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Quiet, please. Golfers at work Employment issues raised at DA’s office

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

SUNRIVER — Each day at the Jeld-Wen Tradition, John Downing keeps a quiet watch over the people crowded around the first tee box. With a steady gaze, Downing looks back and forth and tries to prevent noise before it happens. Downing, 72, is one of the tournament’s marshals, in charge of ensuring a hush falls over the crowd at the right time. Throughout the weekend, 120 marshals will be spread around the course, and in their matching shirts they’ll serve as a simple reminder that this is a game heavy with etiquette and rules. And the top piece of etiquette? Quiet, please. After all, it’s hard enough to swing a stick at a ball, hit that ball and have it go exactly where you want it to go. It’s a lot harder when the people around you are making loud noises and walking around in your line of sight. See Tradition / A6

Last month, a group of deputy district attorneys filed a petition with the state to As the Deschutes County District At- create a collective bargaining group. Suptorney’s Office gears up for its first lead- porters of the proposed bargaining group ership transition in 25 years, employ- have not commented on what prompted ment has become a hot topic for some the move, but a July 6 letter from Dugan deputy district attorneys. to Flaherty suggests that emIn May, Bend attorney Patrick ployees of the District Attorney’s Flaherty — a onetime Deschutes Office had been “hearing many County prosecutor — unseated rumors of your intent to release District Attorney Mike Dugan, or fire members of this staff.” who was first elected to the posiThis week, one staff member, tion in 1986. Chief Deputy District Attorney Since the election, Flaherty Darryl Nakahira, received a has not publicly discussed his Patrick letter from Flaherty outlining a plans for the 18 prosecutors who Flaherty more specific plan. currently work under Dugan, In the short letter, dated but there have been some indiAug. 17, Flaherty wrote that cations that he intends to make changes. he had not heard from Nakahira since There are also signs that some deputy the election, and added that Nakahira district attorneys are concerned about would no longer be an employee in the what will happen when Flaherty takes District Attorney’s Office beginning in office in January — and that some are January. split over a recent effort to unionize. See Employment / A8

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Matthew Parson, 47, left, and his son Tyler Parson, 17, of Veneta, quiet the crowd as Jerry Pate putts on the 15th green Friday at Crosswater Club in Sunriver.

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Trusts, new income pull Redmond pet shelter back from the brink of closure

SMILE IF YOU’RE AT THE BREW FEST

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

The Redmond Humane Society is getting closer to climbing out of debt and operating in the black for the first time in several years. In 2008, the shelter nearly closed, and a new board of directors eventually took over operations. The shelter had been operating with a roughly $72,000 annual shortfall and owed Deschutes County $1.4 million. Since then, the shelter has reduced its annual shortfall by about $67,000 and paid back nearly half of the county loan, according to Mike Daly, president of the board of directors and a former Deschutes County commissioner. To reach this relatively bright financial picture, the shelter has relied both on new revenue and on family trusts of which it is a beneficiary. The Alice Teater Trust and a Willamette Valley-based trust have so far given the shelter about $700,000. Income from both trusts is expected to pay off the Humane Society’s full county debt, Daly said. But in the last year, the shelter has also launched a thrift store, an RV park, new fundraisers, and a spay and neuter clinic. “We were way behind the 8 ball,” Daly said. The thrift store has succeeded beyond expectations, Daly said. The store, which opened on June 3, cost about $12,000 to open. In June, sales were over $22,334, with $13,400 net profit. In July, sales were at $16,800, according to a shelter presentation. See Humane / A7

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Robin Winchell, 32, left, and her friend Kerri Gladney, 33, both of Bend, share a laugh Friday while sampling an offering from Ninkasi Brewing of Eugene, during the Bend Brew Fest at the Les Schwab Amphitheater. “I’m glad we can bring our friends from out of town here and show them what Bend is all about,” Gladney said. Bend Brew Fest continues today from noon to 11 p.m. at the amphi-

theater. A required tasting mug costs $10 and includes four tokens, with additional tokens sold five for $5. Each 4-ounce taste costs one token. The event is otherwise free to enter. To find out what offerings are on tap from the 36 participating breweries, go to www.bendbrewfest.com and click on the “Brews+Brewers” link.

Wrong tube: Lax oversight leads to medical errors

Victims of bedbug infestations beginning to feel like pariahs By Emily B. Hager New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Jeremy Sparig spent months fighting bedbugs. Now, to some people, he is like a mattress left on the street, something best avoided in these times. “They don’t want to hug you anymore; they don’t want you coming over,” said Sparig, of East Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “You’re like a leper.”

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At the Brooklyn district attorney’s office, which recently had a bedbug breakout, defense lawyers are skittish about visiting, and it is not because of the fierce prosecutors. Even Steven Smollens, a housing lawyer who has helped many tenants with bedbugs, has his guard up. Those clients are barred from his office. “I meet outside,” he said. “There’s a Starbucks across the street.” See Bedbugs / A8

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Handler Don Frey leads Ruby, a beagle trained to detect bed bugs, through a house in New York on Thursday.

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Thirty-five weeks pregnant, Robin Rodgers was vomiting and losing weight, so her doctor hospitalized her and ordered that she be fed through a tube until the birth of her daughter. But in a mistake that stemmed from years of lax federal oversight of medical devices, the hospital mixed up the tubes. Instead of snaking a tube through Rodgers’ nose and into her stomach, the nurse instead coupled the liquid-food bag to a tube that entered a vein. See Tubes / A6

TOP NEWS INSIDE MIDEAST: Israelis and Palestinians agree to D.C. peace talks, Page A2


A2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Mideast rivals agree Oil spill claim to D.C. peace talks rules: Distance By Anne Gearan and Matthew Lee The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Plunging into the Mideast peacemaker’s role that has defeated so many U.S. leaders, President Barack Obama on Friday invited Israel and the Palestinians to try anew in face-to-face talks for a historic agreement to establish an independent Palestinian state and secure peace for Israel. Negotiations shelved two years ago will resume Sept. 2 in Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said. Obama will host Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas for dinner the night before. The goal: a deal in a year’s time on the toughest issues that

have sunk previous negotiations, including the borders of a new Palestinian state and the fate of disputed Jerusalem, claimed as a holy capital by both peoples. “There have been difficulties in the past, there will be difficulties ahead,” Clinton said. “Without a doubt, we will hit more obstacles.” Indeed, soon after Clinton’s announcement the militant Hamas movement that controls the Gaza Strip, which along with the West Bank is supposed to be part of an eventual Palestinian state, rejected the talks, saying they were based on empty promises. Winning agreement to at least restart the direct talks makes good on an Obama campaign promise to confront the festering conflict early in his presidency,

instead of deferring the peace broker’s role as former President George W. Bush did. Bringing the two sides to Washington for a symbolic handshake also will saddle Obama with one of the world’s most intractable problems just when many other things, from a jobless recovery to probable midterm election losses, are not going well. The breakthrough after a nearly two-year hiatus in face-to-face negotiations brings the two sides back to where they were when the last direct talks began in November 2007, near the end of the Bush administration. Those talks broke down after Israel’s 2008 military operation in Gaza, followed by Netanyahu’s election last year on a much tougher platform than his predecessor.

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Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, center, was in Bahrain on Friday, a stop on a U.S.-funded trip to appear as a symbol of American religious freedom. Rauf, who also is spearheading a planned Islamic center near the World Trade Center site, refused to discuss the controversy Friday.

Amid mosque furor, imam’s goodwill tour sparks comment By Rachel Zoll The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The furor over the planned mosque and Islamic center near ground zero has put Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf in a curious position: At the same time he is being vilified in the U.S. for spearheading the project, he is traveling the Mideast on a State Department mission as a symbol of American religious freedom. Some of the imam’s American critics said they fear he is using the taxpayer-funded trip to raise money and rally support in the Muslim world for the mosque. “I think there is no place for this,” said the Rev. Franklin Graham, who is the son of evangelist Billy Graham and opposes the Islamic center and mosque.

“Can you imagine if the State Department paid to send me on a trip anywhere? The separation of church and state — the critics would have been howling.” At his first event Friday in the Persian Gulf state of Bahrain, Rauf refused to discuss the uproar over plans for the community center two blocks from the World Trade Center site. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley has said Rauf understands that he cannot solicit funds for the project on his 15day tour. The $100 million, 13-story project is modeled after the YMCA and Jewish Community Center. Rauf and his wife, Daisy Khan, a co-leader of the project, have a long record of interfaith outreach and insist the center will promote moderate Islam.

Opponents have condemned the plan as an affront to families who lost loved ones on Sept. 11, 2001, and the sensibilities of a nation still dealing with the wounds of the attacks. Some critics have accused Rauf of quietly harboring extremist views. The dispute has sparked a national debate on religious freedom and American values and is becoming an issue on the campaign trail ahead of the midterm elections. In New York, Khan said organizers are sticking with their plan and are not considering scaling it back or changing locations. “Dropping the plan is definitely not an option at all,” she told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Friday.

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Virtual colonoscopy catches more, study finds By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Colonoscopy is an important tool to detect colorectal cancer. In recent years, virtual colonoscopy, which involves a CT scan of the colon instead of the invasive, optical inspection of the colon, has been shown to be as effective as traditional colonoscopy. Now, a new study suggests that virtual colonoscopy may even be superior because it can identify can-

cers outside of the colon. In a study of 2,277 patients who underwent virtual colonoscopy, almost half were found to have some suspicious lesions outside the colon. Further testing showed that 240 of those lesions were considered medically significant, such as being some type of cancer. After further evaluation, 19 surgeries were performed to identify six cancers (one lymphoma, three renal cell cancers and two lung cancers) Self Referrals Welcome

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and one aortic aneurysm. Virtual colonoscopy essentially allows for an examination of the entire abdomen and pelvis, unlike traditional colonoscopy, which is limited to the interior of the colon and rectum.

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By Curt Anderson The Associated Press

MIAMI — A flower shop in Florida that saw a drop-off in weddings this summer is probably out of luck. So is a restaurant in Idaho that had to switch seafood suppliers. A hardware store on the Mississippi coast may be left out, too. The latest guidelines for BP’s $20 billion victims compensation fund say the nearer you are geographically to the oil spill and the more closely you depend on the Gulf of Mexico’s natural resources, the better chance you have of getting a share of the money. Also, a second set of rules expected this fall will require that businesses and individuals seeking compensation for long-term losses give up their right to sue BP and other spill-related companies — something that could save the oil giant billions. The new rules for the claims process were released Friday by Washington lawyer Kenneth Feinberg, who was picked by President Barack Obama to run the fund and previously oversaw claims for 9/11 victims. Beginning Monday, the claims will be handled by Feinberg rather than BP, which is still footing the entire $20 billion bill. Who gets paid and who doesn’t will depend largely on how much proof there is that losses were caused by the spill and not by something else, such as the recession. Feinberg’s guidelines say key factors include a claimant’s geographic proximity to the disaster and how much the business or property is linked to “injured natural resources.” Feinberg elaborated on his reasoning during town meetings this week in Louisiana. “How close are you to the beach? To the Gulf? BP got claims from restaurants in Idaho. Go figure,” he said. “How close are you? That’s a major factor. How dependent are you, as an individual or a business, on the resources of the Gulf?” That worries business owners like Susan Mitchell, who runs a flower shop about a mile from Pensacola Beach, Fla., where tarballs from the spill washed up. She said her business was down about $4,000 this year in July from the year before. “But it is hard to prove exactly

By Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Newly discovered cliffs on the moon indicate that it has shrunk in the past as it cooled off, and that it might even still be shrinking, researchers said this week. The shrinkage isn’t dramatic — perhaps no more than a 300foot reduction in the moon’s 2,000-mile diameter — but it is enough to cause cracks to form just like they would in the rind of a dried-up orange. Researchers had first noticed the cliffs, technically called lobate scarps because they are semi-circular like a lobe, in images from the Apollo 15, 16 and 17 missions. But those images were collected only near the equator, and geologists thought they probably indicated a local

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Florida could seek $1B from BP Florida may send BP a claim for more than $1 billion to close a budget gap after the largest U.S. oil spill slashed tax receipts from tourism. Steve Yerrid, a Tampa lawyer chosen by Florida Gov. Charlie Crist to advise him on legal issues concerning the spill, said the state may seek an initial payment in the “lower range” of billions of dollars to make up for lost tax revenue. “We’re hoping rather than jobs being sacrificed or services to Floridians being lost, that we can develop some type of dialogue to get interim relief until state claims can be properly calculated,” Yerrid said in a telephone interview this week. States that filed claims for funds spent or revenue lost because of BP’s spill in the Gulf of Mexico would be joining idled fishermen and empty hotels struggling because tourists stayed away. Florida would ask London-based BP to pay it separately from the $20 billion fund the company set up to handle claims so the state doesn’t have to compete with its own citizens, Yerrid said. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service why that is and everyone keeps telling us we have to prove that it was because of the oil,” she said. “We usually have beach weddings all summer. We deliver to hotels with people having birthday parties and celebrations on the beach.” Jeffrey Breit, a Virginia-based lawyer who represents more than 600 Gulf Coast fishermen, said the geographic limitations will certainly cut out many deserving claimants. “I think it’s unfair to draw arbitrary geographic lines when it is clear that many businesses rely on the natural resources of the Gulf for their livelihoods,” Breit said.

Study shows moon has shrunk slightly

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phenomenon. But new images from the entire surface of the moon collected by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, reported Thursday in the journal Science, show that the scarps appear all over the body. “This is the first evidence that the moon has been shrinking, and may still be shrinking,” NASA’s chief lunar scientist, Michael Wargo, said in a news conference. But, he added, “the kind of radius change and shrinking we are describing here is so small that you would never notice it.” The scarps themselves can only be observed with highresolution cameras of the type that are aboard the LRO. The biggest of them is about 300 feet high and several miles long.


T OP S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 A3

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W  B Karzai clears blocks to fighting corruption KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan’s president pledged Friday to let Western-backed anti-corruption teams pursue investigations free from political interference following two rounds of candid talks with U.S. Sen. John Kerry that the lawmaker said were marked by “sometimes tough” conversation. Kerry urged President Hamid Karzai to move quickly to combat corruption or risk losing support in the U.S. Congress at a critical phase in the war. U.S. lawmakers have expressed doubt the military effort can succeed without a serious campaign against bribery and graft that have eroded the Afghan people’s trust in the Karzai government. Also in Afghanistan, Taliban fighters in a rural area near the Helmand River staged an audacious nighttime raid early Thursday, swooping down on several hundred sleeping Afghan private security guards who were securing a road construction project, and killing at least 21, according to guards who escaped.

Wyclef Jean barred from Haiti’s election PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Haiti’s electoral commission said Friday that hip-hop artist Wyclef Jean cannot run for president of this Caribbean nation, ending his outsider’s bid to lead a country struggling to recover from the Jan. 12 earthquake. Jean, who faced a challenge to his candidacy in the Nov. 28 elections because he has not lived in Haiti for the past five years as required, issued a statement urging his supporters to remain calm and respond “peacefully and responsibly to the disappointment.” “Though I disagree with the ruling, I respectfully accept the committee’s final decision, and I urge my supporters to do the same,” he said. The electoral commission approved 19 candidates and rejected 15, spokesman Richardson Dumel told journalists late Friday, without providing justification for the decisions. While rejecting Jean, the board approved two leading presidential candidates, former Prime Minister JacquesEdouard Alexis and Yvon Neptune, who was the last prime minister under ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

QUALITY FOR LESS! Photos courtesy U.S. Marshals Service

Casslyn Welch and John McCluskey were arrested Thursday at dusk at an Arizona campground. The capture brought an end to a manhunt that began July 30 when McCluskey and two murderers broke out of a medium-security prison. McCluskey reportedly told officers he wished he had been able to shoot them with a gun he had in a nearby tent.

‘Bonnie, Clyde’ nabbed with no gunfire after 3-week run By Felicia Fonseca and Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

ST. JOHNS, Ariz. — Over the past three weeks, an escaped Arizona prisoner and his girlfriend bedeviled the hundreds of lawmen hunting them across the desolate highways and thick forests of the West. There would be sightings of John McCluskey and Casslyn Welch. One in Montana. Another as far away as Arkansas. And then sometimes nothing. Until Thursday, when an alert forest ranger’s tip led police right to them. The self-styled “Bonnie and Clyde” offered little resistance. A few threats. No shootout.

They didn’t even try to run. As the nation kept a lookout for them and law enforcers put up alerts at campgrounds and truck stops, the couple somehow slipped back into Arizona, their beat-up Nissan hidden at a campground across the state from the prison from which McCluskey escaped, police say, with help from Welch — his cousin and fiancee. When a SWAT team descended on the campsite at dusk, Welch reached for a weapon but dropped it when she realized she was outgunned, police said. A shirtless, tattoo-covered McCluskey told officers that he regretted not shooting them with the gun he had in a nearby tent.

“He has no remorse,” Apache County Sheriff’s Cmdr. Webb Hogle said. The capture brought an end to a manhunt that began July 30 when McCluskey and two murderers broke out of a medium-security prison in Kingman, 185 miles northwest of Phoenix. Authorities say Welch threw a set of wire cutters onto prison grounds, allowing them to cut open a fence. One inmate was caught after a shootout in Colorado. The other was nabbed in a small Wyoming town after he was spotted at a church. The escape cast a critical spotlight on Arizona’s prison system. A report on Thursday found a se-

ries of breakdowns that allowed the inmates to slip away into the desert, including alarms that went off so often that prison personnel often just ignored them. Police on Friday were still trying to piece together details about the couple’s time on the lam. McCluskey and Welch are suspected in several crimes, including the killing of a couple in New Mexico whose torched bodies were found in Santa Rosa. Officials said the Nissan had New Mexico license plates that were stolen around the time the couple was killed. During the arrest, he suggested that the gun used in the killings was in his tent, police said.

FLOOD THREAT SHIFTS SOUTH IN PAKISTAN

S. Korea arrests ‘unification activist’ SEOUL, South Korea — A South Korean Christian pastor who has fueled a bitter debate by visiting North Korea without government permission was arrested Friday during his trip home across the heavily guarded border between the countries. The pastor, the Rev. Han Sang-ryol, a self-styled “unification activist,” was waving a “one-Korea” flag that showed an undivided Korean Peninsula as he stepped across the military demarcation line at the border village of Panmunjom, government officials said. He was immediately whisked away by South Korean authorities for interrogation. During its so-called sunshine policy of engaging North Korea from 1998 to 2008, the government in Seoul often approved, and sometimes encouraged, visits by South Koreans to the North. — From wire reports

D A Y S A L E !

Accused gun-runner expects exoneration BANGKOK — Viktor Bout, a Russian businessman who is expected to face gun-running charges in the United States after his extradition from Thailand, expressed confidence Friday that he would be exonerated. “We will go to court in America and we will win,” Bout told a reporter from Russia’s RIA Novosti news agency after a Thai court ordered the extradition. Bout, who inspired the movie “Lord of War,” starring Nicolas Cage, is suspected of running a large-scale trafficking organization that provided weapons to governments, rebels and insurgents across the globe.

L A B O R

Kevin Frayer / The Associated Press

Residents protect themselves from dust blown about by a Pakistani helicopter as it lands during a food drop Friday at the flood-encircled village of Tul in Sindh Province, southern Pakistan. The flood damage is creeping southward, Pakistani officials said Friday. Of primary concern was the water level at flood barriers north of the city of Hyderabad, also in Sindh Province. The next two days will be critical for the city’s 1.5 million people, but embankments strengthened over the last 10 days offer some protection, said an officer at the flood control room there, who gave his name as Maj. Ehsan.

“We have done a lot of work, making sandbags and stone pitches to build up the embankments,” he said. The Indus River, which has flooded five to seven miles beyond its banks, is flowing at a rate of more than 700,000 cubic feet per second, he said Friday. The rate was expected to rise to 800,000 cubic feet per second in the next 24 hours at the flood barrier, called the Kotri barrage, he said. “If the water coming does not exceed that, we will be able to pass through this,” he said. — New York Times News Service

Biden urges Democrats Cleaning for Magna Carta, to buck up for midterms replica, 800 years after writing By Jeff Zeleny New York Times News Service

ST. LOUIS — Vice President Joe Biden admonished Democrats on Friday to shake away their pessimism about the fall elections, arguing that the prospect of historic losses would be minimized because the Republican Party has been overtaken by extreme candidates and stale ideas. “The reports of the death of the Democratic Party have been greatly exaggerated,” Biden said, paraphrasing Mark Twain as he addressed party leaders here. “The day after the election, there will be a Democratic majority in the House and a Democratic majority in the Senate. If it weren’t illegal, I’d make book on it.” As the Democratic National

Committee gathered for its summer meeting at Union Station in St. Louis, anxiety marked a stark change for a party that had reveled in back-to-back election cycles that produced control of Congress and the White House. Democrats acknowledged the difficult political climate, but they said that their candidates could benefit from Republican shortcomings. “The choice is not between Democrats and the Almighty. It’s between Democrats and the Republican tea party,” Biden said, suggesting that most U.S. voters would not tune into the election until after Labor Day. “Voters are going to look at what the Republican Party is really offering — more of the past but on steroids.”

The Washington Post WASHINGTON — Okay, liberty lovers — time for your summer-slowdown pop quiz: True or false? The following sentence appears in the U.S. Constitution: “No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned ... or in any other way destroyed ... except by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land. To no one will we sell, to none will we deny or delay, right or justice.” The correct answer: False. In 1215, scribes for King John of England wrote that declaration, in Latin, into the Magna Carta, after a bunch of barons confronted their despotic king about their rights and demand-

ed, “put it in writing, your Majesty.” It is the oldest document seen as establishing the rule of common law. Americans may not be carrying around little copies of the Magna Carta in their shirt pockets and purses, in the way that the Constitution and Bill of Rights are the must-have accessory for “tea party” members. But it remains an important piece of animal skin. And both the replica of it in the U.S. Capitol and the real thing at the National Archives are getting spruced up. The August recess is the moment for important refurbishing, restoring, repainting and reconfiguring at the Capitol and across its ground.

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A4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R In North Carolina, dueling billboards reinvigorate church-state debate By David Zucchino Los Angeles Times

ASHEVILLE, N.C. — In the Internet age, the nation’s culture wars are often waged through online blogs and e-mails. But across North Carolina, a heated church-state debate is playing out on an old-fashioned canvas: highway billboards. An atheist group has erected six billboards containing the phrase “One nation indivisible,” leaving out the words “under God,” from the Pledge of Allegiance. Outraged, a church group has responded by putting up a dozen billboards featuring the phrase “One nation under God.” The dueling billboards have sharpened a long-simmering debate in this Bible Belt state over just what the Founding Fathers intended when they prohibited the establishment of government-endorsed religion. The First Amendment to the Constitution reads, in part: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.” Jennifer Lovejoy, a retired Army noncommissioned officer and an atheist, says the Constitution bans the type of prescribed religion reflected in the “under God” phrase in the pledge. “The Founding Fathers were adamant about separation of church and state. Many of them feared God but they feared religion more,” said Lovejoy, an Asheville resident and a member of Western North Carolina Atheists, part of the North Carolina Secular Association, which raised money for the billboards. The “One Nation Indivisible” billboards went up just before the July 4 weekend in Asheville and five other North Carolina cities along the Interstate 40 and Interstate 85 corridors. The Rev. Ralph Sexton Jr., pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in Asheville, was offended. The Asheville billboard was near his church — and not far from the Billy Graham Freeway. Sexton and other church leaders, under the banner of a coalition called “We Still Pray,” raised money for the “One Nation Under God” billboards to counter what Sexton calls “political cor-

David Zucchino / Los Angeles Times

A billboard in Asheville, N.C., from an atheist group leaves “under God” out of language from the Pledge of Allegiance. rectness gone amok.” The billboards were erected in the same six cities and will remain for at least another few weeks.

Interpreting history “We were established as a Christian nation, so don’t try to rewrite history and sanitize it to write out God,” Sexton said. Lovejoy said it’s the church group that’s rewriting history. She points out that the original pledge did not contain “under God” when it was written in 1892 by a Baptist minister, Francis Bellamy. The phrase was added by Congress in 1954 at the height of the Cold War against the communist Soviet Union. “Her problem is that she doesn’t know American history,” Sexton said of Lovejoy. He contends that the pledge has religious underpinnings. He insists that the Constitution seeks to protect religion from government interference

but does not ban religion in government. “We are a nation built on Christian principles,” Sexton said. “Our Founding Fathers intended not that God be out of government, but that the government stay out of the church.” Lovejoy, the wife of a retired military policeman who is also an atheist, said her group’s billboards were in response to a controversy in Asheville in December, when a city councilman refused to obey an obscure provision in the North Carolina Constitution that disqualifies public officeholders “who shall deny the being of Almighty God.” The councilman, Cecil Bothwell, is an atheist. When he was sworn in to office, Bothwell recited an alternative oath that did not require him to affirm a belief in God or to swear on a Bible. State religious tests for officeholders were ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1961.

Lovejoy said she was also motivated by a Baptist minister who held Bible studies and prayer sessions for a high school football team that included her sons, who do not consider themselves Christians. Sexton said his We Still Pray group was formed in 2000 to protest a court ruling that prohibited student-led prayer in public schools. The group held a prayer rally at an Asheville high school. The atheist group’s billboard on the Billy Graham Parkway in Charlotte was defaced by someone who painted in the words “under God” below “One Nation Indivisible.” Other than that incident — and a few blogs and online news site comment sections peppered with obscenities and insults — the billboard debate has remained civil. “The good part of all of this,” Sexton said, “is that we’re talking to each other about an important issue.”

Obama Christian, pastors affirm Polls show increasing number think president is Muslim By Margaret Talev McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Pastors who have prayed with President Barack Obama defended his Christian faith Thursday as the White House downplayed new polling that showed a steep climb since he took office in the percentage of Americans who think he’s Muslim or at least don’t believe that he’s Christian. “He is a Christian by choice, a devout Christian,” said Pastor Kirbyjon Caldwell of Windsor Village United Methodist Church in Houston. Caldwell is among a group of Christian leaders whom Obama regularly calls for inspiration. Caldwell also officiated at the wedding of President George W. Bush’s daughter Jenna. Pastor Joel Hunter of Northland Church near Orlando, Fla., said of Obama, “Those of us who’ve spent time with him and have had a part of forming his spiritual life can testify with certainty of his commitment to Christ.” Although Obama has made several high-profile overtures to Muslims in the U.S. and worldwide in the past year, both of those pastors said they suspected the rising false perception that Obama was Muslim had more to do with spurious Internet and partisan media campaigns. “There’s a fairly effective 24hour-a-day noise box out there intentionally misrepresenting the faith of the president, and it’s very unfortunate,” Caldwell said. “I think we’re living in very interesting times when for the first time in modern-day politics we have a president who says, ‘I am a Christian,’ and some folk

basically say, ‘We don’t believe you.’ ” Said Hunter: “There are a lot of folks who are naive and don’t know, and they just buy into the strongest voice. Bottom line: They are wrong or misinformed.” Some of Obama’s more socially liberal positions on gay rights or atheists’ role in society could be contributing to the corollary belief that he isn’t a Christian. However, the pastors also said that his preference to practice his faith privately rather than join a Washington church or to wear religion on his sleeve might have helped minimize the public’s impression of him as a religious person. Hunter described the president’s call to him earlier this summer when he learned that Hunter’s granddaughter had brain cancer. “He said, ‘Remember now, the Lord’s with you,’ ” Hunter recalled. “He became my pastor for just a conversation. It was very genuine, very personal and very much at his initiative. It’s one of those glimpses no one else is able to see, and if they were it wouldn’t even be a question” of his faith. The two mega-church pastors, both of whom have prayed with Obama by phone in recent weeks, spoke out after the release of two polls that reveal growing distrust of the president among his critics and a growing uncertainty about his religious beliefs even among traditional supporters. The Pew survey of 3,003 adults found 18 percent of Americans saying Obama is Muslim,

up from 11 percent in March 2009, two months after his inauguration. The percentage who identified him as Christian went from 48 percent to 34 percent,

while 43 percent of Americans said they didn’t know what he believed. The rise in those who insist that Obama is Muslim was found primarily among Republicans, from 17 percent last year to 31 percent today.

R  B Lead Pastor Ken Wytsma will share the message at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the Redux service at 11:15 Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “The High Cost of Low Living” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Worship in Praise,” based on Colossians 3:15-17, at 10 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “The Book of Revelation & The End Times” as the part of the series “Q & A: Your Questions. God’s Answers” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part two of the message “Room For Everyone,” based on 2 Peter 3:9, at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “The Reality of Entitlement” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Al Hulbert will share the message “Taking Truth for a Walk” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Greg Bolt will speak on the topic “Such A Time As This” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service and 10:45 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “What’s In A Name?,” based on Luke 13:10-17 and Jeremiah 4:1-10, at the 9 a.m. contemporary service and 10:30 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will share the message “Jesus You Never Knew” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Regal Old Mill 16 Cinemas, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., Bend. • Jim Peltier will share the message “Creating Peace and Harmony in Your Life” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone

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Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor David Carnahan will share the message “It’s Not What We Know …” based on Luke 13:25 and 27, at 10 a.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Lay Leader Carol Sisson will speak on the topic “The Power of the Spoken Word” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Teri Hawkins will speak on the topic “Discover Your Sacred Path” at 10 a.m. Sunday at The Unity Community of Central Oregon, held at Eastern Star Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend. • Pastor Mike Alexander will speak of “Rewriting the Rules — A Father’s Story” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Senior Pastor Myron Wells will share the message “How to Win Over Discouragement,” based on Nehemiah 4:1-23, at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • The Rev. Dr. John Mahon, Co-executive Presbyter from Eugene, will share the message at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Randy VanMehren will share the message “It Is God Who Opens Our Deaf Ears That We May Hear His Gospel and Receive Life and Forgiveness Through Christ,” based on Mark 7:31-37, at the 10:30 a.m. service Sunday at Emmaus Lutheran Church, 2175 S.W. Salmon, Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “From Bondage to Brotherhood,” based on the book of Philemon, at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “Only the Man Who Has the Keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, the Gospel of Christ-Crucified For the Sins of All Men, Is Able to Enter Heaven,” based on Luke 13:24, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

D E S E R T

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R E S E R V E Y O U R A D S PA C E B Y S E P T. 2 4 C A L L 5 4 1 - 3 8 2 - 1 8 1 1


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care plus Teen Ministry 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

WESTSIDE CHURCH

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

Summer Schedule of Services June 20 – September 5 9:00 AM Sunday School / Bible Study 10:00 AM Worship Nursery provided on Sundays

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor

Christian Schools

“Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike will share his message titled, “Room For Everyone” Part II 2 Peter 3:9 10:30 am Children’s Church “Faithtown” WEDNESDAYS 7:00 PM: Fuel Youth Group A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups. Please contact the church for details and times. Child care provided during Sunday morning service. Pastor Michael Johnson The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

RADIANT LIFE FELLOWSHIP Loving God & Truth + People & Life 60670 Brookswood Blvd. • (541) 389-4749 www.rlfbend.org Pastor George Bender SUNDAY “GLOW” Sunday School @ 9:30 am “IGNITE” Worship @ 10:30 am “SPARKLERS” Kids’ Care & Kids’ Church WEDNESDAY “VISION” Bible Study @ 7 pm “ILLUMINATE” Youth Worship @ 7 pm REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, La Pine 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00AM Sunday Mass — 10:00AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00PM HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30PM Sunday Mass — 8:00AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15AM

EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary)

OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00–12:15PM

Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary)

HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15PM

Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10;15 AM Worship Service This Sunday guest speaker Al Hulbert is speaking “Taking Truth for a Walk” For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Joe Reinig Fr. Daniel Maxwell Deacon Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 8:00 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, August 22th Message: “How to Win Over Discouragement” Nehemiah 4:1–23 Speaker: Myron Wells POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Episcopal TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Rewriting the Rules—A Father’s Story Pastor Mike Alexander Playing by the right rules is the difference between winning and losing in life’s biggest arena. WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00 and 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th and 5th Grades Meet: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond

9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 10:45am

SUMMER SCHEDULE Sunday Worship Service at 10:00 am

SOUTH CAMPUS The International Fan Jesse Hinrichs Life, Sports and God. Can they intersect? Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97701 Sunday at 11:00am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 11:00am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years, We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are welcome! Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 • www.jccobend.com Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack Religious Education & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Fri. Aug. 27 - 7 pm. Fri. Evening Service Sat. Aug. 28 - 10 am - CJ Fritz’s Bar Mitzvah Sun. Sept. 5 - 10 am Bagels & Back to School High Holiday Workshop Wed. Sept. 8 - 7 pm - Erev Rosh HaShana Service Thurs. Sept. 9 - 10 am - Rosh HaShana Service 11 am - Childrens Service Sun. Sept.12 - 10 am -1st Day of Sunday School Fri. Sept. 17 - 6:30 pm Sharp! - Kol Nidrei Sat. Sept. 18 - 10 am - Yom Kippur Services 11 am - Children’s Services Followed by Community Potluck Break the Fast TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. We offer a wide range of monthly activities including services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education. Rabbi Glenn Ettman Upcoming Services: Sat., August 21- Torah Study: 9:00-10:15 am Sat., August 21 – Torah Service: 10:30 am **************** High Holy Days Services to be held in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church – led by Rabbi Glenn Ettman Erev Rosh Hashanah Service – Wednesday, September 8 @ 7:00 pm Rosh Hashanah Day Service – Thursday, September 9 @ 10:00 am Rosh Hashanah Children’s Service – Thursday, September 9 @ 2:00 pm Erev Yom Kippur Service, Kol Nidre – Friday September 17 @ 7:00 pm Yom Kippur Day Service – Saturday September 18 @10:00 am For the complete schedule of High Holy Days services go to: www.bethtikvahbend.org We are currently enrolling students in grades K—6 for Sunday School and Hebrew School Classes begin Sunday, September 12th

CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128

For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000

Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission” DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you! Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM Come and meet our new pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org

www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org

6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00am

Foursquare

Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm

Vacation Bible School at Trinity August 23–27 from 9:00 AM–12:00 PM “You’ll be zip, zap, zoomin’ for Jesus on Planet Zoom”

All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study, Wednesday 7:15 a.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach “Worship in the Park” August 29th, 10:00 am at Sam Johnson Park Pavilion, Redmond 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim Pastor www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational ALFALFA COMMUNITY CHURCH Alfalfa Community Hall 541-330-0593, Alfalfa, Oregon Sunday School 9:30, Worship 10:30 We sing hymns, pray for individual needs, and examine the Bible verse by verse. You can be certain of an eternity with Jesus (Eph. 2:8,9) and you can discover His plan and purpose for your life (Eph. 2:10). We welcome your fellowship with us. CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org REDMOND BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Big Sky Conference Center 3732 SW 21st Street, Suite 103 (Next to Color Tile) Expositional, verse by verse teaching with emphasis on Paul’s Epistles. Great fellowship beginning at 10 am, ending at 11:30 every Sunday morning. For more information call Dave at 541-923-5314 or Mark at 541-923-6349 SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER “The Adventure of a Lifetime” This Summer at CLC Summer Schedule Sundays - 9:30 AM in the Amphitheater Wednesday Mid-Week Service - 7:00 PM Nursery Care and Children’s programs available for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur 21720 E. Hwy. 20 541-389-8241 www.clcbend.com

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765

Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor

SUMMER SERVICE TIMES We will be back at Nativity Lutheran Church this Sunday, August 22nd and service will be held at 9:30am Sermon by Pastor David C . Nagler Choir meets at 8:30 AM

8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 10:00 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 1:00 pm - Middle School Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program 7:00 pm - Senior High Youth Small Groups Meet Regularly

Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

(Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

Sunday Worship “Such A Time As This” Rev. Greg Bolt 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional Wednesday 5:30 pm The Fold (9th-12th grades) Movie Night 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship Family Camp August 27–30 Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always! www.bendfp.org 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation

Sunday, August 22nd at 11:00 am Carol Sisson: “The Power of the Spoken Word” UUFCO Lay Leader Carol Sisson will share her wisdom and reflections on this topic. Please join us! Childcare and is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569United Church of God

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson 9:00 am Contemporary Service 10:30 am Traditional Service Sermon title “**What’s In A Name?*” Scripture: Luke 13:10–17 & Jeremiah 4:1–10 Jubilee Service for Children *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

$126 The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday

CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Temples


A6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Tubes Continued from A1 Putting such food directly into the bloodstream is like pouring concrete down a drain. Rodgers was soon in agony. “When I walked into her hospital room, she said, ‘Mom, I’m so scared,’ ” her mother, Glenda Rodgers, recalled. They soon learned that the baby had died. “And she said, ‘Oh, Mom, she’s dead.’ And I said, ‘I know, but now we have to take care of you,’ ” the mother recalled. And then Robin Rodgers — 24 years old and already the mother of a 3-year-old boy — died on July 18, 2006, as well. (She lived in a small Kansas town, but because of a legal settlement with the hospital, her mother would not identify it.) The deaths were among hundreds of deaths or serious injuries that researchers have traced to tube mix-ups. But no one knows the real toll, because this kind of mistake, like medication errors in general, is rarely reported. A 2006 survey of hospitals found that 16 percent had experienced a feeding tube mix-up. Standards groups have advocated since 1996 that tubes for different functions be made incompatible — just as different nozzles at gas stations prevent drivers from using the wrong fuel. But action has been delayed by resistance from the medicaldevice industry and an approval process at the Food and Drug Administration that can discourage safety-related changes. Hospitals, tube manufacturers, regulators and standards groups all point fingers at one another to explain the delay. Hospitalized patients often have an array of clear plastic tubing sticking out of their bodies to deliver or extract medicine, nutrition, fluids, gases or blood to veins, arteries, stomachs, skin, lungs or bladders. Much of the tubing is interchangeable, and with nurses connecting and disconnecting dozens each day, mix-

Tradition Continued from A1 Ralph Holland is in charge of the marshals. He has volunteered for Peter Jacobsen Sports for 25 years, working every one of the tournaments the group’s put on over the years. In an average tournament, he doesn’t see much golf. Holland said more often than not, the marshals have very few problems with fans. “The gallery is actually typically as well-educated about golf as (the marshals),” Holland said. “The gallery can be your best friend.” That’s because most spectators are there to see golf at its best, not to drink beer and talk loudly while players are lining up their putts. “They’ll shut people up,” he said. Holland said his average day during the Tradition runs about 12 to 14 hours. He arrives about 6 a.m. to make sure the course is ready. But it’s not the fairways or the greens he’s looking at. “I make sure the ropes are in position,” he said. “I make sure the course is ready for spectators.” Then he puts his marshals out on the course and makes sure they’re all in the right spots. He tries to stay ahead of the most popular players and the leaders, because they get much larger galleries of fans. “When the lead group is at 7 or 8, I make sure we’re ready for them to be on 10 and 11,” Holland said. Primarily, marshals make sure spectators are quiet and respectful. They also help the pros find their golf balls when they fall into the rough or other hard-tospot areas. They stand on the course for hours at a time, raising and lowering their arms, sometimes shushing a fan or two. Last week, Holland ran a training course for new volunteer marshals. He has just three rules: have fun, stay hydrated and take breaks. “They’re a dedicated group of people,” Holland said. “And they love their golf.” Dedicated is an understatement for Dallas Cowell. The 38-year-old traveled from Brisbane, Australia, to be a Tradition marshal. He’s in the United States for three months on a golf holiday, and decided to swing up to the Tradition and volunteer for the week at the start of his vacation. He’s camping in La Pine and spending his days out on the 16th hole this weekend. “This is just an incredible experience,” he said. “We don’t have this in Australia. We have a major once in awhile, but they’re very exclusive, and you can’t get this close.”

ups happen — sometimes with deadly consequences. “Nurses should not have to work in an environment where it is even possible to make that kind of mistake,” said Nancy Pratt, a senior vice president at Sharp HealthCare in San Diego and a vocal advocate for changing the system. “The nuclear power and airline industries would never tolerate a situation where a simple misconnection could lead to a death.” An international standards group is seeking consensus on specific designs on how tubes for different bodily functions should differ, but the group has been laboring for years and its complete recommendations will take years more. Some manufacturers have used color-coding to distinguish tubes for different functions, but with each manufacturer using a different color scheme, the colors have in some cases added to the confusion. Advocates in California got legislation passed in 2008 that would have mandated that feeding tubes no longer be compatible with tubes that go into the skin or veins by 2011. But in 2009, AdvaMed, the manufacturers’ trade association, successfully pushed legislation to delay the bill’s effects until 2013 and 2014. In the meantime, FDA reviewers have begun to question whether feeding tubes that could mistakenly be connected to intravenous tubes should be declared fundamentally unsafe. The catalyst for those questions, according to internal documents provided to The New York Times, was an application filed in August 2009 from Alan Reid, president of Multi-Med in West Swanzey, N.H., to produce feeding tubes for newborns that go into the stomach using the same connectors as those that go into veins. The FDA was so concerned about the application that it inspected the Multi-Med plant in September and issued a warning letter for Multi-Med’s failure to test or design its pediatric feeding tubes adequately.

Cowell said that while he didn’t have much company while on the fairway of the 16th hole on Thursday, he didn’t mind. “I was all by myself with a big smile,” he said. His day out on the back nine was quiet, and he said he didn’t have to shush anyone. “All I wanted to do was raise my hands,” he said. “But there was nobody there.” After 11 years as a marshal for tournaments around the state, Downing doesn’t get too worked up anymore. He likes to talk to the players and caddies and enjoys being outdoors. When he finishes on the first tee, he often goes to help out on another hole in the afternoon. The first tee, he said, is easier than the 10th, where he worked the past three years. There, he often had to stop people from walking and stop the chatter. But with years of experience, Downing can tell when he’s got someone in the crowd who might be a problem. “You can sort of tell by the way people walk and the way they stand,” he said. “But for the most part, they’re pretty good.” On Friday, all was well. Today and Sunday, however, might be a different story. “Those are a little bit more of a challenge,” Downing said. Each hole has a captain who uses a walkie-talkie to check on challenges around the course. In many cases, The Tradition’s marshals make it a family affair. For example, Matthew Parson and his son, Tyler, are overseeing the 15th hole this tournament. Parson is a golf fanatic, and said after having attended the tournament as a spectator for the past couple years he wanted to get closer. “I wanted to get in on the action,” he said. “I wanted to get inside the ropes and get close.” It’s his first year as a marshal, but Parson said he’s already got a method for keeping spectators quiet. “When it’s a big crowd, I’ll put my arms up so that people know that a putt or a stroke is on its way,” he said. “But unless they’re being loud, I’ll just ask them nicely.” He said he tries to make friends with the groups who settle in to watch at his hole. “I’ve had a couple really nice groups,” he said. Tyler, 17, said the 13-hour days are a challenge. On Friday, the pair came prepared with stools. “We’re up early, and we’re asleep early,” he said. “But it’s worth it,” his dad replied. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Facebook feeling unfriendly toward film, but what to do? By Michael Cieply and Miguel Helft

Jesse Eisenberg portrays Mark Zuckerberg in “The Social Network,” a 2010 film directed by David Fincher. The movie seeks to tell the story of Facebook’s rise to prominence, but Zuckerberg and his colleagues bristle at the portrayal.

New York Times News Service

At the New York Film Festival next month, Hollywood will unleash “The Social Network,” a biting tale of Facebook and its founder Mark Zuckerberg. Now Facebook must decide whether to bite back. After fretting for months over how to respond, the company appears to have decided that its best bet is to largely ignore the movie and hope that audiences do the same — that “The Social Network” will be another failed attempt to bottle a generation, like “Less Than Zero,” and not culturally defining, as it aspires to be, in the way of “Wall Street” or “The Big Chill.” Behind the scenes, however, Zuckerberg and his colleagues have been locked in a tense standoff with the filmmakers, who portray Facebook as founded on a series of betrayals, then fueled by the unappeasable craving of almost everyone for “friends” — the Facebook term for those who connect on its online pages — that they will never really have. Zuckerberg, at 26 a billionaire, and his associates are wary of damage from a picture whose story begins with the intimacy of a date night at Harvard seven years ago and depicts the birth of a Web phenomenon in his dorm room. By his account, and that of many others, much in the film is simply not true. It is based on a fictionalized book once described by its publicist not as “reportage” but as “big juicy fun.” “It’s crazy because all of a sudden Mark becomes this person who created Facebook to get girls or to gain power,” said Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder who left in 2007 to join the Obama presidential campaign. “That’s not what was going on. It was a little more boring and quotidian than that.”

‘They do not like it’ Scott Rudin, a producer of “The Social Network,” said two top Facebook executives, Elliot Schrage, the vice president of communications, and Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer, “saw the movie a while ago, and they do not like it.” Rudin described months of backdoor contacts during which he tried to ease relations with Zuckerberg by letting colleagues of the Facebook

Columbia Pictures via The New York Times

“It’s a sign of Facebook’s impact that we’re the subject of a movie — even one that’s fiction.” — Facebook chief read the script, and even by accommodating them with small changes. Facebook had insisted on bigger changes, which the producers declined to make. In the end, Rudin said, “We made exactly the movie we wanted to make.” Zuckerberg declined to be interviewed for this article. In a recent onstage interview, he said, “Honestly, I wish that when people try to do journalism or write stuff about Facebook that they at least try to get it right.” He later added, “The movie is fiction.” But Rudin said the movie was about conflicting truths, as recalled by Zuckerberg and his associates, largely in a pair of court cases that ended in settlements. “There is no such thing as the truth,” Rudin said. In a statement, Facebook acknowledged that “it’s a sign of Facebook’s impact that we’re the subject of a movie — even one that’s fiction.” “The Social Network,” which is set for release by Sony Pictures on Oct. 1, is being rushed into awards contention by a pair of Hollywood’s most powerful filmmakers, director David Fincher and writer Aaron Sorkin. The two worked without acquiring the rights from Zuckerberg and other subjects, relying instead on journalist Ben Mezrich’s book, “The

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Accidental Billionaires,” and on the legal protection provided to free speech, along with Rudin’s diplomacy. The book drew heavily on interviews with Eduardo Saverin, a co-founder of Facebook and a former friend of Zuckerberg’s, who later felt that he was unfairly sidelined. For months, Rudin said, he talked with Schrage and others about a collaboration that would have involved incorporating work from David Kirkpatrick, who was writing a separate book about Facebook. Eventually, it became clear “that we were not going to be working together,” Rudin said, although he maintained contact long enough to screen a nearly finished film for Schrage and Sandberg.

Party scenes Filmmakers often elect not to buy rights for people who figure only marginally in a picture. That is also the case for television movies that adhere closely to the public record. But studios like to lock down the rights to their principal living subjects, if only so they will not be bound to literal truth in their portrayals. Rudin said rights were unnecessary in this case, partly because of the extensive legal record. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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The movie deals heavily with themes familiar to Hollywood, like friendship and betrayal, but makes little effort to explain Silicon Valley or the Facebook phenomenon. Indeed, much of the story borrows from depositions taken in cases pressed by former associates — Saverin, Divya Narendra and Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss — over the founding and subsequent ownership and control of Facebook. The film is also sprinkled with scenes of extravagant parties, and it is not clear how authentic they are. As of this week, Rudin said, one remaining question was to what extent the finished film would include a scene that depicted Sean Parker, the Napster co-founder who was heavily involved with Facebook’s early history, delivering his dialogue while a pair of teenage girls offer partygoers lines of cocaine from bared breasts. Matthew Hiltzik, a spokesman for Parker, declined to comment. But a person who was involved with research for the film, and spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid conflict with the producers, said that sequence was one of several that were mostly made up. Rudin said his main concern about the scene involved how much could be shown without compromising the movie’s hopedfor PG-13 rating. As for the portrayal of Zuckerberg, Rudin offers no apologies. Zuckerberg is “simultaneously a builder and a destroyer,” Rudin said. “It’s a big subject. It’s a big American subject.”

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C OV ER S T ORY

Humane Continued from A1 The shelter also reopened its event center, which is booked for several months ahead of time, Daly said. Families had rented the space for reunions, birthday parties and weddings, he said. But not every attempt to make money has met expectations. An RV park next to the shelter is bringing in about $600 a month and is not at capacity, Daly said. “It isn’t filling as quickly as I thought it would,” he said and pointed to increased competition among RV parks in the economic recession. In the last year, the shelter has also begun to cover its own costs. One of the Humane Society’s main expenses has long been spaying and neutering the animals brought to the shelter. Until recently, the shelter had to pay for the animals’ care with no way to cover the cost. But the shelter’s manager, Chris Bauersfeld, launched a low-cost spay-and-neuter clinic last year, and income from that has covered the costs for animals at the Humane Society. The spay-and-neuter clinic raised almost $70,000 last year, an amount roughly equal to the animal care costs, Bauersfeld said. With that cost taken care of, and new income from the store and event center, Bauersfeld believes the shelter will operate in the black this fiscal year. “With the programs we have and the diversity of our income, I believe we should (be out of the red),” Bauersfeld said. That’s a great relief to the county. Deschutes County bailed the shelter out to allow time for it to become stable, according to County Administrator Dave Kanner. Now, the county is seeing the fruits of that bet. The trusts have paid the shelter earlier than the county expected, and the Humane Society has found more ways to make money consistently, Kanner said. “(In 2008), I did not think they would be in the position they are in today, looking at financial solvency,” Kanner said. “It’d be fair to say I’m surprised. It’s a happy surprise.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 A7

After Iraq, U.S. troops fill base towns By Isolde Raftery and James Dao New York Times News Service

LAKEWOOD, Wash. — At Galloping Gerties Grill here, Sue Rothwell can spot the soldiers who have returned to nearby Joint Base LewisMcChord by their tanned faces and the way their children cling to their necks. Up the block at Plaza Cleaners and Laundry, a pile of dusty Army dress blues and greens await altering for a homecoming ball scheduled for this weekend. And three freeway exits north at Mina’s Nails, a line of military wives and girlfriends wait to get their nails painted with extravagant designs that match their evening gowns. “They all left in dribs and drabs, and all of sudden, this town was empty,” Rothwell said. “Now, it’s a sea of green here in the morning.” These are scenes that play out in military base towns whenever troops return from war — but rarely with the frequency and intensity that this town and others are seeing now as the Pentagon draws down troops in Iraq. This week the United States officially ended its combat mission in Iraq, leaving 50,000 troops — down from 140,000 a year before — to train and support Iraqi security forces. Although the Pentagon has been pulling units out of the country for months, the process will continue into the fall as thousands more service members flow back to their home bases to reunite with families, enter life beyond the military — or prepare for new missions. The returns are moments of cel-

Matthew Williams / New York Times News Service

Pfc. Chadwick Lewis-Fridley tries on his dress greens Friday at Plaza Cleaners in Lakewood, Wash. Joint Base Lewis-McChord, near Lakewood, is experiencing among the largest influxes of returning troops: At the beginning of the year, almost half the base was deployed, mostly to Iraq, and by late fall, nearly all will be back. ebration and relief, but tension and peril can lie ahead. Suicides, crime and marital problems often spike in the months after a deployment ends, military mental health experts say. And while the police in Lakewood said they have seen no problems yet, the base took the precaution of tripling its mental health staff, to 50, in preparation for the returning soldiers. Other bases around the country have also done so. “I’ve been bracing for all the things that come with the return of troops,”

said Andrew VanDenBergh, a former Marine and a war critic who helped start Coffee Strong, a nonprofit cafe that helps soldiers find services. “I sound pessimistic when I say it’s a matter of time.” Joint Base Lewis-McChord is experiencing among the largest influxes of returning troops. At the beginning of the year, nearly 18,000 of its service men and women — almost half the base — were deployed, most to Iraq. By late fall, nearly all will be back. At Fort Bragg, N.C., two brigades

of the 82nd Airborne Division will return by fall, and the post expects to have most of its 55,000 soldiers home for Christmas for the first time in nine years, its garrison commander has said. A brigade has about 3,000 soldiers. And the Third Infantry Division, based at Fort Stewart in Georgia, is scheduled to bring back nearly 14,000 soldiers by late fall from three combat brigades, a headquarters unit and a combat-aviation brigade. Kevin Larson, a spokesman for Fort Stewart, said that by the end of the year, five of the division’s six brigades will be home, only the second time that has happened since 2001. Senior military officials say they hope that with fewer troops needed in Iraq, the Pentagon will be able to keep troops home longer, perhaps reducing some of the deployment stress that experts say has contributed to record high numbers of suicides in the military. But with the surge under way in Afghanistan, where there are now more than 100,000 U.S. troops, many soldiers and Marines know that new deployments are inevitable. “We all know he’s going back to Afghanistan,” said April Berry, 29, the wife of a Joint Base Lewis-McChord soldier just back from Iraq. At the dry cleaners, Maria Dibbens offers alterations with a listening ear. Dibbens knows precisely when units will return and when the homecoming balls take place. “These young kids, they need support,” she said. “Sometimes I give out my number.”


A8 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Bedbugs Continued from A1 Beyond the bites and the itching, the bother and the expense, victims of the nation’s most recent plague are finding that an invisible scourge awaits them in the form of bedbug stigma. Friends begin to keep their distance. Invitations are rescinded. For months, one woman said, her mother was afraid to tell her that she had an infestation, even as the daughter kept coming over to visit. When she found out and went to clean her mother’s apartment, she said, “Nobody wanted to help me.” Fear and suspicion are creeping into the social fabric wherever bedbugs are turning up, which is almost everywhere: “Public health agencies across the country have been overwhelmed by complaints about bedbugs,” said a joint statement this month from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Environmental Protection Agency. Some of the fear is rooted in fact: The bugs, while they are not known to transmit disease, can travel on clothing, jump into pocketbooks and lurk in the nooks of furniture. And they do, of course, bite.

‘I don’t want the cooties’ Wenay James, a credit card account executive in Chicago, said that last year, a friend who had just had an infestation brought her children over for a visit. “I’m staring at their seat,” she said, “wondering if the cushion is going to run across the room.” “I haven’t been over to her place in a year,” James said. “I don’t want the cooties.” Even in New York, where the roach and the rat are considered members of the melting pot, no one wants to be associated with the minuscule pests that treat sleeping bodies as smorgasbords. Whole livelihoods are considered in jeopardy. Tutors and music teachers, who go from apartment to apartment, fear losing their clients. An Upper West

Employment Continued from A1 “Given your position as chief deputy, your involvement in Mr. Dugan’s campaign and your failure to contact me after the election, I expect that you are not interested in being a member of my office anyway,” he wrote. “However, I just want to make certain that you are not under any misimpression that might cause you to delay seeking other employment.” Flaherty and Nakahira both declined to comment on the letter or employment issues in the office. Nakahira, who has been a prosecutor since 1986, has worked in the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office for 14 years, including the last eight years as a chief deputy. Because of his position as a supervisor, he is not eligible to join the proposed union. Nakahira has prosecuted several high-profile cases, including those of the teenagers convicted of the murder of Barbara Thomas, of Redmond, and Randy Guzek, the man who has been sentenced to death four times for the 1987 murder of Terrebonne residents Rod and Lois Houser. In an e-mail, Dugan rebuffed Flaherty’s assertion about Nakahira’s campaigning, noting that Nakahira was wrapped up with work on Guzek’s fourth death penalty trial in the lead-up to the election. He added that Nakahira still plans to be a career prosecutor. Dugan wrote that he is concerned about his successor’s interest in releasing Nakahira — and possibly other attorneys — from their positions. “I understand that the DA-elect might want a chief deputy of his choosing, but I don’t understand why he is targeting some of the best prosecutors in the state,” he wrote. County Counsel Mark Pilliod said on Friday that he has talked with Flaherty about possible staffing changes at the office, but declined to be more specific. He said the District Attorney’s Office is unique in that the district attorney is an elected state official, while his or her employees work for the county. Tony Green, a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Justice, said he could not comment on the letter, deputies’ plans to unionize, or on Flaherty’s ability to make personnel decisions before taking office. A decision on a union will likely be reached by next month,

Katie Orlinsky / New York Times News Service

The AMC 25 movie theater in Times Square recently closed temporarily to get rid of bedbugs in the seats. In the most recent fiscal year, which ended on June 30, New York City’s 311 help line recorded 12,768 bedbug complaints, 16 percent more than the previous year and 39 percent above the year before. Side caterer canceled work and dressed in long sleeves and pants during July’s hottest days so no one would see her bites. “Who is going to want me in their private home?” said the woman, who was interviewed on the condition that her name not be disclosed, for obvious reasons. Businesses are fearing the stigma as well, as reports of infestations multiply. In recent weeks, bedbugs snuggled into the seats at AMC’s movie theater in Times Square, crept around a Victoria’s Secret store on Lexington Avenue and the offices of Elle Magazine and hitchhiked into the Brooklyn district attorney’s office. “There were attorneys that didn’t want to come to our building,” said an assistant district attorney who would identify herself only as Caroline A. “I don’t blame them; I wouldn’t want to go somewhere where there is known to be bedbugs.” But those places are becoming increasingly hard to avoid. Bedbugs, once nearly eradicated,

after deputy district attorneys submit their votes to the Oregon Employment Relations Board. Becky Gallagher, a Eugene attorney who represents the prosecutors who submitted the original petition, said a union can be formed without a vote if more than half of the potential members agree to join. But if at least 30 percent of the potential members call for an election, the entire group must vote by secret ballot. Earlier this month, another group of prosecutors in the office filed a petition calling for an election. Deputy District Attorney Jason Kropf, the named petitioner on the document, said he didn’t want to disclose exactly how many prosecutors want an election or how he feels about the union idea. “I have questions and concerns about it,” he said. “Prior to a formal vote, I plan to educate myself as much as possible so I can make an informed decision about what is best for the office and the community we serve.” Deputy District Attorney Wells Ashby said he doesn’t think a union is a good idea for the office. “I have great respect for my co-workers, but I do not support the formation of a union,” he said. “We do important work at the District Attorney’s Office, prosecuting criminals, protecting justice. … A union is not necessary to do that work.” Ashby declined to comment on the letter to Nakahira, but said he wouldn’t change his opinion on the proposed union even if he got a letter of his own. “I have a lot of friends in the DA’s office, and this is certainly a period of change, but we work in a political office,” he said. “Elections have consequences, and I think that’s what the (union) vote is about.” If a majority of prosecutors vote in favor of the union, the group will have to negotiate its terms with the county. It’s unclear how long that process could take or how it might impact hiring and firing actions. If a deputy district attorney was fired and filed a lawsuit, Pilliod said it’s possible the county could be named in a lawsuit. But at this point, a variety of factors could impact the future of employees in the District Attorney’s Office. “Anything could happen between now and January,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

have spread across New York City, in part because of the decline in the use of DDT. According to the city’s Department of Housing and Preservation, the number of bedbug violations has gone up 67 percent in the last two years. In the most recent fiscal year, which ended on June 30, the city’s 311 help line recorded 12,768 bedbug complaints, 16 percent more than the previous year and 39 percent above the year before. A New York City community health survey showed that in 2009, 1 in 15 New Yorkers had bedbugs in their homes, a number that is probably higher now.

Changing behaviors Anecdotal evidence suggests that bedbugs’ social cost is rising as well.

The Upper West Side caterer’s best friend was too scared to invite her to come out to the Hamptons this summer. When Hilary Davis, a waitress from Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, had her apartment treated two years ago because of bedbugs, her friends and even her boyfriend refused to take her in. (But they were willing to take care of her cat.) “So I was left in a bug-ridden apartment alone,” Davis said. Everyday behaviors are changing, too. “I don’t go to the movies anymore, I’m not sitting in those seats, and don’t sit on wooden benches,” said Gale A. Brewer, a member of the City Council. When she sees a mattress in her path, she said, she crosses the street. But the panic, certainly, is not widespread. “It’s all part of life,”

said Janice Page of the Bronx, who recently thought she had received two bites while traveling in California. (They turned out to be mosquito bites.) “What am I going to do? Walk around with a fumigation can?” “It’s like terrorism,” said a woman as she ran into the recently sprayed AMC theater. “Just cross your fingers and keep going.” A bill awaiting New York Gov. David Paterson’s signature would require landlords to disclose to potential tenants whether any apartment in the building has had bedbugs within the previous year. The bill passed the legislature despite opposition from many landlords, who feared it would stigmatize their buildings. Sparig fought his landlord in court, representing himself, and recently settled the case for a rare 100 percent rent cut for the eight months that his apartment was infested, as long as he promised to move out. Not surprisingly, he is having trouble finding a new home, doubly stigmatized by having had bedbugs, which he acknowledges to prospective landlords, and by having been in court with his previous one. Now, he said, they “don’t even let me come over” to see an apartment. Perhaps no one is more tuned into bedbug paranoia than Steven Brodsky, a Midtown psychotherapist. He treats people suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder, and, in that capacity, has attracted a number of bedbug victims. Patients tell him they feel like they are “sacrificing themselves because they’re literally being eaten as they sleep,” he said. “It really is like H1N1,” Brodsky said, using the clinical term for last year’s bugaboo, swine flu. “Everybody is concerned about it, wondering if they’ll be next.” But Brodsky himself likes to sleep tight, once the last patient of the day has left. “I do check the chair to see if there’s anything,” he said.

Harvard says scientist is guilty of misconduct By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

Harvard University said Friday that it had found a prominent researcher, Dr. Marc Hauser, “solely responsible” for eight instances of scientific misconduct. Hours later, Hauser, a rising star for his explorations into cognition and morality, told The New York Times, “I acknowledge that I made some significant mistakes” and saying he was “deeply sorry for the problems this case had caused to my students, my colleagues and my university.” Hauser is a leader in the field of animal and human cognition, and in 2006 he wrote a well-received book, “Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong.” Harvard itself had faced growing criticism for not releasing more details of the inquiry since The Boston Globe reported Aug. 10 that the university had found evidence of scientific misconduct in Hauser’s lab. On Friday, Dr. Michael Smith, dean of the Harvard faculty of arts and sciences, issued a letter to the faculty confirming the inquiry and saying the eight instances of scientific misconduct involved problems of “data acquisition, data analysis, data retention, and the reporting of research methodologies and results.”


CL

COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

The 411 on ‘Five-0’ Classic cop show reboots in September on CBS, Page B2

B

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010

SPOTLIGHT “It’s like, ‘Why’s this guy doing this?’ But music changes everything. ... Hopefully, this grows to the point where I get really cool, creative breakrooms. I know there are some breakrooms out there that are just phenomenal.”

Family-friendly air show a week away in Madras The Airshow of the Cascades will be held at the Madras Airport from 4 to 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27, and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 28. The show will feature airplane rides, a kids’ play area, military displays, a vintage aircraft display, a hot-rod show, glider rides, food booths, live music and more, according to the air show website. A dusk air show performance will be from 7:45 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Aug. 27, and an afternoon air show will be from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Aug. 28. Organizers encourage attendees to bring hats, sunglasses, blankets and chairs. Pets are not allowed. Admission is $5 per day for adults; military veterans and children 12 and younger get in free. The airport is located at 2028 N.W. Airport Way in Madras. Contact: 541-475-6947.

— Brian Hinderberger, on his “Brian in the Breakroom” office tour

10 Barrel’s latest benefit to donate to bagpipers Each month, 10 Barrel Brewing Co. picks a charity to support through shirt sales and a charity night; Bend Fire Pipe and Drum Band, a bagpipe and drum band made up of firefighters from the Bend Fire Department, has been chosen for the month of August. In addition to proceeds from sales of its “I drink for charity” T-shirts and special pint glasses, 10 Barrel will donate to the band 75 percent of the net profits made from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday. Band members wearing kilts will be on hand as guest servers and bartenders. Also, on Aug. 28 from 5 to 9 p.m., the band will perform during an evening also featuring games and raffles. 10 Barrel Brewing is located at 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Building A, in Bend. Contact: 541-678-5228 (10 Barrel) or bendfirepipesanddrums@gmail.com.

Local volunteering fair at Redmond library The Redmond Public Library and Volunteer Connect are hosting a “Keep it Local — Volunteer Expo” Aug. 30 at the Redmond Public Library in Redmond, where 16 local agencies will be available to talk about volunteer opportunities. The event runs 3 to 6 p.m. It is free and open to the public. The library is located at 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., in Redmond. Contact: 541-312-1063 or visit www.deschuteslibrary.org.

21-and-over variety show benefit at the Tower A variety show to benefit Bonnie Morrissey, who has kidney disease, will be 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27, at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend. The event will feature music, dancing and comedy acts. The cost is $15 per person and is limited to those 21 and older. Proceeds will be used to defray the costs of Morrissey’s upcoming kidney transplant. For tickets, contact the Tower Theatre at www.towertheatre.org or 541-388-0700. To donate, go to the National Transplant Assistance Fund at www.ntafund.org/find-apatient. The Tower Theatre is located at 835 N.W. Wall St. Contact: Yoleen Faerber, 541-633-9637.

Food summit at COCC The Central Oregon Food Summit will be held Sept. 10 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Wille Hall at Central Oregon Community College. The summit, intended for members of the public, food producers, retailers, chefs and policymakers, will discuss ways to create more food security in Central Oregon. It is a part of The Central Oregon Community Food Assessment, an initiative of Wy’East Resource Conservation & Development, a local conservation organization, and several other local organizations. Registration is required by Sept. 3; the summit costs $20, which includes lunch. The college is located at 2600 N.W. College Way, in Bend. Contact: www.cofoodsummit .yolasite.com. — From staff reports

Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Brian Hinderberger salutes after playing an original song, “Ebb and Flow,” in the kitchen of Bend’s Healthy Beginnings, part of his “Brian in the Breakroom” series of performances. Employees John Houchens and Laurel Case take in the performance.

Guitar gigs from the office to Austin • By way of lunch-break performances in town, a Bend soloist shoots for a spot at Texas’ South by Southwest music festival

By David Jasper • The Bulletin

A

fter a detour through the wrong office, singer-songwriter Brian Hinderberger walks into Healthy Beginnings’ office, where he’s greeted by employees John Houchens, Randi Whitley and Laurel Case.

Hinderberger is at the west Bend nonprofit to sing them a song. “Brian

in the Breakroom,” as he’s calling this ongoing series of office visits, is

Get your breakroom gig To contact Hinderberger about having him perform in your company’s breakroom, e-mail him at brianbreakroom@gmail.com.

his one-man pursuit of musical greatness — one lunch hour at a time. It began 21⁄2 weeks ago, when the 38-yearold from Bend began hitting offices — so far, limited to places where he knows someone — offering to perform. This Wednesday performance at Healthy Beginnings marks his eighth time hitting the linoleum stage. About three times a week, during his own lunch break from KTVZ, where he produces the station’s promotional spots, Hinderberger will climb in his car and zip across town to play a song or two before a quizzical group of workers. The only question, really, is why? Hinderberger says his goal with Brian in the Breakroom is to play about 80 lunchhour shows, finishing up in Austin, Texas, where the annual South by Southwest music and film festival is held each March.

A member of the Bend band KouseFly — a play on “house fly” and “cows fly” — he’s already applied to officially perform as a solo artist at the festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2011. More than 500 acts from 49 countries played the last festival, according to sxsw.com. Hinderberger is determined to be there, whether he goes in an official capacity or merely as one of the crowd members who descend on Austin each year. And while in Austin, he’d like to play offices, including that of the festival’s organizers. Further, he’s filming each breakroom performance show as part of a 15-minute independent film documentary he plans to produce. See Breakroom / B8


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Teen mom feels used by her baby’s grandma Dear Abby: I’m a teen mom who feels like I am being taken advantage of by my newborn’s grandmother, “Liz.” My baby’s father, “Todd,” lives with her. They provide no financial support. Liz puts me on the spot constantly and makes me feel bad if I tell her she can’t have the baby that day or take her to a certain place. Since day one, she has wanted to take my baby out of town. That bothers me because I don’t want my daughter going out of town unless I am with her. I feel obligated to let Todd’s mother see the baby all the time to avoid the drama she would cause in my life if I don’t. I don’t want to be mean, but I need to let her know how I feel. How do I approach her? — Young Mom in Richmond, Ind. Dear Young Mom: No one can be taken advantage of unless she (or he) allows it. Do not allow anyone — no matter how well-intentioned — to do anything with your baby that makes you uncomfortable. You may be young, but as a mother you are responsible for your child’s welfare. Do not “approach” Liz; let her approach you. When she does, be polite but firm, and stand your ground. If she tries to turn it into a power struggle, end the conversation. Do not allow her to make you lose your temper. Dear Abby: My boyfriend of four years, “Omar,” and I have been having major arguments lately. They’re about the relationship he has with his sister. I feel he confides in her more than he does me. I realize she’s his sister, but he consults her about finances, what kind of pet to buy, how things are going at work, etc. He’s never open with me about those issues. He shuts me out to the point that I have told him if it doesn’t change, we’re through. He says I’m “overreacting.” Even more peculiar, she makes

DEAR ABBY

A more complex McGarrett

‘Hawaii Five-0’ producers keep theme, update other elements of classic cop show By Chuck Barney

“Hawaii Five-0”

Contra Costa (Calif.) Times

phone calls for Omar — like when his mortgage payment was late or when he had to ask the IRS a tax question. Omar is 34 and should be handling these things himself. It galls me when he puts her on a pedestal and puts me down when I make a mistake. I’m a single mom, doing well on my own, but he refuses to acknowledge it. What should I do? — Second Fiddle in Arizona Dear Second Fiddle: It is possible that Omar’s sister has been running his life for so long that she’s the first person he thinks of when he gets into a bind. And obviously she has done a capable job of it, or he wouldn’t keep having her intercede for him. It should be clear to you by now that putting yourself in competition with her is getting you nowhere. So accept the two of them as a package deal or find a man who is independent. Dear Abby: I am 21 and recently became engaged to my boyfriend of three years. We are trying to pull off a wedding on a budget. My parents dislike my fiance, so we are footing the bill. My fiance’s mom owns a beauty salon and, in the past, has offered to cut and highlight my hair. I have accepted twice in the last two years. She also fixed my hair for my university mixer. Would it be appropriate to ask her, as the mother of the groom, to fix my hair on my wedding day? — Budgeting in Fairfax, Va. Dear Budgeting: I see nothing inappropriate about it. Go ahead and ask. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Confession time: As a kid who lived and breathed the television show “Hawaii Five0,” I got totally stoked whenever I heard its hard-charging theme music. Oh, those pounding drums, those blaring horns, that rolling wave … Occasionally, I’d even dress up in my dad’s suit, turn up the volume on the stereo and run around the house like a mad little dork pretending to be detective Steve McGarrett in a gunfight with vicious island thugs. Let me just say: Coolest TV theme song ever. So you can imagine how pleased I was to hear that the iconic tune is being incorporated into CBS’ rollicking reboot of the series, scheduled to premiere Sept. 20. After all, you just can’t get “Five-0” right without getting the music right. Ah, but they almost screwed it up. Executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Peter Lenkov admitted during the TV press tour that, at one point, they considered having a “popular rock star” come in to redo the theme with an electric guitar. Horror of horrors. Eventually, though, they came to their senses and did it with a 35-piece orchestra conducted by the show’s composer, Brian Tyler. They even brought back some of the original musicians to participate in the re-recording. Says Kurtzman, “We decided that you just don’t mess with perfection.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

When: Premieres Sept. 20 Where: CBS

CBS via The Associated Press

Detectives Steve McGarrett (Alex O’Loughlin) and “Danno” Williams (Scott Caan) bring back “Hawaii Five-0.” The two characters offer a different dynamic than in the original, but one thing hasn’t changed: the Hawaiian scenery (even more beautiful in HD.)

What else is new? As for other aspects of the show, the producers felt free to tinker. The pilot episode, made available to critics, is a turbocharged hour full of action, escapist fun and the kind of special effects not available back in the day. There’s also a sense of humor that the stonecold serious original lacked. The biggest changes revolve around McGarrett. The Big Kahuna of crime fighters will no longer sport Jack Lord’s lacquered black pompadour or deploy the kind of icy gaze that could freeze molten lava. As played by Alex

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O’Loughlin (“Moonlight”), the modern McGarrett will have a different kind of vibe. “I love Jack Lord’s McGarrett. I love Jack Lord’s hair. I think he started blue steel (with) the look that he does.” O’Loughlin told reporters. “But I can’t get away with that today in 2010.” O’Loughlin’s McGarrett is still a stoic ex-military guy, but he has a bit more hang-looseness to him. In the new version, we’ll also delve deeper into his tragedy-marred back story — something the original mostly avoided. “This guy is a really interesting case study for me as an actor and

as a sort of researcher of human movement,” O’Loughlin says. One more change: Whereas the original had McGarrett’s lead assistant, Danny Williams (James MacArthur) serving as little more than a yes-man, the new “Five-0” presents a Danno played by Scott Caan (son of James Caan) who often butts heads with the boss and engages him in spirited banter. “He’s McGarrett’s right-hand man,” Lenkov says. “But he’s really an equal in terms of his experience and what he brings to the table.” Rounding out the cast are Daniel Dae Kim (“Lost”) and Grace Park. The latter adds a touch of femininity that was virtually nonexistent in the testosterone-laden original. But one thing hasn’t changed: Like its predecessor, the new “Five-0” is brimming with gorgeous island scenery, which looks all the more vivid and vibrant in sparkling high-definition cinematography. “Hawaii is definitely an important character on the show,” says Kurtzman. “Hawaii is the fifth Beatle.” Sounds good to us. Book it, Danno.

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An architect’s new remote controls his universe. › “The Benchwarmers” (2006, Comedy) David Spade, Rob Schneider. 131 Color Splash: Mi Antonio Treatment ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters Divine Design ‘G’ Sarah’s House Dear Genevieve Curb/Block Color Splash: Mi House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Hillbilly: The Real Story ‘PG’ Å Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels ›› “Family Sins” (2004, Docudrama) Kirstie Alley, Will Patton. ‘14’ Å “Confined” (2010, Suspense) David James Elliott, Emma Caulfield. Å Project Runway Hats Off to You ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 “Intimate Stranger” (2006) Kari Matchett, Peter Outerbridge. ‘14’ Å Lockup: Raw Hardcore Lockup: Raw Dues and Don’ts Lockup Inside San Quentin Lockup The Criminal Mind Lockup Folsom State Prison. Death and the Dentist 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Raw The Revolving Door ›› “ATL” (2006) Tip Harris, Lauren London. Four Atlanta teens face challenges. ’ When I Was 17 Hard Times Hard Times Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 Teen Mom ’ ‘14’ Å SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush Big Time Concert ‘G’ Big Time Rush Victorious ’ ‘G’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Malcolm-Mid. Malcolm-Mid. 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Gangland Hate Nation ’ ‘14’ Å Gangland Latin Kings. ’ ‘14’ Å (8:13) Gangland Race Wars Los Angeles. ’ ‘14’ Å (9:26) Scrappers (10:05) Scrappers (10:43) Scrappers Bike Job ’ (11:22) Scrappers 132 31 34 46 Gangland Chicago. ’ ‘14’ Å “Lake Placid 2” (2007, Horror) John Schneider, Sam McMurray. ‘14’ Å “Lake Placid 3” (2010, Horror) Ryan Carnes. Premiere. “Croc” (2007) Peter Tuinstra. ‘14’ 133 35 133 45 › “Spring Break Shark Attack” (2005) Shannon Lucio. ‘PG’ Å In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades Thru History Travel the Road “The Path of the Wind” (2009, Drama) Joe Rowley. Conquerors Virtual Memory Michael English 205 60 130 Love-Raymond Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens › “Fool’s Gold” (2008) Matthew McConaughey, Kate Hudson. Å ›› “Failure to Launch” (2006) Matthew McConaughey. Å 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “The Sting” (1973, Comedy-Drama) Paul Newman, Robert Redford. Two De- (7:15) ››› “Cool Hand Luke” (1967, Drama) Paul Newman, George Kennedy, J.D. Cannon. A gutsy prison ››› “Rachel, Rachel” (1968) Joanne Woodward. A teacher (11:15) ›› “Paris Blues” (1961, Romance) 101 44 101 29 pression-era con men plot to swindle a crime lord. Å inmate refuses to yield to authority. Å finds momentary happiness in a love affair. Å Paul Newman. Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘14’ Strange Sex ‘14’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘MA’ Strange Sex ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å ››› “3:10 to Yuma” (2007) Russell Crowe, Christian Bale. Å ››› “Gladiator” (2000) Russell Crowe. A fugitive general becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. Å (10:55) Dark Blue Urban Garden ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 (3:30) ›› “The Guardian” (2006) Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Total Drama Total Drama Scooby-Doo › “MVP2: Most Vertical Primate” (2002, Comedy) Richard Karn. Premiere. King of the Hill King of the Hill The Boondocks The Boondocks 84 Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife ‘G’ Å Top Ten Natural Wonders The Colorado: River of Wonders ‘G’ Earth’s Natural Wonders ‘G’ Å Earth’s Natural Wonders ‘G’ Å Top Ten Natural Wonders 179 51 45 42 Alaskan Wild ‘G’ Å Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith ››› “Hairspray” (2007) John Travolta. A Baltimore girl becomes an overnight celebrity. ››› “Juno” (2007, Comedy-Drama) Ellen Page, Michael Cera. Å ››› “Enchanted” (2007) Å 15 30 23 30 (4:00) › “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry” Money Hungry ’ ‘14’ 20 Greatest Celebreality Fights ‘14’ The Short List ’ The T.O. Show Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ‘PG’ ››› “Purple Rain” (1984, Musical) Prince, Apollonia Kotero. ’ Å 191 48 37 54 World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) ›› “Fire Down Below” 1997 (5:50) ››› “The Rookie” 2002, Drama Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “The Mummy Returns” 2001 Brendan Fraser. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:10) ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “All the Right Moves” 1983, Drama Tom Cruise. ‘R’ Å ››› “All the Right Moves” 1983, Drama Tom Cruise. ‘R’ Å ››› “All the Right Moves” 1983 Tom Cruise. ‘R’ After Film School “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” Insane Cinema: United by Fate ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Slick City ‘14’ Å Weekly Update Bubba’s World Insane Cinema: United by Fate ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Slick City ‘14’ Å Moto: In Out American Misfits Bubba’s World Weekly Update Golf Central Golf Videos PGA Tour Golf Wyndham Championship, Third Round From Greensboro, N.C. Golf Central LPGA Tour Golf Safeway Classic, Second Round From North Plains, Ore. Irish Seniors Open Highlights “The Long Shot” (2004, Drama) Julie Benz, Marsha Mason. ‘PG’ Å “The Magic of Ordinary Days” (2005) Keri Russell, Skeet Ulrich. ‘PG’ Å “Love Comes Softly” (2003) Katherine Heigl, Dale Midkiff. ‘PG’ Å “Wild Hearts” (2006) ‘PG’ Å (5:15) ›››› “The Dark Knight” 2008, Action Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart. Batman battles a vicious criminal ››› “The Informant!” 2009, Comedy-Drama Matt Damon. Premiere. An ADM execu- True Blood Russell vows revenge against Hard Knocks: Training Camp With the HBO 425 501 425 10 known as the Joker. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tive informs on price fixing by agribusinesses. ’ ‘R’ Å his foes. ’ ‘MA’ Å New York Jets ’ ‘MA’ Å “Open Water 2: Adrift” 2006 Susan May Pratt. ‘R’ (6:35) ››› “Mad Max” 1979 Mel Gibson. ‘R’ (8:15) ››› “Sherrybaby” 2006, Drama Maggie Gyllenhaal. ‘R’ Indie Sex II: Censored ‘MA’ Å (11:15) “Open Water 2: Adrift” 2006 IFC 105 105 (4:15) › “Land of the Lost” 2009, Comedy ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 2009, Action Hugh Jackman, will.i.am. Wolverine (7:50) ›› “Enough” 2002, Suspense Jennifer Lopez, Billy Campbell. A woman takes ››› “Whip It” 2009, Comedy-Drama Ellen Page, Marcia Gay Harden. Premiere. A MAX 400 508 7 Will Ferrell. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å becomes involved with the Weapon X program. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å her daughter and flees her abusive husband. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Texas teen joins a roller-derby team. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Garbage Moguls Pet Project (N) ‘14’ Garbage Moguls Fishy Business ‘14’ Garbage Moguls All-Nighter (N) ‘PG’ Garbage Moguls Pet Project ‘14’ Garbage Moguls Fishy Business ‘14’ Garbage Moguls All-Nighter ‘PG’ Grand Canyon Skywalk ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard The Penguins The Mighty B! ’ Fanboy-Chum The Penguins The Penguins Tigre: Rivera Tigre: Rivera Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Penguins The Penguins The Secret Show Tak and Power NTOON 89 115 189 Profess. The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Trophy Quest Realtree Rdtrps Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Jimmy Big Time OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) ›› “Flawless” 2007, Crime Drama (6:15) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008 Javier Bardem. iTV. Flings with a pair of The Big C Pilot ’ Weeds Thwack ’ Chris Spencer’s Minority Report The Strikeforce Houston: Lawal vs. Feijao Muhammed Lawal vs. Rafael Cavalcante; Tim SHO 500 500 Michael Caine. iTV. ‘PG-13’ tourists complicate a painter’s life. ’ ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å comic performs. (N) ‘MA’ Å Kennedy vs. Ronaldo de Souza; Jorge Gurgel vs. KJ Noons. Stealth Rider Stealth Rider Intersections ‘G’ Intersections ‘G’ Intersections ‘G’ Intersections Intersections ‘G’ NASCAR NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: O’Reilly 200 SPEED 35 303 125 The Stepfather (5:40) › “Old Dogs” 2009 John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:10) › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ Å The Stepfather STARZ 300 408 300 (4:50) › “Hardball” 2001 Keanu Reeves. A gambler coaches a (6:40) ›››› “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” 1977, Science Fiction Richard Dreyfuss, François Truf- ›› “Wolf” 1994, Horror Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, James Spader. A midlife (11:10) ››› “The Company of Wolves” TMC 525 525 youth baseball team to work off a debt. ’ faut, Teri Garr. UFO sighters finally meet the aliens that obsessed them. ’ ‘PG’ Manhattan editor turns into a werewolf. ’ ‘R’ 1985 Angela Lansbury. ‘R’ Bull Riding PBR Memphis Invitational From Memphis, Tenn. Whacked Out Whacked Out Bull Riding PBR Memphis Invitational From Memphis, Tenn. Whacked Out Whacked Out Bull Riding PBR Nashville Invitational VS. 27 58 30 Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Bridezillas Kendall & Stephanie ‘14’ My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls You’re Wearing You’re Wearing The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY INK & METAL: A custom car, motorcycle and tattoo show; with live music, a poker run and more; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; free; all day; The Black Horse Saloon, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-3824270 or www.blackhorsesaloon.com. JELD-WEN TRADITION: Professional golf tournament; proceeds benefit local nonprofit organizations; $20 in advance, $25 at the gate; 8 a.m.; Crosswater Golf Course, 17600 Canoe Camp Drive, Sunriver; www. jeld-wentradition.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $10; free ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m.-10 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www. highanddrybluegrassfestival.com. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. ART WALK: With live music and a street dance; free; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Aspen Alley Mall, 51470 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine; 541-848-9470. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music, a show and shine and more; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 10 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-548-6329. HIGHWAY 97 FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling vegetables, fruits, cheeses, pastas and handmade crafts; free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-548-5418. NEIGHBORHOOD SUMMER FRENZY: Event includes a barbecue, inflatable toys, street hockey, rock climbing, face painting, games and more; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend; 541-382-8274. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. QUILTS IN THE PARK: Mount Bachelor Quilters Guild presents the 27th annual outdoor show of more than 300 locally made quilts; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 1525 Hill St., Bend; 541-385-5505. SATURDAY COMMUNITY MARKET: Local artists and food vendors sell their wares; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188. BEND BREW FEST: Event includes tastings from more than 30 brewers, live entertainment, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; noon-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510, info@bendconcerts.com or www. bendbrewfest.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Naseem Rakha talks about her book “The Crying Tree”; registration requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525.

HIGH DESERT RENDEZVOUS: Wear Western gear for a best of the West auction and gala, featuring live music, dinner and hosted bar; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; museum will close at 2 p.m.; $200, $150 for museum members; 5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 365, hdr@ highdesertmuseum.org or www. highdesertrendezvous.org. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT IV: A Beethoven program featuring Van Cliburn International Piano Competition finalist Di Wu; $30-$60, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-9310 or www. sunrivermusic.org. “BONNIE AND CLYDE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents a musical about the two famous outlaws; $20, $17 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “CADDYSHACK”: A screening of the R-rated 1980 comedic golf film; proceeds benefit the Tower Theatre Foundation; $5; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. IMPROV SHOW: Featuring performances by Bend Improv Group and Triage; may contain adult language; $5; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.bendticket.com. RINDY AND MARV ROSS: The Portland-based musicians, from Quarterflash and The Trail Band, perform; bring a lawn chair; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., gates open 7 p.m.; Harmony House, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. TAARKA: The Colorado-based jazzy world-folk band performs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com.

SUNDAY JELD-WEN TRADITION: Professional golf tournament; proceeds benefit local nonprofit organizations; $20 in advance, $25 at the gate; 8 a.m.; Crosswater Golf Course, 17600 Canoe Camp Drive, Sunriver; www.jeld-wentradition.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $10; free ages 12 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www. highanddrybluegrassfestival.com. SATURDAY COMMUNITY MARKET: Local artists and food vendors sell their wares; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188. CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring medleys honoring American composers and Broadway tunes, under the direction of Sue Steiger; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-382-2712, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. DINE WITH YOUR DOG: Dogs are served dinners while their owners eat; proceeds benefit Bend Spay and Neuter Project; $10; 2-5 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Brewing Company The Lodge, 1441 S.W. Chandler Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-617-1010. “BONNIE AND CLYDE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents a musical

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

about the two famous outlaws; $17; 6 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. MARCHFOURTH MARCHING BAND: The Portland-based big band spectacular performs; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

MONDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “CC&Rs: Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions in Central Oregon”; reservations required; free; 5:30 p.m.; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions presents a dinner theater murder mystery; reservations recommended; $20; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www. buckboardproductions.com. CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS: Featuring a performance by John Hiatt; $16, $57 with dinner; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062, inquiry@c3events.com or www.c3events.com. SISTER SPEAK: The San Diegobased acoustic blues duo perform; free; 7-9 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. TWO PLUS TWO: A “mini-monster” piano concert, with four pianos playing classical, pop and patriotic music; free; 7:30 p.m.; St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 807 E. First St., Prineville; 541447-7085. MAT KEARNEY: The pop/rock musician performs, with Katie Herzig; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: ”Fat Tire Fury” showcases fat-tire riding in multiple settings; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes kayak, canoe and boat gear demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by Americana band Moon Mountain Ramblers; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407.

MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring classic rock covers by the Doug Zinn Band; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www. visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by Billy Dean; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. PUB RUN FUNDRAISER: Three- or five-mile fun run ends at Brother Jon’s pub; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Lesedi Project and the Girls on the Run program in Portland; $10; 6-8 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-398-1601, marci@ fleetfeetbend.com or www. fleetfeetbend.com. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients and learn about enhancing your diet with raw foods; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Home” by Marilynne Robinson; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www.deschutes library.org. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE HUMP DAY HASH: Shireen Amini performs; proceeds benefit the Human Dignity Coalition; free; 6:30-10 p.m.; Century Center, Southwest Century Drive and Southwest Commerce Avenue, Bend; 541-388-0389. “BONNIE AND CLYDE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents a musical about the two famous outlaws; $20, $17 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY IT’S A REAL DOG AND PONY SHOW: Featuring a barbecue and live music by The Quons; proceeds benefit Equine Outreach and the Humane Society of the Ochocos; free admission; 5-8 p.m.; Desperado Couture, 330 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-749-9980 or bend@ godesperado.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Paty Jager reads from her books “Spirit of the Mountain” and “Doctor in Petticoats”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook talks about his book “Bend, Overall”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. GUILD SHOWCASE: Central Oregon Writers Guild members read original works; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-923-0896, elsiemariewrites@gmail.com or www.centraloregonwritersguild.com. BROTHERS YOUNG: The Portlandbased folk-pop group performs; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. CASCADES THEATRICAL COMPANY’S SNEAK PEEK: Preview the upcoming 32nd season with cold readings; appetizers and drinks available; reservations recommended; free; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or ticketing@ cascadestheatrical.org. “BONNIE AND CLYDE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents a musical about the two famous outlaws; $20, $17 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

M T For Saturday, Aug. 21

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6:30, 9:30 THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 6:15, 9:40 INCEPTION (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:45, 6:20, 9:25 THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:45 WINTER’S BONE (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE 3-D (PG) 11:40 a.m., 1:45, 3:55 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2:10, 4:25, 6:40

DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:35, 4:05, 6:35, 7:10, 9:35, 10:15 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 12:05, 2:40, 5:05, 8, 10:30 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:25, 4, 7:20, 9:40, 10:35 LOTTERY TICKET (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10:10 NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10 PIRANHA 3-D (R) 12:10, 2:20, 4:45, 7:30, 9:55 SALT (PG-13) 12:15, 2:50, 5:20, 8:05, 10:40 SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:05, 4:35, 7:35, 10:20 STEP UP 3-D (PG-13) 6:30, 9:20 THE SWITCH (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 1:50, 4:10, 6:55, 9:30 TOY STORY 3 (G) 12:35, 4:15 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE

(PG-13) 7:05, 9:45 VAMPIRES SUCK (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:55, 7:45, 10:05 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:30 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:45, 7, 9:15 SCOTT PILGRIM VS. THE WORLD (PG-13) 6:30, 9 VAMPIRES SUCK (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 6 BABIES (PG) 3:30 THE KARATE KID (PG) 12:30 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 8:55

CYRUS (R) 3:30, 5:45, 8 DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30 THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) 3 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 SALT (PG-13) 3

PINE THEATER REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

DESPICABLE ME (PG) 12:15, 2:15, 4:15

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

INCEPTION (PG-13) 1, 7 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 4, 9:45

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N   N  Leno’s Gulf Coast show to benefit fishermen BILOXI, Miss. — Jay Leno, the “Tonight Show” host and comedian, will appear today at the Beau Rivage Theater in Biloxi, Miss., in a benefit performance for residents who’ve been affected by the massive oil spill. The appear- Jay Leno ance is billed as “Stand Up for the Gulf Coast: A Special Evening with Jay Leno to Benefit the Gulf Coast Community Foundation.” Leno says the coastal fishing community and others need money, and he wants to help raise it. Tickets for the benefit are $40, $80 and $150 each. Funds raised will be administered by the foundation through its Mississippi Oil Spill Recovery Fund.

said an order of protection she acquired against him was no longer necessary; she did not explain her change of heart. “I wish her the best,” Lohan told reporters. “Hopefully we can be friends, and we’ll take it from there.” Lohan was arrested last December and again in January on charges of violating an order of protection involving a fight with his previous girlfriend. Those charges also were eventually dropped. Lohan’s daughter, an actress who is dealing with her own legal headaches, reportedly has no contact with her father. Lohan divorced Dina Lohan, Lindsay’s mother, after a 22-year marriage in 2007; they have skirmished periodically since over child visitation and other issues. In a tense interview with NBC “Today” show co-host Matt Lauer a week ago, Dina Lohan said her daughter will move from California and back to New York after she gets out of drug rehabilitation. Dina Lohan argued with Lauer over how many times Lindsay had been in drug treatment.

2 copyright claims over Obama image dropped

The Associated Press file photo

Shakira performs at the World Cup in South Africa last month. The Colombian pop star has been in Barcelona for more than two months, filming for her new album.

Barcelona might fine singer for fountain bath BARCELONA, Spain — Barcelona is considering penalizing Colombian singer Shakira for her actions while filming a videoclip to promote her new record in the northeastern Spanish city, local officials said Friday. Press and Internet images have shown Shakira sitting on the back of a motorcycle with her hair flowing in the wind, while she should have worn a helmet, the sources said. The singer also danced in a public fountain where fans joined her. As a public personality, Shakira should have “set a good example” and requested permission for such acts, which would certainly have been granted for filming purposes, the sources said. A year ago, Barcelona fined the Irish band U2 for rehearsing outside the agreed hours and for exceeding the authorized noise level.

NEW YORK — A photographer who took a picture that the Barack Obama “HOPE” image was based on dropped his claim Friday that he owns the copyright to the photograph, instead of The Associated Press. The AP also dropped its claim against him. The agreement between the AP and photographer Mannie Garcia was filed in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, where a judge is presiding over a legal fight to decide whether artist Shepard Fairey infringed AP copyrights when he based his artwork on the AP’s photograph during Obama’s 2008 run for the presidency. Garcia, 56, of Kensington, Md., said he owned the copyright to the picture after Fairey sued the news cooperative last year, saying his creations did not infringe AP copyrights. In a countersuit, the AP said the uncredited, uncompensated use of its picture violated copyright laws and threatened journalism. Garcia’s attorney, Warren Zinn, said his client, currently a freelance photographer, was relieved to drop the lawsuit, which resulted from a picture Garcia took in 2006 of Obama, then a senator. — From wire reports

Lohan dad nearly free of harassment charge HAMPTON BAYS, N.Y. — The father of Lindsay Lohan has been told that if he stays out of trouble, criminal charges against him on eastern Long Island will be dropped. Michael Lohan’s ex-fiancee no longer wants to pursue criminal charges against him in a fight they had last month in the home they shared in Water Mill. Lohan and Kate Major appeared side-by-side this week for a brief court proceeding but went their separate ways after Major explained that she wanted a harassment charge filed against Lohan to be dropped. She also

Shepard Fairey via The Associated Press

Attorneys for poster artist Shepard Fairey, who designed the famous Obama “HOPE” image, say he based it on a photograph taken by then-AP photographer Manny Garcia.


B4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Aug. 21, 2010: This year, events could easily transform your life. Though at first you might not see the opportunity that evolves, the quality of your life changes. You pull the wild card financially and might not be sure which way your finances could go. Avoid taking any risks if you cannot afford a loss. If you are single, you will meet someone who could be very enticing and exciting. This person could be a foreigner or very different. If you are attached, you understand yourself better, bringing that knowledge into your relationship. You bond more tightly. Count on AQUARIUS. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Know that you will clear out responsibilities and be able to kick back for the remainder of the weekend. Get into a project, making sure it is done. Others count on your efficiency. Make important calls late in the day. Tonight: You have reason to celebrate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Adjust to your changing plans. A surprise encourages more opportunities. A friend also could be unpredictable. Boredom isn’t a problem! Assume responsibility and bring others together. Tonight: Why not go for a spontaneous happening? GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH A partner or dear friend needs your attention. This person has become more in sync with

his or her inner self. You could be surprised by his or her change of heart and its implications. Tonight: Go for a getaway. In another environment, you will feel great. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Others dominate. Unexpected news invigorates your energy. You actually might be looking at an opportunity that you didn’t think would happen. Make sure you have the necessary funding. Tonight: Visit with a special person. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Clear out errands, and take time to go to the gym or exercise. A partner, close friend or loved one could surprise you. Before you know it, you could be entertaining, which you do well. Go with spontaneity and relax. Tonight: Make a call or two. Be where the party is. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Allow more imagination to filter into your days. You don’t always need to do what you say, especially if you need some flex time. A child or loved one delights in this newfound flexibility. Tonight: Let go of restraints. Do what you want. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Stay close to home. You might decide to invite others over later, or an event occurs that encourages homeward-bound behavior. If you are doing some work on your home, rest assured there could be a twist or two along the way. Tap into your sense of humor. Tonight: Light up the night. Add fireworks and sparkle. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Feel free to adjust your

plans to changing demands. A child or loved one is full of surprises. A discussion could be wild or crazy if you decide to be rigid. Add this person’s element of playfulness to the moment. Tonight: You don’t have to go far. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Make sure your budget is intact. An unexpected cost could head your way. Maintain a sense of humor. Keep a conversation flowing. Think about what is said later rather than reading anything into the conversation. Tonight: Get together with friends. Play a favorite game. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might be more adaptable than others realize. An element of surprise and unexpected happenings has laced through your life for a while. Make plans that suit you, or work with a change. Tonight: Your treat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might want and need some time off from everything that is going on. Be careful with your funds; you have pulled the wild card. Money could tumble either way. Nap if you want to. Restore your energy. Tonight: Stretch, then decide. Clearly, others won’t leave you alone. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH The daylight hours point to summer fun. You still might be confused by a partner’s or friend’s odd behavior. Postpone worry. The whole situation could change again. Go off and enjoy yourself. Tonight: Do what you need to do for you.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

SLEIGH BELLS

Twisted, jingling candy for the ears By Joe Heim The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The track to indie rock stardom these days is lickety-split. And the fall can be even faster. But if that ever-shrinking shelf life is on the minds of guitarist Derek Miller and vocalist Alexis Krauss, the two members of Sleigh Bells, they’re not showing any signs of it. The Brooklyn, N.Y., group, barely a year old, has shot to the heights of indie success with its much-heralded album, “Treats,” released in May on M.I.A.’s N.E.E.T. label. With its startling meld of thrashing distortion and sugarysweet pop vocals, Sleigh Bells has earned a ceaseless stream of attention and online hype almost since its inception. We reached Miller recently by phone to chat about the origins of the band’s breathtaking sound and how he and Krauss are dealing with their out-of-nowhere approval.

Q:

(The album’s) so unbelievably distorted and other than just liking how that sounds, I wondered if you were trying to make any kind of statement with that. Definitely not, it was necessity. ... When I was listening back to the mixes, I would listen to it extremely loud so that my headphones would literally break up. And then I would turn it down, and it just sounded like a joke. I just thought, wow, this is god-awful; it lacks energy and immediacy. So I was trying to get it to sound like it did when it was turned up but at a reasonable volume.

A:

Q:

The contrast between this intensely aggressive music and Alexis’ sweet voice works surprisingly well. I love really heavy confrontational music, but I (expletive) hate the macho testosterone idiocy that occurs with heavy music. I despise it. So Alexis is kind of the antidote. She provides this sugary pop element that I also love very much.

A:

Q:

You’re on M.I.A.’s label and you produced a song on her new album. How much of an effect has she had on your music? In a way she’s always been a part of what we’re doing, because I’ve been listening to her since “Galang” and “Piracy Funds Terrorism.” I just think we have similar interests. She makes pop music but from a really creative point of view. She sort of re-imagines it and that’s something that I really admire. When she got in touch with us, it was flattering and encouraging because I was just full of selfdoubt and always a ton of fear.

A:

Q: A:

Do lyrics matter or is it just the sound of the vocals that you’re after? The sound is first and foremost, but that being said, the lyrics are really important to me. I’m aware that they’re not easy to decipher. We are going to put the lyrics online, but I sort of didn’t want that to be the focus right off the bat. I just wanted the record to be taken in sonically and almost abstractly as just a mood.

Q: A:

Who writes the songs?

I write 95 percent of them. ... In previous bands, it has been of case of there being too many cooks in the kitchen. I’m really happy controlling the entire process. Alexis trusts me, and it’s nice to have her support and not have to fight with somebody. ... I like the accountability. I’m responsible for all of the record’s weaknesses, but I’m also responsible for any strengths and I’m comfortable with that.

Q: A:

So what’s Alexis’ role?

If she doesn’t like something, we don’t use it. Live is her thing. I just want to be the guy in the shadows in the back. I’m aware of the fact that she’s the center of attention — and that’s her world and she loves performing and it’s rad. She’s awesome.

Q: A:

Why do you think this album has generated so much enthusiasm and excitement? I have no idea, no (expletive) clue, man. I don’t get it.

Wilco builds a festival for itself By Nate Chinen New York Times News Service

NORTH ADAMS, Mass.— In the final stretch of the Solid Sound Festival on Aug. 15, under light rainfall and a darkening sky, Jeff Tweedy augmented his solo acoustic set with reinforcements. He enlisted members of the Autumn Defense, Pronto and the Nels Cline Singers, three very different groups that had played here over the previous three days. Or to put it another way, he was leading a slightly modified version of Wilco, his steadfastly ambitious rock band. The patrons of this firsttime event, held at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, were primed to appreciate the distinction. The Solid Sound Festival, which drew more than 5,000 people to Mass MoCA over the weekend, was conceived as a Wilco production, top to bottom. Tweedy and his band mates served as curators (their word), reserving space first for their own side projects and then for a handful of compatible acts. The programming, though uneven, had a strong center of gravity, a spirit of communion between the band and its fans. Wilco created a festival in its own image, in other words, and by most measures it was a jubilant success. So there was a sparse, bewitching twist on Appalachian music from Mountain Man, a trio of women from Bennington, Vt., who often sang a cappella. There were a few different strains of indie, including Vetiver, which winningly emulated the cohesiveness of the Grateful Dead; and Avi Buffalo, whose jangling melodies were fatally hindered by its yelping young lead singer. A more rugged band, the Baseball Project, had a touch of celebrity (Mike Mills and Steve Wynn of REM) while the Deep Blue Organ Trio, from Wilco’s hometown of Chicago, traded simply on the mastery of an idiom, easing through midtempo struts with Hammond B-3 organ, crisp guitar and drums. By obvious design, nobody was equipped to outshine the headliner. (The soul queen Mavis Staples, whose forthcoming album was produced by Tweedy, probably had the best chance.) In its current lineup — with Tweedy on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, John Stirratt on bass, Nels Cline on lead guitar, Mikael Jorgensen and Pat Sansone on keyboards and Glenn Kotche on drums — Wilco is a sturdy and curious band, equally drawn to the sweet and the sour. Having lurched a safe distance from its old alternative-country baseline, the group now synthesizes both the soft-rock of the 1970s and the noise-rock of a similar vintage, though there’s still room for a little honk and twang in its sound. Its exultant Saturday-night show, in a field with the Berkshire mountains as a backdrop, began with “Wilco (The Song),” which opens its most recent album, and articulates a direct pledge to its audience: “Wilco/Wilco/Wilco will love you, baby.” The long set that followed was a fulfillment of that pledge, with band staples, old and new, mixed in with relative obscurities from the extended catalog. During most of “Jesus, Etc.,” one of the band’s more popular songs, Tweedy relinquished vocal duties to the crowd. The array of Wilco side projects suggested a study of its component parts: some hazy melody, some shrewd improvisation, a lot of careful texture. Pronto, which includes Jorgensen, was the most assertively pop, while the Autumn Defense, featuring Stirratt and Sansone, sounded warm and radiant, all countrified shimmer. It was also frankly Wilcolike at times, a testament to how subtly but deeply Sansone has influenced Wilco since joining its ranks six years ago. Another important new Wilco addition around that time was Cline, whose Nels Cline Singers, a jazz-rock guitar trio (with no vocals, despite the name), played an excellent and far-reaching set, combining dissonant outbursts with ethereal melody, and swirling in and out of fixed tempo. It would have been the most avant-garde expression of the festival if not for On Fillmore, which consists of Kotche on

Photos by Nathaniel Brooks / New York Times News Service

Wilco fans listen to the band perform during the Solid Sound Festival at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in North Adams, Mass., on Aug. 14. The first-time festival drew over 5,000 people.

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Jeff Tweedy plays solo during the last day of the Solid Sound Festival on Aug. 15. The first-time festival was conceived by Tweedy, and showcases several musical acts. percussion and Darin Gray on bass, and specializes in a brooding, evil-sounding variation on loungy exotica. Even in its most abstract mode, On Fillmore put on a real show, with both of its members periodically walking out into the crowd. That notion of accessible avant-gardism was mirrored by two sound installations within the museum. One of these was a series of drums sonically prepared by Kotche, with springs, wires, and other devices. The other, by Cline, involved two stations of effects pedals, little temples of distortion. In the case of both installations — which proved irresistible, and not just to the many kids in attendance — participation was the point. The installations also reflected Solid Sound’s acute sense of place. Mass MoCA occupies a sprawling complex of 19th-century factory buildings, and the festival made ample use of it, with scheduled performances in an indoor theater, two outdoor plazas and a grassy back field developed specifically for this purpose. (A few unscheduled performances took place in the galleries.) The museum, which is also home to the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival, an experimental-music series with a dedicated but much smaller audience, absorbed the site-preparation expense. “Jeff and the band were interested in something more than a concert,” said Joseph Thompson, Mass MoCA’s director, describing discussions that began in 2008, after Wilco had played a concert at nearby Tanglewood. “I had their records and liked the range and the literacy and the deep musical knowledge, and in a way it reminded me of Bang on a Can — that strange triangulation between new music and classical and rock.” Tony Margherita, Wilco’s longtime manager, said that despite a steep learning curve for everyone involved, Mass MoCA had been the ideal partner for him and Alex Crothers, a promoter based in Burlington, Vt. “It’s not just about a nontraditional venue,” Crothers said. “It’s a better fan experience than going to a soulless concrete-and-steel shed, and we get to control a lot more things. We can keep ticket prices and fees down. We can affect what food and beverage is being sold. We can eliminate parking fees.” Three-day tickets, including parking and museum admission, were $99.50, (with an early bird price of $86.50), with no additional charges. Beyond those conveniences — though the value of free water refills and Intelligentsia Coffee is not to be dismissed — the important thing was a sense of intimacy among festivalgoers. In that context, it wasn’t even strange to see Tweedy, hours before Wilco’s show, sitting on the ledge of a dunk tank, with proceeds going to a local charity. (“I have a show to do tonight — don’t hurt me!” he cried before the first pitch, a direct hit.) Later, on Sunday night, Tweedy had the main stage to himself, and he held it captive, singing in his pinched croak and

playing acoustic guitar. He did some Wilco songs, none of them repeats from the previous night. He did a song by Uncle Tupelo, the band he jointly led before Wilco. He bantered with the audience, good-naturedly bickering over song requests, and covered Bob Dylan. And eventually he got to inviting others onstage. “It’s our festival, we get to do stuff like this: play with our friends, make friends,” he said then, between companionable duos with the guitarist Sir Richard Bishop and Nick Zammuto of the Books. “That’s never been my strong suit, making friends,” he added wryly, and in the face of much contradictory evidence.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 B7

Cathy turns past the comics page By Adam Tschorn

“I think I’m doomed to be a writer. ... I’d be thrilled to write something where I didn’t have to stop and draw it every four or five sentences.”

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Cathy Guisewite doesn’t know what the last four panels of her “Cathy” comic strip will look like when they run in 700 daily and Sunday U.S newspapers in early October. In fact, even after a nearly nonstop, 34-year run of putting words in the mouth and anxieties in the mind of her alter ego, she’s hardpressed during an interview to say what the next four panels will look like — even though a deadline looms in less than 24 hours. “Quick, give me ideas!” Guisewite says as she sits behind the desk of her Studio City, Calif., home office. At first glance, the desk, with its gleaming white iMac in one corner and a disappointingly small stack of folded newspapers, Vogue magazines and scribbled-on scraps of paper (“I just did a huge cleaning”) in another, seems incongruous with the widely beloved (and more than occasionally skewered) paper-piling, dressing-room loathing Everywoman comic strip character that has evolved in this room for the last 17 years. Then one notices the word “AACK,” Cathy’s familiar utterance of exasperation, rendered in large wooden letters on one of the four white walls; the pieces of graph paper that flutter across the counter like autumn leaves; and the four rectangular windows above the Porta-Trace light box on which she draws. Guisewite literally frames her view of the world in four panels — just like a daily cartoon strip. And now she wants out. Earlier last week, when she announced the last of the daily “Cathy” strips would run Oct. 2, with the final Sunday strip appearing the following day, Guisewite said she wanted to quit to spend more time with her family. (She has parents who live in Sarasota, Fla., and her daughter is about to enter her senior year of high school.) Ensconced in the bubble of her quasi-comic-strip office, surrounded by ceramic Cathy cookie jars, stained-glass Cathy wall hangings and shelves full of Cathy figurines, Guisewite explains that the constant deadline pressure of generating a daily strip has made it hard to do much else. But is Cathy done? “I’m open to any and all possibilities,” Guisewite says when asked about plans. “All I can’t do anymore is the daily deadline, because right now I’m so obsessive about the way I create the comic strip it doesn’t leave me any time to do anything else.”

34 years of Cathy By her own reckoning, Guisewite has done more than 12,000 strips, with the only extended break coming when she took eight weeks of maternity leave to spend with her newly adopted daughter in 1992. “In the last several years I’ve had one month off out of the year,” she said, “which I use to do things like clean out the trunk of my car.” The comic strip debuted in 1976. Guisewite was living in Detroit and had freshly embarked on a career in advertising. She started sending her parents stick-figure communiques that lamented her relationship travails, workplace frustrations and diet-based angst. At her mother’s urging, she sent a packet of material to Universal Press Syndicate — and the company sent back a contract. “They said they loved the emotional honesty of my submission and that they were confident I’d learn how to draw if I had to do it 365 days a year,” Guisewite says,

Q:

There are a lot of products that promise to help simplify and organize your life. In your experience, which types of items are actually helpful? Janet Schiesl, a Centreville, Va.based organizer: Products are not the answer to organizing. To simplify your space, you must consider the amount of stuff you have. After purging what is not needed, find a home for everything. For different people, this means different things. Where will you use this object? That’s where it should live. For storage, you must know if you are an out-of-sight, out-of-mind thinker. Storage can be open or closed. It depends on what will work for you.

Q:

I have purchased shoe racks in the past, but my shoes never end up in them. I tend to

Every Friday

— Cathy Guisewite, who will retire her long-running “Cathy” comic strip in October

Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Cathy Guisewite works on a future cartoon in her Studio City home earlier this month. After a 34-year run, Guisewite’s comic strip, “Cathy,” will end Oct 3. noting that she considers herself a writer first and foremost. Even her critics understand her place in pop culture. “I have to be honest, right up front: I’m not a big fan of the artwork,” says author (“The Art of ‘Toy Story 3’”) and comics historian Charles Solomon. “But when she started, there were far fewer women cartoonists. And this wasn’t just that she was a woman cartoonist, but the strip spoke to the daily life of women, and there hadn’t been anything like that before. I think that’s what helped it overcome its visual limitations — the idea of a woman speaking to other women, trying to find romance. That was something new.” Chronicling the foibles of a serial-dieting, mom-guilted, relationship-challenged relapsing shopaholic tapped into the reservoir of feelings shared by many women, and over the years Cathy has appeared in three animated TV specials (one of which won Guisewite an Emmy), countless books, a Reuben Award from the National Cartoonists Society, and a slew of licensed products that have included Cathy cake pans, chopsticks, greeting cards, lifesize stuffed dolls, ceramic cookie jars, figurines and candy boxes. The strip once appeared in 1,400 newspapers.

‘Jumping ship’ into marriage But her desire to be honest and truthful to the female of the species also resulted in a move that fundamentally altered the direction of the comic strip forever — a change that longtime “Cathy” fans simply refer to as “marrying Irving.” After years of dating drama, the main character married her boyfriend in a February 2005 strip. “That I am guilt-stricken about,” Guisewite says. “Because I had promised that Cathy would be the single woman that would not

abandon the other single women by getting married. That’s every single woman’s experience: that one by one all of her friends jump ship.” But Guisewite (who had married screenwriter Christopher Wilkinson in 1997; they’ve since separated) says she was committed to making the strip “as much as I could from the heart. And by that time I’d been married (for several years) and I couldn’t write about dating, about being single anymore. The world of being single had changed radically. I mean, back when I was single there was still a busy signal. So that was my conflict.” And a source of tension. “That’s the thing about comic strips and their creators,” said Ben Schwartz, author and comics historian. “They don’t age the same way. It’s hard for creative people to keep going back to what’s best about the strips and to keep growing creatively at the same time.” It’s a tension that Guisewite, who celebrates her 60th birthday next month, acknowledges. “I was somewhat obligated to keep Cathy’s age as vague as possible so women of a lot of different ages could relate, so I couldn’t really write about being my age. That’s not appropriate for her.” As for what she has next, “cleaning out the trunk of the car is the only thing I have for sure,” she says. And then she adds, “I think I’m doomed to be a writer.” She has folders upon folders labeled “fashion,” “diet” and “relationships” crammed with magazine pages, orphaned jokes and half ideas. “I’d be thrilled to write something where I didn’t have to stop and draw it every four or five sentences,” she says. And when she decides on what that is, Guisewite will be well on her way to sketching in the details in that fourth panel of a life that balances professional and personal pursuits but this time it is hers.

Key to organizing: Know what works The Washington Post

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

step out of my shoes in front of my dresser, or maybe in my closet, and that is where they stay until I feel like moving them to a rack. Do you have any suggestions that might work with my natural inclination? You are right in that you have to work with your natural inclination. If you are not inclined to lift them up off the ground to put them away, then consider under-the-bed storage for your shoes. It may be an issue of the type of shoe rack you are using. I recommend a rack with flat, solid shelves. I don’t like the slanted racks. Shoes tend to fall unless you place them perfectly.

A:

Q:

I’m looking at my side of the bedroom: nightstand and floor covered with books, magazines, newspapers. Any ideas?

A:

Yes: De-clutter. Be conscious and consistent about

reading and quickly recycling the magazines and newspapers. If you’re saving the magazines for certain stories, tear out the pages and keep them in a folder. And take a few minutes to decide which books you actually need right next to your bed. I’m guessing two at the most.

Q:

I used to get invitations, important letters or coupons and hang them on my refrigerator. Thanks to my new house’s fully open floor plan with virtually no walls and my lovely suite of stainless appliances, all of these things now have no place to go. How about hanging some cork on the inside of one of your kitchen cabinets? Get some cork from a hardware store and cut it to the exact size you need. You could probably hang it with a few strips of Velcro.

A:

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C OV ER S T ORY

B8 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

where KouseFly drummer Meshem Jackson works. On Aug. 31, he’ll play an employee barbecue at Bend Memorial Clinic. Hinderberger is considering bringing amplification. “It’s really different singing into a mic and singing out loud. It’s two different ways of doing it,” he says. While it’s easier with a microphone and amps, “it’s nice just to jump up, whip out the guitar and play. “I’ll tell you right now — so far it’s been very liberating. Because there are a lot of hoops you have to jump through to get a gig. You’ve got to get into their schedule, or into a venue. I haven’t gotten a ‘no’ yet,” he says, chuckling. “I didn’t think it was going to take off — not that it has yet, anyway, but I think it has gotten a lot of traction,” he says. In just a couple of weeks’ time, the Facebook page Brian in the Breakroom has more than 53 fans.

Photos by Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Brian Hinderberger, who also plays the harmonica, records himself while playing a song in the kitchen of Healthy Beginnings. Hinderberger plans to make a documentary about his breakroom shows.

Breakroom Continued from B1

‘A quick tune’ “Hopefully, I’ll get enough video and footage that I can make a cool video about America’s breakrooms, or at least a small portrait of it,” he explains to the awaiting audience while setting up his Flip camera on a tripod. When one of the employees replies that the room isn’t technically a breakroom, he remains undeterred. The name of this game is speed. He usually arrives at 12:15, plays the song, then grabs lunch before heading back to work. “I’ll just hit a quick tune and get out of your hair,” Hinderberger tells the trio. After he tunes his acoustic guitar,

he begins to strum and blow into the harmonica, Dylan-style, then lets loose with “Ebb and Flow.” The song, he later explains, is about “the ups and downs and curveballs life throws your way.” It’s the first of his songs to be added to KouseFly’s repertoire, and in performance it’s a duet with bandmate Chris Evans.

Trash-pile guitar Hinderberger’s affair with music began after he graduated from Mountain View High School in Bend and joined the Navy at 19. In the Navy, he found a guitar in a trash pile. “I always wanted to play the guitar, so I started playing on the ship during my off times, and out at sea, and fell in love with the instrument,” he says. Once he returned to Bend at 22, he studied journalism at Cen-

tral Oregon Community College in Bend. He landed his first job as a “production grunt, running teleprompters and stuff like that.” He fell in love with the broadcast medium: “It seemed like a lot of weird people, like I was.” He next attended University of Oregon, graduating in 2000 with a degree in journalism, and returned to Bend and KTVZ. He was laid off from the station after 9/11, did some magazine writing and explored other fields, including marketing and freelance Web design. He was recently rehired at KTVZ as its promotion producer. In fact, he says, it was working for an actual employer again that partly inspired Brian in the Breakroom. “It just seemed like it was a meeting place. It definitely was the inspiration of this thing,” he says. He was further inspired by the Avett Brothers, a group known to play venues large and offbeat, including offices, he says. Hinderberger has been married to wife Shannon for nearly five years. His wife attended SXSW last year and was supportive of his idea to play breakrooms and try to score a slot at the festival. The couple have a 2-year-old son who attends Rowdy Rascals Preschool, the site of a recent Brian in the Breakroom set. The first Brian in the Breakroom show was at a sign shop

‘Music changes everything’ Judging from the reception of the crowd at Healthy Beginnings, which grows to five when two women from other offices in the building wander in during the song, Hinderberger’s project is off to a healthy start. In the silent moment before enthusiastic applause kicks up, he thanks the room for letting him play. After it dies down, Laurel Case says, “That was really cool. Probably the best break we’ve had.” Hinderberger tells the group that, at first, his presence is awkward for everyone. “It’s like, ‘Why’s this guy doing this?’ But music changes everything. A great example is (when) I was playing for toddlers at a preschool. At first everyone was puzzled, but “before you know it, they were clapping. The demeanor of the whole room just changed. Kids weren’t crying anymore. It’s amazing what music will do.” A moment later, Randi Whitley says, “I think we’re having a pretty good day anyways, but —” “Yeah,” interjects Case, “we were having a good day, but now it’s a great day.” “Yeah,” agrees Whitley. “Great idea,” Case says to Hinderberger. “We all need music.” Ultimately, Hinderberger’s goal is playing music for a living. More immediately, he hopes to get booked at SXSW. “But the liberating thing is, I don’t care, because I’m still going to go anyway, and still have as much fun, and probably enjoy playing just as much music on the way there,” he says. In other words, he’ll hit the breakrooms while he looks for his big break. “Hopefully, this grows to the point where I get really cool, creative breakrooms. I know there are some breakrooms out there that are just phenomenal,” he says. “Locally, there are a few breakrooms here that are just, ‘Wow, I can’t believe employers do that for their employees, exercise equipment, pingpong tables.’ It’s going to be interesting to find out what’s out there.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

Julie Sorick and Tanley Lemon of Central Oregon Mediation, and Randi Whitley of Healthy Beginnings, applaud Hinderberger after his performance in the Healthy Beginnings kitchen Wednesday.

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Inside: Sports Can Oregon’s football team get back to the Rose Bowl after a tumultuous offseason?

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN • Four-page special section, C1-C2, C7-C8

TheTradition’10

The Jeld-Wen Tradition • A major golf tournament on the Champions Tour • August 19-22 • Crosswater Club in Sunriver

Leaderboard D.A.Weibring

-10 From the course Quotable “The parade through the (medical) trailer over here is pretty amazing.”

TomLehman

-8

Through the second of four rounds of play of The Tradition • Full results and tee times for today on Page C2

FredFunk

JayDonBlake

-7

-7

BobTway

GilMorgan

-7

JayHaas

-7

BernhardLanger

-6

-6

Staying in front D.A. Weibring fires another 67 to take a two-shot lead, but a large group will try to track him down this weekend

— D.A. Weibring, about the various aches and pains Champions Tour golfers often suffer throughout the course of a tournament.

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

SUNRIVER — D.A. Weibring has never been this high on the second-round leaderboard of a Champions Tour major championship. Inside Gil Morgan has, but it has been since 2006, and he has not logged a • Champions top-10 finish since 2009. Tour stalwart Both players are in contention afJay Haas ter two rounds at the 2010 Jeld-Wen shoots low Tradition. round of day, On a postcard sunny and warm Page C2 Friday at Crosswater Club, Weibring • Second-round shot his second consecutive 5-underpictures, par 67 to take the 36-hole lead in the 72-hole tournament. Tom Lehman Page C8 is two shots back of Weibring and a shot ahead of a four-way tie that includes Morgan and Fred Funk. For Weibring, who is 57, the first two rounds represent a turn of fortune. See Tradition / C7

Player to watch Bernhard Langer The Champions Tour’s hottest player is still lurking after shooting 6 under par through the first 36 holes.

What to watch for Bucking the Tradition trend? No second-round leader has won the Jeld-Wen Tradition since it moved to Crosswater Club. Will that change in 2010?

About The Tradition What: Golf tournament for professional golfers on the Champions Tour, which consists of players age 50 and older When: Today and Sunday; for today, tee times start at 8:25 a.m. and run through 10:05 a.m. (see Page C2 for tee times for today’s third round) Where: Crosswater Club in Sunriver Tickets: $25, at the front gate of The Tradition. For more information: www.jeld-wentradition.com or call 503526-9331

By the numbers A look at some of the numbers from the first round of The Tradition:

5

Tournament schedule TODAY • Will call open, 6:30 a.m.; gates open, 7 a.m. • Third round at Crosswater, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY • Will call open, 6:30 a.m.; gates open, 7 a.m. • Final round at Crosswater, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Awards ceremony at 18th green following play)

Number of consecutive birdies carded Friday by Bob Tway on the back nine.

1

TV schedule

Saturday and Sunday, 1-3 p.m., NBC

Mt. Bachelor shuttle schedule

Number of birdies made on the par-3 hole No. 17 on Friday. Tom Lehman was the only player to play the hole under par, and it took a chip shot from the bunker to do it.

33 Number of spots Jay Haas moved up Friday after shooting a 7-under-par 65. He jumped from a tie for 40th place to a tie for seventh place.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

D.A. Weibring lines up his putt while playing the 17th hole at Sunriver’s Crosswater Club during the second round of The Tradition Friday afternoon. Weibring, a first-round co-leader, has a two-shot lead heading into the third round.

Lehman salvages round late to remain near lead By Zack Hall The Bulletin

7 Number of players among the top eight on the leaderboard who already own Champions Tour or PGA Tour major titles.

Through Sunday; cost is free • Bus service at the Shops at the Old Mill District, 7:30 a.m. • Service will run on regular intervals, picking up and dropping off at the Old Mill District and at The Tradition’s main gate. • Bus service will be most frequent after 10 a.m. • Bus service ends one hour after play concludes.

SUNRIVER — Tom Lehman could have put himself into a real jam during Friday’s second round of the Jeld-Wen Tradition. At even par for the day, the 1996 British Open champion looked to be in trouble on Crosswater Club’s par-5 12th hole after he hit his tee shot into the right rough. Lehman was able to advance his next shot about 150 yards, leaving still another 270 yards to the green. From there, he was able to get near the green with a 3-wood , then got up and down to save par

— and perhaps save his round as well. “From that point on I played OK again and finished the round off well,” Lehman reflected later. He went on to birdie the 14th, 15th and 17th holes to post a 3-under-par 69 and move to 8 under for the tournament, staying on the heels of 36-hole leader D.A. Weibring. But it was not easy for Lehman, who birdied the second hole, only to give the shot back with a bogey after flying the green on the par-4 eighth hole. See Lehman / C7

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Tom Lehman reacts after a 20-foot putt misses the mark on the 18th hole Friday during the second round of The Tradition. He made par for a 69 on the day and is in second place.

ON THE WEB: Visit www.bendbulletin.com/tradition for an interactive map of Crosswater and coverage of all four rounds of the tournament


T H E T R A DI T ION

C2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE PLAYERS

TRADITION SCOREBOARD SCORES

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jay Haas buckles his knees after missing his birdie putt on the 18th hole during the second round of The Tradition on Friday. Haas is four shots off the lead.

One of the Champions Tour’s greats still has fight left in him Jay Haas, a 14-time winner on the senior circuit, shot a 65 for the low round of the day to move into contention By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

SUNRIVER — One of the Champions Tour’s most dominant players over the last five years, Jay Haas, posted the low round of the day Friday, carding a 7-underpar 65 during the second round of the 2010 Jeld-Wen Tradition. Haas, 56, posted six birdies on Crosswater Club’s front nine and one on the back side to move to 6 under overall, four strokes back of D.A. Weibring, who leads the tournament midway through at 10 under par. “I hit some shots close in and had one long putt,” said Haas, a 14-time winner on the Champions Tour. “Other than a 25-foot putt (on hole No. 6), all the birdies were pretty close.”

The Champion Tour’s leading money winner in both 2006 and 2007, Haas has won a tournament in each full season he has played on the 50-and-over circuit, but not yet this year. Haas does have four top-10 finishes this season, including at last month’s Senior British Open Championship, in which he tied for eighth. “Hopefully I can use this (Friday’s round) as a boost,” said Haas, whose most recent of his three Champions Tour major titles was the 2009 Constellation Energy Senior Players. “The young guys are coming up and they should be playing well. … I know I can still play some good golf, but the window’s closing. “I know it sounds corny,” Haas added, “but the ball doesn’t know

how old you are. If you hit the ball solid, things will go right for you. If you don’t hit it good, and I don’t care if you’re Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus or Hale Irwin, things don’t turn out well.” David Frost and Hal Sutton also had strong second rounds Friday as each posted a 6-under 66. While Sutton was a model of consistency, recording three birdies on the front and three birdies on the back, Frost tore up the first 17 holes, going to 8 under before losing his tee shot on No. 18 and posting a double bogey on his final hole of the day. Despite his late mishap, Frost, the 50-year-old South African who won the 3M Championship in Minnesota earlier this month, put himself on the leaderboard

Friday and now sits tied for 14th place at 4 under, six strokes back of Weibring. Sutton enters today’s third round tied for 19th at 3 under par. “It’s just a matter of getting comfortable,” Frost said about his fast start Friday. “This (tournament) is the first time I’ve played a competitive round on this course.” A 10-time winner on the PGA Tour, Frost has posted nine top-10 finishes this year and has already earned more than $700,000 on his first full season on the Champions Tour. “It’s nice to get back into contention,” said Frost, whose last win before the 3M Championship was in 1999. “I haven’t been in this position in 11 years. When you get that adrenaline going again, being in a position to win, you want more of it.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

Jay Haas, at a glance PGA Tour victories: Nine, including two each in 1981 and 1982. Champions Tour victories: 14; two of his wins came just last year. Champions Tour in 2010: No victories, but he has finished in the top 10 of four events. He is 23rd on the money list with $403,759. Did you know?: Haas won at least two titles in each of the last five years. ... Haas has two sons, Bill and Jay Jr., who are both professional golfers as well. ... Haas is 13th on the alltime money list in Champions Tour history, with $10,695,681. He is tied for 14th on the alltime list with 14 wins.

THE COURSE

Winds pick up, change how pros play Crosswater By Zack Hall The Bulletin

SUNRIVER — Tricky winds are a part of playing Crosswater Club. That much became evident Fri-

day during the second round of the 2010 Jeld-Wen Tradition. Winds at Crosswater, though generally light, shifted throughout the day. And though the scores on average were lower dur-

ing the second round (71.712) than the first round (71.894), the breeze gave the golfers something more to think about. “It was all over the place,” Tom Lehman said of the shift-

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ing winds. “It was really bizarre the way it moved around. It’s not blowing hard, but an 8-mile-anhour wind helping and then an 8-mile-an-hour wind hurting is a 16-mile-per-hour difference.” How does that affect the golfers? Lehman cited the par-5 16th hole as an example. He said he teed off with the wind blowing from his right. For his second shot, the wind was head-on. And his approach shot was played downwind. “That’s the kind of games that it plays with you,” Lehman said. “It’s hard to know exactly whether you can trust what the wind is doing.” Regardless how challenging he found the winds, Lehman managed to stay in contention after posting a 3-under-par 69 Friday. Fred Funk, winner of the 2008 Tradition here at Crosswater, also noticed a shift in the wind. “It did a 180 (-degree turn) on us,” Funk said. “You have some tricky greens. So you get a little bit of wind, and you don’t have that much margin for error on some shots, like (No.) 8 and (No.) 4. You have got to be careful on holes like those.” The Champions Tour is forecasting that the breezes should continue to be a factor throughout the weekend. For the final round on Sunday afternoon, the tour is forecasting winds to pick up to between 10 and 20 mph. That could be an issue as the top contenders head for the

“It was all over the place. It was really bizarre the way it moved around. It’s not blowing hard, but an 8-mile-an-hour wind helping and then an 8-mile-an-hour wind hurting is a 16-mileper-hour difference.” — Champions Tour player Tom Lehman, on the winds at Crosswater on Friday

homestretch. “Wind is the No. 1 factor that makes scores go up,” said D.A. Weibring, who is leading The Tradition after two rounds. If the winds become an increasing factor, golfers will have to be cautious, Lehman said. “You just have to take your time to make sure you can get committed to what it’s doing,” Lehman said. “You take that extra four or five seconds as you are thinking through the shot, to make sure you know what it’s doing. The worst thing you can do is rush. You start rushing, and you make mistakes.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Friday At Sunriver Resort Crosswater Club Sunriver Purse: $2.6 million Yardage: 7,533; Par: 72 (36-36) Second Round D.A. Weibring 67-67—134 -10 Tom Lehman 67-69—136 -8 Gil Morgan 68-69—137 -7 Jay Don Blake 69-68—137 -7 Bob Tway 70-67—137 -7 Fred Funk 68-69—137 -7 Jay Haas 73-65—138 -6 Bernhard Langer 69-69—138 -6 Tom Jenkins 69-70—139 -5 Bob Gilder 68-71—139 -5 Tommy Armour III 71-68—139 -5 Tom Purtzer 70-69—139 -5 Bobby Clampett 69-70—139 -5 David Frost 74-66—140 -4 John Cook 72-68—140 -4 Scott Simpson 69-71—140 -4 Fulton Allem 68-72—140 -4 Michael Allen 69-71—140 -4 Russ Cochran 71-70—141 -3 Tim Simpson 73-68—141 -3 Mark Calcavecchia 69-72—141 -3 J.L. Lewis 70-71—141 -3 David Peoples 71-70—141 -3 Hal Sutton 75-66—141 -3 Bobby Wadkins 72-69—141 -3 Larry Mize 71-70—141 -3 Nick Price 71-70—141 -3 Gene Jones 71-71—142 -2 Andy Bean 70-72—142 -2 Jeff Sluman 71-71—142 -2 Eduardo Romero 71-71—142 -2 Craig Stadler 73-69—142 -2 Tom Watson 71-71—142 -2 Mark Wiebe 69-73—142 -2 Loren Roberts 69-74—143 -1 Brad Bryant 72-71—143 -1 Chien Soon Lu 70-73—143 -1 Corey Pavin 68-75—143 -1 Mike Goodes 74-69—143 -1 Morris Hatalsky 71-73—144 E Peter Senior 73-71—144 E Don Pooley 69-75—144 E Joe Ozaki 71-74—145 +1 Joey Sindelar 73-72—145 +1 Bruce Vaughan 69-76—145 +1 Hale Irwin 69-76—145 +1 Wayne Levi 74-72—146 +2 Dan Forsman 74-72—146 +2 Mark O’Meara 73-73—146 +2 Ronnie Black 73-73—146 +2 Mark James 69-78—147 +3 Olin Browne 74-73—147 +3 Jerry Pate 75-72—147 +3 Mike Reid 79-69—148 +4 Keith Fergus 77-71—148 +4 Tom Kite 74-74—148 +4 Bruce Fleisher 76-73—149 +5 David Eger 75-75—150 +6 Ben Crenshaw 76-74—150 +6 Chip Beck 77-74—151 +7 Fuzzy Zoeller 73-79—152 +8 Denis Watson 76-76—152 +8 Phil Blackmar 81-72—153 +9 Isao Aoki 78-77—155 +11 Allen Doyle 77-79—156 +12 Graham Marsh 77-85—162 +18

TEE TIMES Today Tee No. 1 8:25 a.m. — Eduardo Romero, Craig Stadler, Tom Watson 8:35 a.m. — Gene Jones, Andy Bean, Jeff Sluman 8:45 a.m. —Bobby Wadkins, Larry Mize, Nick Price 8:55 a.m. —J.L. Lewis, David Peoples, Hal Sutton 9:05 a.m. —Russ Cochran, Tim Simpson, Mark Calcavecchia 9:15 a.m. — Scott Simpson, Fulton Allem, Michael Allen 9:25 a.m. — Bobby Clampett, David Frost, John Cook 9:35 a.m. — Bob Gilder, Tommy Armour III, Tom Purtzer 9:45 a.m. — Jay Haas, Bernhard Langer, Tom Jenkins 9:55 a.m. — Jay Don Blake, Bob Tway, Fred Funk 10:05 a.m. — D.A. Weibring, Tom Lehman, Gil Morgan Tee No. 10 8:25 a.m. — Mark Wiebe, Loren Roberts, Brad Bryant 8:35 a.m. — Chien Soon Lu, Corey Pavin, Mike Goodes 8:45 a.m. — Morris Hatalsky, Peter Senior, Don Pooley 8:55 a.m. — Joe Ozaki, Joey Sindelar, Bruce Vaughan 9:05 a.m. — Hale Irwin, Wayne Levi, Dan Forsman 9:15 a.m. — Mark O’Meara, Ronnie Black, Mark James West Yorkshire 9:25 a.m. — Olin Browne, Jerry Pate, Mike Reid 9:35 a.m. — Keith Fergus, Tom Kite, Bruce Fleisher 9:45 a.m. — David Eger, Ben Crenshaw, Chip Beck 9:55 a.m. — Fuzzy Zoeller, Denis Watson, Phil Blackmar 10:05 a.m. — Isao Aoki, Allen Doyle, Graham Marsh


S

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Golf Inside Ai Miyazato holds lead at LPGA event in Oregon, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010

L O C A L LY Bend playing host to Northwest Cup roller hockey The 17th annual Northwest Cup roller hockey tournament is under way this weekend at Cascade Indoor Sports in Bend. Teams from around Oregon, Washington and Idaho, and from as far away as Canada, are scheduled to compete in the Northwest Cup, which includes divisions for youngsters through adults. Games are slated to start at 8 a.m. today and continue through the evening; today’s last game starts at 10:30 p.m. On Sunday, play starts at 8:30 a.m. Championship games will start at 1:40 and 2:30 p.m. Spectators are welcome, and admission is free. Cascade Indoor Sports is located at 20795 High Desert Lane in Bend. For the tournament schedule, visit www.cascadeindoorsports.com. — Bulletin staff report

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL

Bend Elks’ strong season generates record attendance By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Lots of Elks fans • The Bend Elks drew more than 50,000 spectators this season, and more than 6,000 in two playoff games

A winning season that ended with a deep run into the playoffs helped the Bend Elks draw more than 50,000 fans for the first time in the summer collegiate baseball franchise’s 11-year history. “Our goal when we set out at the beginning of the season was to put 50,000 people through (Vince Genna Stadium),” Elks owner and general manager Jim Richards said this week. “And we achieved that. It was a combination of playing more split-squad games, Two Dollar Tuesdays (promotional nights) and huge crowds in August.” After finishing second in the West Coast League’s West Division with a

Rose repeat? After a tumultuous offseason, the Ducks will try to find a way to win the Pac-10 again and return to the Rose Bowl

Stretching study: It may not help, but don’t change

INSIDE

Mike Bonnicksen / Wenatchee World

The Bend Elks’ Andy Hunter scores in the sixth inning of a West Coast League Champions Series game on Monday. The Elks lost the series, two games to one.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: OREGON PREVIEW

RUNNING

Should runners limber up before they head out on their path? Well, it’s no stretch to say that the latest study left scientists reaching for the real answer. In a clinical trial designed to shed light on a long-standing debate in the running world, USA Track and Field randomly split 3,000 runners into two groups — asking some to stretch before running and others not to. Both groups wound up with the same risk of injury — 16 percent. The most important conclusion from the study: If you’re used to stretching, keep doing it, but if you’re not, there’s no need to start. The most significant finding was that runners who normally stretched but were told not to for the experiment had twice the injury risk as regular stretchers who stayed on their routine. Meanwhile, runners who normally start without pre-run stretching didn’t necessarily improve their injury protection by starting a stretching routine. Lump it all together, and there was no statistical difference between the stretchers and non-stretchers. — The Associated Press

27-21 regular-season record, the Elks upset Corvallis in the first round of the league playoffs and advanced to the WCL Championship Series for the first time. Bend fell to the Wenatchee AppleSox two games to one in the best-of-three final series, but the two playoff series brought the Elks two more home games, which combined drew more than 6,000 spectators. “It wasn’t just the two playoff games,” Richards added about his team’s late-season attendance push. “We drew over 6,000 in the Wenatchee weekend series (the final three games of the regular season). We had 12,000 fans over the last five games. That’s pretty impressive.” See Elks / C5

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Oregon running back LaMichael James Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press

Coming Sunday • A preview of Oregon State football, in Sports

EUGENE — When Oregon’s season ended in Pasadena on New Year’s Day, it appeared all but certain that the Pacific-10 champions would lead the conference again this fall. But after a tumultuous offseason, the Ducks’ outlook in the league is far more tenuous. Even though Oregon is still considered the league’s strongest team in light of Southern California’s downturn, the Ducks’ fate this season really depends on how the team handles expectations and the loss of quarterback Jeremiah Masoli. Nobody is more aware of that than second-year coach Chip Kelly. “Preseason rankings don’t mean anything to us,” Kelly said. “The great thing about our game is that it’s played out on the field.” Oregon’s offseason troubles started in the weeks following their Rose Bowl appearance against Ohio State. Whispers about a fraternity house theft that involved football players led to charges against Masoli. Then prolific freshman running back LaMichael James was accused of assaulting his ex-girlfriend. Both athletes went on to plead guilty to charges connected to the allegations. Kelly suspended Masoli — projected as a possible Heisman Trophy candidate — for the upcoming season, while James was suspended for the season opener. Masoli’s fall from grace was complete weeks later when he was stopped for a traffic violation and marijuana was found in the car. Kelly kicked him off the team. Nate Costa, the Oregon quarterback whose injury two seasons ago ultimately led to Masoli’s rise, looks favored at this point to take over this fall as the Ducks try to put the disarray in the past. But he’s going to be challenged by Darron Thomas and there’s even a possibility that the Ducks could rotate both. A final decision will be made the week before fall camp ends, Kelly said. Costa is more of a traditional passer while Thomas is more of a threat on the ground. See Ducks / C5

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Oregon quarterback Nate Costa is the favorite to start this year, but he might split time with Darron Thomas at the position.

Ducks schedule (All times Pacific) Saturday, Sept. 4 Saturday, Sept. 11 Saturday, Sept. 18 Saturday, Sept. 25 Saturday, Oct. 2 Saturday, Oct. 9 Thursday, Oct. 21 Saturday, Oct. 30 Saturday, Nov. 6 Saturday, Nov. 13 Thursday, Nov. 26 Saturday, Dec. 4

vs. New Mexico at Tennessee vs. Portland State at Arizona St. vs. Stanford at Washington State vs. UCLA at Southern Cal vs. Washington at California vs. Arizona at Oregon State

12:30 p.m. 4 p.m. TBA 7:30 p.m. 8:15 p.m. TBA 6 p.m. 5 p.m. TBA TBA 4 p.m. TBA

MLB Rangers .........2 Orioles ...........0

Braves............5 Cubs ..............3

Tigers ............6 Indians ...........0

Phillies...........1 Nationals .......0

Mariners ........6 Yankees .........0

Mets...............7 Pirates ...........2

Blue Jays ..... 16 Red Sox .........2

Marlins ..........9 Astros ............0

Twins .............7 Angels ...........2

Brewers........ 10 Padres ...........6

Athletics.........5 Rays ...............4

Giants ............6 Cardinals .......3

White Sox ........ Royals .......ppd.

D’backs ..........4 Rockies ..........3

BA S K E T BA L L C O M M E N TA RY

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Women’s hoops pioneers are still guiding the WNBA By George Vecsey New York Times News Service

T

Reds...............3 Dodgers .........1

Roundup, see Page C6

INDEX Scoreboard ............................... C4 Auto racing ............................... C4 Golf ............................................C5 MLB ...........................................C6

Michelle V. Agins /The New York Times

Carol Blazejowski, left, president and general manager of the New York Liberty, and Donna Orender, president of the WNBA, stand at Madison Square Garden in New York earlier this week. Blazejowski and Orender were once players, but they’re now WNBA executives.

oday they are suits — pro basketball executives — but once upon a time they were kids, looking for a game. They played their sport at the highest level of its time. Now their game keeps inching toward the rim, and they preside over it. Donna Orender borrowed her father’s car in suburban Long Island. Didn’t tell him she was heading into the city for a game. Drove down a one-way street and lived to tell the tale. Now she is the president of the Women’s National Basketball Association. Carol Blazejowski took the bus from New Jersey into the city, to play at the Rucker women’s tournament in Harlem. A nice man named Lamar escorted her back downtown, but as her bus headed for the tunnel, all of Manhattan went dark. It was the blackout of 1977. She thought, “How am I going to get home?” The immortal Blaze is president and general manager of the red-hot Liberty, which have won 10 straight after beating Tulsa 95-85 Thursday at Madison Square Garden. See WNBA / C5

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C4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

IN THE BLEACHERS

FOOTBALL NFL

TODAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Czech Open, third round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — Champions Tour, The Tradition, third round, NBC. 2:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Safeway Classic, second round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 6:55 a.m. — Enlish Premier League, Arsenal vs. Blackpool, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 8 a.m. — Little League World Series, pool play, Toms River, N.J., vs. Hamilton, Ohio, ESPN. 10 a.m. — Little League World Series, pool play, British Columbia vs. Panama, ESPN. 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, FSNW. Noon — Little League World Series, pool play, Columbus, Ga., vs. Walpahu, Hawaii, ABC. 1 p.m. — Junior League, final, teams TBA, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Minnesota Twins, Fox. 3 p.m. — Little League World Series, pool play, Chinese Taipei vs. Saudi Arabia, ESPN. 4 p.m. — MLB, San Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals, MLB network. 5 p.m. — Little League World Series, pool play, teams TBD, ESPN.

LACROSSE 9 a.m. — MLL playoffs, first semifinal, Boston Cannons vs. Chesapeake Bayhawks, ESPN2.

SWIMMING 11 a.m. — Pan-Pacific Championships (taped), NBC.

TENNIS 11 a.m. — ATP Tour, U.S. Open Series, Western and Southern Financial Group Masters, first semifinal, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — ATP Tour, U.S. Open Series, Western and Southern Financial Group Masters, second semifinal, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL Noon — Global Community Cup, Lithuania vs. United States, ESPN. 8 p.m. — WNBA, Los Angeles Sparks at Seattle Storm, ESPN2.

AUTO RACING 3 p.m. — IRL, Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma, qualifying (taped), VS. network. 4:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Irwin tools Night Race, ABC.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — NFL preseason, Pittsburgh Steelers at New York Giants, NFL network. 7 p.m. — NFL preseason, Green Bay Packers at Seattle Seahawks, Fox.

SUNDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Czech Open, final round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, final round, CBS. 1 p.m. — Champions Tour, The Tradition, final round, NBC. 2:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Safeway Open, final round, Golf Channel.

TENNIS 9 a.m. — ATP Tour, U.S. Open Series, Western and Southern Financial Group Masters, final, CBS. Noon — WTA Tour, U.S. Open Series, Rogers Cup, final (same-day tape), ESPN2.

BASEBALL 9 a.m. — Little League World Series, Elimination Game, teams TBD, ESPN. 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at New York Yankees, FSNW. 11 a.m. — Little League World Series, Elimination Game, teams TBD, ABC. Noon — Little League World Series, Elimination Game, teams TBD, ESPN. 3 a.m. — Little League World Series, Bracket Final, teams TBD, ESPN. 5 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Minnesota Twins, ESPN. 5 p.m. — Little League World Series, Bracket Final, teams TBD, ESPN2.

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Friday’s Game Cincinnati 22, Philadelphia 9 Today’s Games Baltimore at Washington, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 4 p.m. Miami at Jacksonville, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Carolina, 5 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Oakland at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 6 p.m. Detroit at Denver, 6 p.m. Green Bay at Seattle, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Game Minnesota at San Francisco, 5 p.m. Monday’s Game Arizona at Tennessee, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 11 5 4 37 28 New York 9 7 4 31 21 Toronto FC 7 7 5 26 21 Chicago 6 5 6 24 23 New England 6 10 3 21 19 Kansas City 5 9 5 20 15 Philadelphia 4 10 5 17 23 D.C. 3 14 3 12 13 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 13 3 4 43 32 Real Salt Lake 11 4 6 39 36 FC Dallas 8 2 9 33 27 Seattle 8 8 5 29 23 Colorado 7 5 7 28 21 San Jose 7 6 5 26 21 Houston 5 10 5 20 23 Chivas USA 5 10 4 19 22 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games New York at Toronto FC, 10 a.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 1 p.m. Colorado at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New England at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Philadelphia at D.C. United, 11 a.m.

GA 19 22 21 22 29 22 34 35 GA 13 16 17 25 18 20 30 25

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB x-Indiana 21 12 .636 — x-New York 21 12 .636 — x-Washington 21 12 .636 — x-Atlanta 19 14 .576 2 Connecticut 17 16 .515 4 Chicago 14 19 .424 7 Western Conference W L Pct GB z-Seattle 27 6 .818 — x-Phoenix 15 18 .455 12 Los Angeles 13 20 .394 14 San Antonio 13 20 .394 14 Minnesota 12 21 .364 15 Tulsa 5 28 .152 22 x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference ——— Friday’s Games Washington 75, New York 74 San Antonio 75, Indiana 61 Connecticut 78, Chicago 71 Seattle 78, Phoenix 73 Los Angeles 98, Minnesota 91 Today’s Games Chicago at Tulsa, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Seattle, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Phoenix at San Antonio, Noon Washington at Atlanta, Noon Connecticut at New York, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Indiana, 2 p.m.

LACROSSE

TENNIS WTA Tour

10 a.m. — MLL, Championship Game, teams TBD, ESPN2.

TRACK AND FIELD 11 a.m. — IAAF Diamond League (taped), NBC.

SWIMMING Noon — Pan-Pacific Championships (taped), NBC

AUTO RACING 2 p.m. — IRL, Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma, VS. network.

HORSE RACING 4 p.m. — Emerald Downs, Longacres Mile, FSNW.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — NFL preseason, Minnesota Vikings at San Francisco 49ers, NBC.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Global Community Cup, United States at Spain (same-day tape), ESPN2.

RADIO SUNDAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Minnesota Twins, KICE-AM 940. . Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— ROGERS CUP A U.S. Open Series event Friday Montreal Singles Quarterfinals Svetlana Kuznetsova (11), Russia, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-1, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (8), Russia, def. Kim Clijsters (5), Belgium, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2. Caroline Wozniacki (2), Denmark, def. Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Victoria Azarenka (10), Belarus, def. Marion Bartoli (17), France, 6-2, 7-6 (6).

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS A U.S. Open Series event Friday Mason, Ohio Singles Quarterfinals Mardy Fish, United States, def. Andy Murray (4), Britain, 6-7 (7), 6-1, 7-6 (5). Andy Roddick (9), United States, def. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 6-4, 7-5. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, 6-4, 7-5. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4.

GOLF PGA Tour WYNDHAM CHAMPIONSHIP Friday At Sedgefield Country Club Course Greensboro, N.C. Purse: $5.1 million Yardage: 7,117; Par: 70 Second Round (a-amateur) Brandt Snedeker 63-65—128 Arjun Atwal 61-67—128 Kevin Streelman 64-65—129 Lucas Glover 64-65—129 John Rollins 64-65—129 Webb Simpson 66-64—130 Boo Weekley 64-67—131 Tim Herron 67-64—131 Justin Leonard 68-63—131 Marc Leishman 66-66—132 John Mallinger 65-67—132 David Toms 64-68—132 Jeev Milkha Singh 64-68—132 Garrett Willis 66-66—132 Jonathan Byrd 66-66—132 Spencer Levin 65-67—132 Scott Piercy 66-66—132 Martin Laird 67-65—132 Will MacKenzie 68-64—132 Jerry Kelly 66-67—133 Scott McCarron 65-68—133 Alex Prugh 69-64—133 Andres Romero 66-67—133 Richard S. Johnson 67-66—133 Fredrik Jacobson 67-67—134 James Driscoll 67-67—134 Michael Letzig 66-68—134 Bill Haas 69-65—134 Tim Petrovic 66-68—134 Briny Baird 66-68—134 Steve Marino 69-65—134 Josh Teater 66-68—134 Glen Day 67-67—134 Michael Sim 66-68—134 Paul Stankowski 67-67—134 Jason Gore 65-69—134 Daniel Chopra 70-65—135 Mark Wilson 68-67—135 Mathias Gronberg 67-68—135 John Merrick 68-67—135 Joe Durant 68-67—135 Chad Collins 68-67—135 Jay Williamson 65-70—135 Robert Garrigus 69-66—135 Chris DiMarco 67-68—135 James Nitties 67-68—135 Troy Matteson 68-67—135 Aaron Baddeley 66-69—135 Jason Dufner 66-69—135 Omar Uresti 69-66—135 Michael Connell 66-69—135 Brian Stuard 69-66—135 Chris Riley 67-69—136 John Daly 68-68—136 Skip Kendall 66-70—136 Blake Adams 65-71—136 Derek Lamely 70-66—136 Cameron Beckman 67-69—136 Aron Price 67-69—136 Jerry Richardson, Jr. 70-66—136 Garth Mulroy 68-68—136 Tom Gillis 69-67—136 Bob Estes 66-70—136 Jeff Quinney 66-70—136 Brett Wetterich 70-66—136 Charles Warren 67-69—136 Greg Owen 69-67—136 Kent Jones 66-70—136 Kirk Triplett 69-68—137 Troy Merritt 67-70—137 Rocco Mediate 70-67—137 D.J. Trahan 69-68—137 Kris Blanks 69-68—137 Frank Lickliter II 70-67—137 Trevor Immelman 68-69—137 J.J. Henry 71-66—137 Kevin Na 66-71—137 Drew Weaver 67-70—137 Failed to qualify Jeff Maggert 68-70—138 Tom Pernice, Jr. 68-70—138 Woody Austin 68-70—138 Brett Quigley 71-67—138 Brian Gay 69-69—138 Carl Pettersson 69-69—138 Ryan Moore 68-70—138 Lee Janzen 70-68—138 Greg Chalmers 71-67—138 Roger Tambellini 71-67—138 Brian Duncan 68-70—138 Mike Weir 67-71—138 Ryuji Imada 69-69—138

David Duval Johnson Wagner Brad Faxon Brent Delahoussaye Cameron Percy Davis Love III Billy Mayfair Andrew McLardy Brendan Gielow Henrik Bjornstad Steve Wheatcroft Patrick Moore Todd Hamilton Jimmy Walker Dean Wilson Roland Thatcher Marco Dawson John Senden Jarrod Lyle Chris Tidland J.P. Hayes Nicholas Thompson Chris Smith Chris Couch Nathan Green Martin Flores Brian Harman Craig Barlow Michael Bradley Jeff Gove Mark Brooks Matt Hill Ted Purdy Mathew Goggin David Lutterus Vance Veazey Graham DeLaet Craig Bowden Brenden Pappas Joe Ogilvie Seung-yul Noh Chris Wilson Kevin Johnson Alex Cejka Cliff Kresge Robert Gamez Anthony Kim Fred Couples Mark Hensby Cameron Tringale Steve Lowery Carlos Franco Rod Pampling Chris Stroud Henrik Stenson Steve Flesch George McNeill Curt Sanders Kevin Stadler Rich Barcelo a-Tanner Kesterson Eric Shriver Greg Kraft Jerod Turner

70-68—138 73-65—138 68-70—138 70-68—138 68-70—138 68-71—139 68-71—139 71-68—139 70-69—139 72-67—139 69-70—139 70-69—139 70-69—139 73-66—139 70-69—139 68-71—139 68-71—139 68-71—139 71-68—139 66-73—139 69-71—140 70-70—140 69-71—140 66-74—140 69-71—140 71-69—140 68-72—140 66-74—140 71-69—140 71-69—140 72-68—140 69-71—140 72-69—141 72-69—141 73-68—141 72-69—141 67-74—141 72-69—141 74-68—142 74-68—142 69-73—142 68-74—142 68-74—142 72-70—142 74-68—142 72-70—142 70-72—142 72-70—142 70-72—142 69-73—142 69-74—143 72-71—143 73-70—143 68-76—144 69-75—144 73-71—144 69-76—145 70-75—145 70-76—146 76-70—146 72-74—146 75-73—148 74-75—149 75-WD

LPGA Tour SAFEWAY CLASSIC Friday At Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club, Ghost Creek Course North Plains Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,552; Par: 72 (37-35) (a-amateur) First Round Ai Miyazato 34-32—66 Teresa Lu 34-33—67 Jee Young Lee 34-33—67 Chella Choi 35-33—68 Brittany Lincicome 34-34—68 Momoko Ueda 36-32—68 Amy Hung 35-33—68 Mina Harigae 36-33—69 Juli Inkster 35-34—69 Jiyai Shin 36-33—69 Na Yeon Choi 34-35—69 Eun-Hee Ji 35-34—69 Stephanie Louden 35-34—69 Adrienne White 37-33—70 Dorothy Delasin 36-34—70 Cristie Kerr 36-34—70 Laura Davies 35-35—70 Shanshan Feng 38-33—71 Anna Nordqvist 35-36—71 Suzann Pettersen 34-37—71 Morgan Pressel 38-33—71 Stacy Lewis 37-34—71 Inbee Park 37-34—71 Brittany Lang 35-36—71 Alena Sharp 35-36—71 Iben Tinning 35-36—71 Nicole Jeray 36-35—71 Gloria Park 36-35—71

Cathryn Bristow Lisa Meldrum Pernilla Lindberg Allison Fouch Karrie Webb Michelle Wie Jimin Kang Sherri Steinhauer Amy Yang Song-Hee Kim Na On Min Giulia Sergas Kyeong Bae Jean Bartholomew Beth Bader Cindy Lacrosse Samantha Richdale Becky Morgan Ilmi Chung Aree Song In-Kyung Kim Candie Kung Christina Kim Pat Hurst Hee-Won Han Vicky Hurst Meena Lee Hee Young Park Jennifer Rosales Tanya Dergal Yoo Kyeong Kim Alison Walshe Jane Park Paola Moreno Paige Mackenzie Katherine Hull Paula Creamer Sophie Gustafson Kristy McPherson Ji Young Oh Louise Friberg Seon Hwa Lee M.J. Hur Anna Rawson Ilhee Lee Ashli Bunch Danielle Downey Reilley Rankin Russy Gulyanamitta Mikaela Parmlid Lisa Strom Lindsey Wright Jill McGill Haeji Kang Irene Cho Liz Janangelo Lorie Kane Yani Tseng Leta Lindley Mika Miyazato Stacy Prammanasudh Jennifer Song Sandra Gal a-Amy Simanton Jamie Hullett Marianne Skarpnord Maria Hernandez Katie Futcher Sarah Lee Christi Cano Michelle Ellis Gwladys Nocera Michele Redman Eunjung Yi Wendy Ward Kris Tamulis Louise Stahle Diana D’Alessio Libby Smith Mallory Blackwelder Belen Mozo Heather Bowie Young Nicole Hage Amanda Blumenherst Sarah Jane Smith Soo-Yun Kang Mariajo Uribe Azahara Munoz Brandie Burton Angela Stanford Maria Hjorth Karen Stupples Sun Young Yoo Rachel Hetherington Catriona Matthew Moira Dunn Meredith Duncan a-Kristina Merkle Nannette Hill Angela Park Karine Icher Jean Reynolds Misun Cho Mindy Kim Karin Sjodin Taylor Leon Dina Ammaccapane Mi Hyun Kim Janice Moodie Christine Song Beatriz Recari Katie Kempter Young-A Yang Allison Hanna Kelli Kuehne Leah Wigger Sarah Kemp Jimin Jeong Julieta Granada Kris Tschetter Jeong Jang Shi Hyun Ahn

AUTO RACING NASCAR SPRINT CUP ——— IRWIN TOOLS NIGHT RACE LINEUP After Friday qualifying; race today At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 123.475. 2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 122.937. 3. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 122.764. 4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 122.584. 5. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 122.497. 6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 122.372. 7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 122.287. 8. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 122.248. 9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 122.178. 10. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 122.154. 11. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 122.131. 12. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 122.131. 13. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 122.022. 14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 121.999. 15. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 121.999. 16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 121.968.

Johnson wins pole for Bristol night race By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

BRISTOL, Tenn. — Jimmie Johnson crossed winning at Bristol Motor Speedway off his to-do list in March. Now he’ll try to make it two in a row by starting from the pole in tonight’s race. The four-time defending NASCAR champion turned a lap at 123.475 mph in Friday’s qualifying to put his Chevrolet on the front row. “Everybody wants to win here,” Johnson said. “We all know how hard I fought this track myself, my own demons, whatever it is that we finally got over in the spring to win here. I would love to go out and win again. If not, just have a really solid race.” Johnson bettered Carl Edwards, who earned the second starting spot with a lap at 122.937 in a Ford. His hold on the pole was for just a few minutes — Johnson ran his lap two cars after Edwards’ attempt.

AUTO RACING: NASCAR “I was on it for 15.54 seconds or however long it took Jimmie to run that thing,” Edwards said. Joey Logano qualified third in a Toyota, and also had a brief time atop the speed chart before Edwards and then Johnson knocked him into the second row. “When Carl ran his lap, he beat me by just a little bit and I was thinking, ‘Oh man, it would stink to get beat by that much,’ ” Logano said. “But Jimmie ran a really fast lap. I don’t think I had that much in me.” Tony Stewart qualified fourth and David Reutimann bounced back from a bout with food poisoning to qualify fifth. NASCAR had 49 cars vying for 43 starting positions. Drivers not making the race were Dave Blaney, Joe Nemechek, Kevin Lepage, J.J. Yeley, Brian Keselowski and Mike Bliss.

37-35—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 39-33—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 40-32—72 38-35—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 34-39—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 39-34—73 38-36—74 37-37—74 41-33—74 38-36—74 40-34—74 39-35—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 35-39—74 38-36—74 37-37—74 38-36—74 40-34—74 38-36—74 35-39—74 38-36—74 39-36—75 39-36—75 38-37—75 37-38—75 39-36—75 38-37—75 39-36—75 38-37—75 41-34—75 37-38—75 38-37—75 40-35—75 39-36—75 40-35—75 36-39—75 40-35—75 41-35—76 40-36—76 38-38—76 36-40—76 40-36—76 39-37—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 35-41—76 39-37—76 39-37—76 39-37—76 39-37—76 39-37—76 40-36—76 37-39—76 37-39—76 38-39—77 40-37—77 39-38—77 39-38—77 40-37—77 43-34—77 40-37—77 41-36—77 38-39—77 38-39—77 36-41—77 39-38—77 38-39—77 36-41—77 39-38—77 40-37—77 42-35—77 41-37—78 42-36—78 38-40—78 41-37—78 38-40—78 38-40—78 38-41—79 41-38—79 39-40—79 42-37—79 41-38—79 40-40—80 42-38—80 38-42—80 42-38—80 41-39—80 40-40—80 40-40—80 40-41—81 42-39—81 41-40—81 41-44—85 41-37—WD 46-36—WD

Wade Payne / The Associated Press

Driver Jimmie Johnson looks on during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Irwin Tools Night Race at Bristol Motor Speedway Friday in Bristol, Tenn.

17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 121.952. 18. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 121.89. 19. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 121.867. 20. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 121.813. 21. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 121.79. 22. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 121.651. 23. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 121.512. 24. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 121.474. 25. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 121.466. 26. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 121.42. 27. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 121.382. 28. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 121.29. 29. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 121.274. 30. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 121.113. 31. (26) Jeff Green, Ford, 120.999. 32. (66) Scott Riggs, Toyota, 120.953. 33. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 120.915. 34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 120.915. 35. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 120.915. 36. (64) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 120.816. 37. (07) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 120.763. 38. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 120.71. 39. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 119.678. 40. (7) Kevin Conway, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (71) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 120.664. Failed to Qualify 44. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 120.286. 45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 120.241. 46. (4) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 119.269. 47. (46) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 118.863. 48. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 117.957. 49. (32) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 112.997.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Florida C Ronny Paulino for testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Placed 2B Dustin Pedroia on the 15-day DL. Called up INF Yamaico Navarro from Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Acquired RHP Zach McAllister from the N.Y. Yankees as the player to be named to complete the Austin Kearns trade. DETROIT TIGERS—Optioned RHP Robbie Weinhardt to Toledo (IL). Recalled RHP Alfredo Figaro from Toledo. MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed INF Nick Punto on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Matt Tolbert from Rochester (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Placed OF Conor Jackson on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Jeff Larish from Sacramento (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS—Recalled LHP Michael Kirkman from Oklahoma City (PCL). Optioned LHP Derek Holland to Oklahoma City. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Designated LHP Randy Flores for assignment. Recalled INF Jonathan Herrera from Colorado Springs (PCL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Optioned OF Nick Stavinoha to Memphis (PCL). American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Traded INF Hector Bernal to St. Paul for cash. FORT WORTH CATS—Traded RHP Dustin Cameron to Wichita for future considerations. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS—Signed RHP Marcus Salmon, C Cody Merrell. Traded OF Robert Perry, RHP Dan Griffin and RHP Luke Prihoda to Shreveport-Bossier for cash. LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Released RHP Nick Tyson, C Jeremy Gillan, RHP Jacob Marceaux. Signed LHP Cody Walden and RHP Sean Potter. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Signed OF Andre Marshall. Acquired RHP Scott VanderWeg from Fort Worth for a player to be named. SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS—Released RHP Cardoza Tucker. Signed RHP Cody Kelley. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Signed INF Erick Scott. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended free agent G Delonte West for ten games for carrying a concealed weapon and wearing, carrying, and transporting a handgun. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Suspended Buffalo TE Shawn Nelson for four games for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy. DALLAS COWBOYS—Signed TE Martin Rucker. Released QB Matt Nichols. DENVER BRONCOS—Signed LB Worrell Williams. Waived LB Devin Bishop. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Placed LB Freddy Keiaho on injured reserve. Signed LB Alvin Bowen. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Waived FB Marcus Mailei. Signed FB Jason McKie. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed G Shawn Andrews. Waived OL Cliff Louis. HOCKEY National Hockey League PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Signed F Arron Asham to a one-year contract. COLLEGE ALABAMA—Named Amy Bragg director of performance nutrition. ALABAMA-HUNTSVILLE—Named Mike Warde men’s assistant ice hockey coach. ALVERNIA—Named Jason Kilgore men’s and women’s track and field coach. ILLINOIS-CHICAGO—Named Howard Moore men’s basketball coach. JUNIATA—Named Kevin Moore men’s volleyball coach. LONG BEACH STATE—Named Ryan Hellenthal director of basketball operations. OHIO STATE—Announced sophomore OT Marcus Hall will redshirt the 2010 football season, due to academic problems. ROSE-HULMAN—Named Kevin Robinson women’s golf coach and women’s assistant basketball coach, Tony Karras defensive line coach, and Akeem Leviston quarterbacks coach. SACRED HEART—Named Matt McGreevy men’s golf coach. SAINT AUGUSTINE’S—Named Rachel Sloan Bullard women’s basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd The Dalles 376 108 296 100 John Day 195 51 198 66 McNary 97 24 462 153 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 353,671 29,940 292,672 121,503 The Dalles 276,337 25,108 140,480 66,849 John Day 252,916 24,862 99,131 46,452 McNary 221,919 17,554 83,772 36,228

Kyle Busch picks up another Nationwide win BRISTOL, Tenn. — Kyle Busch moved one step closer to sweeping the weekend at Bristol Motor Speedway, winning the Nationwide Series race on Friday night after intentionally wrecking Brad Keselowski. The boos rained down on Busch as he celebrated his 10th Nationwide victory of the season. Busch is the defending champion of the Cup race. He had to work hard to get the Nationwide win, battling for at least a dozen laps with Keselowski for the lead. He finally made the pass with 31 to go, but as he slid in front of Keselowski, Busch didn’t have him cleared and contact between the cars sent Busch down the track and back to second. He promptly drove back up to Keselowski’s bumper and intentionally spun him. Keselowski, the Nationwide Series points leader, wound up 14th while Busch survived several late cautions to go to Victory Lane. — The Associated Press


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 C5

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Football • Seahawks talking to Chargers about WR Jackson: A Seahawks’ spokesman is confirming Seattle has been talking with San Diego about acquiring holdout wide receiver Vincent Jackson. The spokesman told The Associated Press on Friday that the Seahawks were granted permission by the Chargers to talk to the wide receiver a couple of weeks ago. Jackson has not reported to training camp because he is unhappy with being a restricted free agent in San Diego. He wants a multiyear contract. Jackson is a Pro Bowler coming off his second straight 1,000-yard season. He recently pleaded guilty to his second DUI since joining the NFL. He is suspended for the first three regularseason games. • T.O. has 43-yard catch, Bengals beat Eagles 22-9: Terrell Owens put some bite back into the Bengals’ offense. Owens caught a 43-yard pass along the sideline, setting up the only touchdown by Cincinnati’s starting offense Friday night in a 22-9 preseason victory over the Philadelphia Eagles. The Eagles couldn’t keep up with the 36-year-old receiver. Owens caught a perfect throw from Carson Palmer along the right sideline, stretching over Joselio Hanson to pull it in before going out of bounds at the 6-yard line. Bernard Scott ran it in on the next play. Owens had three catches for 67 yards in the first half, and ran 1 yard on a reverse.

Swimming • Lochte, Phelps win to help U.S. dominate Pan Pacs: Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps led all the way in winning their individual events at the Pan Pacific championships on Friday, helping the United States dominate on the third night of the year’s biggest international meet. Lochte, the Olympic champion, won his fourth gold medal, taking the 200-meter backstroke in 1 minute, 54.12 seconds, the world’s fastest time this year. That eclipsed the meet record of 1:54.44 set by Aaron Peirsol four years ago. American Tyler Clary earned the silver in 1:54.90. Ryosuke Irie of Japan, the world silver medalist who came in with the world’s best time, was third. Phelps won the 100 butterfly to collect his third gold medal.

Baseball • Home runs lift Texas at LLWS: Jake Orlando hit two blasts and Blake Toler’s solo shot in the first set the tone for the mini-mashers from Pearland, Texas, in a 10-8 win Friday over Plymouth, Minn., to get the Little League World Series off to a homer-happy start. The 13-year-old Orlando finished four-for-four with five RBIs. Also on Friday, Fairfield, Conn., beat Auburn, Wash., 3-1, on Jack Quinn’s tie-breaking tworun double in the fifth. Manati, Puerto Rico, defeated Ramstein Air Force Base, Germany, 110, while Tokyo, Japan, beat Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, 4-2, after Ginga Maruoka smacked a three-run homer with two outs in the top of the sixth.

Tennis • Baghdatis upsets topranked Nadal: Spraying balls all over the place, an erratic Rafael Nadal was upset by unseeded Marcos Baghdatis 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 in the quarterfinals of the Cincinnati Masters on Friday night. The top-ranked and top-seeded Nadal committed 30 unforced errors in the first two sets and double-faulted on break point in the ninth game of the third set, allowing the 20th-ranked Cypriot to serve for the match. Earlier Friday, fourth-seeded Andy Murray, playing his eighth afternoon match in 10 days, lost to unseeded Mardy Fish 6-7 (7), 6-1, 7-6 (5) in a match that lasted 2 hours, 56 minutes. Fish will meet Andy Roddick in the tournament’s first all-American semifinal since Roddick lost 7-5, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (2) to Andre Agassi in 2004. The ninth-seeded Roddick eliminated No. 2 Novak Djokovic 6-4, 7-5. • Semifinals set at Montreal: Svetlana Kuznetsova of Russia, Vera Zvonareva of Russia, Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark, and Victoria Azarenka of Belarus advanced to the semifinals of the Rogers Cup in Montreal on Friday. Kuznetsova beat Zheng Jie of China, 6-1, 6-3, while Zvonareva beat Kim Clijsters, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2. Wozniacki defeated Francesca Schiavone of Italy, 6-3, 6-2, and Azarenka beat Marion Bartoli of France, 6-2, 7-6 (6). • No. 1-ranked Serena Wil-

Ai Miyazato, of Japan, tees off on the 18th hole during the first round of the LPGA Safeway Classic golf tournament at Pumpkin Ridge, Friday in North Plains. Miyazato shot a 66 for the early lead.

liams pulls out of U.S. Open: Serena Williams withdrew from the U.S. Open on Friday, saying she still is recovering from surgery to repair cuts on her right foot. The top-ranked Williams has won three titles at Flushing Meadows, part of her 13 Grand Slam singles championships, the most among active women. Last year, she lost in the U.S. Open semifinals after a tirade at a line judge over a foot-fault call, an outburst that drew a record fine. Williams said doctors advised her not to play so her foot can heal, and she called missing the tournament “one of the most devastating moments of my career.”

Basketball • Serbia center released after basketball brawl: Serbia’s Nenad Krstic, a center for the Oklahoma City Thunder, was released Friday after being held in police custody overnight following a chaotic brawl during a match with Greece in Athens. The fight broke out during the last game of the Acropolis tournament, which was abandoned with 2:40 remaining and Greece leading by one point. The incident occurred just a week before the basketball world championship in Turkey, where both teams will play. The fight began when Greece forward Antonis Fotsis moved threateningly against Serbia guard Milos Teodosic, who had fouled him. Krstic grabbed Fotsis by the throat and threw a chair toward Sofoklis Schortsanitis, who was pursuing him. The chair hit Yannis Bouroussis, who had not played because of a hand injury, and left him with a bloody wound on the side of his head. The teams were finally separated after they had carried the fray off the court. • Delonte West suspended 10 games after guilty plea: Free agent guard Delonte West was suspended without pay for 10 games Friday after pleading guilty last month to weapons charges. Maryland authorities said he was carrying two loaded handguns, a loaded shotgun and an 8 1⁄2 -inch Bowie knife while speeding on a threewheel motorcycle on the Capital Beltway last September. West played for the Cleveland Cavaliers last season. The Minnesota Timberwolves waived him Aug. 3 after acquiring West in a trade. • Oregon Ducks postpone Italy exhibitions: The University of Oregon basketball team has postponed a summer trip to Italy for a year. The Ducks had been scheduled to leave Monday for the 10-day exhibition tour. But coach Dana Altman said Friday that team injuries led him to delay the trip until 2011. The Ducks had practiced five times in preparation for the Italy games. Official practices for the upcoming season start on Oct. 15.

Baseball • Pedroia back on the DL: Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia returned to the disabled list Friday with soreness in the foot he broke in late June, a difficult blow for Boston as it tries to reach the postseason. Pedroia spent seven weeks on the DL after he fouled a ball off his left foot on June 25 at San Francisco. He played in two minor league rehab games last weekend, showing no signs of problems. But the 2008 AL MVP experienced significant pain after going one for three in Boston’s 7-5 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday and was scratched from Thursday’s lineup. • Marlins C Paulino suspended for positive drug test: Marlins catcher Ronny Paulino was suspended for 50 games Friday after he tested positive for a performance-enhancing substance under Major League Baseball’s drug policy. Paulino’s suspension begins immediately, and since the Marlins have only 42 games remaining, will extend into the 2011 season.

Auto racing • Danica Patrick expected to run NASCAR again in 2011: JR Motorsports expects to field a Nationwide Series car next season for Danica Patrick. JRM co-owner Kelley Earnhardt said Friday she’s waiting for the IndyCar schedule to be released to determine how many races Patrick will drive in NASCAR. She’s running a 13-race schedule this year for JRM that is built around her IndyCar commitments. Patrick has a career-best finish of 24th at Chicago last month through her six races so far. Her average finish is 30.5. — From wire reports

WNBA

GOLF ROUNDUP

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Japanese golfer jumps to early lead in Oregon The Associated Press NORTH PLAINS — Japan’s Ai Miyazato has set her sights on reclaiming her No. 1 status. Miyazato shot a 6-under 66 on Friday for the first-round lead at the Safeway Classic at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club west of Portland. Miyazato had a one-stroke lead on Teresa Lu of Taiwan and Jee Young Lee of South Korea. Miyazato is in a five-way battle for the world’s top ranking. American Cristie Kerr is currently No. 1, followed by Miyazato, Jiyai Shin of South Korea, Suzann Pettersen of Norway and Yani Tseng of Taiwan. “It’s really fun, really exciting because the top five players all represent different countries, so it’s really a good motivator for me,” Miyazato said. In a changing of the guard since the retirement of Lorena Ochoa earlier this year, Miyazato, Kerr and Shin have traded the top ranking six times in the past three months. “Even though it was just for two weeks, I was so very happy,” Miyazato said about her time on top. “I was happy because I experienced something that I never really experienced before, and so it will just be really good for my future as my career goes on.” Miyazato has won four times on tour this season. Also making a case is the 21-year-old Tseng, who won the Women’s British Open on Aug. 1 for her second major victory of the season and

Ducks Continued from C3 Costa is a senior and has been with the Ducks for five years. But he’s had three knee surgeries — and only one start — in that span. Kelly has said the role of the quarterback this season will be to distribute the ball to James, receiver Jeff Maehl and others, but it cannot be ignored that the quarterback has historically been key in Kelly’s offenses. Masoli and Dennis Dixon before him prove the point. In fact, when Costa went down just before the start of the 2008 season, the Ducks appeared to flail for a time without a true replacement. But Kelly is correct that Oregon has a talented corps of returning players with the ability to boost anyone in the QB role. “Our players understand what we expect of them,” he said. “We think we’re going to have a pretty good team this year.” Among the most visible is James, who rushed for 1,546 yards last season, the ninth-highest total in the nation. He had seven consecutive 100yard games before Ohio State limited him to 70 in Oregon’s 26-17 loss in the Rose Bowl.

Elks Continued from C3 In addition to watching a winning ballclub, fans also had a chance to see local standout Tommy Richards, a 2008 Bend High graduate, tear up WCL pitching. Richards, the team owner’s son and a junior-to-be at Washington State University, won the 2010 WCL batting title with a .364 average. In 41 regular-season games, Richards recorded 60 hits (second-most in the WCL), 33 RBIs (tied for third), and a .497 slugging percentage (fourth). His productivity continued in the postseason, during which he went eight for 17 (.471) in five games. “Tommy having a banner year, that added some fan interest,” Jim Richards said about his son’s breakout season. “That’ll be hard to replicate down the road. You’re not always going to have a local kid that helps take the team to the final game of the WCL title series. … As a (general manager), as a dad, it was great to see him play well.” Already looking ahead to the 2011 season, Jim Richards said the Elks will work to again have a strong nucleus of experienced pitchers. “What worked well for us this year was having experienced arms,” Richards said. “Our top

third in three years. The Kraft Nabisco winner in April, Tseng made a 6-foot par putt on the final hole at Royal Birkdale for a one-stroke victory over Katherine Hull. She also won the 2008 LPGA Championship. But Tseng shot a 3-over 75 at the Safeway. South Korea’s Chella Choi, Taiwan’s Amy Hung, Japan’s Momoko Ueda and American Brittany Lincicome were two strokes off the lead with 4-under 68s. Veteran Juli Inkster joined a large group at 3 under. M.J. Hur is the defending champion of the tournament nestled in farmland at the base of the Cascade Range about a 20-minute drive west of Portland. She won her first-ever title by beating Pettersen with a birdie on the second playoff hole. Hur shot a 74 on Friday on the 6,546-yard Ghost Creek Course. It is the tournament’s second year on the rural course after 19 years at Columbia Edgewater County Club. Also on Saturday: Two tied on top of PGA leaderboad GREENSBORO, N.C. — Brandt Snedeker shot a 65 and shared the lead with Arjun Atwal at 12-under 128 after two rounds of the Wyndham Championship. Snedeker had an eagle and three birdies to move into familiar territory atop the leaderboard of golf’s final pre-playoff event. He won this tournament in 2007 and shared the lead after a rainy first day last year.

He will sit out the season opener against New Mexico on Sept. 4 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor harassment charge stemming from the altercation with his former girlfriend. Placekicker Rob Beard was also suspended for the opener after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor harassment charge for his role in a street fight that left him seriously injured. James will be backed up by fellow sophomore Kenjon Barner and complemented by Maehl, who had 53 catches last season. Oregon also returns all five starters on its offensive line. Oregon’s offense racked up more than 37 points and 424 yards per game during the regular season while ending USC’s seven-year reign as Pac-10 champion. The Ducks have eight returning starters on defense, including defensive linemen Kenny Rowe and Brandon Bair, along with linebackers Casey Matthews and Spencer Paysinger. The Ducks were picked by the Pac-10 media to finish atop the conference, followed closely by USC. Oregon State was third. “This is a conference that any team in it can win,” Bair said recently at the Pac-10 media day at the Rose Bowl. “It’s not just about one or two teams. There’s talent across the board.”

six arms were all either sophomores or juniors (last spring in college). That’s something we’ll continue to strive for.” Richards said he expects next year’s Elks roster to again have a strong Oregon State University and University of Oregon presence, and that one of next season’s top priorities will be to find a standout catcher to anchor the team’s defense. Genna Stadium, which this season featured a new scoreboard, could also be in for more changes. Richards said he wants to experiment with sodding the stadium’s base paths this fall and spring, and he is considering modifying the third-base dugout by sinking it down in the ground as much as three feet. The lower dugout, he said, could allow for expansion of box seating at the stadium. “We’ve got some fun things scheduled,” Richards said. “We’ll try to knock them out while the weather’s still nice.” Richards also noted that both Oregon State University and the University of Oregon are expected to resume their fall scrimmage in Bend this October. The exact details have yet to be released. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from C3 Ann Meyers Drysdale was the first four-time all-American at UCLA. She signed a $50,000 contract and had a tryout with the Indiana Pacers. She is general manager of the Phoenix Mercury, the WNBA champions of 2007 and 2009. On Tuesday evening, Orender and Blazejowski sat on a sofa at the Garden and talked about the league, now in its 14th season. Blazejowski said women are more hesitant than men to commit to buying season ticket packages. In a telephone conversation, Meyers Drysdale said women are more conservative than men about spending on sports, citing the charity golf tournaments she attends: “You see things auctioned off — four days of golf in Costa Rica? The men say, ‘I’m going for that.’ ” Orender suggested women are adapting their spending habits and said attendance and business are good, all things considered. The Liberty has a leaguehigh average of 10,895 fans per game, up 14 percent from last year. The neat thing about the WNBA is that some stars of the past have stayed around to take care of business, just as the NBA has retained its Wests and Birds, its Dumarses and Thorns. These women are survivors, pioneers who had to seek out a game. Blazejowski would show up in a schoolyard, wearing a baggy sweatshirt and a cap, and wait around until she finally got into a game. As the action heated up, she would discard the outer wrappings and boys would exclaim, “Hey, you’re a girl.” But she could shoot, and she stayed on the court. Playing against boys was the best preparation, they all agreed. In the early days of Title IX, Orender played a short girls schedule in high school, then worked out with the boys team. “I played at the McBurney Y later,” Orender recalled. An advertising executive started pushing her around, saying, “There’s only two places for you — the kitchen and the bedroom, not the court.” No coach ever gave a better motivating speech. I asked the two old friends to talk about their classic meeting on March 6, 1977, at Madison Square Garden — a college doubleheader that drew 12,336 fans, breaking the record for a women’s event. Blaze’s Montclair State and Orender’s Queens College played first at 11 a.m. With Orender guarding her, Blazejowski had only 14 points at halftime. “But then I made a mistake and my coach took me out,” said Orender, whose last name then was Geils. By the time Orender got back in, Blazejowski was closing in on her total of 52 — still the Garden record for any college player, man or woman, and Montclair State won, 102-91. “Blaze could shoot,” Orender said, with Blaze nodding in agreement. They all have their stories about amateur tournaments in funky gyms in small towns. One time, Blazejowski won a trophy, and the enforcer on the other team — known as Duchess — picked up the trophy and chased Blazejowski around the gym, until security finally stopped her. Orender and Blazejowski were more than glad to talk about their pal Ann. Blazejowski remembered an AAU final in Allentown, Pa., around 1979, when somehow Blazejowski’s team led Meyers’ team at halftime. Blazejowski’s teammates stuck their ears against the grimy, asbestos walls of the locker room to hear Meyers’s coach — her older sister, Patty Meyers — berating the players for losing to a bunch of no-names. “Who won that game?” Orender asked, not so innocently. “Umm, I don’t remember,” Blazejowski said. Later, on the phone, Meyers Drysdale recalled her team’s comeback victory, three decades ago. After her playing career, she became a broadcaster and executive while raising her three children from her marriage to the Hall of Fame Dodger pitcher Don Drysdale, who died of a heart attack in 1993. “Don was a pitcher who would knock down the hitters,” Orender said fondly, recalling that Don, after a basketball game, told Ann, “You’ve got to get tougher.” Meyers Drysdale did not remember the pep talk. “I was falling in love,” she said. Those were good days, early days, building days. The women had no league for a long time, but David Stern and the NBA found a way to start a women’s league with its own season, its own clientele, its own economy. The Liberty, jelling under another lifer, Anne Donovan, stunned Lin Dunn’s Indiana Fever, 75-57, on Tuesday, with shifty Leilani Mitchell scoring 19 points on soft shots near the basket. The comedian Robert Klein, observing from a front-row celebrity seat, was raving about Mitchell afterward. Cappie Pondexter, the Liberty star, knows that the league president and the Liberty president played pro ball but has never seen clips of Blazejowski tossing the one-hander. Just like them, Pondexter proved herself against the boys in a schoolyard on the west side of Chicago. “I’m a city girl,” she said. “I would hang around with the scrubs until I got into a game.” The old hands agreed that today’s players were at another level of size and agility and skill. “It’s the same with the guys,” Meyers Drysdale said, but she insisted that Bill Russell or George Gervin would excel in today’s NBA, and she reserved the right to think that Blazejowski and Cheryl Miller and Nancy Lieberman would all be stars today. They were just looking for a game, back in the old days. Turns out they were building something, too.


C6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 75 47 .615 — Tampa Bay 74 48 .607 1 Boston 69 54 .561 6½ Toronto 64 57 .529 10½ Baltimore 43 80 .350 32½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 71 51 .582 — Chicago 66 55 .545 4½ Detroit 59 63 .484 12 Kansas City 51 70 .421 19½ Cleveland 50 72 .410 21 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 68 53 .562 — Oakland 61 60 .504 7 Los Angeles 61 62 .496 8 Seattle 49 73 .402 19½ ——— Friday’s Games Detroit 6, Cleveland 0 Seattle 6, N.Y. Yankees 0 Texas 2, Baltimore 0 Toronto 16, Boston 2 Minnesota 7, L.A. Angels 2 Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, ppd., rain Oakland 5, Tampa Bay 4 Today’s Games Seattle (J.Vargas 9-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 9-9), 10:05 a.m. L.A. Angels (T.Bell 1-3) at Minnesota (Slowey 11-5), 1:10 p.m. Texas (Cl.Lee 10-6) at Baltimore (Bergesen 4-9), 1:10 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 1-2) at Detroit (Scherzer 8-9), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 10-5) at Kansas City (Humber 0-0), 4:10 p.m., 1st game Toronto (R.Romero 10-7) at Boston (Matsuzaka 8-4), 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 15-5) at Oakland (Bre.Anderson 3-4), 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (T.Pena 3-2) at Kansas City (Bullington 1-2), 7:10 p.m., 2nd game Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Detroit, 10:05 a.m. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Texas at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Toronto at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Kansas City at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Seattle at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 72 50 .590 — Philadelphia 69 52 .570 2½ Florida 61 60 .504 10½ New York 61 61 .500 11 Washington 52 70 .426 20 Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 71 51 .582 — St. Louis 65 54 .546 4½ Milwaukee 58 64 .475 13 Houston 53 68 .438 17½ Chicago 50 73 .407 21½ Pittsburgh 40 82 .328 31 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 73 48 .603 — San Francisco 69 54 .561 5 Colorado 62 59 .512 11 Los Angeles 62 61 .504 12 Arizona 48 75 .390 26 ——— Friday’s Games Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 3 N.Y. Mets 7, Pittsburgh 2 Philadelphia 1, Washington 0 Florida 9, Houston 0 Milwaukee 10, San Diego 6 San Francisco 6, St. Louis 3 Arizona 4, Colorado 3, 10 innings Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 1 Today’s Games Atlanta (Hanson 8-8) at Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 6-7), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-5) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 5-3) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 8-5), 4:05 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 9-11) at Florida (Volstad 6-9), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Correia 10-7) at Milwaukee (Narveson 9-7), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 11-7) at St. Louis (C.Carpenter 13-4), 4:15 p.m. Colorado (Jimenez 17-3) at Arizona (Enright 3-2), 5:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 11-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-7), 7:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Houston at Florida, 10:10 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 11:15 a.m. Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 1:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Chicago Cubs at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 7:05 p.m.

NL ROUNDUP Giants 6, Cardinals 3 45-06*4‡3PPLJF .BEJTPO#VNHBSOFS QJUDIFEJOUPUIFFJHIUIJO OJOHBOE4BO'SBODJTDP HPUIPNFSVOTGSPN1BCMP 4BOEPWBMBOE"VCSFZ)VGG  TFOEJOH4U-PVJTUPJUTTFB TPOXPSTUGJGUITUSBJHIUMPTT "MCFSU1VKPMTIJUIJTUI DBSFFSIPNFSGPSUIF$BSEJ OBMT XIPMFEUIF/-$FOUSBM CZBHBNFBGUFSBESBNBUJD TXFFQPGUIF3FETPO"VH  CVUIBWFESPQQFEGJWFPG TJYTJODFUIFOBOECFHBO UIFOJHIU˜HBNFTCFIJOE $JODJOOBUJ1FESP'FMJ[ TJOHMFEBOETDPSFEUXJDF BOEIBOEMFEUXPDIBODFTBU UIJSECBTFJOIJTEFCVUXJUI 4U-PVJT San Francisco A.Torres cf Posey c A.Huff 1b-lf Burrell lf Ishikawa 1b J.Guillen rf Schierholtz rf Sandoval 3b Fontenot ss F.Sanchez 2b Bumgarner p Romo p b-Rowand ph Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 5 5 3 3 0 4 1 5 4 5 4 0 1 0 40

R H 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 13

St. Louis F.Lopez 2b-ss Craig rf d-Schumaker ph Pujols 1b Holliday lf P.Feliz 3b Y.Molina c Jay cf Westbrook p Hawksworth p a-Miles ph-2b

AB 5 4 1 4 5 4 4 4 2 0 2

R 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 3 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 10

Avg. .286 .342 .295 .274 .289 .400 .240 .268 .286 .263 .148 .000 .242 .000

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

Avg. .245 .175 .265 .316 .302 .225 .253 .353 .125 .000 .312

B.Ryan ss MacDougal p M.Boggs p c-Winn ph Totals

3 0 0 1 39

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 13

1 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 0 1

0 .224 0 --0 .000 0 .244 7

San Francisco 021 000 210 — 6 13 0 St. Louis 010 000 020 — 3 13 0 a-lined out for Hawksworth in the 7th. b-lined out for Romo in the 9th. c-grounded out for M.Boggs in the 9th. d-singled for Craig in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 12, St. Louis 10. 2B—Posey 2 (18), Sandoval (28), Jay (17). HR—Sandoval (10), off Westbrook; A.Huff (21), off Hawksworth; Pujols (32), off Bumgarner. RBIs—A.Torres (49), Posey (46), A.Huff 2 (70), Sandoval (49), Bumgarner (2), Pujols (88), Jay (17), B.Ryan (23). Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 7 (J.Guillen, A.Huff 2, Sandoval, Burrell 2, Rowand); St. Louis 5 (F.Lopez 2, B.Ryan, Holliday 2). Runners moved up—Westbrook. GIDP—Holliday. DP—San Francisco 1 (F.Sanchez, A.Huff). S. Francisco IP H R ER BB SO Bmgner W, 5-4 7 9 2 2 1 5 Romo 1 2 1 1 0 1 Wilsn S, 35-38 1 2 0 0 0 1 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wstbrok L, 1-1 6 7 3 3 2 7 Hawksworth 1 2 2 2 1 1 MacDougal 1 1-3 4 1 1 2 2 M.Boggs 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Bumgarner pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—M.Boggs 2-0. T—2:52. A—43,822 (43,975).

NP 97 16 17 NP 113 25 39 4

ERA 3.20 2.31 2.01 ERA 3.60 5.19 5.19 3.86

Reds 3, Dodgers 1 -04"/(&-&4‡)PN FS#BJMFZQJUDIFETFWFOTPM JEJOOJOHTJOIJTTFDPOETUBSU GPSUIFTVTQFOEFE+PIOOZ $VFUP #SBOEPO1IJMMJQT CBDLFEIJNXJUIUISFFIJUT BOEUISFF3#*TBOEUIF 3FETCFBUUIF%PEHFSTGPS UIFJSTFBTPOIJHITFWFOUI TUSBJHIUWJDUPSZ5IFXJO  DPVQMFEXJUI4U-PVJT IPNFMPTTUP4BO'SBO DJTDP JODSFBTFE$JODJOOBUJT MFBEJOUIF/-$FOUSBMUP˜ HBNFT‡UIF3FETMBSHFTU NBSHJOTJODF.BZ  5IFZBSFTFFLJOHUIFJSGJSTU EJWJTJPOUJUMFTJODF  XIFOUIFZTXFQUUIF%PEH FSTJOUIFGJSTUSPVOEPGUIF QPTUTFBTPO Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b L.Nix lf Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf Hanigan c Stubbs cf Janish ss H.Bailey p Rhodes p c-Edmonds ph F.Cordero p Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 0 1 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 3 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 3 3 11

Avg. .285 .288 .320 .299 .265 .290 .237 .282 .222 --.274 ---

Los Angeles Podsednik lf Theriot 2b Ethier rf Loney 1b Kemp cf Blake 3b J.Carroll ss Ausmus c Monasterios p Belisario p a-Gibbons ph Jansen p b-Belliard ph Dotel p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2

Avg. .289 .285 .297 .281 .254 .247 .284 .209 .100 --.375 --.216 ---

SO 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

Cincinnati 010 200 000 — 3 8 0 Los Angeles 001 000 000 — 1 5 2 a-walked for Belisario in the 5th. b-struck out for Jansen in the 7th. c-struck out for Rhodes in the 9th. E—Loney (3), Monasterios (1). LOB—Cincinnati 8, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Blake (20). RBIs—B.Phillips 3 (48), Theriot (25). S—Stubbs, Monasterios. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 3 (Bruce, L.Nix, Stubbs); Los Angeles 3 (Ethier, Theriot, Belliard). Runners moved up—Janish, J.Carroll. GIDP—Votto, Blake. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Janish, B.Phillips, Votto); Los Angeles 1 (Blake, Theriot, Loney). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Bailey W, 3-2 7 4 1 1 2 6 114 4.52 Rhodes H, 23 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.34 Crdro S, 33-39 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.90 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Monsters L, 3-44 1-3 8 3 1 1 6 88 3.63 Belisario 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 5.54 Jansen 2 0 0 0 2 1 33 0.93 Dotel 2 0 0 0 0 3 30 4.15 Inherited runners-scored—Belisario 2-0. WP—Monasterios. T—3:02. A—46,418 (56,000).

Brewers 10, Padres 6 .*-8"6,&&‡$BTFZ .D(FIFFIPNFSFEBOE ESPWFJOGPVSSVOT BOEUIF #SFXFSTQJMFEVQIJUT BHBJOTUCBTFCBMMTUPQQJUDI JOHTUBGGUPTOBQUIF1BESFT GJWFHBNFXJOOJOHTUSFBL 5IF1BESFT PXOFSTPGUIF CFTUSFDPSEJOUIF/BUJPOBM -FBHVFBUBOEMFBE JOHUIF/-8FTUCZGJWF HBNFT IBEXPOPG San Diego AB R Venable lf 4 0 M.Tejada ss 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 Ludwick rf 3 1 Headley 3b 4 1 Torrealba c 4 0 DenorďŹ a cf 3 1 E.Cabrera 2b 3 2 LeBlanc p 0 0 Stauffer p 1 0 R.Webb p 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 b-Stairs ph 0 0 c-Hairston ph 1 0 Totals 31 6

H BI BB 1 2 1 1 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 6 6

SO 2 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .232 .295 .298 .274 .278 .295 .290 .205 .300 .143 .000 --.197 .221

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Dickerson rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b L.Cain cf A.Escobar ss Lucroy c Gallardo p Capuano p a-Inglett ph Coffey p Braddock p Totals

H 1 3 0 2 1 2 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 15

SO 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .275 .289 .197 .292 .268 .287 .375 .251 .264 .240 .250 .270 .000 ---

AB 5 4 1 3 3 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 0 0 36

R 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

BI 1 0 0 1 1 4 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 10

BB 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

San Diego 320 100 000 — 6 7 0 Milwaukee 203 211 10x — 10 15 0 a-singled for Capuano in the 7th. b-was announced for Mujica in the 9th. c-fouled out for Stairs in the 9th. LOB—San Diego 6, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Venable (10), M.Tejada (6), Weeks (26), McGehee (28). 3B—Hart (4). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (24), off Gallardo; Headley (9), off Gallardo; McGehee (20), off LeBlanc; Lucroy (3), off LeBlanc. RBIs—Venable 2 (43), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (78), Headley 2 (51), Weeks (73), Braun (69), Fielder (62), McGehee 4 (81), Lucroy 2 (14), Inglett (7). SB—A.Escobar (9). S—LeBlanc 2. SF—Fielder. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 4 (Ludwick, Headley 2, Ad.Gonzalez); Milwaukee 3 (L.Cain, McGehee 2).

Runners moved up—Lucroy. GIDP—E.Cabrera, McGehee. DP—San Diego 1 (M.Tejada, E.Cabrera, Ad.Gonzalez); Milwaukee 1 (A.Escobar, Weeks, Fielder). San Diego IP H R ER BB LeBlanc L, 7-11 3 1-3 7 7 7 1 Stauffer 1 2-3 4 1 1 2 R.Webb 2 4 2 2 0 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB Gallardo 3 1-3 6 6 6 5 Capuano W, 2-23 2-3 0 0 0 1 Coffey 1 0 0 0 0 Braddock 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Capuano Gallardo (Ad.Gonzalez). T—3:19. A—27,976 (41,900).

SO NP ERA 3 69 3.85 1 52 1.17 1 37 3.30 1 9 3.31 SO NP ERA 1 76 3.28 4 40 3.86 2 16 4.53 2 20 3.24 3-0. IBB—off

Diamondbacks 4, Rockies 3 (10 innings) 1)0&/*9‡,FMMZ+PIO TPOEPVCMFEJO+VTUJO6QUPO GSPNGJSTUCBTFXJUIPOFPVU JOUIFUIJOOJOHBOEUIF %JBNPOECBDLTSBMMJFEUP CFBUUIF3PDLJFT5SBJMJOH JOUIFOJOUIJOOJOH UIF%JB NPOECBDLTSBMMJFEGPSUXP SVOTUPGPSDFFYUSBJOOJOHT +PIOTPOTJOHMFEBOE$ISJT :PVOHXBMLFE$PMPSBEP DMPTFS)VTUPO4USFFUTUSVDL PVUUIFOFYUUXPCBUUFSTBOE UIFOIBE.JHVFM.POUFSPBU BDPVOUCFGPSFIFEPV CMFEUPSJHIUUPUJFUIFHBNF Colorado AB E.Young lf 5 Belisle p 0 Street p 0 Beimel p 0 Fowler cf 5 S.Smith rf 5 Tulowitzki ss 2 Stewart 3b 5 Helton 1b 5 Iannetta c 5 Barmes 2b 4 Rogers p 2 Mat.Reynolds p 0 b-Spilborghs ph-lf 2 Totals 40

R H 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 12

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 5

Avg. .281 .333 .000 .000 .245 .264 .319 .266 .247 .207 .241 .250 --.268

Arizona S.Drew ss J.Upton rf K.Johnson 2b C.Young cf Ad.LaRoche 1b Mar.Reynolds 3b Montero c 1-Hester pr-c G.Parra lf Heilman p I.Kennedy p a-Church ph Boyer p Demel p c-Ojeda ph Vasquez p d-Ryal ph-lf Totals

R H 0 2 2 3 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

BI 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .264 .268 .281 .273 .272 .214 .295 .219 .244 .000 .167 .181 .000 --.191 .000 .280

AB 5 5 4 3 4 4 4 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 36

Colorado 001 200 000 0 — 3 12 0 Arizona 000 100 002 1 — 4 11 2 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for I.Kennedy in the 5th. b-grounded out for Mat.Reynolds in the 8th. c-grounded out for Demel in the 8th. d-grounded out for Vasquez in the 9th. 1-ran for Montero in the 9th. E—Montero (1), I.Kennedy (1). LOB—Colorado 12, Arizona 7. 2B—Fowler (17), S.Smith (14), Tulowitzki (23), Helton (13), K.Johnson (31), Montero (12). RBIs—Fowler (20), Tulowitzki 2 (53), K.Johnson (56), Ad.LaRoche (78), Montero 2 (31). CS—Barmes (2), J.Upton (8), C.Young (5). S—Rogers. SF—Tulowitzki. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 8 (Stewart 2, E.Young 2, Barmes 2, Rogers, Fowler); Arizona 2 (Montero, Ryal). Runners moved up—C.Young. GIDP—J.Upton. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, Barmes, Helton); Arizona 1 (Hester, Hester, K.Johnson). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rogers 6 1-3 6 1 1 1 6 100 4.53 Reynolds H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Belisle H, 15 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 2.18 Street BS, 4-13 1 2 2 2 2 2 33 4.61 Beimel L, 1-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 10 2.68 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Kennedy 5 10 3 3 1 4 93 4.41 Boyer 2 0 0 0 0 0 15 4.34 Demel 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 4.61 Vasquez 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.40 Heilman W, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.83 IBB—off Street (G.Parra). HBP—by Heilman (Barmes), by Vasquez (Tulowitzki). WP—I.Kennedy 2, Demel. T—3:22. A—26,294 (48,633).

Phillies 1, Nationals 0 1)*-"%&-1)*"‡3PZ )BMMBEBZQJUDIFETFWFO TIVUPVUJOOJOHTUPMFBE1IJM BEFMQIJBUPBWJDUPSZPWFS 8BTIJOHUPO)BMMBEBZ   XPOIJTTJYUITUSBJHIUXIJMF BMMPXJOHFJHIUIJUT TUSJLJOH PVUGJWFBOEXBMLJOHUISFF  NBUDIJOHBTFBTPOIJHI *UXBTUIFOJOUIUJNFUIJT TFBTPOIFIBTOUBMMPXFEB SVOBOEUIFUIUJNFJO TUBSUTIFIBTQJUDIFETJYPS NPSFJOOJOHT Washington Morgan cf Desmond ss A.Dunn 1b Zimmerman 3b Bernadina lf Morse rf I.Rodriguez c A.Kennedy 2b Marquis p a-Mench ph Jo.Peralta p Slaten p c-W.Harris ph Totals

AB 5 5 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 0 1 36

R H 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Utley 2b Werth rf Ibanez lf Victorino cf M.Sweeney 1b C.Ruiz c Halladay p b-Do.Brown ph Madson p Lidge p Totals

AB 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 1 0 0 28

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .262 .272 .266 .305 .267 .277 .272 .261 .111 .100 .000 --.179

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .246 .316 .276 .302 .265 .256 .250 .294 .139 .238 .000 ---

Washington 000 000 000 — 0 10 1 Philadelphia 001 000 00x — 1 4 1 a-struck out for Marquis in the 6th. b-struck out for Halladay in the 7th. c-lined out for Slaten in the 9th. E—Desmond (28), Rollins (5). LOB—Washington 12, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Morgan (13), Desmond (21), A.Kennedy (12), Werth (41), Ibanez (24). RBIs—Ibanez (60). SB—Rollins (15). CS—Werth (3). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 7 (Bernadina 3, Morgan, Mench, A.Kennedy, A.Dunn); Philadelphia 6 (Ibanez 2, Victorino 2, Polanco 2). Runners moved up—Zimmerman, Morse, Halladay. GIDP—Bernadina. DP—Philadelphia 2 (Utley, Rollins, M.Sweeney), (Ibanez, Utley). Washington IP Marquis L, 0-6 5 Jo.Peralta 2 Slaten 1 Philadelphia IP Hallady W, 16-87 Madson H, 7 1

H 4 0 0 H 8 1

R 1 0 0 R 0 0

ER 1 0 0 ER 0 0

BB 4 0 0 BB 3 0

SO 1 1 1 SO 5 1

NP ERA 94 11.39 31 2.53 15 2.90 NP ERA 116 2.16 16 3.23

Lidge S, 17-21 1 1 0 0 0 Balk—Halladay. T—2:51. A—45,093 (43,651).

1 11 4.13

Braves 5, Cubs 3 $)*$"(0‡3JDL"OLJFM IJUBCBTFTMPBEFEUSJQMFPGG BXJME$BSMPT.BSNPMXJUI UXPPVUJOUIFOJOUIJOOJOH  TFOEJOH%FSSFL-FFBOEUIF #SBWFTUPBWJDUPSZPWFSUIF $VCT.BSNPMFOUFSFEXJUIB MFBEBOEXBMLFEUISFFPG UIFGJSTUGPVSCBUUFSTIFGBDFE "GUFS.FMLZ$BCSFSBTUSVDL PVU "OLJFMMJOFEBQJUDI JOUPUIFSJHIUGJFMEDPSOFS Atlanta AB Infante 2b 4 Heyward rf 3 Prado 3b 2 D.Lee 1b 4 McCann c 3 1-Di.Hernandez pr 0 D.Ross c 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 Me.Cabrera lf 4 Ankiel cf 4 Jurrjens p 2 a-Conrad ph 1 Moylan p 0 b-Hinske ph 1 Wagner p 0 Totals 31

R 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Chicago Fukudome rf S.Castro ss Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b A.Soriano lf Marmol p DeWitt 2b c-Barney ph Nady 1b K.Hill c Dempster p Fuld lf d-Je.Baker ph Totals

R H 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10

AB 4 4 4 4 4 0 2 1 4 4 3 0 1 35

H BI BB SO 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 10 BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .344 .254 .319 .249 .268 .333 .283 .261 .264 .236 .069 .248 --.249 --Avg. .262 .309 .305 .233 .260 --.277 .214 .231 .211 .146 .000 .235

Atlanta 001 100 003 — 5 5 0 Chicago 010 101 000 — 3 10 0 a-ied out for Jurrjens in the 8th. b-struck out for Moylan in the 9th. c-singled for DeWitt in the 9th. d-ied out for Fuld in the 9th. 1-ran for McCann in the 9th. LOB—Atlanta 4, Chicago 6. 2B—Infante (12), Ale. Gonzalez (7), Fukudome (13), Ar.Ramirez (15). 3B—Ankiel (1), Byrd (2). HR—Infante (4), off Dempster; Ar.Ramirez (18), off Jurrjens. RBIs—Infante (31), Ale.Gonzalez (16), Ankiel 3 (6), Ar.Ramirez 2 (59), K.Hill (13). Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 3 (D.Lee, Me.Cabrera, Hinske); Chicago 4 (Dempster, Nady, S.Castro, Je.Baker). Runners moved up—Heyward. GIDP—Jurrjens, Byrd. DP—Atlanta 1 (Prado, Infante, D.Lee); Chicago 1 (Dempster, S.Castro, Nady). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Jurrjens 7 9 3 3 1 2 94 Moylan W, 5-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 Wgnr S, 30-37 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Dempster 8 4 2 2 2 7 106 Marmol L, 2-3 1 1 3 3 3 3 30 IBB—off Jurrjens (DeWitt). WP—Dempster. T—2:35. A—39,345 (41,210).

ERA 3.91 2.92 1.68 ERA 3.56 3.02

Marlins 9, Astros 0 .*".*‡"OJCBM4BODIF[ QJUDIFETFWFOTDPSFMFTTJO OJOHTBOE$PEZ3PTTBOE )FDUPS-VOBIJUCBDLUP CBDLIPNFSTUPQPXFSUIF .BSMJOTUPBXJOPWFSUIF"T USPT%BO6HHMBBOE&NJMJP #POJGBDJPFBDIESPWFJOB QBJSPGSVOTGPSUIF.BSMJOT  XIPIBWFXPOGPVSTUSBJHIU Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 0 Ang.Sanchez 2b 4 0 Pence rf 4 0 Ca.Lee lf 2 0 C.Johnson 3b 3 0 Wallace 1b 3 0 Manzella ss 3 0 Ja.Castro c 3 0 Happ p 2 0 Fulchino p 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 a-Bourgeois ph 1 0 Abad p 0 0 Totals 29 0 Florida H.Ramirez ss Bonifacio lf G.Sanchez 1b Uggla 2b Stanton rf C.Ross cf Luna 3b Hayes c Ani.Sanchez p Ohman p b-Helms ph Sanches p Totals

AB 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 33

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1

R H 3 2 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 12

BI 1 2 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 9

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .246 .282 .283 .247 .340 .216 .214 .195 .000 --.000 .233 ---

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .285 .246 .287 .293 .261 .263 .182 .212 .140 --.224 ---

Houston 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Florida 100 002 42x — 9 12 0 a-fouled out for Byrdak in the 8th. b-popped out for Ohman in the 8th. LOB—Houston 3, Florida 3. 2B—C.Johnson (14), Ja.Castro (3), H.Ramirez (23), G.Sanchez (30), C.Ross (24). HR—C.Ross (11), off Abad; Luna (1), off Abad. RBIs—H.Ramirez (61), Bonifacio 2 (5), G.Sanchez (59), Uggla 2 (79), C.Ross (56), Luna (1), Ani.Sanchez (1). CS—Luna (1). SF—Bonifacio. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 2 (Stanton, Uggla). GIDP—Stanton. DP—Houston 2 (Ja.Castro, Ja.Castro, Ang.Sanchez), (Manzella, Ang.Sanchez, Wallace). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 3-2 6 5 3 3 2 6 101 3.54 Fulchino 2-3 4 4 4 0 0 32 6.51 Byrdak 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.82 Abad 1 2 2 2 0 1 13 9.00 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchz W, 10-8 7 3 0 0 1 5 88 3.16 Ohman 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.59 Sanches 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.02 Inherited runners-scored—Byrdak 1-1. WP—Happ, Fulchino, Byrdak. T—2:33 (Rain delay: 0:37). A—19,456 (38,560).

Mets 7, Pirates 2 1*554#63()‡%BWJE 8SJHIUBOE+PTF3FZFT FBDIIBEUISFFPGUIF.FUT TMVNQFOEJOHIJUT .JLF 1FMGSFZQJUDIFEFJHIUJOOJOHT BOE/FX:PSLBTTVSFEUIF 1JSBUFTPGUIFJSSFDPSEFY UFOEJOHUIDPOTFDVUJWF MPTJOHTFBTPO$ISJT$BSUFS IPNFSFEBOEESPWFJOUXP SVOTBOJHIUBGUFSUIF.FUT XFSFMJNJUFEUPUISFFIJUT EVSJOHBMPTTJO)PVTUPO New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan lf Beltran cf Carter rf Francoeur rf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Thole c R.Tejada 2b Pelfrey p

AB 5 5 5 4 1 5 4 4 3 4

R 2 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .289 .295 .225 .275 .231 .293 .243 .290 .177 .111

Parnell p Totals

0 0 0 0 40 7 15 6

Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Tabata lf N.Walker 2b Alvarez 3b Doumit rf Clement 1b Snyder c Cedeno ss Karstens p Gallagher p Ledezma p a-Delw.Young ph Resop p Park p Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 1

H BI BB 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 2

0 .000 1 SO 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .281 .296 .296 .240 .249 .201 .226 .245 .067 .000 --.242 -----

SO NP ERA 5 119 3.80 1 14 3.24 SO NP ERA 1 70 4.98 0 43 4.95 0 13 8.10 0 16 5.23 0 16 9.00 2-2, Ledezma

AL ROUNDUP Athletics 5, Rays 4 0",-"/% $BMJG ‡(BCF(SPTTTDPSFEUIF HPBIFBESVOPOTFDPOE CBTFNBO#FO;PCSJTUT GJFMEJOHFSSPSXJUIUXPPVUT JOUIFFJHIUIJOOJOH BOE 0BLMBOECFBU5BNQB#BZ GPSJUTTFDPOETUSBJHIUPOF SVOWJDUPSZJOUIFTFSJFT3B KBJ%BWJTIJUBUZJOHTBDSJGJDF GMZJOUIFFJHIUI UIFO$MJGG 1FOOJOHUPOIJUBHSPVOEFSUP TFDPOEBOEXPVOEVQQBSU PGUIFXJOOJOHQMBZGPSUIF UIJSETUSBJHIUHBNF)FIJUB HBNFFOEJOHTJOHMFUPCFBU 5PSPOUPPO8FEOFTEBZ BOEBHPBIFBE UXPSVO EPVCMFJO5IVSTEBZT WJDUPSZPWFSUIF3BZT Tampa Bay Jaso c Zobrist 2b Crawford lf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Joyce rf W.Aybar dh B.Upton cf Bartlett ss Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 2 4 3 4 31

R 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

H BI BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 4 4

SO 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 2 1 8

Avg. .271 .258 .300 .293 .212 .223 .243 .242 .250

Oakland AB R Crisp cf 5 1 Barton 1b 3 0 K.Suzuki c 4 0 Cust dh 3 1 1-Gross pr-dh 0 1 Kouzmanoff 3b 4 1 R.Davis lf 3 0 T.Buck rf 4 0 Tolleson 2b 3 0 a-M.Ellis ph-2b 0 0 Pennington ss 4 1 Totals 33 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 8 4 3

SO 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 8

Avg. .286 .274 .248 .275 .240 .258 .267 .179 .353 .260 .263

Tampa Bay 210 000 100 — 4 4 2 Oakland 002 001 02x — 5 8 2 a-walked for Tolleson in the 8th. 1-ran for Cust in the 8th. E—C.Pena (5), Zobrist (2), Tolleson (1), Mazzaro (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Oakland 8. 2B—Bartlett (20), Pennington (22). HR—Zobrist (7), off Blevins; Cust (9), off Hellickson. RBIs—Jaso (37), Zobrist (53), Joyce 2 (28), Barton 2 (42), Cust (32), R.Davis (39). SB—Crawford (40), Crisp (20), Pennington (20). SF—Jaso, R.Davis. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 2 (W.Aybar, Crawford); Oakland 2 (K.Suzuki, Crisp). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 6 1-3 7 3 3 1 7 104 2.05 Choate H, 12 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.91 Benoit L, 0-2 1 1 2 1 2 1 37 1.40 Cormier 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.18 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mazzaro 6 1-3 3 3 1 4 5 105 3.56 Blevins 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 11 4.02 Rodrigz W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.52 Breslow S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 3.13 Inherited runners-scored—Choate 2-0, Benoit 2-0, Cormier 2-1. T—3:01. A—13,207 (35,067).

Twins 7, Angels 2 .*//&"10-*4‡#SJBO %VFOTJOHTUSVDLPVUTJYJO FJHIUJOOJOHTBOE+BTPO ,VCFMIJUBUISFFSVOIPNFS UPHFU.JOOFTPUBSPMMJOHJO BWJDUPSZPWFS-PT"OHFMFT %VFOTJOH  BMMPXFE POFSVOBOETFWFOIJUTUP JNQSPWFUPTJODFNPW JOHJOUPUIFTUBSUJOHSPUBUJPO +VMZ)JT&3"ESPQQFEUP BTUIF5XJOTCPVODFE CBDLGSPNBOMPTTUP UIF8IJUF4PYPO5IVSTEBZ OJHIU%BO)BSFO  HPU LOPDLFEBSPVOEJOIJTTJYUI TUBSUGPSUIF"OHFMT)F HBWFVQTFWFOSVOTBOE IJUTJOTFWFOJOOJOHT Los Angeles B.Abreu dh H.Kendrick 2b Callaspo 3b Tor.Hunter rf J.Rivera lf Napoli c E.Aybar ss Br.Wood 1b Bourjos cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 33

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 1 0

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Kubel rf Cuddyer 1b Thome dh Delm.Young lf Valencia 3b Hardy ss Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 2 32

R H 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 7 11

BI 0 1 1 3 0 0 1 0 1 7

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Los Angeles IP H R ER Haren L, 1-4 7 11 7 7 Kohn 1 0 0 0 Minnesota IP H R ER Dunsng W, 7-1 8 7 1 1 Guerrier 1 1 1 1 IBB—off Haren (Mauer). T—2:14. A—40,747 (39,504).

BB 1 0 BB 0 0

SO 3 1 SO 6 0

NP 94 13 NP 103 13

ERA 4.39 3.72 ERA 1.92 3.20

Mariners 6, Yankees 0

New York 302 200 000 — 7 15 1 Pittsburgh 011 000 000 — 2 6 1 a-ied out for Ledezma in the 7th. E—D.Wright (16), Tabata (1). LOB—New York 7, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Jos.Reyes (24), Pagan (23), N.Walker (19), Cedeno (21). HR—Carter (3), off Karstens; Doumit (10), off Pelfrey. RBIs—Beltran (11), Carter 2 (17), I.Davis (56), Thole 2 (9), A.McCutchen (37), Doumit (36). SB—Jos.Reyes (27), D.Wright (18), A.McCutchen (26). CS—D.Wright (9). S—Karstens. Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (R.Tejada, Beltran, D.Wright); Pittsburgh 5 (Alvarez 2, Gallagher 2, Doumit). GIDP—R.Tejada, Tabata. DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, R.Tejada, I.Davis); Pittsburgh 1 (Alvarez, N.Walker, Clement). New York IP H R ER BB Pelfrey W, 12-7 8 6 2 1 2 Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB Krstns L, 2-10 3 1-3 11 7 7 0 Gallagher 3 2 0 0 1 Ledezma 2-3 1 0 0 0 Resop 1 1 0 0 0 Park 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Gallagher 1-0. T—2:53. A—23,695 (38,362).

(81), Delm.Young (87), Hardy (26). CS—H.Kendrick (4). SF—Mauer, Hardy. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick); Minnesota 3 (Cuddyer 2, Kubel). Runners moved up—B.Abreu, Tor.Hunter, J.Rivera, Span, Kubel. GIDP—Tor.Hunter, Hardy. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Callaspo, H.Kendrick, Br.Wood); Minnesota 1 (Valencia, O.Hudson, Cuddyer).

SO 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 6

Avg. .263 .275 .283 .296 .257 .251 .264 .163 .146

SO 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4

Avg. .270 .287 .333 .262 .275 .269 .317 .335 .263

Los Angeles 000 100 001 — 2 8 0 Minnesota 103 300 00x — 7 11 0 LOB—Los Angeles 4, Minnesota 4. 2B—Callaspo (23), Bourjos (3), Kubel (19), Valencia (14), Hardy (14). 3B—Thome (2). HR—Kubel (18), off Haren. RBIs—J.Rivera (44), O.Hudson (33), Mauer (66), Kubel 3

/&8:03,‡'FMJY)FS OBOEF[OFBSMZCFDBNFUIF GJSTUQJUDIFSJONPSFUIBO ZFBSTUPUISPXGPVSTUSBJHIU DPNQMFUFHBNFTBHBJOTU /FX:PSL BOE3VTTFMM #SBOZBOIJUBQBJSPGIPNFST PGG"+#VSOFUUBOEESPWF JOGPVSSVOTUPMFBE4FBUUMF )FSOBOEF[  LFQU/FX :PSLPGGLJMUFSGPSFJHIUJO OJOHT BMMPXJOHGPVSIJUTBOE TUSJLJOHPVU)FXBTMJGUFE BGUFSQJUDIFTGPS(BSSFUU 0MTPO XIPQJUDIFEBQFS GFDUOJOUIUPIFMQUIF.BSJ OFSTXJOUIFJSUIJSEJOBSPX Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Branyan dh Jo.Lopez 3b F.Gutierrez cf Kotchman 1b A.Moore c Tuiasosopo lf Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 3 37

R H 1 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 6 12

New York AB R Gardner lf 4 0 Jeter ss 4 0 E.Nunez 3b 0 0 Teixeira 1b 4 0 A.Rodriguez dh 1 0 a-Kearns ph-dh 3 0 Cano 2b 3 0 Swisher rf 3 0 b-Thames ph 1 0 Granderson cf 2 0 Cervelli c 2 0 R.Pena 3b-ss 3 0 Totals 30 0

BI 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .308 .248 .241 .239 .253 .216 .200 .181 .257

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 4 0 3 13

Avg. .283 .276 .000 .254 .265 .281 .323 .294 .311 .247 .242 .198

Seattle 301 101 000 — 6 12 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 b-ied out for Swisher in the 9th. LOB—Seattle 8, New York 6. 2B—Jeter (24). HR—Branyan 2 (18), off A.J.Burnett 2. RBIs—I.Suzuki (32), Branyan 4 (42), Kotchman (42). SB—I.Suzuki (31), Figgins (31), F.Gutierrez (18). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Figgins, F.Gutierrez 2); New York 4 (Kearns, Gardner 2, Teixeira). Runners moved up—Teixeira. GIDP—Figgins, Jeter, R.Pena. DP—Seattle 2 (Jo.Wilson, Figgins, Kotchman), (Figgins, Jo.Wilson, Kotchman); New York 2 (Jeter, Teixeira), (Teixeira). Seattle IP H R ER Hrndz W, 9-10 8 4 0 0 Olson 1 0 0 0 New York IP H R ER Burnett L, 9-11 7 12 6 6 Gaudin 2 0 0 0 HBP—by Gaudin (Jo.Wilson). PB—A.Moore. T—2:42. A—46,493 (50,287).

BB SO NP ERA 3 11 117 2.51 0 2 12 6.14 BB SO NP ERA 3 4 122 4.80 0 1 17 6.04 WP—F.Hernandez.

Blue Jays 16, Red Sox 2 #0450/‡-ZMF0WFS CBZIJUUXPIPNFSTBOE ESPWFJOBDBSFFSIJHITFWFO SVOTBT5PSPOUPCBUUFSFE"MM 4UBSQJUDIFS+PO-FTUFSPO BNJTFSBCMFEBZGPS#PTUPO 3FE4PYTFDPOECBTFNBO %VTUJO1FESPJBSFUVSOFEUP UIFEJTBCMFEMJTUXJUITPSF OFTTJOUIFGPPUIFCSPLFJO MBUF+VOF BEJGGJDVMUCMPXGPS #PTUPOBTJUDIBTFTBQPTU TFBTPOTQPU Toronto F.Lewis dh Y.Escobar ss J.Bautista rf V.Wells cf c-Wise ph-cf J.Buck c A.Hill 2b Overbay 1b Jo.McDonald 3b Snider lf Totals

AB 5 6 5 3 1 5 4 5 5 5 44

R 3 1 1 1 0 4 1 3 2 0 16

H 3 3 1 0 0 4 0 4 3 2 20

BI 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 7 3 0 16

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 5

Avg. .275 .308 .254 .266 .262 .286 .212 .253 .253 .241

Boston Scutaro ss a-Y.Navarro ph Lowrie 2b-1b V.Martinez c Du.Brown c D.Ortiz dh A.Beltre 3b Lowell 1b Nava lf J.Drew rf b-Kalish ph-rf Hall lf-2b-ss D.McDonald cf Totals

AB 2 3 3 3 1 4 3 2 2 2 2 4 3 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 9 2 3

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 8

Avg. .273 .333 .305 .279 .250 .268 .325 .233 .273 .258 .250 .243 .275

Toronto 513 023 110 — 16 20 0 Boston 000 000 200 — 2 9 1 a-singled for Scutaro in the 5th. b-struck out for J.Drew in the 6th. c-struck out for V.Wells in the 7th. E—Lester (3). LOB—Toronto 5, Boston 8. 2B—F.Lewis (31), Y.Escobar (5), Jo.McDonald (7), Du.Brown (1), D.Ortiz (27). HR—Overbay 2 (15), off Lester 2; Jo.McDonald (3), off Bowden; J.Bautista (38), off Delcarmen. RBIs—Y.Escobar 2 (12), J.Bautista 2 (92), J.Buck 2 (51), Overbay 7 (54), Jo.McDonald 3 (11), Du.Brown 2 (2). SF—J.Bautista. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (Snider, J.Bautista 2); Boston 5 (A.Beltre, V.Martinez 2, J.Drew, D.Ortiz). GIDP—J.Bautista, V.Wells, V.Martinez 2. DP—Toronto 2 (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Overbay), (Jo. McDonald, Overbay); Boston 2 (Scutaro, Lowrie, Lowell), (A.Beltre, Y.Navarro, Lowrie). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cecil W, 10-6 6 2-3 9 2 2 3 6 111 3.90 Carlson 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.86 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.95 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester L, 13-8 2 8 9 9 3 1 51 3.26 Atchison 2 1-3 4 2 2 0 0 30 4.15 Bowden 1 2-3 4 3 3 0 1 29 6.00 Delcarmen 1 1 1 1 0 1 19 4.78 WakeďŹ eld 2 3 1 0 0 2 31 5.29 Lester pitched to 3 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runners-scored—Carlson 1-0, Bowden 2-2. WP—Cecil, Bowden. PB—Du.Brown. T—3:02. A—37,726 (37,402).

Rangers 2, Orioles 0 #"-5*.03&‡$+ 8JMTPOUPPLBUXPIJUUFSJOUP UIFOJOUIJOOJOHBOEIBEB DBSFFSIJHITUSJLFPVUTUP DBSSZ5FYBTQBTU#BMUJNPSF 8JMTPO  SFUJSFE TUSBJHIUCBUUFSTVOUJM#SJBO 3PCFSUTMFEPGGUIFOJOUI XJUIBEPVCMF#FGPSFUIBU  UIFPOMZUXPIJUTBHBJOTUUIF

MFGUIBOEFSXFSFCZ+VMJP -VHP‡BGJSTUJOOJOHTJOHMF BOEBEPVCMFJOUIFUIJSE Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Hamilton lf Guerrero dh Dav.Murphy rf Moreland 1b Teagarden c A.Blanco 2b Borbon cf Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 3 2 4 4 35

R H 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 10

Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Lugo lf Markakis rf Pie rf Wigginton 1b a-Scott ph Ad.Jones cf Fox dh Wieters c C.Izturis ss J.Bell 3b Totals

AB 4 4 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4

SO 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 6

Avg. .277 .286 .354 .299 .273 .292 .154 .245 .265

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 12

Avg. .252 .257 .286 .284 .252 .294 .278 .220 .241 .239 .216

Texas 010 000 100 — 2 10 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 a-fouled out for Wigginton in the 9th. E—C.Izturis (7). LOB—Texas 10, Baltimore 4. 2B—Hamilton (38), B.Roberts (7), Lugo (4). HR—Moreland (3), off Arrieta. RBIs—Hamilton (82), Moreland (8). CS—Borbon (7). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 4 (Guerrero 2, Teagarden, Borbon); Baltimore 2 (Markakis, Scott). Runners moved up—Dav.Murphy, Pie. GIDP— M.Young. DP—Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, B.Roberts, Wigginton). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wilson W, 12-5 8 2-3 3 0 0 1 12 118 3.02 Feliz S, 30-33 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.46 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta L, 4-5 6 2-3 8 2 1 3 3 111 4.90 Hendrickson 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 4.96 Simon 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 23 4.50 Albers 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.55 M.Gonzalez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4.15 Hendrickson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—N.Feliz 1-0, Hendrickson 2-1, Simon 2-0. IBB—off Arrieta (Moreland). T—2:49. A—18,751 (48,290).

Tigers 6, Indians 0 %&530*5‡"SNBOEP (BMBSSBHBEPNJOBUFE$MFWF MBOEBHBJO QJUDIJOHUISFFIJU CBMMGPSTFWFOJOOJOHTUPMFBE %FUSPJU'BDJOHUIF*OEJBOTGPS UIFGJSTUUJNFTJODFIJTOFBS QFSGFDUHBNF+VOF (BMBS SBHBTUBSUFEKVTUBTRVJDLMZ UIJTUJNF)FSFUJSFEIJTGJSTU IJUUFSTCFGPSF+BZTPO/JYT EPVCMFKVTUPWFSUIFHMPWFPG MFGUGJFMEFS%PO,FMMZ Cleveland Crowe cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf Hafner dh Duncan lf J.Nix 3b LaPorta 1b Valbuena 2b Marson c Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0

Detroit A.Jackson cf Rhymes 2b Damon dh Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch rf Jh.Peralta ss Inge 3b Kelly lf Laird c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 2 37

R H 1 3 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 3 2 4 0 1 6 16

BI 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

SO 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 1 8

Avg. .250 .286 .290 .268 .239 .250 .240 .160 .194

SO 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .306 .286 .271 .340 .272 .235 .262 .241 .197

Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Detroit 220 100 01x — 6 16 0 E—Marson (4). LOB—Cle LOB—Cleveland 3, DDetroit 10. 2B—J.Nix — N (8), Inge (24), Kelly (4). 3B—Inge — (4). RBIs— — A.Jackson (28), Rhymes m (5), M Mi.Cabrera C (101), Kelly (15), Laird (18). SB—A.Jackson — (19). S—Laird. — Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland —C 1 (LaPorta); DDetroit 7 (Damon D m 3, Rhymes, m Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera M C 2). Runners m moved up—Rhymes, — m DDamon. m GGIDP— D — Jh.Peralta. DDP—Cleveland —C 1 (A.Cabrera, C Valbuena, LaPorta). C Cleveland IPP H R ERR Mstersn L, 4-126 M 11 5 5 Ambriz m 2 5 1 1 DDetroit IPP H R ERR GGalraga W W, 4-5 7 3 0 0 Perry 1 0 0 0 CCoke 1 0 0 0 T—2:30. — A—33,936 — (41,255).

BB 1 1 BB 0 0 0

SO 5 2 SO 8 0 0

NP 113 42 NP 100 12 11

ERA RA 5.33 5.83 ERA RA 4.21 4.29 2.47

LEADERS NATIONAL NA ONA LEAGUE AGU BATTING—Votto, BA NG— CCincinnati, .320; Prado, Atlanta, .319; CG CGonzalez, CColorado, .318; Pujols, St. Louis, .316; Polanco, Philadelphia, .316; Byrd, CChicago, .305; Zimm merman, m m W Washington, .305. RUNS—BPhillips, CCincinnati, 85; Votto, CCincinnati, RUNS— 83; Pujols, St. Louis, 82; UUggla, Florida, 82; W Weeks, M Milwwaukee, 82; Prado, Atlanta, 81; CG CGonzalez, CColorado, 78. RBI—Pujols, RB — St. Louis, 88; HHoward, w Philadelphia, 81; McGehee, M G Milwaukee, M w 81; Votto, CCincinnati, 81; CG CGonzalez, CColorado, 79; UUggla, Florida, 79; 5 tied at 78. HHITS—Prado, S— Atlanta, 144; BPhillips, CCincinnati, 142; CG CGonzalez, CColorado, 141; Pujols, St. Louis, 141; Braun, M Milwaukee, w 138; Byrd, CChicago, 138; W Weeks, Milwaukee, M w 137. HOME RUNS— HOM RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 32; ADunn, D Washington, 31; UUggla, Florida, 28; Votto, CCincinnati, W 28; M MarReynolds, Arizona, 27; Fielder, M Milwaukee, w 25; CGonzalez, CColorado, 25. CG SSTOLEN O N BAS BASES—Bourn, S— HHouston, 39; M Morgan, Washington, 30; Pagan, NNeww York, 30; JosReyes, NNeww W York, 27; AMcCutchen, MC Pittsburgh, 26; CCYoung, Arizona, 25; ATorres, San Francisco, 23; Venable, San DDiego, 23; Victorino, Philadelphia, 23. PPITCHING—Jimenez, CH NG— m CColorado, 17-3; W Wainwright, w St. Louis, 17-7; HHalladay, Philadelphia, 16-8; THudson, H Atlanta, 14-5; NNolasco, Florida, 14-8; CC CCarpenter, St. Louis, 13-4; Latos, San DDiego, 13-5; Arroyo, CCincinnati, 13-7. SSTRIKEOUTS—Halladay, R K OU S—H Philadelphia, 180; Lincecum, m San Francisco, 169; W Wainwright, w St. Louis, 165; Kershaw, w Los Angeles, 163; HHamels, m Philadelphia, 162; JoJohnson, Florida, 162; DDempster, m CChicago, 160. SAVES—HBell, SAV S—H San DDiego, 37; BrWilson, W San Francisco, 35; FCordero, C CCincinnati, 33; W Wagner, Atlanta, 30; LNunez, N Florida, 28; CCapps, W Washington, 26; FRodriguez, NNeww York, 25. AMERICAN AM R CAN LEAGUE AGU BATTING—Hamilton, BA NG—H m Texas, .354; M MiCabrera, C D Detroit, .340; M Mauer, M Minnesota, .333; ABeltre, Boston, .325; CCano, NNeww York, .323; DDeJesus, Kansas CCity, .318; DDelmYoung, m Minnesota, .317. M RUNS—Teixeira, NNeww York, 90; CCrawford, RUNS— w Tampa m Bay, 87; Jeter, NNeww York, 86; M MiCabrera, C DDetroit, 84; CCano, NNeww York, 82; HHamilton, m Texas, 82; JBautista, Toronto, 80; M MYoung, Texas, 80. RBI—MiCabrera, RB —M C DDetroit, 101; ARodriguez, NNeww York, 97; JBautista, Toronto, 92; Teixeira, NNeww York, 88; GGuerrero, Texas, 87; DDelmYoung, m Minnesota, 87; M Konerko, CChicago, 85. HHITS—Hamilton, S—H m Texas, 163; ISuzuki, Seattle, 156; CCano, NNeww York, 151; ABeltre, Boston, 149; M MiCabrera, C DDetroit, 147; Jeter, NNeww York, 141; AJackson, DDetroit, 140; MYoung, Texas, 140. M HOME RUNS— HOM RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 38; M MiCabrera, C DDetroit, 31; Konerko, CChicago, 31; DO DOrtiz, Boston, 27; Teixeira, NNeww York, 27; HHamilton, m Texas, 26; CCano, NNeww York, 24; CCPena, Tampa m Bay, 24; QQuentin, CChicago, 24. PPITCHING—Sabathia, CH NG— NNeww York, 16-5; PHughes, H NNeww York, 15-5; Price, Tampa m Bay, 15-5; Pavano, M Minnesota, 15-8; CCBuchholz, Boston, 14-5; CCahill, OOakland, 13-5; Lester, Boston, 13-8; Verlander, DDetroit, 13-8; ESantana, Los Angeles, 13-8. SSTRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, R K OU S— W Los Angeles, 186; FHernandez, H Seattle, 183; Lester, Boston, 166; Liriano, Minnesota, 165; CCLewis, M w Texas, 154; M Morrow, w Toronto, 153; Verlander, DDetroit, 152. SAVES—Soria, SAV S— Kansas CCity, 35; RSoriano, Tampa m Bay, 35; NNFeliz, Texas, 30; Papelbon, Boston, 30; GGregg, Toronto, 27; Aardsma, m Seattle, 24; M MRivera, NNeww York, 24.


T H E T R A DI T ION

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 C7

NOTEBOOK

Broadcaster getting back in the swing of things at Tradition By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Fred Funk hits his second shot from the long grass off the side of the 17th green on Friday evening. He saved par on the hole.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Jay Don Blake eyes his 18th hole putt on Friday. He carded a 68 to join a group of players at 7 under par.

Tradition Continued from C1 He won a Champions Tour major in 2008, the Constellation Energy Classic, and has five wins since joining the 50-and-over pro golf circuit. But he has just two top-10 finishes over the last two years as he has battled an assortment of injuries, including a current bone spur in his shoulder. “It feels good,” Weibring said after Friday’s round, referring to his position atop the leaderboard and not to his ailing shoulder. “I have had runs on this tour for sure. The one year I had 15 top 10s or whatever, and I was in the last couple of groups it felt like almost every week. “I said to my wife, ‘No matter what happens, at least I’ve got that major under my belt,’ ” Weibring said. “Almost every season (since) I’ve been hurt. But that happens.” Morgan is among the most accomplished players in Champions Tour history, winning 25 times on the circuit since joining in 1996. But at 63, Morgan’s prodigious pace has slowed. The last time he was in better shape at a major than he is now was at the 2006 Senior PGA Championship, when he was in second after 36 holes. But Morgan, a seven-time PGA Tour winner, looked the part of a contender Friday at Crosswater, firing a 3-under-par 69 that included five birdies against two bogeys. “Unbelievable, isn’t it, that old guys can do that?” said Morgan shortly after finishing his round. Morgan won The Tradition in both 1997 and 1998, when the tournament was still played in Arizona. He found that feel again Friday, needing just 23 putts to complete his second round — fewer putts than any other player in the field. Fellow Champions Tour golfer Mike McCullough has worked

Lehman Continued from C1 “Today was actually a really difficult day for me,” Lehman said. “I started out the first six or seven or eight holes playing extremely well and just making nothing. But (I was) hitting good putts and (they were) not going in, and (I) really started losing my patience, which is a little unusual for me. “I started hitting it lousy and started kind of pushing and pressing. The round was kind of getting away from me.”

Oregon golfer remains in contention Corvallis native Bob Gilder, a crowd favorite at Crosswater, remained in the hunt for his first win since 2006 after shooting a 1-under 71 in Friday’s second round, moving to 5 under for the tournament. D.A. Weibring leads the 2010 Tradition at 10 under after two rounds of play. Gilder, 59, mixed four birdies with three bogeys Friday after posting a 4-under 68 on Thursday. He tees off on hole No. 1 today at 9:35 a.m. with Tommy Armour III and Tom Purtzer.

“I look forward to the weekend to challenge myself to go out and play the golf course. I’m sure there are going to be good scores. I just have to worry about myself.” — Tradition leader D.A. Weibring, on the rest of the tournament with Morgan recently on his putting stroke, Morgan said. And the help seems to have paid dividends. “I was glad to see that aspect of my game kind of come around,” Morgan said. “It’s been giving me some fits early on this year. But I seem to be improving at this point in time, and I hope it continues for the weekend.” Funk is used to contending at major championships, particularly at The Tradition, which he won here at Crosswater in 2008. But by his lofty standards, Funk has struggled of late with just three top-10 finishes this year. He teetered on the brink of trouble Friday on the 17th and 18th holes, but he saved par on both. Funk pulled his tee shot into knee-high grass on the par-3 17th hole but was able to chip to 15 feet and drill the par putt. “I’m in a good spot,” Funk said. “I’m pleased to be back in the hunt. It looks like I am actually REALLY turning the corner where I am playing good again. I’m hitting a lot more good shots than bad shots, where it’s been the other way around recently.” Lehman, winner of the 2010 Senior PGA Championship, struggled at times himself on Friday. But he birdied three of his final five holes to finish his 69 and end at 8 under for the

Then came No. 12, which gave him resolve to get something out of his round, he said. “I said to my caddie, ‘Let’s make three birdies coming in and get something out of the day,’ ” Lehman recounted. “And we did. It is gratifying and satisfying to do that.” On the par-3 17th, Lehman holed out from a right greenside bunker. It turned out to be the only birdie of the entire day on the brutal 17th hole. Despite his strong finish to the second round, Lehman said he needs to play better over the final two rounds if he wants to win

SUNRIVER — To fans of professional golf, Bobby Clampett may be best known for his work as a television analyst for CBS and TNT. He hopes to change that. Since turning 50 in April, Clampett has been spending more time on the links and less time in the TV booth. Playing competitive golf this year for the first time since retiring from the PGA Tour in 1995, Clampett has entered eight Champions Tour events so far in 2010, including this week’s Jeld-Wen Tradition. “I’ve been having a ball,” said Clampett after shooting a 2-under-par 70 on Friday to move into a tie for ninth place at 5 under midway through the 2010 Tradition. “I’m having a lot of fun after not doing this for 16 years.” A three-time All-America golfer at Brigham Young University, Clampett enjoyed a solid if not spectacular pro career on the PGA Tour, earning more than $1 million between 1980 and 1995. He joined CBS as a part-time course reporter in 1991 before becoming a fulltime member of the network’s golf coverage team in 1995. Now eligible for the Champions Tour, though, Clampett is planning to cut back on his television work to concentrate more on playing golf’s 50-andover circuit. “I’m still learning,” said Clampett, whose best finish so far this year has been a tie for fifth place at the Regions Charity Classic in May. “But there’s no substitution for experience.”

Carrying the family name D.A. Weibring, who enters today’s third round of The Tradition with a two-stroke lead over current runner-up Tom Lehman, spoke to his son, Matt, on Thursday by phone. Matt Weibring, himself a standout golfer who won more than $500,000 on the PGA Tour last year, is looking at six to eight months of recovery after undergoing hip surgery last week. “I said, ‘I feel bad. You should be playing and I should be on the couch,’ ” D.A. Weibring recounted Friday. “ ‘But if I am going to be out here, I might as well play well.’ ” On second thought … Fred Couples, who originally committed to play in The Tradition, failed to make the cut Friday at the PGA Tour’s Wyndham Championship in Greensboro, N.C. Couples, who is currently second in the Champions Tour’s Charles Schwab Cup standings, withdrew from the Champions Tour major to compete in the North Carolina event, where he missed the cut by five strokes. Chip shots Crosswater Club’s hole No. 17 was again the course’s most difficult hole. On Friday, Tom Lehman was the only player to record a birdie on the 232-yard par-3 hole, and it came on a shot from the bunker. Hole No. 2 proved to be the easiest on Friday, when 33 birdies were posted on the 582-yard, par-5 offering. … Bob Tway equaled the Champions Tour’s longest birdie streak of the season Friday, recording five consecutive birdies between the 11th and 15th holes. Tway finished the second round with a 5-under 67. … Jay Haas, 56, marveling at 65-year-old Hale Irwin, who was one of Haas’ playing partners Friday, said: “He’s 65 years old. He thinks I’m a kid.” … Mike Reid, the 2009 Tradition champion, made the biggest turnaround of the tournament on Friday, improving on his first-round score by 10 strokes. Reid, who shot a 7-over 79 on Thursday, posted a 3-under 69 on Friday.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Gil Morgan watches his putt from the edge of the 18th green during the second round of The Tradition at Crosswater Club in Sunriver on Friday. Morgan is in a tie for third place. tournament. “I haven’t had my whole game going in the right direction at the same time yet,” Lehman said. “Yesterday, I drove it great and putted very well. Today, at least starting, I was much better tee to green, but I couldn’t get the ball into the hole.” Weibring’s best 36-hole position in a major came at the 2003 Senior British Open, where he stood in second place, and he has not contended in a major since his 2008 win. But you wouldn’t have known that the way he played Friday. He putted beautifully most of the day, and he capped his round by draining a 20-foot birdie putt that sent him to 10 under. “It was a good day,” Weibring said. “I like the way I played. I hit a lot of good, solid shots. I hit some recovery shots. But I did putt very, very well.” Weibring contended here in 2007, when he played in the final group on Sunday and finished in third place, six shots behind win-

The Tradition. “I do feel good about this round that I squeezed three birdies out at the end,” Lehman said. “After that par on 12, that was the key hole for me. It was a horrendously played hole off the tee and then to make, with where the pin was, a par from 270 was spectacular. “Yet I need to go over to the range and hit a few and work on my skills a bit and try to get things more tuned in for tomorrow.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

ner Mark McNulty. Weibring knows his work is not done here. But there is reason for hope this weekend. “I look forward to the weekend to challenge myself to go out and play the golf course,” Weibring said. “I’m sure there are going to be good scores. I just have to worry about myself.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bobby Clampett clears his ball from a bunker at the front of the 18th green on Friday. He finished the second round at 5 under.


C8 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

T H E T R A DI T ION

WATER VIEW

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A canoe full of people makes it way down the Little Deschutes River as professional golfers set up for their second shots on the ninth fairway during the Tradition on Friday.

Just off the beaten path

IN THE TALL STUFF

It was another beautiful day at Crosswater Club in Sunriver on Friday for the second round of The Tradition. And while most of the spectators enjoyed the tournament in conventional ways, some Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Several spectators attempt to help golfer David Frost, right, look for his ball after hitting into the deep rough of the 18th hole on Friday afternoon at The Tradition.

chose to check out the action from a different vantage point.


L

Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010

Officials: Geese program working By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Setting out rows of champagne flutes for a wedding Friday evening at Pioneer Park in Bend, event planner Aleah Knight said she’s noticed a big difference since the Bend Park & Recreation District started cracking down on geese in the city’s riverside parks. “This past month, it’s twice as clean as it used to be,” she said. “I don’t know if it’s because we have less of them, or they’re cleaning it up more, but it’s way nicer.”

D

BUSINESS Sugar beet crop awaits USDA review, see Page D3. OBITUARIES Guitarist who influenced Linda Rondstadt dies, see Page D7. OREGON 2009 state timber harvest near Depression-era low, see Page D8.

In late June, 109 geese captured at Drake Park were gassed to death, butchered and donated to local food banks. The food banks and the park district received several angry phone calls, and opponents of the killings organized a memorial service in memory of the dead geese. Seven weeks later, Bend Park & Recreation District Natural Resources Manager Paul Stell said district staff are spending less time cleaning up droppings left behind by geese, but the goosereduction effort is not yet finished. See Geese / D7

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Group to appeal resort ruling By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

A local land use watchdog group will appeal two Deschutes County ordinances adopted in late July that allow land to be added to and removed from the county’s destination resort development zone. Central Oregon LandWatch filed notices of intent this week to appeal the ordinances to the Oregon Land Use

Board of Appeals. County officials set out a year ago to remove land ineligible for resort development from the zoning map, and said that would reduce the total amount of land zoned for resorts and give the public a better sense of where resorts can be built.

Cyrus family resort Land must be included on the des-

tination resort zone map before property owners can apply for a resort. The ordinances grew controversial as the process progressed, in part because the county commissioners added an exemption to protect the Cyrus family’s resort development plans, according to commissioners’ statements and documents obtained by The Bulletin. See Zoning / D7

Where the grass is always bluer

Photos by Jeff Wick / The Bulletin

Jayson Bowerman, of Bend, above, tunes one of his hand-built mandolins at the High and Dry Bluegrass Festival on Friday evening. Bowerman was selling his handmade instruments at the festival. Gary Miller, of Sisters, on the banjo and Dave Ledder, of Bend, on guitar, at left, play a set with their band “Back From the Dead” Friday night at the festival. The festival started at 3 p.m. Friday and continues through 3 p.m. Sunday near the Bend Municipal Airport. For more information, visit www.highanddrybluegrassfestival.com.

Oregon wildfire update

An unconventional candidate

Fires reported as of Friday afternoon in Central and Eastern Oregon. For fire updates, go to www.nwccweb.us/information/firemap.asp#top.

1. LOWER DESCHUTES COMPLEX FIRE

• Threatened structures: 0 • Cause: Lightning

• Acres: 5,200 • Percent containment: 30% • Threatened structures: 14 • Cause: Lightning

3. D. HARRIS FIRE • Acres: 3,800 • Percent containment: not available • Threatened structures: 0 (one barn burned) • Cause: Lightning

2. WHITE LIGHTNING COMPLEX FIRE • Acres: 4,500 • Percent containment: 0%

Umatilla Pendleton

Lower Deschutes Complex Fire

D. Harris Fire

Maupin Antelope

White Lightning Complex Fire Sisters

Mitchell Prineville

Dayville

Enterprise Pendleton Bend Burns O R E G O N Lakeview

Ontario MILES

Sunriver La Pine

Burns

0

Lemurian teachings

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

John Day Seneca

Bend

Joseph

Indebted writer, hypnotherapist, spiritual seeker takes on Walden in 2nd District

50

Andy Zeigert and Greg Cross / The Bulletin

The Lower Deschutes River north of Maupin was set to be opened to campers, anglers, boaters and others at 6 a.m. today, as crews were able to keep the Lower Deschutes Complex of fires from growing significantly on Friday, said Ronda Bishop with the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center. “Pretty much everything’s holding its own,” Bishop said. “They’re still doing the mop-up ... and they were able to get lines around it.” Crews were busy with other fires in the north-central part of the state as well. The D. Harris Fire has burned around 3,800 acres southwest of Maupin, said Rich Hoover with the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office, and officials were sending the structural firefighters home Friday night due to the decreased threat to structures. The fire did burn one barn, however, he said. And on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, crews were dealing with several fires in the White Lightning Complex. More than two dozen fires were sparked from 400 lightning strikes earlier this week, and five of those grew to 1,000 acres or more in size. People living near the Johnson Lake Fire, two miles south of Simnasho, were put on a voluntary evacuation order; however, that fire has burned no structures. Although Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort and Casino remains open, Tribal Highway 3 is closed north of the junction with Tribal Highway 8 at the Kah-Nee-Ta road. — Kate Ramsayer

WASHINGTON — In her campaign bio, U.S. House candidate Joyce Segers presents herself as a “wife, mother and small business owner” who was driven to run for the U.S. House after relocating to Ashland. The characterization is brief. She’s also a hypnotherapist, the author of a memoir-inprogress titled “Secrets of the Other Sex,” the widow of a Korean War veteran and Freudian therapist who committed suicide six years ago, an explorer of alternative spiritual belief systems and a woman who accrued hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt as a result of the housing crash and supporting her son, another military veteran who faced mental health issues. Segers is challenging six-term incumbent Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, to represent Oregon’s 2nd District, which encompasses the state’s eastern two-thirds, including Central Oregon. She spoke with The Bulletin on Friday, after articles she wrote on an alternative spiritual website called Spirit of Ma’at

ELECTION

“We don’t need another person who fits the mold. I think we need someone who has a different outlook.” — Joyce Segers, candidate, U.S. House of Representatives surfaced this week. Segers has written at least two articles and posted a handful of comments concerning a spiritual group called the Lemurian Awakening. According to articles on Lemurian websites, including lemuria.net and lemurianconnection.com, Lemuria is an ancient continent that once spanned a massive area from the Indian Ocean to California and is now submerged. Some writers on Lemuria believe aliens instructed early Lemurians or were themselves the first settlers of Lemuria. The inhabitants are said to have constructed a city within Mount Shasta, called Telos, which has made the mountain an important aspect of current Lemurian belief.

Segers moved to Ashland last year after selling a medical billing company she owned for nearly 20 years in Florida. Her articles are both first-person accounts of trips she took with the Lemurian Awakening: “Lemuria is so much more than a period of time in our unwritten history books. Lemuria is a still living, vivid memory in our cells of those times when Divine Balance was part of our reality, when the power of the Divine Feminine was greatly loved and cared for,” Segers wrote, in an article posted last year on the Spirit of Ma’at website. “These memories are still in our DNA. If we fully open up for these kinds of memories we can greatly speed up the process to regain our own Mastery. If we reconnect the Master inside, we can greatly affect the upcoming planetary changes.”

Ongoing exploration Asked about the articles, Segers said she doesn’t consider her trips with the group part of a religion. Rather they’re part of her ongoing exploration of different spiritual beliefs, many of which are outside the JudeoChristian tradition. “I was raised Jewish, so it’s not my religion,” Segers said of the Lemurian group. “It was part of learning about cultures that at one time lived in peace and respected the planet.” Does she believe the stories about Lemuria are true? “I don’t know what’s true in that,” Segers said. “I wouldn’t say that it’s my belief system because I’m too flexible in what I believe every day. I do believe in God,

a creator, and I do believe that everyone has a different story about how that came about and different traditions about how that came about.”

Articles removed Even though Segers had her articles removed from the sites for fear of “distracting from the real issues,” she said she’s not afraid that voters will be put off by the writings. “I honestly wasn’t afraid of the materials, because anyone who took the time to read them would see it was about people getting together and being compassionate,” Segers said. Segers’ opponent, Walden, is an Episcopalian, a Protestant Christian denomination, although he doesn’t often discuss his religion. Asked for an example of how Walden’s religious beliefs have influenced his work in Congress, spokesman Andrew Whelan cited the Jubilee Act, which Walden first co-sponsored in 2007. The bill, which was reintroduced this year, would encourage the U.S. and international institutions like the World Bank to forgive debts owed by poor countries. “The short back story is that a member of his church went on a hunger strike for a long period of time … and during that time talked to Greg about the bill,” Whelan wrote in an email. “Greg evaluated the merits and thought it made sense so he joined as a cosponsor.” Segers said she began to explore alternative medicine after her husband David, a Korean War veteran, committed suicide in 2004. See Segers / D2


D2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Second suspect arrested in carjacking A second Bend man believed to have been involved in a carjacking at Albertsons in northeast Bend last week was arrested Thursday evening. Early Thursday morning, Bend police officers were called to an apartment on Southeast McKinley Avenue to investigate suspicious activity believed to be related to a report of a possible stabbing that had occurred earlier on Reed Lane. During the investigation, officers found and arrested one suspect in the carjacking, 25year-old Jeffery Dale Stanphill, of Bend. Police had spoken with David Andrew Strunk, 21, when they were called to Reed Lane, and later determined that he was also a suspect in the carjacking. He was arrested Thursday morning for violating his parole and was lodged in the Deschutes County jail. After additional investigation, police arrested Strunk on suspicion of second-degree robbery and unlawful use of a vehicle about 9:30 p.m., according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. Police believe Stanphill and Strunk were riding on a motorcycle about 10:30 p.m. Aug. 13 when they pulled up behind a Jeep Patriot in the Albertsons parking lot on Northeast Third Street. They allegedly approached the Jeep, pulled the driver and a passenger out, and then Stanphill took off in the Jeep, with Strunk

Segers Continued from D1 David struggled for decades with post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from his service, Segers said. “When we met, he was still waking up at the bottom of the bed shooting at the enemy,� she said. David was a Freudian psychoanalyst who also used hypnotherapy in his practice. That’s where she picked up the skill, Segers said. Following David’s suicide, her son, Brian, saw his own problems with post-traumatic stress intensify. Brian served in the Air Force in the late 1990s, including a deployment in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, Segers said, and found his father’s body. When traditional medicine didn’t help Brian, Segers said she looked elsewhere. “I was looking for anything

following on the motorcycle. The victims, all Bend residents, were identified as Jesus Medoza, Ryan Fevig and Drew Hansongroon. The Jeep was found the next day not far from Albertsons. The alleged stabbing on Reed Lane and the carjacking are still under investigation.

Fire sweeps through Chan’s Chinese in Bend Chan’s Chinese Restaurant on Southeast Third Street in Bend sustained serious damage in a fire that tore through the building early Friday morning. Firefighters were called to the restaurant around 2 a.m. on Friday, according to a news release from the Bend Fire Department. When crews arrived at the scene, they found that the attic above the kitchen was filled with smoke and still burning. They were able to put out the blaze within an hour, but heat and smoke caused about $700,000 in damage. Officials believe the fire started in the kitchen, but are still investigating. Lap Chan, the restaurant’s owner, said on Friday evening that it could be three months before the restaurant is ready to reopen.

Seven arrested in Redmond drug bust A monthlong drug-dealing investigation by the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team led to several arrests Thursday

morning at a home in Redmond. Police executed a search warrant on the home, located on Southwest 26th Street, around 6:45 a.m., according to a news release from CODE. Officers found six people inside, including one juvenile, who was taken into protective custody by the Department of Human Services. Another three people who showed up while police were executing the warrant were also detained, the release said. Officials found methamphetamine, prescription pills, packaging material and drug paraphernalia during the search. Eddie Engle, 46, was arrested on suspicion of possession, delivery and manufacturing of methamphetamine and frequenting a drug house. Christine Engle, 43, was arrested on suspicion of possession of methamphetamine and frequenting a drug house. Robert Edmondson, 22, was arrested on suspicion of possession and delivery of methamphetamine and frequenting a drug house. Nicholas Edmondson, 20, was arrested on suspicion of possession of methamphetamine and frequenting a drug house. Damion Lawson, 22, was arrested on suspicion of frequenting a drug house and for violating parole. James Griffin, 21, was arrested for violating parole and on an outstanding Deschutes County warrant. Kathleen Robertson, 19, was arrested on suspicion of possession of methamphetamine and frequenting a drug house. All seven were lodged in the Deschutes County jail, while

“I was looking for anything that was going to help heal, and there was very little that was effective. Modern medicine was limited, and I began searching for some other answers. I began looking at different modalities.� — Joyce Segers, candidate, U.S. House of Representatives that was going to help heal, and there was very little that was effective,� Segers said. “Modern medicine was limited, and I began searching for some other answers. “I began looking at different modalities.�

BodyTalk That included a holistic health system called BodyTalk, which operates on similar principles as acupuncture. Rather than sticking needles into pressure points, though, BodyTalk practitioners tap on certain parts of the body

to restore disrupted “energy flow� within the body. Like many alternative therapies, the health benefits of BodyTalk have sometimes been questioned.

Son’s practice Meanwhile, Segers supported her son for nearly five years and paid for his therapy. He’s doing well now, Segers said, with a wife, a son and his own BodyTalk practice. But she lent Brian money to start his business. And shortly after, Florida’s real estate market plunged, leaving her deeply underwater on her

Sandra Ruybalid, 41, was cited for possession of a controlled substance.

Sheriff launches seat belt campaign The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will launch a threeweek campaign enforcing seat belt laws beginning today, according to a news release. Extra traffic patrols will monitor drivers through Sept. 12. Police will be looking for anyone violatiing seat belt or child safety restraint laws. The campaign is part of a larger statewide effort to reduce the number of injuries and deaths caused by crashes in Oregon. Increased traffic patrols will also be conducted during nighttime hours, with officers focusing on DUII enforcement.

Party planned for river shuttle sponsors A party to thank the sponsors of Bend Area Transit’s Ride the River Shuttle will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 4 at McKay Park, according to a news release. The party will be hosted by KXIX-FM, known as Power 94, and will help celebrate the sponsorship of the radio station, along with Les Schwab Tire Centers, Western Beverage and Parrilla Grill, among others. Ride the River shuttle riders and the public are welcome to attend the party, which will feature food, games, giveaways and music.

house. The result, Segers said, is the $200,000 to $1 million in debt she has listed on her personal financial disclosure statement filed with the U.S. House. That experience, Segers said, has given her a firsthand view of the problems that Oregonians face during the current uncertain economy. “I know what it’s like, and I know the frustration of it,� Segers said. “All of it was good intentions and 20 years of paying my bills and taxes, and running a very successful business, and I got hit with it like everyone else.� If her experiences make her a unique candidate, Segers said, that’s fine with her. “We don’t need another person who fits the mold,� Segers said. “I think we need someone who has a different outlook.� Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A purse and two iPods were reported stolen at 8:47 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 700 block of Southeast Briarwood Court. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen from vehicles at 9:05 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 61000 block of Country Club Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:11 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 700 block of Northwest Wall Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:24 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Northwest 14th Street and Northwest Fresno Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 2500 block of Northwest Regency Street. DUII — Stephanie Ann Judd, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:09 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Northeast 10th Street and Northeast Franklin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:35 a.m. Aug. 20, in the 500 block of Southwest 13th Street. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:06 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:07 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 4100 block of Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:03 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:22 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:10 p.m.

Aug. 19, in the 2500 block of Southwest 23rd Street. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 11:57 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 2600 block of Southwest 23rd Street. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 11:56 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 3100 block of Southwest Metolius Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:56 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 2700 block of Southwest 23rd Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:26 a.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Southwest 31st Street and Southwest Indian Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 5:08 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:41 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 300 block of West Washington Avenue in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:37 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Bear Creek and Teal roads in Bend. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen from a vehicle at 3:21 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of First Street and Bluewood Avenue in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:59 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 63400 block of Deschutes Market Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:45 p.m. Aug. 19, in the 300 block of Northwest 74th Street in Redmond. DUII — Robert Holden Morra, 65, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:22 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 67600 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Cloverdale. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:17 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 1500 block of Southwest Cline Falls Road in Redmond.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:08 a.m. Aug. 19, in the 19300 block of Indian Summer Road in Bend. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:30 p.m. Aug. 18, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 146. DUII — Cameron James Campbell, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:46 p.m. Aug. 19, in the area of Mayfield Pond Access Road and Powell Butte Highway. DUII — Kayla M. Sheeley, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:40 a.m. Aug. 20, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 Business and O.B. Riley Road in Bend.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Poodle and Lhasa Apso mix — Adult male, black and white; found near Northwest Sixth Street and Northwest Cedar Avenue. Beagle and Jack Russell Terrier mix — Adult male, tri-color, brown leather collar; found near

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday

The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Aug. 21, the 233rd day of 2010. There are 132 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Aug. 21, 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an executive order making Hawaii the 50th state. ON THIS DATE In 1609, Galileo Galilei demonstrated his new telescope to a group of officials atop the Campanile in Venice. In 1807, Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat set off from Albany on its return trip to New York, arriving some 30 hours later. In 1831, Nat Turner led a violent slave rebellion in Virginia resulting in the deaths of at least 55 white people. (He was later executed.) In 1878, the American Bar Association was founded in Saratoga, N.Y. In 1911, Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa� was stolen from the Louvre Museum in Paris. (The painting turned up two years later, in Italy.) In 1940, exiled Communist revolutionary Leon Trotsky died in a Mexican hospital from wounds inflicted by an assassin the day before. In 1963, martial law was declared in South Vietnam as police and army troops began a crackdown on Buddhist anti-government protesters. In 1991, the hard-line coup against Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev collapsed in the face of a popular uprising led by Russian federation President Boris Yeltsin. TEN YEARS AGO Rescue efforts to reach the sunken Russian nuclear submarine Kursk ended with divers announcing none of the 118 sailors had survived. FIVE YEARS AGO Pope Benedict XVI triumphantly ended his four-day trip to his native Germany, celebrating an open-air Mass for a million people in Cologne. Robert A. Moog (mohg), whose self-named electronic synthesizers revolutionized music in the 1960s, died in Asheville, N.C., at age 71. ONE YEAR AGO Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi welcomed with a

T O D AY I N HISTORY hug the only man convicted of the 1988 Lockerbie bombing that killed 270 people and praised Scotland’s leaders for “their courageously right and humanitarian decision� to release him. A high-level delegation of North Korean officials paid their respects to late former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung. Leaders of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America voted to lift a ban that prohibited sexually active gays and lesbians from serving as ministers. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor-director Melvin Van Peebles is 78. Singer Kenny Rogers is 72. Rock-and-roll musician James Burton is 71. Pop singermusician Carl Giammarese is 63. Actress Loretta Devine is 61. CBS “Early Show� co-host Harry Smith is 59. Actress Kim Cattrall is 54. College Football Hall of Famer and NFL quarterback Jim McMahon is 51. Rock singer Serj Tankian (System of a Down) is 43. Actress Carrie-Anne Moss is 40. Rock musician Liam Howlett (Prodigy) is 39. Actress Alicia Witt is 35. Singer Kelis is 31. TV personality Brody Jenner is 27. Singer Melissa Schuman is 26. Olympic gold medal sprinter Usain Bolt is 24. Actor Cody Kasch is 23. Actress Hayden Panettiere is 21. Actor RJ Mitte (TV: “Breaking Bad�) is 18. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Old age is the most unexpected of all the things that happen to a man.� — Leon Trotsky (1879-1940)

Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

( 541 ) 678-0020

1ST ANNUAL

Clearance Sale Only Clearance Merchandise in store during this sale. Summer & Winter items

Starts 10 a.m., Monday, Aug. 23 through Aug. 28th

1 WEEK ONLY!

N  R POLICE LOG

Bar Association founded in 1878

Northwest Coyner Avenue. Domestic short-haired cat — Young male, white and gray tabby; found near Northwest 19th Street. Domestic mediuim-haired cat — Young neutered male, gray and brown tabby; found near Southwest 12th Street.

Mon - Sat 10am - 6pm 1001 NW Wall Street 541-550-7001


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 D3

D3

B

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,179.76 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +.81 +.04%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages D4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Bank of America’s ex-chief denies fraud Kenneth Lewis, the former chief executive of Bank of America, responding Friday to a lawsuit filed early this year by the attorney general of New York, denied allegations of fraud in connection with the bank’s merger with Merrill Lynch. In a filing with the state Supreme Court, Lewis said the case against him about the merger, at the height of the financial crisis, was without merit. “Some have looked to assign blame for every aspect of the financial crisis, even where there is no evidence of misconduct,” the filing said. “This case is a product of that dynamic and does not withstand either legal or factual scrutiny.”

t

CLOSE 10,213.62 DOW JONES CHANGE -57.59 -.56%

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1,071.69 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -3.94 -.37%

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.61 treasury CHANGE +1.56%

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$1227.20 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$6.60

Concerns over eggs grow as millions more recalled Salmonella cases could number in thousands By William Neuman New York Times News Service

A national outbreak of salmonella was linked on Friday to another major egg producer, Hillandale Farms, prompting the recall of an additional 170 million eggs in 14 states. Oregon is not included in the recall. The latest action — the third recall announcement in two weeks for eggs — is bound to shake the confidence of consumers rattled by a succession of food safety scares in recent years, most prominently

for foods like beef and lettuce. The idea that half a billion suspect eggs have been circulating in the food supply comes as an embarrassment for the egg industry and federal regulators. New egg safety rules went into effect in July that the Food and Drug Administration had said would prevent tens of thousands of salmonella illnesses a year. “You have to treat eggs with the assumption that they’re contaminated with salmonella,” said Carol Tucker Foreman, a food safety expert of the Consumer Federation

of America. “We may all object to the fact that we have to treat food like toxic waste, but if we don’t want to get sick, and especially if you have someone in your house that’s immune-suppressed, you have to handle things carefully and demand that the standards be set higher.” Hillandale Farms, one of the nation’s largest egg companies, said it was recalling eggs produced at two Iowa sites, in some cases as far back as April. It follows an even larger recall by Wright County Egg, also of Iowa, which recalled 228 million eggs on August 13, and then expanded its recall by an additional 150 million eggs on Wednesday. See Eggs / D5

BIOTECHNOLOGY IN AGRICULTURE

Jobless rate drops in 18 states, rises in 14 WASHINGTON — Unemployment fell in fewer states in July than in the previous three months, a sign that the pace of job growth has slowed. The jobless rate dropped in 18 states and Washington, D.C., last month, the Labor Department said Friday. It rose in 14 states and stayed the same in 18. That’s a slowdown from the past three months when unemployment fell in more than 30 states. Nationwide, the unemployment rate remained stuck at 9.5 percent in July.

VW to bring $85K Phaeton back to U.S. BERLIN — Volkswagen plans to bring back the $85,000 Phaeton to the U.S., where the sedan flopped and was withdrawn in 2006, as part of the German carmaker’s aim of tripling its share of the world’s second-largest market by 2018. “We have our eyes firmly set on the U.S. market,” Juergen Borrmann, director of Volkswagen’s plant in Dresden, Germany, where the Phaeton is built, said in an interview. The model will be completely redesigned and retooled before VW begins selling the high-end sedan in the U.S. again, he said. Former CEO Bernd Pischetsrieder pulled the Phaeton from the U.S. four years ago after the car failed to meet sales goals and called a 20,000 global target a “pipe dream.” — From wire reports

Correction In a story headlined “Nonfiling nonprofits could lose tax status,” which appeared Friday, Aug. 20 on page B2, the year Newcomers of Bend was founded was reported incorrectly. It was founded in 2002 and incorporated as a nonprofit in 2009. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Factory output

Growers left in limbo on modified beet seed Half of U.S. sugar supply hangs in the balance pending a USDA review that could take years By Michael J. Crumb The Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa — A judge’s ruling halting planting of genetically modified sugar beet seeds has left growers feeling uncertain as they wait for federal officials to decide the next step for a crop that provides half of the nation’s sugar supply. Duane Grant, chairman of the board at the Boise, Idaho-based Snake River Sug-

ar Co., said if a solution can’t be worked out to use the genetically modified seed, his company and its growers fear there isn’t enough conventional seed to plant next year. The company produces about 20 percent of the nation’s beet sugar. “There has been no incentive, no market, no demand for conventional seed since 2008, and we believe there is not enough conventional seed available for

our growers to plant a full crop in 2011,” he said. U.S. District Court Judge Jeffrey White in California issued his ruling Aug. 13 that put on hold future planting of sugar beets using genetically modified seeds. White’s ruling allows this year’s crop to be harvested and processed, but the current seed crop can’t be planted until the U.S. Department of Agriculture reviews the effect the genetically altered crops could have on other food. That could take several years. Until then, genetically modified seeds can be stored. See Beets / D5

WHAT’S GOING UP?

The industrial production index: 2007=100

What: Some Day Farm LLC Where: 20361 Tumalo Road, Tumalo Owner: Catherine Cruger General contractor: Steve Keeton Construction Inc., Sisters Contact: 541-848-8519 Website: www.somedayfarmllc.com Details: Some Day Farm LLC is an equestrian training facility that is moving across the street from its current location in Tumalo. The business’ services include boarding, training, show services and riding lessons. Owner Catherine Cruger said the move to a larger facility was

95

93.4

90

85 2009

Eric Hylden / The Grand Forks Herald

Sugar beets are elevated from a harvester into a semi-trailer truck on the GKT Useldinger Farm south of East Grand Forks, N.D., on Tuesday. A judge’s ruling allows this year’s genetically modified beet crop to be harvested and processed, but a new crop can’t be planted until the U.S. Department of Agriculture reviews the practice.

2010

Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Federal Reserve Board

AP

necessary to meet the demand she is seeing. Construction is under way on a 28-stall barn, a 100foot-by-200-foot indoor ring and a 150-foot-by-250-foot outdoor ring, Cruger said. Cruger, who works with her fiance, Travis Wren, said she bought the facility June 1 and expects construction to be complete in October. The 32 acres of land will also have a training course with natural obstacles, including water jumps and ditches. “We’re busting at the seams right now,” Cruger said about the current 15-acre location. — David Holley, The Bulletin

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Bryce Clark, left, and Kelly Moor construct a barn door for a new equine facility at Some Day Farm in Tumalo.

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$17.982 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.336

Despite cash, profits, CEOs say demand won’t justify adding jobs By Neil Irwin The Washington Post

CHICAGO — Corporate profits are soaring. Companies are sitting on billions of dollars of cash. And still, they’ve yet to amp up hiring or make major investments — the missing ingredients for a strong economic recovery. Many Democrats say the economy needs more stimulus. Business lobbyists and their Republican allies say it needs less regulation and lower taxes. But here in the heartland of America, senior executives say neither side’s diagnosis fits. They blame their profound caution on their view that U.S. consumers are destined to disappoint for many years. As a result, they say, the economy is unlikely to see the kind of almost unbroken prosperity of the quartercentury that preceded the financial crisis. Across the industrial parks and office towers of the Chicago region, in more than a dozen interviews, senior executives said they see Americans for years ahead paying down debts incurred during the nowended credit boom and adjusting spending to match their often-reduced incomes. See Executives / D5

“It took us a decade to get in the ditch we are in. There isn’t going to be instant gratification to get us out of it. We’re going to have to get used to a lowergrowth economy, and that is going to be a big adjustment for all of us.” — David Speer, chief executive, Illinois Tool Works

After pension fraud case, wondering who’s up next By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

The federal government’s crackdown on the state of New Jersey this week for misrepresenting the condition of its pension funds raises a question: Who else might have pension numbers that could draw regulatory fire? Cities and states are scrambling to make sure their pension disclosures are in order, and investors in distressed debt — who make money off financial trouble — are scrambling too, sensing opportunity. Though some advisers are urging caution, New Jersey and other states have continued to issue new debt at reasonable rates as investors clamor for highgrade securities in a low-rate environment. “The cease-and-desist order has heightened awareness of the importance of accurate pension disclosure,” said John McNally, a partner at the law firm Hawkins Delafield & Wood, and the project coordinator of the newest edition of “Disclosure Roles of Counsel,” a treatise telling municipal bond lawyers what is expected of their clients. See Pensions / D5


B USI N ESS

D4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 19.17 ACE Ltd 53.51 AES Corp 10.40 AFLAC 46.63 AGCO 35.25 AK Steel 13.46 AMB Pr 23.92 AMR 6.57 AOL n 22.56 AT&T Inc 26.45 AU Optron 9.02 AbtLab 49.34 AberFitc 36.39 Accenture 38.42 Actuant 19.78 Acuity 37.49 AdvAuto u55.89 AMD 6.25 AecomTch 23.30 AegeanMP 15.91 Aegon 5.51 Aeropostl s 22.68 Aetna 27.11 AffilMgrs 68.21 Agilent 28.56 Agnico g 63.18 Agrium g 68.71 AirProd 75.01 Aircastle 8.30 Airgas u66.25 AirTran 4.66 AlskAir 50.04 Albemarle 41.23 AlcatelLuc 2.64 Alcoa 10.57 Alcon 160.95 AllgEngy 22.04 AllegTch 43.70 Allergan 62.96 AlliData 56.59 AlliancOne d3.48 AlliBInco u8.42 AlliantEgy u35.58 AldIrish 2.13 AllisChE 4.05 Allstate 27.75 AlphaNRs 40.69 AlpTotDiv 5.49 Altria u22.71 AmBev 110.02 AmbacF h d.52 Amdocs 26.62 Ameren 27.14 Amerigrp 37.75 AMovilL 49.60 AmAxle 8.85 AmCampus 28.10 AEagleOut 13.05 AEP 34.82 AmExp 40.76 AmIntlGrp 35.17 AmTower u47.43 AmWtrWks 22.08 Americdt 24.12 Ameriprise 43.13 AmeriBrgn 28.92 Amphenol 41.66 Anadarko 48.70 AnalogDev 29.62 AnglogldA 43.85 AnnTaylr 15.90 Annaly 17.59 Anworth 6.86 Aon Corp 36.91 Apache 90.53 AptInv 19.71 AquaAm 19.16 ArcelorMit 29.85 ArchCoal 24.11 ArchDan 30.52 ArrowEl 24.77 ArvMerit 13.82 AshfordHT 8.62 Ashland 48.20 Assurant 36.36 AssuredG 17.00 AstoriaF 12.20 AstraZen 50.53 AtlasPpln 17.02 AtwoodOcn 24.47 AutoNatn 23.42 Autoliv 54.17 AvalonBay 104.45 AveryD 33.81 AvisBudg 9.39 Avnet 24.17 Avon 29.00 AXIS Cap 30.81 BB&T Cp d23.11 BBVABFrn u8.57 BHP BillLt 67.44 BHPBil plc 56.65 BJs Whls 41.77 BP PLC 36.40 BPZ Res 4.13 BRE 39.94 BRFBrasil s 13.32 BabckW n 23.46 BakrHu 39.01 BallCp 57.14 BallyTech 33.04 BcBilVArg 12.40 BcoBrades 18.12 BcoSantand 11.71 BcSBrasil n 12.98 BcpSouth d12.84 BkofAm d12.87 BkIrelnd 4.03 BkNYMel 24.65 BarInvVIX 23.12 Barclay 19.79 BarVixShT 22.84 Bard 78.82 BarnesNob 15.53 BarrickG 44.78 Baxter 44.57 BeazerHm 3.70 BeckCoult 46.64 BectDck 70.82 Belo 5.42 Bemis 29.44 Berkley 26.39 BerkH B s 77.73 BestBuy d32.50 BigLots 31.80 BBarrett 34.72 BioMedR 16.70 Biovail 22.48 Blackstone 10.18 BlockHR d13.47 Boeing 64.60 Boise Inc 6.84 Boise wt .68 Borders 1.21 BorgWarn 45.51 BostProp 81.23 BostonSci 5.69 BoydGm 7.72

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Name

Last

Chg Wkly

Brandyw 10.75 -.03 +.17 BridgptEd d13.07 -.48 -.44 Brinker 15.60 -.04 +.53 BrMySq 26.44 +.38 +.12 BroadrdgF 20.16 +.11 -.03 Brookdale 13.14 +.04 -.25 BrkfldAs g 25.47 -.11 +.17 BrkfldPrp 14.12 -.16 +.14 Brunswick 14.79 +.54 +.02 Buckle d24.45 -.27 -1.41 Buenavent 37.93 +.03 +.01 BungeLt 53.64 -.43 -.32 BurgerKing d16.45 -.27 +.04 CB REllis 16.34 -.08 +.19 CBL Asc 12.06 -.05 -.22 CBS B 13.61 -.15 -.34 CF Inds 90.01 +1.16 +5.36 CIGNA 32.41 -.47 -.97 CIT Grp n 38.04 -.18 +.73 CMS Eng u17.04 ... -.32 CNO Fincl 4.75 -.05 -.22 CSX 49.79 -.50 -.60 CVS Care 27.99 -.53 -.71 Cabelas 15.90 +.68 +1.73 CablvsnNY 25.39 -.14 -.17 CabotO&G d29.28 -.31 -1.41 CACI 42.89 +.39 +1.44 CalDive 4.91 -.09 -.24 Calgon 12.58 +.09 +.36 Calpine 12.46 +.04 -.63 CamdnP 44.10 +.02 -1.08 Cameco g 25.46 -.17 +.67 Cameron 36.84 -.70 -1.10 CampSp 36.64 +.13 +.45 CdnNRy g 60.64 -.40 +.05 CdnNRs gs 32.20 -.54 +.05 CP Rwy g 56.84 -.40 -.55 CapOne 37.78 +.17 -1.04 CapitlSrce 5.00 -.04 -.18 CapsteadM 11.88 -.02 +.03 CardnlHlt s 31.14 +.01 -.22 CareFusn n 22.81 +.81 -.04 CarMax 21.56 +.39 +.74 Carnival 31.79 -.37 -.62 Carters 24.00 +.24 +.70 Caterpillar 68.86 -.43 +.85 Celanese 26.27 -.62 -1.15 Celestic g 8.05 +.13 -.04 Cemex d8.41 -.11 -.20 Cemig pf 15.09 +.47 +.54 CenovusE n 25.31 -.33 -.78 CenterPnt 14.55 +.06 +.05 CnElBrasil 12.94 +.27 +.26 CntryLink 35.99 -.06 -.06 Cenveo 6.54 -.06 +1.04 ChRvLab 29.95 -.07 +.10 ChesEng 20.38 -.43 -.40 Chevron 75.05 -.79 -1.63 ChicB&I 21.52 -.40 +.43 Chicos d8.86 -.08 +.02 Chimera 3.88 +.01 +.01 ChinaGreen 12.01 +.16 +1.20 ChinaLife 64.16 -.24 -.09 ChinaMble u53.18 +.57 +.49 ChNBorun n u9.24 +.11 +.70 ChinaSecur 5.29 ... -.02 ChinaUni 13.39 -.02 -.11 Chubb 53.39 +.36 +.29 ChungTel 20.22 -.02 +.12 Cimarex 68.14 -.78 +.06 CinciBell d2.48 -.04 -.19 Cinemark 15.46 +.07 -.05 Citigp pfJ 26.19 -.01 ... Citigrp 3.75 -.04 -.13 CliffsNRs 61.28 -.22 +2.79 Clorox 64.42 +.02 +.11 Coach 37.31 +.15 ... CocaCE 29.02 +.18 +.31 CocaCl 55.30 +.02 -.43 Coeur 16.41 +.09 +1.87 CogdSpen 6.22 -.04 -.03 ColgPal 76.03 -.72 -.36 CollctvBrd 14.43 -.16 +.50 Comerica 35.34 -.18 -.53 CmclMtls 13.39 -.13 +.29 ComScop d19.79 -.11 -1.11 CmtyHlt d28.88 -.18 -1.29 Compellent 13.95 +.06 +2.09 CompPrdS 16.74 -.37 -.41 CompSci d42.02 +.01 -.02 ComstkRs d21.36 -.54 -.69 Con-Way d27.61 +.07 +.91 ConAgra 21.45 -.29 -.17 ConchoRes 60.56 ... -.04 ConocPhil 53.89 -.82 -1.13 ConsolEngy 34.11 -.26 -2.21 ConEd 46.70 +.20 -.25 ConstellA 16.66 -.02 -.04 ConstellEn 28.90 -.30 -.76 CtlAir B 21.74 -.08 -1.07 ContlRes 41.31 -.80 -1.64 Cnvrgys 10.13 -.05 +.39 Cooper Ind 41.97 -.93 -.37 CooperTire 18.19 -.22 +.22 CornPdts 34.02 +.07 +1.67 Corning 16.10 +.07 -.77 CorpOffP 36.05 -.28 -.88 CorrectnCp 21.07 +.06 +.06 Cosan Ltd 9.92 -.18 -.33 Cott Cp 6.58 -.12 +.26 CousPrp 6.34 -.04 -.07 Covance 40.37 +.37 +.05 CovantaH 14.68 -.02 +.09 CoventryH 20.02 -.25 -.54 Covidien 38.09 -.50 -.49 CrwnCstle 40.60 -.01 +1.84 CrownHold 28.67 +.09 +.50 Cummins u79.51 -1.73 +2.03 CurEuro 126.65 -1.10 -.43 Cytec 48.60 -.25 +.14

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

DREBear rs 29.65 DirEMBr rs 35.97 DirFnBear 15.99 DrxFBull s 18.99 Dir30TrBeard34.52 DrxREBll s 40.33 DirxSCBull 35.48 DirxLCBear 15.53 DirxLCBull 43.67 DirxEnBull 26.79 Discover 14.27 Disney 33.05 DolbyLab 57.15 DollarGn n 29.44 DollarTh 48.15 DomRescs u43.93 Dominos 13.08 Domtar grs 61.00 DoralFncl d1.13 DEmmett 15.80 Dover 46.18 DowChm 24.43 DrPepSnap 36.76 DuPont 40.34 DuPFabros 24.43 DukeEngy 17.06 DukeRlty 11.10 Dynegy rs 4.78 EMC Cp 18.69 EMCOR 23.24 EOG Res 91.42 EQT Corp d33.54 EastChm 60.94 EKodak 3.77 Eaton 73.04 EatnVan d26.70 EV TxDiver 11.64

+.32 +.12 +.32 -1.06 +.10 +.61 -.19 -.90 +.12 -4.32 -.42 -.82 -.02 -.01 +.16 +.21 -.42 -.78 -1.00 -1.87 -.13 -.41 -.14 -.63 +.01 +.99 +.44 +.68 +.27 +.70 +.26 +.02 -.03 -.09 -.56 +1.04 -.06 -.16 +.15 +.37 -.28 -.23 -.48 -.73 -.04 -.08 -.25 +.02 -.42 -.99 +.02 +.05 +.13 -.06 -.01 +.25 +.14 -.07 -.36 -.44 -.10 -2.75 -.72 -2.61 +.31 +.81 +.02 +.07 -.34 -2.23 -.01 -2.22 -.03 +.17

FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Fortress FortuneBr FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline

Last

Chg Wkly

11.77 4.09 11.32 27.60 26.73 3.67 42.58 20.57 98.92 71.37 7.72 12.00 28.72

-.12 -.38 -.07 -.27 -.14 -.08 -.17 -.28 -.72 -1.02 -.04 -.21 -.38 -1.75 -.30 -.53 +.50 -.61 -.72 +1.30 -.07 +.12 -.15 -.60 -.55 -.37

G-H-I GLG Ptrs GMX Rs Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Gartner GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s Genpact GenuPrt Genworth GeoGrp Gerdau g Gerdau

4.43 d4.43 13.92 18.81 7.02 12.32 d17.32 u28.12 15.97 5.02 23.51 60.23 15.03 13.96 d5.11 35.14 13.55 42.96 11.36 21.52 10.95 13.83

... -.10 -.12 -.25 -.07 -.22 -.39 +.06 -.08 -.03 -.12 -.39 -.22 -.17 -.02 +.01 -.31 +.09 -.18 -.17 ... +.02

+.01 -.67 +.43 -.76 +.99 -.34 -.35 +.62 +.89 +.17 +.15 -.44 -.35 +.46 +.10 +.28 -.39 +.95 -.54 -.85 +.03 -.22

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

MorgStan Mosaic Motorola MuellerWat MurphO NBTY NCR Corp NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navistar Netezza NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NikeB 99 Cents NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp

Last

Chg Wkly

25.92 -.07 +.02 56.64 +.08 +5.44 7.48 -.06 -.16 2.80 +.12 +.18 54.90 -.55 +.08 54.00 -.06 -.01 12.61 +.16 +.22 20.73 -.56 -1.23 12.57 -.03 -.25 28.46 -.14 -.97 16.51 -.67 +.05 23.01 -.10 -.20 2.63 -.05 -.04 44.43 -.82 -1.64 41.51 -.31 -.87 38.23 -.46 -1.26 23.78 -.05 +.38 13.36 +.28 +.53 36.95 +.02 -.42 45.65 +.28 +.49 15.39 +.28 +1.50 16.05 -.08 -.14 7.72 -.23 +.01 12.97 +.19 +1.88 2.61 +.01 -.08 15.34 -.21 -.68 49.51 -1.41 -1.09 58.02 -.42 +1.30 8.20 +.12 +.20 18.90 -.20 -.26 53.29 +1.45 +1.27 16.50 -.16 -.07 71.26 -.08 +.68 17.51 +.77 +1.40 31.50 -.68 -1.10 67.10 -.89 -.05 9.09 -.03 +.23

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

Pentair 31.11 +.06 -.51 PepcoHold u17.85 +.08 +.33 PepsiCo 64.80 +.14 -.76 PerkElm 21.07 -.48 -.37 Petrohawk 15.34 -.52 -.81 PetrbrsA 30.59 +.01 -.73 Petrobras 34.42 -.12 -1.45 PtroqstE 5.43 -.03 -.03 Pfizer 15.92 -.11 -.16 Pharmerica d7.17 -.34 -.63 PhilipMor 51.98 -.02 -.01 PhilipsEl 27.92 -1.04 -.70 PhlVH 49.39 +.22 +.19 PhnxCos 1.79 -.02 -.09 Pier 1 6.19 -.19 -.17 PimcoHiI 13.04 -.11 -.21 PinWst 39.28 +.04 -.22 PioNtrl 57.95 -.05 +1.58 PitnyBw d19.76 -.04 +.21 PlainsEx 22.47 -.52 -1.72 PlumCrk 34.19 -.20 -.45 Polo RL 83.04 +.32 +2.68 PolyOne 9.68 -.12 -.05 Polypore u26.46 -.23 -1.04 PortGE 19.69 +.05 ... Potash u149.67 +.83+38.33 PwshDB 22.20 -.14 -.21 PS Agri 26.22 +.05 +.25 PS Oil 23.67 -.17 -.35 PS USDBull 24.13 +.17 +.02 PwShPfd u14.31 -.01 +.06 PShEMSov u28.03 +.10 +.46 Praxair u88.35 +.24 +1.06 PrecCastpt 119.24 -.77 +1.36 PrecDrill 6.54 -.16 -.19 PrideIntl 23.04 -.46 -.40 PrinFncl 22.39 -.35 -.50

LO C AL ADVE RTI S I N G FACT #2

of all Central Oregon adults cite The Bulletin as their primary source for local sales and shopping information. (More than all other sources combined.)

Drive results for your advertising dollars call 541-382-1811 AMERICAN OPINION RESEARCH 2006

DCT Indl 4.51 +.05 -.01 DPL 25.24 -.03 -.09 DR Horton 10.27 -.16 +.03 DTE 45.91 +.05 -.30 DanaHldg 10.92 -.04 -.18 Danaher s 36.33 -.03 -.69 Darden 41.27 +.21 +1.62 Darling 7.68 -.02 +.24 DaVita 63.82 +.15 -.26 DeVry d37.98 -.84 -4.73 DeanFds 10.09 +.12 -.11 Deere 65.13 -.58 +.28 DelMnte 13.10 ... -.13 DeltaAir 10.53 -.25 -1.02 DenburyR 14.69 -.53 -1.05 DeutschBk 64.94 -.74 -2.19 DBGoldDL 32.47 -.18 +.65 DevelDiv 10.29 -.12 -.30 DevonE 62.14 -.86 -1.56 DiaOffs 59.03 -1.10 -1.48 DiamRk 8.71 -.10 -.11 DicksSptg 26.47 -.10 -.77 DigitalRlt 58.19 -.46 -1.45 Dillards 21.60 +.64 +1.75 DrxTcBll s 27.13 -.01 +.65 DrxEMBll s 27.20 -.27 +.68 DrSCBear rs 37.22 -.04 -.43

EVTxMGlo Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g EBrasAero EmersonEl Emulex EnCana g s Energizer EngyTsfr EnergySol EnerSys ENSCO Entergy EntPrPt Equifax EqtyRsd EsteeLdr EvergE rs ExcelM ExcoRes Exelon ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl FMC Tech FNBCp PA FairchldS FamilyDlr FedExCp FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FidClayOp FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FirstEngy FlagstB rs FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FEMSA FootLockr

AriadP 3.49 ... +.29 Ariba Inc 15.88 +.43 +.79 ArkBest 19.87 +.37 +.16 ArmHld 15.13 +.11 +.67 ArrayBio 2.79 -.01 -.11 Arris d8.57 -.12 -.38 ArtTech 3.25 -.04 -.04 ArubaNet 16.67 +.10 -.17 AsiaInfoL 20.72 +.09 +.16 AsscdBanc 12.47 -.05 -.15 athenahlth 29.51 -1.14 +.05 Atheros 26.51 +.72 +.85 AtlasAir 44.79 -.83 -.88 AtlasEngy 28.13 -.48 -1.37 Atmel 5.73 +.02 -.02 Autodesk 28.11 +.48 -.01 AutoData 39.40 -.05 -.39 Auxilium 25.46 +.51 +1.14 AvagoTch 20.43 -.08 +.44 AvanirPhm 2.94 -.04 -.17 AviatNetw 4.05 -.10 +.10 Axcelis 1.50 ... -.06 BE Aero 27.67 -.01 +.32 BGC Ptrs 5.13 -.01 ... BMC Sft 37.67 +.08 +2.79 BSD Med 2.25 -.13 +1.17 BallardPw 1.79 -.20 +.09 BannerCp 2.10 -.02 +.01 BeacnRfg d14.12 -.01 +.12 BebeStrs 5.93 +.03 -.01 BedBath 38.34 -.22 +1.26 Biocryst d4.81 -.14 -.17 Biodel 4.14 -.11 +.06 BiogenIdc 55.38 +.32 -.56 BioMarin 20.62 ... +.27 BioSante 1.41 +.01 -.05 BioScrip 4.55 -.06 -.07 BlkRKelso 10.69 +.31 +.30 Blckbaud 21.70 +.06 -.61 Blkboard d33.72 -.39 -.97 BlueCoat 17.50 -1.45 -.49 BobEvans 25.76 +.13 +.73 BonTon 7.65 -.37 -.15 BostPrv 6.17 +.09 -.03 BreitBurn u17.13 -.11 +.64 BrigExp 16.25 -.17 +.38 Brightpnt 6.28 -.10 -.40 Broadcom 32.97 +.68 +1.04 Broadwind d1.73 -.08 -.33 BrcdeCm d4.79 +.04 -.12 BrklneB 9.22 +.11 +.17 BrooksAuto 7.19 -.08 -.03 BrukerCp 13.16 -.16 +.14 Bucyrus 60.20 +.11 +1.49 BuffaloWW 41.75 -.11 +1.57 CA Inc 18.35 -.04 +.03 CBOE n 22.87 -.13 -.13 CDC Cp A d1.51 -.02 -.13 CH Robins 66.16 +.97 +1.56 CME Grp d237.69 -3.07 -7.13 CNinsure 23.79 +.14 +.90 CTC Media 17.75 -.16 +.14 CVB Fncl 7.56 -.10 -.50 Cadence 7.08 +.28 +.70 CalifPizza 15.32 -.27 -.08 CdnSolar lf 11.78 -.74 +.19 CapellaEd d65.85 +.28 -4.35 CapProd 8.45 +.29 +.13 CpstnTrb d.69 -.01 -.01 Cardica h 2.34 +.06 +.65 Cardiom g 6.89 +.17 -.67

Cardtronic 13.88 -.03 -.50 CareerEd d17.54 -.75 -1.25 Carrizo 18.10 -.20 -.07 Caseys 37.68 -.02 +.16 CasualMal 3.15 +.03 +.35 CatalystH 41.78 +.71 +1.07 CathayGen 10.17 -.07 -.29 CaviumNet 23.40 +.11 -.32 CeleraGrp 6.51 -.03 -.30 Celgene 53.67 -.24 -2.00 CelldexTh 4.41 -.13 -.23 CenterFncl 4.98 -.02 +.37 CentEuro 24.00 -.50 +.40 CEurMed 21.21 -.54 -.76 CenGrdA lf 9.38 -.03 +.05 CentAl 10.13 +.01 -.11 Cephln 58.83 +.13 +.50 Cepheid 15.44 -.28 -.11 Cerner 75.34 -.03 -.74 ChrmSh 3.42 -.07 -.28 ChkPoint 34.72 +.01 +1.03 Cheesecake 22.73 -.25 +.70 ChildPlace 44.84 -.36 +4.57 ChinAgri s 17.50 +.23 +1.69 ChinaBAK 1.48 -.06 -.08 ChinaBiot 14.10 -.26 -.79 ChinaCEd 6.07 -.08 -.11 ChinaDir d.99 -.05 -.04 ChinaInfo 5.32 -.04 +.10 ChinaMda 10.20 -.35 -.48 ChinaNGas d5.42 -.19 -1.22 ChinaSun 3.87 -.10 -.13 ChinaTcF 3.37 +.04 +.42 CienaCorp 12.58 +.22 +.39 CinnFin 26.92 +.09 +.25 Cintas 26.19 +.08 +.35 Cirrus 17.10 -.44 -1.57 Cisco 22.23 +.01 +.87 CitiTrends 23.73 +.57 -3.91 CitrixSys u59.21 +1.27 +2.45 CleanEngy 15.29 -.16 -.01 Clearwire 6.52 +.08 +.35 CogentC 8.30 -.12 -.16 Cogent 8.86 +.27 +.36 CognizTech 59.61 +.54 +1.33 Coinstar 47.19 -.99 +2.57 ColdwtrCrk 3.57 -.06 -.18 ColBnkg 17.00 +.40 +.61 CombinRx 1.36 +.01 -.03 Comcast 17.81 -.03 -.06 Comc spcl 16.74 +.01 -.04 CmcBMO 36.99 -.21 -.38 CommVlt 20.79 -.06 +1.54 CompDivHd 14.04 -.04 -.11 Compuwre 7.43 +.04 -.16 ComScore 18.00 -.27 -.02 Comtech 20.96 -.25 -.68 Concepts 13.52 +.13 +.08 ConcurTch 46.57 +.96 +1.94 Conexant d1.63 +.02 -.03 ConstantC 17.36 +.30 -.84 CopanoEn 26.69 -.20 -.79 Copart 34.01 +.23 -.04 CorinthC d4.49 -.91 -2.17 Costco 55.04 +.03 -.27 Covenant 7.22 -.16 -.78 CowenGp d3.65 +.03 -.24 CrackerB 45.94 +.07 +.30 Cree Inc 57.93 -.30 +1.17 Crocs 12.51 -.23 -.29 CrosstexE 7.18 -.07 -.11

D-E-F

Name

10.51 -.50 -.37 47.45 +.36 -.25 33.86 +.32 -.08 58.18 +.54 +.87 11.50 ... -.11 4.77 -.06 -.18 18.42 -.11 +.81 25.44 -.80 -.10 46.68 -.71 -1.55 8.75 -.09 +.40 27.70 -.45 -.91 64.99 +.57 +2.89 46.81 +.13 -.76 4.75 -.03 +.02 22.99 -.51 +.77 41.51 -.67 -2.20 77.46 -.40 -.65 37.19 +.02 +.43 30.13 -.43 -.07 44.85 +.19 -.03 57.39 -.65 -.43 1.08 -.47 -.84 5.51 -.03 +.10 13.88 -.29 -.89 40.41 -.15 -.96 21.34 -.45 -.77 15.11 -.03 +.17 58.89 -.40 -1.02 61.63 -.66 -.34 7.77 -.26 -.10 8.36 +.17 +.33 u42.83 -.34 -.09 81.23 -.35 +.43 d20.49 +.22 +.06 4.49 -.10 -.20 10.28 +.05 +.22 16.17 -.09 +.07 14.76 +.09 +.68 26.49 +.06 -.01 19.15 +.03 -1.00 14.04 +.08 +.47 .51 -.01 -.01 5.10 ... +.10 d10.27 +.06 -.07 4.51 +.11 -.14 35.84 -.33 -.40 2.62 -.03 -.12 25.82 +.05 +1.82 95.29 -1.06 -.93 46.59 -.16 +.51 49.93 +.09 +1.89 12.39 -.60 -.12

GlaxoSKln 37.54 +.25 -.60 GlimchRt 6.00 ... -.06 GlobalCash 3.69 ... +.05 GolLinhas 13.68 -.12 -.22 GoldFLtd 14.13 -.16 +.17 Goldcrp g 41.89 -.31 +2.25 GoldmanS 148.24 +1.19 +.16 Goodrich 72.25 -.17 +.43 GoodrPet d11.16 -.21 -1.52 Goodyear 9.85 -.14 -.13 GrafTech 15.18 -.09 +.20 Graingr 107.68 -.43 -1.98 GrtAtlPac 2.92 +.13 -.03 GtPlainEn 18.52 +.12 +.22 GpTelevisa 19.29 +.30 +.17 Guess 39.31 +.63 +2.32 HCP Inc 34.19 +.02 -.32 HSBC 49.30 -.53 -1.20 HSBC Cap2 u26.94 +.01 +.64 Hallibrtn 27.82 -.74 -.28 Hanesbrds 26.18 -.34 -.18 HarleyD 25.21 -.20 -.36 Harman 30.71 +.21 +1.10 HarmonyG 10.06 -.19 -.83 HarrisCorp 42.76 -.01 -1.06 HartfdFn 20.13 -.23 -.75 Hasbro u42.47 -.54 -.31 Headwatrs 3.25 -.01 -.08 HltCrREIT 45.08 +.22 +.36 HltMgmt 6.70 +.20 +.05 HealthNet 24.10 -.33 -2.22 HlthSouth 16.94 -.32 -.31 Heckmann 4.10 ... -.09 HeclaM 4.95 -.10 +.11 Heinz 47.10 +.54 +1.46 HelixEn d9.10 ... -.33 HelmPayne 36.33 -1.09 -1.09 Hersha 4.62 -.09 -.08 Hershey 47.74 +.59 +1.39 Hertz 9.20 -.01 -.23 Hess 51.24 -.75 -1.53 HewittAsc 48.64 +.01 +.08 HewlettP d39.85 -.91 -.60 Hexcel 17.23 -.30 -.10 HighwdPrp 30.23 -.31 +.06 HollyCp 26.79 -.15 +.34 HomeDp 28.17 -.05 +.86 Honda 32.77 -.21 +.71 HonwllIntl 40.64 -.13 -.37 Hormel 43.48 +.11 +.58 Hospira 51.32 -.83 -1.15 HospPT 19.67 -.06 -.50

HostHotls 13.43 HovnanE 3.88 Humana 48.51 Huntsmn 9.07 IAMGld g 18.09 ICICI Bk 42.53 ING 8.96 ION Geoph 3.89 iShCmxG s 12.01 iSAstla 21.10 iShBraz 69.48 iSCan 26.09 iShGer 19.72 iSh HK 16.16 iShJapn 9.51 iSh Kor 49.25 iSMalas u12.78 iShMex 50.51 iShSing 12.07 iSPacxJpn 39.26 iSTaiwn 12.56 iSh UK 15.08 iShSilver 17.59 iShS&P100 48.82 iShDJDv 44.27 iShBTips 107.16 iShChina25 40.54 iShDJTr 76.17 iSSP500 107.90 iShBAgB u108.30 iShEMkts 41.02 iShiBxB u112.10 iSSPGth 55.48 iShSPLatA 46.05 iSSPVal 51.56 iShB20 T u106.04 iShB7-10T u98.30 iShB1-3T 84.28 iS Eafe 50.31 iSRusMCV 37.79 iShRsMd 83.87 iSSPMid 73.71 iShiBxHYB 87.73 iShC&SRl 58.98 iSR1KV 55.89 iSR1KG 47.85 iSRus1K 59.31 iSR2KV 56.95 iSR2KG 66.75 iShR2K 61.15 iShUSPfd u39.86 iShDJTel 20.06

Ctrip.com s 42.10 CubistPh 22.22 Cyclacel 1.55 CyprsBio 3.75 CypSemi 10.41 Cytori 5.01

FstNiagara FstSolar FstMerit Fiserv Flextrn FlowInt FocusMda FormFac Fortinet n Fossil Inc FosterWhl FredsInc FresKabi rt FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FushiCopp

-.22 -.25 -.01 -.04 -.30 -.82 -.22 -.25 -.17 +.42 +.05 +1.30 -.15 -.29 -.07 -.19 -.03 +.12 +.06 +.10 -.39 +.87 -.22 +.32 -.41 -.41 +.02 -.09 -.09 +.07 -.24 +.97 +.10 +.55 -.12 +.27 +.04 +.07 -.10 -.05 +.04 +.01 -.09 -.30 -.33 -.15 -.24 -.47 -.22 -.33 -.13 -.07 +.10 +.49 -.23 +.06 -.40 -.79 -.15 +.31 -.12 +.34 +.20 +1.46 -.17 -.11 -.20 +.17 -.22 -.57 -.12 +3.75 -.32 +.23 -.03 +.07 -.53 -.40 -.15 -.14 +.01 +.24 ... +.19 +.21 +.62 -.13 -.14 -.23 -.59 -.12 -.08 -.18 -.30 -.05 -.14 +.05 +.38 +.06 +.08 -.01 -.06 -.08 +.03

iShREst iShFnSc iShSPSm iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed ITW IngerRd IngrmM IntegrysE IntcntlEx IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif Interpublic IntPotash Invesco IronMtn ItauUnibH IvanhM g

50.27 -.15 -.16 49.91 -.11 -.77 54.08 -.01 +.06 3.79 +.04 +.11 44.17 +.23 -.34 d52.22 -1.58-12.11 42.10 +.06 -.92 35.22 -.33 -.07 15.76 -.01 -.06 48.93 +.22 +.49 97.05 -.37 +.59 127.50 -1.40 -.37 4.95 -.04 +.31 45.83 +.17 -.52 15.33 -.03 +.11 21.21 -.07 -.66 18.90 -.02 +.68 8.57 +.04 -.07 23.72 -.33 +.17 18.50 +.15 +.10 d21.58 +.16 -.39 21.40 +.04 +.01 17.31 +.01 +.56

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M-N-O M&T Bk MBIA MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MGIC

89.76 9.06 18.41 10.48 6.95 7.27 7.38

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Name

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TempurP 29.09 +.31 +.44 Tenaris 35.30 -.94 +.18 TenetHlth 4.23 +.06 +.06 Tenneco 26.00 -.04 -.13 Teradata 30.49 +.06 +.69 Teradyn 9.49 -.19 -.12 Terex 20.10 +.88 +1.00 TerraNR rt d.21 -.03 -.11 Tesoro 11.32 -.23 -.65 TetraTech 8.45 -.16 -.10 TexInst 24.70 +.17 +.42 Textron 17.89 -.26 -.27 ThermoFis 44.20 -.15 -.10 ThomCrk g 8.92 -.05 +.04 ThomsonR 35.10 -.02 -.15 Thor Inds 24.73 +.56 -.28 3M Co 80.66 -1.15 -2.82 3Par u18.04 +.01 +8.39 Tidwtr 39.42 -.09 +.41 Tiffany 43.30 +.09 +1.51 TW Cable 53.79 -.26 -.55 TimeWarn 30.31 -.35 -.50 Timken 33.72 -.38 -.57 TitanMet 19.33 -.31 +.25 TollBros 16.57 -.03 +.14 Trchmrk 49.49 -.38 -1.14 TorDBk g 67.23 -.42 -.93 Total SA 48.12 -.69 -1.64 TotalSys 14.19 -.05 -.17 Transocn 51.00 -1.31 -3.15 Travelers 50.09 +.25 -.05 TrinaSol s 23.01 +.16 +1.25 Trinity 17.37 -.16 -.20 Tuppwre 40.75 -.10 +.49 TycoElec 26.23 -.34 -.50 TycoIntl 38.70 +1.96 +2.22 Tyson 16.62 +.16 +.35 U-Store-It 7.94 -.06 +.06 UBS AG 16.48 -.33 +.05 UDR 19.90 ... -.25 UGI Corp 27.45 -.28 +.57 US Airwy 9.10 -.09 -.04 USEC 5.12 +.13 +.05 USG 12.34 +.26 +.66 UltraPt g d39.39 -.74 -1.34 UndrArmr 36.78 +.47 +.89 UnilevNV 26.83 -.26 -.19 Unilever 26.59 -.11 -.07 UnionPac 74.26 -.24 +.81 Unisys rs 22.71 -.77 -.32 UtdMicro 2.90 -.01 -.03 UPS B 65.10 -.32 +.66 UtdRentals 12.41 -.39 +.38 US Bancrp 21.74 +.02 -.48 US NGsFd 6.95 -.09 -.34 US OilFd 32.95 -.30 -.84 USSteel 47.06 -.72 +1.96 UtdTech 68.12 -.39 -2.15 UtdhlthGp 31.61 -.18 -.42 UnvHlth s 34.86 -.28 -1.45 UnumGrp 20.33 -.10 -.48

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Nasdaq National Market Name

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B USI N ESS

Executives

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Gary R. O’Connell has joined Columbia State Bank as senior vice president and Central Oregon Commercial Banking Team leader. He will lead a local team of commercial banking professionals to provide for financial needs of small- and medium-sized businesses in the commercial, industrial and medical fields in Central Oregon. O’Connell joins the bank with 16 years of financial services experience. He is a graduate of the University of Portland, Army Officer Candidate School, and is currently participating in Pacific Coast Banking School. James Taylor and Nathan Martin have joined Steele Associates Architects. Taylor is a design professional who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture from the University of Idaho, and an associate’s degree in liberal arts from the College of Southern Idaho. He is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) accredited and has over four years of experience with local senior housing, hotel, resort, educational and commercial projects. He is working on projects including the OSU/Crook County Open Campus Building, a veterinary clinic and Jo-Ann Fabrics. Martin is a CAD Drafter who

Eggs Continued from D3 Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of cases of salmonella since May have been linked to tainted eggs, according to federal health officials. Investigators are continuing to look at the clusters of illness to see whether any other egg producers might be linked to the outbreak. Investigators are also looking at ties between the two egg farms operated in Iowa by Hillandale and the five farms run by Wright County Egg, which is owned by the DeCoster family, a major egg producer. “Hillandale Farms of Iowa and Wright County Egg Farm share a number of common suppliers because they are in the same industry in the same state,” Hillandale said in a statement late Friday. The company said that it bought young birds, called pullets, and feed from a company run by the DeCosters. FDA officials said the chicks used by both farms came from a hatchery that participated in a national program meant to ensure that its chicks were free of salmonella infection. Chickens can get salmonella from rodents in hen houses, from contaminated feed or from work-

Pensions Continued from D3 McNally has also been serving as a special disclosure counsel to the city of San Diego, the first government to have been accused of securities fraud by the SEC for faulty pension disclosures. New Jersey was the first state. The SEC and other regulators found that San Diego had numerous pension problems, but in general, regulators said its government did not adequately describe the size of its obligations to retirees. In addition, there were discrepancies between the pension numbers in the official statement distributed to bond buyers and the pension numbers in other documents. At the moment, the municipal bond market’s players — advisers, investors and underwriters — are more concerned about Illinois than any other state. Its credit was downgraded this year, and all the main ratings agencies said the poor condition of its public pension funds was a primary

James Taylor

Nathan Martin

Matt Johnson

Jim Johnson

earned his certificate of completion in computer-aided design at Central Oregon Community College. Martin interned at Steele Associates while attending COCC. He has experience with residential remodeling and truss design, is well-versed in CAD and 3-D modeling, and is working with teammates on a variety of projects. Bend Oregon Real Estate Expert has recognized Matt Johnson as top sales broker for the month of July, and Jim Johnson as top listing broker for July.

ers who may not follow sanitary procedures. Infected hens can lay eggs with the bacteria inside them, and people can become sick if they eat tainted eggs that are not fully cooked. Health experts say that people should make sure that they cook eggs fully to destroy any possible bacteria and wash their hands and utensils after handling raw eggs. Salmonella commonly results in diarrhea, vomiting and stomach cramps. In rare cases, it can lead to more serious conditions, like arterial infections. Even though the recall numbers are large, they represent a small fraction of national egg production, which runs at about 7.5 billion a month. The recalled eggs have also been produced over several months, meaning that most have long since been cooked and eaten. The Wright County eggs have been distributed nationwide. The Hillandale eggs went to 14 states, according to the company: Arkansas, California, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin. They were sold under the brand names Hillandale Farms, Sunny Farms, Sunny Meadow, Wholesome Farms and Werst Creek.

factor. A spokeswoman for Gov. Pat Quinn’s Office of Management and Budget, Kelly Kraft, said Illinois believed its pension disclosures were complete and accurate. The state has not hidden the fact that its pension funds have big shortfalls, she said, and there was no reason to think the SEC might lodge a complaint against it, as it did with New Jersey. She said the state had no plans to revise any of its financial documents. Still, some actuaries are deeply concerned about Illinois’ pension numbers, particularly because of a pension law enacted earlier this year. State officials claimed the measure had sharply lowered costs for the state by cutting the benefits that will be earned by workers hired in the future. (The current work force will continue to earn the same benefits as before.) The state’s bond offering documents, however, have not been updated since the law was passed.

Continued from D3 “It’s a different era,” said Daryl Dulaney, chief executive of Siemens Industry, whose 30,000 U.S. employees make lighting systems for buildings and a wide range of other products. “Our hiring and investment decisions have to be prudent and reflect that.” Executives see little evidence that the economy is slipping back into recession. But they describe a business environment in which sales come in fits and starts and their customers can’t predict what they will want to buy in the future. “In the past, our customers had more long-term vision on what they’re going to need,” said Bill Larsen, president of Larsen Packaging Products in Glendale Heights, Ill. Now, “they don’t know what they’re going to need and when they’re going to need it.” Larsen’s company sells boxes and other packaging materials to all types of companies, so its sales closely reflect overall economic activity. Those sales have been swinging widely from month to month. When companies consider whether to hire workers or invest, say, in a new factory, this kind of volatility and uncertainty about future conditions makes for a strong disincentive. During the first half of this year, capital expenditures by businesses have been a bright spot in the economy, growing at more than a 20 percent annual rate. But executives say little of this reflects expanded capacity. They say firms are spending primarily to replace equipment they had held onto longer than usual last year to conserve cash. David Casper, who heads commercial banking at Harris Bank, which has more than 300 branches in the Chicago area, estimated that the firm receives three loan applications from businesses looking to replace outdated equipment for every customer seeking to expand productive capacity. “These decisions are not being made lightly,” he said. “We’re not in normal times yet.”

Doing more with less From his office in a leafy office park in suburban Lake Forest, Ill., Robert Crawford is one of the executives making such

Beets Continued from D3 At issue are seeds developed by St. Louis-based Monsanto Co., used to grow about 95 percent of the sugar beet crop. The seeds are engineered to withstand the weed killer Roundup, allowing farmers to reduce the use of other chemicals and limit the practice of tilling fields to kill weeds. Monsanto seeds also dominate corn and soybean production, but experts said last week’s decision is limited to sugar beets. Some groups hope, though, that the ruling could prompt the USDA to take a broader look at questions involving genetically modified crops. Monsanto referred questions to Luther Markwart, executive vice president of the American Sugar Beet Growers Association. He said the next move is up to the USDA. “The message we’re giving people is, ‘You have to be patient and let this play out,’ ” Markwart said. USDA spokesman Caleb Weaver said the agency’s attorneys are reviewing the ruling but haven’t made any decisions. White’s ruling was the latest step in a lawsuit filed in 2008 by the Center for Food Safety, the Organic Seed Alliance and the

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 D5

tough decisions. He founded rather than one three times that Brook Furniture Rental in 1979 size as before. to rent sofas, dining room tables and such, mostly to executives on temporary assignments. The Bigger government? firm now has 500 employees in What role is government poliseven markets. cy playing in fostering corporate At first glance, Crawford, 71, caution? The executive class here is appears to be on an expansion binge; his company has roughly none too pleased with many of doubled its purchases of fur- the policies of President Barack niture this year. But that’s not Obama, their former hometown because of any grand expecta- senator. They criticize his willingtions for the future. Instead, he’s ness to let Bush-era tax cuts exmaking up for last year, when pire at year’s end for households the company cut furniture pur- that make over $250,000 and alchases 40 percent and ran down low the capital gains tax rate to its inventory. The large spending increase. They dislike aspects bump this year is meant mainly of his landmark health care law, to get inventory back up to nor- and some fear that the financial reform legislation mal levels. enacted this sumAnd like the mer will make it corporate sector “In the past, our harder for them as a whole, when customers had to get loans. Crawford gives “Congress has the green light to more long-term been very tough an investment, it’s vision on what on businesses,” usually designed said Jason Speer, to lower the need they’re going to chief executive for labor. Instead need. (Now,) they of Quality Float of expanding caWorks of Schapacity, he is look- don’t know what umburg, Ill., ing to serve ex- they’re going to which makes the isting customers need and when industrial equivmore efficiently. alent of toilet That means, for they’re going to ball floats, items example, small- need it.” that sell for up to scale investments $1,200 and are in software and — Bill Larsen, president used to measure new packing pro- of Larsen Packaging water levels in cedures so that Products in Glendale farm and indusfurniture-delivHeights, Ill. trial equipment. ery crews spend The company less time in traffic also makes the and can get seven or eight stops done in a day, com- metal balls that go on the top of pared with five or six before. flagpoles. Fundamentally, executives obHe has thus reduced staffing this year despite an increase in jected to Obama’s policies on the grounds they would make the business. “Every investment decision United States a less competitive we make is more careful and place to operate in the long run. But when Speer and other exmethodical than it was just a few years ago,” Crawford said. “Now ecutives were pressed on the role we go in smaller, and take time to that tax and regulatory policies build out capacity. We’re being play in hiring, they drew only much more precise and conser- vague connections. Speer said his decision whether to hire is vative about growth.” By contrast, for most of the 31 driven primarily by demand for years he has been in business, his products. Orders are comit has paid to be bold. As across ing in strong enough that he is corporate America, risk-taking running about 20 hours a week was rewarded. Those who bet of overtime. So he is weighing on growth to justify hiring more whether to hire two or three adworkers and buying more ma- ditional manufacturing workers. None of the executives interchinery often profited at the expense of more timid competitors. viewed linked a specific new govBut executives now project ernment initiative with a specific more gradual economic growth decision to refrain from hiring. and are making less ambitious investment decisions. At Brook Furniture, that means enter- Long-term solutions ing new markets with a 20,000Democratic leaders, however, square-foot distribution center, have been arguing that addition-

Sierra Club challenging the USDA’s regulatory oversight for genetically engineered sugar beets and the potential that the seeds could contaminate other crops. Sugar beets are planted on more than 1 million acres in 10 states, with Minnesota, North Dakota and Idaho being the top producers. Robert Green, a North Dakota beet grower, said he didn’t know what would happen next but was confident he would plant sugar beets next spring. “Sugar beets provide half the sugar for this country, and I don’t believe they will make the requirements so stringent people will go without sugar,” said Green, who farms near St. Thomas in far northeastern North Dakota. Grant, whose Snake River Sugar Co. has about 1,000 growers in Idaho, Washington and Oregon, said the USDA must act quickly so growers can plan for next year. “We have a limited ability to influence them, and we will be dependent on their timely decisionmaking process,” Grant said. Representatives of the groups that filed the sugar beet lawsuit said their suit and another involving alfalfa show the USDA hasn’t properly overseen genetically modified crops. Matthew Dillon, founding director of the Organic Seed Alliance, said he would like the

al government spending could further stimulate the economy, protecting jobs and perhaps even prompting new hiring. Some economists, meantime, have urged the Federal Reserve to goose the recovery by embarking on an aggressive new effort to pump money into the economy. But Illinois Tool Works in Glenview shows why more government action might offer limited help. David Speer, no relation to Jason, is chief executive of the company, which has 60,000 employees worldwide in more than 800 business units and $14 billion in sales. He said an additional burst of fiscal stimulus from Washington might help boost economic growth for a period of months. But that is unlikely to affect his decisions about hiring and expansion, which Speer said are based on expectations for sales over years to come, not just the immediate future. As long as U.S. consumers remain deeply strained, he is unlikely to undertake aggressive expansion. More fiscal stimulus “might help make things a little better for a couple of quarters, but I’m not sure it would get at the underlying economic issue,” Speer said. “The core question is: How do you get consumers back on their feet? We need growth in a sustainable way, not another Band-Aid.” Nor is it clear that new Fed action, such as steps to try to lower long-term interest rates and encourage investment, would prompt him to expand. For large companies such as Illinois Tool Works, the price of borrowed money isn’t the problem. The company had $1.3 billion in cash on its balance sheet at the end of June, up from $743 million at the end of 2008. Lower interest rates wouldn’t make much of a difference, either. “I could borrow $2 billion tomorrow for 3 1/2 percent,” said Speer. “But what am I going to do with it?” Speer is coming to terms with a new economic reality. After an extended economic boom, the nation is less than three years into the process of working out the excesses of that period. “It took us a decade to get in the ditch we are in,” Speer said. “There isn’t going to be instant gratification to get us out of it. We’re going to have to get used to a lower-growth economy, and that is going to be a big adjustment for all of us.”

USDA to review of all genetically modified crops. “We hope the government will sit down and look at what coexistence will look like. And past administrations have skirted the issue, believing that somehow, magically, plants won’t cross and these two types of systems can coexist without contamination,” Dillon said.

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The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.68 AbdAustEq 10.11 AbdnChile u20.21 AbdnIndo 12.59 AdeonaPh .82 AdvPhot .59 AdvanSrce .21 Advntrx rs 1.83 AlexcoR g 3.43 AlldDefen 2.86 AlldNevG 22.00 AlmadnM g u1.99 AlphaPro 1.62 AmApparel d.75 AmDGEn n 2.78 AmDefense .26 AmLorain n 2.89 AmO&G 7.00 Anooraq g .87 AntaresP 1.60 AoxingP rs 2.60 ArcadiaRs .47 ArmourRsd 7.04 Augusta g 2.03 Aurizon g u6.32 BMB Munai d.54 Ballanty 8.05 Banro g d1.67 BarcUBS36 39.56 BarcGSOil 21.41

+.02 ... -.06 -.06 +.22 +.54 +.15 +.56 -.01 -.01 +.01 -.02 ... -.00 +.01 -.01 -.07 +.28 -.01 -.42 +.01 +2.51 +.17 +.16 +.02 -.04 -.00 -.66 -.02 +.31 +.01 +.01 +.00 +.02 -.07 -.18 -.01 -.05 +.05 -.02 -.05 -.06 +.04 -.04 -.01 +.03 -.09 -.13 +.13 +.50 +.01 -.03 -.04 -.28 +.10 -.03 -.26 -.46 -.24 -.59

BrcIndiaTR 66.94 BioTime n 5.01 BlkMuIT2 u14.71 BlkMunvst u10.66 BlkS&PQEq 11.79 BootsCoots 2.98 BovieMed 2.40 Brigus grs 1.13 BritATob 67.41 CAMAC n 3.05 CanoPet .81 CapGold n 3.35 CaracoP 5.90 Cardero g 1.04 CardiumTh .45 CastleBr .36 CelSci .49 CFCda g 14.91 CentGold g 48.36 CheniereEn 2.62 CheniereE 17.30 ChiArmM 3.61 ChiGengM 1.23 ChIntLtg n 2.90 ChiMarFd 6.14 ChinaPhH n 2.95 ChinaShen 1.04 ChinaNet 4.48 ClaudeR g 1.13 ClayFront 21.32 CloughGEq 13.29 ClghGlbOp 11.96

+.24 +1.32 -.02 -.24 -.10 +.08 +.04 +.31 ... ... +.01 +.01 -.13 -.37 +.03 -.03 -.62 -2.95 +.20 +.38 -.03 -.07 -.01 -.14 +.26 -.55 -.01 -.03 +.01 +.04 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.14 +.13 -.25 +.78 ... +.10 -.03 -.29 -.05 -.41 +.05 -.02 -.14 -.35 -.19 +.25 -.08 -.19 ... +.09 +.24 +.65 +.04 +.06 +.22 +.38 -.01 +.15 -.03 +.04

CompTch 1.63 Contango 42.91 Continucre 3.40 CornstProg 6.99 CornerstStr 10.85 CrSuisInco 3.58 CrSuiHiY 3.09 Crossh glf .13 Crystallx g .37 CubicEngy .91 Cytomed .60 DejourE g .37 DenisnM g 1.41 DryfMu u9.60 EV CAMu 13.01 EV LtdDur 16.36 EVMuniBd u13.85 eMagin 3.07 EmersnR h 2.50 EndvrInt 1.12 EndvSilv g 3.29 EngyInco 25.09 EntGaming .25 EntreeGold 2.27 EvolPetrol 4.40 ExeterR gs 6.22 Express-1 1.40 FT WindEn 9.83 FiveStar u4.36 FrkStPrp 11.33 FrTmpLtd 12.90 Fronteer g u7.37

+.06 -.09 +.07 -1.29 ... -.08 -.01 +.06 +.11 -.17 ... -.05 -.07 -.06 -.00 -.00 +.01 -.03 +.01 -.01 +.07 ... +.04 -.01 -.03 +.06 +.10 +.22 -.01 +.13 +.01 +.10 +.10 +.32 -.03 +.07 +.19 ... -.02 -.01 -.03 +.03 -.06 +.28 +.00 +.01 +.04 +.04 ... -.01 -.15 +.17 ... -.01 -.20 -.70 -.07 -.10 +.07 +.13 +.21 +.08 +.12 +1.04

FullHseR GSE Sy GabGldNR GascoEngy Gastar grs GenMoly GenesisEn GeoGloblR Geokinetics GerovaFn GlblScape GoldStr g GormanR GrahamCp GranTrra g GrtBasG g GreenHntr GpoSimec HQ SustM HSBC CTI HawkCorp Hemisphrx HooperH HstnAEn Hyperdyn iMergent ImpacM n ImpOil gs IndiaGC Innovaro InovioPhm Intellichk

3.13 3.78 16.16 d.32 d3.23 3.12 20.57 .85 3.85 5.91 2.85 4.60 27.00 14.12 5.90 u2.04 d.57 7.53 d2.79 6.98 33.43 .50 .56 9.53 1.13 3.67 2.90 36.98 d.63 d1.56 .90 1.22

-.05 -.03 ... -.06 -.08 +.06 -.00 -.02 -.11 -.27 +.09 +.20 +.07 +.09 -.04 -.05 -.16 -.11 -.19 -.08 +.06 +.34 -.03 +.20 -.20 -1.30 -.15 +.11 -.08 -.05 -.04 +.19 +.01 -.14 +.02 +.48 -.15 -.31 +.01 +.01 +.67 +2.16 -.01 +.02 -.01 -.01 +.09 +.66 +.01 +.04 +.02 +.10 +.05 +.06 -.39 -.60 +.01 -.17 +.05 -.04 +.01 +.01 +.02 -.11

IntTower g 6.27 -.06 +.09 Inuvo .28 +.01 +.02 InvVKAdv2 u12.85 +.08 +.10 Iteris 1.38 -.02 -.12 KeeganR g 6.05 -.11 +.15 Kemet 3.17 +.07 +.08 KodiakO g 2.71 -.08 -.23 LGL Grp u18.00 -1.06 +5.92 LadThalFn 1.01 -.02 -.07 Lannett 4.19 +.09 -.01 Libbey 11.26 +.14 +1.01 LibertyAcq 10.12 -.03 -.07 LibAcq wt 1.30 ... -.01 LongweiPI 2.02 -.05 +.02 LucasEngy 1.69 +.02 -.01 MAG Slv g 7.31 +.53 +.69 MadCatz g .42 +.01 +.01 MagHRes 4.12 +.13 +.15 Metalico 3.49 +.07 +.21 Metalline .69 -.01 -.08 MetroHlth 3.56 +.11 +.11 MdwGold g .48 -.02 +.04 MincoG g 1.00 -.01 +.04 Minefnd g 9.00 -.07 +.22 MinesMgt 1.61 -.02 -.01 NIVS IntT 2.14 -.01 -.04 NTN Buzz .44 -.01 ... NeoStem 1.82 +.10 +.01 NeuB HYld 13.30 +.02 ... NBIntMu u14.86 -.19 -.07 NBRESec 3.51 ... +.06 Neuralstem 1.84 -.04 -.33

Nevsun g u4.45 NDragon .07 NewEnSys 6.65 NwGold g 5.72 NA Pall g 3.13 NDynMn g 6.76 NthnO&G 14.57 NthgtM g 2.86 NovaGld g 6.79 NCADv3 13.53 NuvDiv2 u15.13 NuvDiv3 15.05 NICADv 15.06 NvInsDv 15.17 NuvInsTF 15.18 NMuHiOp u13.34 NuvREst 9.32 NvTxAdFlt 2.53 Oilsands g .54 OpkoHlth 2.20 OrienPap n 4.99 OrionEngy d2.34 OrsusXel d.15 OverhillF 4.48 PHC Inc 1.31 Pacholder u8.56 PacRim .17 Palatin .21 ParaG&S 1.31 ParkNatl 62.66 PhrmAth 1.40 PionDrill 5.63

Biggest mutual funds +.24 +.45 -.00 -.01 -.33 -.26 +.02 +.16 -.08 -.08 -.02 +.04 -.36 -.49 -.03 -.03 -.03 +.22 +.10 +.07 -.06 -.09 +.03 ... +.02 +.06 -.04 -.03 -.22 -.31 +.03 +.03 +.01 +.19 -.08 -.04 -.01 +.03 -.04 +.03 -.13 +.66 -.05 -.36 ... -.08 +.07 +.23 -.02 +.01 ... -.04 -.03 -.02 -.01 +.01 +.06 -.04 +.24 +1.16 +.06 -.03 -.31 -.50

PlatGpMet PolyMet g ProceraNt ProlorBio Protalix PudaCoal n Quaterra g QuestCap g RMRAsiaP RadientPh RaeSyst RareEle g ReavesUtl RegeneRx RELM Rentech RexahnPh Richmnt g Rubicon g SamsO&G ScolrPh SeabGld g SearchMed Senesco SinoHub SondeR grs SulphCo TanzRy g Taseko Tengsco TianyinPh TimberlnR

1.79 1.50 .50 6.25 7.25 8.34 1.47 1.50 16.69 .47 .76 2.80 20.55 .26 d1.81 d.84 1.19 4.57 4.26 1.16 .45 28.36 2.62 .28 d2.09 2.90 .37 5.30 4.39 .45 2.94 1.03

-.03 -.22 -.04 +.04 -.01 -.00 +.20 +.13 +.09 +.30 +.06 -.93 +.02 +.24 -.03 -.03 +.10 +.28 -.07 -.21 +.01 +.01 -.06 -.07 +.03 -.07 +.01 -.04 +.08 -.11 -.02 -.10 +.03 -.04 -.08 +.20 -.16 +.24 +.07 +.02 +.02 -.03 -.28 +3.06 -.78 -.31 +.00 -.03 -.03 -.34 -.14 -.07 +.02 +.05 -.06 -.13 -.16 +.18 +.01 -.03 -.04 -.05 -.01 +.12

TrnsatlPt n TravelCtrs TriValley Tucows g TwoHrbInv UMH Prop UQM Tech US Geoth US Gold Uluru Univ Insur Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn VangMega VangTotW VantageDrl VirnetX VistaGold WalterInv WFAdvInco WFAdMSec WFAdUtlHi WellsGard WidePoint WT DrfInd WT DrfChn WT Drf Bz WizzardSft Xenonics YM Bio g ZBB Engy

3.04 3.61 d.73 .63 8.69 10.03 d2.46 .76 4.91 .11 4.17 .83 1.17 2.48 36.78 41.37 1.29 6.38 1.95 16.45 9.64 15.53 11.32 2.65 .76 25.34 24.90 27.57 .20 d.24 1.31 .69

+.12 +.06 -.01 +.00 +.12 -.01 +.13 +.01 -.08 +.00 -.06 +.01 +.02 -.02 -.18 -.26 ... +.06 +.04 -.08 -.04 +.16 +.02 -.12 -.03 -.06 ... +.01 +.01 -.01 ... -.03

-.03 +.33 -.05 -.01 +.36 -.03 -.17 +.00 +.25 -.00 -.04 -.00 -.03 +.05 -.27 -.09 +.02 +.18 +.48 +.27 -.16 +.24 -.01 +.28 +.01 +.17 ... +.23 ... -.04 -.07 -.19

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: GwthFdA p American Funds A: CapInBldA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapWGrA p American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk American Funds A: WshMutA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p American Funds A: NewPerA p American Funds A: FundInvA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n American Funds A: BalA p

IB XC LG BL LG GL BL SP SP LC LV IL IL LV IB BL GL LC XC BL

137,039 63,566 61,323 55,373 53,952 51,442 48,436 46,968 46,671 45,460 39,482 36,776 36,688 36,140 33,800 31,232 30,154 29,724 29,636 29,359

+1.8 -2.9 -2.6 0.0 -2.2 -1.5 -0.3 -2.6 -2.6 -2.9 -3.5 -1.5 -1.7 -1.5 +1.8 -0.4 -2.2 -2.0 -2.9 -0.2

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

NAV

+12.3/B +9.2/C +6.1/D +8.0/D +12.2/A +5.3/D +12.3/A +8.4/A +8.6/A +6.3/C +5.9/C +5.3/B +6.6/B +10.2/A +12.0/C +15.4/A +7.8/B +8.7/A +9.3/B +10.0/B

+47.5/A -0.1/C +3.1/B +16.1/B +15.7/A +20.1/A +13.2/B -2.8/A -2.2/A +0.3/B -12.7/D +27.8/A +18.0/A -2.3/B +45.8/A +20.4/A +21.6/A +11.2/A +0.4/C +10.3/C

1,000,000 3,000 250 250 2,500 250 250 3,000 5,000,000 250 2,500 250 2,500 250 1,000,000 1,000 250 250 100,000 250

NL NL 5.75 5.75 NL 5.75 5.75 NL NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 4.25 5.75 5.75 NL 5.75

11.50 26.61 26.10 46.73 57.21 31.61 15.36 98.95 98.32 24.47 90.77 36.35 30.59 23.92 11.50 2.05 24.45 31.54 26.62 16.28

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


D6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

The union of farmland and marriage

A

lmost 40 years after the passage of Senate Bill 100, the measure that put the state’s current land-use planning scheme in place, some ambiguities remain. Among

them is question of what’s an allowed activity on land zoned for exclusive farm use, and it’s been a particularly troublesome one in Deschutes County. Consider the case of Kelly Brown, who was found guilty in Deschutes County Circuit Court earlier this month of illegally renting her Redmond-area property out as a wedding venue, which violates county rules about commercial use of farmland. Last week she was fined $500 for her crime, and her lawyer told The Bulletin that she likely will ask the county commission to amend its code to make some commercial uses legal. If it agrees to take up the matter, it won’t be the first time the commission has considered changing the code in the last few years. One such request was rejected, however, and though commissioners considered revisiting the matter late in 2009, the request that they do so was withdrawn, no doubt to commissioners’ relief. Such requests often force the county to decide between two opposing aims: With farming something of a non-profit pursuit in much of the county, such things as weddings and soccer games can keep some operations in the black. At the same time, farmers have neighbors who may not relish the idea of a band playing on till midnight as a happy couple and friends celebrate a marriage. Now, while county planners have

the matter on their to-do list for the current fiscal year, there are enough questions surrounding any proposed change to make a simple solution almost impossible. State laws and regulations give them little direction, and as a result counties have responded to the vacuum in different ways. Some allow the creation of private parks on farmland, and the parks can be rented out under certain circumstances. Some counties, Deschutes included, have not allowed private parks and continue to prohibit most commercial uses. And so far, no one has sued to find out if the parks and the activities upon them are legal in Oregon. The Association of Oregon Counties recognizes the problem and has created a task force to study it and come up with possible solutions. Deschutes County planners would like to know just what will be proposed, we suspect, before they get too far into their planned rewrite of the portion of the county’s code that deals with commercial use of farmland. That’s a reasonable desire. It hardly makes sense to rewrite the code only to have the effort tossed out shortly thereafter because laws or rules have changed.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Editor’s Note: The following editorial, which does not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today, appeared on Nov. 25, 1984.

Politics on both sides It comes as no surprise that teachers’ groups and school administrators are unhappy with a state Board of Education proposal to introduce statewide testing of all Oregon eighth-graders. A look at what’s at stake makes their fears clear. It also makes clear why the board is so eager to begin testing as soon as possible. Teachers and administrators have argued the board’s interest in instituting tests at this time is politically motivated, and they’re right. The board, as is virtually every similar body in the country, is under pressure to prove it’s responding to last years’ National Commission on Excellence in Education report that

charged American education was wallowing in a sea of mediocrity. Further, as Oregon lessens its reliance on property taxes to finance local education, the state board can expect to play an ever greater role in gaining money from the Legislature for that education. Being able to point to test scores — high ones, of course — would be a valuable weapon in the fight. Just the opposite is true for the local districts. Teachers and administrators do not want to have to explain why their students didn’t do as well as the children in the next community when they seek public support for their programs. They fear, probably correctly, that such comparisons will be made without an understanding of just what test results show. ... The tests will neither give the public the club teachers and administrators are frightened of, nor will they give the state board much of a bargaining chip.

My Nickel’s Worth Re-elect Stiegler As a school district administrator for over 25 years and a member of several boards (including Bend-LaPine School Board), I know that a strong educational system is the foundation of a healthy economy and a vibrant community. Judy Stiegler has worked tirelessly to make quality, lifelong educational opportunities available to the people of Bend and Central Oregon. Stiegler was a member of the Bend-La Pine School Board for four years and became its chairperson. She was then appointed to the State Board of Education and served from 1994 until 2003, chairing it for two years. With her expertise, she represented Oregon as a member of the National Association of State Boards of Education, again providing exceptional leadership as chairperson. Stiegler took that strong background to Salem when we elected her our representative in 2008. She helped stabilize funding for K-12 schools and community colleges. She fought to keep OSU-Cascades from being closed and continues to support expansion of the program to a four-year college while continuing its close relationship with COCC. Stiegler credits her public school education with helping her overcome a childhood of poverty, leading to a law degree and becoming the first woman to practice law in Redmond. She knows how important access to education is for everyone, whether it’s kids getting a solid foundation at Head Start or adults training or preparing for new careers.

Our community is much stronger because of our schools, and it will stay strong if we have Judy Stiegler fighting for us in Salem. Mara Stein Bend

No conspiracy There have been two recent “In My View” articles about students learning history from Howard Zinn’s book “People’s History of the United States.” Zinn described himself as “Something of an anarchist, something of a socialist. Maybe a democratic socialist.” He stated we need to move beyond capitalism. He stated he “didn’t pretend to be objective” and that his book was “to present material which would move readers in certain directions.” He doesn’t pretend to write a balanced history book. Sure sounds like a person and a book I’d want teachers using to teach “history” to our kids…. Bill Bodden, the second recent “In My View” author, is a history revisionist who believes in a huge conspiracy. He takes snippets of information, ignores information that doesn’t agree with his hypothesis, and reconstructs it into his own fantasy, presenting it as though it is truth. Bodden thinks anyone who does not believe his theories is “ill-informed.” His “more plausible theory” regarding the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs is that they were not dropped to save 500,000 American servicemen, as Truman stated, but to send a message to

the Soviet Union. In stating his theory is “more plausible” than the reasons given by Truman, he’s saying that Truman, his Cabinet, Winston Churchill, and others involved in this decision all conspired and lied to the U.S. and the world. If you look at his “facts,” and at the other information Truman was evaluating, it is evident to me that Bodden’s theories are not realistically supported. Carolyn Hansen Bend

State self-dealing The process described by Dan Re (“Conflicts of interest keep employee costs high,” Aug 14) should make all Oregonians livid. This process ranks right up there with the officials in Bell, Calif., who paid the mayor and other positions up to $750,000 annual salary and $100,000 to city councilors to attend a few meetings a year. Possibly the Oregon situation is even worse because the Bell situation is correctable and apparently has been corrected. Over time the case in Oregon may cost taxpayers much, much more. Even worse, no politician in Oregon seems to want to touch this issue, especially governors and gubernatorial candidates. This self dealing process is clearly a case of white-collar crime, and it seems to go unpunished. Dan Re seems to be standing alone in this swamp. Dean Finley Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Oregon State Treasury committed to transparency, performance By Ted Wheeler Bulletin guest columnist

T

he Oregon State Treasury is responsible for guiding Oregon’s public investments, and our performance beat the majority of our peers and the markets last year — just as the Treasury has done for the past decade. These high returns benefit everyone who relies on Oregon’s portfolio, whether they are taxpayers, Bend firefighters, schoolchildren, or workers who are injured. Ultimately, the success of Oregon’s investments helps all of us. Naturally, when you have a successful streak, competitors want to know how you did it — and they would love to borrow your playbook. Conventional wisdom says you shouldn’t share any information that could impair your competitive advantage. In Oregon, we believe more transparency is better than less. When reporters for national business publications want to know what’s happening in the investment arena, they

often call the Oregon State Treasury. When private investment firms want data about fund performance, they request our data. Why? Because the Oregon State Treasury, while being known for shrewd investments and solid returns, is also renowned for our commitment to transparency, and for how readily we make information available. In many other states, officials release data about the performance of their underlying investments once a year — if at all. In another Western state, the most recent data you can get about its private equity investments is from September … of 2009. In Oregon, we update and disclose the performance of our investments every month, and we post quarterly reports that detail all of our underlying funds. All of the Oregon Investment Council meetings are open, all of the recommendations about which investments to buy are discussed publicly and posted online, and we even ship audio recordings

IN MY VIEW of meetings to those who request them. All the fees we pay are reported to the public. A trade magazine, Pensions & Investments, even did a story recently about the volume of data the Oregon Treasury offers. I believe transparency is critical to a healthy democracy. I want you to know how we invest in the public interest, where that money is put to work, and how our investments benefit you. I also am committed to doing even more. A good recent example: I recently revamped the Treasury travel rules and imposed new accountability measures. You can go online to both read the new rules and get a better understanding of why travel is vital to protect Oregon’s billions in assets. At the same time, the Treasury must be pragmatic and nimble. We make volumes of information available, but shar-

ing our entire playbook with our competitors would hurt us — and hurt you. The Treasury is the only state agency to directly compete in the private sector. And the competition is intense: We are vying for the best investments against private foundations, other states and even “sovereign wealth funds” from other nations. Oregon’s most profitable investments over the past 30 years are in a class known as “private equity,” and these have returned an astounding average of 16 percent a year. Some provisions of these investment contracts are confidential, and the highly competitive firms who manage these investments will not do business with Oregon if we disclose all of their proprietary information. We share all of the information we can without jeopardizing the partnership: how much we invest, the cost of the fees, how the investments perform, and even where firms hold their annual meetings. Losing access to profitable opportunities would be a disaster for taxpayers,

schoolchildren and public workers. Remember, the success of our investments eases the financial burden for all Oregonians. We do not want to find ourselves facing the same plight as other states, whose portfolios were not as diversified when the market crashed — and who regretted their narrow focus. It’s a balancing act, but I am confident that Oregonians support our efforts to be a national leader in transparency while also protecting business relationships that allow us to prosper. In short, we work hard to be responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars. We will continue to make as much information public as possible, and my office is in the process of revamping our website to make our data both easier to find and easier to understand. Please visit our website, www.ost. state.or.us/About/Investment, to view information about Oregon’s investments. Ted Wheeler is the Oregon state treasurer.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 D7

O Small college football star Bailey dies at 43 Guitarist By Sarah Portlock The Associated Press

HOUSTON — Johnny Bailey, a record-breaking running back in the small college ranks and former NFL Pro Bowl kick returner, has died from pancreatic cancer. He was 43. Texas A&M-Kingsville announced his death Friday. Bailey played for the Division II school from 1986-89, when it was known as Texas A&I University, and became the second college player to run for more than 6,000 yards in a career. “He was quite a top guy,” said Fred Nuesch, who was the Texas A&I

sports information director during Bailey’s college career. “He was a nice young man and he represented us well whenever he went to different places (to accept his awards).”

3-time player of the year Bailey rushed for 6,320 yards. At the time, only he and Tony Dorsett at the University of Pittsburgh had run for more than 6,000 yards in a career. He was a three-time NCAA Division II player of the year and runner-up for the award as a freshman, when he ran for 2,011 yards. That made

him at the time only the third college running back to top 2,000 yards in a season. He rushed for more than 200 yards in his first four college games and had at least 100 yards in his first 11. He gained 7,803 all-purpose yards, an NCAA career record. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

Chicago Bears Bailey played 81 games and scored nine touchdowns over six seasons in the NFL after he was drafted by the

Chicago Bears in the ninth round in 1990. He holds the team’s record for the longest punt return when as a rookie he took one back 95 yards for a touchdown. Bailey also played two seasons in Phoenix and two with the Rams, one in Los Angeles and the next when the franchise moved to St. Louis. He made the Pro Bowl in 1992 as a return specialist when he averaged 13.2 yards returning punts for the Cardinals. Funeral arrangements were pending for Bailey, who also starred at Houston Yates High School.

who helped boost Linda Ronstadt’s career dies By Randy Lewis Los Angeles Times

Revered jurist, law professor dies at 99

Kenny Edwards, a founding member of the Stone Poneys country-rock band that launched Linda Ronstadt’s career and a valued supporting guitarist and singer for Stevie Nicks, Don Henley and numerous others, died Wednesday after battling cancer and a blood disorder in recent years. He was 64. Edwards had collapsed earlier this month in Denver while on tour with singer-songwriter Karla Bonoff, a longtime musical partner. He was diagnosed with the blood disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or TTP, and also had been undergoing chemotherapy for prostate cancer. He was hospitalized in Denver, then air-lifted to a hospital near his home in Santa Barbara, where he died.

DAN ROSTENKOWSKI, 1928-2010

By Bryan Marquard The Boston Globe

Few justices were as revered for their writing and thinking as Benjamin Kaplan, yet each ruling he penned for the Supreme Judicial Court or the state Appeals Court renewed his sense that this time he might not be up to the challenge. “I don’t come to decisions easily,” he told the Globe in 1981, restless physically and intellectually as he sat in a swivel chair in his book-lined study. “I really have been in pain most of the time.” That discomfort seemed reserved only for him, though. For others, perusing his work was a sublime pleasure. Justice Kaplan, whom hundreds of Harvard Law School students considered their most influential teacher, died of pneumonia Wednesday in his Cambridge home. He was 99 and kept writing opinions until a few years ago for the Massachusetts Appeals Court, where he was recalled as a justice after reaching the SJC’s mandatory retirement age of 70.

‘A beacon’ for Ronstadt

Chicago Tribune file photo

Taking a break from working on a speech in 1985, Dan Rostenkowski laughs while on the phone. The Chicago Democrat who became the leading architect of congressional tax policy in the Reagan era but later went to federal prison for corruption, died Wednesday, Aug. 11, a family friend said. He was 82.

Hispanic rights advocate Obledo dies at 78 By Douglas Martin

‘Greatest teacher’ “He was the greatest teacher I ever had,” said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the US Supreme Court, who took Justice Kaplan’s first-year civil procedure class at Harvard Law. “He knew his subject matter inside and out. He wasn’t telling us things; he had us thinking all the time. I came to love civil procedure because of Ben Kaplan.” Justice Kaplan could be formidable in the classroom or courtroom and was imposing from the beginning of a legal career that lasted more than 70 years. An eminent scholar of copyright law, he co-wrote the first casebook on the topic, and his 1967 book “An Unhurried View of Copyright” is considered a classic.

“He was always a beacon to me,” Ronstadt said Thursday. “He introduced me to so much stuff, and his opinion always counted a lot to me.” She credited Edwards with creating the musical framework for her only No. 1 single, “You’re No Good,” in 1974. Shortly after the Stone Poneys disbanded after their 1967 breakthrough hit “Different Drum,” which established Ronstadt as a rising star from the nascent Southern California country-rock scene, Edwards teamed with singer-songwriter Wendy Waldman, Karla Bonoff and Andrew Gold to form the folk-rock band Bryndle. Bonoff issued a statement Thursday thanking Edwards “for being my teacher, my musical partner and my best friend for the last 43 years.”

New York Times News Service

Mario G. Obledo, who slept on the floor with 12 siblings as the child of illegal immigrants and went on to become the founder and leader of major Hispanic-American organizations, a top state official in California and an acid critic of stereotypical treatment of Mexicans, died Wednesday in Sacramento. He was 78. The cause was a heart attack, his wife, Keda Alcala-Obledo, said. Obledo’s overarching accomplishment was to help usher Hispanics toward the center of the American political discussion, declaring they would no longer “take a back seat to anyone.” Known just as Mario, in the manner of his ally Jesse Jackson, he helped forge alliances with other minorities and build political power by registering hundreds of

thousands of Hispanics to vote. During the administration of Gov. Jerry Brown, he became the first Hispanic chief of a California state agency: health and welfare, the largest in both budget and workers. In 1982, he was the first Hispanic citizen to mount a serious run for governor of California.

Medal of Freedom When former President Bill Clinton presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998, the citation said Obledo had “created a powerful chorus for justice and equality.” He was called the “Godfather of the Latino Movement” in the United States. His approach was as unsubtle as it was impassioned. He created a national commotion in the 1990s by protesting the stereotypical

Mexican accent of the Chihuahua in Taco Bell commercials. When someone put up a sign at the California border saying, “Illegal Immigration State,” he threatened to burn it down. He ignited an explosive response in 1998 when he said in a radio interview that Hispanics were on the way to taking over all of California’s political institutions. He suggested that people who did not like it go back to Europe. In the face of criticism that Hispanics have lagged behind blacks in creating political and civil rights institutions, he created and led many. These included the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Hispanic National Bar Association, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and the National Coalition of Hispanic Organizations.

Bernard Knox, one of world’s foremost scholars of classical literature, dies The Washington Post After two years of fighting in Europe during World War II, a swashbuckling U.S. Army captain named Bernard Knox took momentary refuge in a bombed-out farmhouse in Italy. There, peeking from beneath the rubble, was a gilt-edged volume by the ancient Roman poet Virgil. Capt. Knox had studied Latin in college and remembered enough to translate a bit: “Here right and wrong are reversed,” began a passage about war that served as an epiphany for the young soldier. After the war, Bernard Knox became one of the world’s foremost scholars of classical literature and served as the founding director of the Harvard University-affiliated Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington. Knox died July 22 at his home in Bethesda, Md., of a heart ailment. He was 95. A British-born expert in the works of Sophocles, he was known for his ability to brush the cobwebs off ancient texts and illuminate their enduring relevance in the modern world.

Andrew Roth, 91, U.S. writer on British political foibles dies

Zoning

New York Times News Service

Continued from D1 Neighbors who oppose the Cyruses’ plans to convert their Aspen Lakes subdivision and golf course into a resort cried foul, but the commission ultimately adopted the ordinances with the exemption. Paul Dewey, an attorney for Central Oregon LandWatch, said one reason the organization is appealing the county’s decision is that he says the amendment to help the Cyruses does not comply with state law. “From a legal perspective, their provision to allow existing cluster subdivisions to be eligible for destination resorts, we believe, is not consistent with state law, which requires that 50 units of overnight housing be built before any private lot sales,” Dewey said. Dewey added that LandWatch will likely argue additional legal points. Dewey said he is also concerned the ordinances will allow for more land to become eligible for resort development, because they establish processes to both remove and add land to the resort zone map. The county created a process to remove land that could not be developed anyway, such as properties under the required minimum 160 acres, and open more land to development “so the net result is more developable land for destination resorts than currently exists,” Dewey said. “We don’t believe that’s appropriate, given the incredible surplus there is already in lots.” Deschutes County Principal Planner Peter Gutowsky said several people have already inquired with the county about adding their land to the destination resort zone map. Gutowsky will ask the County Commission at a Sept. 1 meeting whether they want to move ahead with processes to remove and add land to the resort zone, now that the ordinances have been appealed.

LONDON — Andrew Roth, a New York-born journalist with left-wing ideals who fled the McCarthy-era America of 1950 for a new life as a meticulous and often abrasive chronicler of the foibles, business links and

Geese Continued from D1 Parks staff and representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services Division are in the parks several days each week, Stell said, using dogs to chase geese off the grass. The park district also plans to resume egg oiling next spring, the practice of coating goose eggs with vegetable oil to suffocate the goslings inside. He said parks’ staff and volunteers oiled approximately 70 eggs this spring, and should be able to get more next year — all of the nesting sites where eggs were found have been recorded. “They are pretty good at hiding when they want to. They’ll pick some interesting places you can’t really get to,” Stell said. “They’ll have nests on top of office buildings and apartment

private lives of British politicians, died in London on Aug. 12. He was 91. The cause was prostate cancer, his family said. For nearly 60 years, Roth was one of the most controversial figures in the Britain’s equivalent of inside-the-

Beltway Washington. With a penchant for flamboyant ties and infectious laughter, he became a British citizen in 1966 and told friends that in his later years he had rejected a State Department offer to renew his U.S. passport.

houses, up on the cliffs along the river, that’s a popular spot. ... You can’t remember everywhere, so we mapped that all out, and next year we’ll know exactly where to go.” Jeff Amaral, a biologist with USDA Wildlife Services who’s been working with the city, said recent surveys of the goose population show the smallest number of birds recorded in recent years. Keeping the population down will require continued hazing and egg oiling, he said, though the job is likely to get easier in the coming years. Creating a longer-term plan for hazing and egg oiling, or setting a target date for reaching a certain population is all but impossible, Amaral said. “Geese are wild animals, and any time you’re dealing with wildlife, it’s very dynamic. Populations fluctuate for multiple reasons, some humaninfluenced and some not,” he said. “Basically the best thing to do is just

constantly monitor those numbers and reassess the situation.” Several geese captured in Bend parks in recent years have been banded, Amaral said, allowing the USDA to determine if the birds leave the park. One banded goose was reported in southern Washington, he said, and a few near Sisters, but most have ventured no further than the edge of Bend. Stell said park district staff haven’t figured out a way to measure progress toward the goal of cleaner parks, but should know when they’ve succeeded. “I think we’ll know we’ve won at the point we don’t have to clean up Drake Park every week,” Stell said. “If it will stay clean for a month or so, we’ve probably reached our objective.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-3830387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

D8 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, AUGUST 21 Today: Increasing afternoon cloud cover, cooler, afternoon winds.

HIGH Ben Burkel

79

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

80s Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

81/51

80/50

84/50

59/43

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

83/47

75/37

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

77/42

76/45

Camp Sherman 74/37 Redmond Prineville 79/40 Cascadia 75/41 78/41 Sisters 77/39 Bend Post 79/40

Oakridge Elk Lake 76/39

77/38

75/35

74/37

Fort Rock

Vancouver 61/52

Seattle

City

Missoula 87/51

Helena Bend

90/57

Boise

79/40

91/51

Idaho Falls Elko

89/57

95/50

94/50

78/39

Silver Lake

76/34

70s

Redding Christmas Valley

Chemult

69/53

Reno

76/36

88/54

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 62/53 Clear to partly cloudy skies tonight.

Crater Lake 61/33

Salt Lake City

90s

98/70

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Sunny and warm.

HIGH

LOW

Last

Aug. 24 Sept. 1

New

First

Sept. 8

Sept. 14

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 65/48/0.00 . . . . . . 65/52/c. . . . . . 63/51/sh Baker City . . . . . . 88/40/0.00 . . . . . . 84/43/s. . . . . . 69/39/pc Brookings . . . . . . 60/50/0.00 . . . . . 60/48/pc. . . . . . 59/50/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 87/44/0.00 . . . . . . 83/41/s. . . . . . 70/36/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 79/47/0.00 . . . . . 76/48/pc. . . . . . 75/45/pc Klamath Falls . . . 86/45/0.00 . . . . . . 76/40/s. . . . . . 70/40/pc Lakeview. . . . . . .NA/41/0.00 . . . . . . 79/44/s. . . . . . . 72/42/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 86/37/0.00 . . . . . 78/36/pc. . . . . . 68/31/pc Medford . . . . . . . 92/54/0.00 . . . . . . 81/53/s. . . . . . 79/53/pc Newport . . . . . . . 63/43/0.00 . . . . . . 63/51/c. . . . . . 63/49/pc North Bend . . . . . 63/48/0.00 . . . . . . 63/50/c. . . . . . 62/49/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 93/56/0.00 . . . . . . 92/56/s. . . . . . 78/51/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 85/47/0.00 . . . . . . 82/51/s. . . . . . 78/49/pc Portland . . . . . . . 75/51/0.00 . . . . . 73/56/pc. . . . . . . 70/54/c Prineville . . . . . . . 82/44/0.00 . . . . . 75/41/pc. . . . . . 74/40/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 86/39/0.00 . . . . . . 78/42/s. . . . . . 73/36/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 83/55/0.00 . . . . . 75/52/pc. . . . . . 75/50/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 78/48/0.00 . . . . . 75/51/pc. . . . . . . 73/49/c Sisters . . . . . . . . . 84/38/0.00 . . . . . 77/39/pc. . . . . . 71/34/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 86/51/0.00 . . . . . . 76/54/s. . . . . . 74/50/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

6

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82/48 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 2009 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 in 1947 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.40” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.33” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.18” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.78 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.37 in 1979 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters..................................Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97........Ext. La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras............Ext. Prineville ............................Ext.

LOW

LOW

89 44

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Sunny and warm.

HIGH

88 43

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

WEDNESDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:10 a.m. . . . . . .8:17 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:23 a.m. . . . . . .9:27 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:15 a.m. . . . . . .9:36 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:09 p.m. . . . . . .9:12 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .9:10 a.m. . . . . . .9:21 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:00 p.m. . . . . . .9:02 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 79/58

60s

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:16 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:00 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:17 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:58 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:28 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:17 a.m.

LOW

80 39

BEND ALMANAC

78/38

70/30

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 93° Ontario • 31° Meacham

TUESDAY Sunny, significantly warmer.

NORTHWEST

Eugene Mostly sunny skies today. 76/48 Clear to partly cloudy Grants Pass skies tonight. 79/49 Eastern

Hampton

Partly cloudy, unseasonably cool, afternoon LOW breezes.

Coastal areas will see lingering clouds, with a mix of sun and clouds over the rest of the west.

73/56

Burns

MONDAY

73 34

80s

76/36

Crescent

HIGH

40

72/37

70s

78/36

60s Crescent Lake

LOW

Portland

Brothers

77/37

La Pine

Tonight: Partly cloudy, cool.

Paulina

75/38

Sunriver

67/28

Mostly cloudy at the coast; otherwise, partly cloudy skies today. Central

81/46

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,713 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,959 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,844 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 30,522 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118,418 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,750 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,070 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67.9 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 61/52

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 79/58

S

Saskatoon 74/49

Seattle 69/53 Portland 73/56

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Bismarck 93/65

Billings 99/61

Boise 91/51

Needles, Calif. Stanley, Idaho

Cheyenne 89/58

• 5.05” Bemidji, Minn.

Las Vegas 105/85

Salt Lake City 98/70

Phoenix 106/86

S

S

Dallas 102/81 Houston 98/81

La Paz 93/71 Juneau 60/47

Mazatlan 91/82

Portland 77/57

Halifax 74/53

Boston 78/63 New York 85/69 83/71 Philadelphia Columbus 88/70 92/69 Washington, D. C. 91/72 Louisville 90/72 Charlotte 90/72 Nashville 94/74

Detroit 86/70

St. Louis 88/70

Oklahoma City 101/73

Chihuahua 91/63

S S

To ronto 80/66

Green Bay 80/61

Des Moines 89/67 Chicago 87/70

Kansas City 90/74

Tijuana 79/64

Anchorage 61/48

S

Quebec 74/53

St. Paul 87/66

Omaha 91/67

Denver 95/63 Albuquerque 94/69

Los Angeles 76/63 Honolulu 89/74

S

Winnipeg 82/56

Rapid City 99/68

San Francisco 62/53

S

Thunder Bay 76/45

• 113° • 29°

S

Little Rock 97/76 Birmingham 94/75 New Orleans 91/78

Buffalo

Atlanta 89/75

Orlando 93/76 Miami 92/78

Monterrey 97/75

FRONTS

OREGON BATTLING SCATTERED WILDFIRES

Mark B. Gibson / The Dalles Chronicle

Jason Bumgardner of Pine Grove tries to put out a fire along Highway 216 as he helps fight the Juniper Flats fire near Pine Hollow on Thursday. Fire crews in central Oregon were spread out Friday across five wildfires set off by lightning earlier this week. The fires in the White Lightning Complex were burning mostly across high desert and rangeland with no serious injuries or damage to homes reported. The largest blaze in the complex — the John-

son Lake fire, about two miles south of Simnasho — had burned about 2,500 acres of rangeland and threatened numerous homes. However, no losses were reported by Friday afternoon. In southern Oregon, the Oak Flat fire had burned more than 1,700 acres, or nearly three square miles, in rugged mountains west of Grants Pass. The blaze was reported 18 percent contained Friday with more than 1,100 firefighters deployed. It started a week ago. Investigators believe it was human-caused.

2009 timber harvest verged on historic low By Steven Dubois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Continued weakness in housing construction sent the Oregon timber harvest to near-historic lows last year, the state Department of Forestry said Friday. The 2009 harvest was 2.748 billion board feet, a 20 percent decline from a weak 2008 and the lowest figure since a Great Depression-era harvest of 2.622 billion board feet. Timber picked up some earlier this year, after a temporary bounce in log prices, but Forestry Department economist Gary Lettman was cautious about predicting a major recovery. “The earliest would be 2011, but that’s optimistic,” he said. Oregon’s largest timber har-

vest was 9.743 billion board feet in 1972. The state maintained levels above 8 billion until the late 1980s, when environmental issues such as the spotted owl prompted sharp cutbacks in logging on federal lands.

Housing bubble In the past decade, the harvest slumped during the 2001 recession, rebounded during the housing boom, then plunged when the real estate bubble burst. “We’re not going to see major improvements until there’s a turnaround in housing, nonresidential construction, remodeling markets,” Lettman said. “And for housing, forecasters keep pushing that recovery into the future.” Most of last year’s decline was

in Western Oregon, where the vast majority of the state’s timber is harvested. State figures show a drop from 3.079 billion board feet in 2008 to 2.403 billion board feet in 2009. Eastern Oregon, which saw a 45 percent drop between 2004 and ’08, had a 5 percent decline in 2009. Douglas County, in the southwestern part of the state, replaced neighboring Lane County as the state’s top producer in timber volume. Yamhill County, in the wine country southwest of Portland, was the only Western Oregon county to have a stronger 2009 than 2008. Klamath County harvested the most timber in eastern Oregon, and had a 14 percent increase from 2008 to 2009.

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .99/78/0.00 . .100/76/s . 100/76/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . 89/68/pc . . . .83/64/t Albany. . . . . . . . .78/64/0.04 . 80/63/pc . . 75/62/sh Albuquerque. . . .92/67/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . 93/69/pc Anchorage . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .61/48/c . . . .63/49/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/76/0.00 . . .89/75/t . . . .89/75/t Atlantic City . . . .92/69/0.03 . . .83/71/s . . 84/69/pc Austin . . . . . . . .100/78/0.00 100/75/pc . 102/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . . .89/71/s . . 86/71/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . . .99/61/s . . . .96/57/t Birmingham . . . .93/77/0.23 . . .94/75/t . . . .92/73/t Bismarck . . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . . .93/65/s . . . 99/65/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .95/60/0.00 . . .91/51/s . . 74/44/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .86/69/0.00 . . .78/63/s . . 77/62/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .87/68/0.00 . . .79/66/s . . 76/69/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .77/59/0.02 . 85/69/pc . . 78/64/sh Burlington, VT. . .71/58/0.00 . 77/63/pc . . 75/65/sh Caribou, ME . . . .72/55/0.00 . 74/50/pc . . . 73/53/c Charleston, SC . .93/78/0.72 . 89/77/pc . . . .89/77/t Charlotte. . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . . .87/70/t Chattanooga. . . .94/72/0.00 . . .89/73/t . . . .91/72/t Cheyenne . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .89/58/s . . . 88/59/s Chicago. . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . . 82/70/s Cincinnati . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . . .91/71/c . . . 88/69/s Cleveland . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . . .89/70/c . . . 83/66/s Colorado Springs 86/60/0.00 . . .89/57/s . . 92/57/pc Columbia, MO . .92/71/0.88 . 89/70/pc . . . 91/70/s Columbia, SC . . .91/78/0.09 . . .91/73/t . . . .90/73/t Columbus, GA. . .93/77/0.07 . . .91/76/t . . . .91/77/t Columbus, OH. . .89/67/0.00 . . .92/69/c . . . .86/67/t Concord, NH . . . .79/61/0.00 . 81/55/pc . . . 78/60/c Corpus Christi. . .96/79/0.00 . 95/78/pc . . 96/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth 102/81/0.00 102/81/pc . 103/80/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .91/69/c . . 85/67/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .88/58/0.00 . . .95/63/s . . . 98/64/s Des Moines. . . . .80/71/0.31 . . .89/67/s . . . 88/66/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . . .86/70/t . . . 84/67/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.84 . 81/59/pc . . . 79/61/s El Paso. . . . . . . .101/77/0.00 100/75/pc . 100/74/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .65/46/0.00 . 67/43/pc . . . 69/44/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . 92/66/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . 81/55/pc . . . .78/56/t

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .91/66/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . 83/62/pc Green Bay. . . . . .85/63/2.92 . 80/61/pc . . . 82/62/s Greensboro. . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .91/73/s . . . .86/70/t Harrisburg. . . . . .88/65/0.00 . . .87/69/s . . . .83/68/t Hartford, CT . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .83/62/s . . 82/65/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .87/51/0.00 . 90/57/pc . . 78/49/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . . .89/74/s . . . 89/74/s Houston . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . 98/81/pc . 100/81/pc Huntsville . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .94/75/t . . . .93/73/t Indianapolis . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .90/69/t . . . 89/69/s Jackson, MS . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .93/76/t . . . .96/76/t Madison, WI . . . .89/70/0.31 . 83/64/pc . . . 84/64/s Jacksonville. . . . .97/77/0.19 . . .91/75/t . . . .91/75/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .60/52/0.00 . .60/47/sh . . . 58/46/c Kansas City. . . . .96/70/1.00 . 90/74/pc . . . 90/71/s Lansing . . . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . 82/61/pc Las Vegas . . . . .107/83/0.00 . .105/85/s . 104/85/pc Lexington . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . 87/68/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .89/72/0.09 . . .92/67/s . . . 92/69/s Little Rock. . . . .100/77/0.00 . 97/76/pc . . 99/75/pc Los Angeles. . . . .73/62/0.00 . . .76/63/s . . . 78/63/s Louisville . . . . . . .94/71/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 88/71/pc Memphis. . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . 97/79/pc . . 99/78/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .92/78/0.49 . . .92/78/t . . . .91/78/t Milwaukee . . . . .91/71/0.02 . 83/67/pc . . . 82/68/s Minneapolis . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 89/69/s Nashville . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 93/73/pc New Orleans. . . .92/79/0.65 . 91/78/pc . . . .94/78/t New York . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .83/71/s . . 81/69/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . .82/70/s . . . 81/69/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . .90/71/s . . 87/73/pc Oklahoma City .101/78/0.00 . .101/73/s . . . 98/72/s Omaha . . . . . . . .87/72/0.18 . . .91/67/s . . . 90/70/s Orlando. . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . . .93/76/t . . . .93/76/t Palm Springs. . .109/80/0.00 . .109/84/s . 108/83/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.30 . . .87/67/t . . . 87/65/s Philadelphia . . . .93/71/0.00 . . .88/70/s . . 86/71/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .110/86/0.00 106/86/pc . 106/86/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . 90/69/pc . . . .83/64/t Portland, ME. . . .80/60/0.00 . 77/57/pc . . . 74/59/c Providence . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .82/62/s . . 79/64/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .93/72/s . . 88/71/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .93/55/0.00 . . .99/68/s . . 101/64/s Savannah . . . . . .97/77/0.37 . . .91/76/t . . . .90/76/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .92/56/0.00 . . .88/54/s . . . 85/51/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . 69/53/pc . . 66/53/sh Richmond . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . . .92/70/s . . 89/70/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .86/70/0.15 . . .91/65/s . . . 91/69/s Rochester, NY . . .72/61/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 78/63/sh Spokane . . . . . . .79/51/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . 72/48/pc Sacramento. . . . .90/55/0.00 . . .85/54/s . . . 87/59/s Springfield, MO. .96/76/0.00 . . .94/69/t . . . 94/70/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .92/73/0.04 . . .88/70/t . . . 92/70/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .91/80/t Salt Lake City . . .93/61/0.00 . . .98/70/s . . 92/62/pc Tucson. . . . . . . .105/80/0.00 . 99/77/pc . . 99/77/pc San Antonio . . .100/79/0.00 . 98/80/pc . 100/79/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . .101/81/0.00 . . .99/75/s . . . 96/73/s San Diego . . . . . .76/66/0.00 . . .74/67/s . . . 75/67/s Washington, DC .92/71/0.00 . . .91/72/s . . 86/71/pc San Francisco . . .62/53/0.00 . 62/53/pc . . . 63/55/s Wichita . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . . .96/72/s . . . 97/73/s San Jose . . . . . . .78/58/0.00 . . .72/56/s . . . 78/59/s Yakima . . . . . . . .85/43/0.00 . . .79/48/s . . 76/48/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .92/58/0.00 . 90/56/pc . . 90/59/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .109/84/0.00 . .104/85/s . 105/84/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .81/61/0.00 . 77/59/pc . . 71/60/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . 90/69/pc . . 89/69/pc Auckland. . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .59/46/sh . . 58/46/sh Baghdad . . . . . .115/81/0.00 . .114/87/s . . 113/86/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.85 . . .88/77/t . . . .87/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .82/68/t . . 74/67/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . . .96/82/s . . . 93/81/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . . .75/63/t Bogota . . . . . . . .64/48/0.06 . .66/51/sh . . 67/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 79/57/pc . . . 83/60/s Buenos Aires. . . .68/37/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . 72/57/sh Cabo San Lucas .90/77/2.05 . 89/76/pc . . 93/77/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . .100/79/0.00 . .104/80/s . . 103/79/s Calgary . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .79/58/sh . . 64/49/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 91/75/pc . . . .89/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.14 . .65/57/sh . . 65/53/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 63/51/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .79/64/1.10 . . .83/63/s . . . 88/67/s Harare . . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .76/47/s . . . 79/49/s Hong Kong . . . . .91/79/0.07 . . .87/77/t . . . .90/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .82/65/s . . . 79/61/s Jerusalem . . . . .101/76/0.00 . .104/77/s . . 100/74/s Johannesburg . . .63/41/0.00 . . .73/47/s . . . 79/50/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . . .64/57/s . . . 64/56/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . . .89/67/s . . . 83/64/s London . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .73/62/sh . . 71/59/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . .93/69/s . . . 98/71/s Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .90/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/88/0.00 . .111/88/s . . 112/87/s Mexico City. . . . .75/57/0.03 . . .75/56/t . . . .76/56/t Montreal. . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . 75/56/pc . . 73/60/sh Moscow . . . . . . .63/48/0.19 . 66/43/pc . . 68/52/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . .76/56/sh . . 79/58/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .99/79/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .93/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .89/80/0.40 . . .89/79/t . . . .90/81/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .99/81/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .90/80/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .72/56/sh . . 71/54/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .72/50/0.12 . 76/57/pc . . 74/60/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . 83/62/pc . . 80/64/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .84/63/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . . 80/65/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . 87/68/pc . . . 88/69/s Santiago . . . . . . .75/37/0.00 . . .71/42/s . . 67/39/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .80/57/s . . . 82/58/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .82/79/0.00 . . .83/71/c . . 79/70/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . . .89/76/t Shanghai. . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . 95/79/pc . . 96/79/pc Singapore . . . . . .82/72/2.49 . 91/76/pc . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .71/59/sh . . 69/56/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .62/44/s . . . 64/46/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .95/81/t . . . .95/82/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .96/80/s . . . 95/78/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . 89/78/pc . . 91/79/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .73/57/0.11 . .80/66/sh . . . .79/63/t Vancouver. . . . . .68/52/0.00 . 61/52/pc . . 68/55/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 82/60/pc . . . 84/61/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .74/56/c . . . .80/62/t


E SATURDAY, AUGUST 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Only two townhomes remain! On the Deschutes River in an unmatched, private setting, Rocky Point Townhomes feature nearby parks, trails and an easy walk to downtown. The two 2,251 and 2,929 sq. ft., 3 bedroom townhomes feature beautiful interiors, fabulous outdoor living and breathtaking river views. Primary or secondary residence. Open Saturday and Sunday. 12 - 4 pm. From Hwy. 97, west on Revere, right on Harriman. More at www.rockypointbendoregon.com or call Bill Duffey, Principal Broker (541) 419-8546.

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Going

Underground with a fan. While air-source heat pumps work well even at surprisingly low outdoor temperatures, ground-source pumps that use a basically similar process work even more efficiently. There’s one simple reason for this: they have a lot less work to do. “The advantage is that the ground-source heat pump only has to make up the difference between the desired indoor temperature and the temperature that’s five feet beneath the earth,” said Cindi O’Neil, vice president of SolAire Homebuilders, and a geothermal enthusiast. “When you start with air that’s 52 or 55 degrees, you don’t have to go far to reach a comfortable, year-round

Geothermal energy finds a home in Central Oregon by Hilda Beltran Wagner, for The Bulletin Advertising Department What exactly is geothermal energy, and what does it have to do with keeping cozy in January and cool in July? Even if you’re not an expert, chances are good that you have had first-hand experience with geothermal energy — maybe in some remote hot spring, or maybe in an underground cave where the air feels refreshingly cool in summer and comfortably warm in the winter. This is the basic concept behind innovative geothermal technologies, which aim to maximize the stable, continuous earth-generated heat as an efficient, renewable and relatively benign energy source. On a large scale — think city, state, nation — a recent Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) study concluded that enhanced geothermal energy systems could supply 10 percent of our electrical needs by 2050 at a relatively low cost and with a

small footprint. Oregon, with its volcanic advantage, is currently ranked third in the nation for geothermal energy projects currently under development. On the smaller, homier scale — now think of a Snuggie-free living room — state-of-the-art geothermal heating systems can provide residential heating and cooling needs for a fraction of the operating costs of conventional heat pump systems. Often called “ground-source heating” by those in the trades, residential geothermal heating systems apply the mechanics of the more familiar air-source heat pumps to the task of extracting hot (or cool) air from the ground. To get an idea of how this happens, consider the workings of a standard heat pump, which takes outdoor air and transfers it inside, processing it through an anti-freeze-like liquid that extracts the heat from it, and then circulates it through a home’s ductwork

during the Tour. Both awards were largely due to the incorporation of a geothermal system into the home. For O’Neil and for SolAire, the first venture into geothermal heating systems came at the request of homeowners David and Beverly Maul. The project resulted in a showcase, LEED-certified home that was featured on the 2009 Tour of Homes and the 2009 Green and Solar Home Tour. “The Mauls really wanted to show that a gorgeous home could also be extremely energy efficient,” said O’Neil. The Maul’s system pulls its heat through five 200foot wells that go down through the backyard and pumps an anti-freeze-like liquid into and out of the home in a continuous loop. The site’s rocky soil — notwithstanding a single snafu involving a lava tunnel — provided a fairly straightforward drilling environment. Additionally, the rocky base now contributes to the overall system, regulating and moderating the temperature in the home. The final result is a system that is virtually invisible, with results that are evident in the utility bill. This past June, the 4,316-square-foot Maul

“When you start with air that’s 52 or 55 degrees, you don’t have to go far to reach a comfortable, year-round indoor temperature of around 75 [degrees].” indoor temperature of around 75 [degrees].” O’Neil, who comes across, above all, as an “envelope-first” advocate, regards geothermal heating as a high-priority add-on to a well-insulated home. “After creating a passive solar design and a great, efficient envelope, installing a geothermal system is the first thing I would do for a low-footprint home and a return on investment,” said O’Neil. O’Neil estimates that there are currently about 30 homes in Central Oregon, many of them outside of Bend’s city limits, that incorporate ground-source heat pumps into their designs. One of Central Oregon’s newest homes that features geothermal technology was constructed by Black Rock Construction in Brasada Ranch. The home was featured on the 2010 COBA Tour of Homes. Although unavailable for comment, Terry Henry, owner of Black Rock Construction, was awarded the Energy Performance Score Award for a home larger than 2,000 square feet without solar technology, and the Green Award for a home priced more than $1 million

residence in Awbrey Glenn racked up utility charges of just $36. “That’s electricity and gas,” said O’Neil. While the Maul’s investment in a ground-source system represented a steep $60,000 upgrade from a standard heat pump, O’Neil, who managed the LEED certification for the project, has used the benefit of this experience to package a more attractive offer for future homeowners. SolAire’s next geothermal system will be incorporated into a Tumalo home next spring. For this project, rather than managing an ad-hoc team of subcontractors as they had done before, SolAire will subcontract the work through a single consultant who can package a custom system at less than half of the cost of that of the first venture. “Combine that with a 30 percent tax credit, and you can put this system in for $15,000 to $20,000,” said O’Neil. “Dollar for dollar, that starts to really compete with a solar photovoltaic system as an attractive energy-wise investment.” Illustration by Nicole Werner


E2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

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BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

1052 NE Rambling #1 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, all appl., W/S paid! Gas fireplace, garage, fenced yard. $795/mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1700 NE Wells Acres #40 Cozy 2 bdrm/ 1 bath w/ patio. All kitchen appls., w/s/g pd, no pets. $499+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 1 Bdrm., 1 bath in triplex, near Downtown, gas heat, quiet neighborhood, fenced yard, W/S paid, cat okay, $480/mo. 541-306-9742 $250 Move-In Special Spacious apts. Off-Street parking. Nice shade trees. On-site laundry. Near Hospital. Just $525 mo., incl. WST Computerized Property Management 541-382-0053

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

403 NE Dekalb #3 2 bdrm, 1 bath, all appl., W/S/G paid. Garage. $610/mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

842 NE Hidden Valley #1 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, all appl., W/S paid! Gas fireplace, garage, fenced yard. $725/mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

First Month’s Rent Free 1753 NE Laredo Way 2 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, single garage, w/d hook-up, w/s/g pd. Small pet neg.$695+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 FREE MONTHS RENT Beautiful 2/2.5 , util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $650 1st+last+sec. 541-382-5570,541-420-0579 Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2350 NE Mary Rose Pl., #1, $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

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Rentals

600 Bend, 8th/Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, no smoking $400. 541-317-1879

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District www.ThePlazainBend.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Pricing starting from $1200/ month

Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing

TTY 1 800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity

Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

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Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Beautiful 2 bdrm, quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928.

SUNRIVER SHOWCASE SATURDAY 12-4

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Like new, 2/1.5, W/D, walk-in closet, mtn. views, W/S/yard paid, no smoking, 61361 Sally Ln, $725+$725 security, 1 yr. lease, 541-382-3813 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $555. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

off S. Hwy 97, right on N. Imnaha, right on Maury Mtn.

Hosted by: CARRIE HEBERT Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated.

Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com A Large 1 bdrm. cottage-like apt in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

W/D, fireplace, fenced, 1425 sq.ft., 2925 SW Obsidian Ln, $725, W/S/G paid, 541-385-5911, 408-209-8920 SW REDMOND: 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, 1270/sf. apt (and) 3 bdrm., 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, appl. inc/ W/D, W/S/G pd, no pets/smoking, credit check req., HUD ok, For appt/info: 541-504-6141

managed by

GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

$99 Summertime Special!

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly w/new large dog run, some large breeds OK with mgr. approval. Rent Starting at $525-$550. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

TERREBONNE $995 4/2.5 Views! double garage, w/d hookups, fireplace, RV pad. 1425 Majestic Rock Dr.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds 648

541-385-5809

Houses for Rent General BEND RENTALS • Starting at $495. Furnished also avail. For pictures & details www.alpineprop.com 541-385-0844

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

1459 NW Albany 1st Month Free with 1 year lease or ½ Off first month with 8 month lease. * 1 bdrm $495 * 2 bdrm $575 * 3 bdrm $595 W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with deposit. Call 382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 BDRM $445

Country Terrace

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

First Month’s Rent Free 20507 Brentwood Ave. #2 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, patio, all appl., garage, w/s pd., lndscping pd. $829+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 Townhouse-style 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath apt. W/D hookup, no pets/smoking, $625, w/s/g paid, 120 SE Cleveland. 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

AWBREY GLEN CHARMER SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12-4

3590 NW McCready Dr. Directions: From Mt. Washington take Putnam, go through AG Gate (Champion Circle), take 4th right on McCready Dr., home on left.

$475,000

Principal Broker, EA STAR Certified

Broker

$245,000

20836 Tamar Lane

$344,000

“THE BRIDGES” S.E. BEND

Hosted & Listed by Broker

541-410-2475

63105 Dakota Dr. Directions: Lava Ridges - off Empire

$349,000 Listed by: EDIE DELAY Hosted by: RICK PARROTT

IN TOWN COUNTRY ESTATE 3.37 acre mini farm in the heart of Redmond. Zoned R4 with 3 irrigated acres. Older 3 bdrm, 4 bath home. Beautiful setting with 2936 W. Antler Ave. guest house, fenced Directions: Head west on W. pastures, privacy. Rare Antler, past 27th St. then west opportunity. to property on the left.

Hosted by: TABITHA DAHL Broker, CRS, GRI, SFR

Listed by: MARK WEERS

Kim Warner

Principal Broker

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, Bonus room up and Den downstairs, 10' ceiling. Picture windows and lots of light, RV pad and much more.

SAT. 11AM - 3PM

This award winning former model home in the Pahlisch Development, The Bridges, is loaded with high-end finishes and 61152 Sydney Harbor Drive green features. 4 bd, 3.5 ba, Directions: East on Reed Market Rd, 3348 sq. ft. Triple garage, right on SE 15th, past Ferguson Rd. dual heating & cooling Left into The Bridges, follow signs. systems. Facilities include $519,900 pools, clubhouse, exercise complex and sport court.

541-420-2950

SUNDAY 1-4

541-420-2950

SATURDAY 8/21 11 AM - 2 PM

Directions: Going east on Reed Market, turn south on 15th, left on Golden Gate, then follow the signs.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!

and Portland.

541-480-1856

THE BRIDGES/ SE BEND

Broker

Hosted by: RICK PARROTT

Broker, CRS, GRI, ABR

541-948-0447

Hosted by JULIE BURGONI

1924 craftsman cottage on two city lots. Loads of charm in this 2 bedroom, 1 bath cottage. Full basement, large shop, garage, 74 NW Portland Ave. stone fence. Fantastic Directions: From downtown location near the river north on Wall St., turn west on and downtown. Portland Ave. Corner of 1st St.

Listed by: MARK WEERS

PHYLLIS MAGEAU

3 bedrooms, 3 baths, spacious, single level floor plan perfect for entertaining. Great room features a gorgeous fireplace, skylight and a lot more.

DOWNTOWN BUNGALOW SAT. 11 - 3 PM

Hosted & Listed by:

Listed by: EDIE DELAY

Broker

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

Westside Village Apts.

SAT & SUN 1-4

Custom crafted estate on 1 acre bordering National forest. 9816 sq. ft., 3 private bedroom suites, wine cellar, 6 fireplaces, stunning water feature and more. Originally 20 MAURY MTN. LANE, SUNRIVER offered at $3,300,000! www.sunriveroregonestate.com. Directions: Take Cottonwood exit

541-388-0220

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

THE PARKS

Call about our Specials Newer 3/2.5,upgrades, gardener,

•Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm, 1 bath Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495/mo. Includes WSG. •Spacious Apts. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, near Old Mill Dist. $525/mo. Includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 Left! • Quiet SE Area 2 bdrm, 1 bath duplex w/yard and carport. W/D hookups. Close to Costco. $550 WS included. • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 bdrm/1 bath with Murphy bed. $595 mo. includes WST & Wireless • Nice Townhome near Hospital. 2 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, with utility room & garage. $625 per mo. includes W/S • 2 bdrm/1 bath with garage and laundry room inside. Private Courtyard in front. Near Hospital. Pet? $625 WST • Immaculate Duplex near Hospital. 2 bdrm/2 bath. Single garage and W/D included. (No pets) $695 mo. incl. WS • 1/2 Off 1st Month! Spacious condo w/ two masters, Plus 1/2 bath, W/D incl., Dbl. garage, MUCH MORE incl. Pool +Tennis courts. Small Dog? ONLY $725 mo. • SE Craftsman Home - 3 bdrm, 2 bath in lovely area off Brosterhous. Large. dbl. garage and laundry room. $725 mo. •1400 sq.ft. house in DRW - 3 bdrm, 2 bath on small acreage. Space & privacy. $795 per mo. • Lovely 1408 sq.ft. Home in Nottingham Square, 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/ office, large kitchen. End of road in park like setting. Dbl. garage. Laundry room. $850 mo. •Nicely appointed NE Home, 1332 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, w/ media area off living room . Dbl. garage. Perfect landscaped yard. $895 per mo. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY

$1,995,000

Summer Special! $99 Move in * $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments at

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

One of Bend’s best neighborhoods - golf, tennis, parks & trails! Custom 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2513 sq. ft. home on corner lot with wrap-around porch. Hardwood, granite and fresh interior colors matched by a lovely outdoor setting.

Principal Broker

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets, 541-382-3678

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

This Weekend’s

Listed by: CATE CUSHMAN

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Houses for Rent General

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

CALL 541-382-9046

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NW-Side, 1/2 mile to COCC, spacious 2 bdrms., 950 sq. ft., $550/mo. W/S/G paid, 2 on-site laundries, covered parking. 541-948-5198. On The River! 1562 NW 1st 1 Bdrm, $640, 1/2 off 1st. mo., W/S/G+cable paid, on site laundry/parking, no pets /smoking, call 541-598-5829 until 6pm.

Fox Hollow Apts.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1 bdrm Units with Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios Water, sewer & garbage paid.

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541-322-7253

½ off first month rent!

Call 541-743-1890

2 Luxury Condos Mt. Bachelor Village Resort 2B/2B & 3B/3B, furn., views, deck, BBQ, pool, hot tub, tennis courts, garage. $1300 & $1600 mo.+ dep., Avail. 8/15. No pets. 541-280-3198

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, wood stove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. $595/mo + dep.; (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

NEWLY REMODELED QUIMBY ST. APTS.

OPEN HOUSE

631

(Private Party ads only)

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

under 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(541) 383-3152

630

Rooms for Rent

* HOT SPECIAL *

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

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20077 Beth Ave. # 2 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, gas heat, w/s paid! www.bendpropertymanagement.com Landscaping Maintained! 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car ga$695. 541-382-7727 rage, detached apt., with BEND PROPERTY W/D, no pets/smoking, MANAGEMENT 63323 Britta, $700/mo., www.bendpropertymanagement.com $1000 dep., 541-390-0296. 20077 Beth Ave. # 4 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliHave an item to ances, gas heat, w/s paid! Landscaping Maintained! sell quick? If it’s $760. 541-382-7727 $

403 NE DeKalb #3 2 bdrm, 1 bath, all appliances, garage, w/s/g paid! $610. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

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Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

1033 NW Newport Ave Bend, OR

Broker, CRS, GRI, ABR

541-330-8520

$249,999


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 E3

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Farms, Ranches and Acreage

331 NW Flagline

60949 Amethyst St 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, wood stove, Extra parking & storage w/ fenced yard. $850 541-382-7727

Eagle Crest - approx. 2000 sq.ft., 2/2, w/ office, huge great room w/fireplace, large dining area, huge kitchen, 1 year lease with 1 year option, $1355/mo. Includes all amenities of Eagle Crest incl. yard care. Bea 541-788-2274

1864 NE Monroe Ln 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, all appliances incld, pellet stove, low maint lndscpe, pet neg. $950+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, near Hospital, 2000 sq.ft., $925, pets considered, garage,1st/last/dep, 541-610-6146. avail 8/17. Move-in special if rent by 9/1 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1556 sq.ft., family room, w/wood stove, big rear deck, fenced yard, dlb. garage, w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393

725 NE SHELLEY Nice 3 bed, 2.5 bath, hot tub, A/C, garage, trex decking, large bonus room. $1350/mo ABOVE& BEYOND PROP MGMT 541-389-8558

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

4 bdrm/3.5 bath, huge bonus room w/kitchenette, mtn. views, triple car garage. $1800/mo ABOVE& BEYOND PROP MGMT 541-389-8558

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Beautiful Broken Top, 1850 sq. ft.,3 bdrm., 2 bath, furnished or unfurnished, $1500 unfurnished, near schools no pets/smoking, 541-330-2490

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Furnished 2 bdrm., 2 bath home in NW Bend, 2 blocks to Downtown foot bridge. Avail. Oct. 1st for 6 mo. $900/mo. 541-408-3725.

LOVELY 3/2, open plan, CLEAN, 1 level. New granite, blinds, appl, floors,etc. Gas fireplace, large private lot, trees. 2-Car +RV, $995, 503-754-5615.

NW Crossing 2148 Highlakes Lp. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, master bdrm with walk in closet, frplc,all kitchen appl.,AC $1295+dep. Cr Property Management 541-318-1414

VERY PRIVATE .25 acre corner lot SW Bend. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 1180 sq. ft. $825 month. 541-647-3517.

WESTSIDE classic home w/ upgrades, overlooking river and park, 4/3 and den, large laundry, basement. $1250, Available Sept. 1 541-385-8644

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

Houses for Rent SE Bend 752 Breitenbush

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com 944 NE Lena Place 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas heat, dbl garage on cul-de-sac. $875. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

The Bulletin

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas heat, dbl garage, fenced yard. $850 mo. 541..382.7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

A clean 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1340 sq.ft., new carpet, new paint, wood stove, family room, dbl. garage, .5 acre. $895/mo. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803. Cottage For Rent, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, patio, W/D, garage, month to month, $695/mo. furnished, $625/mo. unfurnished, 503-913-5745.

Eagle Crest Chalet, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, loft, designer furnished, W/D, resort benefits! $985/mo. + utilities. Avail. Sept. 503-318-5099 Terrebonne, very well kept, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near school, no smoking, no cats, dogs neg., refs req., 8862 Morninglory, $770, 541-480-2543

541-385-5809 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

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Commercial for Rent/Lease 1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ Alley Access, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Houses for Rent Redmond

$250 26' trailer, propane heat, low monthly electric. 4270 S Canal #B $725 3/2, double garage w/opener, w/d hookups, bonus room, shed, fenced. 2236 SW 34th St $875 3/2.5, w/d, gas fireplace, sprinklers, garage w/opener. 1730 SW 22nd $875 3/2.5, views, dbl garage w/opener, gas fireplace, covered patio, fenced. 2240 SW Obsidian $1000 3/2, central air, gas fireplace, garage w/opener. Golf Community. 4250 Ben Hogan $1250 3/2, gated, views, 1/2 acre lot, dbl. garage, large deck! 2345 Linnet Ln.

1500 sq.ft. Newer home on acreage, large wrap around deck, mtn views, horse property w/indoor arena usage avail for the right person. 1st & security. $1400/mo. 541-420-8855

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

658

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www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

$875 3/2, 5 acres, range, dishwasher, w/d hookups, 3500 gal cistern, dbl garage. 25220 Bachelor Ln

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Tumalo, 3/2

2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796. VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

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Mobile/Mfd. for Rent ROOM FOR RENT in mfd home in Bend, $300 mo. Call 253-241-4152.

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

To p l a c e y o u r a d , v i s i t w w w . b e n d b u l l e t i n . c o m o r 5 4 1 - 3 8 5 - 5 8 0 9 Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5:00pm

Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5:00pm Satruday 10:00am - 12:30pm


E4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE Intent to Award The Deschutes Public Library District intends to award the contract for the East Bend Library 2010 Tenant Improvement for Architectural Services to BLRB/GGL Architects. Protests are due by (7 days of public notice) to 507 N.W. Wall St. Bend Oregon Attn.: Joe Flora under the District Rules 137-048-0240. Joe Flora Facilities Manager Deschutes Public Library District

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF ABANDONMENT The Pines Mobile Home Park gives notice that personal property (the "Property") described below is abandoned. The Property will be sold by private bidding. Sealed bids will not be accepted. The Property is described as a 1976 Marlette manufactured home, Plate

#X130676, Manufacturer Serial #H14270FBY50528. The Property is located at 61000 Brosterhous, Space 599, Bend OR 97702. The tenant that occupied the home was Reta Newell. To inspect the property, contact Harvey Berlant, 61000 Brosterhous, Bend OR 97701, Phone #541-382-8558. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Mark G. Reinecke, Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 10:00 a.m. on November 24, 2010, in the lobby of the offices of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. GRANTOR: DAVID HANSEN and MARSHA HANSEN

BENEFICIARY: EUGENE L. JENKINS and FREDY E. JENKINS TRUST DEED RECORDED: October 8, 2002, in Book 2002 at page 55484, Deschutes County Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: 60225 Sunset View Drive, Bend, Oregon and more particularly described as: Lot Fifty-five (55), SUNSET VIEW ESTATES PHASE III, Deschutes County, Oregon DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. Regular installment payments since September 1, 2009 at $1,760.64 each for a total of $17,606.40, plus interest through and including July 8, 2010 at the rate of eight percent (8%) per annum 2. Trustee's Foreclosure Guarantee: $800.00 SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $223,241.46 with interest at eight percent per annum from October 1, 2009, until paid. Notice is given that any

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-98228 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TIMOTHY W. CASEY, AND ANNA MARIE CASEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 11/16/2006, recorded 11/17/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-76339, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2007-HE5. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 6, AND EASTERLY 25 FEET OF LOT 7, BLOCK 6, NOTTINGHAM SQUARE DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20755 CANTERBURY COURT BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 4, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2009 2 payments at $ 2,515.05 each $5,030.10 5 payments at $ 2,293.05 each $11,465.251 payments at $ 2,687.31 each $2,687.311 payments at $ 2,465.31 each $2,465.315 payments at $ 2,084.74 each $10,423.702 payments at $ 1,862.74 each $3,725.48 (05-01-09 through 08-04-10) Late Charges: $1,265.78 Beneficiary Advances: $327.13 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $37,390.06 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $266,400.00, PLUS interest thereon at 9.94% per annum from 04/01/09 to 7/1/2009, 9.94% per annum from 07/01/09 to 12/01/09, 9.94% per annum from 12/01/09 to 01/01/10, 9.94% per annum from 01/01/10 to 02/01/10, 9.94% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 7, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, pr had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Dated: 8/4/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION TRUSTEE By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3682334 08/14/2010, 08/21/2010, 08/28/2010, 09/04/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trust Deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): 1. TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Grantor: Waldorf School of Bend, in Oregon non-profit corporation. Trustee: Amerititle. Successor Trustee: Craig G. Russillo, 1211 SW 5th Avenue, Suite 1900, Portland, OR 97204, (503) 222-9981. Beneficiary: Tobron Oregon, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company. Recording Date: December 18, 2007. Recording Reference:2007-64602. County of Recording: Deschutes. 2. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY (the "Property"): A parcel of land located in the Northwest One-quarter of the Northeast One-quarter (NW1/4NE1/4) of Section Twenty (20), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a 2-1/2" brass cap at the North One-quarter corner of said Section 20; thence South 0°26'09" West along the North-South centerline of said Section 20, a distance of 25.08 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a yellow plastic cap marked "WHP" at the point of beginning; thence leaving said North-South centerline of said Section 20 South 89°56'48" East, 295.92 feet to the Westerly right of way line of O.B. Riley Road marked by a 5/8" rebar and the beginning of a non-tangent 1492.39 foot radius curve to the left (the radius point of which bears North 60°48'25" East); thence Southeasterly along said right of way line along said curve 91.48 feet, subtended by a chord of which bears South 30°56'56" East, 91.46 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a yellow plastic cap marked "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence continuing along said right of way line South 32°42'18" East, 99.54 feet to a 2" Brass Cap and the beginning of a 1460.45 foot radius curve to the right (the radius point of which bears South 57°17'42" West) ; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line along said curve 131.72 feet, subtended by a chord which bears South 30°07'l6" East, 131.68 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a yellow plastic cap marked "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 27°32'14" East, 315.92 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a yellow plastic cap marked "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence leaving said right of way line South 70°46'32" West, 14.80 feet to the beginning of a 150.00 foot radius curve to the right; thence Westerly along said curve 55.68 feet, subtended by a chord which bears South 81°24'32" West, 55.36 feet; thence North 87°57'28" West, 227.31 feet; thence North 86°28'5l" West, 183.69 feet; thence South 5°22'l2" West, 36.31 feet to the beginning of non-tangent 184.95 foot radius curve to the right (the radius point of which bears South 25°47'03" West); thence Northeasterly along said curve, 73.81 feet, subtended by a chord which bears North 52°47'0l" West, 73.32 feet to the beginning of a 155.00 foot radius compound curve to the left (the radius point of which bears North 48°38'55" East); thence Northwesterly along said curve 86.25 feet, subtended by a chord which bears North 57°17'32" West, 85.14 Feet; thence along said North-South centerline of said Section 20 North 0°26'09" East, 496.07 feet to the point of beginning. 3. DEFAULT: The Grantor or any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed. The default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to do the following: 4. Failure to make monthly interest payments in the amount of $8,000 per month from December 1, 2008 through December 1, 2009; and Failure to pay the entire amount due under the note and Trust Deed on December 1, 2009. 5. AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default just described, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following: Principal balance of $1,600,000, together with unpaid interest of $96,000 through December 1, 2009, late charges in the amount of $4,800, Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, costs of foreclosure and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed. Interest continues to accrue on the unpaid principal balance and unpaid interest at the rate of 9% per annum from December 2, 2009, until paid. 6. ELECTION TO SELL: Both the Beneficiary and Trustee have elected to foreclose the Trust Deed by advertisement and sale as provided under ORS 86.705 to 86.795, and to cause the Property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the described Property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor or Grantor's successor in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed, including the expenses of the sale, compensation of the Trustee as provided by law and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorneys. A Notice of Default has been recorded as required by ORS 86.735(3). 7. DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Date: October 12, 2010. Time: 10:00 A.M. (in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110). Location: The main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse - 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following: a. payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred; b. curing any other default that is capable of being cured, by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed; and c. paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information and a directory of legal aid programs for where you can obtain free legal assistance is available at http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. DATED: June 8, 2010. /s/ Craig G. Russillo. Craig G. Russillo, Successor Trustee.

person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the above-described defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day

notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 25, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service.

Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included within this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included within this notice. OREGON STATE BAR, 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, (800)452-8260, http://www.osbar.org. DIRECTORY OF LEGAL AID PROGRAMS: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org MARK G. REINECKE, Successor Trustee

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-108934 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAMES S. THOMSON, A MARRIED PERSON AND KIMBERLY L. THOMSON, A MARRIED PERSON, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 5/23/2006, recorded 5/31/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-37552, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWO (2) OF BIG SKY COUNTRY, RECORDED JULY 18, 1985, IN CABINET C, PAGE 155, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 65940 OLD BEND REDMOND HWY BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 27, 2010 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,675.31 each $ 8,376.55 (03-01-10 through 07-27-10) Late Charges: $ 622.00 TOTAL: $ 8,998.55 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 3/1/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee.By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $287,619.14, PLUS interest thereon at 4.500% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 2, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 7/27/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 None Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3671434 08/07/2010, 08/14/2010, 08/21/2010, 08/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain deed of trust (the "Trust Deed") dated October 9, 2004, executed by Suzanne K. Courts (the "Grantor") to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association (the "Trustee"), to secure payment and performance of certain obligations of Grantor to U.S. Bank National Association (the "Beneficiary"), including repayment of a promissory note dated October 9, 2004, in the principal amount of $40,100 (the "Note"). The Trust Deed was recorded on November 1, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-65614 in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The legal description of the real property covered by the Trust Deed is as follows: Lot 12 in Block AA of Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. No action has been instituted to recover the obligation, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed or, if such action has been instituted, such action has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments in full of $338.12 owed under the Note beginning December 8, 2009, and on the 8th day of each month thereafter; late charges in the amount of $232.00 as of May 9, 2010, plus any late charges accruing thereafter; and expenses, costs, trustee fees and attorney fees. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank National Association, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable which sums are as follows: (a) the principal amount of $29,999.18 as of May 9, 2010, (b) accrued interest of $295.70 as of May 9, 2010, and interest accruing thereafter on the principal amount at the rate set forth in the Note until fully paid, (c) late charges in the amount of $232.00 as of May 9, 2010, plus any late charges accruing thereafter and any other expenses or fees owed under the Note or Trust Deed, (d) amounts that U.S. Bank National Association has paid on or may hereinafter pay to protect the lien, including by way of illustration, but not limitation, taxes, assessments, interest on prior liens, and insurance premiums, and (e) expenses, costs and attorney and trustee fees incurred by U.S. Bank National Association in foreclosure, including the cost of a trustee's sale guarantee and any other environmental or appraisal report. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank National Association, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, and the Successor Trustee have elected to foreclose the trust deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.705 to ORS 86.795 and to sell the real property identified above to satisfy the obligation that is secured by the Trust Deed. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Successor Trustee or Successor Trustee's agent will, on November 29, 2010, at one o'clock (1:00) p.m., based on the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, just outside the main entrance of 1164 N.W. Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell for cash at public auction to the highest bidder the interest in said real property, which Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest that Grantor or the successors in interest to Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to U.S. Bank National Association, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and, in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, and the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest of grantor, as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. In accordance with the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, this is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. This communication is from a debt collector. For further information, please contact Jeanne Kallage Sinnott at her mailing address of Miller Nash LLP, 111 S.W. Fifth Avenue, Suite 3400, Portland, Oregon 97204 or telephone her at (503) 224-5858.

/s/ Jeanne Kallage Sinnott Successor Trustee File No. 080090-0607 Grantor: Courts, Suzanne K. Beneficiary: U.S. Bank National Association

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Dakota Clair, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as Beneficiary, dated September 8, 2008, recorded September 10, 2008, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2008-37260, covering the following described real property: Lot 4 in Block 3 of HAYDEN VILLAGE PHASE I, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay: Regular monthly payments of principal, interest and escrow collection in the amount of $1,205.21, from February 1, 2010, through present, together with late fees, escrow collection for taxes, insurance, and other charges as of May 10, 2010, as follows: Late Fees: $152.73; Escrow Collection: (-$408.75); and other charges to be determined. Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: 1. Principal: $160,441.50, plus interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from May 10, 2010, until fully paid; 2. Accrued Interest: $3,661.60 (as of May 10, 2010); 3. Late Charges: $152.73 (as of May 10, 2010); 4. Escrow Collection: (-$408.75) (as of May 10, 2010); and 5. Other Costs and Fees: To be determined. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on October 12, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee.

Legal Notices

DATED this 23rd day of July, 2010.

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NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED this 24th day of May, 2010. Tamara E. MacLeod, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 382-3011 STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above-named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Tamara E. MacLeod, Attorney for Trustee

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-98274 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GARTH A. BARBER AND DOLORES L. BARBER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR RESIDENTIAL WHOLESALE MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 4/1/2007, recorded 4/13/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-21342, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT THIRTY-SIX (36), EMPIRE CROSSING PHASES 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES, COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63182 DE HAVILAND AKA 63182 DE HAVILAND STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 5, 2 010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,031.25 each $ 4,125.00 (05-01-10 through 08-05-10) Late Charges: $ 773.40 Beneficiary Advances: $ 110.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $5,008.40 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $220,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from 4/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 8/5/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3685945 08/14/2010, 08/21/2010, 08/28/2010, 09/04/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-98329 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL J. NICHOLS AND CLAIRE C. NICHOLS, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO. OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/30/2008, recorded 2/6/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-05654, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 2 OF STEARNS SUBDIVISION, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2605 SOUTHWEST 27TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of August 10, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,634.77 each $6,539.08 (05-01-10 through 08-10-10) Late Charges: $202.80 Beneficiary Advances: $11.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,752.88 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $236,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from 4/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on December 13, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 8/10/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3689532 08/21/2010, 08/28/2010, 09/04/2010, 09/11/2010


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

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Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

738

Multiplexes for Sale Unique Duplex Opportunity! Highway frontage R2 zoning, nicely remodeled on 10,000 sq. ft. lot on NE 3rd St. in Prineville. Many options. $142,900. 541-280-0955.

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 E5

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Redmond Homes

Recreational Homes and Property

Acreages

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land

For Sale -Health Reasons: 3/2, dbl. garage, all appl. incl., security system, A/C, 2 sheds, landscaped, extra cabinets $34,900, 541-318-1922

CRR older 2 bdrm., 2 bath mobile on 2+ acres. Garage. Great starter or retirement home. Owner will finance. $120,000. 541-420-1467.

RECENT FORECLOSURE 1818 SW 21st Street, Redmond 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 story home on .26 acre. Backs to Dry Canyon, RV Parking! Move in Ready! $109,900 Call Peter at 541-419-5391 for more info: www.GorillaCapital.com RECENT FORECLOSURE 3690 SW Williams Rd. Powell Butte, 4 bdrm., 3.5 bath, 3855 sq.ft on 10 acres. Energy Efficient concrete Rosta block home.Heated floors, built in vac, 6.9 acres irrigated. Mtn. View and borders small lake. Priced $449,900. $367,910 Below Market Value! 2009 County $199,100 Below Recent Pre-Foreclosure Listing! Move in ready! $449,900 Call Peter at 541-419-5391 for more info: www.GorillaCapital.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

SNOWBIRD to beautiful Palm Springs area, own your own lot and park model in senior gated community: pool, spas, putt-putt golf course and much more. Pics avail. $29,000. 503-949-1390. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613 Little Deschutes Frontage, 3+ Acres, off of Timberlane Lp., in Lazy River South subdivision, borders State land on S. side, great for recreation, asking $395,000, great investment property, well is drilled, buildable, 541-389-5353,541-647-8176

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Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

H I G H

Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc.

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D E S E R T

Open Houses OPEN Sat. 1-4PM Hunnel Hills Mini Ranchette

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Healthy Living in Central Oregon

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Sunriver/La Pine Homes

A SLICK STOCK M A G A Z I N E C R E AT E D

FSBO: 125’ RIVER FRONTAGE, 2/3 acre, covered boat slip Fabulous, close-in location. with ramp, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 3,848 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 1½ miles from Sunriver. baths, rec. room, artist's stu$699,000. Owner Terms. dio, on 5 irrigated, fenced, 541-593-1720. very private acres. Some Cascade views, 1,150 sq.ft. F S B O : Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, shop/barn w/ 2 horse stalls. w/decks & lots of windows, Only $499,000. 63825 W. hot tub, wood stove & gas Quail Haven Dr., Bend. heat, near Lodge, $245,000, Randall Kemp, Broker owner terms, 541-617-5787. 541-410-8377, The Hasson Company 762

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Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND M A I N TA I N A N A C T I V E , H E A LT H Y LIFESTYLE.

Homes with Acreage 16 acres prime riverfront North Fork John Day River & 2 bdrm 1000 sq. ft. home, adjacent to Thomas Orchards, 541-934-2091. $299,000. FSBO: 2 bdrm, 1 bath on 1.47 acres of Park Like Grounds. Includes 2 car Garage, enclosed Shop. Sunriver Area. Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203 Today!! Recreational Hunting Horses 160-acre parcels, 8 mi. from Burns , LOP tags 2 Elk & 2 Deer. 2 homes to choose from: 2296 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 3 full baths. $429,500 or $449,500. Prices reduced almost $100,000! Must sell! Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521.

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/ Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

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Recreational Homes and Property NEW BROKEN TOP golf club home 4600 sq. ft., 5 bdrms, 4 baths, study, large bonus/office, oversized 3 car garage, on the course. All upgrades. Buy direct & save! $699,950. Call Robert 503-317-2509.

R E S E R V E Y O U R A D S PA C E B Y S E P T. 2 4 CALL 541-382-1811

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HINES, OREGON: 2-story 4 bdrm., large lot, outbuildings, fixer upper, $59,000, Please call 503-830-6564 or 503-665-8015.

Central Oregon (800) 970-0149

John Day: 2003 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1920 sq.ft., wood, stove, forced air heat, vaulted living room, Silestone counters stainless appl., master suite/ walk in closet, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056 OWNER FINANCING Several 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes available on contract or lease option. Don’t let short sale or foreclosure keep you from owning your own home! 541-815-2986. www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

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Northwest Bend Homes FSBO, Gated Community, all amenities on .5 acre, 3+ 2 & bonus studio apt, near river,elec./wood heat, terms, $340,000. 541-617-5787.

NEAR RIVER AND PARK 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1.25 acres, 2-car garage + pond + 24x36’ garage/shop + studio. $298,000. Owner/ broker 541 633-3033 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Nice & neat, near Tumalo school 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft., recent upgrades, dbl. garage. storage bldgs, $195,000. 541-330-0464.

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Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

NEW PLAN - SAVE $4,000!

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right


E6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE 486 SW Bluff Dr.

REALTOR

SE Bend | $105,000

Privacy- 4 Bedroom Suites each have decks that back to New Earth Advantage townhome in NORTHWEST CROSSING. Great room with the course greens & mature trees. 3807 sq. ft., vaulted ceilings, Master on Main, floor to ceiling river rock gas fireplace. Secluded patio. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 fireplace, parking for 5 vehicles. baths, double garage. Move in today! Builder MLS#201005526 will contribute $5,000 towards closing costs. Call For Directions- Cell: 541-306-9646 MLS#2713334 60714 Golf Village Loop 2502 NW Crossing Dr.

Three Rivers South | $110,000

Redmond | $117,900

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Open House | $299,900 Widgi Creek Golf Home | $799,000 Rivers Edge Village | $99,000 SAT O . & PEN SU N. 1 2-

Independently Owned and Operated

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MORRIS REAL ESTATE

Enjoy the sunrise from this large east facing view lot. Some City, Smith Rock and southern views. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $99,000! MLS#201005716

Excellent value. Close to restaurants & shopping. Features include: Great room concept with open floor plan. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1180 sq. ft. home. Bank owned. Call for more info. MLS#201006896

This sportsman cabin would be great for weekend getaways. 1 bedroom cabin sits on 1.63 acres with a brand new never used sand-filter septic. MLS#201007396

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1559 sq. ft. home, beautiful finishes including tile counters, hardwood and slate floors and a gas fireplace. Neighborhood play area, picnic area and pool. MLS#201007027

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DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

NE Bend | $139,000

NE Bend | $139,500

Co-Housing | $147,500

NE Bend | $166,500

Prineville | $190,000

NE Bend Duplex | $225,000

Bright and affordable with 4 bedrooms plus family room. Large windows bring in the sunlight while refinished wood floors, fresh carpet and paint invite you to make this your home. MLS#2910497

Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1122 sq. ft. home. Deck off dining area. Fenced yard, 2-car garage. Well cared for home. MLS#201007496

Radiant floor heat, cement floors, energy efficient construction. Co-Housing community of Higher Ground. Adorable home, 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Club house, gardens, meadow. Not a short sale. MLS#201006634

Nice 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1593 sq. ft. close to the Forum Shopping Center. Slate around the gas fireplace and in the entry way. Natural gas heat. 2 story home with peek-a-boo mountain views. MLS#201005690

Nicely remodeled home on beautiful acreage with mountain views. There’s a private well, a barn and 1 acre of irrigation. The new master suite even includes a jetted tub! MLS#201006713

View of Pilot Butte, large back decks. Quiet neighborhood on a cul-de-sac. Each unit is 2 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1058 sq. ft. and has washer/dryer hook up. Nice sized living rooms. Window coverings included. MLS#2900544

JOY HELFRICH, Broker 541-480-6808

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

CATHY DEL NERO, Broker 541-410-5280

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

NE Bend/ Single Level | $229,900

SE Bend | $229,900

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MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-480-7355

Better than new 3 bedroom, 2 bath! Conveniently located in new neighborhood close to shopping & medical facilities. Great room floor plan with gas fireplace. Large corner lot, fenced backyard & mountain views. MLS#201004596

Deschutes River Lot | $249,000 Stonehaven | $264,000 Golf Course Frontage | $275,000

1.0 acre Bend Deschutes River view Single Level, lovely southern exposure, lot. Level building site amongst mature open vaulted living area, gas fireplace, gas forced air & central AC. Convenient kitchen, Ponderosas. River and surrounding forest separate utility room & under house storage. vistas. Privacy. Wildlife. Nature’s finest water feature. You won’t want to leave. Landscaped .18 of an acre lot. MLS#201002533 MLS#201007013

Darling craftsman with a stunning yard and water feature. Great room plan with quality finishes throughout. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2230 sq. ft. MLS#201006804

2ND FAIRWAY, Bend Golf & Country Club. Premium location in Timber Ridge, 1820 sq. ft. single level, one-owner, 2nd home with great room styling & pool room. Lots of windows and good privacy. MLS#2910602

SE Bend | $275,000

2 story, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2800 sq. ft. upgraded home. Hardwood floors, great room and dining room, slate entry and lots of storage. Bonus room upstairs. Nicely landscaped with sprinklers. MLS#201007029

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

Mountain High | $279,000

Sunriver | $319,000

Easy Living on the Fairway! Private, peaceful setting in gated community with Golf Course Views on 1 and a half beautifully treed lots. Single level, 2 Bedroom + Den, 2 Bath. MLS#201001975

Charming Sunriver cabin, well maintained and upgraded, very popular rental. Gas fireplace in great room. Large covered front porch with hot tub & view of lawn and pool. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. New appliances. MLS#201006982

1879 sq. ft. 2 bedroom, 2 bath located in gated Mountain High Community. Overlooks the 13th Fairway. Granite Counters, Stainless Steel Range/Oven, Built-In Refrigerator & Pozzi Wood Windows. Park-Like Setting. MLS#201003573 60817 Willow Creek Lp.

Cabin on acreage on the Big Deschutes. 3.8 acres with river frontage and deck facing the river. Knotty Pine interior. Vaulted great room, 3+ bedrooms, Near Wickiup Reservior. MLS#201006013 12925 W. Deschutes River Rd.

A rare find in this much sought after neighborhood! 3 bedroom, 3 bath, open floor plan, large kitchen and master, 832 sq. ft. shop with separate RV storage on 2.5 acres. Mountain views, a must see! MLS#201004751

Adjacent to Sawyer Park with city & river views. Access the river through the park from your backyard. 3481 sq. ft., hardwood floors & granite tile counters. Heated driveway, .25 of an acre. MLS#201003535

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

Sunriver | $439,000

Gated Community | $445,000

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR 541-383-4349 541-420-1111

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Golf Course View | $349,000 On the Deschutes | $375,000 Boonesborough | $395,000 Rivers Edge Village | $384,000

20 Acres/City Street Frontage Wonderful West Hills Home | $415,000 Northwest Crossing | $417,000 Full Cascade Mountain Views | $425,000

Redmond acreage, 17.2 irrigated, 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 1952 sq. ft. Large development potential when the city brings south facing .29 of an acre lot. Beautiful in land on the east side, this should be the landscaping & decks. Great living spaces, 1st as it borders city services. For now a vaulted ceilings & large windows. great home site or investment property. Location is key! $399,900 MLS#201006837 MLS#2613316

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

Awbrey Butte | $450,000

JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159

Very functional 2300 sq. ft. floor plan. Master on main, all tile bathrooms. Hardwood floors in living room, dining room & kitchen. Large, inviting front porch as well as covered back deck. MLS#201007128

Quiet 9.81 acres in Tumalo. 1 acre irrigated. 1700 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath like new home. Paved drive and 1440 sq. ft. pole barn/shop. Breathtaking views. Easy to see, ready for immediate move-in. MLS#2809508

2131 sq. ft. custom 3 bedroom, 2 bath with Large deck & retractable awning. Wet bar, 2 dining areas, stone fireplace and large solarium entry. Oversized garage with office & shop area. MLS#201006729 tourfactory.com/638467

Impeccably maintained home and updated with slab granite and so much more. Fireplace, formal dining, separate family room with built in bar. 3 bedrooms plus office, 3-car garage all on 3/4 of an acre. MLS#201001983

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

CHUCK OVERTON, Broker, CRS, ABR 541-383-4363

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436

SW Bend | $575,000

Sunriver | $594,900

Gorgeous Views | $599,000

On the Pond | $470,000 Black Butte Ranch | $575,000

Open great room floor plan, abundance of light from many windows. Red oak hardwood floors, knotty wood cabinets, surround sound inside and out. 3 bedroom, 2.75 bath, 2475 sq. ft. 3-car garage. MLS#201006831

Full on views of the lake at Painted Ridge. Ideal floor plan with great room and master suite on main level, upstairs loft area, 2 bedroom suites and office. Huge decks with privacy and views. MLS#2709663

Numerous upgrades have been completed on this 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2034 sq. ft. furnished home that sleeps 15. Great room floor plan with master bedroom on main level. Double attached garage. MLS#201003074

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

LESTER & KATLIN FRIEDMAN FRIEDMAN & FRIEDMAN, P.C., Brokers 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

Tumalo | $650,000

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GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-322-2404

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

See every Mtn. in Cascade Range from this home & expansive decks. Large private lot. Custom home-open living, coffered ceilings, formal dining, & large kitchen with eating area. 3-car garage. MLS#201004464 1119 Stoneridge

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

NW Bend/Awbrey Glen | $675,000 NW Bend/Awbrey Glen | $675,000 Awbrey Butte | $689,000 Acreage/Home on Los Serranos | $689,000 Awbrey Village | $759,000

2.7 acres with Big Mountain Views. Beautiful home with Cascade and golf Enjoy ranch life without all the work. course views. 3 bedrooms/3.5 baths, plus Gorgeous 2788 sq. ft. NW farm style a family room. Open floor plan with main home with covered porches, knotty alder, floor master. Walk-out lower level, .60 granite, stainless & knotty pine. acre wooded lot. MLS#201006478 MLS#201007052 19000 Couch Market Rd.

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

NW Bend | $837,000

SE Bend | $948,000

This immaculate home on very quiet, Private country estate offers beauty, private acreage with Mountain views near productivity and seclusion. Immaculate Tumalo, features great room living, formal home with mature landscaping and pond. dining, 2 masters, huge bonus room, Additional buildings include shop with RV dream kitchen, oversized 4-car garage. storage, and horse barn. 16 acres, 4 irrigated. MLS#201007051 MLS#2909521

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3189 sq. ft. home Multiple upgrades, extra-tall ceilings completely remodeled in 2005. Nice .60 upstairs & down, combed cedar siding, acre lot in a great location on the way to oversize 2- car garage. 2 Master suites + Mt. Bachelor. Beautiful kitchen, open floor a lock-out. Expansive views from upstairs plan, huge master suite & RV parking. living area. Previous rental info available. MLS#201004368 MLS#201005860

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

Custom built home on .6 of an acre lot. Beautiful high end details througout. 4 bedrooms, office, and bonus room! Main floor master. Private wooded yard with water feature and hot tub. MLS#201003567

Beautiful home on .66 of an acre. Gently sloping pine treed lot with panoramic Cascade mountain views. Very private cul-de-sac location. 3 bedroom, den, 2.5 bath, 3220 sq. ft. Fabulous private patio & backyard. MLS#2906426

Superb finishes embrace stunning One of a kind single level remodeled 4 bedroom on 3.6 acres. RV building & 4-car mountain and city views! Dream kitchen, wine bar, 2 dining options, main level attached garage. Living, family, bonus master, separate guest suites, 3-car room, kitchen and formal dining area. Large master suite, walk-in closet. Extras! garage, shop and unfinished bonus area. MLS#2902704 MLS#201007575

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050 541-383-4350

Awbrey Butte | $949,000 Broken Top | $984,900 NW Bend | $1,200,000 Chiloquin Ranch | $2,950,000

Northwest contemporary home with the highest of quality finishes and fabulous Cascade Mountain views. 4745 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. 2.14 acres. MLS#201007491

Wonderful home on 17th fairway. Expansive deck with all the views, mountain, lake, and golf course. 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, master on main, bonus/game room. MLS#201006774

Private Estate 23+ Easy to maintain acres with breath taking views of the Cascades. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3-car garage plus shop. Perfect 2nd home or retreat. MLS#201006284

458 acre cattle ranch, 2 mile Sprague River frontage. Property includes a main home, ranch manager home, 4-bay garage/shop, 5-stall barn, cattle facilities, and hay barn. Borders National Forest. MLS#201001249

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-383-4361


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 F1

CLASSIFIEDS

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The Bulletin

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Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

1 7 7 7

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

ROBBERSON.COM PRE-OWNED

INTRODUCING THE ALL NEW

2011 FORD FIESTA

541-312-3986 BEND’S BEST WARRANTY 2009 CHEVROLET AVEO

2007 FORD FOCUS SE

Best in Class Fuel Economy (40 MPG) Available 6-Speed Automatic Transmission Over 1 Million Road Tested Miles Class Exclusive Driver’s Knee Airbag Voice Activated Sync Technology

• Automatic • AM/FM Stereo WAS $ 10,998

NEW 2010 FORD FOCUS SE

14,998

$

VIN: 368946, STK# UC9885P

2007 JEEF COMPASS 4WD

2007 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

$

• Alloy Wheels • Off-Road Tires

13,977

• Power Sliding Doors • Quad Seating WAS $ 16,998

WAS $ 18,998

Stk#9361; VIN: A56163 MSRP $34,855-$3,000 Factory Rebate-$1,000 FMCC Rebate-$2,857 RFS Disc.

robberson.com

$

25,998 27,998

• Sync Voice Activated System • 18” Premium Alloy Wheels • 6-Way Power Driver’s Seat • Reverse Sensing System robberson.com

SALES HOURS Mon. - Fri. 8am - 7pm Sat. 8am - 6pm Sun. 11am - 6pm Pizza Hut

McDonalds

Albertsons Revere

4th Street

3rd Street

N

$

• Dual Power Seats • Alloy Wheels

15,977

• Running Boards • AM/FM Stereo WAS $ 21,998

$

AT

• 30 MPG!! • Stability Control

• Pickup Shell • Towing Package

*

• Satellite Radio • Full Power Options

$

18,977

VIN: 618374, STK# UC9829P

VIN: C07249, STK# UT9760M

2008 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER

2005 FORD F250 SUPER DUTY 4WD

1

AT

Stk# 9413, VIN: JM3ER2WM5A0315998 MSRP $22,875 - $1,877 RFS Discount

20,998

• 28 MPG!! • 17” Alloy Wheels

*

• Keyless Entry • Custom Roof Spoiler

NEW 2010 Mazda Tribute 4x4 • 4WD • OnStar • Oversize Off-Road Tires • Alloy Wheels

• Running Boards • MP3 (Single Disc)

WAS $ 22,998

WAS $ 24,998

$

19,977

$

• Alloy Wheels • Bed Liner

20,977

2009 FORD F150 SUPERCREW 4WD

**

21,998

1

AT

VIN: D10759, STK# UT9820M

VIN: 208810, STK# UT9762M

2008 CHRYSLER ASPEN

$

Stk# 9574, VIN: 4F2CY9C74AKM07828 MSRP $26,095 - $4,097 RFS Discount

• 6-Speed Automatic • 6-Disc CD Changer

*

• Traction Control • Full Power Options

NEW 2010 Mazda MX-5 Miata Grand Touring • 4WD • Privacy Glass WAS $ 25,998

robberson.com

$

• Leather • Alloy Wheels

20,977

• Running Boards • CD (Single Disc) WAS $ 33,998

VIN: 107987, STK# UT9844M

robberson.com

$

$

• Bed Liner • Alloy Wheels

29,977

VIN: C73012, STK# UT9766P

robberson.com

800-588-1084

SERVICE DEPARTMENT Mon. - Fri. 7am - 11:30pm Sat. 8am - 5:30pm

382-4521

ROBBERSON FORD Underwood

541-

17,998

1

*

NEW 2010 FORD EDGE SEL ALL WHEEL DRIVE 1 AT

$ Stk# 9435, VIN: 1YVHZ8BH1A5M23274 MSRP $22,205 - $4,207 RFS Discount

• Leather • CD (Single Disc)

• 301 Horsepower • 29 Miles Per Gallon • Premium Leather Seating • Shaker Custom Sound Package

Stk#9730; VIN: 108841 MSRP $27,090-$500 Factory Rebate-$592 RFS Disc.

• 28 MPG!! • Premium Alloy Wheels

NEW 2010 MAZDA6 i Sport

2009 FORD F150

Bend, Prineville and www.Robberson.com Main Showroom: 2100 NE 3rd St. Bend • Preowned: On Butler Market & 2nd St.

East

Bend River Promenade

Butler Mkt. Rd. Izzy’s

y

$

*

NEW 2010 Mazda CX-7

NEW 2011 FORD MUSTANG PREMIUM 1 AT

• 3rd Row Seating • Climate Control

13,977

*

• 31 Miles Per Gallon! • 6-Speed Transmission • Full Power Options • Motor Trend Car of the Year!

Stk#9754; VIN: 372703 MSRP $20,420-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$422 RFS Disc.

$

• Privacy Glass • Alloy Wheels

VIN: 338958, STK# UT9827T

2009 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS

17,998

16,998

1

AT

• Privacy Glass • CD (Single Disc) WAS $ 15,998

NEW 2010 FORD FUSION

$

$

10,977

VIN: 252244, STK# UC9806M

VIN: 596857, STK# UT9892M

1 AT

NEW 2010 MAZDA5 Sport

Stk# 9623, VIN: JM1CR2WL8A0381386 MSRP $19,260 - $750 Factory Rebate - $1,512 RFS Discount

• 35 Miles Per Gallon!! • Sync Voice Activated System • Ambient Lighting Package • Redundant Audio Controls

Stk#9745; VIN: 280814 MSRP $19,475-$3,000 Factory Rebate-$1,477 RFS Disc.

8,977

• MP3 (Single Disc) • Alloy Wheels

rk wa

$

*

$

• FWD • Air Conditioning WAS $ 12,998

3rd St.

1 AT

• All Power Options • MP3 Single CD

Pa

• • • • •

X

ROBBERSON PRE-OWNED SUPERSTORE

North

*Sale prices in lieu of FMCC special APR. **Must qualify and finance with FMCC, On Approved Credit. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures may vary from actual vehicles. Not all buyers will qualify. Must be present at dealership to purchase advertised vehicle. No dealers or brokers. Special APR in lieu of rebates. Sale vehicles may have scratches or dents. Offer good through 8-23-10. Thanks for buying at Robberson and reading the small print.

1

AT

Stk# 9277, VIN: JM1NC2FF6A0207112 MSRP $31,150 - $4,152 RFS Discount

26,998

• Hard Top Convertible • Bose Sound System • 6-Speed Manual • Leather Seating

Come in for a test drive today!

ROBBERSON MAZDA 2100 NE 3rd St., Bend 800-588-1084 • 541-382-4521 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Illustrations may not be identical to actual vehicles. Ask about our creative financing plans. *On approved credit. Sale price in lieu of special financing. Minimum 680 Beacon Score, must finance w/MAC. License, title, and doc not included in price. Offers good through 8-23-10.

*


F2 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

General Merchandise ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

280

Estate Sales

Project Connect 2010 Clothing Drive Sept. 18, 2010 9:00am - 4:30pm Deschutes County Fairgrounds WE NEED: • Socks and outdoor shoes •Sweat pants and shirts •Winter gear (especially hats and gloves) •Coats •Sleeping bags! * Drop site locations: Prineville Family Resource Center Robberson Ford Bend Lithia Motors Newport Market Robberson Ford Sisters US Bank Bank of the Cascades La Pine La Pine Community Kitchen Redmond City Center Church

Clothes will be donated to Project Homeless Connect, a non-profit working to end homelessness by connecting families to resources, education and employment.

Where buyers meet sellers.

Easily. The Classified Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every category is indexed on the section’s front page.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food

282

282

200

205

208

208

208

208

Items for Free

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317

Mini Rat Terrier puppy, female, 9 weeks, $125 OBO, call 541-318-6919.

Lab Puppy, AKC Reg., black female, 1st shots, worming, hips & eyes guaranteed, $450, 541-280-7495. Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Pit Bull Puppies, in all colors, starting at $250, 541-280-2827.

FREE Printer, HP color Laserjet, 2002, Model #8550N, exc cond! Call 541-318-1897 FREE USED POSTS & TOP RAILS, about 60. You haul, take all! Call 541-389-0371

202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

205

Items for Free

Truck Toolbox, black fiberglass, locks, great shape, fits 5’ wide truck bed. $35. 541-312-4144

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

16’ EXTENSION LADDER Aluminum. $45. Call 541-385-6928 Alpaca manure ready for all your landscaping and garden needs. FREE 541-385-4989

284

55 GAL. FISH TANK, new, with stand. $125 OBO. Call 541-389-9268

286

Beautiful German Shorthair 1 yr old. (Maya) Excellent bloodlines, papers, 2nd shots, dew claws. Lots of energy, very loving and needs tons of attention! Bird hunting dog.... But would make a great family pet! Paid $400 but will sacrifice for a good home. Call George at 541-382-3439 or 541-948-2137 Black Lab AKC male puppy, shots, dew claws, born 4/24, $450. 541-788-5161.

Dachshund Puppies, Mini, Heavily championed Pedigree, shots, $200 reds, $250 piebald. 541-678-7529 Dachshunds, AKC mini’s, males /females, black/tan & chocolate, short & long hair, shots, ready now, $325-$375 541-420-6044,541-447-3060 English Bulldog AKC male pup, 5 mo., all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376.

LABS - Purebred 4 black females, 1 yellow male, $200. 541-420-5781. German Shorthair AKC Pups, 6 weeks, Champ bird Lhasa Apso Pups, beautiful dogs, white/liver & ticked, colors, exc. personalities, $600, 541-330-0277. $250, Madras, 503-888-0800. Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, shots, wormed, vet checked. $500 & up. 509-281-0502.

BOXER PUPS, AKC,ready for new homes, 4 males, 2 females, brindles 541-280-6677

Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, born 8/8, $600, 541-408-0839.

Chihuahua Puppies, AKC, 3 females, 8 weeks old, shots & wormed, 541-536-8554

Golden Retriever Pups, AKC Reg. Ready for 'forever' homes, wormed & 1st shots. 2 Females $600, 7 males $500 541-788-2005

Chocolate Labs AKC, 4 females, 2 males, born 5/18, dew claws removed, 2 sets of shots, mom is OFA certified for good hips, elbows normal, dad OFA certified exc. hips, elbows normal, $550 ea. 541-548-4700.

KITTENS! All colors, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Placement fee just $25. Nice adult cats just $15. Adult cat free w/adoption of kitten. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, call re: other days/times. 389-8420, 598-5488, www.craftcats.org

288

288

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

HUGE MOVING -TO-HAWAII SALE! Large Awbrey Butte home, antiques include mission sideboard, oak armoire, child’s armoire, primitive style cupboard & white display cabinet, 3 Duncan Phyfe drum tables, chairs, unique cedar chest, 2 iron beds, silver, china, glassware, collectibles, gold & costume jewelry, PLUS carved china cabinet, leather recliner & full living room, large wooden electric fireplace, bistro set, kitchenware, freezer, s/s fridge, crystal chandelier, near new snow blower, Sanborn air compressor, Dremel saw & stand, Delta jig saw, shop vac, power & hand tools, fire pit, lots of yard & garden items, shop & yard supplies, large pond/fountain pump, golf clubs, 2 nice vintage saddles, aluminum ping pong table, Quickie P100 electric wheel chair, and much more! Portland to 9th, north to Hillside Park, right on Stone Pine, left to 2328 NW Stone Hill FRI. & SAT. Numbers 8 a.m. Friday Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 For pictures & info go to atticestatesandappraisals.com

Huge multi-family sale. Friday and Saturday 8:00-3:00. New items still in boxes,crafts, saddles, furniture, Jewelry, clothes. 65635 White Rock Loop, Bend, between Tumalo & Eagle Crest. Moving Sale! Furniture, fine art, antiques, collectibles. Sat-Sun, 10-4. 2879 NW Fairway Heights Drive.

Big Barn Sale! Over 1000 items: antiques, collectibles, 30s/40s memorabilia & junk. Sunriver exit, take roundabout 2nd exit to SpringRiver Rd., cross bridge, 2nd left on Solar, 1½ miles turn left on Upland to 17109. Fri.-Sat.; 9-5, Sun. 1/2 price.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

20584 Jacklight Ln., off Brosterhous in Sun Meadows, too many items to list: camping gear, 3-person canoe, clothes, antiques, misc. kitchen items, dishes, glasses, etc., Fri. & Sat. 8-3.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

GARAGE SALE: Fri.-Sun., 7 am, 2743 NE WELLS ACRES, ALMOST everything $5 or less, lots of free items!

DESIGNER GARAGE SALE: Bathroom vanities, interior lighting, furniture, lamps, home decor, sinks, faucets, clothing, textiles and more. SATURDAY ONLY 20227 Murphy Road

Manx kittens. 7 wks. Will be large. Socialized & healthy. $150. 541-419-4827 MINI AUSSIES AKC - minis and toys, must see. 541598-5314 or 541-788-7799

Guy Stuff: Tools, knives, ‘89 Garage Sale: Sporting goods, Ford F250; Gal stuff: knick electronics equip, antiques, Garage Sale - Lots of scrap Huge 2-Family Garage GARAGE SALE 615 NE knacks, size 12-14 clothes, fabric (silks, cotton); jewelry, general household items. Sale! Lots of interesting Cheyenne Drive, Redmond. glassware, bikes, household, cat toys, clothing & houseSat., 9-4 , 19775 Silver Ct. items. Saturday only, 8-4, A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING frames, off W. Hwy 20, right hold items. Thurs-Sun, 9-4, 225 SE Craven Road. Sat. 8/21 from 7:30 to ? on Cook Ave, left on 5th St, HUGE GARAGE SALE! Sat. 63665 Deschutes Mkt Rd. Only, 9-5, Rommaine Village, right at 64695 Wood Ave. Suzette & Fred Shafer 61040 S Queens Dr., #1, KIDS SALE! Sat. 7am-12pm & Yard Sale 8/21 Sat. only 8-2 Tents, cobblestones from San 12-1pm=1/2 off. Tons of Clothes, motor scooter, pine Francisco,brand name clothes, clothes (girls 6-7/8; boys 60716 Willow Creek Loop box coffee table, kids stuff. kids size 6-10, women’s size 3-5) toys, books, vhs, dvd, SATURDAY, AUG. 21 • SUNDAY, AUG. 22 Antiques, books, fishing, tools, 3028 NW Winslow Dr. 4-14, pictures, books, garPS2, much more. 63664 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM clothes, housewares, much den, home decor, misc. High Standard off Cooley Rd. Crowd control admittance more, Fri.-Sat., 8-5, 3 mi. W. numbers issued at 8:00 am Saturday of Tumalo towards Sisters. Multi-Family Garage Sale: Massive 2 home moving Fri. & Sat. 8-4, 60976 sale! Furniture, lots of Take 15th St. to Knott Rd., follow west to Mtn. High subdivision, Downsizing Sale: Sat. 8-4, 3926 Snowberry Pl, off Brookenter gates & follow signs to Willow Creek Lp. Parking only on NW Lower Village Rd, off household misc, clothes, swood - Sweetbriar - Snowside opposite of Mailboxes. DO NOT PARK ON GRASS! Archie Briggs, Priced to Sell, beds, piano, bikes, and much berry.Household items, home Cash Only. more. Fri 8-5, Sat 8-5, Sun Lovely Oriental Antiques and other items include: Bronze Cranes; furnishings, tools, & outdoor 9-12, free afternoon! 63578 Japanese Lacquer picture with applied Mother of Pearl and sports items. No early birds. FIND IT! Boyd Acres Rd @ Cooley. Ivory; Thai Temple Goddess bronze with gilt; Porcelain boy BUY IT! Happiness in the home; Temple Jars; Bronze Japanese Hibachi; White Water KAYAK, archery/ Tang Dynasty horse; Coffee Table; Red lacquer large cabinet SELL IT! hunting, camping, kids' stuff, Moving Sale: Sat. 8-?, 2420 with Mother of Pearl overlay; Oxblood porcelain pieces; BroyNE Desert Willow Ct, brand The Bulletin Classifieds western saddle, '89 Jeep hill dining table-6 chairs, 2 leaves; Remington and Russell renew kitchen items, home deWrangler, sports equipment production bronzes; Nice sofa and chair with ottoman; Hide a Estate Sale: Antique clocks, cor, appl., furniture, no junk! and MORE! 8/21 from 7-3. bed; Trundle bed with two headboards; Two Bookcase units, coins, Dolls, jewelry, glass19417 Indian Summer Rd. one with desk; two faux cherry wood bookcases; very tall oak ware, 1016 NW Newport Sale: Fri.-Sun. 8-?, bike, cookbookcase; Ladies swivel lounge chair and ottoman; Two dulciware, glass, books, furniture, Ave., Sat.-Sun. 9-4. 286 mers and African drum; 1859 Enfield musket; Reproduction pis284 blankets, baby items, clothes, Sales Northeast Bend tol from civil war; Copper pieces; 1939-1942 Life magazines, albums, misc, 2844 NE Waller Sales Southwest Bend not each month; Marquetry table; small Empire display cabinet; Big Family Garage Sale: Fri. 1936 International "Courtship" sterling; 1936 Gorham" King 2 Family Yard Sale: Fri. 8-4, Sat. 9-3, 20717 WanEdward" sterling; Arcade game Ms. Pacman works; Computer 12-5, Sat. 8-5, 60970 Aldalea Dr, kids stuff & clothes, desk; Great treadmill; Massage Table; Recumbent Exercycle; pine Ln., Romaine Village, household, gardening, more! Lovely Bakers rack; Men's and ladies clothing and shoes; Linens; kitchen gadgets & lots of misc. lots of Books and DVDs and CDs; Kitchen ware--pots and pans Book, Books, Books! Fiction, and electrical appliances; Lots of nice glassware and serving 4 Family Sale. Baby/kid stuff, Non-fiction, for kids & adults. dishes; Very nice dresser and matching small chest; Ultra Chef furniture, fabric, toys, tools, Hardback & paperback. Some Barbecue; Patio table and umbrella; Other patio items; shelving; much more. Fri 10-7 Sat 8-7 Homeschool curriculum. Sat Great hand woven wool area rug; Two older sewing machines; Garage Sale Sat-Sun 9-4. Sun 10-5 60105 Cheyenne Rd only 8/21 8am - no earlier Golf clubs and balls; Vacuums and air purifiers; Lots of garage Paintings $10-$300, suit1751 NE Taurus items and misc. ~~~So much more to see!!! cases & bags, furniture, bid Awesome Garage Sale! Presented by: Family Garage Sale: Sat. items, wall rifle holder, lots 8/21/10, 9-1. artist’s supDeedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC of clothes incl Western, plies, paintings, frames, and 7:30-3, Children’s clothes, www.deedysestatesales.com much miscellaneous! 65139 household items. toys, furniture, misc., 1952 Collins Rd. (Tumalo) 117 SW Roosevelt Ave. NE Zachary Ct, #2. 541-419-2242 days ~ 541-382-5950 eves

ESTATE SALE

Scottish Terrier Pup (1), CKC reg., 1st shots/wormer, female, $400 541-517-5324.

Shih-Poo & Poo-Chis: adorable, hypoallergenic. $300/$200. 541-744-1804 ask for Martha

Siberian Husky/Golden Retriever, 1.5 yrs. Beautiful, spirited & energetic dog needs fun family. LOVES: snow, water, cats, kids; on a wellness plan, shots, neutered, dewclaws removed. $100. 541-350-4460

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Sales Redmond Area

(Private Party ads only)

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Scottish-fold mix female 9 wks, black & white, litter trained, $75/cash. 541-419-3082.

Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com

Lots of Great Stuff! Lots of HUGE YARD SALE!!! everything Furniture, Vintage Items, must go. furniture, sports New Golf Shirts, SAT. 9 - ? equipment, clothes, camping 21047 SE AZALIA AVE. gear and MORE. Saturday ONLY. 1310 NW 57th Street Redmond. 290

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537

Shih

Big Moving Sale - Everything must go! Sat, 9-4; Sun, 9-2. 7433 NW Larch Dr. (Cline Falls 74th St exit by Eagle Crest, follow signs.

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

www.bendbulletin.com SALE! Sat. 8:30-2:00, 2729 NW Estate Sale: Sat. & Sun. 9-6, Marken St., Valhalla. 2009 toys, dishes, misc., some an50cc scooter, cruiser/Mtn tique furniture pieces, bikes and much more! 18988 Shoshone Rd., off Baker Rd., 541-306-6955. Tumalo Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-4,

Lhasa-Poos: Darling little black & white teddy bears, great family dogs, taking deposits now, ready 8/28, they won’t last long, $375 ea. 541-923-7501.

POODLES-AKC Toy, parti, phantom & other colors, joyful tail waggers. 541-475-3889

SALE! Play centers: kitchen, vet, etc.; turtle sandbox; Hot Wheel; adult clothes, kids 6-12; changing table; white dbl. sink; towel stacker; chairs; flooring; twin bed; flower pots; file cabinets, lights; drawer pull; soaker hoses. Aug. 20 & Aug. 21, 9-2. 3743 SW Xero Ave.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Store No More Garage Sale: Thur.-Sun. 10-3, 824 NW Helmholtz Way, 1 mi. N. of Reindeer Farm, Macramé, craft beads, baskets, sewing notions, clothing size 14/2x, jeans, blouses, skirts, dresses, free stuff also. No kids items. A garage full of other stuff, you know the drill. No early sales, cash only, bring change & small bills, no items over $30. Yard Sale: Sat. 9-3, Fainting couch, computer desk, fabric, craftables, portable pet yard & more! 5060 NW Kingwood Ave.

Huge OWWII Garage Sale: Fri. 8-3, Sat. 8-2, Coke Machine,outdoor dining canopy, coolers, BBQ, household items, 55952 Wood Duck Dr.

Huge Yard Sale:

Fri & Sat. 8-5, located at 52470 Wayside Lp., La Pine, take Burgess to Sunrise to Wayside Lp. Paddle boat w/trailer, bird cages, tools, wood cart, BBQ, knick knacks, picnic table, windmills, and lot of household & other outdoor items to pick from. NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE.

Multi-Family Sale: Bikes to books & new beds too! Oodles of nice clothes & housewares, antiques & appl., A-Z, we got it! Don’t miss it, Sat. & Sun. 8-5, 2027 SW Jericho Ln., Culver, 1 mi. E. off Hwy. 97. Powell Butte: Antiques, glass ware, china set, furniture, costume jewelry, tools, Fri., Sat., Sun, 8-5, 7861 SW Ridge Ln., off Riggs Rd.

541-322-7253

Sisters - Huge Moving Sale. Fri., Sat., & Sun. 9am-4pm. Antiques, collectables, furniture, Bauer, Fiesta, Fishing lures, Hoosier, lots of misc. No Earlies. 69410 Lasso, Tolegate.

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Sales Other Areas 67590 HWY 20, 4 MILES EAST OF SISTERS, Fri. 9-1, Sat. 9-3, new Lane recliner, shopsmith, store fixtures, yarn, pictures, small appliances, clothes, linens, Christmas, misc. 541-709-0448 CULVER: 2-family, Sat. & Sun., 10-5, Pepsi Machine, organ, rollaway bed, BBQ, clothes, household, 623 View Point Dr.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Yard Sale 8/20 and 8/21 from 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at 3367 SW Williams Rd., Powell Butte, OR. Furniture, clothing, outside equipment. Contact: 541-504-0365

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Yard Sale: Sat. 9-5, S. of Sunriver off Vandervert to Blue Eagle to Trader Ln to 17838 Trader Ln., 541-598-7284.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 F3

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Lost and Found

Hay, Grain and Feed

Siberian Husky Puppies, AKC, 8 weeks old, champion lines, health certificate, 2nd shots & dewormed, ready to go now. 1 male left. $450 ea. 541-504-7660 541-279-3056

STANDARD POODLE PUPS: black and silver, 1 females, 2males, $400. 541-647-9831. Standard Poodle Registered Chocolates, Apricots & Creams, Females & males $600 each. 541-771-0513. Vizsla AKC Puppies ready to go home Sept. 6th. No white, own both Dam & Sire. Natural hunters, pointer, retrievers. $100 dep, $650 due on pick up. Call 541-620-2633 Yellow Lab pups - AKC, parents on site, 1st shots & worming done. 541-420-9474

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Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

Remington 700 BDL 7mm, never fired, w/unmounted 3x9 Redfield Scope, $450; Remington 700 BDL .243 Winchester , $400; JC Higgins 12 ga., 2-3/4, dbl barrel, $200 541-382-5106.

WIN 73 32/20, 38/40, 71/348, & 94 30/30 & 32. Marlin model 375/375 & 30/30. REM 41, 30 REM, Browning Safari 30-06, Perrazzi 12 ga. single shot, trap. WIN 101 12 ga., single shot trap & O/U 12 ga. WIN model 12, 12 ga. trap. Pumps, auto and side-by-side 12 & 20 ga. H & H Firearms 541-382-9352

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Antiques & Collectibles

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Antique Furniture:Cane rocker, $300;4 Nesting tables, $400, Scottish armoire, $300; marble top dresser, $500; English game table, $325; marble top table, $300; 541-306-6955.

Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

FOOSBALL TABLE,

"clas-

sic sport" $200 OBO 650-544-8074 .

251

Hot Tubs and Spas

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 THE JEWELRY DOCTOR Robert H. Bemis, formerly at Fred Meyer, now located at 230 SE 3rd St. #103 Bend. 541-383-7645. Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures

FOUND prescription eyeglasses 1st Quality Grass Hay in case near Sully’s restauBarn stored, no rain, 2 string, rant Redmond.541-788-5492 Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton FOUND Prescription Sun541-549-3831 glasses, Fall Creek Trail, Monday 8/16. 541-603-0675 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3 bales, $25 bale; Orchard Found: Small Green Bag, while grass hay mid-size 3x3 bales, Hiking Broken Top, 8/18, call $45 bale. Volume discounts, to ID, 541-330-9586. delivery avail. 541-480-8648. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 from the rest! Have the top bales, approx. 750 lb., If no line in bold print for only answer, please leave msg., I $2.00 extra. will return your call. Redmond, 541-548-2514 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; LOST: Beloved Boop is missing. Kentucky Bluegrass; ComLast seen at home 8/5. Sispost; 541-546-6171. ter Beep is crying. Family is crying. Boop is 5 yr old neu333 tered male Tabby cat. Gray, Poultry, Rabbits, black & tan striped. NW and Supplies Quincy Ave, lower west hills area. Please call if you think you’ve seen him. Our hearts Rooster, Black Silkie, 4 months, sweet boy, FREE, are heavy. Thank you. 541-617-9501. 541-480-3122, 541-382-3322 LOST BLACK CAT: Fluffy, large neutered Male, $50 reward. Crooked River Ranch or perhaps lower bridge route to Sisters? Call 541-923-1174

Keys indoor 3-person infrared Carpet Cleaner, Roto-Vac corner sauna, was $3200; like Cleaning System, Por- LOST gold-hinged wedding new, $1600. 541-536-3135 band, single round ½ carat table or truck mount, hardly diamond. Lost at Tangleused, $2000 new, asking 253 wood? Skyliner? Crescent $1000, 541-350-5092. TV, Stereo and Video Lake? Call 541-317-9571.

264 Lost Keys Nissan+Fob+Disney Entertainment console, 48” Munch-N-Music, Drake park, high, holds 32” TV, 3 shelves, Snow Removal Equipment 8/12, Reward, 541-610-6600 A-1 Washers & Dryers 2 doors, $50. 32” Color TV, $125 each. Full Warranty. Panasonic CRT, fits above 215 Lost: Left my Mossberg Rifle in Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s console, $25. 541-526-1371 Rack at Shooting Range E. of Coins & Stamps dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Bend, reward offered. Retro TV, Motorola 25” color 541-389-567, 541-848-7812 Appliances, new & recondiconsole on wheels, $25. WANTED TO BUY 541-526-1371 tioned, guaranteed. Over- US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & SNOW PLOW, Boss REMEMBER: If you have lost an Currency collect, accum. Pre stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s animal don't forget to check 8 ft. with power 255 1964 silver coins, bars, The Humane Society in Bend, Maytag, 541-385-5418 turn , excellent condition Computers rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold 382-3537 or Redmond, $2,500. 541-385-4790. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & 923-0882 or Prineville, dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex THE BULLETIN requires com447-7178 puter advertisers with mul& vintage watches. No col265 tiple ad schedules or those lection too large or small. BedBuilding Materials selling multiple systems/ rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 software, to disclose the Bend Habitat RESTORE 242 Bunk Bed, Lodge Pole name of the business or the Building Supply Resale Pine, Top is Twin and the term "dealer" in their ads. Exercise Equipment Quality at LOW PRICES Bottom is Full Size. $1200 Private party advertisers are 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Phone, 541-419-2383 defined as those who sell one Bowflex X-treme, exc. cond,. Open to the public . computer. training DVD, $600 OBO. 541-382-0394. Logs sold by the foot and also Look at: Bendhomes.com 257 Log home kit, 28x28 shell for Complete Listings of 245 Musical Instruments incl. walls (3 sided logs) Area Real Estate for Sale 308 ridge pole, rafters, gable end Golf Equipment logs, drawing (engineered) Farm Equipment all logs peeled & sanded Ping Eye 2 black dot irons, and Machinery $16,000 . 541-480-1025. 3-PW. ZZ-Lite shafts. $200 or best offer. 541-510-6309. 1998 New Holland Model 267 "1725" Tractor. $13,900. 246 1910 Steinway Model A Fuel and Wood Very good condition. OrigiParlor Grand Piano burled Guns & Hunting nal owner. 3 cylinder diesel. Dining Set, Ethan Allen All Year Dependable mahogany, restored. orig. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO and Fishing Farmhouse Pine collection, soundboard & ivory keys. Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole never used. Backhoe and box table, 6 chairs w/custom $41,000 OBO. 541-408-7953. cord, $165 for 1, or $290 for scraper included. Trailer also cushions, lighted hutch, sofa .270 Savage 116, new, stain2, Bend Delivery Cash, Check. available. (541) 420-7663. Advertise your car! less & Nikon ballistic scope, table, $2000, 541-306-4297 Visa/MC. 541-420-3484 Add A Picture! 3x9x40, $675. 541-280-4794 Kubota B2400 tractor 4WD 24 DRESSER 64x18 triple mirror, Reach thousands of readers! Best Dry Seasoned Firewood HP, diesel, front loader & $300; TV stand 48x17, oak, Benelli M1 Super 90 12 Gauge Call 541-385-5809 $110/cord rounds, split harrow. $7295 541-318-1367 Semi Auto- Camo, $850 or The Bulletin Classifieds $65. 541-382-3387. avail., fuel costs may apply. trade for 12 or 20 Gauge Landpride Equipment: Fast, friendly service. French Country maple dining Electronic Organ w/Rhythm O/U. 541-480-9181 Cutters, Boxblades, 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. table with leaves extends 8’, Section, Thomas “CaliforLandscape Rakes. BROWNING BBR .300 win., 6 upholstered chairs, $325. nian 263”, w/dual keyboards, CRUISE THROUGH classified 0% down for 12 months w/factory break, wood stock, 541-382-0394. volume pedal, left foot keys, when you're in the market for On Approved Credit. $695; Ruger M77, .338 win., electronic simulation of a new or used car. See Store for details. wood stock, $575; Winchesstringed instruments, brass, Furniture Midstate Power Products ter Mdl. 70, .300 win, wood piano & drums, Rhythm secRedmond, OR stock, $575. 541-728-1036. tion w/8 selections from 541-548-6744 Waltz to Rumba. Asking CASH!! $150, you haul from E. Bend, LOG Truck loads of dry LodgeFor Guns, Ammo & Reloading pole firewood, $1200 for to see this beautiful Organ & Supplies. 541-408-6900. Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 Visit our HUGE home decor play it, call 541-480-6480. or 541-536-3561 for more consignment store. New Find exactly what Piano, Yamaha M500, great information. items arrive daily! 930 SE cond., $1100, call you are looking for in the Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., SEASONED JUNIPER 541-390-9601 Bend • 541-318-1501 CLASSIFIEDS $150/cord rounds, www.redeuxbend.com $170/cord split. 260 GUNS FOR SALE: Knight Disk Delivered in Central Oregon. Misc. Items GENERATE SOME excitement in Muzzleloader, Cabela's Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. your neigborhood. Plan a gaHawkins 54, Winchester 12 Bedrock Gold & Silver rage sale and don't forget to 269 gauge Model 25, Parker-Hale Special Low BUYING DIAMONDS & advertise in classified! 308 with scope and ammo, 0% Financing Gardening Supplies R O L E X ’ S For Cash 385-5809. Interarms Mark X 30-06. All 541-549-1592 & Equipment fairly priced. Staying in Bend Hide-A-Bed couch, sectional, New Kubota this week. Call 714-488-5008 Buying Diamonds navy & multi, lots of pillows, B3300 SU /Gold for Cash good cond., $50, 617-5787. GUN SHOW BarkTurfSoil.com • Front Loader • 4WD SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS Sept. 4th & 5th Instant Landscaping Co. Mattresses good • 3 Speed Hydro 541-389-6655 Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds PROMPT DELIVERY quality used mattresses, Buy! Sell! Trade! • Power Steering • 33 HP 541-389-9663 BUYING at discounted SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Lionel/American Flyer trains, fair prices, sets & singles. Wall to Wall Tables Reg Price $18,760 accessories. 408-2191. DAN'S TRUCKING $8 Admission 541-598-4643. Sale Price $16,995 Top soil, fill dirt, landscape OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS DO YOU HAVE & gravel. Call for quotes Recliner Rocker, burgundy, 541-347-2120 Financing on 541-504-8892; 480-0449 SOMETHING TO SELL swivels, with ottoman, like approved credit. FOR $500 OR LESS? new, $60. 541-317-5154 Oregon’s Largest 3-Day SUPER TOP SOIL Midstate Power GUN & KNIFE SHOW www.hersheysoilandbark.com ROLL TOP DESK computer Non-commercial Ladies Free This Screened, soil & compost compatible, oak finish, real Products advertisers can Month! mixed, no rocks/clods. High nice, $500. 541-416-9605. 541-548-6744 place an ad for our August 20 - 21 - 22 humus level, exc. for flower Redmond beds, lawns, gardens, Portland Expo Center "Quick Cash Special" straight screened top soil. Fri. 12-6 * Sat. 9-5 * 1 week 3 lines Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you * Sun. 10-4. I-5 exit #306B $10 bucks haul. 541-548-3949. - Admission $9 or 1-800-659-3440 2 weeks $16 bucks! Tractor, Case 22 hp., 270 CollectorsWest.com fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. Sofa, Beautiful 82” 3-cushion, Ad must Lost and Found mower deck, bucket, auger, new upholstery 4-5” corner include price of item blade, move forces sale posts, $150; Beige Chair, Pine Country Outfitters FOUND CAMERA in middle of $11,800. 541-325-1508. $75, 541-382-6539 is your Authorized Beretta www.bendbulletin.com hwy near Suttle Lake, on and CZ dealer. We are now or Sunday 8/15. Call to identify. open at 1441 SW Chandler, 325 Call Classifieds at 541-388--4054. Suite 101, next door to 541-385-5809 Cascade Lakes Brewery. Found Keys, 1 key, 2 electronic Hay, Grain and Feed Come in and check out our openers, Awbrey Butte, 8/17, 1st cutting Alfalfa/cow, GENERATE SOME excitement inventory and take advan541-383-1676 $75/ton; 2nd cutting Orin your neigborhood. Plan a tage of our 10% discount. chard grass, $140/ton; 2nd Swivel Rocker, in Brown Fabric, garage sale and don't forget Found Keys: Between FootExp. 8/28/10. cutting Alfalfa, $130/ton. bridge & Galveston in Drake Like new $15, please call to advertise in classified! Call 541-706-9295 Madras, 541-948-0292 Park, 8/15, 541-408-2204. 541-382-6539. 385-5809. Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Farm Market

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Horses and Equipment Crosby English Saddle 16½” ~ $350. 541-382-0394.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Adult Care

Child Care, Reg. Tiny Town CC ~ Annette M-F, 6am-6pm 12 wks-5 yrs. FT $25/PT $15 Pre-pay Bend N. 541-598-5031 tinytowncc@gmail.com

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Stubben English Saddle, $200; English Bridle, $50, Western Bridle, $45, Western Saddle, $95, Kids Western Saddle, $85, call 503-369-6345.

The Bulletin

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Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Utah & British Columbia. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Arborist: Ground person with commercial experience. Valid drivers license & good record req. 541-383-2290

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Meat & Animal Processing GRASS FED BEEF, quick sale special. $1.80/lb. hanging weight + cut and wrap. Order now with deposit. Call 388-4687 or 610-6408. Pasture Raised, All Natural Angus Beef, $2.85/lb, hanging weight, 1/4’s, 1/2’s, or whole, ready early Nov., please call 541-323-6316.

383

Produce and Food KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, Oregon U Pick: Free Stone Canning peaches - Sun Crest, semicling peaches - Flavorcrest, Early Necarines, Santa Rosa Plums

Bring Containers Open 7 Days per week, 8 a.m. 6 p.m. Only. 541-934-2870

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction

Randy, 541-306-7492

Decks DECK

REFINISHING

Don’t let old stains build up year after year, strip off for the best look. Call Randy 541-410-3986. CCB#147087

Excavating

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Home Improvement

Since 1978

If you want a low price, that is N O T us, if you want the highest quality, that IS us! www.brgutters.com 541-389-8008 • 800-570-8008 CCB#103411

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

CCB# 191228 • VI/MC/DS/AE

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

• Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

541-390-1466 541-504-1211 • Cabinet tune-ups • Adding Accessories • Retro-fits • Home Repairs www.andresfixandfinish.com info@andresfixandfinish.com

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Art Picture Yourself Here! Busy frame shop looking for an artistic, friendly, and hardworking part-time salesperson. Art background, outstanding customer service skills and a flexible schedule are required. Submit resume to The Great Frame-Up, 61535 S. Hwy 97, Suite 4, Bend, OR 97702. tgfubend@msn.com Automotive Looking for a technician who is skilled in all parts of the industry; imports, domestics, diagnosing, and repairs. Great pay, benefits, great working environment, full time position. Growing fast and need more help. E-mail resume to: service@murrayandholt.com or mail resume to: Murray & Holt Motors, 187 NE Franklin, Bend, OR 97701. Start Right Away!!!

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Automotive Qualified journeyman technician to service all makes and models vehicles. Pay DOE with benefits. 389-3031, ask for Bill Thomas. AUTO

TECHNICIAN NEEDED Immediate OPENING for local GM Dealership. hourly or Flat Rate. Wage depending on experience and certifications. Excellent income potential, health insurance, 401 K, paid vacation, and more. Bring, mail, or fax resume to Randy at 1740 Washington Ave.,/ PO Box 546 Baker City, Oregon 97814. Info 800-399-3912 Fax 541-523-5158.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Heathcare Accountant/Human Resources

Looking for experienced accountant to oversee financial responsibilities and Human Resources of busy Surgery Center minimum 5yrs experience including supervisory experience. Responsible for organizing and maintaining financial accounting systems, including general ledger, A/P, A/R deposits, payroll, pension plans, financial statements, budgeting/forecasting, case costing, and weekly/monthly/ quarterly financial analysis reports. Coordinate annual reporting to external CPA firm for tax returns and financial statements and other annual reporting requirements. Knowledge of GAAP standards and able to present financials at monthly board meetings. Strong skills in Quickbooks and Excel are essential, Power Point beneficial. Bachelors Degree and CPA licensure preferred. Human Resource duties include bi-weekly review of payroll, time analysis, review/maintenance of employee benefit packages, OFLA/FMLA issues, COBRA issues, maintenance of policies and procedures relating to personnel, Federal and State reporting and posting requirements, and employee relations. Experience with ADP preferred. Position is Full-time - exempt, 40hours per week, Monday-Friday, Salary commensurate with experience, generous benefit package provided. Able to accommodate additional hours for meetings as necessary. Position reports to Administrator. Job Applications can be found at www.bendsurgery.com . Resume's can be emailed to jobs@bendsurgery.com. or faxed to 541.318.0857. Include work history, references, and salary requirements. Position open till filled. Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WIN N IN G TE A M O F S A L E S / P R O M O TIO N P R O F E S S IO N A L S A R E M A K IN G A N A V E R A G E O F $400 - $800 PER WEEK D O IN G S P E C IA L E V E N T, TR A D E S H O W, R E TA IL & G R O C E R Y S TO R E P R O M O TIO N S WH IL E R E P R E S E N TIN G THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

(This special package is not available on our website)

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Free Estimates Senior Discounts Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Roofing

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

476

Employment Opportunities

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

The Bulletin

Are all aspects of your roof correct?

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Brenda’s Cleaning Service has openings for a few new cus tomers. 541-948-2991.

Caregiver avail, retired RN, personal care, assist w/daily activities, daytime hrs, local refs, flex rates. 541-678-5161

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Farmers Column

Pepsi-Cola Bottling in Bend is recruiting for an experienced diesel mechanic to perform preventive maintenance & repair on our International & Cummins powered delivery fleet. Other duties will include trailer, forklift & support vehicle inspection & minor facilities repair. Allison transmission experience is helpful. A good driving record, ability to acquire a CDL, drug screen and physical are required. Competitive wage & benefit package. Tues-Fri, 10 hour shift. Pick up & drop off application at 2440 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 or mail resume or application to PO Box 10728, Eugene, OR 97440 Attn: HR, by 8/27. EOE

454

Looking for Employment

MECHANIC

Moving and Hauling

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FLEET

$42,418 - $59,801 Full Benefits Professional/Mgmt., Regular, Full-Time This position is located in Chiloquin. For more information contact: The Klamath Tribes PO Box 436 Chiloquin, OR 97624 rachel.coss@klamathtribes.com 541-783-2219 x 113

Townsend Antique Transport: We move antiques in-town & out of town, everything padded & strapped, Call 541-382-7333.

Summer Clean Up

CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

Contracts & Grants Compliance Officer

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

JUNK BE GONE

Domestic Services

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states and British Columbia. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

476

Employment Opportunities

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Debris Removal

Building/Contracting

421

Schools and Training

476

Employment Opportunities

Handyman

Barns

Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

400

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Employment

541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Beyond Expectations Senior Concierge Service: Offering assistance w/non-medical tasks & activities. Created specifically for seniors & their families. Call today,541-728-8905

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Same Day Response

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Reach thousands of readers!

The Bulletin

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

REYNOLDS PAINTING Pressure washing H Deck Refinishing H Free estimates Residential Int H Ext repaints 541-419-7814 CCB# 191055. MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Tile, Ceramic

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily


F4 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Front Desk - position for WorldMark/Eagle Crest. Part-time. Strong hospitality exp. desired. Must be flexible, a GO GETTER, and must be willing to work weekends and evenings. Drug Free Workplace. Please apply at Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

General Now accepting resumes for an exciting opportunity at a growing business in Baker City, Oregon, for hard working, self-motivated individuals. 1-3 years of management experience a plus. Please submit resume to Blind Box #16, c/o Baker City Herald, PO Box 807, Baker City, OR 97814. Groundskeeper, Part-time to work 16+ hrs/week. $10/hr. Duties will include cleaning the grounds and light maintenance. Must be able to pass criminal background check. Email resume to kpetersen@ princetonproperty.com or fax 503-794-9045 Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449. Housekeeping Part time position, some hotel resort cleaning exp. preferred. Must be able to work weekends. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) Housekeeping ROOM PREPARATION /QUALITY CHECKER. (2) openings, part time. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) Houseperson -Part-time Must be able to lift 50 lbs and have current ODL. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel)

Logging- Openings for skidder, cat, delimber, buncher, and timberfaller. Work in N. CA. Exp. operators only. 530-258-3025. MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL CLASSROOM AIDE PartTime Bend location. Enrollment in Criminal History Registry, Pediatric First Aid/ CPR, & References required. Send cover letter and resume to eam@wildblue.net. Newspaper Carrier: Adult motor route, part-time, some weekends, Early a.m., 4 hr/ $60/day. ODL, good car, exp. pref.,541-385-0120, msg. p.m Receptionist Receptionist position available, part-time, possible full-time, Mon. - Fri. Clerical support, answering multi-line phone, computer skills, and must have Excel experience. Fax cover sheet and resume to Joanna: 541-330-0853.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RETAIL/WIRELESS - Want a fast paced environment with great pay & benefits at one of Sprint's largest retailers? Exp. sales reps & managers can email resumes to jobs@swirelessnw.com. Sales Agent - Don’t find a sales job, find a sales career. Combined Insurance is looking for quality individuals to join its sales force. We provide training, a training completion bonus, comprehensive benefits and leads for your local market. For immediate consideration please contact Delia Grenier, Market Director, at 503-913-6709 or email a resume and cover letter to delia.grenier@combined.com You may also apply directly in the Careers tab on our website: www.combinedinsurance.com/ careers . EOE.

Sales - Between High School and College? Over 18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what you're worth!!! Travel w/Successful Business Group. Paid Training. Transportation, Lodging Provided. 1-877-646-5050. (PNDC) SALES Cascade Motorsports is currently growing our sales team. Come join us to sell motorcycles, snowmobiles, ATVs and accessories. Must possess a valid ODL with current Motorcycle Endorsement. 2 years retail sales required. Mail resume: 20445 Cady Way, Bend, OR 97701. No walk-ins or phone calls! Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Sales

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $800/wk Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-861-8166

SUTERRA-MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN: 5+ years experience manufacturing setting. Fix mechanical, electrical and other operational problems on equipment; requires welding, milling, etc. Apply/review description visit: www.suterra.com; fax: (310) 966-8298

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com. Welder Full-time. Operate welding machines for stainless steel wire feed, heliarc, stick, cutting torches and air arc. Minimum of 2 years experience, knowledge of stainless steel welding and the use of the Mig and Tig process is required. Mail or fax resume to: KEY TECHNOLOGY, INC. 975 SW First Street Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 923-1170 - fax

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

“WANTED” HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, $5,250. Come see! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21’ SAN JUAN sailboat, trailer, 5 HP Honda outboard. $1,650. 541-610-5801.

Honda 1984,

Magna

V45

exc. cond., runs great, $2500, call Greg, 541-548-2452.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930.

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Winnebago Adventurer 33V 2005, 5K mi, exc. cond., full body paint, 2 slides, Chevy 8.1 Engine, Work horse chassis, fully loaded, $79,900, Call Brad, 541-480-4850.

WINNEBAGO BRAVE 2000 ClASS A 26’, Workhorse Chassis exc. cond., walk around queen bed, micro. gas oven, fridge/freezer, 56K mi. 3 awnings $19,900 OBO. 541-604-0338.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $39,000. 541-815-4121

800

Tandem Kayak, Necky Manitou II ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

with rudder, $700, 541-548-5743.

Motorcycles And Accessories 883 XL HARLEY DAVIDSON Sportster, 2005 exc. shape, Pearl Yellow with accessories, one owner, 3500 miles, $5,500. Any questions call 541-419-1441.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes Baja Vision 250 2007,

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040 HARLEY DAVIDSON 2008 SOFTAIL, CUSTOM, FXSTC, 12,000 mi., $5000 of extras, $15,000, 541-385-0820

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $2200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

$550 OBO!

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004 • Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4,775 541-504-9284

HARLEY DAVIDSON FAT BOY - LO 2010, 500 mi., black on black, detachable windshield, back rest, and luggage rack, $15,900, call Mario, 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

BEAVER 37' 1997 Patriot Best in class. 63,450 miles. Immaculate cond. All options. $72,000. 541-923-2593

Boats & Accessories

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

541-385-5809

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

818-795-5844, Madras 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $19,500. 541-548-3985.

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, & trailer, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

18’ Wooden Sail Boat, trailer, great little classic boat. $750 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Sales

NEED A SUMMER JOB? If you can answer YES To these questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do ur friends say u talk 2 much? 2. Do u like 2 have fun @ work? 3. Do u want 2 make lots of $$$? 4. R u available afternoons & early evenings?

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Work Part-Time with Full-Time Pay Ages 13 & up welcome

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

OREGON NEWSPAPER SALES GROUP

Harley FXDWG 1997, wide glide, Corbin

541-508-2784

seat, saddle bags, low mi., $7500, Call Rod, 541-932-4369.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. 541-689-1351

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

The Bulletin Classifieds

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

SPRINGDALE 25RKLS 2006 - 25’, 1 slide, fully self contained, 18’ awning, load leveler hitch. Great condition! $9,995. 541-389-7961

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

882 Queen

34’

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Ford Rear End, 9”, 1927-29 Ford body & frame parts; lots of ‘71-’73 Mustang parts; set of 4 205-55-ZR16 tires, like new, $200. 541-447-7272.

Keystone Fuzion 2008, Model 393, 39’, toy hauler, 3 slides, 5000W gen,satellite dish, 2nd A/C, $42,000, 541-977-6461 Montana RL3400 2006, 38’ long, 4 slides, W/D, 5500 W generator, King Dome Satellite, central vacs, much more, $38,600, 541-620-1317.

Fifth Wheels

Bigfoot

9.5’

Tires (3) 265/70R17(E), Bridgestone, M700, 50+% tread, $45 ea, 541-480-0403

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Fiat 1800 1976, 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & humming birds, white soft top & hard top, $6500, OBO 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MUST SELL 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000.541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355 Pontiac TransAm 455 1976, 4-spd., 68,400 actual miles, matching numbers, factory air, black on black, all original, $10,000 OBO, 541-364-1175.

Volkswagen Super Beetle Convertible 1978. Very good condition $8,000. 541-480-1479

Fleetwood Caribou Model 11K, 1997, 3-way refrig, stove with oven, microwave, wired for cable, TV & AC, kept covered, original owner, asking $8900. 541-420-0551

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

GOING IN THE SERVICE MUST SELL! 1984 Dodge 360 V8 4 speed, 4x4, Edelbrock Cam, 650 4 barrel carb, $1000. 541-977-7596 or 549-5948.

Dodge Ram 2001, short

1998,

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K miles, $9650. 541-598-5111.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354. Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Dodge Ram 2500 2007

Quad Cab, SLT 4 door, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. Loaded! $30,995 VIN#J590169

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Lance camper 10’3” 2004, solar, 3way refrig, AC, exc cond $12,500. 541-419-8265

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Dodge Ram 2500 2008

Quad Cab, SLT 4 door, 4X4, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. Loaded! $33,995 VIN#G166872

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Dodge Ram 3500 SLT 2007, Quad cab, long bed, diesel, dually, 21K mi., $32,500, 541-977-6461.

Mustang MTL16 2006

GM Manual 4-speed Transmission, for pickups, 1960-1980. $125. Call 541-382-7704

Canopies and Campers

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Chevy Pickup 1972: doors, radiator, bumpers, misc trim, all for $200. 541-504-4249

885

PRICE REDUCED! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 27K mi., 1 owner, garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, 2 TV’s, rear camera exc. cond. $69,000. 541-536-7580

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-279-9581.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

900

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422.

541-385-5809

Dolphin 36’ 1997, super slide, low mi., extra clean, extras, non-smoking $21,500 See today 541-389-8961.

Travel 1987,

DON'T LAG, CALL NOW

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Autos & Transportation

Winnebago Itasca Spirit ClasSkidsteer, on tracks, insic 29’ Class C, 2005, Ford VW Cabriolet 1981, cludes bucket and forks, V10 Queen bed, sofa, booth convertible needs restora540 hrs., $21,000. dinette 2 slides, 23K mi, retion, with additional parts 541-410-5454 cent widow, help! $39,500. vehicle, $600 for all, 541-508-8522 541-318-9999 Everest 32’ 2004, model 541-416-2473. 291L, 30 & 50 amp service, 2 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. slides, ceiling fan, A/C, surAustin Western Super 500 FIND IT! round sound, micro., always Grader - All wheel drive, low stored under cover, under 5K BUY IT! hours on engine - $10,500. mi. use, orig. owner, like SELL IT! 1986 Autocar cement truck new. $19,500, also G M C The Bulletin Classifieds Cat engine, 10 yd mixer Diesel 2007 tow pickup Winnebago Minnie Winnie DL $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 avail. 9K mi., $37,000, 200O, 29.5’, super clean, VW Super Beetle 1974, 541-317-0783. 925 auto levelers self contained, New: 1776 CC engine, dual V-10, $19,500. 541-550-7556 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, Dularto Carbs, trans, studUtility Trailers ded tires, brakes, shocks, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 struts, exhaust, windshield, 2008 CargoMate Eliminator amp. service, central vac, tags & plates; has sheepskin enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ fireplace, king bed, leather seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ wide, full front cabinet, also furniture, 6 speaker stereo, subs, black on black, 25 mpg, 4 side windows, 2 side doors, micro., awning, small office extra tires. Only $4,500! rear ramp, diamond plate space, set up for gooseneck Call 541-388-4302. runners. vinyl floors, lights. or kingpin hitch, for pics see Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 All set up for generator. Paid ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. 933 $13,500. Now asking $38,500, 541-388-7184, or cond., non smoker, no pets, WHOLESALE for $8750. 541-350-0462. Pickups $78,000. 541-848-9225. Frank, 541-480-0062. *** 881 2008 CargoMate Eliminator CHECK YOUR AD enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ Travel Trailers Please check your ad on wide, full front cabinet, also the first day it runs to 4 side windows, 2 side doors, make sure it is correct. rear ramp, diamond plate Sometimes instructions runners. vinyl floors, lights. over the phone are mis All set up for generator. Paid understood and an error $13,500. Now asking can occur in your ad. WHOLESALE for $8750. Gearbox 30’ 2005, all If this happens to your ad, Frank, 541-480-0062. please contact us the first the bells & whistles, sleeps day your ad appears and 8, 4 queen beds, asking we will be happy to fix it $18,000, 541-536-8105 as soon as we can. Big Tex Landscaping/ Deadlines are: Weekdays HOLIDAY RAMBLER 27’ 1999 ATV Trailer, dual axle , 2 12:00 noon for next day, Alumascapes with slide-out. drop gates, 1 on side, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun$8850. 541-604-0586. 7’x12’, 4’ sides, all steel, day; Sat. 12:00 for Mon$1400, call 541-382-4115, Fleetwood Prowler Regal day. If we can assist you, or 541-280-7024. 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., please call us: solar, 7 speaker surround 541-385-5809 sound, micro., awning, lots of The Bulletin Classified storage space, 1 yr. ex*** Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, tended warranty, very good full slide out, awning, A/C, cond., $20,000, MUST surround sound, master SEE! 541-410-5251 bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 Concession Trailer 18’ CHEVY Cheyenne 1500 1995 Fleetwood Wilderness long bed, 2WD automatic, V6 Class 4, professionally built 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, AM/FM radio, 96k miles, in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet Just bought a new boat? fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 $3,700. 541-617-1224. OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706 Sell your old one in the times. Like new! List classifieds! Ask about our $52,000, sell $22,950. 931 Super Seller rates! 541-390-2678, Madras

18.5’ FourWinns 1998, runabout, open bow, sport seating, 5.0L V-8, Samson Tower, dual batteries, canvas cover, always garaged, low hrs., exc. cond., $8900. 541-420-4868.

torsion suspension, many upgrades, tows like a dream, $4950, 541-480-0527.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

ATVs

Boats & RV’s

Alpenlite 22’ 1990, new

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Watercraft

Suzuki DR350 1993, 14,000 mi., exc. cond., ready to go, $2400, 541-504-7745.

RV Consignments

865

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283. Veterinary Tech, Certified Humane Society of Central Oregon seeking experienced CVT to work in Shelter Clinic. This 30 hr position (M-F) assists Veterinarian and other CVT in all duties of clinic, prepping animals for surgeries, surgical and treatment procedures, dentals, cleaning, and other duties as assigned. Please send cover letter and resume to: pmroden@hsco.org or fax to 541-382-2021

870

Boats & Accessories

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

860 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2 slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Lance Squire 3000 1993 8.5’ Clean, well-kept. Self-contained +outside shower. Malin, OR. $3500. 541-281-4225

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, August 21, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 933

935

935

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $20,500, 541-576-2442

Smolich Auto Mall

Hot August Deals!

Ford F150 SuperCrew 4x4 2006 Only 81K miles! Vin #D86130

Only $22,237 photo for illustration use only

Smolich Auto Mall

Hot August Deals!

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Toyota 4Runner Limited 2005 Only $17,733

Hot August Deals!

HYUNDAI HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Ford Explorer 4WD 2006 Ford F250 1983, tow

Only 62K miles! Vin #A22472

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Only $16,777

366

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160. Chrysler Town & Country Limited 1999, AWD, loaded, hitch with brake controller, Thule carrier, set of studded tires, one owner, clean, all maintenance records, no smoke/dogs/kids. 120,000 miles. $6,000 OBO. 541-350-2336.

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

541-389-1178 • DLR

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD F-250 1989, 450 auto, 4WD, cruise, A/C, radio w/cassette player, receiver hitch. Recent upgrades: gooseneck hitch, trailer brake controller, ball joints, fuel pump & tank converter valve, heavy duty torque converter on trans., $2199 OBO. Call Ron, 541-419-5060

Chevy Astro Van AWD 1991, contractor’s racks, 96,000 mi., ladder racks, bins, shelving, exc. cond., tinted windows, $2200, 541-382-7721.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. MITSUBISHI 1994, 4 cyl., Mighty Max, with shell, exc. tires. $1995 or best offer. 541-389-8433.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $9500/consider trade for pickup, 541-593-4437.

Hot August Deals!

van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $3500 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-4677.

Jeep Liberty 4WD 2006 Only 99K Miles! VIN #194845

Only $13,575

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Automobiles

Only 107K Miles! VIN #562544

Suzuki Equator PU 4x4 2009

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

(Private Party ads only)

Only 3K miles! Vin #409837

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $24,998

Hot August Deals!

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Ford Flex SEL AWD 2009 Only 40K miles! Vin #A50785

Only $25,733

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Only 34K miles! Vin #026357

Only $19,999

Only 1K Miles! VIN #791053

Only $26,989

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Nissan Rogue SL 2009, front wheel drive, silver, leather, Bluetooth, heated seats, keyless ignition, portable GPS, sunroof, new tires, traction control, & much more. Mint cond., 18,500 mi., Edmunds Retail, $23,487, will sell for $18,500, call Bill at 541-678-5436.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

541-322-7253

Subaru Outback Limited wagon 2004

Hot August Deals!

AWD, 4 cyl., 5 speed, PS/PB, leather, dual moonroofs

$13,995. VIN#604795

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Dodge Durango 4WD 2007 Only 46K miles! Vin #551428

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 366

Volvo V70 Cross Country 2008

Only 4K Miles! VIN #453938

Only 25K Miles! VIN #012665

Only $26,494

Only $23,450

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-385-5809

Volvo V70 XC 2001, exc. cond. loaded,heated leather,AC,sunroof,pwr,5cyl turbo,AWD, gold ext,162K, $5000,503-720-0366

Volvo V70 AWD Wagon 1998, good shape, 71K, snow tires, $6800. Robert, 541-385-8717.

VW Passat GLX 4 Motion Wagon 2000, blue, 130K, V-6, 2.8L, AWD, auto, w/ Triptronic, 4-dr., A/C, fully loaded, all pwr., heated leather, moonroof, front/side airbags, CD changer, great cond, newer tires, water pump, timing belt, $5900 OBO, 541-633-6953

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

NEW 2011 SUBARUS ARE ARRIVING DAILY! STOP IN AND SEE THEM TODAY!

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i 1 AT

$

16952

OR

$

16,499

mo.

42 Month Lease

Manual

Model AJA-01 SALE PRICE $16,499 Due at signing $2,115.52 MSRP $18,190. Cap Reduction $1,869. Customer Cash Down $1,869. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 56% $10,186.40. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: AG512214 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Special Edition 1 AT

$

22948

mo.

OR

$

20,625

42 Month Lease

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $19,800 OBO. 541-388-2774.

1 AT $

29985

OR

$

mo.

Smolich Auto Mall

22,254

42 Month Lease

Hot August Deals!

Model BDB-01 SALE PRICE $22,254 Due at signing $2,566.85 MSRP $25,220. Cap Reduction $1,995. Customer Cash Down $2,566.85. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 57% $14,375.40. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: B3328144 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5GT Limited

4 cyl., auto., ABS (4 whl) A/C, Cruise, MP3, PS/PW, PDL, leather, dual moonroofs

$14,995

$

VIN# H54997

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Nissan Rogue AWD 2008 Only 19K miles! Vin #110180

Only $21,988

6-Speed Manual

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

smolichmotors.com

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Automatic

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

21,999

Model AFB-21 MSRP $22,890 VIN: AH797957

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Wagon Base Model

PONTIAC SUNFIRE 2005 under 25k miles, like new. $6500. Call Chris 541-536-1584.

The Bulletin Classified ***

Model AAH-04 MSRP $32,693 VIN: A1212075

$

366

$

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $5,000. 541-923-0134.

Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO Engine, $400; Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu.in., $400, 541-318-4641.

28,970

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Special Edition

NISSAN

***

CHEVY CAMARO 1985 Black with red interior, 305 V8 - 700R4 trans, T-top, directional alloy wheels, alarm with remote pager. $1795. 541-389-7669, must ring 8 times to leave message.

Volvo S40 FWD 2009

2 YR/24,000 MILE MAINTENANCE ON ALL NEW CAR PURCHASES!*

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

385-5809

Only $19,754

Hot August Deals!

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

miles, nice condition, $2750, 541-385-8308.

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Hot August Deals!

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

CHECK YOUR AD

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Model AFA-21 SALE PRICE $20,625 Due at signing $2,480.96 MSRP $21,690. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.48. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,929.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: AG900613

Sedan 2009

Cadillac ETC 1994, loaded, heated pwr. leather seats, windows, keyless entry, A/C, exc. tires, 2nd owner 136K, all records $3250. 541-389-3030,541-815-9369

Smolich Auto Mall

SUBARUS!!!

MERCURY SABLE 1993 runs great, great work car! 129,000 miles! $1300 OBO! Call 541-788-4296 or 541-788-4298.

541-389-1178 • DLR Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Corolla, 2006, RED, excellent condition, 38mpg, 6 cylinder, 30,900 miles, original owner, no problems or recalls. Great for school! $9000. Call 541-504-2642

Subaru Legacy L 2000, 92K mi., new tires, very good cond., $6400 or trade for ‘90 & newer camp trailer, 541-233-8944,541-548-8054

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Cadillac DeVille 1998, loaded, 130,000

975

Automobiles

Mercury Grand Marquis LS 1998. 66,700 orig. mi.. one owner. V-8, tan w/blue faux conv. top. Power everything, CD player, airbags, all leather, superior cond. garaged. two new studded tires incl., Melanie 541-480-2793. $7300

Hyundai Sonata GLS

Top Model, 50K miles, blue, all accessories, need the money, $7900, call Barbara, in Eugene at 541-953-6774 or Bob in Bend, 541-508-8522.

975

Automobiles

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 185K hwy. mi. $8,000 541-410-7586.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Subaru Forester 2007, Great shape, southern car, 111K easy hwy. mi., $12,900, Frank 702-501-0600, Bend.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Jeep Wrangler 2009

smolichmotors.com

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

541-389-1178 • DLR

Audi A4 Quattro 2006

Buick Lacrosse 2005,

Find It in

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

975

Toyota Corolla 1999 4-dr, 65K, white, new hoses, plugs, wires, $5600. 541-480-1645

366

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Automobiles

366

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $1100, Call 541-388-4167.

366

Toyota Tundra 2006,

Only $10,744

541-749-4025 • DLR Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Hot August Deals!

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Only 57K miles! Vin #170221

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $10,988

Scion XA 4 Dr., 2006

HYUNDAI

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Nissan Titan PU 2006

Hot August Deals!

1989,

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

975

Smolich Auto Mall

MX6

366

smolichmotors.com

Hot August Deals!

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-389-1178 • DLR

HYUNDAI

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

NISSAN

Hot August Deals!

541-749-4025 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

Mercedes 300SD 1981, Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Hot August Deals!

Smolich Auto Mall

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $12,475

new brakes, clutch, battery, all new parts, $575 OBO, call 541-382-7556.

Vans

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Only 25K miles! Vin #408427

MAZDA RX8 2004, one owner, 6 speed, fully loaded. $15,000. 541-416-9605.

smolichmotors.com Ford F250 1983, tow

Mazda Miata Convertible 2004

Mazda

940 NISSAN

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Only 111K miles! Vin #028786

Smolich Auto Mall

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Hot August Deals!

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Manual

22,999

Model BDA-01 MSRP $24,220 VIN: B1314502

CALL 888-701-7019 CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through August 22, 2010. Subject to vehicle insurance; vehicle availability.


F6 Saturday, August 21, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Air Conditioning! 0% for 36 months on approved credit SMOLICH SALE PRICE

21,885

$ J10059 VIN: AL187192, MSRP $22,860 • 1 at this price

2010 DODGE RAM 1500 CREW CAB 4X4

2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING

2010 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4

W 2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4 ALL NE

MSRP ...................... $34,215 Smolich Discount ......... $3,580 Customer Cash ............ $3,750

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

18,885

26,885

$ C10003 VIN: AN160857

$ DT09078 VIN: AS157574 • 1 at this price

2010 DODGE RAM 2500 CREW CAB 4X4

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY

IN STOCK AND READY FOR DELIVERY! Trade-in your Dodge/Chrysler/Jeep for an additional $1,000 Bonus Cash

MSRP ...................... $21,265 Smolich Discount ............ $880 Customer Cash ............ $1,500

MSRP ...................... $29,520 Smolich Discount ......... $1,385 Customer Cash ............ $2,250

MSRP ...................... $35,935 Smolich Discount ......... $3,550 Customer Cash ............ $2,500

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

25,885

29,885

$ C10009 VIN: AR376729 • 1 at this price

$ DT10081 VIN: AG183417 • 1 at this price

Call us at 541-389-1177 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 8/22/2010. On Approved Credit.

CHRYSLER CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE!! certified pre-owned

6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel!

Limited, Nice!!

2008 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT QUAD 4X4 $

2007 DODGE DURANGO $

2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 $

2009 JEEP WRANGLER $

2008 JEEP WRANGLER $

2010 DODGE CHALLENGER RT $

VIN: 105907, Stk# P10137

VIN: 551425, Stk# P10109

VIN: 6W246894, Stk# J10018B

VIN: 791053, Stk# J10054A

VIN: 8L530123, Stk# J10022B

VIN: 129754, Stk# D10053A

35,885

Very Clean!!

19,885

14,885

Sahara, Less than 2k Miles!

A/C! Hardtop!

27,885

Only 1,700 Miles!

19,995

• 3 month/3,000 mile Maximum Care Warranty • 6 Years/80,000 Mile Power Train Warranty

28,885

• 125 pt. Inspection • Roadside Assistance • Carfax

GRAND OPENING!

Bottom MODEL YEAR-END SALES EVENT

WIN ME!

REGISTER TO WIN A 2011 HYUNDAI DURING SMOLICH HYUNDAI GRAND OPENING

Grand Prize Drawing, Sat, Aug. 28th, 5pm • Details at Dealership; Smolich Hyundai • Highway 20 Next to Costco • SmolichMotors.com

MONTH OF AUGUST ONLY

REC

New car purchases include 2 Year Factor y Scheduled Maintenance

UNCENSORED

IT

...HYUNDAI

(excludes GTR)

0% 60MOS. up to

CLASS LEADING

&

CLASS LEADING

*

On select models. *On approved credit.

HIGHWAY

NEW 2010 NISSAN ALTIMA Auto, CD

$

199/mo. VIN: 507890. MSRP $22,755; Cap Reduction $1,973.99, Customer Cash down $2,495, Includes 1st Payment & DMV. $0 Security Deposit. Lease End Value 57% $12,970.35, 39 Months. 12,000 Miles/year. On Approved Credit.

NEW 2010 NISSAN TITAN

2011 SONATA

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS MSRP $17,795 — Smolich Discount $1,296

SALE PRICE

$

16,499

8,000

28

OFF MSRP

MPG

VIN: 308521. MSRP $35,635; Smolich Discount $4,000, Rebate $4,000, $27,635 + DMV

NEW 2010 NISSAN ROGUE AWD

19,995

MSRP $23,690, Smolich Discount $1,945, Rebate $1,750. VIN: 121450; + DMV

SMOLICH NISSAN “ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ”

541- 389 -1178 VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday, August 22, 2010 at close of business.

SMOLICH CERTIFIED

0% for 60 MOS.

+DMV

$14,999 + 0% for 60 mos.

$

VIN: 068111, MSRP $21,050. Initial Cap Cost $20,770. Cash Cap Reduction $2,303.70. Customer Cash Down $2,825.00. Aqc. Fee $595. Lease End Value $11,998.50. 36 mo. 12,000 Miles per Year. On approved credit.

-$1,500 HMF BONUS CASH

Crew Cab, 4x4

$

36 MONTH LEASE

VIN: 646530

On approved credit

2010 HYUNDAI S A N TA F E G L S MSRP $24,415 — Smolich Discount $1,420 — Rebate $1,000

SALE $ PRICE VIN: 406443

21,995 +DMV

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GL MSRP $10,705 — Factory Rebate $500 — Smolich Discount $206

SALE $ PRICE

MANUAL TRANSMISSION

9,999

+DMV

2 @ THIS PRICE VIN: 192014, 192194

WE MOVED STOP BY! SMOLICH HYUNDAI 2250 NE HWY 20

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

541-749-4025 www.smolichhyundai.com

CENTRAL OREGON’S LARGEST USED SELECTION! 7 Day Exchange Program • 3000 Mile/3 Month Powertrain Warranty • Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car • 105 Point Vehicle Inspection

w w w. s m o l i c h m o t o r s . c o m

Bulletin Daily Paper 08/21/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday August 21, 2010