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Bringing back a species: Release the mountain goats

Possible Deschutes program for traffic violations might boost citations, one cop says

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

It’s not just closing a post office. For residents of Ashwood, a rural town of about 50 people an hour east of Madras, the post office is where residents find out who isn’t feeling well and who needs an extra hand. It’s where community members exchange books during the long winter. And when a letter leaves with an Ashwood postmark, it’s a reminder to the outside world that Ashwood exists. “We’re barely a dot on the map the way it is,” said Ashwood resident Bing Bingham. “If we lose our post office, we lose our dot.” Earlier this month, U.S. Postal Service workers shut down the post office, calling it an “emergency suspension.” Whether the doors will be reopened is unclear. “It’s a possibility. I don’t have a crystal ball, so I don’t know,” said Marilee Spitsnogle, manager for post office operations in Eugene and the overseer of the Ashwood post office. Spitsnogle declined to discuss specifics behind the emergency closure but said it was regarding a personnel issue. See Ashwood / A5

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Robert Brunoe, left, general manager of natural resources with the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, holds a Rocky Mountain goat kid last week before it is released on the east side of Mount Jefferson. In all, about 45 goats were introduced to the area.

Rare animals hoof it up Jefferson’s slopes By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

WARM SPRINGS —

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Bike advocates and local law enforcement members are discussing whether to create a diversion class that could educate bicyclists who break traffic laws in Deschutes County. The program would be similar to classes for drivers that allow some to keep traffic tickets off their driving records or avoid fines. Fines for violations commonly committed by bicyclists, such as riding the wrong way on the road, riding faster than a pedestrian speed on the sidewalk and blowing through a stop sign, range from $152 to $297. One Bend police officer said that if the class were available as an educational and less costly option, more officers would likely cite bicyclists who disobey traffic laws. Multnomah County started a similar class in 2007 for bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers who violate traffic laws. The concept grew out of an educational campaign organized by the Deschutes County Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee, which also launched a new website, www.bikecentraloregon.org, on Friday with information on traffic laws and safe riding for bicyclists and drivers, and a link to bicycling maps and route information. The committee began working on the campaign earlier this year in response to bicyclist and driver conflicts on popular, but deteriorating, Skyliners Road west of Bend. See Bicycling / A4

he song echoed

“This morning, I want

INDEX

Break the law on your bike, a class may await

people before he started to sing a blessing in his native language. It was a nearly cloudless morning on a remote part of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Mount Jefferson stood in the background. The only sound, other than Suppah’s voice, was the thump coming from crates full of Rocky Mountain goats. The animals, once a native popula-

New York Times News Service

Rocky Mountain goats run from their transport crates down a burlap shoot and toward a ridge on the east side of Mount Jefferson, which is land owned by the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. The goats disappeared from the Cascades in Central Oregon more than a century ago.

“This is exciting for us culturally, and as a resource, too. ... I’m sure they have a place in the ecosystem. I hope we can use them traditionally and just appreciate them.” — Pah-tu Pitt, intern, Warm Springs Natural Resource Department tion in the Cascade Mountains, have been gone from the Cascades in Central Oregon for more than a century. Last week, about 45 were introduced to the area. “We made a promise to the Creator. We will take care of what was placed here,” Suppah said.

Officials from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs worked together to capture goats from the Elkhorn Mountains in Baker County and release them at the base of Mount Jefferson. See Goats / A4

At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a website’s frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he needed to credit a source because the page did not include author information. At DePaul University, the tipoff to one student’s copying was “This the purple shade of several para- generation has graphs he had lifted from the always existed Web; when confronted by a writ- in a world ing tutor, he was not defensive where media — he just wanted to know how to and intellectual change purple text to black. property don’t And at the University of Mary- have the same land, a student reprimanded for gravity.” copying from Wikipedia in a pa- — Sarah Brookper on the Great Depression said over, senior, he thought its entries — unsigned Rutgers and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they counted, essentially, as common knowledge. See Plagiarism / A5


A2 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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OneVietnam co-founder and Executive Director James Bao, right, introduces Phong Quan, a OneVietnam volunteer staff member, at the website’s launch party in San Francisco. The social networking site aims to connect young Vietnamese-Americans with the culture of their parents, grandparents and homeland.

For Vietnamese, online link to culture

Big business

By John Boudreau San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — They are the connected generation, the always-texting, iPhone-carrying 20-somethings who post messages on Facebook about buying shoes or eating pizza. And yet they feel disconnected from their Vietnamese heritage, even though many were born in Vietnam. “I see my grandmother watch Vietnamese soap operas all day,” said 23-year-old Milpitas, Calif., resident Lana Huyen, who left Vietnam when she was 6. “I look in the mirror every morning, and I realize I’m Vietnamese. It’s in my face. But it’s really hard when you don’t understand (the culture) for yourself.” She is marketing director of a new social networking site, One Vietnam.org, which launched a week ago with the aim of connecting young VietnameseAmericans with the culture of their parents, grandparents and homeland, as well as to nonprofits providing assistance to Vietnamese communities. The platform encourages friendly banter as well as serious discussions on topics such as Agent Orange, the defoliant used by U.S. troops in Vietnam that has caused widespread health problems there. OneVietnam also is a place for professional networking. But what sets it apart from most other popular social media is its focus on Vietnam. It is designed to link Vietnamese spread across the globe — from San Jose to Switzerland to Saigon, now known as Ho Chi Minh City. The theme of the site is “coming home.” Visitors are asked to log in by using their Facebook and Twitter sign-ins, or OpenID, the authentication standard used by Google’s Gmail, Yahoo and others. People can also log in manually if, for instance, they are using a mobile phone or are in locations where Twitter and Facebook are inaccessible. Twitter and Facebook are sometimes blocked by the Vietnamese

CHICAGO — Jay and Christina Lorance first met in an MSN chat room in May 1996, when the Internet, or even the idea of communicating electronically with a stranger, was an unfamiliar concept to many Americans. Their online interaction led to four months of telephone calls and snail-mail letters, culminating in a face-to-face meeting in Colorado. Jay showed up with a ring. One year and four months later, they were married. “We shocked a lot of people,” said Christina Lorance, 41. “I’m from New York and he’s from Oklahoma, so the first question everyone had was, ‘How did you meet?’ ... When we said the Internet, their eyes would bug out. They didn’t even think it was true.” Digital culture has changed drastically since the Lorances’ first virtual meeting. Online dating is now an accepted and commonplace way to meet someone, having largely shed its stigma as an option for only socially stunted nerds. Match.com, one of the leading websites, celebrated its 15th anniversary in April.

“I look in the mirror every morning, and I realize I’m Vietnamese. It’s in my face. But it’s really hard when you don’t understand (the culture) for yourself.” — Lana Huyen, who left Vietnam for the U.S. at age 6

government. The founders of OneVietnam see their website as a template that can be used by immigrants or other groups seeking to create more tightly knit communities that, while synced to sites like Facebook and Twitter, are more focused. Already, other groups, including Chinese-Americans, have inquired about licensing the technology. “With many immigrant communities, once you get to the second generation, it gets harder and harder to maintain a connection with your culture,” said OneVietnam co-founder Uyen Nguyen. Many Vietnamese in the United States fled the country in the 1970s and 1980s after the Communists took control. For years, few returned to their homeland, and their children were encouraged to embrace American culture. Older overseas Vietnamese, with vivid memories of their lives before leaving the southeastern Asian country, often generously support nonprofit groups and poor family members in Vietnam. But the younger generation does not have that deep personal link to their cultural homeland, said John Anner, president of East Meets West, an Oakland foundation that funds nongovernment organizations in Vietnam and helped set up OneVietnam.org.

Every year, Vietnam benefits from $10 billion in remittances from overseas Vietnamese, Anner said, adding that the amount “far surpasses any development aid by multiple factors.” He said OneVietnam can be a conduit for practical benefits for Vietnam because “the younger generation won’t give back unless they feel connected.” OneVietnam represents a new dimension to social networking, one built around a common purpose, said David Teece, a professor of global business at the University of California-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business and an adviser to the founders of the site. “I think it represents the evolution of networking into something that is more exciting and more productive,” he said. OneVietnam is one of several focused social networking sites branching out from the larger sites, such as Facebook. Togetherville.com, for instance, is aimed at parents and preteens. KeaNewzealand.com is a site for New Zealand expatriates. Pham and others do not expect the government to block OneVietnam because its focus is nonpolitical. “The Vietnamese youth are not chained by the scars of the Vietnam War,” said Huy Do, chairman and president of Strategic Alliance Vietnamese Ventures International.

While advanced technology can’t guarantee in-person chemistry, that hasn’t stopped dozens of new offerings from touting their matchmaking algorithms or catering to a demographic niche. Michelle Teplitz, a 29-year-old Connecticut native, was drawn to JDate.com, a site geared toward Jewish singles, because she wanted to meet someone with similar values. “It weeds out the people you wouldn’t want to talk to in a bar,” said Teplitz, who met her husband of three years on JDate. “You know when you’re on this site, (you’re meeting) people who, for the most part, are interested in meeting someone they want to spend their life with.” Online dating has grown into big business. Match.com is part of IAC/Interactive Corp. and recently became the exclusive dating service on Yahoo, while eHarmony has acquired other Web properties related to weddings and parenting, including Weddingbee and JustMommies. Web-based dating also is taking on new forms, such as mobile applications and services within Facebook. Another twist on the model was launched this year through WinkVid, the brainchild of Jordan Fulghum and Jake Lumetta. Their Chicago-based company offers online speed dating through webcams, with each date lasting four minutes. “This stigma that’s been around for the last decade is really starting to be erased because people’s lives are moving online, and they’re seeing the real benefits of social networks and of these technologies that enable you to meet people,” Fulghum said. A video chat may help bridge that difficult gap between on-

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Love on the Web: With stigma past, dating sites boom

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Michael Tercha / Chicago Tribune

Casey Zgutowicz, 32, right, and his fiancée Micaela De Alba, 30, talk about an upcoming trip to Mexico last month in downtown Chicago. The couple met on eHarmony. line compatibility and in-person chemistry. Still, there’s no predicting how a romantic relationship will develop offline. Although some dating sites brag about their ability to match up life partners, other services acknowledge their limitations. “I really think of our responsibility as ‘no bad first dates,’ which seems like a low bar, but the reason is we can’t promise you a soul mate,” said Sam Yagan, co-founder of OKCupid. “That’s ridiculous. That’s chemistry and what happens when you see each other.” The simplest reason for online dating’s emergence into the mainstream is that more Americans are digitally literate. The age-old practice of meeting and courting a romantic partner has moved online as consumers conduct more of their lives on the Web.

Online savvy A 2006 study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project reported that nearly 7 million American adults have gone out with someone they met online. That number surely has gone up since, said Andrew Fiore, a doctoral candidate at the University of California-Berkeley who has studied online dating since 2003. “As soon as you talk about 7 million people going on dates, they can’t possibly all be computer geeks,” Fiore said. “If you look at the demographics, people using online dating look a lot like people who are on the Internet in general.” These typical users include Chicagoans Casey Zgutowicz, 32, and Micaela De Alba, 30, a recently engaged couple who met on eHarmony. Online dating “is good in the sense you’re peeling back the onion,” Zgutowicz said. He said completing eHarmony’s intricate personality questionnaire was a “grueling process” but helpful, because “you know you have a similar foundation” before meeting in person.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

T S BP plans death blow for leaking Gulf well By Joel Achenbach The Washington Post

The next shot at killing BP’s well in the Gulf of Mexico could begin as early as tonight as engineers plan to pump heavy mud into the capped but still dangerous well, and “bullhead” the rogue oil back down into its source rock 21⁄2 miles below the seafloor. The so-called “static kill” is part of a double whammy of mud and cement that would hit the runaway Macondo well high and low in quick succession. The static kill starts at the top, firing the mud and possibly cement into the blowout preventer that sits on the wellhead. That effort, which would take a day or two, would be followed in another five to seven days by the start of the more laborious “bottom kill,” in which mud and cement will be injected into Macondo through a relief well that engineers began drilling at the beginning of May. If all goes perfectly, the onetwo mud punch will literally be overkill. The static kill will terminate Macondo, and the bottom kill will be more like a confirmation test, akin to poking the body to make sure it’s dead. But optimism has been a dangerous attitude throughout the oil spill disaster, and the federal point man for the spill response, retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, has warned against complacency. “We should not be writing any obituary for this event,” Allen said late last week. As he delivered the latest update on the static-kill plan Sunday afternoon, he also defended the government’s decision to let BP and its contractors use vast quantities of dispersants. He said that the goal of reducing the amount of dispersant used was “generally met” and that the government’s field commander made decisions to allow additional dispersant on a case-bycase basis.

Guard deployment at border to take weeks By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

SAN DIEGO — No boots were seen tromping in the desert sand on Sunday. No commanders were heard barking out orders to their troops. The National Guard, which officials had announced would turn out en masse along the U.S.-Mexico border over the weekend for sentry duty, was nowhere to be found. It turns out it will take weeks longer to select, screen and train the 1,200 National Guard troops the Obama administration had said would be deployed on Aug. 1 along the border from California to Texas. Administration officials explained that the announced date was always a starting point, the beginning of the process of deployment and not the day camouflaged soldiers would begin amassing at the boundary line with their automatic weapons, high-powered binoculars and filled-up canteens. “Full deployment will take place over succeeding weeks,” Janet Napolitano, the secretary of homeland security, said in an interview. “It won’t be 100 percent showing up all of a sudden.” Once they arrive in the weeks and months to come, the troops will do what the thousands deployed during the Bush administration did: aid Border Patrol agents but not carry out direct law enforcement functions, Gen. Craig McKinley, chief of the National Guard Bureau at the Pentagon, said at a recent briefing.

UAE to ban BlackBerry services; Saudi follows suit By Adam Schreck The Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — The United Arab Emirates outlined plans Sunday to block BlackBerry e-mail, messaging and Web browsing services in a crackdown that could jeopardize efforts to establish the country as an international business hub. The government cited a potential security threat because encrypted data sent on the devices is moved abroad, where it cannot be monitored for illegal activity. But the decision — quickly fol-

lowed by a similar move in Saudi Arabia — raises questions about whether the conservative Gulf nations are trying to further control content they deem politically or morally objectionable. BlackBerry phones have a strong following in the region, not only among foreign professionals in commercial centers such as Dubai and Abu Dhabi, but also among youths who see their relatively secure communication channels as a way to avoid unwanted government attention. “The authorities have used a

variety of arguments, like it can be used by terrorists” to justify the crackdown, said Christopher Davidson, a professor at the University of Durham in Britain, who has written extensively about the region. “Yes that’s true, but it can also be used by civil society campaigners and activists.” The UAE’s decision will prevent hundreds of thousands of BlackBerry users from accessing e-mail and the Web on their handsets starting in October. It’s unclear whether the ban will extend to foreign visitors with

AT LEAST 10,000 STILL TRAPPED BY DEADLY PAKISTANI FLOODS

roaming services, including the roughly 100,000 passengers who pass through the region’s busiest airport in Dubai each day. The ban risks further damaging the UAE’s reputation as a relatively easy place to do business. Dubai, one of seven hereditary sheikdoms in the federation, in particular has sought to turn itself into a global finance, trade and tourism hub. But its reputation has been tarnished by a credit crisis that has left the emirate more than $100 billion in debt.

QUALITY FOR LESS!

Space station cooling system shuts down The Associated Press CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Half of the International Space Station’s cooling system suddenly shut down during the weekend, forcing the astronauts to power down equipment and face the likelihood of urgent spacewalking repairs. After huddling Sunday, NASA managers gave preliminary approval for a pair of spacewalks, the first of which would take place later this week. Officials stressed that the six occupants were in no danger. Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900 Naveed Ali / The Associated Press

Pakistani villagers look at a road Sunday that was washed away by heavy flooding in Kalam, Pakistan. The military and other emergency workers struggled against time and nature on Sunday to reach at least 10,000 people trapped by collapsed bridges and flooded roads and threatened by rising water brought by the worst monsoon rains in Pakistan’s history. The army announced Sunday night that it had reached up to 20,000 people, but the government’s response to the disaster — which has

already claimed hundreds of lives — has been widely assailed as slow and inadequate. Criticism was further fed by a decision by President Asif Zardari, already deeply unpopular, to leave the country this week for political talks in Europe. The crisis is especially catastrophic in Swat, once famed as a tourist valley, where the army defeated militants last year. Local leaders said at least 900 Swatis have died, and nearly all the bridges that the army built after last year’s war have collapsed. — New York Times News Service

W  B

Dutch 1st from NATO to end Afghan mission KABUL, Afghanistan — The Netherlands became the first NATO country to end its combat mission in Afghanistan, drawing the curtain Sunday on a four-year operation that was deeply unpopular at home and even brought down a Dutch government. The departure of the small force of nearly 1,900 Dutch troops is not expected to affect conditions on the ground. But it is politically significant because it comes at a time of rising casualties and growing doubts about the war in NATO capitals, even as allied troops are beginning what could be the decisive campaign of the war.

Afghan police clear U.S. in deadly crash KABUL, Afghanistan — The Kabul police have cleared a U.S. Embassy vehicle of fault for a deadly collision on Friday that set off anti-American rioting near the embassy, a senior police official said Sunday. After the crash, hundreds of enraged onlookers threw rocks, chanted “Death to America” and set ablaze two American vehicles. The intensity of the response revealed the deep-seated hostility toward Americans and raised fears of a repeat of the pandemonium that swept the city and left 14 people dead after a fatal crash in May 2006. In that case, a truck in an American convoy plowed into a dozen Afghan cars and killed at least five people. On Sunday morning, several hundred Afghans marched

peacefully through central Kabul to protest both Friday’s collision and the deaths of other civilians caused by American and other Western military forces.

Land mines wash up in South Korea SEOUL, South Korea — Dozens of North Korean land mines loosened by heavy rains have washed ashore on South Korean riverbanks and beaches near the border, presenting a lethal new threat to residents already wary of surprises and nefarious motives from the North. A man in the South Korean border town of Yeoncheon, northeast of Seoul, was killed Saturday when one of two land mines he had picked up from a stream exploded, the Defense Ministry said. A friend was seriously injured and hospitalized. The scare came amid heightened vigilance against North Korea, following the March sinking of a South Korean warship in border waters that was widely blamed on a North Korean torpedo attack. On Sunday, South Korea sent a message urging North Korea to prevent its land mines from being washed downstream to the south, the Defense Ministry said in a statement.

Israel to deport migrants’ children JERUSALEM — Israel moved Sunday to deport the offspring of hundreds of migrant workers, mostly small children who were born in Israel, speak Hebrew and have never seen their parents’

native countries. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the new policy was intended to stem a flood of illegal aliens, whose children receive state-funded education and health care benefits, and to defend Israel’s Jewish identity. “On the one hand, this problem is a humanitarian problem,” Netanyahu said during a meeting Sunday of the Cabinet, which had debated the move for nearly a year. “We all feel and understand the hearts of children. But on the other hand, there are Zionist considerations and ensuring the Jewish character of the state of Israel.” — From wire reports

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A4 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Iraq power shortages test patience with government By Steven Lee Myers New York Times News Service

BAGHDAD — Ikbal Ali, a bureaucrat in a beaded head scarf, accompanied by a phalanx of police officers, quickly found what she was out in the summer swelter looking for: electricity thieves. Six black cables stretched from a power pole to a row of auto-repair shops, siphoning what few hours of power Iraq’s straining system provides. “Take them all down,” Ali ordered, sending a worker up in a crane’s bucket to disentangle the connections. A shop owner, Haitham Farhan, responded mockingly, using the words now uttered across Iraq as a curse, “Maku kahraba” — “There

is no electricity.” From the beginning of the war more than seven years ago, the state of electricity has been one of the most closely watched benchmarks of Iraq’s progress, and of the American effort to transform a dictatorship into a democracy. And yet, as the American combat mission — Operation Iraqi Freedom, in the Pentagon’s argot — officially ends this month, Iraq’s government still struggles to provide one of the most basic services. Ali’s campaign against electricity theft — a belated bandage on a broken body — makes starkly clear the mixed legacy that the United States leaves behind as Iraq begins to truly govern itself,

for better and worse. Iraq now has elections, a functioning, if imperfect, army and an oil industry on the cusp of a potential boom. Yet Baghdad, the capital, had five hours of electricity a day in July. The chronic power shortages are the result of myriad factors, including war, drought and corruption, but ultimately they reflect a dysfunctional government that remains deadlocked and unresponsive to popular will. That has generated disillusionment and dissent, including protests this summer that, while violent in two cases, were a different measure of Iraq’s new freedoms. “Democracy didn’t bring us anything,” Farhan said in his newly

In Iowa tour (yes, already), Republican Pawlenty tests his voice By Jeff Zeleny New York Times News Service

Joseph Sywenkyj / New York Times News Service

A grandmother fans her 6-month-old grandson in their home in July after the electricity went out in Baghdad. Iraq’s capital had five hours of electricity a day in the month of July. darkened shop. Then he corrected himself. “Democracy brought us a can of Coke and a beer.” “Iraqi politicians are killing our optimism,” Hassan Shihab said,

Goats Continued from A1 The animals are the rarest big game in Oregon; about 800 of them are roaming the state. In 2010, only 11 hunters were given tags to go after the animals. Rocky Mountain goat tags are considered “once in a lifetime.” Last year, one tag was raffled off for $24,739. The money from the tags is used to fund reintroduction projects throughout the state. Officials are hopeful the habitat on Mount Jefferson is perfect for the animals, with lots of steep cliffs, glaciers and lichen. Eventually, if the population proves to be thriving, hunting could be allowed. “Biologists are always trying to restore habitat and species back to historical numbers before things were changed with European settlement, and they were hunted out,” said Jamie Hurd, a wildlife biologist with the tribes. “They are culturally significant to tribal members.” Pah-tu Pitt, who was named after Mount Jefferson, is a student at Portland State University and a summer intern with the Warm Springs Natural Resource Department. She said she was happy to watch the tribes and state work together toward such a positive goal. “This is exciting for us culturally, and as a resource, too,” she said. “From the archaeology standpoint, they were used as clothing and

Bicycling Continued from A1 Cheryl Howard, chairwoman of the committee, said the group became interested in a diversion class after seeing an article about the program in Multnomah County. The idea is for the class to be available countywide as an alternative to fines for some people, but the committee still has to discuss the concept with the Sheriff’s Office, Howard said.

Few citations, so far Sgt. Chris Carney of the Bend Police Department said many officers statewide currently do not cite bicyclists when they violate traffic laws in ways that do not obviously endanger themselves or others. Fines up to $297 can seem heavy when bicyclists, even when they are at fault, often come out on the losing end of a collision with a vehicle. “I mean, if they endanger the public or themselves, I’ve written them a citation,” Carney said. “But I think most officers look at bikes a little differently.” If the diversion class were available as a less expensive option that would also educate bicyclists on road rules, officers might be more willing to issue citations to those who break the law, Carney said. “I think it’s so early in its infancy, in its concept, that it’s hard to say where it would go,” Carney said of the class. “I think it’s an extremely positive thing, though.”

complaining about blackouts after Friday prayer at a mosque in Baquba, northwest of Baghdad. Dictatorship, he added, “was more merciful.”

Not long after being released last week, Rocky Mountain goats, including this one, had made their way up a steep cliff on the east side of Mount Jefferson on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. The goats were caught from a herd in the Elkhorn Mountains in Baker County. Pete Erickson The Bulletin

to eat as well. I’m sure they have a place in the ecosystem. I hope we can use them traditionally and just appreciate them.” If the goats do well, there are tentative plans to release them elsewhere in Central Oregon, such as Three Finger Jack and

the Three Sisters area. Since 1950, officials have been working to reintroduce the goats throughout the state. The Warm Springs release was part of the statewide plan. On Tuesday morning, the lactating nannies, or female goats,

and kids were released first. Within seconds, they were running down a 100-yard chute made out of burlap. About 30 minutes later, the entire population of goats could be seen making its way up a steep cliff in the distance.

The key question for local bike advocates and law enforcement is whether they can make the class cheaper than the $152 or $297 fines that accompany the most common bicyclist violations, Carney said. For drivers who face fines for violating the law, one of the incentives to take the traffic class is that they might be able to keep the violation off their driving record, and hence avoid higher insurance rates. This incentive does not apply in the case of bicyclists. The Bend Municipal Court will have to determine whether state law allows judges to convict someone of a traffic law violation and still waive the fine, Carney said. Judges in Multnomah County use this option, known as a sentence of discharge, for some people who take the “share the road safety class.” Judge Pro Tem Christopher Larsen, at Multnomah County Circuit Court, had the initial idea for the class and said reasonable people might disagree about whether state law allows a sentence of discharge in this context. But everyone should be able to agree that police officers can request citations be dismissed for people who successfully complete such a class, and that judges should be able to grant those dismissals, Larsen said.

land bike advocate both called the program a success. As an incentive for people to take the class, violators of certain state traffic laws who were not driving under the influence can have their citation dismissed, meaning the incident does not go on a driver’s record, and there is no fine for bicyclists, pedestrians or drivers. A judge might also decide to convict someone of a traffic violation but not impose the fine, if he or she successfully completes the class. In both cases, the court requires an original certificate of completion from the class, before dismissing a violation or waiving the fine, according to a written summary of the class. Bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers are only eligible for the incentives if it is the first time they took the class. Even when people are not eligible for the incentives, judges can require them to attend the class as part of their sentence. Stephanie Noll, programs manager for the Portland-based Bicycle Transportation Alliance, said Multnomah County’s diversion class has proven to be a success. “I think it’s a really successful model because you’ve got folks in the same room who have offenses with driving or biking or walking,” Noll said. “At this point, thousands of folks have gone through the class. For a larger jurisdiction, that’s still not a significant impact on the revenue raised through traffic fines.” Larsen said the number of citations has not increased since

Multnomah County created the “share the road safety class,” but referrals of people to the program have gone up, and more classes were added. “To me, a one-time opportunity to learn about the law and safety issues is worth foregoing one traffic citation one time, and it hasn’t been an excuse to go out and cite more,” Larsen said. He cautioned other cities against using such a class as a reason to increase citations, saying that could undermine support from bicycle advocates.

Multnomah success In 2007, Multnomah County started its “share the road safety class” for bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers. Larsen and a Port-

Working to teach The Deschutes County Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee is in the midst of a larger education effort that began this summer. Committee members plan to work with the county Road Department in September to install an information kiosk on the side of Skyliners Road, near the turnoff for Phil’s Trailhead, according to the committee’s action plan and interviews. The kiosk will have information about how bicyclists and drivers can share the road, and it will encourage people to abide by traffic laws and “work together to keep everybody safe and enjoying the wonderful route,” said committee member Kevin Tanski. In addition, committee members are working with local bicycle shops to create a bike ambassador program. The committee also wants to encourage staff at the shops to tell tourists and locals about “the whole range of routes around the commu-

“It was just the frosting on the cake to watch them cross that cliff and go up to Mount Jefferson,” Hurd said. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

nity and perhaps de-emphasize Skyliners as the preferred route, although it is among many a real gem for cyclists.” Committee members will work with agencies such as Deschutes County and the Federal Highway Administration to ensure there are bike lanes installed when Skyliners Road is repaved, which is scheduled to happen in 2013 at the earliest. “We’re in this for the long haul,” Tanski said.

WAVERLY, Iowa — The scene had all the makings of an American Gothic painting from Iowa’s own Grant Wood. A red and white barn served as the backdrop. A cornfield was in the distance. And a politician spoke of making the country great again. For this loyal GOP crowd, the setting was a familiar one. The opening line was not. “I’m very thankful for my red-hot smoking wife, the first lady of Minnesota,” said Gov. Tim Pawlenty, pointing to his wife, Mary, who was standing a few feet away. With that, the Pawlenty road show began this weekend in Iowa, the place where presidential aspirations are born. It was Pawlenty’s fifth visit in less than a year, one of many signs that he is working the state as intently as any prospective Republican presidential hopeful. Only the politically attuned may have even noticed, but that’s precisely the point: faceto-face introductions with activists who will spread the word. The midterm election of 2010 may produce a new Congress, but it also will help shape the field of Republicans jostling for the chance to take on President Barack Obama. Yes, it is early. The Iowa caucuses, the traditional starting point in the race for the White House, are 553 days away. Yet the moment that contests for House, Senate and governor are decided this year, a crop of Republicans will swiftly emerge for the party’s next act. “It’s hard to know how he’ll fare in 2012 when he runs for re-election, but based on what we know today, he would be a one-term president,” Pawlenty said of Obama, speaking as he rode along an Iowa highway. On a sultry afternoon, sweat was soaking into Pawlenty’s white shirt as he spoke individually with nearly everyone in the crowd of about 100. His conversations and speeches were peppered with homespun one-liners. On why he believes Democrats have struggled creating jobs: “It’s pretty tough to be pro-job and anti-business. That’s like being pro-egg and anti-chicken. It doesn’t work so well.” Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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THANKS The Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2 would like to thank Project Wildfire and the people of Central Oregon for the success of this year’s FireFree program in reducing the risk of Wildfire At a recent Project Wildfire awards ceremony the following individuals and entities were recognized for their particular contributions to help reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. Tom Andrade – Oregon Department of Forestry Betty Fadeley – Tollgate Subdivision Brad Bailey – Deschutes Recycling Woodside Ranch HOA Awbrey Glen HOA In the past year Project Wildfire has initiated the collection of over 150,000 yards of debris used in composting or energy production rather than just going up in smoke.

GREAT WORK CENTRAL OREGON


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THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 A5





Handcrafted in the USA

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Julia Finnell, 62, walks to her brother’s house next to the Ashwood post office last week. Finnell said she grew up next to the building her father pulled across town and renovated into a store and post office in the late 1960s. Ashwood, located east of Madras, is trying to adapt to life without a post office. “It is our community meeting place,” Finnell said.

Plagiarism Continued from A1 Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty much left it at that. But these cases — typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the plagiarism — suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words they did not write is a serious misdeed. It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study plagiarism. Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students — who came of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking — understand the concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image. “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information is just out there for anyone to take.” Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to understand why it is so widespread. In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald McCabe, a co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about 40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in written assignments. Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in recent surveys from 34 percent earlier

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people. We’re outraged.” Spitsnogle said Ashwood residents will still receive their mail from a carrier. “If they need to buy stamps or mail a package or pick up an item, the carrier can do those things for them,” she said. But residents are still worried logistically how it would work without a post office. The nearest post office is more than 30 miles away, and the roads are narrow, windy and can be icy in the winter. Daisy Thornton, 86, a lifelong Ashwood resident, said she’s disappointed that her town’s post office would be closed. Stand-

in the decade. Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution. “This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual property don’t have the same gravity,” said Brookover, who at 31 is older than most undergraduates. “When you’re sitting at your computer, it’s the same machine you’ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.” Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences between researching in the stacks and online. “Because you’re not walking into a library, you’re not physically holding the article, which takes you closer to ‘this doesn’t belong to me,’” she said. Online, “everything can belong to you really easily.” A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan Blum, disturbed by the high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view authorship and the written word, or “texts” in Blum’s academic language. She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates. “Today’s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts and the people who create them and who quote them,” she wrote last year in the book “My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,” published by Cornell University Press. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today — TV shows that constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier songs. In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual. It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged. “Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it may be waning,” Blum said. She contends that undergradu-

ing outside to meet the carrier to make sure she gets the right postage for an oversized package is unrealistic. And driving to Madras would be nearly impossible. “We don’t have the money, the gas and the time it takes,” she said. “It’s 40 miles to a post office. We feel very bad about this.” Ann Snyder, 58, a local rancher, said she thinks the Postal Service employees underestimate the importance of the post office. “I suspect they thought they had a little community where no one would notice and, oops, someone noticed,” she said. Residents said they weren’t given any warning, and they think the situation has been mishandled by the U.S. Postal Service. Spitsnogle said she is holding a town hall meeting at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Ashwood post office to discuss the closure and the next step. Kim Symons, who lives in the house connected to the post office, said this is just the beginning. “We’re not going to go down without a fight. It’s been a real shock to our community, and we really just want our post office back,” she said.

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ates are less interested in cultivating a unique and authentic identity — like their 1960s counterparts were — than in trying on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking. “If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique, then it’s OK if you say other people’s words, it’s OK if you say things you don’t believe, it’s OK if you write papers you couldn’t care less about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and getting a grade,” Blum said, voicing student attitudes. “And it’s OK if you put words out there without getting any credit.” The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include passages lifted from others. Instead of offering an abject apology, Hegemann insisted, “There’s no such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.” A few critics rose to her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did not win). That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards “does not foster creativity, it fosters laziness.” “You’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and matching,” said Wilensky, who took aim at Hegemann in a column in her student newspaper headlined “Generation Plagiarism.” At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others. Many times, said Donald Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied — knowing it was wrong — who were “unwilling to engage the writing process.” “Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,” he said.

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Continued from A1 “The individual operating the office is no longer with the Postal Service, and we have no qualified person to operate the small office at this time,” she said. Bob Ware has served as the town’s postmaster for the past four years. When asked if he had been fired, he said, “It kind of seems that way.” As to why, he said, “I don’t agree with the bogus charges.” He couldn’t comment further because he was in the middle of moving. Julia Finnell, who was born and raised in Ashwood, said she’ll fight to the end to keep the post office’s doors open. Her mother was the postmaster for more than 40 years, and she grew up in the house attached to the post office. Back then, the post office doubled as a grocery store, and her mother, a rockhound, sold her collection from the post office. She said people would time their daily stops to the post office with the arrival of mail. That way, everyone was showing up at once. “We’re fighting this,” she said. “It’s not going to go away. This is fighting city hall, and I have to face that reality. But I won’t stop until I run against the wall, and neither are a lot of us other

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A6 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN PAID ADVERTISEMENT


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Inside

OREGON Junction City struggles to find its 21st-century identity, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Richman championed San Fernando Valley secession, see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 2010

BEND

T

he Saturday morning before last, an incident at Black Butte Ranch sounded like a deleted scene from “City Slickers.” Fade in: Three middle-age adults are strolling down a bike path that winds through the resort. One of them spots something. They stop. They squint. Is that ...? Yes, right over there, in a nearby pasture, a newborn calf lies unattended. Worried that it’s been abandoned, they phone the stables. The owner tells them the calf is probably fine. But he agrees to swing by as soon as he sees off the next batch of trail riders. They hang up and watch the lonely calf. Their pity swells. They call the police. They call the stable owner again. He’s still busy. Then they decide to take action: Operation Calf Rescue is under way. The gate is locked, so one person shimmies under the barbed wire and manages to scoot the 30-pound calf onto the public side of the fence. They carry the calf — who is still wet from the womb — to a shady patch of grass next to the pro shop at Big Meadow Golf Course. They plop down and cradle the poor orphan in their laps. They pet him. They whisper sweet nothings to him. Mission Accomplished. But our scene doesn’t end there. Next, the stable owner, Cody Koch, arrives on his quad. And he’s irate. “I just wanted to tear their heads off,” he says. The cattle are rodeo stock that belong to another rancher who sublets pasture from Koch. Koch never authorized Operation Calf Rescue. In fact, he told the threesome, over the phone, not to touch the calf. The calf was born earlier that morning. Immediately after birth, cows often leave their calves lying on the ground while they graze for a while, to recover. The babies almost always stay put. And the mothers almost always return to lick the calves clean and nurse them. This particular calf was the cow’s first baby. Experts say it’s not unusual for a first-time mother to take a little longer to return to her calf. It’s part of the animal’s natural bonding process, which all hinges on smell. A cow uses her sense of smell to distinguish her own calf from others in the herd. When the folks picked up the calf and cuddled it, their scent replaced the mother’s. Koch says he tried putting the calf back with its mother, but she wouldn’t acknowledge the calf as hers. “A calf will suck on any cow, but most of the time a cow will only take one calf,” says Vickie Herring, who ran the stables at Black Butte Ranch for several years. Herring now works at R&B Horse Ranch in Sisters, where she is keeping the “rescued” calf and bottle-feeding him three times a day. The smoky-gray animal is friendly and healthy, Herring adds. He lives in a large horse stall and will be bottle-fed for three or four months. Then Herring says she will gradually switch him to a special grain feed. A more natural upbringing would involve nursing from the mother for six or seven months before switching to grass. Herring adds that the people who picked up the calf were lucky that its mother was young and inexperienced. A seasoned cow might have charged at anyone who approached her baby. “They could have been badly hurt,” Herring says. These are the mishaps of a place like Central Oregon, where city folk live next door to working ranches. “We get phone calls two or three times a day, telling us that we have dead horses in our pasture,” Koch says. Callers see horses lying down and remember hearing somewhere that the animals only sleep standing up. (Fact: Some horses sleep lying down.) “The 911 center gets those calls, too,” adds Black Butte Ranch Police Chief Denney Kelley. The moral of our story? Don’t touch the livestock, no matter how honorable your intentions. If you’re worried, call the stables (not 911) at 541-595-1297. Then the worstcase scenario is that you’ll give the cowboys a laugh. Lily Raff can be reached at lraff@ bendbulletin.com or at 541-617-7836.

The Bulletin

Land use advocacy group 1,000 Friends of Oregon will hold the last of its four bicycle tours of Bend’s proposed urban growth boundary Tuesday, and this time there’s free beer. “This is going to be the grand finale,” 1,000 Friends of Oregon spokesman Ben Gordon said. “We’re offering free beer. We’re going big.” The organization began offering bike tours earlier this summer as a way to give people the opportunity to learn about land use issues

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Tuesday’s ride, which starts at 5:30 p.m., will be different from the other bike tours in that it will be off-road. Participants will ride along the First Street Rapids Trail to a bluff that overlooks Gopher Gulch, which is a proposed subdivision in the Deschutes River viewshed that is in the city’s UGB expansion proposal. Gordon said the reason 1,000 Friends of Oregon wants to go to Gopher Gulch is because it encapsulates many of the issues that the city must consider as it revises its expansion proposal, such as transportation planning and infrastruc-

and how they relate to the city of Bend’s proposed 8,462-acre UGB expansion that must be approved by the state. The city is currently expecting a decision from the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development about how it must change its UGB, and officials are fairly certain it will shrink by 1,500 to 2,000 acres. Gordon said about 30 people have gone on the three previous 1,000 Friends of Oregon UGB tours. Those rides have also included city officials who would answer individuals’ questions as they traveled around to see the

Bike tour explores

Rd.

By Nick Grube

ture needs, because it is essentially an undeveloped canyon and has a lot of scenic value. “It’s definitely our future,” Gordon said of the UGB, “because once lands are on the map it’s hard to get them off.” Bend resident J. Johansen went on one of the previous rides that toured the southeast portion of the city’s growth proposal. He said the reason he wanted to take the ride around the UGB was because he was curious about the status of Bend’s proposal, which was initially denied by the state and in need of revisions. “It was really a very good way for me to get more information about what had been going on and what is going on,” Johansen said. See Ride / B5

Bu tl

Final tour organized by land use advocates will go off-road — and will feature free beer

various properties that could be included in the UGB.

son

Leave calf alone till cow comes home

Last chance to bike proposed UGB John

LILY RAFF

Inside • Map of the bike route, Page B5

If you go What: 1,000 Friends of Oregon Urban Growth boundary tour When: 5:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday Where: Bike ride leaves from 115 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend

Block party brings a crowd – and international flavor – to Bend’s west side

Drawn together

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Twelve-year-old Joaquin Sweet creates a sign letting other children know there is chalk to draw with at the Newport Block Party. Joaquin was attending the event, which was sponsored by area restaurateurs, with his family on Sunday.

Local restaurant owners add an exotic twist to the traditional block party

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

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here’s nothing like a good oldfashioned block party to get people out of their houses and mingling with their neighbors. Just barricade a street, add some food, a little music and a splash of beer, and the conversations and chance encounters just seem to happen. On Sunday, a group of Bend restaurant owners tried to capture that vibe near the intersection of Northwest 10th Street and Newport Ave-

nue, and added their own twist to the block party equation by focusing on foreign flavors, sounds and internationally influenced dancing. Steve Koch, a co-owner of Kebaba on Newport Avenue, came up with the idea for the “globally inspired” block party, and said it was intentionally meant to be small scale. He and his business partners worked together with neighboring restaurant Kanpai Sushi and Sake Bar on Newport Avenue and the owners of Spork to organize the party, but they didn’t do much ad-

vertising. Instead, he said they relied heavily on word of mouth and social networking to get people to attend. “We’re just trying to have a neighborhood party and bring some fun to the west side,” Koch said. “It’s grassroots, and we’re just trying to make it happen — and it seems like it is.” John Picarazzi, another co-owner of Kebaba, echoed Koch and said the businesses wanted to let the party “evolve” on its own and use it as a way to connect with the people who live in the neighborhood. See Party / B5

Forecaster: ‘Go out there and enjoy Central Oregon’ Sunny skies, seasonably warm days expected By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Don’t expect any strange weather this week in Central Oregon, because it’s going to be just about perfect. Starting today and looking ahead through Saturday, the National Weather Service’s Pendleton office forecasts sunny daytime temperatures in the Bend area to mainly hover around the mid-80s, with clear evenings expected to dip into the 40s and 50s. Unlike last week, no thunderstorms are on the horizon. Ann Adams, an

assistant forecaster with the weather service, said this is because Central Oregon is under a “high-pressure dome” that should keep things relatively stable over the next several days. “It’s going to be nice, so go out there and enjoy Central Oregon,” Adams said Sunday. Today, daytime temperatures should be between 85 and 90 degrees. Tonight is expected to be clear, with temperatures ranging from 41 to 48 degrees. Forecasts for the rest of the week are similar, with the beginning of the week

expected to stay mostly clear and skies likely to become sunnier as the weekend nears. On Tuesday, highs should be between 82 and 89 degrees during the day, with evening lows between 43 and 53. Wednesday is expected to be the hottest day of the week, with highs ranging from 85 to 92 and lows between 45 and 55. Thursday and Friday should be slightly cooler — but only by a few degrees — with highs hitting 84 to 90 and 82 to 88 degrees, respectively. Temperatures during the evenings are expected to be nearly identical on Thursday and Friday to those for the remainder of the

week, with lows hitting anywhere from 43 to 55 degrees. This very slight cooling trend is likely to continue into Saturday, when high temperatures are expected to be between 80 and 86 and overnight lows between 43 and 53. Historically, Adams said, the first week of August in Central Oregon has seen high temperatures that run in the lower 80s. “It’ll be near normal or slightly above normal,” she said. “So it’s not going to be anything out of the ordinary.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-6332160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.


B2 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Developer hangs on in critical condition Stephen Trono was still in critical condition at St. Charles Bend on Sunday, several days after he was shot in his northwest Bend home. His wife has told authorities she shot him because she thought he was a prowler. Police were called to Trono’s home around 12:30 a.m. on July 28. When they arrived, they found that the 60-year-old had been shot several times and was seriously injured. Trono’s wife, Angelicque Trono, 39, told the police she was awakened after being startled by a noise. After her husband got up to investigate, she said, she shot him because she believed he was an intruder. Bend police are still investigating the incident, and are hoping to talk with Stephen Trono. No arrests have been made. Trono is the founder of the Trono Company, which buys, develops and markets commercial real estate. For the past few years, he has worked on a mixed-use development planned for the Old Mill District called The Mercato. In March, PremierWest Bank

filed a lawsuit against Trono and his company that seeks $4.7 million in loan repayment for property related to that development.

Firefighters battle blazes around region Fire crews are still working to suppress a number of Central Oregon fires that started after last week’s thunderstorms. According to the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center, a 211-acre fire on private land seven miles southwest of Antelope is 40 percent contained, and a 4-acre blaze on Warm Springs Tribal lands, 17 miles southwest of Fossil, was expected to be 100 percent contained by Sunday evening. Fire crews are also continuing to work with the Fossil Rural Fire Department to contain a 410-acre fire on private land about three to four miles south of Fossil. On Sunday, that fire was 75 percent contained. No new lightning-caused fires were reported Sunday, but the dispatch center warned that more blazes could be expected over the next week or so as a result of fires that have smoldered for days but have not flared up.

Ontario-based advocacy group seeking pen pals for soldiers The Associated Press ONTARIO — Veteran advocates are launching an “Adopt A Soldier� program in Ontario, a project in which people will correspond with soldiers deployed in war and abroad — part of efforts to keep up troop morale. Veteran Advocates of Ore-Ida say volunteers who join the project will act as pen pals with the soldiers, and may send cards or care packages. Volunteers are asked to correspond with the soldiers for 18 months. The Argus Observer reports

volunteers and soldiers are matched through a series of questions about interests. “It is an opportunity to support our troops,� said Charlene Pelland, of Veteran Advocates. She said there are safeguards in place to protect the soldier’s privacy as well as the pen pal’s. A commander wrote in a letter that hearing news from home keeps him going during his tours, Pelland said. “This will be the third and fourth deployment for some of these soldiers,� she said.

N  R

Margo Pellegrino is followed by a U.S. Coast Guard ship as she enters Winchester Bay. She’s paddling from Seattle to San Diego in a canoe to raise awareness about ocean issues.

CIVIL SUITS Deschutes County

Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration Filed July 19

Alex Powers The (Coos Bay) World

Woman embarks on a canoe trip for a cause New Jersey mom hopes Seattle-toSan Diego trek will draw attention to the ocean’s problems By Andy Rossback The (Coos Bay) World

WINCHESTER BAY — “I’m in the bar,� a voice said behind the static of a radio. Another voice replied, “Did the Coast Guard come to greet you?� “They almost ran me over!� After a week of bad weather kept her in Newport, Margo Pellegrino finally reached Winchester Bay on Thursday afternoon. She’s paddling from Seattle to San Diego in a 21-foot outrigger canoe at about 5 mph to raise awareness about ocean problems, but the 43-year-old mother from New Jersey has had some problems of her own. She encountered bad weather and Coast Guard rescuers who met her at the mouth of the

Umpqua on Thursday to ensure she made it ashore. A week before, they’d pulled her aboard one of their boats near the mouth of the Siuslaw. “They’re great,� Pellegrino said. “I think they just want to figure out what the hell is going on.� What she is doing doesn’t happen every day — it’s crazy, she says — and dangerous. “The scariest thing is her being trapped out there with no way in,� said June Barnard, the other voice on the radio and Pellegrino’s on-land companion for the trip. Pellegrino carries a GPS tracking device with her, and Barnard follows her on the nearest road (view her exact location at www .seattle2sandiego.com). Barnard and Pellegrino have known each other only about six weeks, but their cause has brought them very close. “When you’re in these kinds of situations, you bond in ways you’d never imagine,� Barnard said. “It’s pretty serendipitous that we were connected.� Pellegrino’s no stranger to the

ocean. She’s paddled the East Coast and the Gulf Coast. “It’s really the coolest way to see the country,� she said. “The West Coast is a totally different animal for me.� The women spend their off time replacing gear, working on logistics and catching up on email. “We stay in people’s yards, on people’s couches — just random people,� Barnard said. However, their sights are set on problems bigger than finding a place to stay. Pellegrino said plastic is building up in the ocean’s gyres, causing many problems for wildlife. “You really can’t go anywhere without seeing a plastic bag,� she said. Logging and lawn runoff also are concerns. “The water quality is so degraded,� she said. “Every time you put something on your lawn, you’re going to drink it.� The problems are big, but Pellegrino isn’t discouraged. “We can change this,� she said. “I don’t think most people want to deliberately ruin a resource. I think they want to know what they can do to help.�

10CV0596AB: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Kathy G. Scarborough, complaint, $37,141.61 10CV0597AB: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Leslie A. Tucker, complaint, $157,790.09 10CV0589ST: Citibank South Dakota NA v. W.E. Kievit , complaint, $30,165.23 10CV0599SF: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Randy A. Kemnitz, complaint, $19,190.46 10CV0600MA: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Kimberley D. Ries, complaint, $13,925.10 10CV0601MA: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Roger L. Ries II, complaint, $14,004.05 10CV0602MA: State Farm Insurance v. Ferguson Enterprises Inc., complaint, $36,461.05 Filed July 20

10CV0606ST: Judy Johnson v. Destination Sunriver Resort Inc. dba Destination Hotels & Resorts, complaint, $164,750.19 economic damages, $200,000 noneconomic damages. Filed July 21

10CV0609ST: FIA Card Services NA v. Carla M. Mandal, complaint, $10,380.81 10CV0611MA: Bel Winkle v. Cascade Healthcare Community Inc. dba St. Charles Health System Inc., complaint, $300,000 Filed July 22

10CV0615ST: Raymond D. Pasquetti v. Susan E. Pasquetti, Jon J. Anderson aka J.J. Anderson, CitiMortgage Inc., complaint, $600,441

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

Every Friday

Iraq invades Kuwait in 1990 The Associated Press Today is Monday, Aug. 2, the 214th day of 2010. There are 151 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Aug. 2, 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, seizing control of the oil-rich emirate. (The Iraqis were later driven out in Operation Desert Storm.) ON THIS DATE In 1610, during his fourth voyage to the Western Hemisphere, English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into what is now known as Hudson Bay. In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began attaching their signatures to the Declaration of Independence. In 1876, frontiersman “Wild Bill� Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory by Jack McCall, who was later hanged. In 1909, the original Lincoln “wheat� penny first went into circulation, replacing the “Indian Head� cent. In 1923, the 29th president of the United States, Warren Harding, died in San Francisco; Vice President Calvin Coolidge became president. In 1934, German President Paul von Hindenburg died, pav-

T O D AY IN HISTORY ing the way for Adolf Hitler’s complete takeover. In 1943, during World War II, Navy boat PT-109, commanded by Lt. John F. Kennedy, sank after being rammed by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri off the Solomon Islands. In 1974, former White House counsel John Dean was sentenced to one to four years in prison for obstruction of justice in the Watergate cover-up. (Dean ended up serving four months.) In 1980, 85 people were killed when a bomb exploded at the train station in Bologna, Italy. In 1985, 135 people were killed when a Delta Air Lines jetliner crashed while attempting to land at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. TEN YEARS AGO Republicans awarded Texas Gov. George W. Bush their 2000 presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Philadelphia and ratified Dick Cheney as his running mate. Former President Gerald Ford was hospitalized after suffering one, possibly two, small strokes. President Bill Clinton postponed the scheduled execution of Juan Raul Garza, a Texas drug kingpin and murder-

er (Garza was executed in June 2001). FIVE YEARS AGO An Air France jetliner from Paris skidded off a runway at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport and burst into flames; all 309 people aboard survived. President George W. Bush signed a free trade pact with five Central American nations and the Dominican Republic. American freelance journalist Steven Vincent was found shot to death in Basra, Iraq, after being abducted by armed men. ONE YEAR AGO A mystery from the 1991 Gulf War was finally solved as the Pentagon announced that the remains of missing Navy pilot Michael “Scott� Speicher had been found. Catriona Matthew won the Women’s British Open for her first major title, beating Karrie Webb by three strokes. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former Sen. Paul Laxalt (R-

Nev.) is 88. Actor Peter O’Toole is 78. Country singer Hank Cochran is 75. Rock musician Garth Hudson (The Band) is 73. Movie director Wes Craven is 71. Singer Kathy Lennon (The Lennon Sisters) is 67. Actor Max Wright is 67. Actress Joanna Cassidy is 65. Actress Kathryn Harrold is 60. Singer Andrew Gold is 59. Actor Butch Patrick (“The Munsters�) is 57. Singer Mojo Nixon is 53. Actress Victoria Jackson is 51. Actress Apollonia is 51. Actress Cynthia Stevenson is 48. Actress Mary-Louise Parker is 46. Rock musician John Stanier is 42. Writer-actor-director Kevin Smith is 40. Actor Sam Worthington is 34. Figure skater Michael Weiss is 34. Actor Edward Furlong is 33. Rock musician Devon Glenn is 30. Actress Hallie Eisenberg is 18. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “A beautiful soul has no other merit than its own existence.� — Friedrich von Schiller, German author (1759-1805)

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 B3

O Junction City trying to reshape its identity for the 21st century Urban sprawl, traffic and economic issues are top concerns for city leaders anxious to maintain community’s sense of identity By Winston Ross The (Eugene) Register-Guard

JUNCTION CITY — Christina Zimmerman never really intended for the Buttermilk Junction to be anything more than a hobby business, where people could stop in for country-styled window coverings, homespun fabric, tin wax melters and Amish barn stars. Then the call center where Zimmerman worked full time closed in 2008, and her secondary source of income became her primary one. Without enough traffic in this sleepy section of downtown Junction City to warrant paying herself a salary, Zimmerman moved a few blocks away, joining Bobbie De Less’ Thimbles and Threads at Sixth and Ivy, which doubles as state Highway 99, right where anyone passing through Junction City is forced to drive. But the highway is rife with diesel truck traffic and cars blazing through at 40 mph. “Some of my poor customers, they about get blown off the sidewalk as they go out of here,” De Less said. The downtown paradox — too tranquil here, too clamorous there — is one of the many challenges city leaders face as they try to revive the economy, capitalize on the region’s agricultural bounty and maintain a strong sense of identity, to keep Junction City from fading into the kind of obscure, bedroom-community status that affects so many small towns across Oregon and America.

Transit issues This was once a city that had more jobs than it did places to live. Before the bankruptcy of recreational vehicle maker Country Coach in November 2009, the downsizing of Monaco and the closure of Gibson Motors, there were 4,000 jobs in Junction City and not enough homes to meet the demand within the urban growth boundary. Now there are half that many jobs and, as of 2008, only 13 percent of Junction City’s residents work in the city. Nearly 40 percent of the town’s 2,126 workers commute to Eugene and Springfield. Much of the public discussion and media attention here of late has swirled around the proposed state hospital and prison complex: Will it come or won’t it? Is Junction City getting the better of the state at the negotiating table when it comes to who pays for water and sewer upgrades? These are relevant questions for Junction City, but answers are in short supply. And some towns-

O  B Suspect arrested in Medford shooting MEDFORD — A 25-yearold man is under arrest in connection with a shooting at a Medford restaurant. Raymond Ranal Williams was arrested on two counts of attempted murder, attempted assault and unlawful use of a weapon. Authorities say he also had an outstanding warrant for failing to appear on a theft charge. Police say an argument broke out Friday outside a Muchas Gracias restaurant, and witnesses reported seeing a man get a gun out of a white sedan’s trunk and fire at least three shots, which struck the restaurant. The shooter then got into the car and left with three other people. Williams was arrested after the occupants of the car were interviewed.

Unattended candle cited in Portland fire

Paul Carter / The (Eugene) Register-Guard

ABOVE: Bobbie De Less sweeps the sidewalk in front of her shop in downtown Junction City as trucks rumble by on state Highway 99. The traffic is so heavy, De Less says, that “Some of my poor customers, they about get blown off the sidewalk as they go out of here.” AT LEFT: Junction City in a photo taken around 1890, possibly from the top of a grain elevator. The view is above Front Street, looking west toward where Highway 99 would be built. Junction City Historical Society via The (Eugene) Register-Guard

folk worry that this discussion threatens to overshadow other important issues here, such as the schizophrenic downtown. There’s an ongoing debate about how to fix Highway 99, which is “reaching a failure point, as we grow,” said City Manager David Clyne. Some are lobbying for a “couplet,” which would result in the four highway lanes being reduced to two that travel only southward, to make room for pedestrian improvements. A northbound counterpart would be dedicated the next block over. But there’s a limited amount of optimism that the $80 million it could cost to pay for major improvements to 99 is going to show up here anytime soon. “If we get funded within 15 years,” Clyne said, “it will be a surprise.” The highway is important because its problems stifle downtown’s walkability and allure to tourists, say Clyne and others, and to fix it requires that the railroad just east of 99 be moved. Junction City has sued the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, which owns the track but doesn’t use it much and hasn’t paid its franchise fee for several years, Clyne said. Federal law prohibits cities from forcing the railroad to vacate the line, so Junction City is suing. The railroad wants to renegotiate the terms of what was once a $50,000 annual fee, Clyne said. Officials with Burlington Northern said they’re looking into the issue.

What’s the attraction? Beyond the highway and railroad issues, there’s a list of 90plus suggestions that a citizens group, “Energize Junction City,” is poring over the results of a $9,000 “visitor readiness report” the group commissioned. The city is applying for state grant money from the “Main Street” program to spiff up downtown with better sidewalks and lighting. There’s the always-controversial question about whether to form an urban renewal district, which siphons property tax money away from other entities but can be used to fund public improvements and spur development. Then come the existential issues: Junction City is taking a hard look at its own identity, how to create a brand and market it. In a few days, tourists from all over the state and beyond will flock here for the town’s annual Scandinavian Festival, which runs from Aug. 12-15. The first festival, in 1961, was expected to draw 2,000 visitors. Instead, 25,000 people showed up. It remains a popular event that earns bucketloads of money for business owners during the week it’s here. But the town’s lineage is less and less Scandinavian: Census figures show the population that hails from that part of the world at around 5 percent today — and the festival has become less and less connected with the merchants who are here year-

County College Wants You to Apply! Application deadline August 20 Get engaged in your government and learn how Deschutes County operates. Find out about services available to you. Deschutes County College is FREE! Interactive activities and informative sessions, tour County facilities, directly experience County government operations, and speak with elected officials. September 14 through November 2 Tuesdays 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. for eight consecutive weeks Attend six or more sessions to graduate Deschutes County citizens new to government are encouraged to apply. To Apply for County College Receive a County College application: call (541) 330-4640, email annaj@deschutes.org or visit www.deschutes.org, click on “County College” under “Quick Links”.

round, Zimmerman said. “A lot of people tell me they come to Junction City for the Scandinavian Festival,” she said. “Once a year is not enough to keep businesses around.” It’s time, she and others argue, to celebrate some of Junction City’s other key strengths. One of those is its family-owned farms. Two weeks ago, Pfeiffer Vineyards hosted a $20-a-plate goingaway party for Clyne, who departs for a new job in Independence on Aug. 10. Pfeiffer Vineyards is 10 miles from downtown Junction City, a drive past grazing cattle, sheep and alpacas, hay bales piled up after the grass seed harvest. But if you ask co-owner Danuta Pfeiffer how far outside city limits the winery is, she looks at you like that’s the dumbest question she’s ever heard. “We’re in the city limits,” she says, and seizing the opportunity to make a point, adds, “This is an agricultural community. This is a period whose time has come; to discover who we are in the 21st century. We are vineyards. We grow the world’s best sheep. Eight out of 10 people come to this winery from out of state. We are a destination to the world.”

PORTLAND — The Portland Fire Department says a candle left lit overnight caused a residential fire that left more than $275,000 in damage and forced two residents to jump from a window. When firefighters responded to the call Sunday morning, the entire front of the house was engulfed in flames. One of the home’s five residents twisted her ankle while jumping out of a window. One firefighter was hurt while moving debris.

Coos County man jailed in wife’s death COOS BAY — The Coos County District Attorney says

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B4 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Severing a cozy relationship with state employees

R

emember the generous perks the state of Oregon’s investment officers got? The Oregonian uncovered earlier this year that the dozen or so state employees responsible for

keeping a close eye on the companies managing Oregon’s billions in investments were being wined and dined by those companies. Investment fund companies were treating the employees to first-class travel, luxury hotel stays, rounds of golf and fancy restaurants. Other state employees couldn’t get that. The Treasury Department got a special exemption. We’d like state employees to be comfortable. That’s different than accepting a shower of gifts and special treatment from the people they are supposed to be watching. To his credit, when newly appointed State Treasurer Ted Wheeler learned about it, he started taking action to end it. Last week, he unveiled more changes to follow up after a state audit confirmed and reinforced The Oregonian’s findings. According to that paper, the new policies include: • No first-class travel; • No hosted golf rounds; • More requirements for documentation of travel expenses; and more. There are still a couple of things missing. For one, when investment firms pick up the tab, what do they pay for state employees? There’s no requirement that investment firms report it.

We’d like state employees to be comfortable. That’s different than accepting a shower of gifts and special treatment from the people they are supposed to be watching. Wheeler said he’ll try to get as much information as he can. He’s going to make it clear to investment firms and his employees that Oregon’s employees are expected to operate according to certain standards. In new contracts between Oregon and investment firms, he’ll reinforce that point. It also brings up another issue. Oregonians can’t know exactly what kind of deal investment firms give state employees. That information is not subject to Oregon’s public records laws. That needs to change if Oregonians are going to know how close its watchdogs are to the watched.

No way to treat a child

I

t’s difficult to look at the pictures of 7-month-old Alayna Wyland without recoiling. The baby has a hemangioma, a rapidly growing mass of blood vessels, bulging from her forehead and pressing on her eye. Last week her parents were charged in Clackamas County with criminal mistreatment for choosing prayer over a doctor’s care for her problem. If they’re convicted, they could receive as much as five years in prison for their lack of action. It may be that that’s as serious a crime as they’re likely to be convicted of. After all, little Alayna is alive, though it’s still not known if she will be blind in that eye. Even if she were dead and her parents charged with murder or manslaughter, Oregon law allows them to argue they should not be convicted for choosing prayer over medicine. Oregon pays great deference to an individual’s religious beliefs in a whole variety of ways, and generally speaking that’s good. Where it’s less good is when those beliefs pose threats either to society or to children. Thus, in Oregon, just about any child may be exempted from routine immunizations for religious or philo-

sophical reasons. No matter that in some schools in Oregon so many parents are given exemptions that children who cannot be immunized for health reasons are at risk. Thus, too, it’s all too easy for parents to opt for faith healing where their children are concerned. It shouldn’t be that way. Society — each of us — has a real stake in the well-being of our children. On the intangible level, we want them to grow up healthy and well educated so they can keep the future bright. Moreover, when the state must step in and remove a child from his or her family to provide medical care, that’s an expensive and horribly disruptive process. The state works hard to keep families involved with their children in these cases, but several hours a day with parents is a far cry from living at home. We’d all be better served by stricter laws. Tighten or eliminate for all but health reasons, a parent’s right to reject childhood immunizations. Remove the active defense of religious belief for charges of murder and manslaughter when a child dies and parents have refused medical treatment. Oregon’s children deserve at least that much.

My Nickel’s Worth The blessings of the geese It seems to me that the goose problem is a blessing in disguise. During a time when we are trying to find ways to use less energy and have a smaller footprint on the planet, along come these geese. A wild, sustainable food source is the best possible protein available. Factory farms pollute, consume energy, water and space. If you consume meat or fish, you are already responsible for the death of many “poor” creatures. Why are these geese any different from the cows or chickens we eat that are treated much worse than the geese, or the salmon and other fish that are ripped from their free-swimming lives to die a slow death in the hold of a ship? I say let them reproduce and then harvest a number that will leave some for all to enjoy and some to feed the hungry. Once upon a time, there were wolves, bears, coyotes and other animals all eating the geese and forcing them to move on, keeping their numbers at a healthy level. That has changed. I love wildlife, but I realize the need for balance just as most people realize the need to trap mice or rats when their numbers get too large. For some reason, we pick and choose which animals are cute and should live, and which ones are expendable. I imagine they all want to live, but to have life there has to be death. That is how nature works. Robert Meredith Bend

Cyclist responsibility On a recent Sunday afternoon while driving on Mt. Washington Drive, I passed several groups of racing cyclists. All was fine until I approached a group of three women cyclists decked

out in their racing garb and contentedly talking to each other while riding three abreast, despite the existence of a bike lane, the left-most rider in the middle of Mt. Washington Drive. Thinking that these were knowledgeable and considerate cyclists who had merely lost track of their road position, I gave a courteous tap of the horn as I slowed to 10 mph under the posted limit. To my dismay, none of the riders acknowledged the presence of my vehicle immediately behind them. So I tapped the horn again. Finally, the three cyclists squeezed together, still three abreast and nudged toward the bike lane sufficiently that I could safely pass. Not two minutes later as I entered the traffic circle at Shevlin Park Road, a different racing cyclist entered the circle at the same moment to my immediate right (I know this because my wife called out the warning ... bicyclist to your right!). Don’t cyclists understand how dangerous this practice is? Why is it necessary to constantly remind cyclists to follow the rules of the road that they share with motor vehicles? Perhaps it is time to institute a bicycling license, comprising a written and road test. David Edlund Bend

Working in Oregon Early this year, Chief Executive Magazine published a report on the best and the worst states in which to find work, and at the bottom of the list, in fact 37th on the list, was our great state of Oregon! Why? The right-to-work states showed the best record where employees have superior work ethics, and public officials have a more favorable attitude toward business, especially small business. The top seven states have right-to-

work laws prohibiting the firing of employees for refusal to pay dues or fees to an unwanted union. The states are: Florida, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. Private-sector employment in rightto-work states is up by 1.5 million since 1999. Meanwhile, in the forced-unionism states, private-sector employment is down by 1.9 million since 1999. Evidently President Obama, a union man, had not read the report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Labor Department. Margaret Dement Madras

Better Wal-Mart location I am responding to the editorial “Wal-Mart silence speaks volumes,” (July 12). I was opposed to Wal-Mart’s plan to open a bigger store on U.S. Highway 97 and Cooley because I felt that the store already in good use in the south of town was a better place to expand into a superstore. Why waste money, time and land, when you had room to grow where you were already established? Traffic problems had already been taken care of, and homes surrounding Wal-Mart came after it was built. (Duh!) I am glad to see someone in corporate woke up and discovered my idea. I will still be opposed to its plans to develop the Highway 97 and Cooley location, no matter what the economy, because of the aforementioned problems. I might change my mind if I was sure that the company would pay Bend the same amount of taxes that you or I have to pay. That would help our local economy, no matter what the economic conditions were at the time. Beverly A. Scalise Bend

Letters policy

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Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

The United States should stand up to North Korea By Scott Friedman Bulletin guest columnist

T

here is never a good time to start a senseless military conflict that results in thousands of people killed or injured, but as far as North Korea is concerned, it’s now or never. Let’s just hope that strategic and tactical realities will prevent this country’s isolated and brainwashed state apparatus from crossing a dangerous line. Already responsible for a successful nuclear weapons program as well as attempts to share it with other totalitarian regimes, this ideologically warped dictatorship recently sank a South Korean vessel and killed 46 sailors before throwing a diplomatic temper tantrum about being caught red-handed. Pyongyang then successfully intimidated the United Nations into watering down its condemnation of the sinking by not naming North Korea as the perpetrator when all investigations con-

sistently pointed north. In reaction to the diluted U.N. condemnation, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton laid blame for the sinking of the South Korean vessel squarely on North Korean naval forces. Also helping to stir the pot is a four-day joint military exercise scheduled to begin last Sunday (July 25-28), which is ruffling Pyongyang’s feathers to no end. For some reason, this nation of starving missile makers above the 38th parallel has been particularly sensitive and belligerent toward any action that could be remotely perceived as hostile. Claiming that any condemnation of the sinking that named North Korea would be considered an act of war, they succeeded in making the U.N. blink, though it’s usually the Chinese and Russian diplomats doing the blinking. (Or are they winking … at Kim Jong Il?) Unfortunately, the pitiful drama at

IN MY VIEW the U.N. matters little now as the democratically elected South Korean government prepares to defend its people from a horror they remember all too well. Yet the northern government continues to scream foul, declaring the upcoming joint military training an unacceptable provocation that cannot be tolerated by the Korean People’s Army. This brings us back to the question that still lingers. Just what do these guys want? Are they simply crazy, or is something else going on? Well, yes, they are crazy, but there’s more to it than that. A power struggle is going on in Pyongyang because Kim Jong Il’s longterm health is uncertain. We shouldn’t be surprised by what is possible in the name of this power struggle because

the morality of North Korea’s culture has been festering in isolation for 60 years. The North Korean leaders rattling sabers today all grew up in a culture of blind obedience underlined by the constant threat of merciless execution. This means we have no conception of what these guys are capable of, especially the children of Kim Jong Il. Besides internal power struggles and lost morality, this fiery belligerence is also being stoked by North Korea’s belief that this may be the best time to play brinkmanship with Uncle Sam. North Koreans see a majority of the United States armed forces pinned down in Iraq and Afghanistan, the current U.S. administration mired in a complex standoff with Iran, an American-born recession that won’t end and the American people more divided than they’ve been in 150 years.

All these factors may convince enough people in Pyongyang to do something drastic, but their urgency belies the fact that North Korea is quickly becoming an anachronistic exception to the democratic rule that dominates our geopolitical world — a democratic ideal that has slowly and painfully spread across the globe to leave only a few more holdouts of tyranny and ideological rot. The same democratic ideals that just pulled our country through one of the most exceptional elections in history is at the core of how democracy continues to spread. This is one of those moments in history when who is in the oval office doesn’t matter. All that matters right now is that the United States of America is the only country prepared to stand up to North Korea. Scott Friedman lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 B5

O Ride

“It’s good that people still put effort into putting on a party. I like the energy, and that people can just hang out and kick it.” — Ian Minsker, Icee’s Shave Ice cart owner

Continued from B1 While he doesn’t plan to go on Tuesday’s ride, he said anyone interested in land use issues and the UGB would be able to learn a lot from the information discussed during the tour. “It’s a nice bike ride, for one,” Johansen said, “and two, it’s a way to see what’s going on in different parts of the city, and three, it’s a nice way to get questions answered by somebody who knows what the answer is.” Because the last tour is off-road, organizers suggest riders bring bikes that can handle trail riding. Everyone at least 21 years old who is on the tour will receive one free beer at the Bend Brewing Company after the ride. A wrap-up discussion will also take place at the Bend Brewing Company, and Gordon said city staff and some city councilors will be on hand to listen to the conversation and take suggestions. That discussion, Gordon said, is open to people who don’t go on the ride, and will start at approximately 7:15 p.m. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Members of the community mingle while attending the Newport Block Party, held Sunday at the intersection of Northwest 10th Street and Newport Avenue. The event featured international cuisine along with Bollywood-style dancers and belly dancers.

By Jennifer Barrios Newsday

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Bike tour explores UGB proposal Bend city limits (current urban growth boundary) Proposed urban growth boundary

Cooley Rd.

End Empire Ave. . Rd. Mkt tler u B

97

d.

97

R ott Kn

Ward Rd.

15th St.

St.

Reed Mkt. Rd. Stevens Rd.

Thi rd

wood B lv Brooks

Dr. Centur y

Bear Creek Rd.

20

d.

Rd.

27th St.

ners

Skyli

14th St.

First Street Rapids Trail Start

Butler Market Rd. Dickey Rd.

Cooley Rd.

Deschutes Market Rd.

Joh

nso

20

Juniper Ridge

Hamby Rd.

nR

d.

97

Party Continued from B1 “We’re a neighborhood restaurant, and we wanted to create something organic and unique,” Picarazzi said in between sips of his drink. “We’re just trying to have a party for the neighborhood.” Dozens of people strolled through the Sunday block party or sat under umbrellas as they drank and ate the many different types of food and beverages. For those who stuck around into the evening, they were greeted with local Bollywood-style dancers as well as belly dancers who maneu-

vered through the party. Bend resident Leia Napoli, 32, one of the belly dancers who performed Sunday, said she liked what was being offered at the party because she enjoys international cuisine, from kebobs to sushi. As she sat on a curb under the shade of an umbrella, she also mentioned the laid-back feel of the party. “This is so mellow,” Napoli said with a smile. “It feels like a pocket of San Diego at the beach ... It’s just a little more low key. “I could hang out here all day.” That sentiment was felt by others who spent some time at the party Sunday, and relaxation seemed to be

on everyone’s mind — even some of the vendors. Ian Minsker, who owns Icee’s Shave Ice cart, thought the block party was a great addition to an already festive city. As he took a break from handing out flavored ice treats, he said he enjoyed the scene the block party created and would like to see it continue. “It’s good that people still put effort into putting on a party,” Minsker said. “I like the energy, and that people can just hang out and kick it.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@ bendbulletin.com.

Rickard Rd. Knott Rd.

Hat China

Mile O

1

FORMER CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLYMAN DIES

Rd.

Richman backed secession of the San Fernando Valley Erich Steidtmann Source: City of Bend

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

dies amid probe into his Nazi past By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

Three months after German prosecutors reopened an investigation into whether he had participated in massacres of thousands of Polish Jews, Erich Steidtmann, a former Nazi officer, died July 25 in Hanover, Germany. He was 95. Steidtmann was commander of a police unit, the 3rd Battalion of Police Regiment 22, that in the fall of 1942 guarded trains deporting Jews from “It’s incredibly the Warsaw Ghetto to the Treblinka extermination frustrating. I camp. His unit remained in sometimes the ghetto until late 1943, indicating that he was insay that I am volved in crushing Jewish the only Jew in resistance after Gen. Juerthe world who gen Stroop sent in thousands of troops in April of prays for the that year. More than 55,000 health of Nazi people were gunned down deported to the camps. war criminals.” or“Steidtmann denied being there in April 1943,” — Efraim Zuroff, Efraim Zuroff, the coordicoordinator of nator of Nazi war crimes Nazi war crimes research for the Simon research for the Wiesenthal Center, said Simon Wiesenthal Thursday in a telephone Center interview from Jerusalem, “but witnesses say he was there.” Steidtmann was later transferred to Battalion 101, one of many police units that participated in what the Nazis called the Harvest Festival — the shooting of tens of thousands of Jews in labor and concentration camps in and around Lublin, Poland, on Nov. 3-4, 1943. He later claimed that he was on leave at the time, but a letter he wrote just before the massacres indicated that he was there. Kathrin Soefker, a Hanover prosecutor, told The Associated Press that authorities were investigating “whether he was on vacation during the time of the massacres or whether he was at the location when it happened.” The investigation was continuing when Steidtmann died. “It’s incredibly frustrating,” said Zuroff, the author of “Operation Last Chance: One Man’s Quest to Bring Nazi Criminals to Justice” (2009). “I sometimes say that I am the only Jew in the world who prays for the health of Nazi war criminals.”

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate

By Kevin Modesti

Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES — Keith Richman, a former California assemblyman who would have been mayor of the San Fernando Valley if the 2002 secession drive had prevailed, has died after fighting brain cancer for more than a year. Richman died Friday night at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. He was 56. “Keith Richman was a great leader and passionate public servant,” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said. “He advocated for so many important causes in California, including health care and pension reform, and his work for our state made a lasting impact that will be remembered.”

Supported cityhood Colleagues remembered the longtime Northridge resident and physician’s political courage in being one of the few prominent elected officials who supported San Fernando Valley cityhood before the movement became popular. “There are few people who have done so much for the San Fernando Valley,” said Richard Close, who was chairman of the secession effort. “Keith was a warrior, and we needed warriors,” said attorney David Fleming, a major backer of secession. Richman gained a unique place in San Fernando Valley history by winning an office that never existed. He handily defeated nine other candidates to serve as mayor of the San Fernando Valley if the area’s bid to become a separate city had gone through in the same November 2002 election. Valley secession from Los Angeles won a majority among voters in the Valley itself but was rejected by a wide margin in the rest of the city. Richman’s victory became moot. Richman, who followed his father Monroe Richman into medicine, had a practice in Sun Valley and founded Glendale-based Lakeside Community HealthCare Inc. He was also on staff at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center and had served as chairman of a campaign to raise $15 million of the $160 million needed to build a 138-bed expansion

The Associated Press file photo

Former Assemblyman Keith Richman, of Northridge, Calif., a San Fernando Valley doctor, served three years in the California Assembly. He died Friday of cancer. that is slated to open in December. “Keith was a champion for Providence Holy Cross, working tirelessly to ensure hospital beds are available for residents of the northern Los Angeles County area,” said Larry Bowe, chief executive of the Mission Hills medical center. “He was determined to ensure that quality health care was readily available for the communities he served. He was a leader with an enormous heart.”

Forced out by term limits After being active in community politics — on issues ranging from improving public transportation in the Valley to restoring athletic programs at Cal State Northridge — Richman, a Republican, won election to the Assembly in 2000 from the 38th District, representing parts of the north San Fernando Valley, Simi Valley and Santa Clarita. Named the Legislature’s Rookie of the Year by the California Journal, he served in Sacramento until 2006 before being forced out of office by term limits. He campaigned for state treasurer that year but lost in the primary. Richman described himself as a moderate Republican with an optimistic view of the political system. His willingness to work with Demo-

crats drew applause from centrists but angered Republican legislative leaders and conservative ideologues. Although he was credited with key roles in workers’ compensation reform, planning to deal with state budget deficits and promoting infrastructure investment, he left office expressing frustration about rising partisanship. “I went up there to try to solve problems,” Richman told the Daily News in 2006. “But the problem in Sacramento for a moderate is that most of the time moderates lose. “What I found out very quickly is that the special interests — on both sides of the aisle — pretty much call all the shots.” Richman said that after he and Democratic colleagues received complaints from hard-liners in their respective parties, he and other moderates moved their meetings away from the Capitol “so no one would see us discussing issues.”

Leaving a legacy In 2002, Richman won the vote for Valley mayor on the same day he won re-election to his Assembly seat. In his Valley campaign, he offered detailed proposals to improve governance and public services in the area. He wanted to divide the Valley into mostly self-governing boroughs and add 500 officers to the Valley police force. “Whether Valley cityhood happens or doesn’t happen, the movement for a city that provides better services for the people is not going to go away,” Richman said as the secession referendum results were being digested. Close said Richman’s legacy will include many changes — past and future — that make the Valley “a better place to live and work.” As a policy wonk and a “fiscal watchdog,” Richman was “ahead of his time,” said Mitch Englander, who managed Richman’s campaigns for the Assembly and Valley mayor. One of the first leaders to advocate state pension reform, Richman pursued his passion for controlling government spending by founding the California Foundation for Fiscal Responsibility after he left office. He was a board member at the time of his death.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

MELVILLE, N.Y. — Morrie Yohai was present at the creation of the Cheez Doodle. In a 2005 interview with Newsday, Yohai said the cheese-powder-covered baked corn puff was developed at the Old London Melba toast factory in the Bronx, which also made the Cheese Waffie, popcorn, caramel popcorn and other snacks. “We were looking for another snack item,” he said. “We were fooling around and found out that there was a machine that extruded cornmeal, and it almost popped like popcorn.” Yohai and his partners thought of chopping the cornmeal product into pieces and coating it with cheese. “We wanted to make it as healthy as possible,” he said, “so it was baked, not fried.” And, he said, the name Doodle occurred to him as they sat around a table tasting different kinds of cheese on the snacks. Yohai, who lived in Kings Point, N.Y., died of cancer on July 27. He was 90. He also was an accomplished photographer, poet, professor and businessman whose quiet wisdom left a deep impression on his family and friends. Morrie R. Yohai was born in Harlem on March 4, 1920. He graduated from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied business, then went to work for the Grumman aircraft company on Long Island. In 1949, he took over his father’s snack-food factory in what would become the beginning of a long career in the food industry. Yohai eventually sold the company to Borden Inc., where he became group vice president in charge of snacks. In the 2005 interview, he said his duties included sitting around a conference table with other executives and choosing the toys for boxes of Cracker Jack.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Sewing & Vacuum Center

B e st Brands, Selectio n & Servi ce

www.educate.com

541-389-9252

Every Saturday

Morrie Yohai, co-creator of the Cheez Doodle, dies at age 90

Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. • Bend


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, AUGUST 2

TUESDAY

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

88

43

STATE Western

91/53

Warm Springs 91/50

84/50

90s Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

91/45

Camp Sherman 83/40 Redmond Prineville 88/43 Cascadia 90/44 87/54 Sisters 86/42 Bend Post 88/43

85/52

76/31

85/40

85/39

Burns 86/41

86/39

79/33

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

84/38

70s

83/40

Fort Rock

Vancouver 73/55

70/53

60s

83/49

85/53

Helena Bend

93/57

80s Idaho Falls

Redding

82/43

89/51

97/49

Reno

Plenty of sunshine with warm temperatures expected today.

80s

Crater Lake

Elko

97/66

87/42

Silver Lake

85/52

Boise

88/43

89/55

Christmas Valley

84/37

Missoula

71/43

93/55

San Francisco

Lake City 90s Salt 89/71

62/54

LOW

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

New

Aug. 2

Aug. 9

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

First

Full

Aug. 16 Aug. 24

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 65/55/0.02 . . . . . 63/53/pc. . . . . . . 67/54/c Baker City . . . . . . 85/44/0.00 . . . . . . 88/50/s. . . . . . . 88/50/s Brookings . . . . . . 69/50/0.00 . . . . . 61/52/pc. . . . . . 62/51/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 84/44/0.00 . . . . . . 88/47/s. . . . . . . 89/49/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 75/50/0.00 . . . . . . 83/49/s. . . . . . 84/52/pc Klamath Falls . . . 82/43/0.00 . . . . . . 83/48/s. . . . . . . 87/49/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 84/39/0.00 . . . . . . 85/50/s. . . . . . . 89/51/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 91/31/0.00 . . . . . 86/39/pc. . . . . . 86/42/pc Medford . . . . . . . 89/53/0.00 . . . . . . 89/58/s. . . . . . . 92/60/s Newport . . . . . . . 63/54/0.00 . . . . . 61/51/pc. . . . . . . 62/52/c North Bend . . . . . . 66/48/NA . . . . . 61/49/pc. . . . . . 63/46/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 93/63/0.00 . . . . . . 95/60/s. . . . . . . 94/61/s Pendleton . . . . . . 85/53/0.00 . . . . . . 91/55/s. . . . . . . 92/57/s Portland . . . . . . . 74/57/0.00 . . . . . . 80/57/s. . . . . . . 83/59/s Prineville . . . . . . . 81/42/0.00 . . . . . 90/44/pc. . . . . . 87/51/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 86/41/0.00 . . . . . . 89/44/s. . . . . . . 88/47/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 78/53/0.00 . . . . . . 83/55/s. . . . . . . 87/55/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 79/51/0.00 . . . . . . 82/53/s. . . . . . 84/55/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 83/36/0.00 . . . . . 86/42/pc. . . . . . 87/47/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 86/63/0.00 . . . . . . 90/60/s. . . . . . . 89/59/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

8V.HIGH

HIGH 6

8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83/50 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . .100 in 2009 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 in 1963 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.02” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.33” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.80” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.99 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.25 in 1976 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

88 46

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Sunny.

HIGH

89 47

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:22 a.m. . . . . . .9:27 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:55 a.m. . . . . .10:11 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:28 a.m. . . . . .10:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .10:26 p.m. . . . . .10:34 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:15 a.m. . . . . .10:32 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .10:16 p.m. . . . . .10:20 a.m.

OREGON CITIES City

Eugene Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:54 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:56 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:29 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:43 p.m.

70s

Seattle 77/57

87/41

Chemult

Calgary

80/57

Brothers

Sunriver

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 93° Ontario • 39° Lakeview

FRIDAY Sunny.

90 47

BEND ALMANAC

50s Portland

Partly to mostly sunny skies with warm temperatures today. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

86/40

86/41

LOW

88 47

NORTHWEST

Paulina

La Pine

HIGH

THURSDAY

Sunny.

Onshore flow will bring low clouds and fog to the coast early today.

Low clouds and fog early today, then increasing sunshine. Central

90/49 89/48

Oakridge Elk Lake

88/55

86/52

69/50

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Mostly sunny.

Tonight: Mostly clear.

Today: Mostly sunny, warmer.

Ben Burkel

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,284 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83,902 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 71,238 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 34,169 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130,670 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,650 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,007 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98.3 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 73/55

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 108° Borrego Springs, Calif.

• 28° Truckee, Calif.

• 2.03” Darlington, S.C.

Honolulu 89/75

S

S

Calgary 70/53

S

Saskatoon 77/57

Seattle 77/57

S Winnipeg 80/60

S

S

Thunder Bay 81/62

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 76/58

Halifax 76/57 Portland Billings To ronto Portland 74/59 87/59 80/62 80/57 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 85/69 83/68 Boise 76/65 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 93/57 83/70 New York 90/63 88/71 82/70 Cheyenne Des Moines 83/58 Philadelphia Columbus Salt Lake Omaha 86/73 Chicago 89/70 85/70 90/73 City 91/74 San Francisco W ashington, D. C. 89/71 62/54 Louisville 86/71 Las Denver 95/76 Vegas 88/65 Kansas City Nashville 104/84 96/80 St. Louis Charlotte 99/74 95/78 89/71 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 88/66 70/62 102/74 102/80 Phoenix Atlanta 103/86 93/76 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 100/78 104/80 73/60 New Orleans 96/80 Orlando Houston 96/77 Chihuahua 96/78 87/59 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 95/74 97/72 Mazatlan 92/80

Anchorage 65/52

Bismarck 87/61

Juneau 67/49

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .101/75/0.00 . .100/73/s . . 100/74/s Akron . . . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . 87/68/pc . . 92/69/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .82/56/0.00 . . .80/66/t . . . .84/67/t Albuquerque. . . .81/65/0.00 . 88/66/pc . . 90/67/pc Anchorage . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 65/54/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .95/76/0.00 . . .93/76/t . . . .95/77/t Atlantic City . . . .82/68/0.02 . . .83/70/t . . 81/75/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 100/74/pc . . 99/76/pc Baltimore . . . . . .83/69/0.01 . . .85/69/t . . 91/72/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .86/62/0.00 . . .87/59/s . . . .87/59/t Birmingham . . .100/78/0.00 100/78/pc . . 99/78/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .85/66/0.34 . 87/61/pc . . 86/60/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . . .93/57/s . . . 92/57/s Boston. . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . 76/65/pc . . . .81/70/t Bridgeport, CT. . .79/63/0.00 . .79/67/sh . . . .80/73/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . 83/70/pc . . 84/71/pc Burlington, VT. . .82/53/0.00 . .79/65/sh . . . .84/67/t Caribou, ME . . . .78/48/0.00 . 79/56/pc . . . .73/59/t Charleston, SC . .91/79/0.11 . . .91/76/t . . 93/76/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .76/68/0.23 . . .89/71/t . . . .92/72/t Chattanooga. . . .99/74/0.00 . . .97/74/s . . 97/75/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .83/58/t . . 81/58/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .85/65/0.00 . 91/74/pc . . . .90/71/t Cincinnati . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . 92/72/pc Cleveland . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 89/69/pc . . 92/71/pc Colorado Springs 88/63/0.00 . . .84/60/t . . . .81/57/t Columbia, MO . .86/66/0.00 . . .93/76/s . . . 98/75/s Columbia, SC . . .86/77/0.00 . . .91/74/t . . . .94/74/t Columbus, GA. .103/77/0.06 . . .99/77/t . . 99/77/pc Columbus, OH. . .86/65/0.00 . . .89/70/s . . 90/71/pc Concord, NH . . . .84/48/0.00 . .78/60/sh . . . .83/64/t Corpus Christi. . .96/72/0.00 . 94/76/pc . . 93/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth 104/76/0.00 . .104/80/s . 103/82/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . 90/71/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .88/65/t . . . .86/64/t Des Moines. . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .86/73/t . . . .87/71/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .83/68/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . . .89/71/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .82/65/0.01 . . .86/62/t . . 86/62/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .96/72/s . . . 99/74/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . 81/54/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .80/68/0.00 . 87/62/pc . . . 86/60/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .64/57/0.22 . . .76/52/t . . . .79/50/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .84/64/0.00 . 86/69/pc . . 85/68/pc Green Bay. . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .83/68/t . . 84/66/pc Greensboro. . . . .72/63/0.07 . . .87/71/t . . 91/72/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .78/69/0.00 . . .82/67/t . . 89/68/pc Hartford, CT . . . .82/61/0.00 . .80/66/sh . . . .83/72/t Helena. . . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . 83/54/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/72/0.01 . .89/75/sh . . 89/76/sh Houston . . . . . . .99/76/0.00 . 96/78/pc . . 95/79/pc Huntsville . . . . . .98/77/0.00 . 99/75/pc . . 98/75/pc Indianapolis . . . .83/67/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . 94/72/pc Jackson, MS . . .100/75/0.00 100/79/pc . 101/77/pc Madison, WI . . . .85/61/0.00 . 85/70/pc . . . .85/69/t Jacksonville. . . . .96/75/0.02 . . .94/78/t . . 92/77/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .63/53/0.15 . 67/49/pc . . 72/50/pc Kansas City. . . . .88/72/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . 99/78/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 86/68/pc Las Vegas . . . . .101/82/0.00 104/84/pc . 103/86/pc Lexington . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . 93/73/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .96/73/t . . 90/70/pc Little Rock. . . . . .99/80/0.00 . .102/80/s . . 104/79/s Los Angeles. . . . .70/62/0.00 . . .70/62/s . . . 69/62/s Louisville . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . .95/76/s . . 98/79/pc Memphis. . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . .101/82/s . . 102/83/s Miami . . . . . . . . .93/78/0.01 . . .91/79/t . . . .91/80/t Milwaukee . . . . .79/63/0.01 . 87/72/pc . . . .86/69/t Minneapolis . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .85/69/t . . 89/67/pc Nashville . . . . . . .92/74/0.00 . . .99/74/s . . . 99/77/s New Orleans. . .100/80/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . 94/81/pc New York . . . . . .80/70/0.00 . . .82/70/t . . . .85/73/t Newark, NJ . . . . .78/70/0.06 . . .84/70/t . . 86/72/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .77/69/0.18 . . .84/71/t . . 88/74/pc Oklahoma City .102/77/0.00 . .102/74/s . . 101/75/s Omaha . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .90/73/t . . 89/69/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .97/75/1.73 . . .96/77/t . . . .94/76/t Palm Springs. . .105/78/0.00 101/78/pc . 104/80/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . 91/71/pc . . 92/72/pc Philadelphia . . . .83/71/0.02 . . .85/70/t . . . .88/75/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .85/81/0.00 103/86/pc . 105/85/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .83/67/0.00 . 87/67/pc . . 89/70/pc Portland, ME. . . .75/54/0.00 . 74/59/pc . . . .77/64/t Providence . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .79/65/sh . . . .83/71/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .78/66/0.10 . . .88/71/t . . 92/72/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .90/63/t . . 88/62/pc Savannah . . . . . 92/78/trace . . .92/75/t . . 92/76/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .91/54/0.00 . . .93/55/s . . . 94/56/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . .77/57/s . . 78/57/pc Richmond . . . . . .80/66/0.14 . . .87/70/t . . 93/73/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . .83/68/t . . 86/63/pc Rochester, NY . . .81/65/0.00 . . .83/69/t . . 87/70/pc Spokane . . . . . . .76/53/0.00 . 84/59/pc . . . 88/61/s Sacramento. . . . .92/55/0.00 . . .90/56/s . . . 91/56/s Springfield, MO. .90/73/0.00 . . .97/74/s . . . 98/75/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . .95/78/s . 101/80/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .92/83/0.00 . . .93/79/t . . . .93/78/t Salt Lake City . . .92/69/0.14 . . .89/71/s . . . 90/69/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . 96/74/pc . 100/77/pc San Antonio . . . .97/75/0.00 . . .97/77/s . . 98/79/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .104/81/s . . 104/81/s San Diego . . . . . .71/61/0.00 . 70/62/pc . . 71/63/pc Washington, DC .82/68/0.05 . . .86/71/t . . 92/74/pc San Francisco . . .69/55/0.00 . . .62/54/s . . . 63/54/s Wichita . . . . . . . .99/76/0.00 . .103/77/s . . 102/75/s San Jose . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . . 79/57/s Yakima . . . . . . . .88/53/0.00 . . .92/54/s . . . 91/61/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .77/61/0.89 . 85/60/pc . . 87/60/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .102/84/0.00 105/82/pc . 106/83/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .72/57/0.00 . .68/59/sh . . 67/57/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . .91/74/s . . . 94/76/s Auckland. . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . .60/45/sh . . 59/52/sh Baghdad . . . . . .115/84/0.00 . .117/89/s . . 119/89/s Bangkok . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .86/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . . 92/78/c Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .93/80/s . . . 90/79/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . 69/60/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .63/50/1.72 . .66/51/sh . . 65/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . 85/61/s Buenos Aires. . . .46/34/0.00 . 47/34/pc . . 46/34/pc Cabo San Lucas .91/79/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . 93/77/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 102/78/pc . 101/76/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .68/55/0.07 . .70/53/sh . . 72/52/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .89/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .65/54/sh . . . 68/51/s Edinburgh . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .63/54/sh . . 66/50/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .79/60/t . . 76/58/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . . 73/50/s Hong Kong . . . . .93/84/0.00 . . .93/82/t . . . .92/82/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .91/77/s . . . 93/78/s Jerusalem . . . . . .94/73/0.13 . . .97/71/s . . . 94/69/s Johannesburg . . .66/41/0.00 . . .71/48/s . . . 72/48/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . . .64/57/s . . . 64/59/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .84/65/s . . . 87/67/s London . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .71/55/sh . . 72/55/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . .101/69/s . . . 98/67/s Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .90/79/t . . . .89/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .109/88/0.00 108/87/pc . 107/86/pc Mexico City. . . . .77/52/0.38 . 77/55/pc . . . .76/56/t Montreal. . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . . .81/65/t Moscow . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . 93/68/pc . . 95/69/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .73/53/sh . . 74/50/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .95/77/1.48 . . .92/81/t . . . .91/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .91/78/0.01 . . .90/79/t . . . .92/80/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .88/78/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.11 . .67/55/sh . . 67/56/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .77/60/t . . . .81/64/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . .76/58/sh . . 75/56/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .93/72/0.00 . .78/63/sh . . . 84/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . 87/68/pc Santiago . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . . .58/35/s . . 59/36/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .63/54/sh . . 64/55/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .79/68/0.31 . . .80/70/s . . . 81/70/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . 89/77/pc Shanghai. . . . . .100/86/0.00 . . .98/81/t . . . .98/82/t Singapore . . . . . .82/73/1.50 . . .89/77/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .68/59/sh . . 67/59/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .54/43/sh . . 58/45/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . . .96/80/t . . . .97/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . .91/79/s . . . 90/78/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .89/79/t Toronto . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .80/62/t . . . .85/67/t Vancouver. . . . . .66/59/0.00 . 73/55/pc . . . 78/56/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . 75/57/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 82/62/pc . . . .84/63/t

ROCK AND ROLL

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

A beachgoer rides a recumbent tricycle along the shoreline near Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach on Saturday as the sun burns off some early fog.

MONTANA

Grizzly cubs in deadly mauling were malnourished, zoo says Th eir condition may explain why their mother attacked campers, killing one and injuring 2 By Matthew Brown The Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. — Three grizzly bear cubs whose mother killed one person and mauled two others in a late-night attack at a Montana campground were malnourished and still in their winter coats. The cubs have arrived at their new home at ZooMontana in Billings. Zoo Executive Director Jackie Worstell said Sunday the two female cubs and one male cub were underweight, possibly explaining their mother’s unusually aggressive behavior. “It may be an indication of what happened,” Worstell said. “There’s obvious signs of stress and malnourishment. Maybe

(the sow) was desperate.” The year-old cubs each weighed only between 60 and 70 pounds, versus a normal range of 80 to 130 pounds. Wildlife officials are investigating what caused the cubs to be malnourished. Grizzlies are omnivores and eat everything from berries and ants to fish and elk. Kevin Kammer, 48, of Grand Rapids, Mich., was killed and two people were seriously injured when the adult bear ripped into several tents Wednesday at the Soda Creek Campground near Cooke City, an old mining town just outside Yellowstone National Park. The 300- to 400-pound sow was euthanized Friday after

DNA tests linked her to the attacks. Wildlife officials have said she appeared to be healthy, but they intend to further study the body in hopes of explaining her behavior. Worstell said the cubs will remain in quarantine for at least 30 days to make sure they are disease-free. The zoo has one other grizzly, a year-old male obtained from Yellowstone National Park that had been seeking food from park visitors. The zoo also has a 10-year-old Eurasian brown bear. The three cubs aren’t expected to be available for public viewing until fall. Wildlife officials say the cubs likely participated in the attack on Kammer, and so cannot be released back into the wild, having probably learned from their mother’s behavior.

Clearance Event Ends 8/13/10

BEND 541-389-3381

ALBANY 541-223-5537

SPRINGFIELD 541-393-2659

SALEM 503-400-6215

8/13/10.


G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON Inside

GREEN, ETC.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 2010

making chemistry

LESS CHEMICAL Bend Research practices using more environmentally friendly materials, creating little waste

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Franz Lembke prepares samples for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis at Bend Research in Tumalo on July 26.

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Bend Research, the company has worked to use the most environmentally friendly solvents possible in its experiments. And its scientists, who design different ways for drugs to be absorbed into the body, often run tests through a computer program before trying them out in the laboratory. It’s just one way to reduce the amount of chemicals used, said David Lyon, vice president of physical and biological sciences with the company. “It immediately reduces the waste,” Lyon said. Across Oregon, companies like Bend Research are thinking green when it comes to manufacturing and research — whether by using less toxic ingredients, conserving water and energy, or finding renewable alternatives. And there’s a push to make this kind of green chemistry even more common for Oregon businesses. “At the core, green chemistry is about designing new materials that are safer for human health and the environment,” said Jim Hutchison, a chemistry professor at the University of Oregon. A common example, he said, is the compostable plastics that are made from corn instead of petroleum products, or cleaning solutions that aren’t toxic to the environment. “Every consumer product is chemical in some way,” Hutchison said. “If we can think about the impacts that those have on the environment and on human health, and think about design at the front end so we design materials that maximize performance and minimize the impact, that’s really the goal.” That can be anything from reducing the amount of water or energy used to make a product, he said, or determining how to reduce waste in the manufacturing process. See Chemistry / C6

At

GREEN

“Green chemistry also is a process of ensuring that products don’t have environmental or health impacts down the road.” — Colin Price, Oregon Environmental Council

“The very purest form of birth control ever devised. Ever.” — Anthony Graesch, on the family study for which he was a fieldworker (he and his wife have two children)

Every hug and fuss, taped and analyzed By Benedict Carey

The Martos family, from left, Lucas, Lyn, Isabel and Antonio, in their home in Glendale, Calif., on May 20. The family is one of 32 that allowed researchers to videotape nearly every waking moment in their lives.

New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — “Get your jacket.” Dad, shoulders slumped, face grave, is standing over his 8-year-old, trying to get the boy out the door. The youngster shifts, ducks, stalls; he wants the jacket brought to him. “Get your jacket.” The boy stalls more, and Dad’s mouth tightens. “Get. Your. Jacket.” The boy loses it. “You’re always acting like a control freak!” he cries, turning to throw himself on the couch. “I’m not calling you names or anything, but you’re a control freak.” At a conference in May, more than 70 social scientists gathered to bring to a close one of the most unusual, and oddly voyeuristic, anthropological studies ever conceived. From 2002 to 2005, before reality TV ruled the earth, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, laboriously recruited 32 local families, videotaping nearly every waking, at-home moment during a week — including the Jacket Standoff. Filmmakers have turned a lens on the minutiae of unscripted domestic life before, perhaps most famously in “The Osbournes,”

Ann Johansson New York Times News Service

SCIENCE

on MTV, and the 1970s PBS program “An American Family.” But the UCLA project was an effort to capture a relatively new sociological species: the dual-earner, multiple-child, middleclass American household. The investigators have just finished working through the 1,540 hours of videotape, coding and categorizing every hug, every tantrum, every soul-drain-

ing search for a missing soccer cleat. “This is the richest, most detailed, most complete database of middle-class family living in the world,” said Thomas Weisner, a professor of anthropology at UCLA who was not involved in the research. “What it does is hold up a mirror to people. They laugh. They cringe. It shows us life as it is actually lived.” See Family study / C6

ABOVE: Mika Mast, left, prepares buffers at a High Performance Liquid Chromatography machine, while Cassie Row moves from another HPLC machine while programing a sequence into the auto sampler.

Broadband helps put Central Oregon in economic fast lane Stimulus to help BendBroadband build network that’s ‘30 times faster’ By Adrianne Jeffries The Bulletin

Central Oregon was an early adopter of high-speed Internet access, thanks to government incentives and strong local demand. History seems to be repeating itself as federal money heads to the region. But the Internet is no longer an esoteric novelty; it’s now considered essential for economic growth. High-speed Internet access, also called broadband, is as crucial to economic development as basic infrastructure like water or sewer, said Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon. Companies looking to move to the region expect fast

speeds, he said, especially now that EDCO is targeting data centers like the one Facebook is building in Prineville. “It comes up as, ‘You’ve got this, right?’” he said. Fortunately, the answer is yes. Several cable, DSL and wireless providers deliver reliable Internet service in Bend and other parts of Central Oregon. Facebook found the Internet speeds and capacity in Central Oregon to be “surprisingly robust,” Lee said. Internet service has come a long way since the early 1990s, when phone and Internet access in Central Oregon could be interrupted by something as frustrating as construction. See Broadband / C3

OTECH


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Dogs kept in locked cars can’t take summer heat Dear Abby: Summer is the season for celebration — beach trips, picnics in the park and barbecues. But it can be a dangerous time for dogs. Every year, thousands of dogs die after being left in overheated parked cars. Heatstroke can come on quickly and result in brain damage or death. Dogs are prone to heatstroke because they can cool themselves only by panting and sweating through their paw pads. If you see a dog left in a car on a warm day, take down the car’s color, model, make and license plate number. Have the owner paged inside nearby stores and call local humane authorities or the police. If you see a dog exhibit any of the following symptoms: restlessness, excessive thirst, a rapid pulse, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting or lack of coordination — get the animal into the shade immediately and call the veterinarian. YOU can save a dog’s life! — Laurie in Milwaukee Dear Laurie: Thank you for an important letter. I recently read that so far this year, 19 CHILDREN have died after being left in automobiles! During the summer months, leaving any living creature in a car — even with the windows cracked — is an invitation to a heart-wrenching tragedy. Dear Abby: I have been married for 15 years. My parents did not attend my wedding because my mother’s job was more important — so my father never walked me down the aisle. My brother is now being married for the first time. It will be his fiancee’s third trip to the altar. Her father died years ago, and they have asked my father to walk her down the aisle without even considering how I might feel about it.

DEAR ABBY When I explained to Dad how hurt I feel, he didn’t understand. But he told me he would not walk her down the aisle if it caused me pain. Now my brother and his fiancee are upset with me. Abby, can a groom’s father give away the woman his son is about to marry? Am I being selfish in suggesting she walk down the aisle by herself just as I did? — Resentful in Michigan Dear Resentful: The answer to both of your questions is yes. Dear Abby: My 8-year-old daughter “Gwen” has friends whose parents allow them to watch movies I prefer my daughter not see — specifically, scary movies. The parents of one of the girls have invited Gwen to a sleepover. I have been making excuses because I don’t want Gwen having nightmares. Would it be wrong or impolite to tell these parents that I don’t want her watching scary movies? I don’t want to appear to be dictating to them what they can or can’t allow their children to see in their own home. How should this be handled? — Protective Mom, Mustang, Okla. Dear Protective Mom: Be upfront with the mother who will be hosting the sleepover. Tell her that you know Gwen would love to participate, but that you prefer that she not see scary films. If the mother can guarantee that none will be viewed that night, give your permission. Making your preference known is neither rude nor overbearing, so speak up.

Abortion debate plays out at ‘12th and Delaware’ HBO documentary has little new to say By David Wiegand San Francisco Chronicle

SAN FRANCISCO — It’s a near certainty that, no matter how good it is, no single documentary is ever going to change hearts and minds when it comes to America’s debate over abortion. But when a film is merely adequate and what it has to say is both unsurprising and unenlightening, you have to conclude that all it can do is throw fuel on the already raging fire. That, unfortunately, is the case with the mildly interesting documentary, “12th and Delaware,” tonight on HBO. Directed by Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing, this is a film about location, location, location in the abortion battle: In the city of Fort Pierce, Fla., the anti-abortion Pregnancy Care Center is directly across the street from an abortion clinic called A Woman’s World. The clinic is operated by an average suburban couple named Candace and Arnold in what looks to be a converted tract house, painted sherbet orange. Arnold routinely leaves the clinic in his lemon-yellow Mustang and returns with physicians, hidden from view by a sheet as they zip by the ever-present protesters and into the garage of the clinic. At its best, the film reminds us of that despite the rhetoric, produced regularly by all sides, the debate on issues involves everyday human beings, just plain folks who believe strongly

about the issue. At the Pregnancy Care Center, the battle against choice is being waged one pregnant woman at a time. Because the two organizations are located across the street from each other, some women seeking abortions mistakenly go to the Pregnancy Care Center where they are offered free ultrasound scans to enable them to see the fetuses inside them. The goal, says Ann, one of the key figures at the care center, is to “get ’em in the door.” In other cases, the anti-abortion protesters try to stop women from going into the abortion clinic across the street altogether. Standing on the sidewalk, they hold up tiny fetal figures to help the women visualize what they

‘12th and Delaware’ When: 9 tonight Where: HBO may be about to abort. “God made you pregnant,” an elderly woman shouts to a potential patient of the clinic. “Was that a mistake?” If you are pro-abortion rights, you’re likely to dismiss statements like that, as well as a sermon from the Rev. Tom Euteneur that abortion is “deeply diabolical at the core of our country.” If you’re anti-abortion, you’ll reject Candace’s contention that “they lie to patients” at the care center to convince the women they are not as far along in their pregnancies as, in fact, they are.

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The reason, she says, is to make the women think they have more time to consider their options than they do. In the end, these are two groups who will never understand each other, and maybe that’s the real message of the film. “I don’t get them people,” Candace says. “I just don’t get them people.” But, other than the fact that the two groups are within spitting distance of each other, that’s also about the only message of the film.

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Å tragedy. ‘14’ Å first day as the boss. ‘PG’ Last American Cowboy ‘14’ Å Last American Cowboy ‘14’ Å Last American Cowboy (N) ’ ‘14’ Whale Wars Ready to Snap ’ ‘14’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars Ready to Snap ’ ‘14’ 68 50 12 38 Last American Cowboy ‘14’ Å Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ 137 44 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Johnny Cash in San Quentin ’ ›› “Young Guns” (1988, Western) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. ’ 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy Biography on CNBC Rachael Ray. BP: In Deep BP: In Deep Mad Money The Oprah Effect Biography on CNBC Rachael Ray. Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 The Oprah Effect Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Rick’s List Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Trading Desk Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana “Legally Blondes” (2009) Milly Rosso, Becky Rosso. 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(N) 23 25 123 25 NBA Basketball 2006 Toronto Raptors at Los Angeles Lakers ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Huge Spirit Quest (N) ‘14’ Å Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Challenge Macaroni and cheese. Extreme Sweets Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive-Ins Diners, Drive-Ins Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Seahawks Minor League Baseball Salt Lake Bees at Portland Beavers (Live) Seahawks The Final Score Mariners The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Abu Dhabi, UAE. That ’70s Show ›› “I, Robot” (2004) Will Smith. 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Flapjack Total Drama Stoked Brofinger King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Samantha Brown’s Asia Vietnam ‘G’ Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations The Human Journey Europe (N) ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Bewitched ‘G’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Loves Raymond Loves Raymond ››› “Big” (1988, Fantasy) Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins. 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Call of Silence ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Smoked ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Dead Man Walking ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) Covert Affairs ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ‘14’ Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ‘14’ Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ‘14’ Money Hungry (N) ’ ‘PG’ Scream Queens (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Money Hungry ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “Housesitter” 1992 Steve Martin. ‘PG’ Å (6:20) ››› “The Breakfast Club” 1985 ‘R’ Å ››› “The Big Chill” 1983, Comedy-Drama William Hurt. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ›› “Dragonfly” 2002 Kevin Costner. ‘PG-13’ (11:35) Set It Off ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt. ‘R’ Å (7:15) ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt. ‘R’ Å (11:15) ›› “Eyewitness” 1981 ‘R’ ASP Women’s Green Label The Daily Habit True Life Stand Bubba’s World ASP Women’s Green Label The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits Thrillbillies ‘14’ Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts (N) The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Big Break Sandals Resorts The Golf Fix Canadian Tour Learning Center Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Doc The Ride ’ ‘PG’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å “Bridal Fever” (2008, Romance) Andrea Roth, Delta Burke. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls ›› “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2” 2008 Amber Tamblyn. Time and dis››› “Marley & Me” 2008, Comedy-Drama Owen Wilson. A couple’s new puppy grows ››› “12th & Delaware” 2010 Premiere. An abortion clinic and ›› “Body of Lies” 2008, Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Russell HBO 425 501 425 10 tance challenge four young women’s friendship. ‘PG-13’ Å up to become an incorrigible handful. ’ ‘PG’ Å an anti-abortion facility coexist. ’ ‘NR’ Å Crowe, Mark Strong. ’ ‘R’ Å (4:45) ›› “Bookies” 2003 ‘R’ (6:15) ›› “Human Nature” 2001, Comedy-Drama Tim Robbins. ‘R’ Freaks-Geeks Whitest Kids ››› “Bug” 2006, Suspense Ashley Judd. ‘R’ Å Nosebleed ‘14’ Three Stooges Speed Grapher IFC 105 105 (4:00) ›› “The Express” 2008, Biography (6:15) ›› “Jennifer’s Body” 2009, Horror Megan Fox. A possessed cheerleader has ›› “Notorious” 2009, Biography Angela Bassett, Derek Luke, Jamal Woolard. Based ›› “9” 2009 Voices of Elijah Wood. Animated. Sentient rag dolls Life on Top 03: MAX 400 508 7 Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘PG’ Å an insatiable appetite for her classmates. ’ ‘R’ Å on the life of slain rapper Christopher Wallace. ’ ‘R’ Å populate a post-apocalyptic world. Å Kiss and Tell ’ Salvage Code Red (N) ‘14’ Fish Warrior The piraiba catfish. ‘PG’ Monster Fish Jungle Catfish (N) ‘PG’ Salvage Code Red ‘14’ Fish Warrior The piraiba catfish. ‘PG’ Monster Fish Jungle Catfish ‘PG’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air BrainSurge ‘G’ BrainSurge ‘G’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air BrainSurge ‘G’ BrainSurge ‘G’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 (3:30) ››› “Little ›› “The Story of Us” 1999 Bruce Willis. A couple’s marriage (7:15) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008 Javier Bardem. iTV. Flings with a pair of The Real L Word It’s My Party and I’ll Cry Weeds Perro Insano Weeds Ducks and The Real L Word It’s My Party and I’ll Cry SHO 500 500 if I Want To ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Women” crumbles over the course of 15 years. ‘R’ tourists complicate a painter’s life. ’ ‘PG-13’ Tigers ‘MA’ if I Want To ’ ‘MA’ Intersections Intersections Barrett-Jackson 2010: The Auctions Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Intersections Intersections Barrett-Jackson 2010: The Auctions Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:50) ››› “Black Hawk Down” 2001, War Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:25) ›› “Big Fat Liar” 2002 Frankie Muniz. ’ ‘PG’ ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ Å (10:45) ›› “Quarantine” 2008 Jennifer Carpenter. ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 “Cyborg Soldier” 2008 Bruce Greenwood. Military agents search › “Superhero Movie” 2008 Drake Bell. A dragonfly bite turns a › “Saw V” 2008, Horror Tobin Bell, Costas Mandylor. A new (9:35) ›› “Pathology” 2008 Milo Ventimiglia. Medical interns (11:10) › “Scary Movie 2” 2001, Comedy TMC 525 525 for a genetically engineered assassin. ‘R’ teen loser into a hero. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å disciple carries on the Jigsaw legacy. ’ ‘R’ Å amuse themselves with games of murder. ‘R’ Shawn Wayans. ’ ‘R’ Whacked Out ››› “Tin Cup” (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner, Rene Russo, Cheech Marin. The Daily Line (Live) Bull Riding PBR San Antonio Invitational From San Antonio. The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Beekeeper’s Apprentice” by Laurie R. King; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3127085 or www.deschuteslibrary.org. REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com.

TUESDAY TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW: Bring in your rare and unusual collectibles, and talk about them with experts; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holiday Inn Express, 20615 Grandview Drive, Bend; 217-241-3170. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “The End of Poverty? Think Again,” which explores global poverty and its possible solutions; free; 6:30-8:15 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. JAZZ CONCERT: Justin Veloso and Jared Henderson perform; proceeds benefit Sisters High School’s jazz program; $15, $10 students suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn at Pine Meadow Ranch, 68467 Three Creeks Road, Sisters. TOWN MOUNTAIN: The Asheville, N.C.-based bluegrass band performs; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

WEDNESDAY TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW: Bring in your rare and unusual collectibles, and talk about them with experts; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holiday Inn Express, 20615 Grandview Drive, Bend; 217-241-3170. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring family activities, rodeo, live music, mutton busting, train rides, science fun, a talent showcase, a barbecue to benefit the Greg Merritt Community Scholarship Fund and more; free admission, $10 or $4 ages 11 and younger for dinner; 5-10 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The Mud Springs Gospel Quartet plays as part of the summer concert series; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com. KEEGAN SMITH: The Portland bluesman performs, with Okwerdz and Grey Space; ages 21 and older; $3; 6 p.m.-midnight; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-6868. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by Melody Guy; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. RHYTHM ON THE RANGE: Keegan Smith and The Fam performs as part of Sunriver Resort’s concert series; free; 6-8 p.m.; Meadows Golf Course, 1 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-593-1000 or www.sunriverresort.com.

THE HUMP DAY HASH: Mark Ransom & the Mostest perform; proceeds benefit KPOV; free; 6:30-10 p.m.; Century Center, Southwest Century Drive and Southwest Commerce Avenue, Bend; 541-388-0389. TOWN MOUNTAIN: The Asheville, N.C.-based bluegrass band performs; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. STONE RIVER BOYS: The Austin, Texas-based Americana-rock band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

THURSDAY TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW: Bring in your rare and unusual collectibles, and talk about them with experts; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holiday Inn Express, 20615 Grandview Drive, Bend; 217-241-3170. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring family activities, rodeo, live music, mutton busting, train rides, science fun, a talent showcase and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575. “THE FISH THAT SWALLOWED THE SUN”: Celeste Rose presents a puppet show about a boy who tells a lie; free; 10:15 a.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-6177078 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Devil in the White City” by Erik Larson; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www .deschuteslibrary.org. “THE FISH THAT SWALLOWED THE SUN”: Celeste Rose presents a puppet show about a boy who tells a lie; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541617-7078 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. TRIBUTE TO HEROES: With live music and a silent auction; food available; $5 suggested donation; 5-8 p.m.; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Jah Sun & The Redemption Band, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.munchandmusic.com. “THE FISH THAT SWALLOWED THE SUN”: Celeste Rose presents a puppet show about a boy who tells a lie; free; 6:30 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St., Bend; 541-617-7078 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD: The rock and soul act returns to Bend, with Flobots; $37 plus fees in advance, $41 at the gate; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. TOWN MOUNTAIN: The Asheville, N.C.-based bluegrass band performs; part of the McMenamins Residency Series; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “ART”: Preview night for the play, which shows what happens to three men when one of them buys a piece of modern art that tests their 15-year friendship; contains adult language; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803, ticketing@cascadestheatrical .org or www.cascadestheatrical.org. DAR WILLIAMS: The melodic singersongwriter performs; $29-$37 in advance, $32-$40 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org.

FRIDAY TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW: Bring in your rare and unusual collectibles, and talk about them with experts; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holiday Inn Express, 20615 Grandview Drive, Bend; 217-241-3170. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring family activities, rodeo, live music, mutton busting, train rides, science fun, a talent showcase and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575. “THE FISH THAT SWALLOWED THE SUN”: Celeste Rose presents a puppet show about a boy who tells a lie; free; 10:15 a.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-6177078 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “THE FISH THAT SWALLOWED THE SUN”: Celeste Rose presents a puppet show about a boy who tells a lie; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541617-7078 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. FLASHBACK CRUZ: Classic Chevy Club presents a classic car show of vehicles from 1974 and earlier; event includes display of cars, food, hourly raffle drawings, a silent auction, music and more; free; 2-8 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-382-9370 or www.centraloregon classicchevyclub.com. JADE’S JAZZ FESTIVAL: The three-day festival features live jazz music from David Patrone, Nina Wachter, Louis Landon, Mark Lair and more; $15, $30 twoday pass, $40 threeday pass; 4-10 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-848-9470, jade@jadesjazz.net or www.jadesjazz.net. “ART”: Gala opening of the play, which shows what happens to three men when one of them buys a piece of modern art that tests their 15-year friendship; contains adult language; with silent auction and dessert reception; event begins at Mockingbird Gallery; $45; 6-10 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803, ticketing@cascadestheatrical .org or www.cascadestheatrical.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Steve Roberts talks about his book “WineTrails of Oregon”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA”: The Children’s Theater Company presents Hans Christian Andersen’s classic tale; reservations requested; $3, $5 reserved; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, info@ childrenstheatercompany.net or www.childrenstheatercompany.net. THE PARSON RED HEADS: The Los Angeles-based folk-pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. WOMANLESS BEAUTY PAGEANT: See men in evening gowns and pageant wear compete in a beauty contest; proceeds benefit Project Connect; free; 7 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-923-9663. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@oldshoepress.com.

EMMA HILL AND HER GENTLEMAN CALLERS: The Portland-based folk singer performs, with Audiafauna; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend.

SATURDAY FLASHBACK CRUZ: Classic Chevy Club presents a classic car show of vehicles from 1974 and earlier; event includes display of cars, food, hourly raffle drawings, a silent auction, music and more; free; 8 a.m.-10 p.m., 8 a.m. show ‘n shine, 7 p.m. downtown cruise; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-382-9370 or www.central oregonclassicchevyclub.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. DUTCH-OVEN COOK-OFF: Contestants prepare a main dish, bread and dessert featuring a surprise ingredient; event also includes hayrides, music, vendors and more; proceeds benefit the La Pine Christmas Basket Association; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; L&S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-2049. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. SUNRIVER QUILT SHOW AND SALE: The annual outdoor quilt show and sale features quilts and quilt supply vendors; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-593-3563 or www .mtnmeadowquilters.org. TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW: Bring in your rare and unusual collectibles, and talk about them with experts; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Holiday Inn Express, 20615 Grandview Drive, Bend; 217-241-3170. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring family activities, rodeo, live music, mutton busting, train rides, science fun, a talent showcase and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. RACE FOR THE RIVER: Race to the Les Schwab Amphitheater on watercraft in various categories or an open swim; followed by a celebration in the Old Mill District with live music, food, activity booths and more; registration required to race; $15, $20 with a dog, free for spectators; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 25 or www.deschutesriver.org. JADE’S JAZZ FESTIVAL: The threeday festival features live jazz music from David Patrone, Nina Wachter, Louis Landon and more; $25, $30 two-day pass, $40 three-day pass; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-8489470, jade@jadesjazz.net or www .jadesjazz.net.

M T For Monday, Aug. 2

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

COCO CHANEL AND IGOR STRAVINSKY (R) Noon, 2:50, 5:30, 8:15 CYRUS (R) 12:05, 3:20, 5:25, 7:55 I AM LOVE (R) 12:10, 5:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:20, 3:30, 7:45 THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (R) 12:30, 3:15, 5:45, 8:20 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:05, 5:40, 8:05 SOLITARY MAN (R) 3, 8:10

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE (PG) 12:20, 2:30, 5:10, 7:20, 9:40

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:35, 6:50, 9:15 CHARLIE ST. CLOUD (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:10, 9:45 DESPICABLE ME 3-D (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 12:05, 2:35, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55 DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5, 7:50, 10:30 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 8:05, 10:40 INCEPTION (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 12:30, 2:40, 4:10, 6:40, 7:30, 10, 10:45 THE KARATE KID (PG) Noon, 4:30 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 9:25 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3-D (PG) 6:30, 9:20 PREDATORS (R) 7:40, 10:15 RAMONA AND BEEZUS (G) 11:20 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 6:55 SALT (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 1:55, 2:50, 4:20, 5:25, 7, 8, 9:30, 10:25 THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:55, 10:35

TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 12:35, 3:55, 6:45, 10:05 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE (PG) 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 2:15, 4:15, 6:45, 8:45 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:45, 5, 8:15 THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 8:50 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE (PG) 5:45, 7:45 CHARLIE ST. CLOUD (PG-13) 5:45, 8 INCEPTION (PG-13) 7:30 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 5:15 SALT (PG-13) 5:30, 8 3, 5:30, 8

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 4 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 7

N   N  Gibson’s ex urges him to ‘tell the truth’

Andy Griffith pitching health care law in TV ad

LOS ANGELES — Mel Gibson’s ex-girlfriend says she’s the victim of a “smear campaign” and never tried to extort money from the Oscarwinning star. In a video interview posted Friday on Rada r Online Oksana .com, Oksana Grigorieva Grigorieva says she’s been “victimized all over again” by speaking out about her troubles with Gibson. She accuses him of “trivializing domestic violence” and urges him to “tell the truth.” The Russian singer and mother of Gibson’s youngest child says the now-infamous tapes allegedly of the filmmaker threatening Grigorieva were all recorded on one night, and that she recorded the calls because she feared for her life. Gibson met with sheriff’s detectives last week to discuss his claims of extortion against his ex. The sheriff’s department is also investigating claims by Grigorieva that Gibson abused her during a January confrontation.

WASHINGTON — Actor Andy Griffith has a new role: pitching President Barack O b a m a ’ s health care law to seniors in a cable television ad paid for by Medicare. The TV star Andy — whose role Griffith as sheriff of Mayberry made him an enduring symbol of smalltown American values — tells seniors that “good things are coming” under the health care overhaul, including free preventive checkups and lowercost prescriptions for Medicare recipients. Polls show that seniors are more skeptical of the health care law than are younger people because Medicare cuts provide much of the financing to expand coverage for the uninsured. That could be a problem for Democrats in the fall congressional elections, because seniors vote in large numbers. — From wire reports

Broadband

quently demand speeds in excess of 1 Gbps, or gigabit per second. Another broadband buildout is happening now, stimulated by $7.2 billion allocated for broadband projects across the nation by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In Central Oregon, BendBroadband will build a ring of cable between Madras, La Pine, Prineville and Sunriver capable of speeds up to 40 Gbps, although the connections it provides government institutions and businesses in Crook and Jefferson counties won’t be quite that fast. The added capacity paid for by $4.4 million from the federal government and $1.9 million from BendBroadband will build 1 Gbps service all the way to “community anchors” such as schools and hospitals. BendBroadband also will build cable to business parks and downtown corridors, making it cheaper for businesses to get hooked up to 100 Mbps connections. That’s more than 30 times faster than what some of these institutions and businesses currently have, Miller said. The superfast network is analogous to a “large 20-lane freeway” and is probably faster than many institutions need now, Miller said, but it will make the region competitive with large metropolitan areas. “The foundation we’re setting is equivalent or better in capacity and pricing than anywhere in the U.S.,” he said. “It doesn’t get any better. There is no rural penalty anymore to do business in Central Oregon, from Madras all the way to La Pine.” The 40 Gbps network may seem mind-bogglingly fast to most Internet users, but demand and capacity for faster Internet speeds continue to accelerate. Qwest is upgrading its national network to 100 Gbps, the company announced last fall.

Continued from C1 “It was a yearly occurrence ... two of the outages were tied ... to a farmer in Madras who would burn in his field and cut the fiber. Service would go out because that was the only connectivity for Central Oregon to the rest of the world,” said Frank Miller, chief technology officer of BendBroadband. Central Oregon showed an early interest in broadband, said Chris Tamarin, telecommunications strategist at Business Oregon, the state economic development department. The Oregon Connections conference, which started in Bend in 1995, drew business and government leaders together to focus on bringing broadband to the area and other parts of the state. The conference pushed for state legislation in 1999 that provided incentives for Internet service provider Qwest to spend $120 million on infrastructure, he said. The buildout that followed that legislation is responsible for much of Oregon’s broadband access, he said, including the redundant network in Central Oregon that keeps the region connected even if part of a cable is damaged by a farmer or construction worker. “Broadband” is a subjective term with no hard and fast definition. In 2008, the Federal Communications Commission used the term to describe speeds as low as 200 Kbps, or kilobits per second; the agency recently revised its definition to 4 Mbps, or megabits per second. Many service providers still use the term to refer to speeds as low as 1.5 Mbps, which is more than adequate for many residential customers. But the increasing popularity of video is driving up consumers’ need for speed, Miller said, and businesses fre-


C4 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Aug. 2, 2010: This year, you encounter obstacles when you least expect them. You are learning about a boss, respected authority figure or someone who means a lot to you. The demands of a situation could create a lot of stress. Take up some form of exercise or meditation. You don’t need to sustain more stress than you can or want to. In spring 2011, an opportunity for travel or growth evolves. You also might have someone enter your life who is quite unique. If you are single, you will meet people with ease, though you don’t need to jump into a committed relationship too quickly. If you are attached, the two of you will become much closer if you take a workshop or plan a getaway together. TAURUS is more stubborn than you. Trust that. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Understand the demands that are made on you. Remember, they are only demands. You make them into more. You could choose to lose that energy. It would be more efficient. Take a strong stand. Tonight: Gather your bills. TAURUS (April 20-May 21) HHHHH Your insights remain key, though you could run into obstacles. Information heads in your direction that forces you to revise your thinking. Look for more facts and opinions too,

as many people will be talking. Tonight: Do only what you want. GEMINI (May 22-June 20) HHH Listen to others, specifically a partner. You wonder why and how this person has such a complete understanding of an issue you are trying to grasp. One-on-one relating needs to remain the theme right now. Tonight: Chat over dinner. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Defer to others, understanding that you, too, have limits. You could have difficulty getting into the swing of an intense day. No matter what you do, know that others are observing you. A boss might like your style. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might feel that you have your hands full, as everyone seems to dump their work on you. You can handle the pressure, but be wise and set limits. Detach from the immediate issue. Tonight: Try something new. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH If you’re feeling entrenched or locked, do move away from the situation mentally, and possibly physically as well. You demand perfection of yourself. As a result, you will find solutions. Talk to an expert in such matters. Tonight: Surf the Net. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You suddenly reveal more of your thoughts. Others could challenge you. The more questions, the more someone plays devil’s advocate, the better off you are. You will be able to see any problems in your thinking.

Tonight: See what is offered. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Take a hint, and know when to back off. There is a point where you and others will have had enough. You could become caught up in a power play. Back off while you can. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. Visit. Catch up on news. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.21) HHH Maintain your focus on the big picture. You might be wondering if you can keep up this hectic pace. You take a stand. Explain where you are coming from. Listen to feedback. Tonight: Focus on what must be done. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your creativity comes through when a jam appears. A boss or someone you care about could challenge you. A partner develops a major chip on his or her shoulder. Tonight: A must appearance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Stay centered, knowing full well what you want. You could be tired and drawn. Understand what is happening within your immediate circle. You might want to pull back or distance yourself from a difficult situation. Tonight: Happy to be home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Keep reaching out for others. You might want to rethink a relationship. You might be in a phase where you are both changing. You could become closer once more. Perhaps you have pushed too hard. Tonight: Have a long-overdue chat. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Chemistry Continued from C1 Green chemistry also is a process of ensuring that products don’t have environmental or health impacts down the road, said Colin Price, research director with the Oregon Environmental Council, a Portland-based group that compiled a report on green chemistry in the state. People are still learning more about the effects of chemicals like bisphenol-A in some plastics, he said. “What’s great about green chemistry is it can help think about some of these potential impacts upfront,” Price said. “It’s a really powerful tool that we can use to help create substances and materials and products that are safer throughout their life cycles.” Researchers at Oregon’s universities have a lot of technical expertise in green chemistry, he said, which can lead to partnerships between institutions and companies. The goal is to figure out how to make things in environmentally friendly ways that

also help increase a company’s profits. Columbia Forest Products, for example, worked with scientists at Oregon State University to develop an adhesive for plywood that was free of formaldehyde, Price said. And with green building, one of the few construction-related fields that he said is doing well, having a green, formaldehyde-free product is an economic benefit for the company. “It’s allowed them to maintain their competitiveness through a green line,” Price said. Another example is Blount, a Portland-based manufacturer of forestry and construction equipment, which discovered it can use a different cleaning method in one step, and eliminate the need for more than 1,000 pounds of lead a year, he said. The green chemistry report identified areas where Oregon can improve what it’s doing, Price said. One recommendation is to increase the awareness of green chemistry, and identify businesses where it can have the most significant economic and envi-

ronmental impacts. The state also should focus on education and training in how to clean up manufacturing processes, whether it’s talking to elementary schoolers or graduate students, he said. “It’s thinking about science as a solution,” Price said. The report also recommended the state commit more resources to green chemistry, perhaps through initiatives or incentives for companies. But green chemistry isn’t a new thing for some companies. Bend Research has a program developed with the Department of Environmental Quality to reduce waste, uses solvents like methanol or ethanol that are easily broken down and are more environmentally friendly, and has set stringent emission levels, Lyon said. “We’ve been actively involved in doing what is now called green chemistry kind of before it was called green chemistry,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Liz Gerroir checks the predicted versus actual pH buffers in the biological systems at Bend Research in Tumalo on July 26.

Family study Continued from C1 The study captured a thin slice of Los Angeles’s diversity, including two black families, one Latino, one Japanese and some ethnically mixed couples, as well as two households with gay male parents. The families lived, most of them, well outside the city’s tonier ZIP codes, in places like La Crescenta, in the east, and Westchester, near the airport. After more than $9 million and untold thousands of hours of video watching, they have found that, well, life in these trenches is exactly what it looks like: a fire shower of stress, multitasking and mutual nitpicking. And the researchers found plenty to nitpick themselves.

The research Mothers still do most of the housework, spending 27 percent of their time on it, on average, compared with 18 percent for fathers, and 3 percent for children (giving an allowance made no difference). Husbands and wives were together alone in the house only about 10 percent of their waking time, on average, and the entire family was gathered in one room about 14 percent of the time. Stress levels soared — yet families spent very little time in the most soothing, uncluttered area of the home, the yard. “I call it the new math,” said Kathleen Christensen of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which financed the project. “Two people. Three full-time jobs.” Parents learned on the fly, she said — and it showed. Dual-earner households with children have existed for years, especially in the lower-income neighborhoods. But the numbers have jumped in recent decades, to 46 percent of families with children in 2008 from 36 percent in 1975. Lyn Repath-Martos and her husband, Antonio, know all about it. With two children, ages 5 and 8, two full-time jobs outside the house and a mortgage, they qualified for the study in 2002. For $1,000, they filled out a sheaf of questionnaires, sat for in-depth interviews and allowed a small film crew into their 943-squarefoot house east of Los Angeles to record every moment.

Sarah Spicker, 12, left, gets a hug from her father, Aaron, as they prepare to leave their home in Redondo Beach, Calif., on May 21. The Spickers have two daughters. Ann Johansson New York Times News Service

One researcher roamed the house with a hand-held computer, noting each family member’s location and activities at 10minute intervals. “I would never volunteer for a reality series,” said Lyn RepathMartos, an administrator at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “But I was curious. And I thought that — well, this is going to sound crazy — I thought that it wouldn’t be that invasive.”

In weekly meetings, the researchers discussed what they were witnessing. “Every time we met, I felt like I was on the defensive,” said Tamar Kremer-Sadlik, the research director, who herself has two children and a working husband. “I mean, it’s not like I approved of everything these parents were doing. But I could relate to them. I knew exactly what they were going through.”

The fieldworkers

The day to day

The initial sensation was one of being studied by anthropologists. “I was in the kitchen making kids’ lunches, the cameras were rolling, and I thought, ‘OK, observe how this is done,’” said another study participant, Aaron Spicker, a businessman who lives in Redondo Beach with his wife, Merrill, a corporate finance specialist, and two daughters. But after a while, they said, family members shrugged off the cameras and relaxed. The same cannot be said of the fieldworkers, most of them childless graduate students seeing combat for the first time. “The very purest form of birth control ever devised. Ever,” said one, Anthony Graesch, a postdoctoral fellow, about the experience. (Graesch and his wife have two children.) In one house, Graesch was recording locations when an escalating argument threatened to get ugly. He bailed out for air and continued to track people inside by peeking through the windows. “Luckily, it was a onestory bungalow,” he said.

Continual negotiations, for one. Parents generally were so flexible in dividing up chores and child-care responsibilities — “catch as catch can,” one dad described it — that many boundaries were left unclear, adding to the stress. The couples who reported the least stress tended to have rigid divisions of labor, whether equal or not. “She does the inside work, and I do all the outside, and we don’t interfere” with each other, said one husband. The videotapes reveal parents as at-home teachers, enforcing homework deadlines. As coaches and personal trainers, sorting through piles of equipment. As camp directors, planning play dates and weekend “family time.” “The coordination it takes, it’s more complicated than a theater production,” said Elinor Ochs, the UCLA linguistic anthropologist who led the study. “And there are no rehearsals.” In addition to housework, mothers spent 19 percent of their time talking with family members or on the phone, and 11 percent taking occasional breathers that the

study classified as “leisure.” The rates for fathers were 20 percent chatting, and 23 percent leisure — again, taken in fragments. Still, parents also had large amounts of solo time with their children, a total of 34 percent for mothers and 25 percent for fathers, on average. Half the fathers in the study spent as much or more time as their spouse alone with at least one child when at home, and were more likely to be engaged in some activity, like playing in the backyard, the study found. Mothers were more likely to be watching TV with a child. Occasionally, camera crews caught family members spitting

into a small vial. This, too, was a part of the study: Researchers measured levels of a stress hormone called cortisol in the saliva, four times a day. These cortisol profiles provided biological backing for a familiar frustration in many marriages. The more that women engaged with their husbands in the evening, talking about the day, the faster their cortisol dropped. But the men’s levels tapered more slowly when talking with a spouse. (A previous generation’s solution: “cocktail hour”). Inside, the homes, researchers found rooms crammed with toys, DVDs, videos, books, exercise machines; refrigerators buried in magnets; and other odds and ends. The clutter on the fridge door tended to predict the amount of clutter elsewhere. Outside the homes, the yards were open and green — but “no one was out there,” said Jeanne Arnold, a UCLA archaeologist who worked on the study. One family had a 17,000-square-foot yard, with a pool and trampoline, and not even the children ventured out there during the study. That, of course, would mean leaving the house, which is not

Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

(541) 678-0020

always as simple as it sounds. At the door, having found his jacket, the 8-year-old in the video flops to the floor and is demanding that someone tie his shoes. Now Mom joins Dad, hovering over the boy, hands on hips, giving him the same hairy eyeball as her husband. Hours seem to pass as the youngster struggles with his laces, his jacket sleeves, his attitude. Finally Dad caves in, and drops to the floor to help him out. And then, just like that — through some combination of stubbornness, patience and dumb love — it is over. The clothes are on, the door swings open, and father and son go out, into the world.

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Golf Inside Bernhard Langer beats Fred Couples for U.S. Senior Open title, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 2010

LOCAL SPORTS

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL: ELK TRACKS

Hillsboro man finishes solo run at Cascade Lakes Relay

Providing a helping hand

Hillsboro resident Eric Salkeld completed the 216.6mile Cascade Lakes Relay solo, finishing in a total time of 75 hours, 8 minutes, 43 seconds. His average per-mile pace was 21 minutes. Salkeld started the running race at 5:09 a.m. on Thursday morning at Diamond Lake Resort and finished in Bend at 8:14 a.m. on Sunday. As a schoolteacher of young student Levi Seed who is fighting leukemia, Salkeld’s solo effort was in part to raise awareness and funds for the Children’s Cancer Association. In other relay news, Portland’s Doug Gofflee collapsed on the course on Saturday from what medical providers described as heat exhaustion. Gofflee was life-flighted to St. Charles Medical Center-Bend. “It was his first leg of the relay, about 60 miles out from Diamond Lake,” said race director Scott Douglass via phone on Sunday. According to family members, Gofflee was in stable condition by Sunday afternoon and being transported to a Portland hospital. Douglass reported that a few other Cascade Lakes Relay participants had heat-related complications. — Bulletin staff report

Former college standout Corey Valine turns attention to coaching By Beau Eastes

Elks’ week ahead

The Bulletin

By all accounts, Bend Elks assistant coach Corey Valine can hit. An all-Western Athletic Conference selection in his junior (2009) and senior (2010) Inside seasons at San • Elks lose Jose State Uniseries finale versity, Valine to Black ranks among the Bears, Page Spartans’ all-time D5 hitting leaders in a number of categories. A .322 hitter for SJSU over the last four seasons, Valine ended his career fifth on the Spartans’ all-time list for runs batted in (120), eighth on the school’s all-time hits list (194), and tied for 13th in both doubles (29) and home runs (14). But after exhausting his eligibility at San Jose State this past spring, Valine, who was not selected in this

Tuesday: Thurston County Senators at Bend Elks (SS), 6:35 p.m. Wednesday: Thurston County Senators at Bend Elks (SS), 6:35 p.m. Friday: Wenatchee AppleSox at Bend Elks, 6:35 p.m. Saturday: Wenatchee AppleSox at Bend Elks, 6:35 p.m. Sunday: Wenatchee AppleSox at Bend Elks, 5:05 p.m. year’s Major League Draft, chose to accept a coaching position in Bend for the summer rather than try to extend his playing career with an independent club. “To be quite honest, I didn’t want to play anymore,” says the 22-yearold Valine, who last summer led the Elks in hitting with a .336 average. “I got burned out my senior year. I had

a few offers to play independent ball, but I’ve always liked helping other players. It’s a different aspect of the game.” Despite not being blessed with a big-league physique — Valine stands 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 210 pounds — the Elks’ first-year hitting coach has performed at the plate at every level. A four-year letterman in high school, Valine was a three-year starter at San Jose State. After playing sparingly as a true freshman in 2007, Valine became SJSU’s everyday third baseman as a sophomore in 2008, when he hit .288 with 33 RBIs, the second-best mark on the team. The next season he hit .387, the eighth-best single-season mark in school history, and solidified himself as one of the best bats in the WAC. This past spring, Valine hit .307 with 39 RBIs and was named to the allWAC first team. See Valine / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Corey Valine, 22, says he likes helping other players and will help out the Elks as an assistant coach this summer.

C A S C A D E L A K E S S W I M S E R I E S & F E S T I VA L

HIGH GEAR Biffle ends losing streak at Pocono Driver gets first victory in 64 races in Pennsylvania, see Page D6

Bulletin staff report

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Swimmers take off from the starting area while participating in the 5,000-meter race Sunday at Elk Lake. The 16th annual Cascade Lakes Swim Series & Festival drew more than 160 participants and dozens of spectators.

Open up and swim Masters swimmers take on Elk Lake in a three-day open-water series

X GAMES Youth dominates Skateboard Park 15-year-old takes gold over his elders, see Page D3

GOLF Tseng wins Women’s British Open Taiwan golfer records a one-stroke victory, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 On the air ...................................D2 Extreme sports ..........................D3 Golf ............................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 High Gear ................................. D6

GOLF

11 locals attempt to qualify for U.S. Am

INSIDE

Greg Biffle holds up the trophy in victory lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series’ Pennsylvania 500 Sunday in Long Pond, Pa.

D

REDMOND — Eleven Central Oregonians are hoping to punch their tickets to the most prestigious amateur golf tournament in the country. Sixty-four golfers, including the local entries, will play 36 holes today at Juniper Golf Club in a one-day qualifier for the U.S. Amateur Championship. The lowest three scorers at the Juniper qualifier will advance to play in a field of 312 at the 2010 U.S. Amateur. If a Central Oregonian earns a berth, he won’t have to travel far to play in the weeklong U.S. Amateur, which will take place Aug. 23-29 at Chambers Bay in University Place, Wash., just south of Seattle. Bend’s Roger Eichhorn, Taylor Garbutt, Jesse Heinly, Brad Mombert, Nicholas Schaan and Andrew Vijarro will all attempt to qualify, as will Redmond’s Alex Fitch, Andrew Fitch, Landon Moore, Andy Rodby and Tim Sundseth. See Am / D5

By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

No one appeared to be particularly mighty at midmorning Sunday on the sunny Elk Lake beach. Older folks and twenty- and thirtysomethings in Speedos and wet suits milled around the sandy wooded area of the lake, tucked away on the south side of Mount Bachelor. To say the least, the atmosphere was relaxed. But one could sense an undercurrent of excitement and stalwart Inside determination. • Complete “Masters swimming results, (ages 18 and older) is Page D2 just a real big part of my retirement,” said Dave Radcliff, of Hillsboro, who completed all five events over the course of the annual three-day masters open-water swim meet known as the Cascade Lakes Swim Series & Festival. At age 76, Radcliff was the oldest competitor in the event. “It keeps me healthy and it keeps me going,” said Radcliff. “And if something bad does happen, I’m usually in fairly good shape to fight through it. I’m a cancer survivor and I’ve had one heart attack. And I’m still going and still trying.” Radcliff was a member of the 1956 U.S. Olympic swim team and holds numerous masters world records in swimming events. More than 160 swimmers and several dozen supporters — many from Central Oregon and elsewhere around the state, others from as far away as Tennessee — took part in the swim series at Elk Lake, hosted by Central Oregon Masters Aquatics (COMA) and the Bend Park

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Masoli set to join Ole Miss By Chris Talbott The Associated Press

David Brancamp, left, and Evan Morrison run toward the finish line while competing in the 5,000-meter swim race Sunday at Elk Lake. Morrison edged out Brancamp for a first place finish in the event, but Brancamp was the overall long-course series winner. The Cascade Lakes Swim Series & Festival is a three-day open-water swimming event that offers 500-, 1,000-, 1,500-, 3,000- and 5,000-meter races. & Recreation District. A whopping 54 swimmers stepped up to the series’ “Survivor Challenge” — which meant completing all five events, a total of 11,000 meters of open-water swimming including 500-, 1,000-, 1,500-, 3,000- and 5,000meter distances. By midday Sunday, after the final swim of 1,000 meters, most of the participants were exhausted. “It’s tiring,” said Henry Holmberg, 25,

of Bend, slumped in a collapsible chair on the Elk Lake beach just moments after completing the last of his five swims. “The first day I was pretty good, but right now I’m pretty exhausted, my muscles are pretty fatigued.” The mountainous surroundings and chilly lake water helped lift the energy of the masters swimmers, many of them said. See Swim / D5

Kicked off the team at Oregon, Jeremiah Masoli has found a new football home at Mississippi. The former Ducks’ quarterback, dismissed from the team after two run-ins with the law, visited the Ole Miss campus in Oxford this weekend and coach Houston Nutt offered him a place on the team as a walk-on. Masoli, a California native, posted on his website Sunday that he intends to take up the offer. He can play immediately under NCAA rules because he has earned his undergraduate degree and is enrolling in graduate school. He said on his website he will enter the parks and recreation management program. See Masoli / D5


D2 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

SWIMMING

BASEBALL

2010 CASCADE LAKES SWIM SERIES & FESTIVAL At Elk Lake (Times in hours, minutes, seconds) Friday’s Results 3,000 Meters Women (wet suit) 25-29 — 1, Jessica Cavas, 46:12. 30-34 — 1, Katie Wewer, 45:31. 35-39 — 1, Elizabeth Henderson, 44:13. 40-44 — 1, Krista Loercher, 1:00:20. 45-49 — 1, Lisa Nirell, 52:02. 2, Ann Thomas, 54:51. 3, Marlene Hoard, 1:13:55. 55-59 — 1, Deb Douglas, 51:44. Men (wet suit) 35-39 — 1, Eric Smith, 42:29. 2, Matt Paz, 1:01:35. 3, Scott Nelson, 1:11:37. 40-44 — 1, Chris Sullivan, 49:24. 45-49 — 1, Sam Peterson, 48:31. 50-54 — 1, Ed Ramsey, 46:15. 2, Mike Douglas, 48:53. 3, Michael Bingle, 58:08. 4, Karl Baldessari, 1:01:58. 55-59 — 1, William Penn, 40:03. 2, John Dewit, 49:48. 60-64 — 1, Byron Oberst, 47:00. 65-69 — 1, Jeff Jacobsen, 54:46. 2, Jerry Balser, 58:54. Women (no wet suit) 18-24 — 1, Anita Isch, 50:02. 2, Katie Rice, 57:13. 25-29 — 1, Kelsey Holmberg, 42:26. 2, Aubree Gustafson, 46:28. 30-34 — 1, Jackie Parker, 52:37. 35-39 — 1, Megan Lassen, 44:15. 2, Julie Himstreet, 45:54. 3, Bonnie Edwards, 51:15. 40-44 — 1, Kim Young, 52:33. 2, Cyndi Smidt, 53:13. 3, Dee Davis, 57:23. 4, Shannon Singer, 58:27. 45-49 — 1, Myla Houlihan, 44:18. 2, Joni Young, 49:09. 3, Jennifer Fordham, 59:07. 4, Gayle Orner, 1:03:18. 50-54 — 1, Kris Denney, 44:27. 2, Laura Schob, 50:12. 3, Dallas Turner, 51:03. 4, Ann Goodman, 55:34. 5, Paula Moores, 1:00:04. 55-59 — 1, Elizabeth Budd, 52:50. 2, Madeleine Holmberg, 54:10. 3, Jill Wright, 59:36. 70-74 — 1, Bea Minor, 1:17:14. Men (no wet suit) 17 & Over — 1, Scott James, 57:07. 25-29 — 1, Tim Farrington, 40:55. 2, Henry Holmberg, 43:45. 3, Brett Crandall, 44:23. 4, Ian McCurdy, 47:03. 30-34 — 1, Evan Morrison, 40:34. 2, Todd Lantry, 48:52. 3, Brian Hemphill, 49:28. 35-39 — 1, Mark Braun, 47:55. 2, Andrew Singer, 53:59. 3, Christian Smelser, 58:22. 4, Jason Lassen, 1:04:43. 40-44 — 1, Mike Self, 39:39. 2, Tim Waud, 43:59. 3, John Gessner, 44:22. 4, Jeff Hackley, 46:10. 45-49 — 1, David Brancamp, 39:41. 2, David Hathaway, 43:02. 3, Peter Collins, 54:36. 4, David Row, 56:50. 5, John Griley, 58:34. 50-54 — 1, Ron Thompson, 47:48. 2, Keith Dow, 52:25. 3, Dan Mayhew, 55:57. 4, Mike Neubig, 1:00:26. 5, Robin Bragg, 1:04:42. 6, Walter Carter, 1:04:57. 55-59 — 1, Charlie Swanson, 45:39. 2, Brooks Richardson, 51:27. 3, Mark Becker, 51:40. 4, Bob Needham, 52:30. 60-64 — 1, Jed Cronin, 48:50. 2, Jim Teisher, 52:07. 3, Hank McCurdy, 1:04:34. 65-69 — 1, Ralph Mohr, 52:52. 2, Dan Grey, 1:03:15. 75-79 — 1, David Radcliff, 47:52.

4 p.m. — MLB, New York Mets at Atlanta Braves, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Minor league, Salt Lake City Bees at Portland Beavers, FSNW.

TUESDAY BASEBALL Noon — Minor league, Salt Lake City Bees at Portland Beavers, FSNW. 4 p.m. — MLB, Chicago White Sox at Detroit Tigers, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — WNBA, Washington Mystics at Atlanta Dream, ESPN2. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Horse racing • Lookin At Lucky runs away with Haskell: Lookin At Lucky has blown away a star-studded field in the $1 million Haskell Invitational at Oceanport, N.J., to establish himself as the leading 3-year old in the country. The Preakness winner surged to the lead around the far turn Sunday and ran away from Kentucky Derby winner Super Saver as well as Preakness runner-up First Dude and Trappe Shot.

Auto racing • AP source: Kentucky Speedway to get Sprint Cup: Kentucky Speedway will get a NASCAR Sprint Cup race in 2011, a person familiar with the decision told The Associated Press. The 1.5-mile tri-oval halfway between Louisville and Cincinnati will host NASCAR’s top series in early July. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision had not been announced. A news conference is scheduled at the track Aug. 10. Speedway Motorsports Inc. purchased the speedway from the original ownership group in 2008. SMI owner Bruton Smith said his main goal was to bring the track a long-coveted Cup date.

Tennis • Querrey defends Farmers Classic title in L.A.: Sam Querrey fought off a match point in the second set and went on to beat Andy Murray 5-7, 7-6 (7), 6-3 in the Farmers Classic final. Querrey successfully defended the title he won last year in his hometown tournament. He became the first player to repeat in consecutive years in Los Angeles since Andre Agassi in 2001-02. Bob and Mike Bryan earlier Sunday won their record 62nd career doubles title on the ATP Tour. The twin brothers defeated American Eric Butorac and Jean-Julien Rojer of Netherlands Antilles 6-7 (8-6), 6-2 (10-7) in the Bryans’ 100th career final. • Azarenka beats Sharapova for Stanford title: Victoria Azarenka beat Maria Sharapova 6-4, 6-1 on Sunday to win the Bank of the West Classic, her first title of the season. Azarenka, who earned $107,000 for her win, beat Sharapova for the first time in three years and the first time on hard court. They have split four career meetings. Azarenka, who won her fourth career title, will be No. 12 in the world when the rankings are released today. Sharapova, who was looking to become the first woman with three titles this year, rises to No. 13. • Ferrero wins Croatia Open for 3rd title of year: Juan Carlos Ferrero won the Croatia Open in Umag, Croatia, on Sunday, beating Potito Starace, of Italy, 6-4, 6-4 for his third title this year. Ferrero, a former No. 1 player who was seeded fourth, defeated an opponent who was playing in his first final in three years and looking for his first ATP title. Ferrero was a finalist in this tournament in 2009. • Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova wins Istanbul Cup: Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova beat Elena Vesnina 5-7, 7-5, 6-4 in the Istanbul Cup final to claim her second WTA singles title. Pavlyuchenkova’s serve was broken seven times Sunday, while Vesnina lost serve eight times. Both players survived tough three-set matches in Saturday’s semifinals. • Almagro beats Gasquet in Swiss Open final: Nicolas Almagro of Spain beat France’s Richard Gasquet in the Swiss Open final in Gstaad, Switzerland. The secondseeded Almagro took just 75 minutes on Gstaad’s outdoor clay to overpower Gasquet 7-5, 6-1.

Soccer • New group acquires Cosmos name: A new group has acquired the name of the old Cosmos soccer team of the North American Soccer League and made Pele its honorary president. The Cosmos said Sunday they have acquired the Copa NYC tournament and said their goal is to re-establish the team as “a part of Major League Soccer.” The Cosmos had Pele, Franz Beckenbauer and Carlos Alberto in their most popular years but folded in 1985, a year after the NASL.

Football • Carroll tells agents for unsigned Okung to act: Seahawks coach Pete Carroll says it’s time for Russell Okung’s agents to act now that the No. 6 overall draft pick has missed the first three practices of training camp. Carroll said Sunday after his replacement for retired All-Pro left tackle Walter Jones missed another workout that the deal should already be done given that the No. 5 and No. 7 picks have signed. Carroll says missing the first days of camp works “immeasurably against” the rookie.

Cycling • Landis finishes tied for 11th in Catskills race: Aurelien Passeron won the Tour of the Catskills, while Floyd Landis faded late and finished the two-stage event tied for 11th. Sunday’s final stage, dubbed the Mountaintop Classic, was an 80-mile race that included an epic climb up Platte Clove known as the “Devil’s Kitchen” leg. Landis, riding unattached, was at the tail of the second group of 12 riders that finished the stage 25 seconds back. Overall, he was 69 seconds behind the winner.

Track and field • Lemaitre’s third gold helps France to relay win: Christophe Lemaitre became the first athlete to earn three golds at the European Championships after helping France win the 4x100 relay title during Sunday’s final night of competition. Lemaitre ran the second leg down the back straight before anchor Martial Mbandjock raced past Italy’s Maurizio Checcucci to win in 38.11 seconds. Italy took silver in 38.17 and Germany claimed the bronze in 38.44 at Barcelona’s Olympic stadium. — From wire reports

Saturday’s Results 500 Meters Women (wet suit) 13-14 — 1, Bella Wiener, 7:16.1. 2, Abby Sorlie, 8:24.8. 15-16 — 1, Kiki Nakamura-Koyama, 8:41.8. 25-29 — 1, Andrea Frank, 9:36.8. 30-34 — 1, Katie Wewer, 7:34.9. 2, Mikenzie Matteson, 8:05.0. 35-39 — 1, Eva Varga, 12:14.0. 40-44 — 1, Kelly Richards, 8:11.8. 45-49 — 1, Mary Molony, 8:34.4. 2, Sandra Schmidt, 9:00.6. 55-59 — 1, Deb Douglas, 8:28.8. 65-69 — 1, Judy Ziemer, 10:48.9. 70-74 — 1, Peggie Hodge, 12:31.2. Men (wet suit) 17 & Over — 1, Scott James, 7:18.0. 40-44 — 1, William Clydesdale, 6:41.4. 45-49 — 1, David Hathaway, 6:13.8. 50-54 — 1, Robin Bragg, 10:26.4. 55-59 — 1, William Penn, 6:32.8. 60-64 — 1, Gregory Frank, 9:18.2. 2, Richard Jenkins, 10:01.0. 65-69 — 1, John Spence, 7:53.6. 70-74 — 1, Paul Olmstead, 9:34.7. Women (no wet suit) 11-12 — 1, Meg Houlihan, 8:46.8. 18-24 — 1, Sarah Tomscha, 7:26.1. 2, Anita Isch, 8:01.9. 3, Katie Rice, 9:02.0. 4, Sophie Diepenheim, 9:57.9. 25-29 — 1, Kelsey Holmberg, 7:06.6. 2, Aubree Gustafson, 7:47.3. 3, Trista Hedlind, 8:54.4. 30-34 — 1, Kristin Wigle, 6:50.6. 2, Amy Holcomb, 7:09.4. 3, Diana Follette, 7:10.7. 4, Abigail Olson, 7:56.3. 5, Jackie Parker, 8:55.7. 35-39 — 1, Megan Lassen, 7:27.7. 2, Julie Himstreet, 7:39.1. 3, Megan McCook, 7:43.9. 40-44 — 1, Kristine Senkier, 6:38.1. 2, Connie Austin, 8:14.7. 3, Cyndi Smidt, 8:24.0. 4, Cheryl Morgen, 8:29.2. 5, Dee Davis, 8:37.2. 6, Kim Young, 8:47.8. 7, Maureen Mauer, 9:02.2. 8, Shannon Singer, 9:36.4. 9, Margaret Finestone, 9:44.5. 10, Krista Loercher, 10:01.9. 11, Maya Kroener, 10:38.1. 12, Ann Angvick, 10:51.0. 45-49 — 1, Arlene Delmage, 7:01.4. 2, Valerie Jenkins, 7:36.1. 3, Kendra Wheeler, 7:40.2. 4, Joni Young, 8:11.2. 5, Nancy Sorlie, 8:36.5. 6, Jennifer Fordham, 8:57.7. 7, Debbie Pappa, 9:28.1. 8, Susan Gorman, 9:51.7. 9, Ann Thomas, 9:56.3. 10, Gayle Orner, 10:30.5. 11, Marlene Hoard, 13:12.1. 50-54 — 1, Mary Sweat, 6:59.2. 2, Kris Denney, 7:18.7. 3, Donna Buck, 8:20.2. 4, Karen Andrus-Hughes, 8:38.0. 5, Ann Goodman, 8:39.6. 6, Dallas Turner, 8:41.6. 7, Caryn Krasne, 9:42.9. 8, Paula Moores, 9:57.3. 55-59 — 1, Elizabeth Budd, 8:33.8. 2, Madeleine Holmberg, 9:00.1. 3, Jill Wright, 9:35.7. 4, Toni Brown, 9:44.2. 5, Leslie Wiegand, 10:14.8. 6, Connie Peterson, 11:57.8. 60-64 — 1, Sarah Olson, 10:49.0. 2, Lynn Sacks, 13:52.4. 65-69 — 1, Pam Himstreet, 12:04.3. 70-74 — 1, Bea Minor, 12:08.1. Men (no wet suit) 11-12 — 1, Ian Wilson, 9:19.3. 2, Ian King, 9:23.6. 17 & Over — 1, Nicolas Morrell, 6:29.5. 25-29 — 1, Tim Farrington, 6:28.5. 2, Henry Holmberg, 6:35.8. 3, Brett Crandall, 7:09.3. 4, Ian McCurdy, 7:22.6. 30-34 — 1, Evan Morrison, 6:30.7. 2, Todd Lantry, 7:30.5. 3, Nick Thorpe, 7:47.3. 4, Brian Hemphill, 7:47.7. 5, Rob Shatting, 8:30.4. 6, Kevin Lutz, 9:09.2. 35-39 — 1, Mark Braun, 7:39.1. 2, Andrew Singer, 7:39.5. 3, Cameron Coker, 9:59.1. 4, John Notis, 9:59.8. 5, Jason Lassen, 10:16.0. 40-44 — 1, Mike Self, 6:02.4. 2, Tim Waud, 6:58.0. 3, Jeff Hackley, 7:10.6. 4, Chris Sullivan, 8:14.3. 5, Steve Wursta, 8:32.6. 6, Chris Cole, 8:39.9. 7, Mark Keel, 9:43.9. 45-49 — 1, David Brancamp, 6:15.1. 2, Jamie Proffitt, 6:32.3. 3, Peter Collins, 8:23.3. 4, John Griley, 9:26.6. 50-54 — 1, Ron Thompson, 7:46.9. 2, Ed Ramsey, 7:55.4. 3, Keith Dow, 8:11.7. 4, Tom Williams, 8:15.6. 5, Mark Fairlee, 8:25.1. 6, Dan Mayhew, 8:39.6. 7, Mike Douglas, 8:55.1. 8, Mike Neubig, 8:58.9. 9, Michael Bingle, 9:11.3. 10, Steve Jensen, 10:07.8. 11, Walter Carter, 10:43.2. 12, Greg Hoard, 10:50.6. 13, Mitch Hanan, 10:52.7. 55-59 — 1 (tie), Doug Brockbank, 7:21.1; Mike Tennant, 7:21.1. 3, Charlie Swanson, 7:56.9. 4, Brooks Richardson, 8:20.9. 5, Jon Dewit, 8:35.6. 6, Mike Warren, 10:10.6. 60-64 — 1, Steve Johnson, 6:52.8. 2, Jim Teisher, 8:42.6. 3, Bren Hirshberg, 9:58.3. 4, James Jenkins, 13:16.2. 65-69 — 1, Ralph Mohr, 8:54.9. 2, Dan Grey, 10:25.6. 3, Jeff Jacobsen, 10:28.0. 75-79 — 1, David Radcliff, 8:59.9. 1,500 Meters Women (wet suit) 13-14 — 1, Bella Wiener, 23:29 15-16 — 1, Kiki Nakamura-Koyama, 27:30 18-24 — 1, Katie Rice, 30:15 25-29 — 1, Andrea Frank, 30:57 30-34 — 1, Katie Wewer, 22:37 40-44 — 1, Kelly Richards, 25:09 45-49 — 1, Lisa Nirell, 25:37. 2, Ann Thomas, 26:13. 3, Mary Molony, 26:19. 4, Sandra Schmidt, 28:38. 5, Connie Speck, 30:01. 6, Marlene Hoard, 39:25 55-59 — 1, Deb Douglas, 26:18 65-69 — 1, Judy Ziemer, 35:04 Men (wet suit) 17 & Over — 1, Scott James, 25:27 35-39 — 1, Jeremy Kwitt, 28:27. 2, Jeff Keith, 28:57. 3, John Notis, 29:15 40-44 — 1, William Clydesdale, 21:47. 2, Patrick Howard, 21:51. 3, Steve Wursta, 23:48 45-49 — 1, Rick Rodriguez, 21:10. 2, Peter Collins, 23:49. 3, Andy Lewis, 25:51 50-54 — 1, Mitch Hanan, 26:38. 2, Michael Bingle, 27:53. 3, Ronald Levine, 27:59. 4, Greg Hoard, 29:20 55-59 — 1, William Penn, 20:162 John Dewit, 25:11 60-64 — 1, Gregory Frank, 26:20. 2, Richard Jenkins, 31:07. 3, James Jenkins, 41:52 65-69 — 1, John Spence, 25:45. 2, Jeff Jacobsen, 26:44. 3, Jerry Balser, 30:19 70-74 — 1, Paul Olmstead, 31:08 Women (no wet suit)

Cameron Beckman (1), $10,800 Bill Lunde (1), $10,620 John Huston (1), $10,620 a-Jonathan Bartlett Troy Merritt (1), $10,380 Charley Hoffman (1), $10,380

IN THE BLEACHERS

68-70-69—207 69-67-72—208 71-65-72—208 70-68-71—209 69-67-73—209 70-66-73—209

LPGA Tour

13-14 — 1, Erin Houlihan, 24:10 18-24 — 1, Sarah Tomscha, 22:41. 2, Anita Isch, 25:16 25-29 — 1, Kelsey Holmberg, 20:51. 2, Aubree Gustafson, 23:35 30-34 — 1, Kristin Wigle, 20:52. 2, Amy Holcomb, 21:15. 3, Diana Follette, 22:31. 4, Abigail Olson, 24:12. 5, Mikenzie Matteson, 24:58. 6, Jackie Parker, 25:59 35-39 — 1, Megan Lassen, 21:18. 2, Kira Pfisterer, 21:41. 3, Elizabeth Henderson, 22:06. 4, Julie Himstreet, 23:10. 5, Megan McCook, 25:285. 6, Julia Austin, 25:55. 7, Bonnie Edwards, 26:06. 8, Dorothy Miller, 30:59. 9, Tara Hare, 31:02 40-44 — 1, Kristine Senkier, 20:55. 2, Stephanie Wahab, 22:02. 3, Connie Austin, 25:33. 4, Cheryl Morgen, 26:09. 5, Kim Young, 26:164. 6, Cyndi Smidt, 26:27. 7, Dee Davis, 28:50. 8, Shannon Singer, 30:56. 9, Margaret Finestone, 31:00. 10, Krista Loercher, 33:06. 11, Ann Angvick, 33:07 45-49 — 1, Arlene Delmage, 21:07. 2 Myla Houlihan, 22:33. 3 Kendra Wheeler, 22:56. 4, Valerie Jenkins, 23:51. 5, Joni Young, 24:42. 6, Nancy Sorlie, 26:11. 7, Susan Gorman, 29:08. 8, Jennifer Fordham, 29:18. 9, Willee Broberg, 29:37. 10, Debbie Pappa, 30:05. 11, Gayle Orner, 31:45 50-54 — 1, Mary Sweat, 21:05. 2, Kris Denney, 21:59. 3, Karen Andrus-Hughes, 23:37. 4, Laura Schob, 25:49. 5, Dallas Turner, 26:10. 6, Ann Goodman, 27:21. 7, Caryn Krasne, 31:10. 8, Paula Moores, 31:14. 55-59 — 1, Madeleine Holmberg, 26:57. 2, Elizabeth Budd, 27:03. 3, Jill Wright, 29:30. 4, Toni Brown, 30:09. 5, Leslie Weigand, 31:37. 6, Connie Peterson, 36:49 60-64 — 1, Lynn Sacks, 43:59 65-69 — 1, Pam Himstreet, 39:37 70-74 — 1, Betsy Jordan, 38:14. 2, Bea Minor, 39:33. 3, Peggie Hodge, 43:35 Men (no wet suit) 11-12 — 1, Bayley Guy, 28:40. 2, Ian King, 31:04. 3, Ian Wilson, 31:35 17 & Over — 1, Nicolas Morrell, 20:45 25-29 — 1, Henry Holmberg, 19:52. 2, Tim Farrington, 20:11. 3, Brett Crandall, 22:36. 4, Iam McCurdy, 22:59 30-34 — 1, Evan Morrison, 19:58. 2, Nick Thorpe, 23:47. 3, Todd Lantry, 24:23. 4, Brian Hemphill, 25:13. 5, Rob Shatting, 25:56 35-39 — 1, Mark Braun, 24:15. 2, Andrew Singer, 25:36. 3, Jason Lassen, 31:36. 4, Cameron Coker, 32:37 40-44 — 1, Mike Self, 19:50. 2, Andrew Gramley, 20:55. 3, Tim Waud, 21:02. 4, Jeff Hackley, 21:52. 5, John Gessner, 22:04. 6, Chris Sullivan, 26:02 45-49 — 1, David Brancamp, 19:49. 2, Jamie Proffitt, 20:53. 3 David Hathaway, 20:57. 4 Mike Riley, 25:40. 5, Don Hanson, 26:00. 6, Warren Barne, 26:17. 7, Chris Guy, 28:49. 8, John Griley, 29:58 50-54 — 1, Curt La Count, 23:14. 2, Ron Thompson, 23:45. 3, Ed Ramsey, 24:24. 4, Tom Williams, 25:14. 5, Keith Dow, 25:41. 6, Mark Fairlee, 25:57. 7, Mike Douglas, 26:45. 8, Dan Mayhew, 29:07. 9, Mike Neubig, 31:06. 10, Robin Bragg, 31:12. 11, Steve Jensen, 31:17. 12, Walter Carter, 31:50 55-59 — 1, Mike Tennant, 22:05. 2, Doug Brockbank, 23:21. 3, Charlie Swanson, 23:50. 4, Brooks Richardson, 25:58. 5, Mike Warren, 30:20. 6, Randy Sargent, 36:19 60-64 — 1, Steve Johnson, 21:13. 2, Jim Teisher, 25:32. 3, Hank McCurdy, 43:58 65-69 — 1, Ralph Mohr, 26:41. 2, Dan Grey, 31:38 75-79 — 1, David Radcliff, 24:27 Sunday’s results 5,000 Meter Women (wet suit) 18-24 — 1, Katie Rice, 1:46:27. 30-34 — 1, Katie Wewer, 1:18:19 40-44 — 1, Kelly Richards, 1:22:31. 2, Kim Young, 1:22:58. 3, Cyndi Smidt, 1:24:13. 4 Krista Loercher, 1:43:02. 45-49 — 1, Connie Speck, 1:45:10. 2, Marlene Hoard, 2:04:21 55-59 — 1, Deb Douglas, 1:29:15. Men (wet suit) 17 & Over — 1, Scott James, 1:22:22 35-39 — 1, Mark Braun, 1:15:20. 40-44 — 1, Jeff Hackley, 1:12:29. 45-49 — 1, Kris Calvin, 1:06:22. 2, David Hathaway, 1:08:00 50-54 — 1, Dan Mayhew, 1:22:46. 2, Mike Douglas, 1:27:09. 3, Michael Bingle, 1:35:40. 4, Ronald Levine, 1:41:28 55-59 — 1, William Penn, 1:07:05. 2 Charlie Swanson, 1:13:22. 3, John Dewit, 1:18:01. 65-69 — 1, Jeff Jacobsen, 1:27:27. 2, Jerry Balser, 1:40:22 75-79 — 1, David Radcliff, 1:15:47 Women (no wet suit) 18-24 — 1, Anita Isch, 1:24:15 25-29 — 1, Kelsey Holmberg, 1:09:55. 2, Aubree Gustafson, 1:17:52. 30-34 — 1, Jackie Parker, 1:33:30 35-39 — 1, Kira Pfisterer, 1:10:22. 2, Megan Lassen, 1:15:11. 3, Julie Himstreet, 1:18:12. 4, Bonnie Edwards, 1:25:58 40-44 — 1, Dee Davis, 1:34:47 45-49 — 1, Joni Young, 1:24:10. 2 Gayle Orner, 1:46:59 50-54 — 1, Mary Sweat, 1:13:42. 2, Kris Denney, 1:16:22. 3, Laura Schob, 1:22:55. 4, Dallas Turner, 1:25:36. 5, Ann Goodman, 1:34:52. 6, Paula Moores, 1:43:21 55-59 — 1, Elizabeth Budd, 1:26:03. 2, Madeleine Holmberg, 1:36:51. 3, Jill Wright, 1:40:47. 4, Connie Peterson, 1:59:28 Men (no wet suit) 25-29 — 1, Tim Farrington, 1:08:44. 2, Henry Holmberg, 1:17:16. 3, Brett Crandall, 1:17:28 30-34 — 1, Evan Morrison, 1:06:14. 2, Todd Lantry, 1:22:17. 3, Brian Hemphill, 1:26:22 35-39 — 1, Jason Lassen, 1:46:54 40-44 — 1, Tim Waud, 1:14:06. 2, John Gessner, 1:17:25. 3, Steve Wursta, 1:30:05 45-49 — 1, David Brancamp, 1:06:15. 2, Hardy Lussier, 1:08:48. 3, Jamie Proffitt, 1:08:54. 4, Gregory Holles, 1:09:07. 5, John Griley, 1:42:55 50-54 — 1, Curt La Count, 1:17:57. 2, Ron Thompson, 1:21:18. 3, Keith Dow, 1:30:14. 4, Mike Neubig, 1:46:15. 5, Walter Carter, 1:47:00. 6, Robin Bragg, 1:47:32 55-59 — 1, Bob Needham, 1:24:58. 2, Brooks Richardson, 1:28:14 60-64 — 1, Jim Teisher, 1:26:29 65-69 — 1, Ralph Mohr, 1:30:24. 2, Dan Gray, 1:46:14 1,000 Meter Women (wet suit) 13-14 — 1, Bella Wiener, 15:27. 2, Abby Sorlie, 17:27 15-16 — 1, Kiki Nakamura-Koyama, 18:55 18-24 — 1, Katie Rice, 20:27. 25-29 — 1, Andrea Frank, 20:11. 30-34 — 1, Katie Wewer, 15:59 40-44 — 1, Dee Davis, 20:05 45-49 — 1, Mary Molony, 18:13. 2, Sandra Schmidt, 19:18. 3, Marlene Hoard, 26:26 65-69 — 1, Judy Ziemer, 21:29 Men (wet suit) 17 & Over — 1, Scott James, 16:41 35-39 — 1, Jeremy Kwitt, 18:39 40-44 — 1, William Clydesdale, 14:12 50-54 — 1, Mitch Hanan, 17:52. 2, Michael Bingle, 20:13 55-59 — 1, William Penn, 14:03. 2 Charlie Swanson, 15:33. 3, John Dewit, 16:35. 60-64 — 1, Gregory

Frank, 18:09. 2 Richard Jenkins, 20:42 65-69 — 1, John Spence, 17:24. 70-74 — 1, Paul Olmstead, 20:32 Women (no wet suit) 18-24 — 1, Sarah Tomscha, 15:35. 2 Anita Isch, 17:12 25-29 — 1, Kelsey Holmberg, 14:40. 2, Aubree Gustafson, 16:23 30-34 — 1, Kristin Wigle, 14:29. 2, Diana Follette, 14:38. 3, Abigail Olson, 15:57. 4, Jackie Parker, 18:04 35-39 — 1, Julie Himstreet, 16:23. 2, Megan Lassen, 16:47. 3, Bonnie Edwards, 17:33 40-44 — 1, Kristine Senkier, 14:24. 2, Stephanie Wahab, 15:31. 3 Cheryl Morgen, 17:37. 4, Connie Austin, 17:51. 5, Cyndi Smidt, 18:02. 6, Kelly Richards, 18:15. 7, Kim Young, 18:38. 8, Margaret Finestone, 20:29. 9, Krista Loercher, 26:17 45-49 — 1, Arlene Delmage, 14:31. 2, Kendra Wheeler, 15:45. 3, Valerie Jenkins, 15:59. 4, Joni Young, 17:36. 5, Nancy Sorlie, 18:32. 6, Debbie Pappa, 20:23. 7, Gayle Orner, 24:47 50-54 — 1, Mary Sweat, 14:53. 2, Kris Denney, 15:44. 3, Karen Andrus-Hughes, 15:57. 4, Ann Goodman, 18:18. 5, Dallas Turner, 18:28. 6, Caryn Krasne, 20:14. 7, Paula Moores, 21:08 55-59 — 1, Elizabeth Budd, 18:14. 2, Deb Douglas, 19:28. 3, Madeleine Holmberg, 19:35. 4, Toni Brown, 20:16. 5, Jill Wright, 21:08. 6, Leslie Weigand, 22:29. 7, Connie Peterson, 25:10 60-64 — 1, Cathy Imwalle, 17:23. 2, Lynn Sacks, 27:39 65-69 — 1, Pam Himstreet, 25:10 70-74 — 1, Peggie Hodge, 26:52. 2, Bea Minor, 26:57 Men (no wet suit) 25-29 — 1, Henry Holmberg, 13:46. 2, Tim Farrington, 14:37. 3, Brett Crandall, 15:31 30-34 — 1, Evan Morrison, 13:53. 2, Nick Thorpe, 15:51. 3, Todd Lantry, 17:02. 4, Brian Hemphill, 17:14. 5, Rob Shatting, 17:30 35-39 — 1, Mark Braun, 16:23. 2, Andrew Singer, 16:56. 3, John Notis, 20:52. 4, Cameron Coker, 20:56. 5, Jason Lassen, 22:39 40-44 — 1, Tim Waud, 14:53. 2, Jeff Hackley, 15:42. 3, Steve Wursta, 19:13 45-49 — 1, David Brancamp, 13:55. 2, Jamie Proffitt, 14:04. 3, David Hathaway, 14:45. 4 Kris Calvin, 15:49. 5, John Griley, 21:35 50-54 — 1, Ron Thompson, 16:12. 2, Tom Williams, 17:19. 3, Mark Fairlee, 17:57. 4, Keith Dow, 17:58. 5, Mike Douglas, 18:28. 6, Dan Mayhew, 19:18. 7, Steve Jensen, 21:20. 8, Mike Neubig, 22:01. 9, Robin Bragg, 22:25. 10, Walter Carter, 24:04. 11, Greg Hoard, 24:53 55-59 — 1, Mike Tennant, 15:31. 2, Brooks Richardson, 17:24 60-64 — 1, Jim Teisher, 18:33. 2, Bren Hirshberg, 19:429. 3, James Jenkins, 31:39 65-69 — 1, Ralph Mohr, 18:21. 2, Dan Gray, 22:46. 3, Jeff Jacobsen, 26:18 75-79 — 1, David Radcliff, 16:45

GOLF PGA Tour THE GREENBRIER CLASSIC Sunday At The Old White Course White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,031; Par 70 Final Round a-amateur Stuart Appleby (500), $1,080,000 66-68-65-59—258 Jeff Overton (300), $648,000 64-62-66-67—259 Brendon de Jonge (190), $408,000 65-68-65-65—263 Woody Austin (104), $226,200 67-68-67-63—265 Paul Stankowski (104), $226,200 69-65-67-64—265 Roger Tambellini (104), $226,200 69-66-65-65—265 Jimmy Walker (104), $226,200 67-64-67-67—265 D.A. Points (104), $226,200 68-66-61-70—265 Pat Perez (66), $138,857 64-69-69-64—266 Chris Stroud (66), $138,857 69-63-69-65—266 Troy Matteson (66), $138,857 69-65-67-65—266 Aron Price (66), $138,857 65-71-65-65—266 Jim Furyk (66), $138,857 68-65-67-66—266 Charles Howell III (66), $138,857 65-67-67-67—266 Boo Weekley (66), $138,857 67-63-67-69—266 Matt Bettencourt (53), $90,000 65-69-67-66—267 Brandt Snedeker (53), $90,000 68-68-65-66—267 Marc Leishman (53), $90,000 68-68-65-66—267 Scott Piercy (53), $90,000 66-67-67-67—267 J.B. Holmes (53), $90,000 69-69-60-69—267 John Senden (43), $47,460 68-67-68-65—268 Michael Letzig (43), $47,460 72-65-66-65—268 Ben Crane (43), $47,460 66-67-69-66—268 Richard S. Johnson (43), $47,460 66-67-69-66—268 Stephen Ames (43), $47,460 68-67-67-66—268 Dean Wilson (43), $47,460 66-70-66-66—268 John Rollins (43), $47,460 65-69-67-67—268 Brett Wetterich (43), $47,460 67-68-66-67—268 Matt Kuchar (43), $47,460 69-69-63-67—268 Rocco Mediate (43), $47,460 70-68-63-67—268 Briny Baird (43), $47,460 67-65-68-68—268 Bob Estes (43), $47,460 66-68-66-68—268 Spencer Levin (43), $47,460 66-67-67-68—268 Justin Leonard (43), $47,460 67-68-65-68—268 Jonathan Byrd (43), $47,460 69-65-64-70—268 Garrett Willis (31), $25,833 71-67-66-65—269 Chris Riley (31), $25,833 68-69-66-66—269 J.J. Henry (31), $25,833 69-69-64-67—269 Aaron Baddeley (31), $25,833 67-65-69-68—269 Scott McCarron (31), $25,833 67-66-68-68—269 Chris Couch (31), $25,833 66-67-68-68—269 Skip Kendall (31), $25,833 67-68-66-68—269 Kevin Na (31), $25,833 70-66-65-68—269 Derek Lamely (31), $25,833 69-69-63-68—269 Tom Gillis (24), $17,160 72-63-69-66—270 Jeev Milkha Singh (24), $17,160 67-69-68-66—270 Jay Williamson (24), $17,160 66-71-67-66—270 Graham DeLaet (24), $17,160 70-67-66-67—270 Cameron Percy (24), $17,160 69-68-66-67—270 Mathew Goggin (24), $17,160 66-70-66-68—270 Kevin Sutherland (16), $13,893 67-69-69-66—271 Brent Delahoussaye (16), $13,893 68-69-68-66—271 Joe Ogilvie (16), $13,893 68-69-68-66—271 Carl Pettersson (16), $13,893 71-64-69-67—271 Greg Chalmers (16), $13,893 68-69-67-67—271 Ben Curtis (16), $13,893 69-66-68-68—271 Chad Collins (16), $13,893 66-69-68-68—271 Brenden Pappas (16), $13,893 71-67-64-69—271 Tim Herron (16), $13,893 69-66-66-70—271 Craig Bowden (9), $12,900 68-70-67-67—272 Blake Adams (9), $12,900 71-67-67-67—272 Charlie Wi (9), $12,900 69-67-68-68—272 Davis Love III (9), $12,900 68-66-69-69—272 Roland Thatcher (9), $12,900 71-67-65-69—272 Sergio Garcia (9), $12,900 68-67-67-70—272 Matt Every (5), $12,420 63-72-70-68—273 Steve Flesch (5), $12,420 68-67-68-70—273 Jeff Quinney (2), $12,120 66-72-67-69—274 Arjun Atwal (2), $12,120 68-68-67-71—274 Charles Warren (2), $12,120 69-68-66-71—274 Jerod Turner (1), $11,820 69-69-67-70—275 Michael Bradley (1), $11,820 69-67-67-72—275 Chris DiMarco (1), $11,460 70-66-69-71—276 Joe Durant (1), $11,460 70-68-65-73—276 Nicholas Thompson (1), $11,460 70-68-64-74—276 Erik Compton (0), $11,460 63-68-68-77—276 John Daly (1), $11,160 69-68-67-76—280 Made cut, but did not qualify for final round Ricky Barnes (1), $10,980 70-68-68—206 Brian Stuard (1), $10,980 67-69-70—206

WOMEN’S BRITISH OPEN Sunday At Royal Birkdale Golf Club Southport, England Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 6,458; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Yani Tseng, $408,714 68-68-68-73—277 Katherine Hull, $256,209 68-74-66-70—278 Na Yeon Choi, $159,825 74-70-69-68—281 In-Kyung Kim, $159,825 70-72-68-71—281 Amy Yang, $101,670 69-71-74-68—282 Hee Kyung Seo, $101,670 73-69-70-70—282 Cristie Kerr, $101,670 73-67-72-70—282 Morgan Pressel, $81,743 77-71-65-71—284 Inbee Park, $61,978 72-71-77-66—286 Ai Miyazato, $61,978 76-70-73-67—286 Christina Kim, $61,978 74-68-70-74—286 Momoko Ueda, $61,978 72-70-70-74—286 Brittany Lincicome, $61,978 69-71-71-75—286 Maria Hernandez, $43,311 73-70-73-71—287 Jiyai Shin, $43,311 71-71-72-73—287 Suzann Pettersen, $43,311 73-68-71-75—287 Gwladys Nocera, $37,516 71-75-72-70—288 Michelle Wie, $37,516 70-76-71-71—288 Song-Hee Kim, $33,856 75-73-71-70—289 Azahara Munoz, $33,856 74-71-72-72—289 Jeong Jang, $28,722 74-73-74-69—290 Paula Creamer, $28,722 74-74-70-72—290 Lee-Anne Pace, $28,722 74-72-71-73—290 Becky Brewerton, $28,722 73-73-71-73—290 Juli Inkster, $28,722 71-70-76-73—290 Chie Arimura, $28,722 77-68-70-75—290 a-Caroline Hedwall 74-75-72-70—291 Jimin Kang, $24,096 74-73-74-70—291 Mindy Kim, $24,096 72-75-73-71—291 Karine Icher, $24,096 74-72-70-75—291 Ji Young Oh, $18,631 79-69-75-69—292 Mi Hyun Kim, $18,631 72-77-73-70—292 Melissa Reid, $18,631 77-71-74-70—292 Vicky Hurst, $18,631 77-71-74-70—292 Haeji Kang, $18,631 75-74-72-71—292 Katie Futcher, $18,631 74-74-72-72—292 Henrietta Zuel, $18,631 74-73-73-72—292 Sakura Yokomine, $18,631 74-71-75-72—292 Stacy Lewis, $18,631 71-74-75-72—292 Sun Young Yoo, $18,631 69-72-78-73—292 M.J. Hur, $18,631 74-68-75-75—292 Anne-Lise Caudal, $18,631 69-73-75-75—292 Amy Hung, $12,810 75-74-71-73—293 Sophie Gustafson, $12,810 73-74-72-74—293 Karrie Webb, $12,810 73-73-73-74—293 Stacy Prammanasudh, $12,810 71-74-74-74—293 Ashleigh Simon, $12,810 74-69-76-74—293 Meena Lee, $12,810 75-71-72-75—293 Brittany Lang, $12,810 71-72-75-75—293 Kris Tamulis, $9,151 75-74-76-69—294 Moira Dunn, $9,151 75-73-74-72—294 Angela Stanford, $9,151 76-73-71-74—294 Sherri Steinhauer, $9,151 76-70-73-75—294 Irene Cho, $9,151 73-71-73-77—294 Florentyna Parker, $6,152 77-71-79-68—295 Wendy Ward, $6,152 73-73-77-72—295 Sarah Jane Smith, $6,152 76-69-78-72—295 Carin Koch, $6,152 72-77-73-73—295 Janice Moodie, $6,152 72-76-74-73—295 Hee Young Park, $6,152 72-72-78-73—295 Iben Tinning, $6,152 73-72-75-75—295 Seon Hwa Lee, $4,880 75-74-74-73—296 Jee Young Lee, $4,880 72-75-73-76—296 Anja Monke, $4,270 75-74-76-72—297 Sarah Lee, $4,270 74-74-75-74—297 Alena Sharp, $4,270 77-71-74-75—297 Eunjung Yi, $1,563 73-76-76-73—298 Stacy Bregman, $1,563 71-73-79-75—298 Anna Nordqvist, $1,563 72-77-77-73—299 Mariajo Uribe, $1,563 73-74-79-73—299 Meaghan Francella, $1,563 74-74-76-75—299 Laura Davies, $1,563 72-74-76-77—299 Giulia Sergas, $1,563 76-73-76-75—300 Shanshan Feng, $1,563 75-73-76-76—300 Jennifer Rosales, $1,563 76-72-75-79—302

Champions Tour U.S. SENIOR OPEN Sunday At Sahalee Country Club Sammamish Wash. Purse: $2.6 million Yardage: 6,866; Par 70 Final Round a-amateur Bernhard Langer, $470,000 69-68-68-67—272 Fred Couples, $280,000 70-70-65-70—275 Olin Browne, $145,760 73-70-70-65—278 John Cook, $145,760 71-68-72-67—278 Tom Watson, $96,938 70-70-75-66—281 Michael Allen, $81,573 69-71-71-71—282 Peter Senior, $81,573 73-70-68-71—282 Larry Mize, $65,735 74-69-72-68—283 Tom Kite, $65,735 72-69-69-73—283 Chien Soon Lu, $65,735 71-71-68-73—283 Tommy Armour III, $56,580 71-68-72-73—284 Dan Forsman, $47,220 78-71-69-67—285 Tom Lehman, $47,220 69-75-72-69—285 J. L. Lewis, $47,220 72-70-73-70—285 John Morse, $47,220 72-74-68-71—285 Scott Simpson, $47,220 70-71-71-73—285 J. R. Roth, $39,837 73-66-75-72—286 Joey Sindelar, $36,577 74-71-74-68—287 Mark Wiebe, $36,577 73-72-72-70—287 Corey Pavin, $30,771 72-75-73-68—288 Joe Ozaki, $30,771 69-73-73-73—288 Jay Haas, $30,771 70-73-71-74—288 Loren Roberts, $30,771 68-72-72-76—288 Jeff Sluman, $24,026 73-74-72-70—289 Jeff Hart, $24,026 73-72-72-72—289 Keith Fergus, $24,026 71-73-71-74—289 Mark Calcavecchia, $24,026 69-73-72-75—289 Rod Spittle, $18,530 75-74-71-70—290 Russ Cochran, $18,530 75-69-74-72—290 Eduardo Romero, $18,530 71-72-74-73—290 Mike Reid, $18,530 74-70-72-74—290 Tsukasa Watanabe, $15,892 75-75-73-68—291 Tom Purtzer, $15,892 72-75-74-70—291 a-Tim Jackson 68-79-74-70—291 Jim Rutledge, $15,892 73-74-73-71—291 Bob Tway, $15,892 73-75-70-73—291 Javier Sanchez, $15,892 71-71-74-75—291 Hal Sutton, $14,145 73-77-73-69—292 Allen Doyle, $14,145 72-76-70-74—292 Bob Gilder, $12,904 75-74-73-71—293 Gary Hallberg, $12,904 73-77-71-72—293 Don Pooley, $12,904 72-73-75-73—293 Mike Goodes, $10,923 73-75-75-71—294 Paul Trittler, $10,923 77-73-73-71—294 Mark Johnson, $10,923 75-72-74-73—294 Jim Roy, $10,923 76-73-70-75—294 Fred Funk, $10,923 76-70-72-76—294 Jeff Thomsen, $8,940 75-73-74-73—295 Craig Stadler, $8,940 74-75-73-73—295 Bruce Fleisher, $8,940 77-69-75-74—295 Rich Parker, $7,845 72-77-76-71—296 Jim Chancey, $7,845 73-75-74-74—296 Bill Britton, $7,179 76-73-78-70—297 Denis Watson, $7,179 79-71-75-72—297 Morris Hatalsky, $7,179 77-72-74-74—297 Gil Morgan, $7,179 76-74-72-75—297 Bruce Vaughan, $7,179 66-82-71-78—297 James Mason, $6,616 75-72-78-73—298 Gene Jones, $6,616 78-71-76-73—298 Mike Lawrence, $6,376 77-73-76-73—299 Rod Nuckolls, $6,376 73-77-73-76—299 David Frost, $6,219 76-72-72-80—300 Graham Marsh, $6,063 74-76-78-73—301 Jon Fiedler, $6,063 75-74-78-74—301 Bill Sautter, $5,854 73-77-78-75—303 Ralph West, $5,854 71-75-77-80—303 a-John Grace 74-75-80-76—305 a-Steven Hudson 73-75-78-81—307 Bob Niger, $5,693 77-73-75-85—310

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Columbus 10 4 4 34 New York 8 6 3 27 Toronto FC 6 6 5 23 Chicago 5 5 5 20 Kansas City 5 8 4 19 Philadelphia 4 8 3 15 New England 4 9 3 15 D.C. 3 12 3 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Los Angeles 12 3 4 40 Real Salt Lake 10 4 4 34 FC Dallas 6 2 9 27 Seattle 7 8 4 25 Colorado 6 5 6 24 San Jose 6 5 5 23

GF 26 20 19 21 14 19 16 12

GA 16 21 19 21 20 27 27 31

GF 31 32 21 21 19 20

GA 13 14 15 25 17 19

Houston 5 8 5 20 23 Chivas USA 5 9 3 18 21 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Game Chicago 3, Los Angeles 2 Thursday, August 5 Columbus at Philadelphia,5 p.m.

27 23

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 18 9 .667 Indiana 16 9 .640 Washington 15 10 .600 New York 14 11 .560 Connecticut 13 12 .520 Chicago 12 15 .444 Western Conference W L Pct z-Seattle 22 3 .880 Phoenix 12 13 .480 San Antonio 10 15 .400 Minnesota 8 16 .333 Los Angeles 8 17 .320 Tulsa 4 22 .154 z-clinched conference ——— Sunday’s Games Atlanta 90, Indiana 74 New York 71, Connecticut 67 Washington 87, Tulsa 62 Phoenix 97, Chicago 96 Minnesota 72, Seattle 71 Today’s Games No games scheduled

GB — 1 2 3 4 6 GB — 10 12 13½ 14 18½

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Sunday’s results) West Division W L Corvallis Knights 27 16 Bend Elks 26 19 Kitsap BlueJackets 23 20 Bellingham Bells 24 22 Cowlitz Black Bears 14 28 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 25 16 Moses Lake Pirates 19 23 Kelowna Falcons 20 25 Walla Walla Sweets 16 25 Sunday’s Games Cowlitz 6, Bend 5 Bellingham 10, Walla Walla 6 Kitsap 5, Moses Lake 2 Corvallis at Wenatchee, late game Today’s Game Corvallis at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m.

Pct. .628 .578 .535 .522 .333 Pct. .610 .452 .444 .390

Sunday’s Summary ——— COWLITZ 6, BEND 5 Cowlitz 021 000 201 — 6 10 3 Bend 100 040 000 — 5 10 2 Hamels, Dorman (5), Sandoval (7) and Sabol. Nygren, Ochoa (8), Donofrio (9) and Ausbun. W — Dorman. L — Ochoa. 2B — Cowlitz: Sabol. HR — Cowlitz: Sheeks. Bend: Busby.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— FARMERS CLASSIC A U.S. Open Series event Sunday Los Angeles Singles Championship Sam Querrey (2), United States, def. Andy Murray (1), Britain, 5-7, 7-6 (2), 6-3. CROATIA OPEN Sunday Umag, Croatia Singles Championship Juan Carlos Ferrero (4), Spain, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-4, 6-4. SWISS OPEN Sunday Gstaad, Switzerland Singles Championship Richard Gasquet (7), France, def. Nicolas Almagro (2), Spain, 7-5, 6-1.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC A U.S. Open Series event Sunday Stanford, Calif. Singles Championship Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def. Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, 6-4, 6-1. ISTANBUL CUP Sunday Istanbul Singles Championship Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (3), Russia, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Recalled LHP Troy Patton from Norfolk (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Recalled 1B Kila Ka’aihue from Omaha (PCL). Placed RHP Robinson Tejeda on the 15-day DL. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Optioned RHP Carlos Fisher to Louisville (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with RHP Brett Myers on a two-year contract extension. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Sent 3B David Freese to Springfield (TL) for a rehab assignment. Placed INF Tyler Greene on the 15-day DL. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed INF Oscar Salazar on the 15-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Recalled LHP John Lannan from Harrisburg (EL). Reinstated RHP Jordan Zimmermann from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Syracuse (IL). Optioned LHP Atahualpa Severino to Syracuse. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS—Placed CB Domonique Foxworth on injured reserve. Signed OL Devin Tyler and G Daniel Sanders. Placed WR Rodelin Anthony on waivers. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Agreed to terms with DT Tyson Alualu on a five-year contract. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Activated WR Wes Welker from the physically-unable-to-perform list. NEW YORK JETS—Placed QB Kellen Clemens and DT Kris Jenkins on the active/physically-unable-to-perform list. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed RB Ryan Mathews to a five-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released S James Brindley and CB Marcus Udell. Signed LS Clint Gresham.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 343 70 4,670 1,801 The Dalles 390 46 3,485 1,534 John Day 240 71 1,881 813 McNary 236 39 2,673 1,100 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 342,027 28,215 190,660 89,328 The Dalles 269,863 23,891 114,133 56,693 John Day 249,205 24,024 81,593 39,286 McNary 217,796 16,932 54,403 24,197


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 D3

GOLF: U.S. SENIOR OPEN

X GAMES

Langer pulls away to win title Teenage rookie takes

Skateboard Park gold

Hometown crowd unable to push Couples to a victory over German star

By Andrew Dalton The Associated Press

By Tim Booth The Associated Press

SAMMAMISH, Wash. — Bernhard Langer was more than willing to be the villain if it meant winning the U.S. Senior Open. Playing in an atmosphere more suited for a Ryder Cup than the final round of a major, Langer was undeterred by a partisan crowd that was rooting hard for hometown hero Fred Couples. The German shot a bogeyfree 3-under 67 on Sunday, took advantage of Couples’ one critical mistake and completed a daunting trans-Atlantic double by winning his second straight Champions Tour major. A week after winning the Senior British Open title at Carnoustie, Langer finished at 8 under for the tournament at Sahalee Country Club. He fought off jet lag and had to tune out crowded galleries hoping Couples could pull out victory just 20 miles east of where he grew up. “It’s never much fun, but I’ve had it before. When you play in the same group with Tiger Woods or Jack Nicklaus or Arnold Palmer or any of the big names in America, certainly the Ryder Cups, I’ve played 10 Ryder Cups, five on American soil, you get a lot more of this,” Langer said. “So I knew what was coming, which doesn’t make it any easier.” Langer became the first German to win any U.S. Golf Association championship and the first Champions Tour player to win back-to-back majors since Tom Watson took the Senior British and Jeld-Wen Tradition in 2003. But Watson didn’t travel eight time zones and win his titles on consecutive weekends like Langer, and with a massive audience rooting for his playing partner. “They were definitely against me and for Freddy,” Langer said. While Langer could take extra satisfaction in overcoming the towering trees of Sahalee and the partisan crowd, Couples was again left with a twinge of disappointment playing a major championship at home. At the 1998 PGA Championship at Sahalee, Couples stumbled through the first round and finished tied for 13th. This time,

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Bernhard Langer, right, congratulates runner-up Fred Couples after Langer won the U.S. Senior Open golf tournament trophy Sunday at Sahalee Country Club in Sammamish, Wash. he put himself in prime position for his first major title on the Champions Tour taking the lead with a birdie at No. 1 Sunday. Then came the second, and gone was any realistic chance of Couples winning the tournament. It was the easiest hole on the course all week, a par 5 at 503 yards. For the first time, Couples laid up with his second after pushing his tee shot right and deciding not to chance a hybrid from the first cut of rough. The layup left him about 65 yards to the pin for his third. The next two sounds left Couples in shock: chunk and plop. “It was a pretty easy shot,” Couples said. His pitch landed in a greenside pond, well short of the green. The transgression was magnified when Couples hit his fifth shot over the green, then needed two putts to walk away with a triple bogey. Suddenly a one-shot lead for Couples became a three-shot deficit. And Langer never opened the door to give Couples hope of rallying. “When I birdied the first hole, that was what I thought I needed

to get going,” Couples said. “And then about 12 minutes later I was looking for a hole to crawl in.” Langer’s counterpunches started at the third. He snaked a long birdie putt at No. 3 after Couples hit his second shot close and added another birdie at the sixth, a 480-yard converted par 5. Langer also made par saves at Nos. 8, 9. Meanwhile, Couples failed to get any putts to drop. He had birdie attempts at every hole between Nos. 4 and 13 and failed to drop any. Couples finally made birdie at the 14th — from the fringe — to close within three. He curled in a 25-footer at No. 16 to give hope of a late rally, but that’s where hope ended. Langer went without a bogey in 44 of his final 45 holes. “I never had the tee. He was up first all day. He hit it down the middle of every fairway,” Couples said. “As I told him, he played eight great rounds to play the British Seniors and this without really a poor round of golf, which is tough to do.” Only once did Langer appear to wobble, at the 11th, when he got a fortunate bounce similar to Vijay Singh when he won the

PGA here 12 years ago. Langer’s tee shot was pulled well to the left and into some of the thousands of trees framing Sahalee. Instead of dropping into the deep rough, or kicking left and out of bounds, Langer’s shot deflected into the middle of the fairway. The lucky kick brought a collective moan from the thousands lining the fairway pulling for Couples. In 1998, Singh found the trees on the 11th hole with his second shot, a 3-wood, but kicked on to the green where he two-putted from 30 feet for birdie en route to the championship. Langer settled for par, but kept his advantage. Couples, who was runner-up at the Senior PGA Championship earlier this year, finished three shots back with an even-par 70. Olin Browne (65) and John Cook (67) were tied for third at 2 under. Watson was alone in fifth at 1 over after shooting 66. “It’s hard to believe I won two back to back majors with an 8hour time change in between and two very challenging golf courses,” Langer said. “I probably played some of my best golf these last two weeks.”

Tim Hales / The Associated Press

Taiwan’s Yani Tseng with the trophy after winning the Women’s British Open at Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England, Sunday. shared third at 7-under 281. American Cristie Kerr was tied for fifth at 6 under with two other Koreans, Heekyung Seo and Amy Yangon. Sweden’s Caroline Hedwall won the Smyth Salver, awarded to the leading amateur for her 3-over 291. In other events on Sunday: Appleby’s 59 leads to PGA Tour victory WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va.

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Tseng takes Women’s British Open by one stroke SOUTHPORT, England — Yani Tseng of Taiwan made a 6-foot putt on the 18th hole Sunday to win the Women’s British Open by one stroke over Katherine Hull of Australia. It was the 21-year-old Tseng’s third major title and second of the year to go along with the Kraft Nabisco. She has four LPGA victories overall, having won the 2008 LPGA Championship and the 2009 Corning Classic. Hull came into the round trailing by four strokes but trailed by just one heading into the 18th. But she missed a 20-foot birdie attempt and had to settle for a 70, and Tseng made her par putt to shoot a 73 and total 11under 277 at Royal Birkdale. Tseng earned $408,000. She drove into a bunker on the last hole and was just off the green in three. Hull chipped poorly before her birdie attempt went past the hole, and Tseng coolly stepped up to make the winning putt. “I was nervous and tired with all the pressure and attention out there today,” Tseng said. “Katherine played really well and put me under a lot of pressure. It was the toughest win I’ve had to date. I usually come from behind to win. I’ve never won from the front before.” Tseng said Annika Sorenstam sent her a message overnight. “She said, ‘I’m very happy to see you on top, that’s where you belong,’ and wished me good luck for today,” she said. On the first three holes, Hull had trimmed three strokes off Tseng’s lead — with birdies at the second and third — while Tseng dropped a stroke at the third. Hull hit a 5wood to 12 feet at the second and made it, then an 8-iron to 40 feet at the fourth and holed that as well. Hull’s putt for birdie at the 17th lipped out. “I’ll probably be working on my short game after that finish,” Hull said with a smile. “I couldn’t believe when that putt on 17 stayed out, but, never mind, I did the best I could. I felt pretty good coming into the week, so there are lots of positives I can take from my performance.” Koreans Na Yeon Choi and In kyung Kim

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GLOVES

GOLF ROUNDUP

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — An X Games dominated by age and experience finally got a dose of youth on closing day. Fifteen-year-old rookie Pedro Barros beat 37-year-old veteran Andy MacDonald to win Skateboard Park on Sunday at a games previously dominated by repeat winners and older athletes. Skateboard Park was designed to allow young skaters versed in street style to compete with the older riders of vert ramps, and this year’s finals went just according to plan, with all the competitors either teens in jeans or pad-a nd-hel met-wea r i ng thirty-somethings. Ryan Sheckler was the youngest winner of this event at 13 in 2003, but the Brazilian Barros becomes the first athlete who wasn’t born when the X Games began to win a gold. He used a combination of stunning 540 airs and grinding slides on the elaborate course at the L.A. Live complex in downtown Los Angeles to reach a final score of 86 out of 100. Barros said it was “sick” to win gold in his first X Games. He didn’t think youth was overtaking age in pro skateboarding just yet, but didn’t deny that his youthful exuberance helped. “We’re young, so we get more energy,” Barros said of the teens in the final. “We just get more hyped up.” McDonald won silver with a score of 81 and 17-year-old Kevin Kowalski won bronze with a 78. Earlier in the competition an even younger face, 14-

— Stuart Appleby hit golf’s magic number, shooting a 59 to win the Greenbrier Classic. Appleby’s 11-under round put him at 22 under to end a four-year winless drought. Third-round leader Jeff Overton finished second by one stroke after his birdie try slid by the hole on the par-3 18th. Appleby is the fifth PGA Tour player to reach the milestone. The Australian’s round came less than a month after Paul Goydos had a 59 at the John Deere Classic. The others to shoot 59 were Al Geiberger at the 1977 Memphis Classic, Chip Beck at the 1991 Las Vegas Invitational and David Duval at the 1999 Bob Hope Classic. Appleby had nine birdies and an eagle in his round of on the Old White course. He is the first to shoot a 59 on a par-70 course. Fisher beats Harrington for Irish Open title KILLARNEY, Ireland — Ross Fisher won the Irish Open by two strokes over Padraig Harrington after shooting a 6-under 65 in the final round. Fisher led by one shot going into the final round but stretched that advantage to three after sinking a 15-foot eagle putt at the par-5 seventh hole. The Englishman totaled 18-under 266 at Killarney Golf and Fishing Club after he had been briefly joined at the top of the leaderboard by Harrington (64) on three occasions. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, of Spain, (67) and Chris Wood, of England, (68) were next at 270. Piller shoots 64 to earn second Nationwide win OMAHA, Neb. — Martin Piller shot a 7-under 64 to come from behind and win the Nationwide Tour’s Cox Classic by two strokes over Dicky Pride. Piller made the 36-hole cut by one stroke, then charged into contention with a 62 on Saturday. He pulled away from the field Sunday to earn his second win of the season and lock up a spot on the PGA Tour in 2011. Piller finished at 23-under 261 and collected a $130,500 check. Pride was two strokes back after shooting a 66. Alistair Presnell (64) and James Hahn (68) were three back.

year-old Curren Caples, wowed the crowd and appeared to be on his way to gold. Weighing 75 pounds with a face that looks closer to 10, Caples inspired Justin Bieber-like screams from young girls in the crowd throughout his seemingly effortless runs that included a 360 frontside air that he had failed to land several times in practice. But Caples fell frequently, couldn’t find his rhythm and was clearly frustrated in the final jam session. Youth got a boost earlier in the competition when Rune Glifberg, the 35-year-old favorite and defending champion, failed to make the finals. Before Sunday, most events at X Games 16 saw professional, perfectly executed performances but predictable winners and an absence of new faces. Jamie Bestwick won gold in BMX Freestyle Vert for the fourth straight year. Pierre-Luc Gagnon won his third straight gold in Skateboard Vert and added another in Best Trick. Daniel Dhers won his third gold in four years in BMX Freestyle Park. If anything these X Games were more memorable for things that happened outside the competition: • Travis Pastrana’s just-for-theheck-of-it double back-flip after he had already claimed gold in Freestyle Moto X. The move that was so groundbreaking for Pastrana four years earlier now was tossed off almost casually, with a smile.

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D4 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MA JOR L EAGUE BASEBALL Padres 5, Marlins 4

STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 66 38 .635 — Tampa Bay 65 39 .625 1 Boston 60 45 .571 6½ Toronto 54 51 .514 12½ Baltimore 32 73 .305 34½ Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 59 45 .567 — Minnesota 59 46 .562 ½ Detroit 52 52 .500 7 Kansas City 45 60 .429 14½ Cleveland 44 61 .419 15½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 61 44 .581 — Los Angeles 54 53 .505 8 Oakland 52 52 .500 8½ Seattle 39 67 .368 22½ ——— Sunday’s Games Cleveland 5, Toronto 4 Boston 4, Detroit 3 Tampa Bay 3, N.Y. Yankees 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Oakland 1 Kansas City 5, Baltimore 4 Minnesota 4, Seattle 0 L.A. Angels 4, Texas 1 Today’s Games Toronto (Morrow 7-6) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-8), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 10-8) at Boston (Lackey 10-5), 4:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 13-6) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Bannister 7-10) at Oakland (Cahill 10-4), 7:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 10:05 a.m., 1st game Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 4:05 p.m., 2nd game L.A. Angels at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 59 45 .567 — Philadelphia 57 48 .543 2½ Florida 53 52 .505 6½ New York 53 52 .505 6½ Washington 46 59 .438 13½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 59 46 .562 — Cincinnati 59 47 .557 ½ Milwaukee 48 58 .453 11½ Chicago 46 59 .438 13 Houston 45 59 .433 13½ Pittsburgh 36 68 .346 22½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 61 42 .592 — San Francisco 61 45 .575 1½ Colorado 55 50 .524 7 Los Angeles 54 51 .514 8 Arizona 39 66 .371 23 ——— Sunday’s Games Arizona 14, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 2, Atlanta 1 Philadelphia 6, Washington 4, 11 innings Houston 5, Milwaukee 2 St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1 Colorado 8, Chicago Cubs 7 San Diego 5, Florida 4 San Francisco 2, L.A. Dodgers 0 Today’s Games Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 1-8), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 8-5) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 11-5), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 9-5) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 5-8), 5:05 p.m. Houston (Myers 8-6) at St. Louis (Westbrook 0-0), 5:15 p.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 7-7) at Arizona (R.Lopez 5-9), 6:40 p.m. San Diego (Richard 8-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 8-9), 7:10 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m. Houston at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

NL ROUNDUP Giants 2, Dodgers 0 SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain pitched four-hit ball into the eighth inning for surging San Francisco, earning his first career win against Los Angeles that completed a three-game sweep. Edgar Renteria hit a two-run triple in the sixth for San Francisco, which moved to 8-2 in its last 10 games. Cain (9-8) allowed four hits in 7 2⁄3 innings, improving to 3-0 with a 1.52 ERA in his last four starts. The right-hander also raised his career record against San Francisco’s longtime rival to 1-8 with a 3.94 ERA in 15 games. Los Angeles Podsednik lf Theriot 2b Furcal ss Loney 1b Kemp cf Blake 3b Paul rf R.Martin c Kershaw p a-J.Carroll ph Dotel p Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2

SO 0 2 0 1 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 9

Avg. .200 .281 .317 .290 .259 .244 .233 .246 .053 .276 ---

San Francisco Torres rf-lf F.Sanchez 2b A.Huff 1b Br.Wilson p Posey c Burrell lf Schierholtz rf Sandoval 3b Rowand cf Renteria ss M.Cain p Ja.Lopez p b-Ishikawa ph-1b Totals

AB 4 3 4 0 3 3 1 4 2 3 3 0 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 5

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 6

Avg. .286 .262 .309 .000 .350 .273 .245 .263 .252 .284 .098 .000 .296

Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 4 2 San Francisco 000 002 00x — 2 6 0 a-singled for Kershaw in the 8th. b-grounded out for Ja.Lopez in the 8th. E—Furcal (15), Kershaw (1). LOB—Los Angeles 5, San Francisco 10. 2B—A.Huff (23), Burrell (6). 3B— Renteria (1). RBIs—Renteria 2 (21). SB—Podsednik (2), Rowand (4). CS—Kemp (13), Torres (6). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Kemp 2); San Francisco 6 (M.Cain 4, Schierholtz, Ishikawa). Runners moved up—Furcal. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Kershw L, 10-6 7 6 2 2 4 Dotel 1 0 0 0 1 S. Francisco IP H R ER BB M.Cain W, 9-8 7 2-3 4 0 0 1 Ja.Lopez H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 Wilsn S, 31-34 1 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez Kershaw (Renteria, Rowand, Posey). T—2:44. A—42,922 (41,915).

SO NP ERA 6 117 2.94 0 21 4.17 SO NP ERA 7 124 2.98 0 2 2.77 2 25 2.28 1-0. IBB—off

SAN DIEGO — Jerry Hairston Jr. hit a two-run double with two outs in the sixth inning to chase Florida ace Josh Johnson, and the Padres avoided a threegame sweep. Newly acquired Ryan Ludwick came up big during the three-run rally, delivering a pinch-hit single and sliding in ahead of the throw after Hairston doubled over left fielder Logan Morrison’s head. Florida H.Ramirez ss Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b Uggla 2b C.Ross cf Stanton rf Helms 3b R.Paulino c Jo.Johnson p Ohman p c-Bonifacio ph Tankersley p Badenhop p e-Do.Murphy ph Totals

AB 4 5 5 3 4 2 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 1 35

R 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 4

SO 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

Avg. .282 .214 .288 .275 .274 .235 .252 .276 .109 --.279 --.000 .308

San Diego Hairston Jr. 2b Headley 3b Ad.Gonzalez 1b M.Tejada ss Torrealba c Venable rf Frieri p d-Stairs ph Gregerson p H.Bell p Hairston lf Gwynn cf a-Ludwick ph-rf Garland p b-Denorfia ph-cf Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 1 0 1 0 0 4 2 2 2 1 31

R 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 8 5 4

SO 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .251 .272 .295 .100 .324 .229 --.190 ----.235 .215 .283 .189 .268

Florida 011 001 001 — 4 8 0 San Diego 200 003 00x — 5 8 1 a-singled for Gwynn in the 6th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Garland in the 6th. c-struck out for Ohman in the 7th. d-flied out for Frieri in the 7th. e-flied out for Badenhop in the 9th. E—Garland (1). LOB—Florida 8, San Diego 7. 2B—C.Ross (21), R.Paulino (16), Hairston Jr. (10), Torrealba (11). 3B—Venable (5). HR—H.Ramirez (14), off Garland. RBIs—H.Ramirez (56), Morrison (3), Helms (19), R.Paulino (37), Hairston Jr. 2 (42), Torrealba 2 (25), Denorfia (25). SF—Denorfia. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 4 (Jo. Johnson, R.Paulino, Stanton, G.Sanchez); San Diego 3 (Hairston, Torrealba, Headley). Runners moved up—C.Ross. Florida IP H R ER BB Johnsn L, 10-4 5 2-3 7 5 5 4 Ohman 1-3 0 0 0 0 Tankersley 1-3 0 0 0 0 Badenhop 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB Garlnd W, 10-7 6 5 3 3 3 Frieri H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 H.Bell S, 30-33 1 2 1 1 1 Inherited runners-scored—Ohman R.Paulino, Torrealba. T—2:57. A—27,560 (42,691).

SO NP ERA 5 109 1.96 0 4 0.00 0 2 8.00 1 17 4.79 SO NP ERA 6 106 3.60 2 18 0.00 1 15 2.45 0 19 1.99 1-0. PB—

Rockies 8, Cubs 7 DENVER — Jorge De La Rosa pitched into the seventh inning to earn his first win in three months and Colorado earned its fourth consecutive victory. Chicago scored three times in the ninth against Huston Street, but Jeff Baker struck out to end the game. Rockies center fielder Dexter Fowler was carted off the field with bruised ribs and a bruised left hip after crashing into the wall while catching Alfonso Soriano’s sacrifice fly. Chicago Colvin rf S.Castro ss D.Lee 1b Soto c Byrd cf A.Soriano lf Je.Baker 3b DeWitt 2b Silva p J.Russell p a-Zambrano ph-p Berg p b-Nady ph Cashner p c-Fukudome ph d-Ar.Ramirez ph Marmol p Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 5 4 5 4 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 38

R H 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 12

Colorado AB R Fowler cf 4 1 Spilborghs lf 0 0 J.Herrera 2b 4 2 C.Gonzalez lf-cf 4 1 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 Giambi 1b 2 1 Mora 1b 0 0 S.Smith rf 3 1 Iannetta c 3 1 Stewart 3b 3 0 De La Rosa p 2 1 Corpas p 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 Street p 0 0 Totals 30 8

BI 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .263 .303 .249 .284 .315 .265 .241 .277 .069 .000 .238 --.221 .000 .249 .221 ---

H BI BB 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 7 7

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .239 .277 .278 .320 .305 .278 .282 .283 .213 .256 .250 .000 .000 .000

Chicago 010 000 213 — 7 12 1 Colorado 240 020 00x — 8 8 1 a-struck out for J.Russell in the 4th. b-grounded out for Berg in the 7th. c-was announced for Cashner in the 8th. d-lined out for Fukudome in the 8th. E—D.Lee (6), Tulowitzki (7). LOB—Chicago 9, Colorado 8. 2B—Je.Baker (7), DeWitt (16), Tulowitzki (20). 3B—Byrd (1). HR—A.Soriano (19), off Corpas. RBIs—D.Lee (49), Soto (40), Byrd 2 (47), A.Soriano 2 (57), DeWitt (31), Fowler (16), J.Herrera (15), C.Gonzalez (69), Tulowitzki 2 (41), Giambi (25), Stewart (52). S—De La Rosa. SF—A.Soriano, Giambi. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 5 (A.Soriano 3, S.Castro, Byrd); Colorado 5 (S.Smith, Giambi, Tulowitzki, J.Herrera, Fowler). Runners moved up—Tulowitzki, Stewart. GIDP— A.Soriano, Giambi. DP—Chicago 1 (S.Castro, Je.Baker, D.Lee); Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, J.Herrera, Giambi). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Silva L, 10-5 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 15 3.92 J.Russell 2 2-3 2 4 2 1 1 46 4.28 Zambrano 2 4 2 2 2 1 53 5.71 Berg 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 4.81 Cashner 1 0 0 0 2 0 25 6.04 Marmol 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.55 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.L. Rsa W, 4-3 6 2-3 8 3 3 2 5 102 5.01 Corpas 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 14 4.23 Beimel 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.81 Street 1 1 3 3 2 1 23 4.00 Inherited runners-scored—J.Russell 2-1, Corpas 2-1, Beimel 1-0. HBP—by J.Russell (Fowler). WP—De La Rosa. T—3:11. A—38,256 (50,449).

Reds 2, Braves 1 CINCINNATI — Brandon Phillips hit a tying triple with two out in the fifth inning and scored the tiebreak-

ing run on shortstop Alex Gonzalez’s error, helping Cincinnati beat Atlanta in the rubber game of the weekend series. Edinson Volquez (2-1) pitched five innings for the Reds, who have won three of four and open a six-game trip today in Pittsburgh. Francisco Cordero got three outs for his 29th save. Atlanta AB R Conrad 3b 3 0 Heyward rf 4 0 Infante 2b 4 0 McCann c 2 0 Hinske 1b 3 0 c-C.Jones ph 1 0 Glaus 1b 0 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 1 Ankiel cf 3 0 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 Hanson p 3 0 Venters p 0 0 d-M.Diaz ph 1 0 Totals 31 1

H BI BB 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 7

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 9

Avg. .225 .270 .342 .275 .271 .250 .244 .259 .000 .262 .128 .000 .242

Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b L.Nix lf-cf Bruce rf Heisey cf Jor.Smith p b-Cairo ph Bray p Masset p F.Cordero p R.Hernandez c Volquez p a-Gomes ph-lf Totals

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 1 1

SO 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .285 .262 .322 .303 .272 .259 .279 .000 .299 ------.289 .000 .268

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 2 30

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Atlanta 010 000 000 — 1 4 1 Cincinnati 000 020 00x — 2 5 0 a-lined out for Volquez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Jor.Smith in the 6th. c-popped out for Hinske in the 7th. d-flied out for Venters in the 9th. E—Ale.Gonzalez (2). LOB—Atlanta 11, Cincinnati 5. 2B—Heyward (20), Rolen (22). 3B—B.Phillips (4). HR—Ale.Gonzalez (1), off Volquez. RBIs—Ale.Gonzalez (3), B.Phillips (40). SB—Infante (4). Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 6 (Hinske, Heyward, Ankiel, Ale.Gonzalez, C.Jones, Infante); Cincinnati 3 (Rolen, Votto, Cairo). Runners moved up—Heyward, Me.Cabrera, Hanson, Votto. Atlanta IP H R ER BB Hanson L, 8-8 7 1-3 5 2 1 1 Venters 2-3 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB Volquez W, 2-1 5 3 1 1 5 Jor.Smith H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 Bray H, 1 1 0 0 0 2 Masset H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 Crdro S, 29-35 1 1 0 0 0 HBP—by Volquez (Ale.Gonzalez). T—2:48. A—40,871 (42,319).

SO 5 1 SO 6 2 1 0 0

NP 92 6 NP 96 9 27 11 22

ERA 3.83 1.21 ERA 6.35 2.53 4.91 4.25 3.86

Phillies 6, Nationals 4 (11 innings) WASHINGTON — Placido Polanco and Jayson Werth each drove in a run in the 11th inning, helping Philadelphia avoid the sweep. Wilson Valdez led off the 11th with a bunt single against Collin Balester (0-1) and was sacrificed to second by pinch-hitter Roy Oswalt. Valdez went to third on a fly ball by Jimmy Rollins and scored on Polanco’s third hit, a single to center. Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Werth cf Howard 1b 1-Ransom pr-1b b-Gload ph-1b B.Francisco lf Do.Brown rf C.Ruiz c W.Valdez 2b Hamels p c-Dobbs ph J.Romero p Madson p Contreras p e-Oswalt ph Lidge p Totals

AB 5 6 5 0 2 2 6 5 5 5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 44

Washington AB Bernadina cf-rf 3 Desmond ss 4 Storen p 0 d-W.Harris ph 1 Balester p 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 Zimmerman 3b 5 Willingham lf 5 Morse rf 3 Jo.Peralta p 0 A.Kennedy 2b 2 Alb.Gonzalez 2b-ss 4 Nieves c 4 Lannan p 1 a-L.Hernandez ph 1 Batista p 0 Morgan cf 2 Totals 39

R H 1 0 2 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 12 R 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .238 .317 .297 .292 .205 .286 .248 .278 .282 .242 .156 .195 --.000 --.133 ---

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 4 1 13

Avg. .274 .257 .500 .189 --.276 .296 .266 .344 .000 .263 .300 .181 .077 .139 .167 .264

Philadelphia 200 000 200 02 — 6 12 0 Washington 000 202 000 00 — 4 8 2 a-grounded out for Lannan in the 5th. b-singled for Ransom in the 7th. c-popped out for Hamels in the 8th. d-grounded out for Storen in the 10th. e-sacrificed for Contreras in the 11th. 1-ran for Howard in the 1st. E—Desmond 2 (26). LOB—Philadelphia 11, Washington 5. 2B—Polanco (20), Werth 2 (36), B.Francisco (10), Desmond (17), Zimmerman (23). HR—A.Dunn (25), off Hamels. RBIs—Polanco 2 (34), Werth (56), B.Francisco 2 (17), Do.Brown (3), A.Dunn 2 (66), Zimmerman 2 (58). SB—B.Francisco (5), Do.Brown (1), W.Valdez (4). S—Hamels, Oswalt, Bernadina. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 6 (C.Ruiz, Polanco, Do.Brown 2, Rollins, B.Francisco); Washington 2 (Morse, A.Dunn). Runners moved up—Rollins 2, W.Harris. GIDP— Nieves. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Polanco, W.Valdez, Ransom). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels 7 6 4 4 0 10 107 3.56 J.Romero 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 2.59 Madson 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 22 4.79 Contrers W, 6-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 3.65 Lidge S, 11-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.32 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan 5 7 2 2 1 3 96 5.63 Batista 1 1 2 2 1 0 20 4.26 Jo.Peralta 2 1 0 0 0 0 34 2.01 Storen 2 0 0 0 0 2 19 2.45 Balester L, 0-1 1 3 2 2 1 1 16 6.75 Batista pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Madson 1-0, Jo.Peralta 1-1. IBB—off Balester (Gload). HBP—by Hamels (Bernadina), by Lannan (Howard). T—3:36. A—35,807 (41,546).

Cardinals 9, Pirates 1 ST. LOUIS — Albert Pujols hit a two-run homer and Adam Wainwright stayed unbeaten at home with seven strong innings for the Cardinals. Pujols’ 25th homer capped a five-run fifth inning. Wainwright (156) allowed one earned run

and six hits, bouncing back strong from one of his worst outings of the season. Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Tabata lf N.Walker 2b G.Jones 1b S.Jackson p Alvarez 3b Milledge rf Cedeno ss e-A.Diaz ph Jaramillo c Duke p J.Thomas p a-An.LaRoche ph Gallagher p Clement 1b Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 0 4 4 3 1 4 1 0 1 0 1 35

R H 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .291 .299 .301 .272 --.222 .272 .247 .333 .148 .100 .000 .227 .000 .202

St. Louis F.Lopez 3b Jay rf c-Winn ph-rf Pujols 1b d-LaRue ph-c Holliday lf Schumaker lf Y.Molina c-1b Rasmus cf B.Ryan ss Wainwright p Motte p D.Reyes p b-Stavinoha ph Boggs p Miles 2b Totals

AB 4 4 0 4 1 4 0 4 4 3 3 0 0 1 0 3 35

R H 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 3 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 9 14

BI 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 9

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .263 .378 .263 .298 .200 .300 .259 .241 .274 .218 .175 .000 .000 .261 .000 .323

Pittsburgh 010 000 000 — 1 10 0 St. Louis 001 050 03x — 9 14 1 a-grounded out for J.Thomas in the 7th. b-singled for D.Reyes in the 8th. c-walked for Jay in the 8th. d-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Pujols in the 8th. e-singled for Cedeno in the 9th. E—B.Ryan (13). LOB—Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 6. 2B—Rasmus (20), B.Ryan (12). 3B—Milledge (3). HR—Pujols (25), off Duke; Holliday (20), off S.Jackson. RBIs—Cedeno (22), Jay (13), Winn (10), Pujols 2 (74), Holliday (63), Wainwright (5), Miles 3 (6). CS—Rasmus (5). S—Duke. SF—Miles. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 5 (Alvarez 2, Tabata, A.McCutchen 2); St. Louis 3 (Miles, LaRue 2). Runners moved up—Wainwright. GIDP— A.McCutchen, Jaramillo, F.Lopez. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (N.Walker, G.Jones); St. Louis 2 (Wainwright, B.Ryan, Pujols), (B.Ryan, Miles, Y.Molina). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Duke L, 5-10 5 7 6 6 1 1 J.Thomas 1 3 0 0 0 0 Gallagher 1 0 0 0 0 0 S.Jackson 1 4 3 3 2 1 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wnwrgt W, 15-6 7 6 1 1 0 5 Motte 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 D.Reyes 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 Boggs 1 3 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—D.Reyes 1-0. T—2:50. A—43,338 (43,975).

NP 90 17 15 32 NP 109 11 14 15

ERA 5.36 9.00 4.86 9.95 ERA 2.19 2.34 3.00 3.23

Astros 5, Brewers 2 HOUSTON — Pinch-hitter Jason Michaels connected for a grand slam in the seventh inning and Houston completed the three-game sweep. The Astros trailed 2-0 before Michaels’ drive to the first row of the Crawford Boxes in left field. Houston has won five straight games while Milwaukee has dropped its last five. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Fielder 1b Braun lf McGehee 3b Edmonds cf Braddock p Coffey p A.Escobar ss Kottaras c Ra.Wolf p Loe p C.Gomez cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 1 31

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 1

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 8

Avg. .276 .288 .259 .274 .270 .284 --.000 .245 .201 .265 .000 .228

Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 0 Ang.Sanchez ss 4 0 Keppinger 2b 4 0 Pence rf 4 2 Ca.Lee lf 3 1 Lyon p 0 0 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 Wallace 1b 2 0 a-Michaels ph 1 1 W.Lopez p 0 0 Bourgeois lf 0 0 Quintero c 3 0 W.Wright p 2 0 b-P.Feliz ph-1b 1 0 Totals 31 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 4 2

SO 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 6

Avg. .249 .268 .291 .275 .238 --.341 .167 .264 --.250 .225 .000 .218

Milwaukee 000 002 000 — 2 4 1 Houston 000 000 41x — 5 9 0 a-homered for Wallace in the 7th. b-doubled for W.Wright in the 7th. E—Weeks (10). LOB—Milwaukee 3, Houston 4. 2B—Ra.Wolf (4), P.Feliz (11). 3B—Keppinger (1), Pence (2). HR—Hart (23), off W.Wright; Michaels (7), off Braddock. RBIs—Hart 2 (72), Michaels 4 (22). Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 1 (McGehee); Houston 3 (Pence, W.Wright, Ang.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Weeks. GIDP—Ang.Sanchez, Keppinger. DP—Milwaukee 2 (A.Escobar, Weeks, Fielder), (McGehee, Weeks, Fielder). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB Ra.Wolf 6 6 1 1 0 Loe L, 1-2 0 0 2 2 2 Braddock 2-3 2 1 1 0 Coffey 1 1-3 1 1 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB Wright W, 1-1 7 4 2 2 1 W.Lopez H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 Lyon S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Ra.Wolf pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Loe pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Loe 1-0, Coffey 1-0. T—2:33. A—27,964 (40,976).

SO 4 0 1 1 SO 6 2 0

NP 76 8 18 15 NP 102 11 17

ERA 4.91 2.53 3.80 4.29 ERA 4.44 3.67 3.47

Braddock 3-3,

Diamondbacks 14, Mets 1 NEW YORK — Adam LaRoche hit a pair of three-run homers and Daniel Hudson made a memorable debut for Arizona. Stephen Drew and John Hester added back-to-back homers as the Diamondbacks wrapped up a dominating season series against New York. They took five of six, rebounding from the lone loss to prevent the Mets from winning consecutive games for the first time since early June. Arizona AB C.Young cf 6 K.Johnson 2b 3 b-Crosby ph-2b 1 J.Upton rf 4 c-G.Parra ph-rf 2 Ad.LaRoche 1b 6 Vasquez p 0 M.Reynolds 3b-1b 4 Ryal lf 5 S.Drew ss 4 Hester c 3 D.Hudson p 4 d-Ojeda ph-3b 1 Totals 43

R 0 2 0 2 1 2 0 1 1 2 2 0 1 14

H 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 1 1 2 1 1 16

BI 1 0 1 0 0 6 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 14

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .269 .280 .223 .282 .251 .257 .000 .220 .301 .264 .216 .250 .175

New York AB Jos.Reyes ss 3 L.Castillo 2b 1 J.Feliciano lf-rf 4 Pagan cf 3 D.Wright 3b 3 O.Perez p 0 e-Beltran ph 1 I.Davis 1b 3 Francoeur rf 2 Dessens p 0 a-Hessman ph-3b 2 Thole c 3 Cora 2b-ss 3 Niese p 1 Carter lf 2 Totals 31

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .281 .234 .290 .313 .305 .111 .218 .248 .236 --.200 .298 .207 .176 .244

Arizona 000 350 213 — 14 16 0 New York 000 100 000 — 1 5 2 a-struck out for Dessens in the 7th. b-popped out for K.Johnson in the 8th. c-singled for J.Upton in the 8th. d-singled for D.Hudson in the 9th. e-singled for O.Perez in the 9th. E—Pagan (3), D.Wright (12). LOB—Arizona 8, New York 5. 2B—Ad.LaRoche (23), Cora (6). HR— Ad.LaRoche 2 (16), off Niese 2; S.Drew (5), off Dessens; Hester (1), off Dessens. RBIs—C.Young (64), Crosby (12), Ad.LaRoche 6 (70), M.Reynolds (66), S.Drew (32), Hester (4), D.Hudson 2 (2), Ojeda (4), I.Davis (53). CS—Ryal (1). SF—Crosby, I.Davis. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 5 (D.Hudson 2, C.Young 2, M.Reynolds); New York 3 (I.Davis, L.Castillo, Hessman). Runners moved up—D.Wright. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson W, 1-0 8 3 1 1 1 4 110 1.13 Vasquez 1 2 0 0 0 1 14 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese L, 7-5 4 1-3 7 7 6 3 2 83 3.78 Dessens 2 2-3 4 3 2 1 1 54 1.93 O.Perez 2 5 4 4 1 2 47 6.70 Inherited runners-scored—Dessens 1-1. WP— D.Hudson, Niese, O.Perez. T—2:41. A—35,014 (41,800).

AL ROUNDUP Angels 4, Rangers 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jered Weaver outpitched Cliff Lee with seven sharp innings in a matchup of the AL’s strikeout and ERA leaders, and Los Angeles beat Texas to win two of three in its weekend series. The Rangers’ lead in the AL West was shaved to eight games by the three-time defending division champs, who avoided falling at least 10 games out of first place for the first time since the end of the 2003 season. Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Dav.Murphy lf-cf Guerrero dh N.Cruz rf-lf C.Guzman 2b Moreland 1b-rf Teagarden c b-B.Molina ph Borbon cf a-Hamilton ph 1-Cantu pr-1b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 1 2 0 1 33

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 1 4

SO 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .272 .300 .256 .305 .324 .000 .364 .059 .194 .271 .362 .333

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss M.Izturis dh Callaspo 3b Tor.Hunter cf Napoli 1b H.Kendrick 2b J.Rivera rf Bo.Wilson c Willits lf Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 2 3 4 3 3 29

R 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 4 2

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 4

Avg. .278 .224 .277 .285 .253 .270 .257 .211 .274

Texas 000 001 000 — 1 5 0 Los Angeles 200 100 01x — 4 9 1 a-walked for Borbon in the 7th. b-flied out for Teagarden in the 9th. 1-ran for Hamilton in the 7th. E—Callaspo (8). LOB—Texas 9, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Guerrero (17), H.Kendrick (27). RBIs—Guerrero (85), Callaspo (47), Napoli (46), H.Kendrick (55), J.Rivera (40). SB—Andrus (27), Moreland (2). S—M.Izturis. SF—H.Kendrick. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 6 (Guerrero 2, C.Guzman, M.Young 2, Andrus); Los Angeles 2 (Bo. Wilson, J.Rivera). Runners moved up—N.Cruz, J.Rivera. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee L, 9-5 8 9 4 4 2 4 109 2.51 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 10-7 7 4 1 0 3 7 115 3.04 Rodney H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.22 Fntes S, 20-24 1 1 0 0 1 0 23 3.62 IBB—off Cl.Lee (Napoli). HBP—by Cl.Lee (Napoli). T—2:30. A—41,019 (45,285).

Twins 4, Mariners 0 MINNEAPOLIS — Francisco Liriano matched a season high with 11 strikeouts, Jason Kubel snapped out of a slump with a threerun double and streaking Minnesota beat Seattle for the second consecutive day. Playing without sluggers Joe Mauer and Justin Morneau, the Twins won their eighth straight and completed a three-game sweep. They remained a half-game behind first-place Chicago in the AL Central. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Branyan dh Kotchman 1b Jo.Wilson ss Tuiasosopo 3b M.Saunders lf Ro.Johnson c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 15

Avg. .307 .238 .244 .254 .219 .255 .150 .243 .191

Minnesota Span cf A.Casilla 2b Delm.Young lf Cuddyer 1b Kubel dh Valencia 3b Repko rf Hardy ss Butera c Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 1

Avg. .276 .282 .335 .276 .259 .388 .324 .260 .184

SO 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 4

Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Minnesota 000 004 00x — 4 9 1 E—Hardy (3). LOB—Seattle 5, Minnesota 5. 2B— Figgins (14), Delm.Young (32), Kubel (16), Valencia (8), Repko (3). 3B—M.Saunders (1). RBIs—Kubel 3 (61), Valencia (13). CS—Kubel (1). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Kotchman, I.Suzuki, M.Saunders); Minnesota 2 (Hardy, Butera). Runners moved up—Repko. GIDP—Cuddyer. DP—Seattle 2 (Figgins, Jo.Wilson, Kotchman), (Ro. Johnson, Ro.Johnson, Figgins). Seattle IP French L, 0-2 6 White 1 League 1 Minnesota IP Liriano W, 10-7 7 Rauch 1 Guerrier 1

H 7 1 1 H 2 0 0

R 4 0 0 R 0 0 0

ER 4 0 0 ER 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0 BB 2 0 0

SO 3 0 1 SO 11 2 2

NP 89 13 12 NP 109 12 18

ERA 6.27 6.55 3.33 ERA 3.18 2.97 2.89

IBB—off French (Cuddyer). HBP—by French (Delm. Young). T—2:14. A—40,374 (39,504).

Red Sox 4, Tigers 3 BOSTON — Pinch-runner Darnell McDonald scored the winning run when Marco Scutaro’s bunt single was thrown away by pitcher Robbie Weinhardt, and Boston won in its last at-bat for the second straight game. After Clay Buchholz outpitched Tigers ace Justin Verlander in a matchup of All-Stars, Jonathan Papelbon (4-4) got the win despite giving up Miguel Cabrera’s two-run double and a game-tying single by Jhonny Peralta in the ninth. Detroit A.Jackson cf Rhymes 2b Raburn lf Mi.Cabrera 1b 1-Kelly pr-1b Boesch rf Jh.Peralta 3b Frazier dh Avila c Santiago ss Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 0 4 4 4 2 3 30

R 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 3 4

SO 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .306 .281 .213 .351 .198 .291 .252 .182 .207 .274

Boston Scutaro ss J.Drew rf Youkilis 1b D.Ortiz dh V.Martinez c A.Beltre 3b Kalish lf Lowrie 2b 2-D.McDonald pr E.Patterson cf Totals

AB 5 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 0 3 32

R 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 9 3 4

SO 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 9

Avg. .283 .267 .307 .258 .288 .333 .286 .296 .261 .214

Detroit 000 000 003 — 3 5 1 Boston 012 000 001 — 4 9 0 No outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for Mi.Cabrera in the 9th. 2-ran for Lowrie in the 9th. E—Weinhardt (1). LOB—Detroit 4, Boston 9. 2B— Mi.Cabrera (36), Jh.Peralta (24). RBIs—Mi.Cabrera 2 (93), Jh.Peralta (47), A.Beltre (66), Kalish (2), E.Patterson (15). SB—Scutaro (3). SF—Kalish. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 1 (Avila); Boston 3 (V.Martinez, J.Drew, E.Patterson). GIDP—Frazier, Santiago. DP—Boston 2 (Scutaro, Lowrie, Youkilis), (A.Beltre, Lowrie, Youkilis). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander 7 6 3 3 3 8 123 3.74 Thomas L, 4-1 1 2 1 0 1 1 25 4.30 Weinhardt 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.86 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Buchholz 8 3 2 2 4 5 109 2.68 Paplbn W, 4-4 1 2 1 1 0 1 9 3.05 C.Buchholz pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. B.Thomas pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Weinhardt pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Weinhardt 2-1, Papelbon 2-2. WP—Verlander. T—2:48. A—37,479 (37,402).

Rays 3, Yankees 0 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — James Shields worked into the eighth inning to outpitch CC Sabathia, prolong Alex Rodriguez’s quest for his 600th homer and help Tampa Bay beat New York. Carl Crawford and Kelly Shoppach drove in runs for the Rays, who took two of three games during a matchup between the teams with the top two records in baseball. New York Jeter ss Berkman 1b Teixeira dh Cano 2b Swisher rf Posada c Granderson cf Kearns lf a-A.Rodriguez ph R.Pena 3b Gardner lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 1 2 1 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 1 11

Avg. .274 .125 .256 .331 .300 .264 .246 .271 .269 .204 .295

Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Crawford lf Longoria 3b W.Aybar dh S.Rodriguez 1b Bartlett ss Shoppach c b-Jaso ph-c Kapler rf c-Joyce ph-rf Brignac 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 4 4 2 1 2 0 4 31

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 9 2 5

Avg. .226 .309 .291 .261 .259 .239 .203 .271 .212 .232 .270

SO 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 7

New York 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Tampa Bay 012 000 00x — 3 9 1 a-struck out for Kearns in the 7th. b-struck out for Shoppach in the 8th. c-walked for Kapler in the 8th. E—Bartlett (9). LOB—New York 6, Tampa Bay 9. 2B—B.Upton (25), Longoria (31), W.Aybar (9). RBIs— Crawford (57), Shoppach (6). Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Kearns, Teixeira, Posada); Tampa Bay 6 (Brignac 4, S.Rodriguez 2). Runners moved up—Berkman, Kapler. GIDP—Berkman, Longoria. DP—New York 2 (R.Pena, Cano, Berkman), (Cano, Berkman); Tampa Bay 1 (Brignac, Bartlett, S.Rodriguez). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sbthia L, 13-5 6 2-3 8 3 3 3 3 112 3.19 K.Wood 1 1 0 0 2 3 26 6.00 Gaudin 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 6.49 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 10-9 7 1-3 4 0 0 1 11 116 4.54 Qualls H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Sorino S, 30-32 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 1.90 Inherited runners-scored—Gaudin 3-0, Qualls 1-0. IBB—off Sabathia (W.Aybar). WP—J.Shields. T—3:06. A—36,973 (36,973).

White Sox 4, Athletics 1 CHICAGO — Gavin Floyd carried a perfect game into the sixth inning before settling for another outstanding outing, leading Chicago over Oakland. Brent Lillibridge hit a three-run triple for the White Sox, who have won six of seven. They improved to 20-2 in their last 22 games at U.S. Cellular Field. Oakland AB R.Davis cf 3 Barton 1b 4 Cust dh 3 a-A.Rosales ph-dh 1 Kouzmanoff 3b 4 M.Ellis 2b 4 Powell c 4 Pennington ss 2 Watson lf 3 Carson rf 3 Totals 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 5 1 3

SO 0 0 3 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 8

Avg. .278 .274 .290 .275 .270 .259 .224 .257 .158 .229

Chicago Pierre dh Al.Ramirez ss Rios cf Konerko 1b Quentin rf R.Castro c Viciedo 3b Vizquel 3b An.Jones lf Lillibridge 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 0 2 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 4

H BI BB SO 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 6 4 0 11

Avg. .264 .289 .300 .297 .237 .328 .318 .285 .204 .387

Oakland 000 001 000 — 1 5 0 Chicago 000 040 00x — 4 6 0 LOB—Oakland 6, Chicago 3. 3B—Lillibridge (2). RBIs—R.Davis (33), Pierre (24), Lillibridge 3 (13). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (Kouzmanoff 2, Carson); Chicago 1 (Konerko). Runners moved up—Viciedo. GIDP—Barton. DP—Chicago 1 (Lillibridge, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Oakland IP H R ER BB Gonzalez L, 9-7 8 6 4 4 0 Chicago IP H R ER BB Floyd W, 7-8 7 4 1 1 3 Thornton H, 16 2-3 1 0 0 0 Putz H, 12 1-3 0 0 0 0 Jenks S, 22-24 1 0 0 0 0 Floyd pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Thornton HBP—by G.Gonzalez (An.Jones). T—2:19. A—32,118 (40,615).

SO 11 SO 5 0 1 2

NP 99 NP 110 7 4 14

ERA 3.69 ERA 3.54 2.43 1.83 4.70

1-0, Putz 1-0.

Royals 5, Orioles 4 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Alex Gordon homered and Bruce Chen won for the first time since July 3 to lead Kansas City past Baltimore. Chen (6-5), who was 0-3 in his previous four starts, went five innings. He allowed three runs and seven hits. Baltimore Lugo 2b Markakis rf Wigginton 1b 1-C.Patterson pr Scott dh Ad.Jones cf Pie lf Fox c J.Bell 3b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 5 3 0 5 4 4 3 4 3 36

R H 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 10

BI 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .258 .293 .254 .273 .282 .272 .260 .227 .192 .244

Kansas City Getz 2b Kendall c B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Betemit 3b Gordon lf Bloomquist lf Maier rf Y.Betancourt ss G.Blanco cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 4 3 3 34

R H 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 5 11

BI 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4

Avg. .248 .268 .311 .262 .372 .212 .235 .263 .256 .333

Baltimore 011 001 100 — 4 10 0 Kansas City 300 101 00x — 5 11 3 1-ran for Wigginton in the 9th. E—Chen (1), Betemit (2), Y.Betancourt (14). LOB—Baltimore 9, Kansas City 5. 2B—Markakis (35), Getz (7), B.Butler (29), Maier (9). HR—Scott (18), off Chen; Wigginton (17), off J.Chavez; Gordon (3), off Millwood. RBIs—Markakis (37), Wigginton (54), Scott (43), B.Butler (52), J.Guillen (61), Betemit (16), Gordon (6), Maier (31). CS—Pie (2). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 5 (Scott 2, Lugo 2, C.Izturis); Kansas City 3 (Kendall, Getz 2). Runners moved up—J.Bell, J.Guillen, Y.Betancourt. GIDP—Markakis, J.Bell, C.Izturis. DP—Kansas City 3 (B.Butler, Y.Betancourt), (Getz, B.Butler), (Soria, Y.Betancourt, B.Butler). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milwod L, 2-11 5 2-3 11 5 5 0 3 96 6.05 Hendrickson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 5.31 Berken 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.75 M.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.40 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen W, 6-5 5 7 3 2 3 4 101 4.74 Texeira H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.50 J.Chavez H, 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 9.00 Bl.Wood H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.79 Soria S, 29-31 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 2.25 Chen pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Hendrickson 2-0, Texeira 3-1. IBB—off Chen (Wigginton). T—2:51. A—14,662 (37,840).

Indians 5, Blue Jays 4 TORONTO — Asdrubal Cabrera hit a two-run homer, Jason Donald added a solo shot and Cleveland beat Toronto for the sixth time in seven games. Jose Bautista hit his major league-leading 32nd home run for the Blue Jays. Aaron Hill and Yunel Escobar also had solo shots for Toronto, which leads the majors with 161 homers. The Blue Jays have gone deep in 13 consecutive games, hitting 31 during that span. Cleveland Crowe cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana c LaPorta 1b J.Brown dh Duncan lf Valbuena 3b a-A.Marte ph-3b Donald 2b Totals

AB 3 5 2 3 4 4 4 3 1 4 33

R 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 7 4 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 6

Avg. .259 .273 .293 .265 .249 .000 .257 .164 .195 .260

Toronto AB Wise rf 4 Y.Escobar ss 5 J.Bautista 3b-1b 4 V.Wells cf 4 Lind dh 3 A.Hill 2b 4 Overbay 1b 4 1-Jo.McDonald pr 0 J.Buck c 3 Snider lf 4 Totals 35

R 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 4 2

SO 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 7

Avg. .278 .323 .260 .275 .219 .206 .251 .218 .276 .240

Cleveland 200 021 000 — 5 7 0 Toronto 011 000 200 — 4 9 1 a-fouled out for Valbuena in the 8th. 1-ran for Overbay in the 8th. E—Y.Escobar (2). LOB—Cleveland 6, Toronto 8. 2B—Crowe (15), LaPorta (11), V.Wells 2 (33). HR—A.Cabrera (2), off Litsch; Donald (3), off Tallet; A.Hill (15), off J.Gomez; Y.Escobar (3), off Sipp; J.Bautista (32), off Herrmann. RBIs—A.Cabrera 2 (9), C.Santana (22), Donald (20), Y.Escobar (9), J.Bautista (80), A.Hill 2 (39). SB—A.Cabrera (2), Jo.McDonald (1). S—Wise. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (J.Brown 2, LaPorta); Toronto 5 (Lind 2, Overbay, J.Buck, J.Bautista). GIDP—LaPorta. DP—Toronto 1 (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Overbay). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Gomez W, 2-0 5 5 2 2 2 2 80 1.50 Sipp H, 10 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 3 34 5.18 Herrmann H, 5 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 3.18 R.Perez H, 5 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 17 3.29 J.Smith H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 5.48 Perez S, 12-15 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 2.13 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Litsch L, 1-5 4 6 4 4 2 1 75 5.79 Tallet 3 1 1 1 1 3 39 6.18 Purcey 1 0 0 0 0 1 21 1.61 Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 1 21 3.54 Litsch pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—J.Smith 1-0, Tallet 3-2. HBP—by J.Gomez (J.Buck), by Tallet (Choo), by Litsch (Crowe). T—2:59. A—21,797 (49,539).


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 D5

WCL BASEBALL

Cowlitz scores a sweep over Bend Bulletin staff report

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

David Radcliff, 76, of Hillsboro, competes in the 5,000-meter event Sunday morning during the Cascade Lakes Swim Series & Festival at Elk Lake. Radcliff was the oldest competitor in the event and completed all five series races — a total of 11,000 meters — over the course of three days.

Swim Continued from D1 “Everybody has their own area where they can meditate and be spiritual, and that’s mine — out in the water,” said Connie Peterson, 55, of COMA. “I enjoy being out on this beautiful lake and being able to look at the mountains every time you breathe,” said Kelsey Holmberg, 28, a COMA swimmer who was the overall top female finisher of the long-course series, which consisted of the 1,500-, 3,000- and 5,000-meter swims. The men’s long-course series winner was David Brancamp, 48, of Reno, Nev. Brancamp swims for the Sierra Nevada Masters swim team and said he has traveled with his family to Central Oregon five times over the years to compete in the Elk Lake swims. “This is a great venue,” said Brancamp. “We love being up here — good people. It’s a neat area and the food and everything is awesome. The people take care of us.” Overall male and female short-course series winners were COMA’s Jamie Proffitt and Kristine

Senkier, respectively. The Cascade Lakes Swim Series, in its 16th year, is sanctioned by Oregon Masters Swimming and is part of the state’s open-water swimming series, which includes six other open-water competitions throughout the summer. The Elk Lake event was open to all ages. “There’s a lot of fast swimmers here,” noted David Hathaway, 49, of Portland, who placed second overall in the 500-meter race on Saturday and completed the Survivor Challenge. “I’ve won three open-water events (this summer), but HERE I was lucky to get top 10. And I was happy with it because there was so much good competition here. This is the best-attended open-water swim that we (Oregonians) have had all summer.” “We had 550, maybe even 600 swims in the whole event — lots of people swam,” noted event director Bob Bruce, who also serves as head coach for COMA. “The demeanor of the crowd tells you everything you need to know about what we do. It’s a family-oriented event and they are having a great time.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@bendbulletin.com.

MLB

Manager: Asian players treated better than Latinos The Associated Press CHICAGO — White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen thinks Asian players are given privileges in the United States that Latinos are not afforded. In his latest rant, the outspoken Guillen also said he’s the “only one” in baseball teaching young players from Latin America to stay away from performanceenhancing drugs and that Major League Baseball doesn’t care about that. He said MLB only cares about how often he argues with umpires and what he says to the media. Guillen said it’s unfair that Japanese players are assigned translators when they come to the U.S. to play pro ball, but Latinos are not.

Masoli Continued from D1 Masoli figured to be a possible Heisman Trophy contender this season after a breakout 2009 for the Ducks. His status quickly changed after the season when he was charged for his role in stealing a pair of laptop computers and a guitar from a fraternity house. He pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of misdemeanor seconddegree burglary and Oregon coach Chip Kelly suspended him for the 2010 season. He still practiced with the team during spring drills and was expected to redshirt. Kelly dismissed him in June, though, after he was cited for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana and two other noncriminal violations following a traffic stop. Masoli could still enroll at another school should he change his mind. Rebels newcomers report Aug. 8. He says on his website he’ll return to Oxford on Wednesday to begin conditioning workouts.

“Very bad. I say, why do we have Japanese interpreters and we don’t have a Spanish one. I always say that. Why do they have that privilege and we don’t?” Guillen said Sunday before Chicago played the Oakland Athletics. “Don’t take this wrong, but they take advantage of us. We bring a Japanese player and they are very good and they bring all these privileges to them. We bring a Dominican kid ... go to the minor leagues, good luck. Good luck. And it’s always going to be like that. It’s never going to change. But that’s the way it is.” Guillen, who is from Venezuela, said when he went to see his son, Oney, in Class-A, the team had a translator for a Korean prospect who “made more mon-

ey than the players.” “And we had 17 Latinos and you know who the interpreter was? Oney. Why is that? Because we have Latino coaches? Because here he is? Why? I don’t have the answer,” Guillen said. “We’re in the United States, we don’t have to bring any coaches that speak Spanish to help anybody. You choose to come to this country and you better speak English. “It’s just not the White Sox, it’s baseball,” he added. “We have a pitching coach that is Latino, but the pitching coach can’t talk about hitting with a Latino guy and that’s the way it is and we have to overcome all those (obstacles). You know why? Because we’re hungry, we grow up the right way, we come here to compete.”

“I am very excited about this opportunity and very thankful Ole Miss is giving me this chance,” Masoli wrote on the home page of www.jeremiahmasoli.net. “I really want to thank Coach Nutt for believing in me.” Nutt, who cannot talk about recruiting Masoli under NCAA rules until the player is in camp, initially told reporters in July he was not interested in expanding the roster. But when backup Raymond Cotton, who was expected to push Nate Stanley for the starting job, left the team, Nutt began the search for depth at a position already thin from the departure of Jevan Snead to the NFL. Nutt could take a public relations hit by bringing in the troubled player but he also may have improved a team picked to finish near or at the bottom in the Southeastern Conference’s Western Division. Stanley played sparingly last season, but looked good standing in for an injured Snead in part of the Cotton Bowl last January. He earned his spot atop the depth chart in spring drills. The only other quarterback on

the roster currently is Randall Mackey, a junior college transfer who has participated in summer workouts but otherwise has no experience. Masoli seems the perfect fit for Nutt’s Wild Rebel offense. If he can earn playing time with just a month to learn the playbook, the talent is there for him to have an impact. He guided the Ducks to their first Pac-10 title since 2001 and their first Rose Bowl appearance since 1995. The 5-foot-11, 220pounder is a two-year starter who threw for 2,147 yards and 15 touchdowns and rushed for 668 yards and 13 touchdowns last season. Masoli has been looking for a team since getting the boot from Oregon and started repairing his reputation by recently launching a website. He addresses his past problems, points out inaccuracies in media stories, notes that Oregon officials said nice things about him to Nutt and updates readers on his situation. “A big shout-out to everyone who has given me strength and support during the last few months,” Masoli wrote.

Am Continued from D1 Vijarro, a junior-to-be at the University of Oregon, made it to the first round of match play in July’s U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. Sundseth, a Redmond High School graduate and assistant men’s golf coach at Oregon State University, qualified for the 2006 U.S. Amateur but fell short of match play.

Last year Brady Johnson, of Mill Bay, British Columbia, and Vijarro’s UO teammate Jack Dukeminier advanced from the Juniper qualifier. Dukeminier is scheduled to play again at Juniper. Today’s first 18-hole round is scheduled to begin at 7:30 a.m. on the first and 10th holes; the last pair is to tee off at 9:10 a.m. After a short break, the second round begins at 1 p.m., and the last group will tee off at 2:40 p.m. The public is welcome to attend the qualifier, and admission is free.

Cowlitz picked up a run in the top of the ninth inning to break a 5-5 tie and take a 6-5 victory in West Coast League baseball action on Sunday at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium. The win gave Cowlitz (1428 WCL) a series sweep over Bend (26-19). The Elks have lost 10 of their last 13 games. Chris Viegas got Bend on the board in the bottom of the first inning on Sunday as the Elks held a 1-0 lead. Cowlitz came back quickly by scoring three runs, two in the second and one in the third, for a 3-1 advantage. That was erased by Elks third baseman Evan Busby who belted a grad slam in the bottom of the fifth to give his team a 53 lead. Cowlitz tied the game with two runs in the seventh and retook the lead in the top

Valine Continued from D1 More of a gap hitter than a typical corner infielder with power, the right-handed-hitting Valine prided himself on driving the ball to the opposite field — and on taking a specific approach to each atbat, something he has tried to instill in this year’s Elks. “My job is to have guys hit with an approach and have a short swing,” Valine says. “The shorter the swing, the better chance you have to hit the ball.” With the Elks’ West Coast League season nearly completed, Valine’s hitting philosophy appears to have been a success. Through Friday, the Elks were hitting .264 as a team, the third-best mark in the league. Also through Friday, Bend had scored more runs (235) than any other team in the WCL, had hit more home runs (30), had batted in more runs (208) and had the

of the ninth when Jordan Fox scored the game-wining run. Busby finished the game hitting two for five with four RBIs. Viegas, Tommy Richards and Tyler Smith each had two hits for Bend. Cowlitz reliever Ben Dorman took the win on the mound, giving up three hits and recording three strikeouts. Bend reliever Richie Ochoa suffered the loss. James Nygren, who started for the Elks, finished with a no decision despite pitching seven innings and recording six strikeouts. Bend returns to action on Tuesday for a split squad game against the Thurston County Senators. That game will begin at Genna Stadium at 6:35 p.m. The Elks will then host league-rival Wenatchee in a regular season-ending series starting on Friday.

highest on-base percentage (.401) of any WCL club. Taking cues from Elks head coach Sean Kinney and pitching coach Scott Anderson, Valine says he is looking at the game from a whole new angle. “One of the things I’ve learned is you have to move on, you can’t hold on to a game,” Valine says. “You can’t hold grudges, you’ve got to coach the next game.” Still a semester away from graduating with a degree in justice studies, Valine plans to return to San Jose State in the fall, and then possibly attend graduate school or law school. Coaching, though, will not be far from his mind. “Eventually I’d love to become a head coach,” Valine says. “But that takes a long time. … I’m looking at 20 years from now.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Biffle Continued from D6 Elliott Sadler and Kurt Busch both walked away from scary wrecks that knocked them out of the race. Biffle’s crew kept the same car after driving the No. 16 Ford to a season-high third-place finish last week at Indianapolis. That finish put Biffle in 11th place in the points standings and now he’s strongly positioned himself with five races for a spot in the 12-driver field for the championship chase. He won Chase races at New Hampshire and Dover in 2008 before falling into this winless drought. Biffle was winless last year for the first full season of his career. He won’t be shut out in backto-back seasons. “The whole company needed it,” Biffle crew chief Greg Erwin said. “I can’t really explain what this means. I know (Roush) is with us. This is a brand new car at Indianapolis and we brought it here because we liked it so much.” Sadler and Bush were the beneficiaries of NASCAR’s safer Car of Tomorrow after two violent wrecks. Sadler was forced to lay down on the triangle track and suffered a sore chest and stomach after smacking the inside wall. The engine on his No. 19 Ford was ripped from the body and smoldered nearby. He called it his hardest hit ever in a race car. It came a day after he was the Trucks Series race winner. Busch’s No. 2 Dodge was hit from behind on a bump drafting attempt by four-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson. Busch slammed into the wall, skidded along the grass, and smashed into an infield barrier. That brought out the first red flag, for 28 minutes, 46 seconds. The second one was for rain and lasted 17:20. The start of the race was delayed 36 minutes by rain. Biffle was one of the harshest critics of the track in a recent Sports Illustrated story, saying “they’re going to kill somebody there.” Track officials have promised changes — like adding more SAFER barriers along the inside wall — in time for next year’s races. The track was deemed by some unsafe after an accident in the June race involving Kasey Kahne.


H IGH G E A R

D6 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NASCAR

RACING SCOREBOARD

Biffle wins at Pocono By Dan Gelston The Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. — Greg Biffle won it for Jack Roush. Biffle raced to victory in an often-delayed Sprint Cup race at Pocono Raceway on Sunday to snap a 64-race winless streak and take the checkered flag for his injured team owner. Biffle hadn’t won since the first two races in the 2008 Chase for the Cup championship. But with Roush in the Mayo Clinic for injuries sustained in a plane crash in Wisconsin, Biffle found Victory Lane. “We know he’s watching,” Biffle said. “It’s been really tough. We worked so hard.” Tony Stewart was second and Roush driver Carl Edwards was third. Kevin Harvick and Denny Hamlin, who won the last two Pocono races, round out the top five. Edwards spoke with Roush on Sunday morning and said his boss sounded in good spirits. “He was Jack,” Edwards said. “Don’t mess anything up. Don’t wreck. He’s been through a lot this last week. He really needed that victory. That’s pretty cool. I’m sure he’s really hard to handle for all those nurses in the hospital.” The start of the 500-mile race was delayed by rain, then had two lengthy red flag stops that totaled nearly 50 minutes. See Biffle / D5

DRAG RACING MADRAS DRAGSTRIP ——— July 23 Results Sport Compact — W: Jose Rodriguez, Madras (Honda Accord), 10.886, 63.29 (10.70 dial). R/U: Jose Plascencia, Bend (1994 Acura Integra), 10.923, 64.38 (10.50 dial). Semis: Alvaro Miranda, Madras (Honda Civic); Eric Banderas, Madras (1998 Civic). Jackpot — W: Gary Walker, Madras (1967 Ford Fairlane), 8.851, 72.12 (8.76 dial). R/U: Dustin Jacobsen, Bend (1968 Buick Skylark), 9.061, 69.77 (8.90 dial). Semis: Gabriel Schmoe, Bend (1967 Firebird); Gary Ben, Pinon, Ariz. (2006 Cobalt). July 24 Results Jackpot — W: Shannon Tatom, The Dalles (1978 Grand Lemans), 9.129, 74.63 (9.30 dial). R/U: Don Gilbert, Boardman (1975 Camaro), foul. Semis: Vickie Farley, The Dalles (1975 Corvette). Bike/Sled — W: Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha), 7.332, 98.04 (7.22 dial). R/U: Kyleah Taylor, Salem, 7.527, 93.36 (7.49 dial). Semis: James Taylor, Salem (1985 Honda); Mitch Taylor, Madras (2003 Ski-Doo). Pro — W: Larry Holm, Eagle Creek (1966 El Camino), 6.998, 96.88 (6.99 dial). R/U: Gene Lind, Redmond (1965 Chevelle), 6.764, 101.81 (6.77 dial). Semis: Denny Robbins, Beaver Creek (1968 Nova); Russ Brown, The Dalles (1985 T-Bird). Sportsman — W: James Love, Bend (1972 Skylark), 8.433, 79.51 (8.40 dial). R/U: Ken Green, Happy Valley (1967 Chevelle), 8.682, 77.85 (8.64 dial). Semis: Jim Piper, Bend (1981 Chevy Pickup). Super Pro — W: Tom Stockero, Bend (1967 Camaro), 6.040, 113.64 (6.02 dial). R/U: Warren Regnier, Bend (1963 Nova), 6.719, 101.58 (6.71 dial). Semis: Lindsay Keever, The Dalles, (1967 Camaro). Jr. Thunder — W: Dallas Hill, Vancouver, Wash., 8.884, 72.35 (8.90 dial). Jr. Lightning — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A), 8.112, 79.37 (8.09 dial). R/U: Kayleah Taylor, Salem, 7.992, 80.21 (7.94 dial). High School — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem. R/U: Kayleah Taylor, Salem. July 25 Results High School — W: Kyleah Taylor, Salem. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, Salem. Jr. Thunder — W: Dallas Hill, Vancouver, Wash., 8.86, 73.29 (8.90 dial). Jr. Lightning — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A), 8.202, 77.72 (8.13 dial). R/U: Brittny Benson, Redmond, 8.662, 75.13 (8.59 dial). Semis: Austin Kroske, Bend; Kyleah Taylor, Salem. Sportsman — W: Jerry Gossette, Quilcene, Wash. (1968 Olds Cutlass), 9.645, 71.88 (9.66 dial). R/U: James Love, Bend (1972 Skylark), foul. Semis: Dan Barnes, Redmond (1967 Chevy Pickup); Fred Lang, Madras (1969 Camaro). Pro — W: Annie Hausinger, Madras (1970 Plymouth GTX), 7.014, 97.61 (7.02 dial). R/U: Doug Gray, Powell Butte (1940 Willys), foul. Semis: John Farlow, Bend (1975 Datsun 280Z); Robert Hensell, Redmond (1971 Camaro). Super Pro — W: Ed Glaab, La Pine (1988 Dragster), 5.334, 128.94 (5.33 dial). R/U: Dave Farley, The Dalles (1970 Firebird),

7.593, 88.58 (7.60 dial). Semis: Warren Regnier, Bend (1963 Nova); Brad Halvorson, Madras (1983 Chevy S10). Bike/Sled — W: Kyleah Taylor, Salem, 7.501, 90.54 (7.45 dial). R/U: Mitch Taylor, Madras (2003 Ski-Doo), 6.419, 104.41 (6.35 dial). Semis: Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha). Jackpot — W: Joe Endres, Madras (1974 Maverick), 8.241, 82.87 (8.12 dial). R/U: Dave Regnier, Bend (1966 Nova), 6.636, 103.69 (6.62 dial). Semis: George Churilla, Oregon City (1969 Ranchero).

FORMULA ONE HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX Sunday At Hungaroring Budapest, Hungary Lap length: 2.72 miles 1. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 70 laps, 1:41:05.571, 113.083 mph. 2. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 70, 1:41:23.392. 3. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 70, 1:41:24.823. 4. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 70, 1:41:33.045. 5. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 70, 1:42:18.763. 6. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 70, 1:42:22.294. 7. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 69, +1 lap. 8. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 69, +1 lap. 9. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 69, +1 lap. 10. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 69, +1 lap. 11. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 69, +1 lap. 12. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 69, +1 lap. 13. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 69, +1 lap. 14. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus Racing, 67, +3 laps. 15. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus Racing, 67, +3 laps. 16. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 67, +3 laps. 17. Bruno Senna, Brazil, HRT, 67, +3 laps. 18. Lucas di Grassi, Brazil, Virgin, 66, +4 laps. 19. Sakon Yamamoto, Japan, HRT, 66, +4 laps. Not Classfied 20. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 23, retired. 21. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 23, retired. 22. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 15, retired. 23. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 15, retired. 24. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 1, retired.

NASCAR Sprint Cup PENNSYLVANIA 500 Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (12) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200 laps, 111.7 rating, 190 points, $205,850. 2. (1) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200, 114, 175, $216,848. 3. (25) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 99.2, 170, $162,373. 4. (14) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 105.3, 160, $151,476.

5. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 120.7, 160, $122,400. 6. (4) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 128.3, 155, $136,301. 7. (10) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 200, 103.6, 146, $101,225. 8. (8) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 112.3, 142, $117,865. 9. (28) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200, 83.3, 138, $85,050. 10. (6) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200, 129.4, 144, $130,203. 11. (15) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 200, 70.6, 135, $85,900. 12. (5) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 88, 127, $110,129. 13. (23) Paul Menard, Ford, 200, 69.7, 124, $83,525. 14. (18) David Ragan, Ford, 200, 73, 121, $81,825. 15. (40) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200, 83.2, 118, $86,225. 16. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200, 97.5, 120, $106,981. 17. (24) David Reutimann, Toyota, 200, 78.2, 112, $101,681. 18. (26) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 200, 73.1, 109, $115,176. 19. (16) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 200, 82.1, 106, $109,715. 20. (11) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 63.3, 103, $97,610. 21. (34) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 63.2, 100, $78,150. 22. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 69.4, 97, $105,879. 23. (21) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 79.8, 94, $115,256. 24. (7) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 200, 74, 91, $106,776. 25. (17) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 63.2, 88, $105,840. 26. (27) Scott Speed, Toyota, 200, 54.2, 85, $87,148. 27. (20) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 199, 64.8, 82, $76,600. 28. (22) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 199, 46.5, 79, $69,175. 29. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 199, 47, 76, $86,285. 30. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 198, 40.4, 73, $82,948. 31. (41) Kevin Conway, Ford, 198, 37.1, 70, $66,725. 32. (31) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, overheating, 171, 43.3, 67, $106,273. 33. (13) Kurt Busch, Dodge, accident, 164, 80.4, 64, $110,198. 34. (29) Elliott Sadler, Ford, accident, 163, 52.1, 61, $73,375. 35. (42) P.J. Jones, Toyota, too slow, 63, 29.3, 58, $78,573. 36. (39) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, brakes, 62, 34.2, 55, $63,775. 37. (43) Todd Bodine, Toyota, electrical, 49, 30.1, 52, $63,600. 38. (30) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, vibration, 48, 32.4, 54, $63,475. 39. (19) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, engine, 46, 46.4, 46, $83,698. 40. (33) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, brakes, 42, 38.7, 43, $63,200. 41. (35) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, vibration, 32, 33, 40, $63,045. 42. (38) Dave Blaney, Toyota, transmission, 24, 29.4, 37, $62,890. 43. (36) Michael McDowell, Toyota, vibration, 23, 31.5, 34, $63,276. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 132.246 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 46 minutes, 51 seconds. Margin of Victory: 3.598 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 31 laps. Lead Changes: 19 among 9 drivers. Lap Leaders: T.Stewart 1-2; J.Gordon 3-17; J.Yeley 18; J.Gordon 19; G.Biffle 20-21; J.Johnson 22-77; J.Gordon 78; C.Edwards 79; J.Johnson 80-107; J.Gordon 108; J.Johnson 109-120; J.Gordon 121-122; G.Biffle 123-127; D.Hamlin 128-146; J.Montoya 147-150; J.Gordon 151; J.Montoya 152; J.Gordon 153-170; S.Hornish Jr. 171-179; G.Biffle 180-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Johnson, 3 times for 96 laps; J.Gordon, 7 times for 39 laps; G.Biffle, 3 times for 28 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 19 laps; S.Hornish Jr., 1 time for 9 laps; J.Montoya, 2 times for 5 laps; T.Stewart, 1 time for 2 laps; C.Edwards, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Yeley, 1 time for 1 lap.

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Greg Biffle crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series’ Pennsylvania 500 Sunday in Long Pond, Pa.

PREVIEWSALES EVENT FORMULA ONE

Webber takes Hungarian GP By Pablo Gorondi

“It was a bit of a gift today for me but I haven’t had many of them,” said Webber, BUDAPEST, Hungary — Mark Webber who competed in his 150th race on the took advantage of a penalty against Red Formula One circuit. Bull teammate Sebastian Vettel to win Michael Schumacher was judged in a the Formula One Hungarian Grand Prix stewards’ inquiry to have illegitimately on Sunday at the Hungaroring track. impeded Williams driver Rubens BarFerrari’s Fernando Alonso was second, richello during an overtaking maneuver followed by Vettel and the other Ferrari Mark Webber on the 66th lap and was penalized 10 podriver, Felipe Massa. sitions at the next race, the Belgian GP Webber’s fourth win of the season gave on Aug. 29. him the lead in the drivers’ championship with The seven-time world champion appeared to 161 points, four points better than Lewis Hamil- try to force Barrichello into the concrete pit wall ton of McLaren, who dropped out on lap 24 with as the two fought for 10th place. technical trouble. Barrichello called the incident “horrible” over Hamilton is now second, followed by Vettel with the team radio and said Schumacher should have 151 points, defending world champion Jenson But- been black-flagged, where a driver is ordered to ton with 147 points and Alonso with 141 points. the pits. The Associated Press

You’re Invited To Come Play And Experience

PRE FMCA SHOW PRICES ON NOW! All Seasons RV & Marine is the Exclusive Winnebago Dealer for the FMCA Show (August 11-14) at the Redmond Fair Grounds. We are offering pre-show specials and FMCA pricing. If you buy from our lot prior to August 7, you will receive show prices plus the Sealant Package for only $1*. (Value $1,440 - $2,440 depending on length)

2011 WINNEBAGO VISTA 35F • Thermo-panel wall construction • Value-priced Class A • Stitch-craft furniture • Winnebago’s #1 in customer satisfaction

AWBREY GLEN & HELP SUPPORT THE HIGH DESERT SPECIAL OLYMPICS PROGRAM We’re Opening Our Course In August For A

2011 WINNEBAGO SIGHTSEER 33C

SPECIAL OLYMPICS FUNDRAISER Play 18 holes of golf at Awbrey Glen for just $75 PLUS: Get a $5 coupon for The Restaurant at Awbrey Glen $25 WILL BE A DONATION TO SPECIAL OLYMPICS Tee times can be made up to 5 days in advance for play after 12 p.m. on any day except Wednesday. Please mention “SPECIAL OLYMPICS” when reserving your tee time. Offer available from August 1 to August 31.

yA Come Pla se f Cour Great Gol To Help A se! Great Cau

• Ford F53 Chassis 362HP • Torq-shift 5-speed auto transmission • Premium high gloss skin • 36 month/36,000 mile warranty on structure

2011 WINNEBAGO VIEW 24K

• Mercedes Benz 3.0 Turbo Diesel • 15-18 MPG • Adaptive ESP technology • Super Slide *Sealant Package includes: exterior paint protection from sun, bird droppings, sap, etc. Interior: protection from spills, stains and other mishaps for all fabric, leather, carpets and more. Windshield bonding to fill tiny grooves and spores to make your windshield stronger and smoother.

High Desert Special Olympics

2500 NW AWBREY GLEN DRIVE | BEND | www.awbreyglen.com | 541-388-8526

20420 Robal Lane • 541-382-3186 • N 3rd St. @ Empire • 541-382-5009 • www.asrvm.com Hours: Mon – Fri 8am – 5:30pm • Sat 9am – 5pm • Sun 10am – 4pm Sales and Parts Only (Service closed)


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

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B u l l e t i n :

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S . W .

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, ID chip, shots. 541-389-8420, www.craftcats.org

Lab/Labradoodle mix puppy, 7 weeks old, $200, please call 541-420-5895.

Dachshund, Mini, red short hair, purebred 8 weeks old; 2 boys $275, 2 females $300. Call anytime (541) 678-7529 English Bulldog 10 week old, female puppy. $1,200 OBO 541-588-6490.

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 English Bulldog AKC puppies, 2 males, 11 weeks, $1500. WANTED - Jamboree 1995, 28’ Laurie, 541-388-3670 or better type motorhome. Need owner financing. Able English Bulldog Pup, AKC Reg, to pay $500 mo. Willing to 1 male left $1700, all shots pay up to $8,000. Also, 541-325-3376. looking for space to park it. ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES Need clean water & electric. AKC registered. First shots & Have local references. microchipped. doniishere@yahoo.com $2000. 541 416-0375 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, Free Kittens, altered, mostly 541- 280-6786. tabbies, some orange, Terrebonne, call 541-548-4870. WANT TO RENT space for 27’ 5th wheel, need water & FREE PEACOCKS: 6 female, 1 power access. 971-241-6126. male - must take all. 541-382-0222.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Low Cost Spay & Neuter is HERE!! Have your cats & dogs spayed and neutered! Cats: $40 (ask about out Mother & Kittens Special!) Dogs: $65-$120 (by weight). We also have vaccines & microchips avail. 541-617-1010. www.bendsnip.org Malamute/Husky/Wolf mix, one-year old female. Loving and sweet. Needs home that can give lots of attention, love and care. Call for details. To approved home only. 541-536-1972. MINI AUSSIES AKC - minis and toys, all colors. 541598-5314 or 541-788-7799 Mini-Australian Shepherd Pups

NSDR, great companion & family dogs, 6 weeks old, raised by kids on farm, 1st shots, $400, 541-749-0402 Mini Dachshunds, AKC, black & tan, short hair, wormed, shots, call for info, $275, 541-420-6044,541-447-3060

Player Piano, looks good, needs some work, with rolls you haul, FREE, 541-318-1827.

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Free Siamese Cat, spayed female,loving personality, 3 yrs? 541-350-6611,541-350-6622 French & English Bulldog pups. Avail. now. (541) 382-9334. www.enchantabull.com

Pets and Supplies TERRIER MIX 3 female, 1 male, 6 weeks, $50. 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC Miniature Schnauzers, black & silver, 6 weeks $400 each. 541-536-6262. Australian Black Swans, must have large pond, shelter and fed everyday. 541-382-0222. Black Lab male 9 wks, AKC reg., shots, dew claws, champion $350. 541-788-5161. Brindle Boxer Pup, 1 male AKC Registered $700 , 1st two shots 541-325-3376.

German Shorthair Pups, AKC, 1 black, 2 liver. Sire used in guiding. Well socialized. Crate & house training started. $600 541-408-1890

Pembroke Welsh Corgis, AKC Tri-colored 3 males left. 1st shots & dew claws removed. $350 ea, can deliver on 7/30, home 775-635-9495 cell 775-741-1716,775-741-9377 POODLES-AKC Toy, home raised. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

German Wire Hair Pointers, 8 weeks old, 1st shots, wormed. 541-350-1745.

CHIWEENIE 2 females, 1½ yr old, $65. 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188.

Jack Russell female smooth coat, 10 wks. old. Current on shots. $200. 541-350-5896

Red Heeler Cattle Dog Pups, 6 weeks old, $200 each, please call 541-385-0977.

KITTENS, all colors, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Adoption fee just $25, 2 for $45. Nice adult cats just $20, free as mentor cat w/kitten adoption. We need to place these so we can help others. Sat/Sun, 1-5 PM, call re: other days/times. 317-3931, 389-8420, for info/photos: www.craftcats.org. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317 LAB CHOC. 7-month-old male Ducks Unlimited Dog of the Year, Bend Chapter. $600. 541-385-9915.

Siberian Husky Puppies, AKC, 6 weeks old, champion lines, health certificate, 1st shots & dewormed, taking dep., $450, 541-504-7660 or 541-279-3056, leave msg.

STANDARD POODLE PUPS: black and silver, 2 females, 3 males, $400. 541-647-9831. Standard Poodle Registered Chocolates, Apricots & Creams, Females $800 males $750. 541-771-0513. Sun Conure, 1 yr. old, hand fed, spoiled $375. 541-548-7653 painusnews@yahoo.com

O r e g o n

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Bicycles and Accessories

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Vision TAT Aerobars Tri-max Plus 1", Incl. Steerer, 9-spd Dura Ace Shifters, Brake Levers, Reynolds Aero Carbon Fiber Fork. Great Condition $500, 541-788-1336 Enrique

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Exercise Equipment Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786108 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Ultra Glide exercise machine, total gym type, $50, 541-389-8745.

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Browning Citori 410 Shotgun, full & modified choke, 28" barrel, beautiful gun, $1000 541-410-6396.

Bed, Sealy Posturepedic queen, very good cond., mattress, box spring, hollywood frame $225. 317-5156.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Log Bdrm. set, w/queen mattress, box springs, frame, headboard, & footboard, 2 side tables, 6 drawer chest, 3 lamps, complete set, $999; Twin recliner loveseat, beige & brown, $200, 2 recliners, burgundy microfiber, set, $100, MOVING SALE, call 541-549-6996.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. Sectional Sofa, curved, 2 piece, 10 matching pillows, ottoman, $495,541-382-9172

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

DPMS LR-308 (.308 AR-15), factory-installed JD competition trigger, 24" fluted stainless barrel, free-floated hand-guard, 10x scope, rings, flip covers, two hard cases, and 19-rnd mag. $1,500.00 obo (541) 728-3389.

• Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $165 for 1, or $290 for 2, Bend Delivery Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $110/cord rounds, split avail., del., Bend, Sunriver, LaPine. Fast, friendly service. 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Ad must include price of item

Kahr .40 Cal. stainless $385, Taurus .22 mag. $250, Weatherby .223 $380, Marlin .17 mag $200, scopes, holsters, some ammo incl. Both handguns & 2 rifles are in near new or like new cond. 541-815-8744.

Pool Table, $750, Heritage by Brunswick, solid slate, leather mesh ball cups, gold tassle fringe, incl. all que sticks, 2 sets of balls, que holder, extra tips, 2 videos, blue chalk, you move. 541-318-1650.

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Remington 1100 semi-auto shotgun 12 ga., exc. cond., $350 OBO. 541-728-1036.

THE JEWELRY DOCTOR Robert H. Bemis, formerly at Fred Meyer, now located at 230 SE 3rd St. #103 Bend. 541-383-7645.

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Ruger Ranch .223 cal., w/Bushnell 3x9, custom stock $575. 541-447-7807.

Smith and Wesson, 38 Special P, hammerless, 5 shot, revolver $400, 541-350-1788,

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. IRONMAN

MEN

USED

once large elite triathlon $175 & hardly used large sprint triathlon wetsuits $125. 541-788-1336 Sage Fly Rod, Z-AXIS490-4 wt., Generation 5 Technology, state of the art, Sage reel 2540 w/line, Sage extra spool w/line, Sage dbl. case, new never used, paid $1460, asking $650. 1-541-884-6440

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

LADIES diamond wedding ring paid $1800, have receipts, $400. 541-974-8352.

Washer/Dryer - Frigidaire, side by side/stacking, heavy duty, $400 OBO. 541-410-5744

TV, Stereo and Video

212

TV, 52”, Samsung, Big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $1000. 541-480-2652.

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255

Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ The Bulletin reserves the right software, to disclose the to publish all ads from The name of the business or the Bulletin newspaper onto The term "dealer" in their ads. Bulletin Internet website. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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257

Coins & Stamps

Musical Instruments

WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $950, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1000. 541-815-4177

Art, Jewelry and Furs

SNOOPY book signed by Charles Shultz w/sketch. $300. 541-385-1076

541-389-6655

fr a u d , T h e re c o m m e n d s f o r F ir e w o o d n d e li v e r y & n.

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

VANITY late 1940’s, exc. cond, dark hardwood, carved mirror, $240. 541-633-3590.

Antiques & Collectibles

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

T o a v oid B u ll e t i n p a y m e nt o n ly u p o i n s p e c ti o

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, restored. orig. soundboard & ivory keys. $41,000 OBO. 541-408-7953.

263

Tools Tools: Coleman 5000 gen., $400. Dewalt compressor; Honda 5.5 motor $200. Topcon rotating lazer $250. (4) 8 hole Tires & wheels 36x14.50R16.5LT. 610-6713

264

Snow Removal Equipment Snowblower, Honda, 6.5 HP, 24” cut, $500, call 541-593-2065.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

270

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

$500 Reward

for missing cat. Lost in Crooked River Ranch around High Cone Dr. Black neutered male with small white patch on chest. Comes to "Blackie" please call 541-633-0299 or 541-788-6924

Logs sold by the foot and also Found IPod, Todd Lake, 7/29, Log home kit, 28x28 shell call to identify, incl. walls (3 sided logs) 541-383-4552. ridge pole, rafters, gable end logs, drawing (engineered) FOUND set of 4 keys at corner all logs peeled & sanded of Colorado and Columbia $16,000 . 541-480-1025. Street. Call to identify. 541-383-2444.

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

FOUND set of keys, corner of SE Fairwood Drive and Airpark, Bend. 541-383-3497.

Hay, Grain and Feed

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178 Still missing, orange cat, gold eyes, striped tail, SW Bend/ DRW area. Please call w/ANY INFO. 541-383-2304

286

Sales Northeast Bend Awesome Garage Sale: 7/30-31, 7am-2pm, 3018 NE Quiet Canyon Dr. Drums, float tube, sewing machine, BB hoop, clothes, and more!!!

1st Cutting Orchard Grass, 2-tie, $110/ton, Alfafla Grass Mix Feeder hay, $90/ton, good quality Alfalfa, $110/ton, 541-475-4242, 541-948-0292 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. Bluegrass straw, small bales, $3 bale; Alfalfa small bales, barn stored, $150T. 541-480-0909 EXCELLENT GRASS HAY FOR SALE, fine stems, leafy green, 80 lb. bales, $125 ton in Culver, 541-475-4604.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Flashy APHA Palomino paint, 15H, 15 yrs. exp. w/ cattle and trails. Intermediate+ rider. $1200 OBO. Must sell. 541-419-6053. FREE: Appy Gelding, 18 yrs., 16.2 hands, appropriate for young rider 541-480-8927 Quiet, well-trained Foxtrotters. www.elkhornfoxtrotters.com Pat Gregg, 541-523-0933

347 288

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Sales Southeast Bend Alpacas for sale, fiber and Moving Sale. Fri.-Sun. 8-5, Everything must go. Couches, Tables, Clothes, Washer & Dryer, 70 VW Camper Van, 96 Ford Explorer, Camping gear Bedroom Set, 742 SE Sun Lane Bend 97702

292

Sales Other Areas

Lost: (2) Eaz-lift hitch spring bars on Ward or Reed Rd. on 7/23. Reward 541-977-8988

2 Family Garage Sale: Fri. 7/30 & Sat.7/31, 7-5, Household items, kids toys, books, furniture and much more! 55511 Big River Drive, Sunriver

Lost: Husky/Norwegian Elk Hound Mix, Female, 12 yrs. old, wearing green collar w/ phone # on it, answers to “Cheena”, missing on 7/8, Prineville area, 541-280-1153

325

Tumalo Grown Alfalfa Small bales, very clean, $100/ton in the field. 541-312-9805

Found Shoes, 7/28, Tumalo Area, call to identify, 541-388-1533.

Lost: Gold Anklet, love knot, w/3 heart charms, on 7/23, South end of Bend? Reward, 541-350-8421.

1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

Lost: White Ferret, Blakely & Powers, 7/29, needs his mate, call 541-508-6603.

BarkTurfSoil.com

Lost and Found

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

LOST: On 7/28 Rolf Vector Comp bicycle wheel near BMC in Bend. 541-383-1519.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Farm Market

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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$2,500. 541-385-4790.

265

541-322-7253

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

9 7 7 0 2

300 LOST Kelpie dog, female, black w/small white patch on her chest. Responds to Tate, is wearing a faded orange collar w/rabies & ID tags. Last seen West Side Nursery on West Hwy 126, Redmond. REWARD and NO questions asked. 541-280-9540

246

22LR Browning Semi-Auto, Silver, 5” barrel, holster, carrying case, extra clip, exc. cond., $350 OBO, 541-280-5085.

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

249

Pembroke Welsh Corgi AKC M/F Health record, bag of food $250 541-383-4552

B e n d

208

205

Items for Free

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver. 389-8420

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

breeding stock 541-385-4989.

available.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

375

Meat & Animal Processing LOCAL BEEF - Taking limited orders for our natural beef half or whole. Slaughter is Oct. 18. Deposit required. 541-382-8393 or message.


E2 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 631

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Merchandiser for Harbor Wholesale Grocery will work in Bend area setting groceries in c-stores. $10/hr. PT/20 hrs. Thurs. & Fri. Resumes fax: 360-352-1658 or hr@harborwholesale.com

Schools and Training Quick Service General Manager. TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Need someone to fly to Vegas in early Aug.,airfare provided, load Penske moving truck & drive to Prineville. Clean ODL req. 702-876-6566. We are looking for an experienced caregiver for our elderly parents. This is an employee position, and possible live-in. 541-480-0517 or 541-548-3030 jensen.cpa@bendcable.com

476

Candidate's skills to include outstanding customer service and culture building. 2-4 years of QSR experience with success in driving operations, sales, and profits. fax resume to: 949-421-5132

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Employment Opportunities APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management Bartender Needed at Cinnabar Lounge, 121 NE 3rd, Prineville. Apply in person, Mon. -Thurs. between 10 am-4 pm. Ask for Cindy, 541-447-3880. Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for 1-3 overnight shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate. References and experience only. 541-447-5773.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Customer Service Looking for friendly customer oriented person to join our team, previous mail & parcel center experience preferred. Send resume to: Postal Connections, 2660 NE Hwy. 20, Ste. 610, Bend, OR 97701

Food service SUBWAY Sandwich Artist wanted! Must be 16 or older. Part-time, full time, days, nights. Apply in person at Riverwoods Country Store, 19745 Baker Rd., Bend.

Front Desk - position for WorldMark/Eagle Crest. Part- time. Drug Free Workplace. Please apply at Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Medical Receptionist - Johnson & Cade Family Practice is looking for a receptionist, exp. in a medical office. Part-time position, 8-20 hours/week. Email cover letter & resume to jcfp@bendbroadband.com, or fax to 541-312-9600.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Sales

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $800/wk Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-861-8166

Condominiums & Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Townhomes For Rent

500

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

507

Veterinary Technicial/ Assistant: Full-Time permanent position. Licensed and / experienced preferred. Outgoing personality ability to follow directions and make decisions are a must. Apply in person at Cascade East Veterinary Clinic, 1689 SW Hwy 97, Madras OR 97741. Absolutely no phone calls. Closes August 7th, 2010. Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com. Welder/Fabricator: Immediate opening for full-time welder/fabricator at Madras manufacturing firm; must be skilled at dual-shield flux core welding & reading mechanical drawings; dependability & integrity required. Request application at 541-475-4239 or dana@doublepress.net

Welder Minimum 3 years Mig experience and print reading required. Overhead crane helpful, forklift required. Send resume to KEITH Mfg. Co., 401 NW Adler, Madras, OR 97741 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

632

Real Estate Contracts Apt./Multiplex General LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

640

Finance & Business

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928.

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval, reduced to $525/mo. 541-389-9901.

573

* HOT SPECIAL *

Unique Opportunity. Work from anywhere. Unlimited financial potential. No selling required. Fast moving team seeking motivated individuals. For info call 510-734-5748 or email velocitygo2010@gmail.com

2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Rentals

600

THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com A Large 1 bdrm. cottage-like apt in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Call about our Specials

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

Business Opportunities

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Summer Special! $99 Move in * $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments at

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Newly Remodeled QUIMBY St. APTS. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1bdrm Units W/Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios, Water, sewer & garbage paid. CALL 541-382-9046 TTY 1 800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $575 mo., $500 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848. 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrm, dishwasher W/S/G paid, oak cabinets, carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 541-383-2430

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

605

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

Roommate Wanted

638

GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

Summertime Special! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008

Local senior conservative male w/exc refs. will share 2 bdrm, 2 bath Condo (winter-spring) in Lake Havasu, AZ in exchange for sharing Central OR, 2 bdrm. home (summer/ fall). PO Box 1390, Redmond, OR 97756 or 541-279-3700.

61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. views. No pets or smoking $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500

Rooms for Rent

Cute, quiet, 1/1, tri-plex, near Old Mill and TRG. Easy parkway access, W/S/G pd., no dogs/smoking. $500/mo. $600/dep. 541-815-5494.

Bend, 8th/Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, no smoking $400. 541-317-1879

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

630

Bend furnished downstairs living quarters, full house access, $450+utils, please call 541-306-6443

Room for rent in home, own bath, $450/mo. + util. Near shopping. 541-312-5781 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Old Mill Studio, separate entrance, all utilities pd. $500 mo. plus $500 deposit. Small pet neg. No smoking. 541-389-2260.

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $555. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

700

nace,1765 sq.ft., $1050 avail. 8/5, Chris, 541-504-9373.

www.redmondrents.com Four plex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo. + dep. pet neg. 541-480-7806

659

fication is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Houses for Rent Sunriver

748

Northeast Bend Homes Know your neighbors! Nestled in Bend's only environmentally friendly co-housing community. http://home.bendbroadband.com/higherground/. Lots of sunlight! 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 1450 sq. ft., foam panel construction, large decks, cozy loft. Bamboo floors. $239,000 Call Jen: 541 678-5165.

Houses for Rent General 3 Bdrm., 1 bath, newly remodeled, hickory cabinets, granite countertops, on 3/4 acre, in Terrebonne, $850, $850 security, 541-923-6513. OWNER FINANCING Several 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes available on contract or lease option. Don’t let short sale or foreclosure keep you from owning your own home! 541-815-2986. Sunriver: Executive Custom Caldera Springs, 4+ bdrm. 3800 sq.ft., amenities incl. golf, swimming, bike trials $4300 mo. 541-678-1434.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, near Hospital, 2000 sq.ft., $925, pets considered, garage,1st/last/dep, 541-610-6146. avail 8/17. Move-in special if rent by 9/1 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1556 sq.ft., family room, w/wood stove, big rear deck, fenced yard, dlb. garage, w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

719

750

Redmond Homes

Will permanently trade our 1 Bdrm. cottage near beach for something similar in Bend. (360)374-2569 shouting777@gmail.com

4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

Homes with Acreage

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

745

Homes for Sale FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 175+ NW Homes Auction: 8/19 Open House: Aug 7, 14 & 15 REDC l View Full Listings www.Auction.com RE Brkr 200712109

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent $495 month, 380 sq. ft. north of downtown Redmond. Call 541-977-7993.

Houses for Rent SE Bend

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Very nice 3 bed, 2 bath w/large fenced yard. Mtn views. $949 Call A Superior Property Management Co. @541 330-8403. www.rentaroundbend.com

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

654

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Real Estate Trades

648

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

658

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 Large luxury family home 705 on-site laundry rooms, stor3/2.5 3200 sq. ft., W/D, age units available. Close to fridge, daylight basement, Real Estate Services schools, pools, skateboard large lot, views, no pets. * Real Estate Agents * park, ball field, shopping cen$1350. 503-720-7268. * Appraisers * ter and tennis courts. Pet * Home Inspectors * friendly with new large dog Remodeled 3 bdrm. home, on 5 749 Etc. run, some large breeds okay acres, near Terrebonne, horse Southeast Bend Homes with mgr. approval. property,small barn,new fur- The Real Estate Services classi-

Private room in rural Redmond, Apt./Multiplex SE Bend in shared house w/2 male The Bulletin is now offering a roommates, utils incl. cable TV 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath Townhouse LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE style apt., W/D hookup, no & internet, pets maybe, avail. Rental rate! If you have a pets/smoking,120 SE Clevenow, $275/mo., $275 dep. home to rent, call a Bulletin land, $625, W/S/G paid, 541-504-0726,541-728-6434 Classified Rep. to get the 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355 new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 616

Want To Rent

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

746

Northwest Bend Homes A

Must See: Waterfront Property, motivated sellers, will carry contract, call Barb Hartnett, Broker, Prudential NW Properties, 541-420-0915

Nice & neat, near Tumalo school 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft., recent upgrades, dbl. garage. storage bldgs, $195,000. 541-330-0464.

748

Northeast Bend Homes

762 FSBO: 2 bdrm, 1 bath on 1.47 acres of Park Like Grounds. Includes 2 car Garage, enclosed Shop. Sunriver Area. Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203 Today!! Recreational Hunting Horses 160-acre parcels, 8 mi. from Burns , LOP tags 2 Elk & 2 Deer. 2 homes to choose from: 2296 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 3 full baths. $429,500 or $449,500. Prices reduced almost $100,000! Must sell! Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521. Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $147,000, 541-576-2390.

764

Farms and Ranches 35 ACRE irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, reduced to $395,000. Will consider trade for small acreage or ? 541-447-1039.

771

Lots

FSBO: Beautiful, approx. 2225 sq. ft., 3/2.5, on 1+ park-like WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in acre, just E. of Bend city limSE Bend. Super Cascade its, large shop/greenhouse, Mountain Views, area of nice ponds, great views,$365,000, homes & BLM is nearby too! 2% courtesy to brokers, Only $199,950. Randy 61765 Tomahawk. Call Schoning, Broker, John L. 541-410-3599,541-410-3949 Scott, 541-480-3393.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 E3

773

860

870

880

880

881

Acreages

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $42,500. Terms owner 541-783-2829. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

7 Mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613 80-140 Acres Remote w/Buttes Rimrock & Trees, exceptional views, bldg. permit avail., fenced, well water, farm deferral taxes, LOP, appraised at $1400 /acre, sell for $500/acre acre. 541-548-3408.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 1994 LIBERTY manufactured home in good condition. $15,999. 541-460-3884. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, new flooring, fresh paint, carport. Pets okay. Owner Financing $6,500 or $500 down, $175 month. 541-383-5130.

17’ Honda 1984,

Magna

V45

exc. cond., runs great, $2500, call Greg, 541-548-2452.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930. Interested buyer for older motorcycles, scooters, etc. Will pay cash. Please contact Brad @ 541-416-0246 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Boats & RV’s

bow, sport seating, 5.0L V-8, Samson Tower, dual batteries, canvas cover, always garaged, low hrs., exc. cond., $9500, 541-420-4868. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 2 For 1 - 17’ 1980 Stingray, 115 HP V4 Outboard Johns, Ski/Fish, walk through bow, seats 8, curtains, vests, etc., EZ-Load trailer, comes with 1990 Chevy 2500 4WD longbed pickup, X-cab, heavy duty, daily runner, both for $3950, 541-548-7137.

9 Ft. Pontoon high quality fishing boat, oars, auxiliary bag $400. 541-923-3998. CANOE 13’ aluminium, square stern, dolly and oars, $350. 541-815-4214.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $2200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

870

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley FXDWG 1997, wide glide, Corbin seat, saddle bags, low mi., $9500, Call Rod, 541-932-4369. Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

882

Fifth Wheels

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2 slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

WINNEBAGO BRAVE 2000 Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, ClASS A 26’, Workhorse 2 slides, Cat engine, many Chassis exc. cond., walk options, very clean, PRICE around queen bed, micro. REDUCED! 541-279-9581. gas oven, fridge/freezer, 56K mi. 3 awnings $19,900 OBO. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 541-604-0338. 2005, Price Reduced, 7.5 KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, Winnebago Class C trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 color TVs, back-up TV camera, Queen bed, Queen hideslides, 44k mi., A/C, awa-bed, $90,000. 541-382-1721 ning, good cond., 1 owner. $39,000. 541-815-4121

Fleetwood Terra 29J 2006, 5500 miles, Ford V-10 with generator, awning, down bed and a great floor plan. VIN # PU0878 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Winnebago Minnie Winnie DL 200O, 29.5’, super clean, auto levelers self contained, V-10, $19,500. 541-550-7556

Pleasure-Way 20’ 2008, Excel TS Ford 350, generator, 11K miles, great cond., $65,000. 541-408-0531.

PRICE REDUCED! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 27K mi., 1 owner, garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, 2 TV’s, rear camera exc. cond. $69,000. 541-536-7580

15’ Smokercraft, 9.9 Mercury engine, EZ-Load trailer w/spare, 3 swivel fishing seats, Bikini top, appox. 40 hrs. on boat & motor, $4200, 541-536-1464

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985.

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, & trailer, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

OUT-CAST Pac 1200, never in water, great for the Deschutes, John Day or small lakes. Cost new $2800, asking $1400 firm. Go to www.outcastboats.com to view boat. 541-420-8954

875

Watercraft

Tandem Kayak, Necky Manitou II

with rudder, $700, 541-548-5743.

Southwind 35P 1997, Ford 460, Satellite system, Gen., awning, back-up camera, levelers to go with a very nice floor plan and a refurbished interior. Sale priced at $19,900. VIN #A02441 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Barns

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who Check out the contracts for construction work to be licensed with the classifieds online Construction Contractors www.bendbulletin.com Board (CCB). An active Updated daily license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB Domestic Services license through the CCB Consumer Website Anne’s Domestic Services has www.hirealicensedcontractor.com openings for new clients who or call 503-378-4621. The are in need of a helping hand Bulletin recommends with shopping, meal prep, erchecking with the CCB prior rands, Dr. appt., house to contracting with anyone. cleaning, etc. Will schedule Some other trades also daily/weekly. Reasonable require additional licenses rates, satisfaction guaranand certifications. teed. Call 541-389-7909 or FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS 541-815-7888. Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic He’ll come running! Painting:9 Yrs. Exp., friendly 541-420-0966. CCB#190754 service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894. Child Care Services Babysitter -Through the summer & weekends, great with kids - have 2 younger sisters, 3 years experience, your home or mine, 541-526-5894

885

925

932

Utility Trailers

Antique and Classic Autos

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

16 FT. Utility Trailer, 82 in. wide bed, above inside rails, ramps, (2) 25 lb axles, spare tire, equalizer hitch, 4 in tie down straps, only 2K mi. $2195 OBO. 541-639-2596.

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, now will sell wholesale for $19,500, Frank. 541-480-0062.

890

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Autos & Transportation

Winnebago Sightseer 27’ 2004 30K, 1 slide, hyd. jacks, lots of storage, very clean, exc cond, $41,900. 541-504-8568

881

Travel Trailers

2008 Hi-Lo 17', 3 way refrig, a/c, 3 burner stove/oven, bathroom, King & bunk bed, like new $16K 541-383-2429

Ford 4x4 F-250 2009, loaded crew cab like new, with 240 Trailblazer 2010. Both units are better than new. Buy them separately or as a package. Call for more info. Vin#A86109 & 025223 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 28.6’ Travel Trailer 2005, loaded, exc. cond., call for pictures and info, $12,000, 541-548-4459.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Everest 32’ 2004, model 291L, 30 & 50 amp service, 2 slides, ceiling fan, A/C, surround sound, micro., always stored under cover, under 5K mi. use, orig. owner, like new. $19,500, also G M C Diesel 2007 tow pickup avail. 9K mi., $37,000, 541-317-0783. Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Excavating

Handyman

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

A ndre's F ix and F inish CCB# 191228 541-504-1211 www.andresfixandfinish.com info@andresfixandfinish.com

Cabinet tune-ups Adding Accessories Retro-fits Home Repairs Major credit cards accepted

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS and everything else. 21 Years Experience. CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

The Bulletin Classifieds

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Super Chips part #735-5682, fits 2003-2007 Dodge 5.9 Cummins, $250. (541) 923-2595.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

916

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

cludes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $4,500! Call 541-388-4302.

Pickups

931

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Case 680G, Construction King backhoe, good cond.$9000. 541-923-0134

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

933

541-385-5809 Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Sale due to death! 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, too much to list. Must Sell - First $8000. 541-593-3072.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, OBO, trades, please call T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Fleetwood Prowler Regal 541-420-5453. Brake, 13 spd. transmission, 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., good tires & body paint Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 solar, 7 speaker surround (white). Also, 1993 27’ step sound, micro., awning, lots of engine, auto. trans, ps, air, deck equipment trailer storage space, 1 yr. exframe on rebuild, repainted T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. tended warranty, very good original blue, original blue Ready to work! $9500 takes cond., $20,000, MUST interior, original hub caps, both. 541-447-4392 or SEE! 541-410-5251 exc. chrome, asking $10,000 541-350-3866. OBO. 541-385-9350. Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List Mustang MTL16 2006 $52,000, sell $22,950. Skidsteer, on tracks, in541-390-2678, Madras

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

GOING IN THE SERVICE MUST SELL! 1984 Dodge 360 V8 4 speed, 4x4, Edelbrock Cam, 650 4 barrel carb, $1000. 541-977-7596 or 549-5948.

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354. FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Ford F150 2001 Lariat, step side, 4x4, 5.4L loaded, incl Leather, CD, running boards, sprayed bedliner, etc. Pristine, must see to appreciate, $9500 OBO, 541-306-4632

Ford F-150, XLT 1994, 2/WD Clean inside and out. with canopy. 4.9- 6 cylinder. asking $2,395 541-416-0569

Ford F250 1973, 390 4X2 manual. Top cond., all rebuilt, new tires and brakes, must see!! Extra engine parts. $1200. 541-536-2134

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscape Maintenance

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Randy, 541-306-7492

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle , 2 drop gates, 1 on side, 7’x12’, 4’ sides, all steel, $1400, call 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

900

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Now asking WHOLESALE for $8750. Frank, 541-480-0062.

RVs for Rent 2005 38’ Atasca Motorhome, self contained, 3 slides, private party. 541-536-6223.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Canopies and Campers

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Boats & Accessories Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Wildwood by Forest River 25’ NW Edition 2004, slide out, sleeps 6, walk around master with separate door, A/C, skylight, micro, TV & stereo, outdoor BBQ, large freezer, awning, EZ lift hitch, sway bars, used very little, like new cond., $9950, 541-420-4155.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

“WANTED” RV Consignments

Dolphin 36’ 1997, super slide, low mi., extra clean, extras, non-smoking $21,500 See today 541-389-8961.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

908

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

34’

Aircraft, Parts and Service

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Harley Davidson Duece Softail 2005, 8400 mi., Screamin’ Eagle pipes, teal blue, asking $11,000, Call 541-388-7826.

Queen

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

865

Snowmobiles

Motorcycles And Accessories

Travel 1987,

ATVs

850

860

18’ 1967 Sail Boat w/trailer, great little classic boat. $1000 OBO. 541-647-7135.

18.5’ FourWinns 1998, runabout, open

$5300 OBO

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

1972,

“WANTED”

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, REDUCED TO SELL NOW! beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat 3 Bdrm,1 bath, in DRW Nice yard, rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 new furnace, 60311 Cheyenne mi., barely broke in, $4000. Rd, #16. 541-728-0529 Call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or for pics email FUQUA mobile home 1976 ddmcd54@gmail.com double wide. 1 bedroom, 800 sq. ft. cabin-style, cute. Yamaha Road Star Mid$1,995, you move. night Silverado 2007, 541-788-8294. 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $7000, 541-771-8233

800

Seaswirl

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

BEAVER COACH 1997 Model Patriot 37’, 14’ slide, 330 motor, 6 speed Allison, Pak brake, 37K, (clean). $50,000, may be some trade. 541-410-4367.

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

• Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

LADYBUG LAWN CARE Clean up, maintenance, pruning, bark, edging, affordable, reliable quality service 541-279-3331, 541-516-1041

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714 Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Weekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct? Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free. Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid. 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Tile, Ceramic MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

933

940

975

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Ford F250 1983, tow pkg., canopy incl, $950 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975 Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Automobiles

HONDA CRV EX 2008, color silver, int. grey leather, roof rack, 12,400 mi. like new $23,400. 541-678-0714.

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD F-250 1989, 450 auto, 4WD, cruise, A/C, am/fm radio w/cassette player, receiver hitch.Recent upgrades: gooseneck hitch, trailer brake controller, ball joints, 4 tires, fuel pump & tank converter valve, heavy duty torque converter on trans., $2995 OBO. RON, 541-419-5060

Ford F250 Superduty 2002, XLT Lariat pkg., leather, 1 owner, newer lift, wheels & tires, $10,900, 503-267-4609

GMC Sierra 2500 1995, 4X4, 350 auto, club cab, A/C, power, 117K, hideaway gooseneck ball, $4500, please call 541-815-8236.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. MITSUBISHI 1994, 4 cyl., Mighty Max, with shell, exc. tires. $2500 or best offer. 541-389-8433. Toyota Tundra 2005, 12,500 miles, garage stored, 4wd fully loaded double cab with matching canopy. Excellent condition. $20,000. 541-504-7059.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevrolet Tahoe 2007, exc. cond., loaded w/options 57000 mi., call for details 541-536-3345,541-410-0645 $29,999, still on warranty. Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0, 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great gas mi., exc. cond.! $23,500 41-475-3670

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Buick Lacrosse 2006, Top Model, 50K miles, blue, all accessories, need the money, $7900, call Barbara, in Eugene at 541-953-6774 or Bob in Bend, 541-508-8522. Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1990, $1500 asking, Please call 541-536-2836.

Cadillac ETC 1994, loaded, heated pwr. leather seats, windows, keyless entry, A/C, exc. tires, 2nd owner 136K, all records $3250. 541-389-3030,541-815-9369

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., 2 tops, consider trade, 541-593-4437. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Mercury Grand Marquis LS 1998. 66,700 orig. mi.. one owner. V-8, tan w/blue faux conv. top. Power everything, CD player, airbags, all leather, superior cond. garaged. two new studded tires incl., Melanie 541-480-2793. $7300 MERCURY SABLE 1993 runs great, great work car! 129,000 miles! $1300 OBO! Call 541-788-4296 or 541-788-4298.

Toyota 4Runner 1998, 1 owner, 155K, Rare 5-spd, 4WD. $5500, 971-218-5088. Local.

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Vans

Chevy Astro Van AWD 1991, contractor’s racks, 96,000 mi., ladder racks, bins, shelving, exc. cond., tinted windows, $2200, 541-382-7721.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

Case No. 10PB0089SF NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published July 26, 2010. Caroline Maurice Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Caroline Maurice 21070 Robin Avenue Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 408-0022 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Thomas J. Sayeg, OSB #873805 tjs@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative

Mini Cooper 2006, Turbo Convertible, fully loaded, 6-spd., $17,500, 541-905-2876.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $19,800 OBO. 541-388-2774.

LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Michael A. Chavez and Ruth M. Chavez, Grantor(s), to Western Title & Escrow Complaint trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 04/30/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-24840, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11777, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 235158; Lot 56, Six Peaks--Phases 1, 2, and 3, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 2930 & 2932 SW Juniper Ave, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1735.30 beginning on February, 2010; plus late charges of $209.48; plus advances of $3900.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $291908.68 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00% per annum from February, 2010 until paid; plus advances of $3900.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 09/03/2010 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance, Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the

highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATED: April 26, 2010 By Katrina E. Glogowski Pioneer Building, Suite 501 600 First Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 903-9966

runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107. CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160. Chrysler Town & Country Limited 1999, AWD, loaded, hitch with brake controller, Thule carrier, set of studded tires, one owner, clean, all maintenance records, no smoke/dogs/kids. 120,000 miles. $6,000 OBO. 541-350-2336. Ford Focus 2007, 17,982 miles, includes winter tires and rims, $11,000. 541-475-3866 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $1100, Call 541-388-4167.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-63096-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SCOTT D. LAWRENCE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10-21-2005, recorded 10-26-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-73142 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: R141225D002300 LOT 4, BLOCK 6, TETHEROW CROSSING PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 5510 NW ODIN FALLS WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 03/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALL-

MENTS OF PRINCIPAL. INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,725.47 Monthly Late Charge $65.54 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $285,748.07 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from 02-01-2010 until paid: plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 11/03/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the

grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5004 T.S. No.: 1286574-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kenyth Kettle and Jennifer Kettle, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated February 27, 2008, recorded March 11, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-10825 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 7 of Stonehedge on the Rim, Phase 1, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2228 SW Stonehedge Ct. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,345.20 Monthly Late Charge $54.71. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $180,197.39 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 13, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 17, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-328302 08/02/10, 08/09, 08/16, 08/23

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Camry Hybrid 2007, 60k mi., extra snow tires 5k miles. City 31/Hwy 39. Extras, $16,950. 541-788-1776

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 185K hwy. mi. $8,000 541-410-7586.

VW Bug 1969, yellow, Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

GMC YUKON SLT 2000 LOOKS NEW!! Metallic Pewter , 3rd row of seats, leather, seat warmers, 5.3L, Denali wheels, new tires, tow pkg, MORE!!! 151,288 miles. $7200 OBO. 916-390-1983

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Estate of JACK MAURICE, Deceased.

Audi S4 2000, 6spd, V6TT, 112k, AWD, very clean, all maint. Mercedes 300SD 1981, records. $9000 541-788-4022 never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm sysAudi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch Quattro, tiptronic, prestart, power everything, 197K mium & winter wheels & miles, will run for 500K miles tires, Bilstein shocks, coil easily, no reasonable offer over springs, HD anti sway, refused, $2900 OBO, call APR exhaust, K40 radar, 541-848-9072. dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

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sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604. VW Passat GLX 4 Motion Wagon 2000, blue, 130K, V-6, 2.8L, AWD, auto, w/ Triptronic, 4-dr., A/C, fully loaded, all pwr., heated leather, moonroof, front/side airbags, CD changer, great cond, newer tires, water pump, timing belt, $6300 OBO, 541-633-6953

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79,5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-108494

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1242 T.S. No.: 1286571-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GREGORY S. WALKER AND KELLI K. WALKER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 8/21/2008, recorded 8/25/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-35235, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY-NINE (49), CALDERA SPRINGS, PHASE ONE, RECORDER FEBRUARY 17, 2006, IN CABINET G-1051, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56820 DANCING ROCK LP. SUNRIVER, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 14, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 7 payments at $ 1,328.00 each $ 9,296.00 (01-01-10 through 07-14-10) Late Charges: $ 265.60 TOTAL: $ 9,561.60 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 1/1/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESS AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $201,999.08, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 22, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include the respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com Dated: 7/14/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877) 237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714) 730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Caleb Cordell, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Mortgageit, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 26, 2006, recorded May 01, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2006-29965 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11 (11), Larch Meadows, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1335 NW 16th Court Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,207.08 Monthly Late Charge $94.52. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $295,745.73 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3651353 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010, 08/16/2010, 08/23/2010

R-328299 08/02, 08/09, 08/16/10


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THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 2, 2010 E5

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714-730-2727 Dated: 03/22/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. BOX 16128 TUCSON, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER: 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE: 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3639192 07/19/2010, 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-63935-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ALEN SWINDLEHURST, MARDELLE SWINDLEHURST as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN INSURANCE TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10/04/2005, recorded 10/21/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception No. 2005-72022 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 166485 LOT 11 IN BLOCK 10 OF STARWOOD, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20870 DIONE WAY BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS

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IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,539.00 Monthly Late Charge $61.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $280,663.56 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 11/01/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY the undersigned trustee will on 11/17/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D511466 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 1044713854/GRAY Investor No: 4000859555 AP #1: 235233 Title #: 4427165 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KEVIN E. GRAY, THERESA M. GRAY as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN as Beneficiary. Dated June 14, 2006, Recorded June 22, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-43133 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN (147), LARKSPUR VILLAGE, PHASE V-VI, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 8 PYMTS FROM 09/01/09 TO 04/01/10 @ 1,450.37 $11,602.96 8 L/C FROM 09/16/09 TO 04/16/10 @ 63.71 $509.68 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $234.94 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $73.50 PLUS RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $200.00 $200.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$12,621.08 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 61118 BROOKHOLLOW DRIVE, BEND, OR 97702-2777 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $219,998.17, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on August 30, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 04/21/10 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 905889 PUB: 07/12/10, 07/19/10, 07/26/10, 08/02/10

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust (the "Trust Deed") made by DONNA J. FOX, A SINGLE WOMAN, and ANGELINA R. RAMIREZ, A SINGLE WOMAN, together as joint tenants, as grantor (the "Grantor") to TIMOTHY M. DOLAN, esquire, as trustee (the "Trustee), in favor of American Capital Funding, L.L.C., a Pennsylvania limited liability company, as to a undivided fifteen percent (15%) interest, Alvin L. Poss & Takako Abe as husband and wife, as to an undivided twenty percent (20%) interest as beneficiary, Lincoln B. Fiske, Jr. and Lori A. Bruchman-Friske, as husband and wife, as to an undivided thirty five percent (35%) interest, Padelford Living Trust, dated October 16, 2008, as to an undivided twenty percent (20%) interest, and Equity Trust Company, Custodian FBO Randal K. Love, IRA, as to an undivided ten percent (10%) interest, (collectively the "Beneficiary") dated December 26, 2007, recorded December 31, 2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as document No. 2007-66369, together with that certain Modification Agreement dated December 2, 2008, recorded April 6, 2009, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as document No. 2009-13952 and appointment of successor trustee recorded on May 5, 2010, in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as document No. 2010-17631, appointing Timothy M. Dolan, esquire, as Trustee, and Amended Notice of Default Election to Sell recorded on June 2nd, 2010, in the records of Deschutes County Oregon, as document No. 2010-21398 covering the following described real property situate in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 7, SUN MOUNTAIN RANCHES, Deschutes County, Oregon. A.P.N.: 15-11-33-CO-02800. Commonly known as: 66844 Central Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made in grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Amount due as of June 14th, 2010: Delinquent payments from 12/31/09 2 payments at $1,200.00 each (12/31/09 - 1/31/10) $2,400.00; 2 Late Charges for 12/31 & 1/31 payments 15 Days past due @ 5% $120.00; Delinquent payments from 2/28/10 4 payments at $1,632.90 each (2/28/10 - 5/31/10) $6,531.60; 4 Late Charges for 2/28-5/31 payments 15 days past due @ 5% $326.60; Attorney's fees and costs, as of June 12th, 2010 (and continuing) $ 3,750.00; Trustee's Sale Guarantee Report $475.00. Subtotal$13,603.20. By reason of the default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following estimated amounts, to-wit: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $ 166,103.89, Plus interest thereon at 12.500% per annum from 12/31/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, title expenses, trustee's fees, recording fees, and additional attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the Property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned Trustee will on the 22nd day of October, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock A.M., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: Front Entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying those sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding, the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words “trustee” and beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED June 17, 2010. Timothy M. Dolan PO Box 455 Garibaldi, OR 97118 503-322-3742.

of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes

plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: 07/07/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. BOX 16128 TUCSON, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER: 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE: 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3657451 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010, 08/16/2010, 08/23/2010

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PUBLIC NOTICE The August 3 and August 17, 2010, meetings of the Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors have been cancelled. The Board will resume a regular meeting scheduled Tuesday September 7, 2010. the September 7 agenda and supplementary reports will be posted on the district’s web site www.bendparksandrec.org, Friday, September 3, 2010. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-97390 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CRAIG L. BURSON AND SUSAN M. BURSON AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 10/1/2004, recorded 10/6/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-60174, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1), BLOCK TWO (2), THOMAS ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 21093 THOMAS DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 13, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 7 payments at $1,190.55 each $8,333.85 (01-01-10 through 07-13-10) Late Charges: $297.72 Beneficiary Advances: $0.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $8,631.57 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $143,423.23, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 7/13/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3649500 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010, 08/16/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4105 T.S. No.: 1171751-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Joseph T. Prinz and Patricia A. Prinz, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 09, 2007, recorded April 13, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-21287 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land located in the Northeast Quarter (NEI/4) of Section 12, TOWNSHIP 16 South, RANGE 11 EAST OF The WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, Deschutes County, Oregon being further described as follows: Beginning at a point which is located South 00° 05' 48" West 1646.53 feet and North 89° 54' 12" West 30.00 feet from the Northeast corner of said Section 12; said point lying on the Westerly right of way line of Gerking Market Road; thence leaving said right of way line North 59° 49' 23'' West 1292.14 feet; thence North 00° 05' 51" East 329.27 feet; thence South 89° 49' 301 East 66107 feet; thence North 00°05' 51" East 83.57 feet; thence South 89° 49' 421 East 631.07 feet to a point on said Westerly right of way line of Getting Market Road; thence South 00° 05' 48" West along said right of way line a distance of 412.92 feet to the point of beginning and mere terminating. Approximately 10.97 Acres Commonly known as: 66295 Gerking Market Rd. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,476.28 Monthly Late Charge $186.47. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $663,000.00 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from May 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-328467 08/02, 08/09, 08/16, 08/23

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FSS-96961 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TODD P. TEBBS, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/2/2007, recorded 4/10/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-20693, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Saxon Mortgage Services, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY (40) IN BLOCK S OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60060 NAVAJO ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 11 payments at $2,575.88 each $ 28,334.68 2 payments at $2,566.64 each $5,133.28 (07-01-09 through 07-12-10) Late Charges: $427.91 Beneficiary Advances: $105.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $34,000.87 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $291,563.62, PLUS interest thereon at 8.99% per annum from 06/01/09 to 6/1/2010, 8.99% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 12, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Regional Trustee Services Corporation, Trustee, By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3647140 07/19/2010, 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-97160 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DONNA K. BARRETT, A SINGLE WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as grantor, to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR RESIDENTIAL WHOLESALE MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 1/22/2007, recorded 1/26/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-05261, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 14, BLOCK 4, PROVIDENCE, PHASE 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3142 NORTHEAST BARRINGTON COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as Of July 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,341.56 each $5,366.24 (04-01-10 through 07-07-10) Late Charges: $201.24 Beneficiary Advances: $11.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,578.48 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $243,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 3/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 7/7/2010 Regional Trustee Services Corporation, Trustee, By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3642303 07/19/2010, 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-97455 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PETER M. THOMAS, A MARRIED MAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE - BEND, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DHI MORTGAGE COMPANY LTD, LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, as beneficiary, dated 3/29/2007, recorded 3/30/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-18831, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FV-1, Inc. in trust for Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 182 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES NO. 2, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61043 SNOWBRUSH DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 14, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 6 payments at $ 4,699.51 each $ 28,197.06 (02-01-10 through 07-14-10) Late Charges: $ 1,068.24 Beneficiary Advances: $ 941.98 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 30,207.28 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $599,721.60, PLUS interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 16, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Dated: 7/14/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION TRUSTEE By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3651324 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010, 08/16/2010


E6 Monday, August 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx3544 T.S. No.: 1284187-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-97197 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DANIEL W. TAYLOR AND RENELLE L. TAYLOR HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF ORE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 6/10/2004, recorded 6/14/2004, under Instrument No. 2004-35008, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association AS TRUSTEE FOR MANA 2007-OR2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 142 OF ELKHORN ESTATES PHASE 11, 12 AND 13, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19986 COVEY LANE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 29, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 2 payments at $ 833.14 each $ 1,666.28 1 payments at $ 831.17 each $ 831.17 S payments at $ 1,188.94 each $ 5,944.70 (11-01-09 through 06-29-10) Late Charges: $ 320.41 Beneficiary Advances: $ 466.63 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 9,229.19 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $171,572.76, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 10/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 6.5% per annum from 01/01/10 to 02/01/10, 6.5% per annum from 2/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 1,2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/29/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 981 04 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3632491 07/12/2010, 07/19/2010, 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-97196

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Trevor J. Ostby, Megan A Berg, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 20, 2005, recorded July 29, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-49306 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot three (3), Sandalwood Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3427 NE Sandalwood Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,632.86 Monthly Late Charge $59.04. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $283,400.00 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 28, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-325540 07/19, 07/26, 08/02, 08/09

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0995 T.S. No.: 1286573-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8411 T.S. No.: 1281838-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by George Vanengelen and Sherron Skidgel Vanengelen, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 30, 2007, recorded August 02, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-42545 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3, and the northwesterly five feet of lot 4, lying parallel to the line common to lots 3 and 4, block 1, Timber Ridge, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20418 Buttriggin Road Bend OR 97702-2647. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,900.39 Monthly Late Charge $95.01. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $281,223.89 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sebastian R. Pena and Obdulia T. Molina, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 27, 2006, recorded November 03, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-73201 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 of Juniper Glen, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2947 SW Indian Place Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,483.25 Monthly Late Charge $74.16. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $214,445.90 together with interest thereon at 8.300% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-328301 08/02/10, 08/09, 08/16, 08/23

R-324793 07/12, 07/19, 07/26, 08/02

HOMES NDISE MERCH A

JOBS

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NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRUCE H. SAGERS, JR. AND DEBORAH R. SAGERS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST COMPANY OF OREGON, INC., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/11/2007, recorded 7/18/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-39597, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 14, ELKHORN RIDGE PHASES 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19931 POWERS ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 8, 2 010 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 4 payments at $2,297.97 each $9,191.88 (04-01-10 through 07-08-10) Late Charges: $289.65 Beneficiary Advances: $11.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,492.53 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $394,400.00, PLUS interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from 3/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 7/8/2010 Regional Trustee Services Corporation, Trustee, By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3643096 07/19/2010, 07/26/2010, 08/02/2010, 08/09/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F512340 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999318926/SEGOVIANO Investor No: 173991466 AP #1: 151318 00 01500 Title #: 100276940 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MIGUEL SEGOVIANO as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated December 29, 2005, Recorded February 23, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-12563 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE1/4NW1/4) of Section Eighteen (18), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, bounded as follows: Commencing at a point which is located North 0 DEG. 01' East a distance of 30 feet from the center of said Section 18, being a point on the Northerly line of the right of way of U.S. Highway No. 28 Oregon Highway 126); thence Westerly along said Northerly line distance of 893.4 feet to the point of beginning; thence North 0 DEG.01' East a distance of 836.7 feet; thence North 8842 West a distance of 250 feet; thence South 0°01' West a distance of 766.7 feet to the Northerly line of said Highway right of way; thence Easterly along said Northerly line of said right of way a distance of 265 feet, more or less to the point of beginning. CONTAINLNG 5.0 ACRES MORE OR LESS. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 PYMTS FROM 11/01/09 TO 05/01/10 @ 836.00 $5,852.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,852.00 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 4627 WEST HIGHWAY 126, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $239,889.90, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on September 17, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 05/04/10 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 908606 PUB: 08/02/10, 08/09/10, 08/16/10, 08/23/10

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Bulletin Daily Paper 08/02/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday August 2, 2010

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