organizers of “Yallah! Artivism for Peace,” a fundraiser for the art/activism startup The Bedouins. Submitted photo

adorned by the LA-based graffiti artist Retna, whose work has recently been featured on the cover of the alternative art magazine Juxtapoz. One deck reads “Israel” and the other reads “Palestine.” “Because he’s so big, they’re going to be like 30 grand,” Nathan Gray said. “Most of the rest of the art is going to be moderately priced, $100 to $200 or so.” Gray said he hopes this kickoff helps get people excited about the plans for The Bedouins. One of the first major projects they hope to take on is bringing Mid-

dle Eastern skaters to the U.S. “It would be a skate tour,” he said, “but we’re also hoping it would serve some other purpose, like spreading awareness, and having the opportunity (for the Middle Eastern skaters) to see what America is really like, and vice versa. “The Israel/Palestine issue is in the media a lot, but I don’t think people get to interact first hand with youth from over there.” Eleanor Pierce can be reached at 541-617-7828 or epierce@bendbulletin.com.


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART GALLERY AT EVERGREEN STUDIOS: Featuring original works by local artists and craftsmen; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight ; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Shine,” solar printmaking and small paintings by local artists; through Sept. 24; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. AZURA STUDIO: Featuring acrylic paintings by Charles H. Chamberlain; through September; 856 N.W. Bond St., Unit 3, Bend; 541-388-1846. BELLA MODA: Featuring works by Noelle Dass; through Sunday, reception from 5-9 tonight ; 1001 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-550-7001. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer ; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Some Like It Hot”; through Nov. 1; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. BICA GALLERY: The Bend Independent Contemporary Art Gallery features “Painted,” works by Scott Conary and Lisa Wachs; through Sept. 25, reception from 5-9 tonight ; wine events offered every Saturday from 3-5 p.m.; 2748 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 130, Bend; 541-788-4623

or www.bicagallery.com. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “Rural Images of the Northwest”; reception from 5-9 tonight; through December; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. EASTLAKE FRAMING: Featuring photography by the Cascade Camera Club; through September ; 1335 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-389-3770. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Ann Bullwinkel, Ellen Dittebrandt, Joanne Donaca and Gary Vincent; through Sept. 27, reception from 5-8 tonight ; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT FRAMEWORKS!: Featuring “Small Greetings,” greeting cards and small works by several artists; through September; 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250 or www. highdesertframeworks.com.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Submitted photo

“Tumalo Falls,” by Laura Jo Sherman, will be on display at Sage Custom Framing and Gallery through Sept. 25. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF BEND: Featuring “6XA6,” fine-art block prints, etchings and monoprints by six artists; through Sept. 28, reception from 5-9 tonight ; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250. HIGH DESERT GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING OF SISTERS: Featuring works by Kimry Jelen; through September; 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Gemstones,” acrylic paintings by Karen Bandy; through September; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425

S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Randi Julianus; through September; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “In Nature’s Light,” works by Lindsay Scott; through September, reception from 5-9 tonight ; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot ; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; live painting demonstration from 5:30-10:30 tonight ; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring works by member artists; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY:

Featuring oil paintings by Carol Armstrong; through Oct. 1; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring works by the painting group “Wooden Walls”; through September ; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CAFE: Featuring a private collection of works by Alfred Rogoway and Etienne Ret; 59 tonight ; 2762 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-382 6740. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “New Directions,” pastels by Laura Jo Sherman; through Sept. 25, reception from 59 tonight ; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “The Dog Show,” canine imagery; through Sept. 24; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring mixed-media paintings by D.L. Watson and watercolor and oil paintings by Mike Smith; through Sunday ; new exhibit, featuring works by Deborah DeWit, Greg Wilbur and Alice Van Leunen, opens Thursday ; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: Who Are We?,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December ; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www. wordsideas.blogspot.com. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring “Yallah! Activism for Peace,” a skateboarding and street art fundraisier for TheBedouins. org; through September; 835 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Of Earth & Sky,” oil paintings by Janice Druian and monoprints and ceramics by Nancy Dasen; through September, reception from 5-9 tonight ; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Mt. Bachelor disc golf

Elk Lake day-use area

Mt. Bachelor disc golf course

3 5

2

4 1

6 8

Pine Marten Lodge

7

9 10

E xp ress

11 12

Pine Mar ten

13 14

15

The Cinder Cone

16 17 18

Century Dr. Julie Johnson / The Bulletin file photo

West Village Lodge Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Source: Mt. Bachelor

South Sister stands tall above the wind-riffled water of Elk Lake.

T

his popular spot

Todd Lake

has a great view

of Mount Bachelor and South Sister and features a pebbly beach, a few picnic tables

Cascade Lakes Highway

Elk Lake Sparks Lake

Elk Lake Resort

46

Mt. Bachelor Hosmer Lake

45

Lava Lake Little Lava Lake

41

Sunriver

MILES 0

Bend

Three Sisters Wilderness

5 40

and plenty of rocks in

97

Elk Lake 46

Beach

like fun taking place. — Bulletin staff

as spectacular views of Broken

After riding the chairlift up the mountain, visitors can play the course while traversing

hunting.

pect to hear lots of child-

and challenging holes as well

rounding area.

the water for crawdad

with young children, ex-

Bachelor offers up fun

Top, South Sister and the sur-

Day-use area

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Popular for families

T

he disc golf course at Mt.

If you go Getting there: From Bend, drive 33 miles southwest on Cascade Lakes Highway. Turn left into Elk Lake day-

use area, past the campground. Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or $5 day-use pass required Contact: 541-388-4848

down the mountain. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: From Bend, take Century Drive about 22 miles west to Mt. Bachelor Cost: Lift tickets cost $15 adult, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; evening lift tickets are available from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday to Sunday and cost $12 adults, $10 seniors and $7 youths Contact: 800-829-2442 or www.mtbachelor.com


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER THE BULLETIN 3, 2010 • FRIDA

this w LITTLE WOODY BAR PERFORMING ARTS SHOWCASE

TODAY & SA

TODAY

MUNCH & MOVIES What: A celebration of local performing arts, with sneak peeks of upcoming performances, appetizers and more; proceeds benefit the Tower Theatre Foundation. Gotta Dance members, from left, Holly Kupetz, Michelle Mejaski and Sara White, perform.

TODAY “JAMES B. THOMPSON: THE VANISHING LANDSCAPE” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features paintings and prints that explore the transformation of the American West; exhibit runs through Jan. 3; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BIRDS OF PREY RELEASE: See a rehabilitated bird of prey released back into the wild; included in the price of admission; 12:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 1 p.m.; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 3-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. ART AT THE RANCH: A display of works from approximately 35 artists in a variety of mediums; with silent auction and reception; proceeds benefit scholarships for Sisters High

When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend Cost: $5 suggested donation Contact: 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org

School students and art for public places; free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Black Butte Ranch, milepost 93, U.S. Highway 20, Sisters; 541-595-5616. TJ GRANT: The Seattle-based singersongwriter performs, with Mosley Wotta; free; 4:30 p.m.; Country Catering Co., 900 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-383-5014. (Story, Page 4) LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and bourbon tastings from regional and local breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package, $30 bourbon tasting; 5-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-3230964 or www.thelittlewoody.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “The Wizard of Oz”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Zoe Ferraris talks about her book “City of Veils”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. PERFORMING ARTS SHOWCASE: A celebration of local performing arts, with sneak peeks of upcoming performances, appetizers and more; proceeds benefit the Tower Theatre Foundation; $5 suggested donation; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.

TODAY & SATURDAY What: An outdoor screening of “The Wizard of Oz” today and “Avatar” Saturday; with food vendors and live music. Vendors help customers at a previous event. When: 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk Where: Compass Park, 2500 N.W.

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 13) FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend.

SATURDAY Sept. 4 GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Bend Fire Department Historical Society; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; North Fire Station, 63377 N.E. Jamison St., Bend; 541-350-9878. ART AT THE RANCH: A display of works from approximately 35 artists in a variety of mediums; proceeds benefit scholarships for Sisters High School students and art for public places; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Black Butte Ranch, milepost 93, U.S. Highway 20, Sisters; 541-595-5616. SISTERS WESTERN & NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS FESTIVAL: Event features live music, fine art, displays, demonstrations and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20

Crossing Drive, Bend, today; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond, Saturday Cost: Free Contact: 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com

and Jefferson Avenue; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. TJ GRANT: The Seattle-based singer-songwriter performs; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Rockin’ Daves Bagels, 661 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-8177. (Story, Page 4) USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRISE TO SUMMIT: Runners race from Sunrise Lodge to the summit of Mount Bachelor; registration required to run; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation; $32 to race; free for spectators; 10:30 a.m.; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. CENTRAL OREGON GRAPE STOMP: Stomp grapes for wine; with live music and wine tastes; a portion of proceeds from wine produced will benefit Partnership to End Poverty; $10, free for children; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464. COMMUNITY BARBECUE: A day of entertainment, food, games and live music; free; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275. RIDE THE RIVER PARTY: After floating the Deschutes River, join a party with food and drinks, games and music; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.;

What: Craft beer and bourbon tastings from regional and local breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society. Attendees gather at last year’s festival. When: 5-10 p.m. today, noon-10 p.m. Saturday

McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-617-3215. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; noon; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. LITTLE WOODY BARREL AGED BREW FESTIVAL: Craft beer and bourbon tastings from regional and local breweries, with live music; ages 21 and older only; a portion of proceeds benefits the Deschutes County Historical Society; $6, $15 beer tasting package, $30 bourbon tasting; noon-10 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.thelittlewoody.com. BIRDS OF PREY RELEASE: See a rehabilitated bird of prey released back into the wild; included in the price of admission; 12:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 3-10 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Zoe Ferraris talks about her book “City of Veils”; free; 5 p.m.; Mavericks at Sunriver, 18135 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-2500.


GO! MAGAZINE •

AY, SEPTEMBER THE BULLETIN 3, 2010 • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

week

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

REL AGED BREW FESTIVAL

CENTRAL OREGON GRAPE STOMP

ATURDAY

SATURDAY What: Stomp grapes for wine; with live music and wine tastes; a portion of proceeds from wine produced will benefit Partnership to End Poverty. Doug Maragas stomps grapes at the winery in 2008. When: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Where: Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver Cost: $10, free for children Contact: 541546-5464

Where: Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend Cost: $6, $15 beer tasting package, $30 bourbon tasting Contact: 541-323-0964 or www.thelittlewoody.com C ourtesy Carlos Perez

MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Avatar”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-3890995 or www.c3events.com. CASINO NIGHT: Featuring blackjack, craps, Texas hold ’em, an auction and more; Western themed, with prizes for best costumes; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Lions Club Sight and Hearing Foundation, scouting organizations and children with diabetes; $10; 7-11 p.m.; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-504-2678. THE PHYSICAL HEARTS: The Portlandbased alt-rock band performs; $4; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 4)

SUNDAY Sept. 5 LABOR DAY BREAKFAST: Includes pancakes, frittata, sausage, biscuits and gravy, fruit and more; $7, $4 ages 4-12, free ages 3 and younger; 7-11 a.m.; Crooked River Ranch Volunteer Fire Association, 6971 S.W. Shad Road; 541-923-6776. SISTERS WESTERN & NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS FESTIVAL: Event features live music, fine art, displays, demonstrations and more;

PAGE 17

free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; begins with an hour of spirituals; refreshments available; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; American Legion Post 45, 52532 Drafter Road, La Pine; 541-536-1402. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission, $3-$5 per bag of books; 1-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. DIXIELAND PARTY BAND AND FRIENDS: Musicians from the Northwest and Northern California perform; refreshments available; donations accepted; 2-7 p.m.; La Pine Moose Lodge, 52510 Drafter Road; 541-536-3388. DOG WASH AND SWIM: Play with your dog and give it a bath; proceeds benefit the Redmond High School water polo team; $10 per dog; 3 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. TJ GRANT: The Seattle-based

FARMERS MARKETS For listings, see Family calendar, Page E3. singer-songwriter performs; free; 4-6 p.m.; 10 Barrel Brewing Co., 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-585-1007. (Story, Page 4) CURTIS SALGADO: The veteran Oregon-based blues and soul singer performs; part of the Live at the Ranch summer concert series; $18 in advance, $20 day of concert, $10 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 6-9 p.m.; Lakeside Lawn at Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard, Sisters; 541-5951510 or www.blackbutteranch. com/concerts. (Story, Page 4)

MONDAY Sept. 6 SOLIDARITY PICNIC: With food, live music and commentary; free; noon-3 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 1525 Hill St., Bend; 541-350-0965 or linder@bendcable.com.

TUESDAY Sept. 7 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Howard Zinn: You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train,”

SISTERS WESTERN & NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS FESTIVAL

SATURDAY & SUNDAY What: Event features live music, fine art, displays, demonstrations and more. A fur trader displays his wares at the 2007 festival. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue Cost: Free admission Contact: 541-549-0251 or jeri@ sisterscountry.com

and “The People Speak,” both of which explore Zinn and his book “A People’s History of the United States”; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

The Autonomics; $15 plus fees; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. (Story, Page 3)

WEDNESDAY

Sept. 9

Sept. 8

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Beekeeper’s Apprentice: Or on The Segregation of the Queen” by Laurie R. King; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FRUITION: The Portland-based acoustic string musicians perform; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. RISE UP FASHION SHOW AND CONCERT: With live music by The Dirty Words, Yenn, Capture the Flag and more, and a fashion show; proceeds benefit Rise Up’s arts projects; $5; 7 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999, art@riseupinternational.com or www. riseupinternational.com. (Story, Page 4) RWANDA — BEYOND THE GENOCIDE: Jacques Prevert Rumanyika talks about his experience with genocide, Rwanda’s progress, the importance of education and more; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541306-0864 or www.kurerafund.org.

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Cry the Beloved Country” by Alan Paton; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-7085 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring traditional island dances and music by the Hokulea Dancers; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $40 per team; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541306-0864 or www.kurerafund.org. FRUITION: The Portland-based acoustic string musicians perform; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) THE THERMALS: The Portland-based indie rock band performs, with

THURSDAY


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

planning ahead

The Bulletin file photo

Ducks are set afloat at the 2007 Great Rotary Duck Race. This year’s event takes place Sept. 12.

Right Around the Corner SEPT. 10-12 — SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Three-day folk music festival including performances by John Hammond, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Slaid Cleaves, Solas and more; daily passes range from $30-$60, $95 all-events pass; 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Sept. 10, 10-12:30 a.m. Sept. 11, 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Sept. 12; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. SEPT. 10 — AUCTION FUNDRAISER: A silent auction to benefit the Bend chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution’s nursing scholarship for Central Oregon Community College students; free; 1-5 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-318-7235. SEPT. 10 — “WETLANDS”: A screening of the documentary, which shows a year of seasons in reclaimed wetlands; free; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4442.

SEPT. 10 — FRUITION: The Portlandbased acoustic string musicians perform; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 10 — “THE FAT BOY CHRONICLES”: A screening of the film about a boy entering high school and struggling with bullying and obesity; followed by Q&A; $7.50, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 10 — TRACE BUNDY: Acoustic guitar virtuoso performs; $13 in advance, $15 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 11-12 — SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; proceeds benefit the La Pine Senior Activity Center; $5, $4 with a trade gun,

free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 12; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. SEPT. 11-12 — UNDER PRESSURE: Watch artists use an industrial steamroller to make art prints; free; 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. SEPT. 11 — BREAKFAST AT THE V: A breakfast of eggs, steak, biscuits and gravy; $6.50, $6 seniors; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. SEPT. 11 — RALLY 4 RECOVERY: A poker run, with auctions, lunch, live music and more; proceeds benefit recovery housing and services in Crook County; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-416-1095. SEPT. 11 — FESTIVAL OF CULTURES: With booths representing nearly 30 cultures, local dance troupes, live music, food and more; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Centennial Park,

Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-610-3075. SEPT. 11 — WALK TO DEFEAT ALS: A three-mile noncompetitive walk to raise awareness of Lou Gehrig’s disease; registration required; proceeds benefit ALS research, treatment and support groups; donations accepted; 11 a.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-681-9851 or www.walktodefeatals.org. SEPT. 11 — 9/11 BARBECUE: Featuring ribs, chicken, ham, hot dogs and more; with live music; proceeds benefit a veterans’ home in The Dalles; donations accepted; noon; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. SEPT. 11 — OCHOCO SUMMER JAM: Featuring performances by Darryl Worley, Rick Derringer and Brian Hanson and Three Quarter Short Band; a portion of proceeds benefits Caring For Troops; $20 or $30; 4-10:45 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 602-400-3251.

SEPT. 11 — STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 7:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com. SEPT. 12 — GREAT ROTARY DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. SEPT. 12 — SECOND SUNDAY: Local writers read from a selection of works by past guests; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SEPT. 14 — “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions presents a dinner theater murder mystery; reservations recommended; $20; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

PAGE 19

planning ahead & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www. buckboardproductions.com. SEPT. 15 — MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The grand finale of the summer concert series features a performance by Larry and His Flask; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com. SEPT. 15 — FINN RIGGINS: The Idaho-based indie band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 16 — JENNA LINDBO: The Asheville, N.C.-based singersongwriter performs a CD-release show; tickets should be purchased in advance; $10; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Broadway Studios, 711 N.W. Broadway St., Bend; 541-3509572 or wcc@bendcable.com.

Farther Down the Road SEPT. 17-19, 22-23 — “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a man-eating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 8 p.m. Sept. 1718 and 22-23, 4 p.m. Sept. 19; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SEPT. 17 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Terri Daniel reads from her book “Embracing Death: A New Look at Grief, Gratitude and God”; free; 4-7 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-549-4004.

Submitted photo

Girls dance at the Festival of Cultures in 2008. This year’s event takes place Sept. 11 in Redmond. SEPT. 17 — WILLIE NELSON: The prolific country-folk musician performs, with Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses; $46 or $79 in advance, $48 or $83 day of show, plus fees; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-7453000 or www.bendconcerts.com. SEPT. 18-19 — BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sept. 18, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 19; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events.com. SEPT. 18 — TEDDY BEAR POKER RUN: Ride to area hospitals and deliver teddy bears for children; followed by a raffle and poker run that ends at Coyote Ranch in Redmond; proceeds benefit Central Oregon ABATE; $5

per hand with teddy bear, $10 per hand without; 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. ride; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-923-3809 or 541-815-3600. SEPT. 18 — GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Glen Gives; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Awbrey Glen parking lot, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541-318-8805. SEPT. 18 — PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for lowincome individuals, food, music and more; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-9663 or www.projectconnectco.org. SEPT. 18 — RUN FOR CONGO WOMEN: Walk from the falls to the Old Mill

THE 2010

GREEN & SOLAR HOMES TOUR Produced by the High Desert Branch of Cascadia

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2ND 9 am - 5 pm Featuring Central Oregon homes packed with green and solar features

District; proceeds benefit Women for Women International; donations accepted; 9:30 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541-3301621, patricia@bendbroadband.com or http://runforcongowomen.org. SEPT. 18 — LATIN AMERICAN GUITAR CONCERT: Rich Hurdle performs a selection of music from Latin America to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SEPT. 18 — LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Smokin’ Ashes play the Salt City Shakers; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-330-1183

or www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. SEPT. 19 — MCMENAMINS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring food, beer and live music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Boxcar String Band and High Five Polka; free; all day, music starts at 1 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SEPT. 19 — VOLLEYBALL FOR BABIES: Volleyball competition; proceeds benefit March of Dimes and Bend Beach Volleyball; $100 or $60 per team, free for spectators; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; sand volleyball courts, across from Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 541-4193004 or marbell1@yahoo.com. SEPT. 19 — D.R.I. (DIRTY ROTTEN IMBECILES): The punk band performs, with Hands on Throat and We are 86’d; $13 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. SEPT. 22 — PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes kayak, canoe and boat gear demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by electro-acoustic band The Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. SEPT. 22 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Payback” by Margaret Atwood; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

The guide will feature homes in Central Oregon that demonstrate the latest innovations in green building and solar energy.

PUBLISHES: SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

For space reservations please call your Bulletin Sales Representative today! 541 - 382 - 1811


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2010

talks, classes, museums & libraries Education

Performing Arts

WRITING FROM PLACE: Mary Sojourner leads a workshop on using the land as writing inspiration; registration required; free; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday; Metolius Preserve, near Camp Sherman, F.S. Road 810; 541-3300017 or www.deschuteslandtrust.org. HOW BIG IS BIG?: Astronomy program shows the universe from a new perspective; $9, $6 ages 2-12, free for nature center members; 8 p.m. Saturday; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www. sunrivernaturecenter.org. HIGH HOLIDAY WORKSHOP: Learn about honeybees, and make candy and Rosh Hashanah cards; free; 10 a.m.noon Sunday; Shalom Bayit, 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-389-9854. HOW TO TALK TO YOUR DOG: Mare Shey shares tips for communicating with dogs; free; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. PET PARTNER TEAM TRAINING: Learn to safely visit hospitals, nursing homes and other facilities with your pet; registration required by today; $90; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 11, 6-8 p.m. Sept. 14 and Sept. 16; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541312-8663 or pwittnberg@cs.com. NATURALIZATION INFORMATION SESSION: Immigrants can learn about the naturalization process, including eligibility and forms; free; 1 p.m. Sept. 11; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 415-987-0191. THE WISDOM OF CELTIC SPIRITUALITY: Abbess Fionntulach talks about Celtic tradition and uniting heaven and earth; registration requested; $30 adults, $10 students in advance, $40 at the door; 1-4 p.m. Sept. 11; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-383-4179 or www.sacredartofliving.org. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541-3837270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www. dpls.us or 541-312-1020. KINDERMUSIK: www. kidsmovewithmusic.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic. com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http:// teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS:

MODERN DANCE CLASS: Bonnie Walker teaches modern dance for adults and teens; $15 drop-in, $45 per month; 7:05-8:05 Tuesdays, beginning Sept. 7; Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-7880725 or fish.hawk.wing@gmail.com. ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-4107894 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: 541-678-1379. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline. org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Submitted photo

Mare Shey will lead a class on communicating with your dog. See the Education section for details. loriew@partnersbend. org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www. spiritualawarenesscommunity. com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec. org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www. raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation. com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust. org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www. envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www. paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594.

SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@ silverstriders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www. sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts THE WORKING QUESTIONS: Explore interests, new ideas and approaches in printmaking; $10, free for Atelier 6000 members; 5 p.m. members, 6:15-8 p.m. nonmembers, Thursday; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains. com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Classes and workshops in printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000. com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio. com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www. MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend. com or 541-617-0900.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www.bowmanmuseum. org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children

ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www.deschuteshistory. org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era; $1; Fort Rock; www.fortrockmuseum. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the “Year of the Forest: Human Connections,” and “Sin in the Sagebrush” exhibits; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; admission is good for one day; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: Featuring lectures, star gazing, instructional sky navigation demonstrations; $5 suggested donation Friday and Saturday; Sunday-Thursday large groups only; 541-382-8331.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (Central Oregon Community College), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Twice the

opera

Two popular productions return to Portland By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

I

n 1997, Portland Opera’s Christopher Mattaliano paired Ruggiero Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci” and Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana” to critical acclaim. Kicking off the 46th season of the Portland Opera, the popular production returns Sept. 24, 26, 30 and Oct. 2 at the Keller Auditorium in Portland. Using the theme, “Fantasy or Reality?,” this season’s operas explore “plays within plays, real and imagined characters and fairy tales of all sorts,” according to a news release. “Visually and theatrically this might be our most compelling season ever,” said Mattaliano, in a news release. “All these operas have a thread of the fantastical and all will ask the audience to wonder what’s real and what’s not. It is a big, powerful and altogether delightful season.” The double-feature begins with “Pagliacci,” composed by Leoncavallo in 1892. In the opera, Cavio the clown (played by tenor Richard Crawley) leads a troupe of traveling actors in a comedy about a jealous husband and his cheating wife. When life imitates art and Cavio’s wife Nedda (played by

T he Portland Opera first paired Ruggiero Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci” (shown here) and Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana” in 1997. Courtesy Duane Morris Portland Opera

soprano Emily Pulley) has eyes for another man, the comedy turns into tragedy. The opera is sung in Italian with English translations projected above the stage. “Carmina Burana,” composed by Orff in 1937, is based on a collection of poetry by 13th century Bavarian monks and bards, according to a news release. Heard in films and advertising, “Carmina Burana” is best known for its song, “O Fortuna.” Sung in Latin and German, the production features the Portland Opera Chorus and Orchestra and choreography and performance by BodyVox. Since its successful premiere, Portland Opera’s “Pagliacci/Carmina Burana” has traveled to opera companies across the country, including in Minnesota, Nebraska, Utah, Georgia and California. Tickets range from $20 to $135 (plus service charges), depending on seat location. To purchase tickets, contact Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster .com. For more information on the Portland Opera, contact 503-241-1802 or visit www.portlandopera.com. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-3830350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

Concerts Through Sept. 5 — Dave Matthews Band, The Gorge Amphitheater, George, Wash.; TM* Sept. 3 — The Budos Band, Dante’s, Portland; TW* Sept. 3 — George Winston, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 3 — Pavement, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; TM* Sept. 3 — Tommy Emmanuel/Patty Larkin, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; 800-882-7488 or www.brittfest.org. Sept. 4 — Cinderella/Queensryche, Oregon State Fair, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; TW* Sept. 4 — Gary Allan/Bomshel, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; 800882-7488 or www.brittfest.org. Sept. 4 — Slayer/Megadeth/ Testament, Washington County Fairgrounds, Hillsboro; TW* Sept. 7 — Asia, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 8 — Mark Kozelek, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 8-12 — MusicfestNW: Lineup includes The Decemberists, The National and Okkervil River; Portland; TW* Sept. 10 — Brad Paisley/Darius Rucker/Justin Moore, Sleep Country Amphitheater, Ridgefield, Wash.; TM* Sept. 10 — Stephen Kellogg & The Sixers, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 11 — Brad Paisley/Darius Rucker/Justin Moore, Gorge Amphitheater, George, Wash.; TM* Sept. 11 — David Gray/Ray LaMontagne, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; TM* Sept. 11 — Kenny Rogers/Oak Ridge Boys, Happy Canyon Arena, Pendleton; TM* Sept. 11 — The Walkmen/The Helio Sequence, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Sept. 11, 25 — “Summer SunSets” Beachside Concert Series: Featuring Celilo and The Tanner Cundy Band (Sept. 11) and Green Machine Jazz Ensemble and Quality Shine (Sept. 25); Taft Waterfront Park, Lincoln City; 541-996-2119 or www.oregoncoast.org. Sept. 12 — The English Beat, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Sept. 14 — Peter Mulvey, Unitarian Fellowship, Ashland; 541-5353562 or www.stclairevents.com. Sept. 14 — Scissor Sisters, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 16 — Chris Botti, Hult Center, Eugene; 541-682-5000 or www.hultcenter.com. Sept. 16-17 — Furthur, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 17 — Bruce Molsky, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; 541-4347000 or www.theshedd.org.

Sept. 17 — Chick Corea Freedom Band, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 17 — Cloud Clout, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Sept. 17 — An Evening with Straight No Chaser, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; 800-882-7488 or www.brittfest.org. Sept. 17 — Kina Grannis, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 18 — Music in the Park: Featuring Back From The Dead; Pine Creek Schoolhouse Park, Fossil; 541-763-2355. Sept. 18 — Willie Nelson, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; TM* Sept. 19 — Willie Nelson, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 21 — Heart, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 21 — Kina Grannis, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-6872746 or www.wowhall.org. Sept. 22 — Hanson, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Sept. 22 — Harry Connick Jr., Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; SOLD OUT; 800-882-7488 or www.brittfest.org. Sept. 22 — Primus, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 23 — Ruby Dee and the Snakehandlers, Sam Bond’s Garage, Eugene; 541-431-6603 or www.sambonds.com. Sept. 24 — Benise: The Spanish Guitar, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 24 — Heart, Sleep County Amphitheater, Ridgefield, Wash.; TM* Sept. 24 — Les Nubians, WOW Hall, Eugene; 541-687-2746 or www.wowhall.org. Sept. 24 — MercyMe, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; 541-779-3000 or www.craterian.org. Sept. 24 — Railroad Earth, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Sept. 25 — Benise: The Spanish Guitar, Hult Center, Eugene; 541682-5000 or www.hultcenter.com. Sept. 25 — Carrie Underwood, Rose Garden, Portland; 877-7897673 or www.rosequarter.com. Sept. 25 — Kenny Loggins, Britt Pavi