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Police wound second suspect in Warm Springs shooting case

OLCC corks home-brew for now By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Homemade beer and wine will have to stay at home until the Legislature intervenes, according to an opinion issued by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission on Thursday. Consuming home-brewed products away from home has been in a state of limbo since late June, when the OLCC turned to the Department

of Justice for an interpretation of a long-ignored state statute. According to the DOJ’s interpretation, all homemade alcoholic beverages must be consumed where they are made, putting home-brewing clubs, homebrewing contests, and gifts of homemade beer and wine on the wrong side of the law. Both the Oregon State Fair and the Deschutes County Fair elected to can-

cel their beer and wine competitions in response to the announcement. Hoping to find a way around the controversy that ensued, the OLCC and the DOJ investigated further, but have determined only the Legislature has the authority to change the law. Christie Scott, spokeswoman for the OLCC, said her agency is committed to seeing the law changed. See Home-brew / A4

“We can’t change a statute, because trust me, if we could change it, we’d be in the process of doing so.” — Christie Scott, OLCC spokeswoman

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

A man was wounded on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation on Thursday afternoon after a shootout with police officers. His eventual surrender and arrest ended a two-month manhunt after shots were fired at officers in May. At about 1 p.m., Warm Springs Police officers surrounded a home in the West Hills of the reservation where they believed Aldo Inez Antunez, 32, was located. Antunez was wanted concerning several incidents in May when shots were fired at police officers. Neighbors were evacuated, and roadblocks were put up to keep bystanders away. Police said a shot was fired from inside the home. More shots came. One police officer returned fire. Shortly after, Antunez called Warm Springs Police dispatch. He told the dispatcher he had been shot and wanted to give up. Antunez walked out of the front door of the home without weapons. Police officers took him into custody. He was transported to Mountain View Hospital and then picked up by Air Link and flown to St. Charles Bend. See Manhunt / A5

FAMOUS FACES AT THE CCC

LeMond’s in town – for Landis

BP’s ‘Skunk Works’ team weighs ideas on oil spill By Bob Drogin Los Angeles Times

BAYOU LA BATRE, Ala. — Gerry Matherne recently built a helicopter from “a bit of this and a piece of that,” which made him a minor star on YouTube when the engine died in midair — and he didn’t. He somehow landed the crippled craft beside power lines. “I’m always inventing something,” said the gruff 61-year-old captain of an oil supertanker. “When I was a boy, a wristwatch was never safe in my hands. I’d dismantle anything to see how it ran.” So when Matherne learned of the runaway BP oil leak, he considered it a personal challenge. He drove to a hardware store, bought some window screens and PVC pipe, and began to tinker.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Greg LeMond talks with riders during Stage 2 of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Thursday at Summit High School in Bend.

Cycling legend backs accusations of Armstrong doping By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Faster, cheaper, more efficient The result is the first device that, according to BP engineers and Coast Guard officials, promises a faster, cheaper and more efficient way to remove spilled oil than traditional skimmers in the Gulf of Mexico. Matherne’s apparatus looks like a trash bag in a giant crab trap, but it works like a sieve to snag sludge and oil while sea water passes through. BP officials say they aim to build and deploy 100 units by the end of the month, and add more after that if needed. See Skunk Works / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Three-time Tour de France winner Greg LeMond stood in a tent in the parking lot at Bend’s Summit High School on Thursday morning, describing the features of his new Revolution Bike Trainer as curious cyclists gave it a spin. A crew was filming a spot for his new product, but that was not LeMond’s primary reason for being in Central Oregon. “I’ve got a friend here, and I’m here supporting Floyd Landis,” LeMond said. “There’s a lot of pressure (on Landis). He’s a good guy that kind of got sidetracked by a bad system.” Landis, who is in Central Oregon this week competing in the Bend Memorial Clinic Cascade Cycling Classic, won the Tour de France in 2006 but was stripped of his title after testing positive

for synthetic testosterone. Earlier this year, after four years of denial, Landis admitted to doping during his pro cycling career. He also came out with allegations accusing fellow American rider Lance Armstrong, a seven-time Tour de France winner (1999-2005), of doping. LeMond, 49, of Medina, Minn., said he is supporting Landis because he believes Landis is telling the truth in his accusations against Armstrong and other cyclists. “I know what’s going on,” LeMond said. “I’m not an idiot. What (Landis) says has been repeated by multiple people. So, it’s not a surprise to me. The surprise is that it’s taken this long.” In 1986, LeMond became the first American cyclist to win the Tour de France. He also won the Tour in 1989 and 1990. See LeMond / A4

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— Greg LeMond, three-time Tour de France winner on Landis, pictured above

Galileo’s bones give museum’s display Catholic overtones

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“I know what’s going on. I’m not an idiot. What (Floyd Landis) says has been repeated by multiple people. So, it’s not a surprise to me. The surprise is that it’s taken this long.”

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Visitors look at the Ruscitti watch collection, most made between the late 16th and 19th centuries, at the Galileo Museum in Florence, Italy. The history of science museum, recently renovated and renamed to honor Galileo, has added three fingers and a molar sliced from Galileo’s corpse nearly a century after he died.

FLORENCE, Italy — The Galileo case is often seen starkly as science’s first decisive blow against not only faith but also the power of the Roman Catholic Church. It has never been quite that simple, though. Galileo was a believer, devastated at being convicted, in 1633, of heresy for upending the biblical view of the universe. Now a particularly enduring Catholic practice is on prominent display in, of all places, Florence’s history of science museum, recently renovated and renamed to honor Galileo. Modern-day supporters of the famous

heretic are exhibiting newly recovered bits of his body — three fingers and a gnarly molar sliced from his corpse nearly a century after he died — as if they were the relics of an actual saint. “He’s a secular saint, and relics are an important symbol of his fight for freedom of thought,” said Paolo Galluzzi, director of the Galileo Museum, which put the tooth, thumb and index finger on view last month, uniting them with another of the scientist’s digits already in its collection. “He’s a hero and martyr to science,” he added. See Galileo / A4


A2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Global warming is a plus for marmots Study links Earlier springs lead to critter population boom By Karen Kaplan Los Angeles Times

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LOS ANGELES — Every year, scientists fan out across Colorado’s Upper East River Valley to count the yellow-bellied marmots that make their home there in rocky meadows bordered by aspen, pine and spruce trees. Over the last decade, the work has gotten more tiring. Now

they know why — the population of squirrel-like critters has exploded due to environmental changes brought on by global warming, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Nature. “It certainly looks like a goodnews story for now, but it would surprise me if it continues for the long term,” said Andrew McAdam, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, who was not involved in the marmot study. For now, the warmer weather

means that springlike temperatures arrive about one day earlier each year. The cumulative effect since 1976 is that the animals now emerge from hibernation nearly a month sooner than they used to, said study leader Arpat Ozgul, a postdoctoral research associate at Imperial College London. The extra month of calories helps sustain them after vegetation dries out in the summer. It also means they are fatter when they settle in for their next hibernation, which begins

around September. But the fortunes of the yellowbellied marmots will probably be reversed as their habitat continues to get hotter, said study co-author Daniel Blumstein, who heads the ecology and evolutionary biology department at the University of California, Los Angeles. “The summer food is drying up,” he said. “Summer droughts really nail the population.” At that point, the yellow-bellied marmots will have few options.

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New York Times News Service Exercise scientists say they have stumbled upon an amazing discovery. Athletes can improve their performance in intense bouts of exercise, lasting an hour or so, if they merely rinse their mouths with a carbohydrate solution. They don’t even have to swallow it. It has to be real carbohydrates, though; the scientists used a solution of water and a flavorless starch derivative called maltodextrin. Artificial sweeteners have no effect. And the scientists think they have figured out why it works. It appears that the brain can sense carbohydrates in the mouth, even tasteless ones. The sensors are different from the ones for sweetness, and they prompt the brain to respond, spurring on the athlete.

Don Amend / The Associated Press

An explosion in a paint can startles Summer of Innovation camp participants, from left, Eyan Christen, Lennox Coplen and Garrett Kary in a demonstration at Northwest College in Powell, Wyo. The explosion was a demonstration of energy released from chemicals set up by Joel Kuper, the science teacher for the program funded by a grant from NASA.

Reprogrammed cells no match for stem cells By Mark Johnson McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MILWAUKEE — Several years after scientists found a way to manipulate biology and send skin cells back to their embryonic origin, they are now learning that nature is not so easily tricked. A reprogrammed skin cell retains a memory of its original identity as skin. Moreover, after the skin cell has returned to the embryonic state, it appears more willing to turn back into skin than to adopt a new identity. The new findings by the lab

Museum officials to return remains By William Mullen

of stem cell researcher George Daley at Children’s Hospital Boston were described Monday in a paper published online in the journal Nature and begin to address one of the mysteries surrounding reprogramming.

Cocktail of genes Since 2007, when the labs of James Thomson at University of Wisconsin-Madison and Shinya Yamanaka at Kyoto University first used a cocktail of genes to create an alternative to human embryonic stem cells, scientists

have been puzzled by subtle differences between actual embryonic stem cells and these engineered versions. The differences are important because the engineered cells were hailed as an alternative to embryonic stem cells that would allow scientists to make all of the cells in the human body while bypassing the ethical controversy that surrounded embryonic stem cells. Daley said his team’s work overthrows the assumption “that when you reprogram a skin or a blood cell you erase its memory

of being skin or blood. ... Researchers have to appreciate the potential for this memory and erase it further or exploit it.” Working with mice, Daley’s group reprogrammed different kinds of cells. The scientists used different reprogramming methods, too, including the technique used by Yamanaka and the technique used to clone Dolly the sheep. The cloning method, known as nuclear transfer, involves removing the nucleus from an unfertilized egg and inserting in its place the nucleus of an adult cell.

personality to brain regions By Leslie Tamura The Washington Post

Does the size of your brain — or, more specifically, different regions of it — say anything about your personality? According to a new study, maybe. Using magnetic resonance imaging and personality questionnaires, Colin DeYoung, a University of Minnesota psychology professor, and his colleagues investigated the biological basis of what psychologists know as the Big Five personality traits: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness/intellect. Their three years of research showed that certain brain regions had significantly different sizes depending on the self-reported strength of a particular personality trait. Researchers used MRIs to compare the brains of the 116 healthy adults to the “reference brain” of a person whose personality traits seemed average, according to an article published in the June issue of Psychological Science. Using computer software, DeYoung said researchers “stretched or squished” individual brain scans to match them with the reference image, and then noted the size of the regions of each brain. MRI scans of self-described extroverts revealed a significantly larger medial orbitofrontal cortex, the area just above and behind the eye socket. This area is involved with keeping track of rewards, researchers said.

Agreeable brains The posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus were larger in people who identified themselves as having many characteristics associated with agreeableness. That area is associated with understanding the actions and mental states of others, researchers said. Above-average conscientiousness was associated with a larger region of the lateral prefrontal cortex, which is involved in planning and voluntary control of behavior. Self-described neurotics, who tended to experience negative emotions, had smaller brain volumes in areas known to regulate emotion. Neurotics also had a significantly larger mid-cingulate gyrus, a region that detects pain and error. The only trait without a significant neuroanatomical relationship, according to the report, was openness/intellect, which researchers said reflects imagination, curiosity, and artistic and intellectual interests.

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Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Field Museum officials have agreed to return the human remains of 22 individuals that a museum expedition brought to Chicago in 1928 after digging them up from an Inuit Indian village. Inuit leaders in Labrador two years ago learned the museum had the skeletal remains and asked for their return, said Helen Robbins, the Field’s repatriation director. The Field has helped plan for repatriation in 2011, agreeing to pay all costs. The bones came to Chicago from a two-year expedition sent to gather Inuit artifacts, she said. At one point they visited an abandoned Inuit community named Zoar, which had been abandoned for more than 30 years, she said. Field anthropologist William Duncan Strong dug up the skeletons from a cemetery. Human remains are valuable to modern anthropological and medical research. The Field, like other big museums, maintains a sizable collection from all over the world, she said, including 1,700 individuals from the Americas alone.

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Lovingly cared for home. 2492 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths. Property is 9.77 acres with 5.5 acres of irrigation. Large shop with covered RV parking. $675,000 CALL KRIS WARNER AT 541-480-5365. MLS: 201006053

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

T S Clinton criticizes Vietnam on rights

GULF OIL SPILL

By Mark Landler New York Times News Service

Official: Cap will hold during storm By Henry Fountain New York Times News Service

“While this is not a hurricane, it’s a storm that will have some significant impacts.” — Thad Allen, spill response commander bed and pulling it up, a process expected to take up to 12 hours. The decision to leave the well capped, which was made at the recommendation of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, means that scientists with the government and with BP think that the well is undamaged and that there is little risk it would deteriorate if kept under pressure, as it has been since valves on a new cap were closed a week ago. Reopening the valves would mean that oil, which has not flowed since

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Arizona judge hears U.S. falls to 12th in Constitution argument adults with higher ed PHOENIX — With just a week remaining before Arizona’s stringent new immigration law is set to take effect, a federal judge in Phoenix heard, for the first time, from Obama administration lawyers urging her to strike down the legislation while dozens of demonstrators argued both sides outside the courthouse. Lawyers from the Justice Department and for the state of Arizona sparred over whether the law, known locally as SB 1070, violates the U.S. Constitution’s supremacy clause, which says federal law generally trumps state law. The federal judge, Susan Bolton, asked pointed questions of both sides but made no ruling from the bench before adjourning at 3 p.m. The hearing marked the first opportunity for the Obama administration to explain why it feels Arizona should not be allowed to empower local police to demand some proof of citizenship from people they suspect are illegal immigrants.

WASHINGTON — The United States has fallen from first to 12th in the share of adults ages 25 to 34 with postsecondary degrees, according to a new report from the College Board. Canada is now the global leader in higher education among young adults, with 55.8 percent of that population holding an associate degree or better as of 2007, the year of the latest international ranking. The United States sits 11 places back, with 40.4 percent of young adults holding postsecondary credentials. The report is backed by a commission of highly placed educators who have set a goal for the United States to reclaim world leadership in college completion — and attain a 55 percent completion rate — by 2025. The commission is urging state and national leaders to pursue a 10-part “action agenda,” which recommends better college counseling and dropout prevention, and streamlined college admissions. — From wire reports

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PARIS — After decades at the forefront of the struggle against apartheid and injustice, Desmond Tutu, the former Anglican archbishop of Cape Town, announced Thursday that he would begin reducing his public appearances in October, on his 79th birthday. A Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1984, at the height of unrest in South Africa’s racially segregated townships, Tutu said in a statement that he would step down from many public duties in order to sip afternoon tea with his wife, watch cricket and “travel to visit my children and grandchildren rather than to conferences and conventions and university campuses.”

His partial retirement could herald the sunset of a career during which Tutu, the first black African appointed to the post in 1986, not only combated apartheid but acted as the nation’s conscience after its first democratic elections in 1994. Although Tutu remained aloof from day-to-day politics, he sounded alarms when he perceived political leaders to be straying from the aspirations enshrined in the apartheid struggle. He assailed corruption, misrule and moral laxity within the post-apartheid leadership and questioned President Jacob Zuma’s leadership qualities before his election last year. In Africa, he opposed dictators, castigating in particular President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe.

OVER

As the threat of a storm stalled efforts to permanently seal BP’s blown-out well in the Gulf of Mexico, the government said Thursday that the well would be left closed off and unattended if ships had to leave the area. By late Thursday evening, Thad Allen, the retired Coast Guard admiral who commands the spill response, said that many vessels at the well site were preparing to leave now that a tropical depression had developed into a tropical storm, Bonnie, that was headed into the gulf. Among those preparing to evacuate, he said, was a drill rig that is working on a relief well considered the ultimate way to seal the well. It was beginning the process of disconnecting a riser pipe from the rig to the sea-

they were closed, would once again pour into the gulf. “We have enough confidence to leave the well shut in,” Kent Wells, a senior vice president of BP, said in a conference call with reporters in Houston. At the well site, 50 miles off the Louisiana coast, most work was halted during the day in advance of the storm’s arrival. “While this is not a hurricane, it’s a storm that will have some significant impacts,” Allen said. Wells said the storm would delay operations 10 to 12 days, depending on its severity and how close it passed by the site. That would push back completion of a relief well, seen as the ultimate way to seal the bad well, to the middle of August, he said. The drill rig that is working on the relief well is most likely to be among the first to leave because it travels very slowly.

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HANOI, Vietnam — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton chided Vietnam on Thursday for intolerance of dissent and infringement of Internet freedom, even as she celebrated its 15 years of normalized relations with the United States. Clinton said she raised the issues of jailed democracy activists, attacks on religious groups and curbs on socialnetworking websites during a meeting with Vietnam’s deputy prime minister, Pham Gia Khiem. The United States will prod Vietnam’s government “to pursue reforms and protect basic rights and freedoms,” she said at a news conference, as Khiem stood expressionless beside her. “Vietnam, with its extraor-

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A4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Senate Dems abandon comprehensive climate bill The Washington Post WASHINGTON — Conceding they can’t find enough votes for the measure, Senate Democrats on Thursday abandoned efforts to put together an energy bill that would seek to limit greenhouse gas emissions, delivering a potentially fatal blow to a proposal Democrats have long touted.

Instead, Democrats will push for a more limited bill that would seek to increase liability costs that oil companies would pay following spills such as the one in the Gulf of Mexico, and would create additional incentives for the development of natural gas vehicles and provide rebates to people who buy products that re-

duce home energy use. They did not release details of the proposal, but Senate Democrats said they expected to find GOP support and pass it in the next two weeks. Democrats have not ruled out pushing for a more comprehensive bill when Congress returns from its August recess.

Guerrilla pianist earns the first lady’s ear By Robin Givhan

“I never could have played the White House under a different administration, with the style that I play. The fact that she urged me on in the face of the criticism I received said a lot about her courage.”

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Rock-jazz pianist Eric Lewis is not the usual sort of musician. He does not sit at the piano but rather assumes a warrior stance in front of it. The keys are his prey, and he attacks each one with a ferocity that sends sweat flying from his athlete’s body and into the front rows. His pounding out “Mr. Brightside” at the May ’09 poetry jam at the White House telegraphed that first lady Michelle Obama wasn’t relying solely on the esteemed masters, the usual suspects or even the critically praised. “I never could have played the White House under a different administration, with the style that I play,” said Lewis, who performs as ELEW. “The fact that she urged me on in the face of the criticism I received said a lot about her courage.” Lewis’s performance was

— Eric Lewis, musician thanks to the many voices that whisper in the ears of this first lady and the wide-ranging vision of her art-scouting emissaries who talk to everyone from experts at the Grammy Museum to the editor of Nylon magazine. “It’s a modern sort of environment here,” Michelle Obama

Home-brew

Kathryn Cook / New York Times News Service

One of Galileo’s fingers is on display at the Galileo Museum in Florence, Italy.

Galileo Continued from A1 How the relics returned makes for an appropriate new chapter in the life and legacy of Galileo, which is still under debate. In 1992, the church came around to acknowledging that the judges who had convicted him of heresy had erred, but it did not quite clear Galileo either. And the relics’ return underscores, yet again, continuing tensions between the church and secular culture in Italy. The scientist’s troubles did not end with his death in 1642.

Proper church burial As a heretic, he could not be given a proper church burial. For years after his death, though, his followers in the circle of the grand dukes of Tuscany pushed to give him an honorable resting place. Nearly a century later, in 1737, members of Florence’s cultural and scientific elite unearthed the scientist’s remains in a peculiar Masonic rite. Freemasonry was growing as a counterweight to church power in those years and even today looms large in the Italian popular imagination as an anticlerical force. According to a notary who recorded the strange proceedings, the historian and naturalist Giovanni Targioni Tozzetti used a knife to slice off several fingers, a tooth and a vertebra from Galileo’s body as souvenirs but refrained, it appears, from taking his brain. The scientist was then reburied in a ceremony, “symmetrical to a beatification,” said Galluzzi, who turns out to be something of an expert on Galileo’s afterlife. After taking their macabre souvenirs, the group placed

Galileo’s remains in an elegant marble tomb in Florence’s Santa Croce church, a pointed statement from Tuscany’s powers that they were outside the control of the Vatican. The church has long been a shrine to humanism as much as to religion, and Galileo’s permanent neighbors include Michelangelo, Machiavelli and Rossini. Galileo’s vertebrae wound up at the University of Padua, famous for its medical school, while his middle finger wound up in the collection that formed the basis for the Galileo Museum. But the thumb, index finger and tooth disappeared in 1905, only to re-emerge in October, in an auction of reliquaries in Florence. Alberto Bruschi, a Florence collector, bought what turned out to be Galileo’s digits and tooth at the urging of his daughter Candida, who collects reliquaries. She also happened to be writing her senior thesis on Galileo’s tomb. After she observed that the figure on top of the reliquary resembled Galileo, the family called an expert who contacted Galluzzi, and the match was made. A spokeswoman for the Pandolfini auction house, which sold the reliquaries, said it could not reveal their provenance but said it had no idea they were Galileo’s. Bruschi credits providence with the find.

Galileo’s reflux “More than by chance, things are also helped along a bit by the souls of the dead,” he said in a telephone interview. “I think they could not have wound up in better hands.” (A dentist who examined the tooth for the museum said it showed signs of gastric reflux and indicated that Galileo

ground his teeth in his sleep.) Although the relics may be the museum’s sexiest draw, they are a small part of the museum, which reopened last month after an elegant, high-tech renovation that transformed it into one of Italy’s best boutique collections, a veritable wunderkammer of beautifully wrought scientific instruments. On a recent sunny morning, visitors seemed captivated by gems, including telescopes, painted globes, clocks and a nearly room-size model of the universe according to the Ptolemaic geocentric system that Galileo largely rejected for the Copernican one, commissioned by Ferdinando de Medici in 1588.

Catholic observatory For centuries, the Vatican has operated a serious astronomical observatory in Castel Gandolfo, outside Rome, which is linked to the observatory at the University of Arizona and run by a Jesuit astronomer with no doubts about heliocentrism. As recently as last fall, at a news conference introducing an exhibition of historic telescopic instruments at the Vatican Museums, the director of the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Culture, Monsignor Gianfranco Ravasi, referred without blinking to “the errors committed by both sides” — indicating both the church and Galileo. Asked by a reporter how he might explain the errors committed by Galileo, the genial monsignor, a former director of Milan’s Biblioteca Ambrosiana who is widely seen as a rising star in the Vatican firmament, beamed and with great gusto said only that he hoped one day to organize a conference on the didactic challenges presented by Galileo’s science. Case closed.

Continued from A1 “The Legislature, they’re the only ones who can change a statute. We can’t change a statute, because trust me, if we could change it, we’d be in the process of doing so,” Scott said. Scott said the OLCC can’t “pick and choose” which parts of state liquor laws it will enforce. However, the agency’s enforcement focus is on public safety issues like underage consumption and visibly intoxicated persons — it would likely take a complaint from the public for the agency to initiate any action against home-brewers or home-brewing contests, Scott said. The OLCC has received next to no complaints about home-brewing over the years, Scott said, allowing the statute banning consumption outside the home to be forgotten. “Honestly, that’s why they’ve flown under the radar for so many years. We don’t license them,” she said. “When we go to the county fairs, we’re looking at where people are consuming alcoholic beverages, where people are buying beverages. We’re not going into the exhibit halls.” State Rep. Judy Stiegler, D-Bend, who advocated for an “administrative fix” that would allow competitions to continue, said it’s unfortunate nothing could be done to save the fair competitions this year. “I’m grossly disappointed.

LeMond Continued from A1 LeMond confirmed Thursday that federal authorities served him last Friday with a grand jury subpoena in the investigation of fraud and doping allegations involving Armstrong and Armstrong’s cycling teams. According to the New York Daily News, federal prosecutors have asked LeMond to provide documents pertaining to Armstrong and the last four cycling teams for which he has competed: United States Postal Service, Discovery Channel, Astana and RadioShack. LeMond has been asked to provide those documents by July 30, the Daily News reported. He may also be asked to testify before the federal grand jury in Los Angeles that is examining the case. “This is beyond cycling,” LeMond said Thursday. “It’s beyond my control; it’s beyond everybody’s control. I don’t get to choose if I participate or not. They subpoenaed my documents, and I don’t have a choice. Armstrong doesn’t have a choice. Nobody has a choice.” LeMond and Armstrong have been in a public dispute for many years, starting when LeMond

Floyd Landis on ABC’s “Nightline” Cameras from ABC’s “Nightline” have been following Floyd Landis during the Cascade Cycling Classic in Central Oregon. The episode on Landis and his allegations against Lance Armstrong is scheduled to air tonight at 11:35.

criticized Armstrong for seeing a controversial Italian doctor. According to the Daily News, a suit involving LeMond and Trek Bicycle Corp. — which was based on allegations that Armstrong had doped — was settled out of court this year. “I’ve dealt with (Armstrong) for nine years and ... the doping issue is just part of it,” LeMond said. “I don’t even like (Armstrong) anymore. “I think what Floyd is highlighting is intimidation and collusion,” he continued. “I had a lawsuit that was basically about that. I’m glad it’s not just a doping sanction, because there’s a lot of people who’ve (tested) positive and they’re not ... anyway, I can’t get into it.” The Associated Press reported

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

I do believe the Department of Justice gave it their best shot. I’m just disappointed they couldn’t find some kind of a path to find a temporary fix,” she said. The state Legislature is not scheduled to meet again until early 2011. Stiegler said there’s been some discussions of a special session where a change to the statute could be considered, but that no special session will be scheduled until the next state

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Thursday that Armstrong has hired a criminal defense lawyer in the face of the federal investigation. “Obviously, you need some legal counsel on this. ... I wouldn’t read anything into it,” Armstrong was quoted as saying by AP on Thursday after finishing 17th in the 17th stage of the Tour de France. “I’m 100 percent confident that there will be a satisfactory resolution for me.” Armstrong has denied the allegations and questioned Landis’ credibility. Landis finished 45th in Thursday’s second stage of the Cascade Classic, the Skyliners Time Trial. Landis, who was being shadowed by cameras from ABC’s “Nightline” for an episode scheduled to air tonight at 11:35, is now in 78th place in the five-stage race, which continues through Sunday. Across the Summit High campus from where LeMond was demonstrating his bike trainer, the United States Anti-Doping Agency posted a sign for Thursday’s time trial winners and overall CCC leaders to report to doping control for drug testing.

said. “The president is trying to get his iPod up to speed. “I’m always curious to hear from the new young talent,” Obama said. “Our goal is to send the message that great music and art is everywhere and everything.” When Lewis arrived at the White House, he expected formality and was planning to play with restraint. He most certainly was not going to go poking around inside a piano in the East Room. Then he met Obama. “She had me off balance from the beginning, honestly,” Lewis said. “As soon as I set my foot down in the room, she said, ‘Oh, Eric, come over here, man.’” “She wanted to make sure I was going to go inside the piano and do some of the special effects that I do. I was totally surprised she had that kind of candor and sheer taste for something edgy, fast and hip,” Lewis recalled. “That particular effect has gotten me negative criticism.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 A5

Auditor: U.S. wasted money on costly President mired in another confrontation of racial politics buildings Afghans cannot maintain By Paul Richter McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — A federal watchdog blasted U.S. agencies on Thursday for squandering taxpayer money on facilities in Afghanistan that are too complex and costly for the Afghan government to maintain. And U.S. officials acknowledge they plan to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to hire contractors to operate the buildings, and other facilities in Afghanistan, for the next 10 years. A federal auditor complained in a report that a complex of

Skunk Works Continued from A1 “This is the first new technology that we’ve taken from concept all the way to deployment,” said Raymond Butler, who runs what he calls BP’s “Skunk Works,” a team of engineers who were given free rein by the oil giant to build something — anything — to ease the nightmare of the nation’s worst oil spill. “It’s not rocket science, but it works,” Butler added. The late entry in the cleanup effort is unlikely to satisfy critics who accuse BP and the Obama administration of moving too slowly to remove the oil that gushed for nearly three agonizing months from the now-capped BP well. But it’s still an achievement. Scientists, oil industry experts, bloggers and kibitzers of all stripes have phoned and e-mailed more than 120,000 suggestions, sales pitches, engineering diagrams, crayon sketches and more to BP. Ideas have flooded in from around the world, including some in Arabic and Russian. Many proposals come from companies offering proven technologies, supplies or services. Others run the gamut from farfetched to wacky.

Explosives? Some people, for example, proposed tossing dynamite or depth charges into the slicks, which would kill fish but destroy little oil. Others urged exploding a nuclear weapon in the sea floor to seal the ruptured well. That would violate U.S. and international law, and could wreak far more devastation than an oil leak, among other problems. BP has ruled out the “use of explosives, including nuclear,” according to its website. Most suggestions are less extreme, but no less impractical. “We get a lot of ideas that have what I call ‘black box magic,’” said Tony Rotolo, a BP engineer who helps screen the deluge of cleanup schemes. “You know, ‘Put the sludge in here and clean water comes out there.’ I wish it were that simple.” BP has assigned 30 engineers to pick out the most feasible proposals. Only a dozen or so ideas have made it off the drawing board and into field tests. One company proposed shooting high-pressure air hoses at beaches soiled with tarry oil residue, for example, and then using powerful vacuums to suck up the muck. “It seemed like a decent concept,” Rotolo said. “But when we went out to test it, it made a com-

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buildings constructed by the Army Corps of Engineers for the Afghan National Police represent an “outrageous waste of taxpayer money” and follow a “regular negative pattern” in overly complex construction in the country. “Why in the world are we continuing to construct facilities all over Afghanistan that we know, and the Afghans know, they will not be able to sustain once we hand the facilities over?” asked Arnold Fields, the special inspector general for Afghan reconstruction.

His critique comes at a time when the Obama administration is funneling billions into projects in Afghanistan as part of its efforts to strengthen the country’s central government and security forces. With support for the Afghan war declining and concerns about U.S. government spending rising, aid for Afghanistan is an increasingly sensitive political issue for the Obama administration. This is not the first time the U.S. government has been accused of overbuilding projects for a frail allied government.

“Like most inventions, once you see it, it seems utterly obvious. Most people say, ‘Why didn’t I think of that?’”

booms to collection points, where powerful pumps vacuum the glop into containment tanks. The process is painfully slow. The disposable bags in the HORD eliminate the pumps and vacuums. Engineers hope they also can link cages in static lines to protect vital channels, and fragile coastal wetlands and estuaries. The advantages seemed clear during tests of the system on a recent torrid afternoon. About five miles out in the Mississippi Sound, two skimmers slowly dragged a containment boom in a V-shape, corralling inky ribbons of oil. A cage at the bottom of the V appeared to scoop up the entire sheen. Nearby, a 90-foot shrimp trawler, The Michael, lowered its outriggers to pull four cages on each side. The bags netted oil and let greenish water filter through. “They say there’s no silver bullet, but I think I’ve come pretty close,” Matherne, the inventor, said with satisfaction as he watched from a nearby boat. Butler agreed. The BP special projects manager said the Skunk Works engineers quickly saw the potential when Matherne first showed his hardware store prototype. “I said, ‘We need to get this in the water as soon as possible,’” he recalled.

— Raymond Butler, manager of BP’s “Skunk Works” plete mess. The sand and the tar balls went every which way. The only thing that got sucked up was clean sand.”

A Whale flop The biggest and most costly disappointment, of course, has been the A Whale. Distressed about the Deep Horizon disaster, Taiwanese shipping mogul Nobu Su ordered an 1,100-foot-long oil tanker converted into what aides called a super skimmer, able to slurp up to 21 million gallons of oily water a day through gill-like vents in the bow, and separate most of the oil in internal tanks. But the A Whale has flopped. After the giant ship was tested at the spill site for two weeks, Coast Guard Adm. Paul Zukunft, the federal on-scene coordinator, announced that it had recovered only “negligible” amounts of oil. “The main problem is the oil isn’t thick enough,” said Frank Maisano, spokesman for TMT Shipping, owners of the ship. He said high waves and BP’s heavy use of chemical dispersants have thinned and broken up the oil, which neutralized the A Whale’s complex intake and decanting systems. Matherne’s gadget, officially called the Heavy Oil Recovery Device, or HORD, is far simpler. It uses a 6-foot-long bag made of the same synthetic mesh used in lawn furniture. The bag is tied inside a large cage, and the mouth of the bag is secured over the open end, like a trash bag in a kitchen pail.

$6,042 solution When the floating cage is towed at slow speed, the porous bag captures weathered oil — the tarry globs that wash ashore — but lets seawater flow through. After a ton of tar balls fills the bag, it is cinched closed and hauled on deck, and a clean bag goes in the cage. The cost: $42 per bag and $6,000 per cage. Matherne already was working for BP, so he will not get paid for the invention. At this point, BP is using 593 modified fishing boats that tow floating barriers to corral the surface oil. They then drag the

50 engineers About 50 engineers and technicians, mostly BP contractors hired since the spill, began working on the project at the two “Skunk Works” facilities — a tin-roofed workshop in this tiny fishing port, and another marine workshop in Theodore, Ala. They tweaked the design, changed the PVC pipe to aluminum tubing and found a Texas company that makes storage sacks for everything from corn to chemicals to supply the giant mesh bags. The team initially planned to build 1,000 of the devices, but cut production to 100 last week when BP finally managed to cap the renegade well and kill the undersea gusher. BP and U.S. officials also announced plans to add a new weapon to their arsenal. Called the “Big Gulp,” it is built on a barge the size of a football field and supposedly can collect 300,000 gallons of oil a day, far more than traditional skimmers or bags in cages. Butler insisted Matherne’s device will prove its value in the long cleanup that still lies ahead, however. “Like most inventions, once you see it, it seems utterly obvious,” Butler said. “Most people say, ‘Why didn’t I think of that?’”

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By Sheryl Gay Stolberg New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — It was exactly one year ago on Thursday that President Barack Obama plunged into a thicket of racial politics by declaring that a white police officer in Cambridge, Mass., had “acted stupidly” in arresting a black Harvard University professor in his own home. Suddenly, the president whose election suggested the promise of a post-racial future was thrust into the wounds of the past. Not much has changed. Obama sought Thursday to tamp down yet another racial uproar, this one over his administration’s mishandling of the case of Shirley Sherrod, a black Agriculture Department official who was dismissed based on a video clip of remarks that appeared to

Manhunt Continued from A1 He was shot in the upper body, according to information from the Warm Springs Police Department. A U.S. Marshal fugitive team, members of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, officers from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department and the Warm Springs Police Department were involved in the investigation. The search for Antunez and Waylon Weaselhead started May 20, after a Madras police officer stopped a vehicle. The driver sped away, and someone inside the vehicle fired shots at the officer. Later the same day, a Warm Springs Police officer attempted to stop a white Ford Explorer on state Highway 3. The vehicle sped away, and someone inside the car fired shots. One shot hit the windshield of an officer’s car. Police believe it was the same vehicle they had stopped earlier. The two people in the car

A N A LY S I S suggest she had discriminated against white farmers. One day after Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack apologized to Sherrod and offered her a new job working on race relations for the agency, Obama offered his own apology. During a seven-minute telephone call, White House officials said, the president shared some of his own personal experiences, and urged Sherrod to “continue her hard work on behalf of those in need.” That, however, is unlikely to be the end of it for Obama, who has struggled since the beginning of his presidency with whether, when and how to deal with volatile matters of race. No matter how hard his White House tries

fled on foot while shooting at officers. About a month ago, Waylon Weaselhead was arrested on suspicion of being involved with the shootings. Weaselhead, 21, is a Warm Springs tribal member. After a Warm Springs police officer went after a speeding vehicle last month, the car pulled over to the side of the road. Weaselhead stepped out of the car, and the driver took off. Weaselhead was arrested without incidence. No police officers were injured during the shootouts. Antunez was arrested on suspicion of nine counts of attempted murder, three counts of unlawful use of a weapon, attempting to elude a police officer and

to keep the issue from defining his presidency, it keeps popping back up, fueled in part by high expectations from the left for the first black president, and in part by tactical opposition politics. Michael Eric Dyson, a sociology professor at Georgetown University, notes that Obama wrote an entire book on race: “Dreams from My Father,” in which he dealt with his own complicated biracial history and struggle to fit into a country that sees things in black and white. The White House rejected the notion that Obama has not provided leadership or is avoiding a conversation on race. “I don’t think anyone has confronted this issue more directly than the president,” said David Axelrod, Obama’s senior adviser.

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2004 DISCOVERY 39L DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 39 FT., STK.# 5123Z 2003 EXCURSION 39S DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 40 FT., STK.# 4974Z 1997 GRAND TOUR 35 DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 35 FT., STK.# 4810A 2005 MANDALAY 40B DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 40 FT., STK.# 5138Z 2000 SAFARI 40 DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, STK.# 4775Z 2003 SEE YA SY40FD DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 40 FT., STK.# 5125Z 2005 SEE YA 40 DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 40 FT., STK.# 5087A 2000 SERENGETTI 37 DIESEL CLASS A MOTOR HOME, 37 FT., STK.# 4922B 2006 ASPECT WF726A CLASS B MOTOR HOME, 26 FT., STK.# 5136Z 2007 AUGUSTA SPORT CLASS B MOTOR HOME, STK.# 5132Z 1990 EXPLORER CAMPER V CLASS B MOTOR HOME, 21 FT., STK.# 4923E 2007 FOURWINDS 29R CLASS C MOTOR HOME, 30 FT., STK.# 4822A 2008 FREELANDER 3150 CLASS C MOTOR HOME, 31 FT., STK.# 5092Y 2009 FREELANDER 2600SO CLASS C MOTOR HOME, 26 FT., STK.# 5090Y 2003 LEPRECHAUN 314SS CLASS C MOTOR HOME, STK.# 4973Z 2004 MCKENZIE 31PBS CLASS C MOTOR HOME, 31 FT., STK.# 4994Z 2008 OUTLOOK 31C CLASS C MOTOR HOME, 31 FT., STK.# 5115Y 2005 ARCTIC FOX A990SA TRUCK CAMPER, 10 FT., STK.# 5076Z 2003 ARCTIC FOX 860 TRUCK CAMPER, 16 FT., STK.# 5031A 2002 LANCE 821 TRUCK CAMPER, 16 FT., STK.# 4687C 2007 LANCE 1131 TRUCK CAMPER, 20 FT., STK.# 4918B 2008 FUSION FIFTH WHEEL TOY HAULER, 37 FT., STK.# 4678A 2004 KARRI ALL 38 FIFTH WHEEL TOY HAULER, 39 FT., STK.# 4990A 2005 RAPTOR RP3512 FIFTH WHEEL TOY HAULER, STK.# 5087Z 2007 RAPTOR RP3612DS FIFTH WHEEL TOY HAULER, 37’ 2”, STK.# 5085Z 2004 TAILGATOR 189 TOY HAULER TRAILER, 22 FT. , STK.# 4774H

33 FT., STK.# 5118Z

38 FT., STK.# 4864B

35 FT., STK.# 5016Z 35 FT., STK.# 4948Z

36 FT., STK.# 4992B 35 FT., STK.# 4917A

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2004 ADIRONDACK AERO TRAVEL TRAILER, STK.# 5130Z 2006 COUGAR CG243RKS TRAVEL TRAILER, 23’ 7” , STK.# 5083Z 2006 DUTCHMAN LITE 20F TRAVEL TRAILER, 20’ 3” , STK.# 5082Z 2006 EAGLE 282 TRAVEL TRAILER, 29 FT., STK.# 4943A 2010 HIDEOUT 19FLB TRAVEL TRAILER, 19 FT., STK.# 5108 1976 IDEAL 22 TRAVEL TRAILER, 22 FT., STK.# 4845A 2002 LAYTON 2760 TRAVEL TRAILER, 26 FT., STK.# 5122Z 2002 MONTANA 335RLBS TRAVEL TRAILER, 33 FT., STK.# 4767A 2008 PALOMINO WPT27DSQ TRAVEL TRAILER, STK.# 5133Z 2007 PIONEER 21CKS TRAVEL TRAILER, 24 FT., STK.# 5053A 2004 QUANTUM 290FQ TRAVEL TRAILER, 29 FT., STK.# 4901A 2003 R VISION 7253 TRAVEL TRAILER, 26 FT., STK.# 4909A 2004 RAGE’N 2427T TRAVEL TRAILER, 25’ 2’’, STK.# 5128Z 2005 SPRINGDALE 298BHL TRAVEL TRAILER, 29’6’’, STK.# 5131Z 2006 SPRINGDALE 179 TRAVEL TRAILER, 20 FT., STK.# 4758A 2007 SPRINGDALE 179 TRAVEL TRAILER, 20 FT., STK.# 5056A 2006 SPRTR 314BHDS TRAVEL TRAILER, 35 FT., STK.# 5120Z 2008 FLAGSTAFF 8314 TRAVEL TRAILER, 33 FT., STK.# 5126Z 2006 TERRY 330FKDS TRAVEL TRAILER, 32 FT., STK.# 5137Z 2009 TRAILLITE 210QB TRAVEL TRAILER, 22 FT., STK.# 4741A 2004 WILDERNESS 300BH TRAVEL TRAILER, 29 FT., STK.# 5124Z 2006 WILDERNESS 270FQS TRAVEL TRAILER, 25 FT., STK.# 5080Z 2001 WILDERNESS 19N TRAVEL TRAILER, 19 FT., STK.# 4874A 2007 WILDERNESS 280FQ TRAVEL TRAILER, 32 FT., STK.# 5028A 2008 WILDERNESS 280BHS TRAVEL TRAILER, 29 FT., STK.# 4944A 2005 WILDWOOD 250RKS TRAVEL TRAILER, 26 FT., STK.# 4777A

Location: Former Walmart Parking Lot in S. Redmond Take the Fairgrounds Exit located in South Redmond off Yew Avenue

On-site Appraiser


B

Auto News Skateboard aesthetics find their way into motorcycles, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,245.89 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +58.56 +2.68%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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CLOSE 10,322.30 DOW JONES CHANGE +201.77 +1.99%

Corporations from AT&T to UPS say business is finally picking up — and investors are cheering. Robust quarterly results from some of the nation’s bellwether companies galvanized Wall Street on Thursday. Stocks soared in a broad rally that lifted the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 200 points. Big names like AT&T, Caterpillar, UPS and 3M posted surprisingly strong sales and profit figures for the second quarter. Even more encouraging, many also issued upbeat forecasts for the rest of the year, suggesting that, for them at least, a recovery of sorts was at last taking hold.

Microsoft posts 48% income boost Microsoft stands as the latest company to benefit from rejuvenated interest in business technology, as it topped Wall Street expectations for its fourth quarter and reported record sales. On Thursday, Microsoft posted a 48 percent rise in net income to $4.52 billion, or 51 cents a share, from the $3.05 billion, or 34 cents a share in the comparable period last year. Revenue in the period, which ended June 30 and was the fourth quarter of Microsoft’s fiscal year, jumped 22 percent to $16.04 billion on the back of improved sales of its flagship Windows and Office software products.

s

1,093.67 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +24.08 +2.25%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.93 treasury CHANGE +1.38%

By Andrew Taylor WASHINGTON — Federal checks could begin flowing again as early as next week to millions of jobless people who lost up to seven weeks of unemployment benefits in a congressional standoff. President Barack Obama on Thursday signed into law a restoration of benefits for people who have been out of work for six months or more. Congress approved the measure earlier in the day. The move ended an interruption that cut off payments averaging about $300 a week to 2½ million people who have been unable to find work in the aftermath of the nation’s

long and deep recession. At stake are up to 73 weeks of federally financed benefits for people who have exhausted their 26 weeks of state jobless benefits. About half of the approximately 5 million people in the program have had their benefits cut off since its authorization expired June 2. They are eligible for lumpsum retroactive payments that are typically delivered directly to their bank accounts or credited to state-issued debit cards. Many states have encouraged beneficiaries to keep updating their paperwork in hopes of speeding payments once the program was restored. See Benefits / B5

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age Fuel, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$2.88 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville. . . . . . . . . . . .$2.89 • Chevron, 1095 S.E. Division St., Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.96 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.98 • Texaco, 2409 Butler Market Road, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.00

DIESEL • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.00 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$3.06 • Texaco, 539 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.08 Collene Funk / The Bulletin

$1195.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$3.90

How Oregonians will benefit Nearly 110,000 Oregonians will benefit from the federal government’s extension of unemployment benefits. Here’s how it breaks down: • Regular Benefits: 30,000 These individuals are collecting 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. Once they have exhausted those benefits, they will have up to 53 weeks of federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation available. • Extended Benefits: 19,000 Those receiving Extended Benefits will move to EUC automatically. • Current EUC: 58,000 Those currently receiving EUC, which consists of four tiers of benefits, will be able to move to the next tier until they have exhausted all four tiers. • No benefits: 2,000 Some Oregonians have a claim too old to qualify for Extended Benefits and so have not been receiving any unemployment. They will now begin receiving EUC. Source: Oregon Employment Department

From farm to cafeteria Celia Rivera, from left, Elvira Garcia and Maria Miranda sort peaches in the packing shed at the Good Humus Produce farm in Esparto, Calif., earlier this month. The produce will eventually make its way to a company in Sillicon Valley, where a corporate worker will take the fresh fruit home.

Home sales dip less than expected in June The U.S. market for existing housing sales softened less than expected last month, with purchases of previously owned homes sliding 5.1 percent, a national trade group said Thursday. Real estate analysts, who had predicted a decline of more than 7 percent on average, had long warned that sales would drop after a federal tax credit that had fueled home buying in the spring expired April 30. Buyers who qualified for the credit of as much as $8,000 on the purchase of a home have until Sept. 30 to close their deals. — From wire reports

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Relief for the unemployed: Obama signs benefits bill The Associated Press

Wall Street soars on robust earnings

B

Gary Reyes San Jose Mercury News

Local-food program connects a region’s farming community with its businesses — and both sides come out ahead

By Lisa M. Krieger San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

ESPARTO, Calif. — One peach, two valleys. The delicious taste of summer begins its journey here, on a small family farm in California’s bucolic Capay Valley, and ends slightly more than 24 hours later in a modern Silicon Valley cafeteria. Through a new “FarmShares” program, the plump peach delivers an explosive flavor to an eager corporate worker — and returns precious dollars to this region’s struggling farms. “Our employees get fresh local food — and we support farms. It’s a win-win,”

said Chad Kromm of Adobe, who introduced the Capay Valley Farm Shop program to the modern glass-and-granite Cafe Adobe in San Jose, Calif., where employees pick up their pre-ordered boxes. “We’re developing strong regional connections.” The travelogue has its roots in the rich alluvial soil of this narrow valley, nestled on the eastern edge of the Coast Range in Yolo County between Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay Area. Edged by wilderness and nourished by bubbling Cache Creek, the scenic valley has been farmed for more than a century. See Agriculture / B2

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$18.115 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.317

PV Powered helps create big revenues for its parent company By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Bend-based PV Powered helped lead its parent company, Advanced Energy Industries, to record quarterly sales and the second-highest revenues in the solarpower inverter industry, company officials said Thursday. “Now, in combination with PV Powered, we hold the number two market position in the fast-growing U.S. inverter market,” said Hanz Betz, CEO of Fort Collins, Colo.-based Advanced Energy. “Based on the momentum we are seeing in the inverter pipeline, ... for the second half of 2010, the lead position is definitely within reach.” See PV Powered / B5

Local film alliance says it’s making progress but needs funds By Adrianne Jeffries The Bulletin

The Film Oregon Alliance’s mission to recruit and foster media productions in Central Oregon is gaining momentum, but the 3-year-old organization still faces obstacles due to a lack of state and local funding for incentives. Central Oregon is ideal for films and other media productions because of its varied terrain and strong talent pool, said president and co-founder Stan Roach, and film productions are ideal for Central Oregon because they provide jobs and boost the local economy. The film and video industry in Oregon generates more than 13,000 jobs and about $1.39 billion in economic output per year, according to an economic impact study commissioned by the state in 2007. Some of that could certainly come to Central Oregon, Roach said. See Film / B2

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B2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

A comic convention bursts its boundaries Actress Angelina Jolie answers a question at a panel for the movie “Salt” at Comic-Con International on Thursday. Some see “Salt,” described by Jolie as “smart, proper, dramatic,” as a mainstream tipping point for the convention. Denis Poroy The Associated Press

By Brooks Barnes and Michael Cieply New York Times News Service

SAN DIEGO — There was a time when a movie like “Salt,” a spy caper starring Angelina Jolie, got its publicity pop on the festival circuit, maybe even playing on the splashier side of Cannes. Yet, here it was on opening day of Comic-Con International, the annual convention for fans of comic books and related TV shows and movies, on Thursday. You get no Croisette, no Hotel du Cap by coming to the San Diego Convention Center, which is plopped between a Marriott and some train tracks. What you do get are 130,000 fans only too happy to blast the Web with movie chatter, and international media coverage second only to that for the Oscars. The showcasing of “Salt,” which opens in theaters today, struck many longtime convention-goers as a tipping point. The movie does not fit into any of the categories Comic-Con has traditionally celebrated: horror, fantasy, superheroes, animation, science fiction. Purists have blustered for years that Hollywood was taking over Comic-Con as a marketing platform. Now, it has become a big, blurry film festival for the

Bonuses Continued from B1 Feinberg’s report points to companies that he says paid eye-popping amounts or used haphazard criteria for awarding bonuses, the people with knowledge of his findings said, and he singles out Citigroup as the biggest offender. Even so, Feinberg has very limited power to reclaim any money. He can use his status as President Barack Obama’s point man on pay to jawbone the companies into reimbursing the government, but he has no legal authority to claw back excessive payouts. Feinberg’s political leverage has been weakened by the banks’ speedy repayment of their bailout funds. Eleven of the 17 companies that received criticism in the report have repaid the government with interest, so they have no outstanding obligations to reimburse.

little guy, with plenty of television — and some comics — thrown in. Jolie’s previous appearances at Comic-Con have been for films that neatly fit its focus — “Beowulf,” for instance. Thursday she bluntly highlighted why “Salt” did not. Her previous action movies were “always based in fantasy in some way,” she said. This one is “smart, proper, dramatic.” “Salt” is not the only headscratcher at this year’s ComicCon, which runs through Sunday. Also represented here are “Nurse Jackie” and “The Other Guys,” a Will Ferrell comedy. CBS dispatched young women in grass skirts to plug its forthcoming remake of “Hawaii Five-O.” “I sort of feel it’s like worrying about the weather — there’s no going back,” Marc Guggenheim, the writer of the forthcoming “Green Lantern” movie from Warner Brothers, told the blog Hero Complex. “The genie is out of the bottle.” Cherry Davis, a fundraising consultant attending the convention from Los Angeles, wasn’t as forgiving when she spotted the comedian Pauly Shore trying to orchestrate a publicity stunt. “What is he doing here? Has he ever even been in a science-fiction

movie?” Davis fumed aloud. There was a lot of obsessiveness on display for the opening day of Comic-Con, which has been sold out for months. Walt Disney Studios wowed fans of its forthcoming “Tron: Legacy” with eight minutes of 3-D footage. The snippet depicted a character entering the movie’s video-game reality for the first time. “That ‘Tron’ footage was definitely amazing,” said John Juarez, a restaurant manager from El Cajon, Calif., who regularly attends Comic-Con. “A lot of these presentations have become just big commercials that we stupidly pay to see.” The director Guillermo del Toro, who reluctantly walked away from “The Hobbit” in May because of production delays, made a surprise appearance to announce the subject of his next big movie: Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion. If Comic-Con is a film festival, though, it still belongs to the people. Those who wanted a glimpse at Robert Rodriguez’s grisly action movie “Machete” were invited to a Thursday night screening of scenes in a parking lot, after a party with free tacos, tequila and beer (“with this flier, while supplies last”).

As a result, Feinberg will merely propose that the banks voluntarily adopt a “brake provision” that would allow their boards to nullify or alter any bonus payouts or employment contracts in the event of a future financial crisis. All 17 companies have told Feinberg that they will consider adopting the provision, although none has committed to do so. Feinberg is expected to call the payouts ill advised but not unlawful or contrary to the public interest, the people with knowledge of his report said. On Wall Street, meanwhile, profits and pay have already rebounded. Goldman Sachs is on pace to hand out an average of $544,000 per worker in salary and bonuses, although many could earn several times that amount. JPMorgan Chase’s investment bank is on track to pay its workers, on average, about $400,000, while the average Morgan Stanley employee could collect about $262,000. If the second half of 2010 plays

out like the first half, Wall Street bonuses will be paid out at about the same level as last year and similar to 2007 levels, when the crisis had just started to unfold. “It’s healthier than I would have ever expected a year ago,” said Alan Johnson, a longtime compensation consultant who specializes in financial services. Feinberg was named last month as the independent administrator for claims tied to the BP oil spill, making it likely that the release of his findings on the financial companies will be his final act as the overseer of banker pay. The review, mandated by the 2009 economic stimulus bill, broadened the scope of Feinberg’s duties to include examining the pay packages of top earners at 419 companies that accepted bailout funds. However, it did not give him the power to demand changes to the compensation arrangements, as he did in each of the past two years at seven companies that received multiple bailouts.

Agriculture Continued from B1 But the valley is too small to be useful for the massive needs of modern agribusiness — so, for three decades, its patchwork quilt of small farmers have formed the leading edge of the sustainable agriculture and local-food movement. It is their collaborative efforts, united under the regional identity “Capay Valley Grown,” that supplies product to FarmShares. “We built a network of farms serving a network of companies,” said Thomas Nelson, 30, a University of CaliforniaDavis-educated MBA who runs Capay Valley Farm Shop and received early support from the Palo Alto, Calif., design firm IDEO. “We hope urban folks can enjoy the agriculture of our very special place and help preserve it.” In Tuesday’s cool dawn, 63-year-old picker Francisco Montes climbed a ladder and reached into gnarled branches with brown, sun-burnished hands. It’s a big day: the first day of a brief three-week harvest for the cherished “Suncrest” peach, the flagship fruit of the farm, Good Humus Produce. On a recent Tuesday, heat came early, so the bounty was quickly hauled to the cool barn. There, with gentle hands, chattering women examined each piece of fruit — curvaceous, with a soft fuzzy robe — for evidence of insects. Then, the fruit gently rolled down the tray of an old-fashioned sorting machine, separating by size. The peaches were then moved into a cooler, between bouquets of fresh flowers, where they awaited afternoon packaging. Outside, a dog slept in the dust. Their next stop was a packing shed, up the road at Live Oak Farm — the heartbeat of FarmShares’ production line. Here, the peaches joined deliveries of other produce — cucumbers from Durst Organic Growers and green beans, eggplant and red beets from Full Belly Farm. Then there was gold chard and torpedo onions from River Dog Farm, summer squash from Blue Heron Farm and plums from the Ol’ Green Go Farm. “We really try to buy from

How it works FarmShares is a multi-farm “Community Supported Agriculture” program operated by a collaborative of family farms, called Capay Valley Farm Shop. Each “share” features a pre-selected box of what’s fresh and best of season. It offers two share sizes, a peck ($16) and bushel ($24). A peck’s seven items feed a household of one to two people; the bushel’s 11 items feed a family of two to four. Additional items, such as nuts, meats, olive oil, wine, lavender, honey and flowers are also available. Members sign up online and pay by credit card by the month, quarter or year. For more information, go to www.capayvalleyfarmshop .com or e-mail infocapay valleyfarmshop.com. as many farms as possible. It just feels so good getting that money to the farms, our neighbors,” said Nina Andres, who weighs and bags the produce, then assembles it into neat boxes. Here, in a cold storage room, it slumbered for the night. It was dawn the next morning when Thomas Nelson backed his truck into the packing shed. It’s been less than 24 hours since the peach left the tree limb. He loaded dozens of boxes into the white truck.

Out of the sleepy valley and onto Route 80, Nelson barreled through rush-hour traffic toward the Bay Area. There’s a quick stop at Chevron in San Ramon; they’ve bought 32 boxes. Roche, in Pleasanton, bought 10 more. In San Jose, Adobe awaits. Nelson arrived at 10:30 a.m. and backed the FarmShares truck into a loading dock. Boxes are loaded and delivered to the sparkling cafeteria. A peach will go home to Los Gatos, Calif., with Elizabeth Schildge, who coordinates global conferences for Adobe. Many other peaches, wrapped in paper and protected in a box with the other produce, await lunchtime pickup by other hungry employees. And then it makes its final stop: the lunch box of 8-year-old Jeffrey Schildge, attending summer camp at Blossom Hill Elementary School. “He gets so excited on Wednesdays, asking ‘What’d we get?’” said Elizabeth Schildge. “We buy by the bushel and eat it all. We’ve been introduced to many new types of healthy foods. “It provides the perfect opportunity to gather together to support our family farms,” she said.

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Film Continued from B1 “We have Alpine forests, high lakes, ranches, river gorges, desert ... you could literally find just about any place in the world right here,” he said. FOA has had some success since it was founded by three actors to bring more productions, and therefore more work, to the region. It lobbied to allocate money to Oregon-based companies that spend more than $75,000 on a production, created a directory of about 250 local actors, crew and ad agencies, and recently started renting a camera to actors recording video auditions. It also signed up a high-profile board member — Jeff Dawn, an Academy Award-winning makeup artist who worked on the TV series “Lost.” But the all-volunteer organization needs funding to do more, like finish the online locations library, which Roach estimates will cost $10,000. FOA approached local governments and economic development agencies, including the

city of Bend, Visit Bend and Economic Development for Central Oregon, which declined to fund FOA because they don’t have the money or don’t typically fund such efforts, he said. FOA also wants to find funding to establish local incentives in addition to what the state provides for tax breaks and rebates for film projects. Incentives are the most important factor when a production decides where to film, Roach said. Location is the next most important, and the local workforce is third, he said. The first movie in the blockbuster Twilight series was filmed in Oregon. But the production moved to Vancouver, B.C., because the $5 million Oregon Production Incentive Fund was on track to run out of money before the second movie could be shot. Oregon raised the cap to $7.5 million in the next biennium, but that’s nothing compared to what other states like Louisiana, New Mexico, Georgia and Michigan offer, Roach said. Incentives don’t have to be rebates or tax breaks, but could include waiving certain permits

or discounting city services, he said, and FOA is still working on creating some kind of incentive package. Local film activity is already higher than usual this year thanks to a feature film, “The Wait,” which employed dozens of locals in the Sisters area during a month of filming before it wrapped last week, he said. All the extras, at least four primary roles and at least six crew members were hired locally, Roach said, and the production spent money on lodging, supplies and transportation. “There’s a big, huge economic impact when a feature film is in town,” he said. The final budget for “The Wait” is expected to amount to more than $200 million, said Vince Porter, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Film & Television. The Portlandbased company will likely get 15 percent refunded thanks to the incentive program that FOA helped push through in the last legislative session, he said. Adrianne Jeffries can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at ajeffries@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 B3

A N Motorcycles stripped down to suit a skateboard aesthetic By Austin Considine New York Times News Service

INDIANAPOLIS — When Lee Bender learned in 2007 that he had multiple sclerosis, he knew right away that his all-consuming passion of nearly 20 years, skateboarding, would no longer be possible. “I was sponsored, skating quite a bit, traveling quite a bit, but that all came to an end,” he said, referring to his time on tour representing skate gear makers. “My balance is off, so anything that rolls underneath my feet is completely foreign feeling.” What rolls underneath his seat is a different story. Though his own transition from four wheels to two was compelled somewhat by circumstance, Bender, a wiry, tattooed, 31-year-old from northeast Indiana, was not alone among skateboarders who have found new expressions of freedom in motorcycles. “On a baseball team, you’ve got a coach yelling at you, ‘Go faster, do this, do that,’” he said. “With skateboarding, I could do whatever I wanted.” Motorcycles preserved his independence, Bender said. “I’m in control of the bike. I do what I want with it.” And at least one motorcycle maker has noted the similar mind-sets of skaters and riders. Harley-Davidson is using star skateboarders to promote a new variation of its Sportster model. “We definitely looked at what these guys were doing and what other guys were doing, and what we saw was this trend toward raw and stripped down,” said Paul James, director of product communications at Harley-Davidson.

Bare-bones For skateboarders who grew up dodging cars — and often, the security guards who looked after their impromptu practice spots — the requirements of a good bike can be reasonably straightforward: a durable machine that makes the trip to and from the skatepark but doesn’t draw too much attention, the deafening blast of its modified exhaust pipes notwithstanding. Then there are the skateboarders whose urge to build something more personalized extends to motorcycles. The bikes are customized, but rarely are they chrome cruisers with stretched out front ends and the high-rise handlebars known as ape-hangers. These are sleek stripped-down machines, recalling a style, popular after World War II, in which owners chopped away excess to make their bikes leaner and faster. Whether it’s a Honda CB350 whittled to the frame in the style of a cafe racer or a 1960s Harley, stripped of its fenders and fitted with a “panhead” engine, there is a bare-bones aesthetic to many of the machines. Typical design features of the genre include custom handlebars, fenderless front wheels, suspensions shorn of all extraneous brackets and no-frills seating for just one person. Bender’s bike started as a 1996 Harley-Davidson Sportster; chrome plating had been lavished on its engine. Today, the engine is just about the only part original to the bike, and most of its chrome has been stripped off. His modifications include a new low-slung frame, a vestigial wind deflector fashioned from a section of rear fender and handlebars that are startlingly narrow — just 16½ inches wide.

Greg E. Andrews / New York Times News Service

either on a skateboard or a motorcycle,” said Rick Eusey, a wildhaired 27-year-old, tattooed from knuckles to throat, who is a longtime friend of Bender’s. “I end up just doing my thing. I don’t need anybody else around.” Eusey started skating at a young age, and eventually earned sponsorships and took part in professional skate tours. He shared a house here with Bender until last month, when they rode their motorcycles to San Francisco, where Bender works at an auto glass shop and Eusey works the door at a bar. The previous owner of Eusey’s 1999 Sportster 1200 had added lots of chrome parts, big accessory lights and a large gas tank. “Basically, I went through, stripped off everything that I could,” he said. “What I’ve tried to do is make it as bare-bones as possible.” There is a “Road Warrior” quality to many skaters’ bikes. Eusey’s Harley, for example, has a hatchet bolted to the frame (handy when camping out) and foot pegs made from railroad spikes. But elegant flourishes often emerge: He recently repainted his gas tank in a psychedelic wild cherry sparkle finish accented by tiny flakes of silver and stripes of gold. The crossover of skateboarding’s design culture to motorcycles has been embraced by Harley-Davidson. A promotional video for a new model in the Sportster line, the Forty-Eight, features skateboard heroes like Leo Romero, Heath Kirchart, Brian Hansen and Matt Ball. And the FortyEight comes tailored with some of the styling elements favored by skaters, including a solo seat, forward-mounted controls and a 2.1-gallon peanut tank. “The trend is certainly broader than skateboarding, but I feel like it started there — maybe it’s purest there,” James said, noting that the enthusiasm seems to have spread to groups like snowboarders as well. “Skateboarding could very well be the epicenter. There’s no question that there are huge parallels there between bikers and skateboarders.”

Lee Bender works on one of his modified Honda motorcycles in his garage in Indianapolis in April. After nearly 20 years of skateboarding, Bender, who learned he had multiple sclerosis in 2007, went from riding skateboards to riding motorcycles as a way to find new expressions of freedom and preserve his independence.

“On a baseball team, you’ve got a coach yelling at you, ‘Go faster, do this, do that.’ With skateboarding, I could do whatever I wanted.” — Lee Bender, skateboarder turned motorcycle enthusiast

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A natural convergence In some ways, an overlap of the skater and biker subcultures seems almost inevitable. Long gone are the days when skateboarders all resembled landlocked surfers, with fluorescent knee pads and long, baggy “board shorts.” Today’s skaters are just as likely to be bearded and dressed entirely in black, tattooed to the knuckles of fingers festooned with skull rings. More important, there’s the philosophical alignment: a shared attitude that prizes freedom and scoffs at rules, for which the roadworn renegade provides the ultimate symbol. “Skateboarding and motorcycling kind of have the same energy to them, where, if I want to go out and ride, I go out and ride,

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B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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D 21.75 +.35 22.85 +1.08 3.57 102.73 +3.92 3.21 +.08 0.80 35.15 +1.12 4.10 +.20 10.56 +.58 1.00 20.84 +.67 25.64 +.97 0.88 29.10 +.91 1.68 -.01 0.84 31.30 +.15 0.60 25.34 -.57 1.74 30.59 +.70 29.11 +1.25 0.37 4.84 +.05 1.66 70.90 +2.60 1.66 59.90 +2.42 24.70 +1.58 44.63 +.48 37.68 +1.24 6.09 +.15 36.23 +.10 3.86 +.52 1.50 39.90 +1.55 0.10 14.32 +.05 0.48 39.98 +.03 74.45 +1.14 0.60 49.41 +1.15 0.68 38.00 +1.37 0.40 55.85 +.90 33.39 +1.27 1.34 57.95 +1.17 0.58 12.59 +.75 0.51 17.72 +.69 0.81 12.96 +.84 0.33 12.94 +.30 0.88 16.69 +.21 0.04 13.66 +.30 2.05 25.10 -.02 2.58 -.03 2.16 25.66 +.11 1.80 49.80 +2.17 1.04 3.93 +.28 2.80 58.73 +1.27 0.36 25.70 +.52 1.96 48.20 +.63 1.42 +.01 0.04 2.17 +.17 23.08 +.80 65.83 +1.72 2.03 25.49 +.08 0.22 18.67 +1.29 90.07 -3.09 24.07 -1.33 0.72 77.35 +1.35 1.00 12.43 +.48 0.32 17.14 +.71 0.40 42.23 +.50 8.61 +.16 1.16 43.25 +1.45 .33 +.01 17.66 +.26 3.90 +.15 1.00 5.89 +.26 0.72 59.90 +.28 1.48 67.40 +.48 38.27 +1.36 6.12 +.32 0.92 29.65 +1.04 16.92 +.74 0.28 26.45 +.36 78.35 +1.72 0.30 28.96 +1.74 0.60 34.93 +1.09 34.56 +.81 31.76 +.63 20.93 +.05 5.56 +.21 56.17 +1.20 19.38 +.02 0.60 17.31 +.78 8.40 +.04 1.58 +.02 6.65 +.01 1.40 90.73 +1.77 5.24 +.23 0.38 20.98 +.46 1.44 31.11 +1.23 1.28 10.30 +.20 4.00 151.21 +7.88 0.95 12.27 +.16 0.35 3.90 +.04 2.28 17.18 +.01 0.17 2.04 +.01 1.36 10.17 +.17 0.40 10.74 +.43 0.60 15.05 +.21 10.71 +.34 21.39 +.97 3.66 +1.15 2.02 32.26 +.13 1.68 66.60 +3.42 5.74 +.06 7.99 +.48 1.36 +.03 42.18 +1.73 0.04 6.85 +.49 2.00 79.14 +3.06 5.93 -.04 0.22 11.34 +.02 8.19 +.58 0.60 10.78 +.50 20.80 +.38 8.80 +.08 17.22 +.60 0.44 18.58 +.98 16.76 +.93 7.65 +.28 1.22 +.07 0.56 16.26 +.92 0.40 20.37 +.71 1.28 24.93 +.18 32.17 +.68 0.32 37.55 +1.27 0.56 20.66 +.43 2.97 +.15 5.13 +.11 13.23 +.46 0.52 24.93 +.85 0.56 15.13 +.60 0.34 9.57 +.57 8.32 +.41 0.31 20.09 +.64 0.28 14.81 +.68 1.20 62.13 +1.15 11.51 +.50 0.05 14.02 +1.02 23.00 +3.06 10.77 +.63 0.80 28.72 +.51 0.10 58.40 +2.52 0.42 39.76 +.80 41.09 +.86 0.92 53.95 +.33 0.25 17.26 +.42 0.16 19.10 +.35 14.68 +.76 6.44 +.23 0.80 13.43 +.74 27.03 +.42 0.20 14.20 +.46 2.14 +.11 0.40 78.91 +2.22 16.01 +.76 1.00 59.40 +1.79 0.04 31.52 +.83 37.20 +.37 1.00 28.54 +.60 4.60 281.72 +8.57 0.60 15.92 +.23 27.61 +1.11 30.38 +.50 5.19 +.23 5.16 167.21 +3.85 0.26 24.49 +.44 13.98 -.05 19.05 +.83 0.96 51.72 +1.70 0.26 17.71 +.68 0.12 9.91 +.25 0.34 10.50 +.80 7.62 +.36 0.35 29.92 -.04 15.89 +.84 0.40 25.50 +.64 0.72 26.23 +.51 33.45 +.67 0.12 32.77 +.03 46.13 +1.65 6.40 +.31 6.49 +.27 0.60 7.35 +.17 0.63 8.16 +.21 13.27 +.50 16.37 +.60 10.80 +.09 0.04 6.61 +.23 5.65 +.21 13.88 +.49 3.86 +.03 1.80 45.32 +2.20 0.28 24.55 +.67 10.65 38.07 +1.10 1.10 36.14 +.19 3.48 64.77 +.78 1.08 61.29 +2.19 0.30 35.18 +.93 1.08 57.86 +1.97 13.68 +.05 39.04 +.90 83.60 -1.61 0.20 42.08 +1.99 0.90 8.71 +.01 0.04 5.09 +.13 2.00 32.21 -.03 1.96 12.14 +.30 .95 +.03 0.80 79.15 +1.30 0.78 33.26 -1.49 21.19 +.51 24.54 -.11 0.64 37.62 +1.42 20.13 +.61 0.40 33.67 +2.24 0.72 35.80 +1.63 19.15 +.91 25.94 +.88 .39 -.13 0.40 36.21 +.20 0.14 34.09 -1.30 15.12 +.65 33.01 -.88 1.76 68.00 +1.13 0.04 11.23 +.87 0.74 23.33 +.78 29.07 +.58 0.36 5.96 +.27 .51 +.03 0.20 28.04 +.89

Nm CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CntrStBks CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChathLT n ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaUni ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC ClayGSol CleanEngy ClearChOut Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogdSpen Cogent Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE Cohu Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conmed ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB Cntwd pfA CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane Credicp CredSuiss Cree Inc Cresud Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s Cubic CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurJpn CurtisWrt CushTRet Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DayStr rsh DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk

D 6.65 +.19 9.06 +.34 52.34 +1.25 .42 +.01 3.22 26.58 +.51 4.85 +.17 0.43 9.87 +.33 0.86 14.73 +.42 0.80 28.60 +.35 20.69 +.45 0.78 14.19 +.28 0.04 8.66 -.52 1.56 12.84 +.39 27.16 +1.74 22.07 +.87 0.01 14.55 +.22 10.18 +.61 2.90 35.54 +.36 5.79 +.49 59.89 -1.14 14.77 +.49 75.60 +2.05 26.27 +.36 34.23 +.42 4.07 +.11 17.88 +1.44 15.10 +.15 33.91 +.95 25.73 +.98 1.70 18.75 -.06 0.30 21.70 +.56 2.88 73.44 +1.27 20.33 +.42 0.16 10.11 +.47 44.71 +1.57 0.63 3.77 +.09 11.84 +1.02 3.44 +.09 17.92 +.75 1.50 +.07 11.48 -.43 10.45 +.38 5.68 +.18 1.54 66.86 +1.76 9.91 +.54 1.81 50.95 +.81 1.78 3.01 -.03 5.18 +.02 4.46 +.25 0.23 13.88 +.59 6.92 +.20 1.30 +.08 133.16 +3.56 12.70 +.65 0.24 7.17 +.24 1.48 52.20 +.51 1.42 20.89 +.33 0.56 65.58 -.02 2.85 +.02 12.95 +.66 0.32 75.87 +2.18 2.95 +.07 1.58 27.24 +.74 0.72 14.36 +.61 0.48 25.88 +.68 18.96 +.40 23.27 +.71 2.13 25.93 -.03 4.05 +.11 .81 +.05 46.62 +1.61 0.40 53.00 +2.12 8.00 +.31 16.56 +.88 10.65 +.64 6.52 +.19 0.56 54.52 +3.24 2.20 64.94 +.55 14.90 +.70 0.60 36.65 +1.55 8.72 +.63 0.36 28.22 +.52 1.76 54.26 +.18 14.99 +.55 0.40 7.31 +.32 9.16 +.22 0.24 18.06 +.80 54.10 +1.03 0.96 14.10 +.25 0.37 6.71 +.25 0.80 11.49 +.39 0.24 15.04 +2.34 46.41 +1.28 3.62 +.09 2.12 82.57 +.07 15.80 +.66 0.60 15.75 +.40 0.04 17.20 +1.00 1.47 +.01 0.38 18.82 +.47 0.38 17.82 +.47 0.20 37.34 +1.12 0.94 38.04 +1.17 0.48 13.87 +.45 9.82 +.25 2.00 24.92 +.41 26.41 +1.20 29.92 -.12 18.38 +.58 0.37 72.06 +1.72 1.36 14.46 +.62 11.43 +.25 18.50 +.86 0.60 46.40 +1.28 8.55 +.17 26.29 +.50 20.99 -.31 0.40 32.80 +.76 0.80 23.79 +.13 12.92 +.42 57.70 +.65 47.29 +1.47 2.24 +.08 17.65 +.81 2.20 53.27 +1.15 0.40 39.22 +1.55 2.38 46.02 +.75 16.87 +.34 0.96 34.10 +1.21 24.14 +.86 45.86 +1.72 10.54 +.29 0.06 38.78 +.90 1.08 44.54 -2.31 0.42 21.94 +1.08 1.09 48.59 +2.01 2.30 27.93 +.39 0.92 21.37 +.48 0.24 77.92 -4.08 18.97 +.48 10.25 +.25 0.56 32.63 +.87 0.20 18.10 +1.30 0.44 27.75 +1.77 1.57 38.27 +1.50 19.52 +.22 10.70 +.29 0.82 54.90 +1.29 6.20 +.15 1.75 23.44 +.16 1.69 22.33 +.18 0.16 6.73 +.26 53.18 -.21 1.50 16.00 +.32 19.01 +.45 0.72 39.98 +.55 3.95 +.28 0.80 32.79 +1.08 1.70 95.04 +2.34 1.85 42.13 +.14 70.88 +3.82 0.32 13.01 +.17 11.37 +.28 6.30 +.18 38.84 +.41 27.46 +.75 .41 +.01 39.46 +1.44 0.18 39.06 +2.38 21.22 +.63 1.80 51.84 +1.23 1.05 75.90 +2.75 1.55 +.05 128.42 +1.15 2.47 89.55 +1.56 113.96 +.16 0.32 30.22 +1.34 0.90 8.56 +.21 1.54 +.08 33.76 +1.52 3.52 +.08 10.95 +.31 2.40 12.93 +.17 .83 +.09 0.05 48.75 -1.11 4.03 +.18 0.28 4.40 +.15 38.99 +1.34 0.10 4.27 +.16 0.78 9.43 +.04 1.21 25.96 +.35 0.15 10.55 +.35 0.60 37.97 +.82 25.39 +1.21 2.12 47.70 +.87 11.24 +.69 0.08 37.46 -.34 1.28 42.57 +1.89 7.81 +.30 58.01 -.38 2.74 +1.34 0.20 51.51 +.25 12.00 +.31 1.51 -.20 47.61 +1.78 1.20 62.81 +1.05 0.36 13.75 +.19 7.43 +.24 13.40 +.33 0.40 23.59 +.63 11.46 +.56 .81 +.03 1.00 21.72 +2.88 15.21 +.49 33.34 +.78 1.19 +.03 2.62 +.09 0.20 29.13 +.60 2.74 +.17 0.93 64.27 +3.85 1.66 23.36 +.21 7.51 +.11 30.90 +.56 11.57 -.17 0.08 10.72 +.58 0.64 63.78 +1.11 17.48 +.94 11.19 +.43 2.36 68.62 +1.35 0.50 62.31 -1.83 0.03 8.73 +.30

Nm

D

DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DirLatBull DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

1.08 2.12 0.16

7.51 5.66 0.20

0.15 7.35 0.20 3.41 4.83 8.17 5.17 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 0.48 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 13.16 +.41 24.96 +.46 28.53 +.58 62.57 +2.21 26.36 +1.17 22.35 +1.21 36.18 +3.37 19.04 +.47 36.46 +.74 31.35 +2.19 27.12 +2.21 38.93 -3.31 34.62 -4.15 30.82 -3.97 52.62 -4.08 37.11 -3.53 14.62 -1.36 21.49 +1.69 41.08 +1.38 28.45 +2.56 40.81 +4.25 14.08 -1.60 40.30 +3.87 14.96 -1.09 46.32 +2.90 29.21 +1.88 14.99 +.72 36.11 +1.13 31.30 +.96 .23 +.02 19.55 +.32 33.59 +.78 28.10 -1.30 67.50 +.97 28.98 +.06 47.63 +.56 42.81 +.85 42.22 +.96 12.87 +.84 52.06 +3.56 46.62 +2.17 16.54 +.46 10.51 15.20 +.79 46.04 +1.74 26.64 +1.12 39.60 +.72 5.62 +.34 30.72 +.81 23.82 +.62 33.33 +.79 4.38 +.07 51.07 +2.52 2.97 +.17 4.28 +.16 37.73 +1.17 25.03 +1.00 17.10 +.20 11.39 +.55 70.18 +1.13 2.36 +.16 2.29 +.06 8.87 +.73 2.02 +.06 3.71 +.07

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp Eastgrp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EV TxAd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp EchelonC Eclipsys Ecolab EdisonInt EducMgt n EducRlty EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EFII eMagin EBrasAero Emcore Emdeon n EMS Emeritus EmersonEl EmpDist EmpireRst EmployH Emulex EnbrEPtrs EnCana g s EndvrInt EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EscoTech EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver n EthanAl Euronet EverestRe EvergrnEn EvgIntlBal EvrgrSlr h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FiberTw rs FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCashFn FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FT Matls FT RNG FTrFltRt FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM

0.25 17.25 +.86 13.35 +.57 20.94 +.77 10.42 +.11 19.87 +.39 26.33 +1.56 2.84 40.34 +1.74 0.62 103.20 +.78 0.88 37.80 +.98 8.17 +.02 4.67 +.21 0.40 25.72 -1.04 0.10 5.52 +.23 0.64 8.50 +.13 0.04 17.18 +.68 2.08 35.41 +1.28 1.76 57.54 +1.86 4.70 +.28 2.32 74.75 +1.61 0.64 29.14 +.86 1.39 15.93 +.21 1.29 14.76 +.34 1.62 11.95 +.35 1.53 10.49 +.21 1.56 11.94 +.22 1.60 13.50 +.12 7.37 +.33 18.61 -.05 0.62 48.40 +.24 1.26 32.91 +.54 15.17 -1.55 0.20 6.36 +.27 57.37 +3.82 0.04 12.42 +.29 21.26 +.36 1.60 30.80 +.02 4.94 0.05 16.03 +.34 15.59 +.72 9.58 +.15 2.33 +.24 0.38 23.80 +.77 .84 +.04 12.68 +.18 44.16 -1.18 15.81 +.86 1.34 48.84 +1.42 1.28 19.51 +.34 1.09 -.02 0.24 16.14 9.79 +.27 4.01 58.13 -.73 0.80 31.61 +.25 1.15 +.07 23.43 +.29 1.00 39.45 +.53 2.90 +.04 35.74 +2.73 0.52 46.53 +1.22 52.60 +1.05 4.72 +.35 2.16 35.36 -.08 3.58 51.16 +.24 16.33 +.71 0.10 4.87 +.12 2.16 22.67 +.23 0.68 21.41 +.11 23.48 +.46 29.10 +.92 0.14 41.20 -.68 4.71 +.26 3.32 78.27 +1.72 2.30 38.70 +.24 2.60 41.34 +1.90 6.95 +.47 10.91 +.14 7.49 +.19 0.16 30.15 +.80 86.51 +1.79 1.20 51.73 +1.61 0.88 16.53 +.68 1.35 44.92 +2.07 0.28 12.14 +.53 0.32 30.67 +5.79 4.13 104.55 +3.64 0.55 62.27 +1.11 18.05 +.43 0.20 15.87 +.90 15.29 +.30 1.92 73.42 +2.14 .10 +.01 0.77 15.24 +.20 .69 +.03 5.40 +.25 0.12 14.90 -.07 3.16 +.09 2.10 41.80 -.15 5.83 +.03 5.62 +.11 0.28 21.19 +.58 0.40 40.66 +1.43 18.20 +.99 42.12 -3.08 26.03 +.45 0.23 14.71 +.66 2.78 -.03 1.76 59.38 +1.21 20.62 +.38 20.16 +.38 83.40+10.29 3.41 +.06 19.15 +.27 30.02 -.23 0.50 59.46 +.82 62.47 +1.79 0.48 7.89 +.36 3.86 -.02 35.24 +1.00 0.92 72.87 +1.75 0.08 23.41 +.87 10.17 +.49 0.62 38.71 +.40 0.84 48.87 +1.38 0.48 78.53 +4.50 0.20 15.16 +.97 2.64 75.64 +2.52 0.24 6.37 +.34 0.96 22.05 +.67 5.25 +.32 8.50 +.91 4.68 +.23 15.57 +.77 0.72 14.72 +1.18 0.20 28.03 +.32 1.28 10.96 +.33 0.04 12.45 +1.17 16.12 +.80 0.16 14.73 +.68 0.24 14.53 +.95 .50 -.01 24.53 +.99 0.04 5.02 +.11 0.40 14.79 +.49 0.75 11.25 +.33 4.03 +.27 0.04 12.15 +.31 0.56 13.08 +.38 137.68 +2.58 0.25 19.68 +.53 0.08 16.03 +.39 0.51 13.30 +.90 2.20 38.43 +.58 0.64 17.97 +.56 46.55 +1.28 3.13 +.07 6.56 +.37 0.80 24.22 +.21 1.16 93.73 +2.23 0.50 46.02 +2.06 17.20 +.21 0.32 45.09 +.51 0.60 13.65 +.43 4.35 +.21 12.09 +.54

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GE 6-32 vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenBiotc h Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp GerovaFn Gibraltar GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GblXChCon Globalstar GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Griffon Group1 GrubbEllis GAeroPac GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HNI Corp HSBC HSBC Cap HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenNat HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HiTchPhm HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HimaxTch HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp HomeProp Honda

D 4.25 +.34 3.25 44.27 +.77 12.19 +.29 28.41 +.54 28.21 +.66 15.51 +.46 10.89 +.76 17.32 +1.32 3.87 +.02 0.76 42.74 +1.37 39.18 +1.86 23.18 +.95 1.90 19.26 +.70 0.88 94.98 +4.24 0.76 12.08 +.62 1.20 68.78 +2.72 .12 20.43 +.85 5.99 +.06 1.00 7.34 +.01 12.85 +.15 1.40 33.00 +1.27 27.38 +1.31 1.23 +.04 0.28 20.25 +.71 0.12 9.14 +.36 7.84 +.14 5.16 +.25 1.12 27.94 -.20 0.20 5.99 +.37 4.40 +.05 6.36 +.07 26.25 +1.01 6.35 +.36 0.44 4.63 +.14 1.68 15.60 +.22 0.14 14.58 +.44 1.28 25.80 +.49 19.99 +.33 5.65 +.10 0.16 13.48 +.02 0.40 18.33 +.22 0.20 49.88 +.47 1.50 30.00 +.70 24.41 +.88 28.19 +1.09 43.40 -.05 16.48 +.30 5.35 +.11 26.35 +.55 1.68 61.03 +1.75 0.40 15.21 +.37 1.66 25.40 -.16 13.70 +.31 0.50 6.09 +.11 1.12 35.36 +.33 3.20 +.13 .35 +.00 17.10 +.12 0.18 15.46 +.30 0.44 20.00 +1.20 19.40 -.56 1.64 42.65 +.18 .47 +.01 15.00 +1.07 54.17 +1.55 21.37 +.25 12.90 +1.33 11.01 +.06 0.21 14.71 +.69 4.77 +.19 5.85 +.25 10.38 +.54 2.13 -.03 29.48 +.68 33.78 +.87 0.52 14.98 +.41 1.98 36.66 +.30 2.41 +.17 0.40 6.21 +.28 3.68 -.20 4.70 +.43 0.08 38.79 +1.40 2.29 +.04 17.14 +.16 1.73 +.03 11.40 +.47 0.40 13.38 +.69 0.17 13.08 +.48 0.18 40.59 +.43 4.06 +.08 1.40 146.55 -.44 1.08 69.77 +2.73 12.86 +1.07 12.23 +.50 484.81 +7.31 24.28 +1.33 0.80 30.68 +.08 16.17 +.59 2.16 108.39 +2.79 1.41 +.07 5.79 +.50 21.68 +.34 0.52 24.26 +1.21 3.55 +.20 3.93 +.30 1.74 +.03 0.07 5.69 +.21 0.83 17.65 +.53 43.99 29.96 +1.09 9.85 +.41 13.60 +.85 1.80 65.83 +1.95 13.00 +.40 27.36 +1.78 1.08 +.07 1.48 31.66 +.18 6.30 +.03 0.52 18.59 +.44 0.64 35.84 +2.05 43.53 +1.90 0.54 25.37 +.58 1.86 34.96 +1.22 0.86 27.30 +1.71 1.70 49.88 +1.65 2.03 25.90 +.19 25.58 +.04 28.33 +.88 20.35 +.79 0.36 30.30 +.42 7.05 +.30 0.96 28.79 +.78 24.49 -.45 18.05 +.04 1.27 +.04 1.00 43.90 +.72 42.94 +.44 0.40 27.90 +1.22 31.26 +1.51 5.99 +.20 0.06 9.98 +.20 0.88 45.92 +1.81 0.82 26.41 +.54 0.20 23.04 +1.29 1.00 40.10 +.76 4.65 29.58 +.36 1.24 23.75 +.56 5.93 +.19 3.12 +.19 2.72 44.81 +.96 6.65 -.02 1.20 23.02 +.84 24.00 +.39 18.13 +.47 16.53 +.12 0.08 15.86 +.40 4.64 +.11 4.84 +.14 1.80 45.44 +.42 9.95 +.51 0.12 3.93 +.12 0.24 41.14 +1.08 .51 +.01 52.77 +1.47 0.80 49.24 -.26 2.50 +.08 0.80 10.02 +.16 0.20 4.81 +.17 1.28 47.75 -2.07 10.92 +.68 0.40 52.20 +1.31 47.53 +.51 0.32 46.07 +.59 18.40 +.72 21.98 +.20 19.06 +.28 1.70 29.66 +1.13 0.41 29.45 +.51 0.25 3.01 +.03 0.60 25.53 +.40 9.38 +.30 13.44 +.13 0.95 28.22 +.75 2.32 48.09 +1.93 30.17 +.68

Nm HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HudsonHi HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt n

D 1.21 42.66 +1.53 0.84 42.38 +.41 16.53 +.52 8.09 +.42 57.57 +1.03 1.80 20.19 +.59 0.04 13.95 +.37 0.28 5.31 +.15 4.07 +.15 30.42 -1.58 1.44 45.29 +2.54 0.60 12.16 +.11 4.38 +.68 1.27 20.31 +.41 25.12 +.98 46.33 +.62 0.48 35.20 +.70 0.04 5.85 +.18 0.40 9.73 +.43 4.37 35.44 +.44

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICO Glb A IdexxLabs IDT Corp IESI-BFC g iGateCorp IHS Inc ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iShCmxG s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iSSpain iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSSPGth iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOG iShEur350 iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Iberiabnk IconixBr Idacorp IDEX Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndBkMI h IndoTel IndSvAm s Inergy Infinera InfoLgx rsh InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed h InspPhar Insteel IntegLfSci IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntractDat IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InetInfra InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare inVentiv Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IrvinSens IsilonSys Isis IsleCapri ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfC

23.82 +.94 0.06 16.44 +.41 0.53 38.98 +1.21 1.70 62.05 +2.57 16.90 +1.55 0.50 22.91 +.92 0.11 17.23 +.35 60.78 +1.09 0.54 6.71 +.12 1.20 10.69 +.18 8.99 +.61 0.33 5.61 +.01 4.28 +.04 11.69 +.10 28.97 +.72 0.81 20.96 +.64 2.58 69.03 +2.10 0.42 26.23 +.58 0.96 32.24 +1.43 0.60 21.92 +1.00 0.30 20.45 +.78 0.48 15.62 +.36 0.45 15.85 +.73 0.16 9.44 +.17 0.39 48.33 +.88 0.25 11.98 +.12 0.75 51.01 +1.38 0.38 12.03 +.27 1.37 38.98 +1.00 2.26 38.34 +1.78 0.21 12.23 +.19 0.44 15.08 +.46 1.20 48.94 +1.19 17.71 +.40 1.04 49.81 +1.06 1.67 45.15 +.97 3.69 105.89 -.10 0.87 55.41 +1.21 0.68 41.12 +1.10 0.94 77.61 +2.83 2.24 109.84 +2.35 3.90 107.62 -.10 0.59 40.87 +1.20 5.51 109.49 -.14 0.64 40.49 +1.15 1.09 56.45 +1.20 1.22 46.04 +1.46 1.18 52.50 +1.15 3.73 100.85 -1.18 3.82 95.79 -.53 1.21 84.14 -.03 1.38 50.99 +1.66 0.69 38.58 +1.04 0.50 46.21 +1.10 1.22 85.13 +2.15 0.94 75.16 +2.12 8.28 88.45 +.78 79.01 +1.42 1.83 58.85 +2.30 1.20 56.91 +1.23 0.71 48.71 +1.07 1.07 60.36 +1.32 1.04 59.13 +2.13 3.60 104.56 -.03 0.44 69.25 +2.31 0.77 63.42 +2.18 2.72 38.70 +.30 0.74 19.84 +.47 0.25 55.95 +1.47 1.81 50.12 +1.74 0.08 11.52 +.37 0.63 51.89 +1.48 0.56 56.46 +1.84 0.86 58.87 +1.88 0.73 34.05 +.36 0.22 50.62 +1.04 1.02 35.01 +1.22 4.20 +.25 1.28 55.85 +.79 1.00 48.76 +1.99 85.18 -3.48 1.36 50.41 +.73 16.10 +.63 1.20 35.45 +.99 0.60 31.80 +.69 1.63 -.07 1.24 42.19 +.13 43.04 +.53 13.87 +.34 18.10 +.11 8.72 +.31 3.16 +.09 17.16 +.09 12.16 +.15 .32 +.02 1.25 36.63 +.83 13.95 +.76 2.78 42.14 +.27 6.99 +.63 5.20 +.03 7.64 +.10 27.05 +.64 0.54 59.96 +1.95 0.28 36.80 +.74 16.17 +.47 0.57 7.90 +.40 .95 +.04 23.30 +1.02 .72 +.02 5.02 +.26 0.12 9.69 -1.09 33.86 -.85 5.32 +.22 9.05 +1.12 2.72 47.32 +1.26 0.63 21.78 +.52 18.09 +.25 0.80 33.76 +.01 106.52 +2.14 27.16 +.95 0.04 11.31 +.58 10.74 +.56 10.39 +.64 0.34 16.33 +.98 2.60 127.47 +2.20 4.43 +.33 1.00 46.22 +1.15 0.24 15.69 +.57 0.50 24.59 +1.10 19.89 +.97 0.05 3.37 +.03 53.67 +1.24 8.03 +.39 0.48 12.23 -.61 22.90 +.42 37.98 +.58 316.98 +.88 0.05 23.48 +3.48 25.90 +.10 0.44 19.26 +.96 3.18 20.32 +.24 0.33 4.46 +.01 15.09 +.56 0.69 8.44 +.17 10.32 +.47 0.25 24.66 +.55 .19 -.01 16.38 +2.82 9.47 +.23 8.44 +.07 0.55 21.70 +.90 57.93 -4.80 1.86 17.30 +.28 10.48 +.61 36.18 +1.93 6.35 +.05 24.66 +.89 10.58 +.45 0.20 39.35 +.93 1.79 33.18 +.15 1.68 24.60 +.05

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JkksPac Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosphBnk JournalCm JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digit n KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Keithley Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Lance Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LearCorp n LeeEnt LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifePart LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LloydBkg50 LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq

D 0.28 15.09 +.49 0.38 25.28 +.85 19.54 +.43 1.01 -.01 38.59 +1.64 7.70 +.20 14.10 +.36 1.99 17.56 +.58 0.04 10.59 +1.12 0.33 29.36 +.67 8.74 +.14 0.30 23.34 +.76 6.38 +.50 2.00 -.05 2.16 57.02 -.10 0.52 30.48 +1.97 0.20 15.56 +.98 0.20 68.23 +3.49 .99 -.05 59.44 +3.00 4.45 +.45 0.70 57.72 +1.34 27.41 +.90 40.94 +1.20 0.25 11.06 +.41 0.20 22.62 +.61 9.91 +.85 9.30 +.50 0.40 8.08 +.19 1.00 30.83 +1.12 18.23 +.26 1.10 +.05 37.45 +1.45 0.72 36.30 +.96 1.92 26.30 +.11 0.15 9.55 +.49 1.50 50.60 -.54 3.03 +.07 0.48 28.23 +1.29 3.65 +.06 9.02 +.21 0.04 7.95 +.41 1.40 31.31 +1.33 2.64 62.96 +.60 0.64 14.40 +.75 4.36 68.82 -.10 4.36 59.50 12.80 +.50 35.85 +.79 8.50 +.14 0.10 16.33 +.72 0.24 4.44 +.11 14.01 +.12 0.24 21.56 +.43 0.08 13.94 +.83 3.26 +.22 47.95 +1.38 13.52 +.33 14.10 +.85 1.16 29.28 +.44 3.77 +.19 0.38 20.43 -.19 7.00 +.41 10.48 +.24 8.21 +.16 1.60 74.23 +1.89 0.33 23.02 +.51 6.53 +.22 15.29 +.14 21.59 +.84 20.82 +.59 4.86 +.08 2.73 +.06 8.45 +.65 1.11 72.24 -3.71 3.62 +.01 41.55 +1.46 27.53 +1.19 0.64 21.30 +5.30 0.20 39.89 +.42 25.07 +.73 0.04 22.76 +1.10 5.58 +.36 7.94 +.26 0.50 29.47 +.97 11.87 +.13 72.48 +2.62 2.62 +.05 2.08 25.21 +.27 0.16 28.57 +.94 1.04 21.32 +.78 0.40 34.29 +.47 0.16 14.76 +.45 0.60 44.97 +1.07 21.32 +1.38 1.10 +.05 1.39 +.06 0.40 5.99 +.24 33.44 +1.01 0.29 4.24 +.13 28.09 +.76 28.04 +.67 11.53 +.44 45.31 +1.01 1.90 30.21 +1.24 1.00 18.98 -.88 47.79 +1.24 36.56 +1.90 30.02 +.31 1.54 +.05 0.60 36.71 +.98 1.96 35.15 +.20 4.35 +.14 0.60 25.22 +.95 0.80 23.75 +.38 0.04 24.13 +1.08 0.92 31.86 +1.50 2.52 29.51 +.26 4.83 +.07 6.81 +.31 0.20 7.37 +.73 9.20 +.34 7.07 +.41 4.80 +.24 1.45 3.87 +.23 1.94 25.23 2.52 74.25 +.59 0.25 36.88 +.89 14.55 +.33 27.80 -1.99 2.24 -.09 4.00 75.91 +1.46 7.34 +.58 0.44 20.83 +.85 1.44 90.37 +3.31 0.50 39.47 +1.04 40.49 +2.17 22.85 +1.38

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd ManTech ManhAssc Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MarkWest MarIntA

2.80 86.68 +3.18 0.04 17.09 -.13 7.94 +.78 0.11 5.32 +.15 1.00 28.52 +1.16 0.63 19.74 +.70 6.71 +.24 11.33 +.48 6.16 +.09 0.76 7.44 +.13 0.58 6.89 +.01 8.61 +.38 10.15 +.46 9.61 +.21 5.18 +.15 20.25 +.44 2.87 +.16 0.88 49.91 +1.78 31.59 +1.05 2.00 39.57 +1.48 1.80 31.26 +1.01 0.20 19.24 +1.04 2.84 49.48 +.26 3.33 -.04 0.18 73.66 +2.14 4.60 +.10 23.45 +1.19 38.22 +1.01 27.99 +1.49 0.08 10.17 +.79 6.33 -.06 0.74 48.00 +.85 0.52 14.68 +.73 1.00 32.70 +.48 7.71 +.63 22.73 +.34 0.11 49.16 +.98 0.08 31.09 +1.08 26.23 +.47 0.42 40.45 +.54 0.45 48.31 +1.36 0.18 77.11 +2.03 2.56 35.85 +.57 0.16 32.04 +1.28

Nm MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio Meritage Metabolix Metalico Metalline MetUSA n Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolinaH MolsCoorB MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMuf Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Move Inc Mueller MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NIC Inc NICESys NII Hldg NMT Med NPS Phm NRG Egy NTT DOCO NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Nelnet Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand NDragon NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn Nextwve rs NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus

D 0.80 23.09 +.67 0.04 7.27 +.63 20.99 +.69 1.60 85.70 +1.77 16.64 +.33 0.30 10.80 +.59 2.00 22.46 +.60 0.24 29.91 +1.49 10.78 +.26 0.60 208.40 +6.90 0.75 21.05 +.39 3.20 -.46 0.80 18.03 +.37 3.37 +.21 1.04 38.87 +.19 24.22 +.69 2.20 71.40 +1.29 0.94 30.71 +1.49 0.72 64.55 -1.90 10.39 +.26 31.58 +1.39 0.90 53.92 +.72 0.12 8.66 +.17 0.92 23.91 +.74 20.64 +1.00 49.00 -4.33 0.80 9.68 +.29 8.70 +.20 0.24 25.26 +.63 30.36 +.84 9.49 +.49 46.95 -2.24 0.90 36.77 +.55 4.14 +.23 15.49 -7.45 0.36 19.48 +.74 9.42 +.47 60.05 +1.13 4.79 +.34 1.52 35.18 -.01 0.92 30.79 +.67 0.76 18.90 +.51 16.94 +.89 16.79 +.82 4.07 +.33 .67 +.07 12.02 -.04 0.62 22.62 +.41 0.28 10.33 +.39 0.74 39.29 +2.40 8.98 +.14 121.24 +3.93 0.14 11.04 +.38 1.37 30.57 +1.02 6.62 +.36 8.54 +.37 15.36 +.27 0.52 25.84 +.72 2.87 +.12 23.26 +.07 2.46 54.46 +1.89 0.09 18.12 +.80 7.24 92.01 +2.78 0.20 30.55 +1.39 7.68 +.38 8.64 +.26 11.71 +.40 4.66 +.08 3.13 +.10 21.84 +.46 8.91 +.73 6.38 +.22 47.97 +3.05 0.61 19.53 +.68 27.23 -.01 1.12 45.91 +1.02 2.37 +.05 18.58 +.34 0.36 38.00 +.19 1.06 56.66 -.91 12.93 +.47 0.36 15.15 +.15 0.42 22.45 +.27 0.20 26.79 -.01 4.26 29.02 +1.06 1.15 15.84 +.03 0.20 44.95 +.12 7.79 -.12 2.23 +.15 0.40 24.39 +.58 0.07 3.85 +.13 1.00 51.82 +1.31 17.79 +.01 14.49 -.24 53.93 +.28 9.26 +.41 13.17 +.50 22.70 +2.46 0.60 14.41 +.22 0.30 6.94 +.49 26.76 +.97 39.18 +1.45 .50 +.05 6.08 +.25 22.40 +.36 0.57 15.73 +.19 0.44 12.78 +.23 1.20 28.01 +.99 18.10 +.42 0.14 23.51 +.55 8.99 +.51 18.40 +.62 0.31 2.83 +.17 10.37 +.35 1.38 48.95 +1.26 7.17 38.27 +.85 0.40 37.86 +1.25 0.04 6.30 +.34 1.52 23.06 +.82 0.40 14.49 +.37 1.80 37.14 +1.16 9.25 +.29 0.24 5.72 +.39 1.66 17.82 +.49 53.02 +1.59 12.15 +.08 0.28 18.92 +1.16 13.86 +.46 10.79 +.04 31.44 +1.72 41.97 +2.14 36.60 +2.31 14.40 +.53 103.56-16.09 2.73 +.20 14.03 +.35 14.74 +1.38 3.02 +.17 5.38 +.22 22.13 +.87 12.67 +.69 .06 -.00 4.94 -.05 95.55 +.53 2.23 -.01 1.00 16.63 +.34 9.16 +.11 0.28 11.42 +.35 2.54 +.11 0.20 15.55 +.37 52.21 +2.10 0.40 59.01 +.84 7.70 +.05 0.15 12.97 +.37 0.15 14.70 +.38 0.20 20.75 +.48 2.00 52.84 +.72 .84 -.09 0.92 16.32 +.49 1.86 43.33 +1.17 1.08 71.56 +1.91 16.79 +.79 21.10 +.20 19.30 -.04 0.20 31.94 +.11 0.72 67.78 +1.71 0.56 9.17 +.35 5.41 +.22 1.45 28.28 +.47 0.80 33.53 +1.49 1.36 54.72 +1.57 9.65 +.52 3.27 +.20 1.03 27.79 +.52 15.01 +1.03 1.12 46.97 -.19 2.93 -.07 1.88 57.90 +1.87 0.40 3.11 +.08 0.40 11.53 +.34 6.33 -.06 1.99 49.56 +1.01 6.33 +.28 2.18 +.01 6.11 +.10 27.11 +.81

NSTAR nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NustarGP NutriSyst NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd NymoxPh OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysseyHlt OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF h OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicell Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpnwvSy OpkoHlth Oracle OrbitalSci Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OrienPap n OriginAg OrionMar Oritani s OrmatTc OrsusXel Orthfx Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordRs n Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMA Cap PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld PacWstBc Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld PallCorp PanASlv PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan Parkrvsn Parkwy PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pebblebk n Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo Peregrne rs PerfectWld PerkElm PermFix Prmian Perrigo PetMed PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinnaclFn PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PiperJaf PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatUnd PlaybyB Plexus PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyOne Polypore Poniard h Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PwShDiv PwSWtr PSFinPf PSETecLd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PremGlbSv PrmWBc h PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltSemi PrUPShR2K ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProUShEur ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProUSSlv rs

D 1.60 37.63 +.74 1.12 18.45 -.06 0.50 28.77 +.96 32.61 +1.01 16.60 +.39 1.44 39.67 +.56 1.80 29.88 -.49 0.70 23.06 +.28 0.75 8.07 +.08 0.65 7.90 +.06 10.54 +.17 13.88 +.29 3.74 +.36 1.45 38.89 +1.08 27.05 +1.35 48.00 +.97 17.04 +.52 1.52 82.12 +2.07 48.17 +1.40 .96 +.08 0.76 12.94 +.68 12.32 +.37 9.98 +.25 26.10 -.29 1.35 +.08 4.25 +.19 13.74 +.92 2.66 105.46 +1.40 44.04 +.76 .57 +.01 36.54 +1.21 0.28 10.60 +.38 0.69 12.59 -.08 0.80 19.91 +1.25 1.44 22.45 +.71 0.09 25.42 +.41 12.33 -.47 0.80 37.74 +1.34 23.55 +1.39 7.32 +.24 1.84 45.63 +.57 21.12 +.31 41.36 +.85 2.01 +.12 2.39 +.03 0.20 24.31 +.75 14.73 -.89 4.45 +.37 4.16 +.15 8.30 +.50 4.46 -.54 7.78 +.29 12.55 9.75 +.24 0.20 28.57 +.94 .21 -.03 27.68 +1.05 1.84 +.06 31.53 +.87 1.75 40.85 +2.66 0.71 27.18 +.20 31.14 +1.24 29.64 +.62 18.41 -.08 .33 +.00 1.00 5.90 -.02 0.17 43.52 +2.98 1.82 43.93 +.73 19.03 +.96 6.75 8.47 +.45 3.48 +.29 0.40 59.78 +1.24 0.50 12.20 +.48 1.71 108.41 +3.68 2.20 66.00 +1.20 1.40 26.81 +.47 19.16 +.28 0.04 20.00 +.60 0.36 45.81 +1.68 7.66 +.32 .71 +.02 .44 +.01 3.59 +.18 0.60 24.49 +.17 29.65 +.16 3.85 +.22 0.64 37.60 +1.05 0.05 23.25 +.33 76.27 +2.10 28.74 +.88 17.41 +.69 1.37 +.04 24.16 +.18 3.94 +.16 1.04 60.60 +2.31 .88 -.03 0.30 15.35 +1.28 2.00 71.43 +.69 13.28 +.89 0.40 26.88 +.29 0.20 15.56 +.60 1.24 26.32 +.54 0.28 45.23 +2.20 17.09 -.02 0.84 9.75 +.21 26.42 +2.32 0.23 18.99 +.32 1.56 19.71 +.27 1.80 19.72 +.37 1.04 9.90 +.19 0.80 24.66 +1.03 0.60 11.74 +.72 13.02 +.84 0.76 33.61 +1.11 0.62 13.93 +.30 0.12 9.57 +.57 1.08 16.77 +.42 1.92 64.21 +.26 1.61 -.02 23.50 +.36 0.28 19.62 +.73 1.80 +.01 1.20 19.25 +.29 0.25 56.01 +.89 0.40 15.95 -.02 3.72 114.18 +3.70 16.64 +.19 1.18 31.98 +.94 1.18 36.28 +.82 6.83 +.31 0.50 31.94 +.64 0.72 14.81 +.31 7.53 59.92 +.23 0.60 27.06 -.12 7.18 +.30 2.32 50.84 +.95 0.95 31.65 +1.29 0.15 50.05 +2.87 2.11 +.19 4.92 +.32 1.12 26.25 +.76 6.89 +.28 6.95 +.36 1.38 17.20 +.40 1.46 12.44 +.06 10.12 +.50 9.66 +.29 2.10 38.76 +.84 6.26 +.18 0.08 59.59 -.05 28.09 -.31 1.46 24.03 +.63 3.77 63.03 +.08 22.09 +1.25 0.20 31.60 +1.67 0.32 39.59 +.80 5.38 -.06 30.26 +1.40 1.68 37.05 +1.14 1.60 61.20 +2.22 0.40 76.47 +3.16 29.66 +.63 10.04 +.72 25.29 +.41 .55 -.03 0.52 20.89 -.70 2.63 +.10 1.04 18.80 +.51 0.80 24.85 +.80 0.40 97.41 +1.27 2.04 35.61 +.98 9.88 +.43 69.97 -5.33 22.51 +.44 25.01 +.14 24.91 +.72 19.21 +.52 24.03 -.20 0.25 12.52 +.19 0.11 15.78 +.36 1.32 16.93 +.06 0.11 15.26 +.41 1.03 13.94 +.04 1.65 26.74 +.10 0.11 22.57 +.52 0.26 45.77 +1.13 1.98 +.03 1.80 84.33 +1.97 0.12 116.00 +4.76 7.26 -.17 6.40 +.25 .46 +.02 1.08 49.44 +2.32 227.92 +9.49 25.17 +1.11 0.50 25.35 +1.11 0.04 10.84 +.36 50.91 -1.04 42.11 -1.06 51.58 -1.18 33.08 -1.56 0.46 42.86 +1.61 27.47 -1.14 18.31 -1.11 57.83 +2.76 17.30 -.91 0.40 36.19 +1.53 35.63 +.75 36.23 -2.04 46.57 -2.90 25.19 -2.00 64.60 -2.80 36.33 -2.58 0.51 39.86 +2.72 20.84 -1.29 0.17 54.40 +3.07 57.68 -4.20 0.17 31.91 +1.74 50.92 -5.97 0.21 28.65 +1.16 0.13 29.58 +1.86 20.53 -1.91 41.13 -1.52 89.13 +5.63 20.91 -1.59 0.02 28.33 +1.87 32.30 -2.30 0.41 135.28 +8.36 10.30 +.65 33.91 -1.64

Nm

D

ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProceraNt ProctGam 1.93 PrognicsPh ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp 0.16 ProLogis 0.60 ProspctCap 1.21 ProspBcsh 0.62 ProtLife 0.56 ProvET g 0.72 ProvidFS 0.44 Prudentl 0.70 Prud UK 0.61 PsychSol PSEG 1.37 PubStrg 3.20 PulteGrp PPrIT 0.71

Nm 13.78 -1.02 58.76 +2.77 18.22 -.05 22.43 -.40 .54 +.11 61.37 +.26 4.25 -.03 41.66 +.64 30.89 +.62 19.65 +.41 10.97 +.58 9.73 +.22 34.03 +1.00 21.51 +.95 6.77 +.12 12.47 +.56 54.68 +1.97 16.24 +.54 33.00 +.05 33.69 +.69 96.08 +3.15 8.34 +.29 6.61 +.02

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QiaoXing QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfG RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk Radware Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RigelPh RINO Intl RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick RushEntA RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIFncl SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapiens Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis SchiffNutr Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schulmn SchUSSmC Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir SearchMed SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SelectvIns SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoreTel ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s

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Nm 7.15 +.25 3.34 +.14 42.52 +.32 5.28 +.13 16.19 +.16 18.83 +.70 6.41 +.16 86.33 +3.97 24.56 +1.22 40.98 +.82 5.50 +.10 4.23 -.21 .95 31.30 +.78 35.10 +.67 2.33 -.01 12.51 +.51 18.05 +.84 3.97 +.07 5.75 +.30 16.10 -.30 6.33 +.23 3.98 +.12 53.83 +1.29 42.38 +1.21 14.26 +.47 62.52 +1.08 21.46 +.52 44.53 +1.21 36.18 +.67 44.00 +1.50 9.79 12.71 -3.81 38.58 +1.24 1.60 +.05 14.73 +.99 24.97 +.01 3.47 +.03 9.43 +.53 8.73 +.37 7.68 +.78 11.49 +.02 32.30 -.24 2.79 +.11 28.18 +1.52 26.80 +1.40 17.77 +.51 .28 +.00 35.65 +.28 32.05 +.97 22.81 +.54 11.69 +.32 37.86 +.49 1.12 +.01 15.80 +.59 4.37 +.24 21.22 +.39 3.98 +.15 20.13 +.52 8.85 +.01 4.67 +.08 11.20 +.18 11.13 +.57 37.43 -2.04 31.32 +.66 28.44 +.18 26.90 +.30 31.10 +.91 53.54 +1.16 14.45 +.41 29.48 +.88 22.04 +.58 30.43 +.48 9.35 +.46 3.69 +.33 56.24 +2.61 20.08 +.69 1.87 +.11 25.15 -.02 45.45 +1.65 17.64 +.55 39.06 +1.18 21.03 +.80 14.62 +.51 7.08 +.33 .90 +.00 63.45 -.46 30.64 +.82 4.89 +.47 15.16 +.69 35.24 +.57 5.14 +.11 45.75 +1.26 13.49 +.69 11.25 +.35 4.09 +.25 47.13 +.38 15.82 +.66 21.23 +.65 7.62 +.05 26.31 +1.33 32.09 +1.05 .43 -.01 33.55 +.52 4.92 +.12 14.15 +1.17 12.82 +.93 2.65 +.21 9.72 +.56 10.99 +.49 24.58 +2.16 23.58 +.66 19.08 +.97 11.12 -.04 4.78 +.25 8.60 +.50 27.10 +1.21 64.96 +.02 19.23 +.42 15.19 +.60 11.50 -.06 30.34 +.59 19.11 +.91 43.77 -2.22 22.65 +.18 21.87 +.70 2.42 +.15 41.64 +4.48 2.00 +.14 30.58 +.57 16.37 +.85 15.67 +.43 15.54 +.52 16.55 +.23 12.45 +.21 4.45 +.18 27.28 +.46 42.25 +.54 32.35 +1.26 10.02 +.55 18.11 +.53 10.38 +.28 10.19 +.49 11.11 +.81 21.59 +.16 25.48 +1.18 16.07 +.23 44.18 +1.08 5.04 +.06 26.82 +.08 51.46 +1.29 4.12 +.15 4.40 +.07 18.84 +.76 39.57 +1.21 38.94 +1.09 35.07 +1.56 28.23 +.74 12.71 +.46 13.65 +.50 4.35 +.19 16.26 +.48 7.09 +.17 12.46 +.60 54.80 +2.52 64.10 +2.48 14.38 +.29 8.61 +.11 33.25 +1.41 9.92 +.61 7.48 +.08 21.92 +.82 9.90 +.05 31.61 +.82 39.49 +1.50 4.28 -.02 24.27 +1.63 32.26 +.59 10.14 +.37 19.94 +.91 36.39 +1.14 8.35 +.51 .73 +.00 21.00 +.78 12.06 +.23 16.99 +.32 18.55 +.02 10.35 +.52 54.00 +.01 16.01 -.30 33.21 -.02 25.29 +.79 13.56 +.76 20.22 +.57 13.52 +.64 50.38 +1.67 37.35 +1.54 9.13 +.34 37.27 +.67 27.84 +.98 41.49 +.33 84.75 +2.45 9.30 +.24 13.59 +.55 39.66 +.21 40.71 +1.50 17.33 +.88 55.08 +1.63 30.81 +1.19 29.55 +.19 10.90 +.60 21.03 +1.15 8.32 +.21 17.14 +.63 3.00 +.02 50.47 +1.37 53.13 +2.00 68.44 +1.13 48.93 +1.45 15.33 +1.17 1.42 +.02 43.34 +2.21 70.74 +1.57 68.45 +1.18 6.36 -.32 35.33 +.61 47.94 +.94 3.10 +.14 51.78 +1.40 46.67 -1.08 49.29 -.58

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

PV Powered

On the Web For more information about Advanced Energy or PV Powered, visit www.advanced-energy.com/ or www.pvpowered.com/.

Continued from B1 Betz made his comments during a conference call with analysts to discuss Advanced Energy’s second-quarter earnings, the first quarterly earnings report since the company completed its purchase of PV Powered on May 3. Both companies make solarpower inverters, which, in simple terms, convert the sun’s energy collected by solar cells into the electricity that runs appliances or machinery. But Advanced Energy’s other products generated the majority of its revenues. Last year, more than 40 percent came from its semiconductor products, according to information from the publicly traded com-

pany. Solar products accounted for 16 percent. Advanced Energy, which was founded in 1981, also makes products used in the flatpanel display, data storage and solar panel industries. The company entered the inverter market in 2007, about three years after PV Powered, and in December, Advanced Energy opened its own 48,000-squarefoot inverter-making plant in Fort Collins. In March, the company announced it would buy PV Powered for up to $90 million — $35

million in cash, $15 million in Advanced Energy stock and an additional $40 million for shareholders if PV Powered met certain financial targets by the end of this year. Betz said Thursday it’s on target to meet those goals. The sale gave PV Powered much needed financial backing. Documents filed earlier this month show it recorded a $12.2 million net loss for 2009, and total liabilities exceeded total assets by $13.7 million. The purchase allowed Advanced Energy to beef up its inverter offerings. The combined product line allows it to sell inverters for nearly any sized solar system, from homes to factories. “We’re kind of hitting the market in the U.S. with a complete suite of (inverter) products at a time when the U.S. market is growing very fast,” Lawrence

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 B5

Firestone, vice president and CFO, said during the conference call. In total, Advanced Energy employs about 1,600, an increase of about 125 workers from the first quarter, Firestone said. The majority of the increase represents PV Powered workers. Growth in the inverter market, Betz said, could lead the product to become as large, or larger, than Advanced Energy’s semiconductor business. Most of the growth has come in the U.S., he said. But the company also has increased sales in Europe, with its first inverters now running on the European electrical grid. To increase production, Advanced Energy expects to have a second shift running at its Fort Collins plant by the end of the month. It’s signed up a contract manufacturer to build inverters in

Canada for that market and added capacity with a plant in China for the Asian market. The company announced on Wednesday the sale of its gas and liquid control product line to Hitachi Metals Group of Japan for $44 million in cash. That sale will allow Advanced Energy to concentrate on inverters and other products, Betz said. Its purchase of PV Powered helped Advanced Energy in the second quarter rack up $115.2 million in total sales, a record for a single quarter, according to its financial report. Inverter sales represented about $14 million, or about 12.5 percent, according to the financial report, with Betz adding that PV Powered contributed about $10 million of that. Advanced Energy’s secondquarter net income reached $11.5

million, compared to $4.9 million in the first quarter and a net loss of $16 million for the second quarter of 2009. The company’s stock closed Thursday at $17 a share, up $3.19. As part of its purchase agreement, Advanced Energy will allow PV Powered to operate as an independent subsidiary for a year, but the two companies have started jointly marketing the inverter lines. “The two teams are working tremendously well together,” Betz said. “This is an excellent combination of two of the most highly reliable product lines together in a financially strong company.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Benefits

Deficit concerns

Continued from B1 In states like Pennsylvania and New York, the back payments should go out next week, officials said. In others, like Nevada and North Carolina, it may take a few weeks for all of those eligible to receive benefits. Thursday’s 272-152 House vote sent the bill to the White House. “Americans who are fighting to find a good job and support their families will finally get the support they need to get back on their feet during these tough economic times,” Obama said in a statement issued after signing the measure. The House action came less than 24 hours after a mostly party-line Senate vote Wednesday on the measure, which is just one piece of a larger Democratic jobs agenda that has otherwise mostly collapsed after months of battles with Republicans.

Opposition marked a change of heart for many Republicans who had voted for deficit-financed unemployment benefits in the past, including twice during George W. Bush’s administration. Earlier this year, Republicans twice allowed temporary unemployment measures to pass without asking for a roll call vote. Opinion polls show that deficits and debt are of increasing concern to voters, especially Republicans’ core conservative supporters and the tea party activists whose support the GOP is courting in hopes of retaking control of Congress. Republicans winced in February when Sen. Jim Bunning, RKy., blocked a temporary benefits measure for several days, only to relent amid a wave of bad publicity. But just a few weeks later, all but a handful of Republicans were opposed to renewing benefits unless they were paid for with cuts elsewhere in the $3.7 trillion federal budget. Democrats countered that many economists say unemployment benefits boost the economy since most beneficiaries spend

Carolyn Kaster / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama signs emergency unemployment benefits legislation in the Oval Office of the White House on Thursday. Wrangling over the larger measure consumed about four months. The jobless benefits portion picked up enough GOP support in the Senate — Maine moderates Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe — only after it was broken off as a stand-alone bill. It would have passed last month were it not for the death of Robert Byrd, DW.Va.; Byrd’s replacement, Democrat Carte Goodwin, cast the key 60th vote Tuesday to defeat a GOP filibuster. Most Republicans opposed the measure because it would add $34 billion to a national debt that has hit $13 trillion, arguing that it should have been paid for with cuts to other programs, such as

Contentious bill The measure is what remains of a Democratic effort launched in February to renew elements of last year’s economic stimulus bill. But GOP opposition forced Democrats to drop $24 billion to help state governments avoid layoffs and higher taxes, as well as a package of expired tax cuts and a health insurance subsidy for the unemployed.

unspent money from last year’s economic stimulus bill, which is earning mixed grades at best from voters as unemployment stands at 9.5 percent nationwide. Thirty-one House Republicans, about one in six, voted for the measure Thursday, while 10 Democrats opposed it. “The other side says that these unemployment benefits stretching to almost two years are needed and must be added to the $13 trillion debt, even as they claim their trillion-dollar stimulus plan has been a success at creating millions of jobs,” said Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La. “It makes you wonder if they’re looking at the same jobs data as the rest of us.”

them immediately. But any such effects are likely to be modest when measured against a $14.6 trillion economy. “Unemployment benefits protect those who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own but would lead to more jobs, higher wages and a stronger economy for all Americans,” said Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. “The money will be spent immediately on necessities, injecting demand into the economy, creating jobs.”

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20 16 17 35 ... ... 37 18 ... 22 17 9 24 21 ... 17 97 11 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1195.00 $1195.50 $18.115

Pvs Day $1186.00 $1191.60 $17.798

Market recap 71.56 33.53 46.34 13.74 45.81 2.02 37.05 116.00 19.68 47.24 66.88 37.43 25.15 6.96 11.86 23.66 17.53 27.39 2.45 16.11

+1.91 +1.49 +1.29 +.92 +1.68 +.05 +1.14 +4.76 -.54 +1.32 -2.68 -2.04 -.02 +.25 +.61 +.59 +.49 +1.33 ... +.61

+8.3 -10.8 +2.9 +8.3 +26.3 -28.1 -1.9 +5.1 -7.6 -1.0 +8.5 -6.5 +9.1 +16.0 -11.6 +5.1 -9.4 +1.5 +16.7 +1.7

Prime rate Time period Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM SPDR Fncl

3951663 2341759 1811982 1005746 813722

4.05 +.11 109.46 +2.39 13.66 +.30 12.09 +.54 14.45 +.41

Gainers ($2 or more) Name BlueLinx EscoTech Americdt Invacare TrueBlue

Last 3.66 30.67 23.91 23.48 12.93

Chg %Chg +1.15 +5.79 +4.21 +3.48 +1.85

+45.8 +23.3 +21.4 +17.4 +16.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name SolarWinds DREBear rs DrSCBear rs PrUPShR2K DirxDMBear

Last 12.71 30.82 34.62 50.92 14.08

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

VantageDrl GoldStr g NovaGld g GranTrra g SamsO&G

40571 40129 20322 20252 20145

Name

1.11 4.06 6.33 5.79 1.20

Intel PwShs QQQ Microsoft Cisco Qualcom

+.03 +.08 -.06 +.50 +.02

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Talbots wt eMagin PacGE pfE GranTrra g Metalico

Last

OrienPap n MastechH IncOpR ASpecRlt s AmBiltrt

2,684 416 68 3,168 175 16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

731586 712595 669604 571039 549150

21.78 +.52 45.77 +1.13 25.84 +.72 23.27 +.71 39.11 +2.95

Name

Last

ZionO&G wt Lance AdvEnId IsilonSys Cohu

3.04 21.30 17.00 16.38 15.04

Chg %Chg +1.04 +5.30 +3.19 +2.82 +2.34

+52.0 +33.1 +23.1 +20.8 +18.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

4.46 3.41 5.60 10.25 3.58

-.54 -10.8 -.39 -10.3 -.39 -6.5 -.60 -5.5 -.17 -4.5

Mellanox TxCapB wt Netflix Mattson PhotMdx rs

Last

336 136 48 520 10 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.27 +.24 +11.8 2.33 +.24 +11.5 22.74 +2.12 +10.3 5.79 +.50 +9.5 4.07 +.33 +8.8

Name

-23.1 -11.4 -10.7 -10.5 -10.2

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -3.81 -3.97 -4.15 -5.97 -1.60

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Indexes

Chg %Chg

15.49 -7.45 7.55 -1.85 103.56 -16.09 3.20 -.46 4.89 -.69

-32.5 -19.7 -13.4 -12.6 -12.4

Diary 2,225 438 104 2,767 38 38

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,745.90 3,312.35 346.95 6,038.11 1,622.48 1,890.00 940.99 9,647.09 518.59

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,322.30 4,303.25 386.77 6,901.91 1,886.73 2,245.89 1,093.67 11,466.18 635.48

+201.77 +160.15 +6.01 +170.75 +40.57 +58.56 +24.08 +268.98 +22.84

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.99 +3.87 +1.58 +2.54 +2.20 +2.68 +2.25 +2.40 +3.73

52-wk %Chg

-1.01 +4.97 -2.82 -3.94 +3.39 -1.03 -1.92 -.71 +1.61

+13.82 +22.74 +3.46 +9.51 +13.27 +13.80 +12.02 +14.28 +16.42

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

335.20 2,501.41 3,600.57 5,313.81 6,142.15 20,589.70 32,720.76 20,694.26 2,981.36 9,220.88 1,735.53 2,955.67 4,394.80 5,477.81

+2.71 s +2.02 s +3.05 s +1.90 s +2.53 s +.50 s +1.91 s +2.76 s -.73 t -.62 t -.76 t +1.01 s -.77 t +.94 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.8934 1.5267 .9645 .001928 .1474 1.2895 .1286 .011494 .078382 .0329 .000831 .1366 .9585 .0310

.8770 1.5147 .9527 .001908 .1474 1.2745 .1286 .011503 .078235 .0327 .000831 .1348 .9511 .0310

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.38 +0.37 -0.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.51 +0.10 +0.4 GrowthI 21.88 +0.50 -0.7 Ultra 19.04 +0.42 -2.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.28 +0.38 -1.5 AMutlA p 22.87 +0.44 BalA p 16.26 +0.23 +1.4 BondA p 12.25 -0.01 +6.1 CapWA p 20.17 +0.08 +2.4 CapIBA p 46.56 +0.70 -1.0 CapWGA p 31.83 +0.81 -5.0 EupacA p 36.58 +0.93 -4.6 FdInvA p 31.93 +0.71 -1.7 GovtA p 14.56 -0.02 +5.7 GwthA p 26.65 +0.59 -2.5 HI TrA p 10.89 +0.05 +6.8 IncoA p 15.34 +0.23 +1.2 IntBdA p 13.52 -0.01 +4.4 ICAA p 25.08 +0.58 -2.4 NEcoA p 21.90 +0.54 -2.6 N PerA p 24.81 +0.60 -3.2 NwWrldA 48.27 +1.01 +2.3 STBA p 10.13 +2.0 SmCpA p 32.55 +0.66 +3.2 TxExA p 12.27 +0.01 +4.1 WshA p 24.16 +0.50 -0.8 American Funds B: CapIBB p 46.56 +0.70 -1.4 GrwthB t 25.75 +0.57 -2.9 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.54 +0.56 -6.0 IntlEqA 25.88 +0.55 -6.1 IntEqII I r 11.00 +0.25 -6.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.07 +0.56 -7.7 MidCap 26.65 +0.72 +4.3 MidCapVal 18.02 +0.48 +0.2 Baron Funds: Growth 42.60 +1.09 +3.1 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.85 -0.01 DivMu 14.64 +0.01 TxMgdIntl 13.88 +0.43 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv x 15.48 +0.26 GlAlA rx 17.61 +0.19 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.46 +0.23 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc rx 17.69 +0.17 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 43.84 +0.93 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 25.22 +0.80 AcornIntZ 34.47 +0.70 ValRestr 41.41 +1.14 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.63 +0.27 USCorEq2 9.23 +0.25 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.22 +0.62 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.57 +0.64 NYVen C 29.13 +0.61 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.51 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.57 +0.38 EmMktV 31.57 +0.72 IntSmVa 14.48 +0.37 LargeCo 8.64 +0.19 USLgVa 17.19 +0.49 US SmVa 20.30 +0.81 IntlSmCo 14.17 +0.33 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 15.97 +0.51 Glb5FxInc 11.44 2YGlFxd 10.27 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 63.36 +1.21 Income 13.29 IntlStk 30.90 +0.92 Stock 93.75 +2.45 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.15 +0.38

+7.0 +3.4 -9.2 -1.3 -1.3 -1.7 -1.1 -1.4 +2.3 +2.5 -2.8 -3.6 +1.5 -2.5 -2.3 -2.8 +5.1 +2.6 +1.0 -3.0 -0.8 +1.4 +3.5 +0.7 +0.9 -4.9 +4.8 +1.3 +0.2 +5.1 -3.0 -1.8 -3.0

NatlMunInc 9.71 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.99 FPACres 24.62 Fairholme 31.83 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.66 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.10 StrInA 12.40 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.27 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.59 FF2015 10.48 FF2020 12.54 FF2025 10.34 FF2030 12.28 FF2035 10.11 FF2040 7.05 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.39 AMgr50 14.01 Balanc 16.61 BlueChGr 37.51 Canada 49.02 CapAp 22.01 CpInc r 8.76 Contra 58.06 ContraK 58.08 DisEq 20.48 DivIntl 26.25 DivrsIntK r 26.25 DivGth 23.51 EmrMk 22.33 Eq Inc 38.58 EQII 15.98 Fidel 27.45 FltRateHi r 9.49 GNMA 11.88 GovtInc 10.80 GroCo 68.88 GroInc 15.65

+0.01 +5.0 +0.39 -2.8 +2.3 +0.18 +0.7 +0.74 +5.8 +0.13 +0.34 -0.6 +0.03 +4.8 +0.34 -0.5 +0.17 +0.14 +0.20 +0.18 +0.23 +0.20 +0.14 +0.26 +0.18 +0.22 +0.88 +1.09 +0.66 +0.06 +1.16 +1.16 +0.45 +0.75 +0.74 +0.65 +0.48 +0.97 +0.41 +0.58 +0.02

+1.3 +1.2 +0.6 +0.1 -0.2 -0.9 -0.9

-0.4 +2.1 +2.5 -1.2 +1.1 +2.7 +5.0 -0.2 -0.1 -2.5 -6.3 -6.2 -0.7 -1.2 -0.6 -1.4 -2.8 +2.5 +6.3 -0.02 +5.3 +1.73 -0.1 +0.39 -2.3

GrowthCoK 68.91 +1.74 HighInc r 8.61 +0.02 Indepn 19.66 +0.57 IntBd 10.58 -0.01 IntmMu 10.33 IntlDisc 28.48 +0.78 InvGrBd 11.77 -0.01 InvGB 7.37 LgCapVal 10.91 +0.24 LatAm 50.36 +1.36 LevCoStk 23.19 +0.76 LowP r 32.71 +0.70 LowPriK r 32.74 +0.70 Magelln 61.64 +1.45 MidCap 23.79 +0.79 MuniInc 12.72 NwMkt r 15.62 +0.04 OTC 44.92 +1.19 100Index 7.75 +0.17 Ovrsea 28.14 +0.89 Puritn 16.15 +0.23 SCmdtyStrt 10.32 +0.20 StIntMu 10.74 STBF 8.45 SmllCpS r 15.97 +0.51 StratInc 11.06 +0.02 StrReRt r 8.73 +0.09 TotalBd 10.90 -0.01 USBI 11.51 -0.02 Value 58.29 +1.66 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.13 +0.91 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 38.74 +0.86 IntlInxInv 31.26 +0.93 TotMktInv 31.45 +0.74 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 38.74 +0.85 TotMktAd r 31.45 +0.74 First Eagle: GlblA 40.88 +0.53 OverseasA 20.01 +0.13 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.91

+5.7 -1.3 +6.3 +3.7 -6.2 +6.2 +6.7 -3.0 -2.9 +1.2 +2.4 +2.5 -4.0 +1.8 +4.4 +7.2 -1.7 -2.3 -9.0 +1.7 -6.7 +2.2 +2.9 +0.2 +5.0 +2.6 +6.3 +5.9 +2.4 +6.3 -0.9 -6.5

-0.9

+2.3 +2.8 +3.8

FoundAl p 9.59 +0.17 HYTFA p 10.14 IncomA p 2.06 +0.02 USGovA p 6.86 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.05 +0.02 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.08 +0.02 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.05 +0.34 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.13 +0.17 GlBd A p 13.11 +0.07 GrwthA p 15.83 +0.42 WorldA p 13.12 +0.32 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.13 +0.07 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 35.60 +0.80 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.05 +0.29 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.28 +0.26 Quality 18.05 +0.28 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.06 +0.02 HYMuni 8.54 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.81 -0.02 CapApInst 31.24 +0.63 IntlInv t 51.99 +1.59 Intl r 52.55 +1.61 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.48 +0.72 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 29.45 +0.72 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.78 +0.94 Div&Gr 17.30 +0.38 Advisers 17.53 +0.30 TotRetBd 11.22 -0.01 HussmnStrGr 13.25 -0.10 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.53 +0.27

-0.7 +5.7 +3.7 +5.7 +5.8 +3.8 +3.4 -0.1 -6.4 +5.7 -5.8 -6.1 +5.4 -3.4 -6.1 +0.2 -6.1 +6.1 +7.4 +6.5 -5.2 -4.4 -4.2 -3.9 -3.8 -2.3 -1.4 +0.3 +6.1 +3.7 -3.3

CmstkA 13.67 +0.29 EqIncA 7.72 +0.13 GrIncA p 16.75 +0.40 HYMuA 9.41 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.02 +0.38 AssetStA p 21.60 +0.39 AssetStrI r 21.77 +0.40 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.53 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.52 -0.01 HighYld 7.88 +0.02 IntmTFBd 11.06 ShtDurBd 10.99 -0.01 USLCCrPls 17.92 +0.41 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 25.41 +0.50 OvrseasT r 43.97 +1.12 PrkMCVal T 19.85 +0.40 Twenty T 57.75 +1.24 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.85 +0.17 LSGrwth 11.46 +0.21 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 19.95 +0.71 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.86 +0.34 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.11 +0.35 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.84 +0.02 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.84 +0.53 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.83 +0.05 StrInc C 14.35 +0.06 LSBondR 13.78 +0.05 StrIncA 14.28 +0.06 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.20 +0.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.94 +0.25 BdDebA p 7.47 +0.03 ShDurIncA p 4.62

-0.3 +0.1 -2.4 +6.5 -3.5 -3.1 -2.9 +5.7 +5.8 +6.1 +3.2 +2.2 -1.4 -3.2 +3.5 +0.3 -6.2 +1.5 +0.1 +0.7 +4.7 +4.5 +2.9 +3.1 +6.8 +6.0 +6.7 +6.5 +7.1 -2.3 +5.1 +4.3

MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.12 +0.16 ValueA 20.14 +0.40 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.23 +0.40 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.75 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.76 +0.15 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 20.24 +0.31 MergerFd 15.69 +0.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.45 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.45 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.04 +0.53 GlbDiscZ 27.39 +0.54 QuestZ 17.20 +0.30 SharesZ 19.22 +0.34 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 38.51 +0.87 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 39.96 +0.91 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.02 +0.01 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.33 +0.30 Intl I r 17.06 +0.41 Oakmark r 36.93 +0.87 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.40 +0.07 GlbSMdCap 13.06 +0.30 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 37.40 +0.82 DvMktA p 29.80 +0.63 GlobA p 52.84 +1.58 IntBdA p 6.41 +0.04 MnStFdA 28.12 +0.71 RisingDivA 13.68 +0.31 S&MdCpVl 26.67 +0.80 StrInA p 4.15 +0.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.43 +0.29 S&MdCpVl 22.96 +0.68

+1.2 -2.3 -2.2 +5.6 -4.4 +5.3 +1.0 +8.4 +8.5 +1.2 +1.3 -0.2 +0.2 +2.0 +1.8 +5.5 -0.8 +1.3 -0.3 +4.7 +2.3 -6.3 +3.6 -0.3 +2.5 -1.3 +0.3 +9.1 -1.8 -0.1

Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.38 +0.28 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.29 RcNtMuA 7.14 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 29.51 +0.62 IntlBdY 6.41 +0.04 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.34 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 12.03 +0.05 ComodRR 7.65 +0.12 HiYld 9.03 +0.02 InvGrCp 11.39 -0.03 LowDu 10.52 RealRtnI 11.14 -0.01 ShortT 9.88 TotRt 11.34 -0.02 TR II 10.97 -0.01 TRIII 10.06 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.52 RealRtA p 11.14 -0.01 TotRtA 11.34 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.34 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.34 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.34 -0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.42 +0.51 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 34.78 +0.76 Price Funds: BlChip 31.78 +0.69 CapApp 18.46 +0.27 EmMktS 30.22 +0.63 EqInc 20.80 +0.48 EqIndex 29.49 +0.65 Growth 26.80 +0.55 HlthSci 25.08 +0.38 HiYield 6.53 +0.02 IntlBond 9.72 +0.07

-1.8 +3.8 +5.4 +3.8 +2.7 +6.6 +7.0 -2.7 +7.3 +7.5 +3.3 +4.8 +1.2 +6.8 +6.4 +7.0 +3.0 +4.5 +6.5 +6.1 +6.6 +6.7 +4.5 -2.2 -3.0 +1.7 +0.4 -1.0 -2.6 -4.2 +6.1 -0.1

IntlStk 12.32 MidCap 49.85 MCapVal 20.92 N Asia 16.85 New Era 41.11 N Horiz 26.65 N Inc 9.62 R2010 14.21 R2015 10.81 R2020 14.73 R2025 10.66 R2030 15.13 R2040 15.11 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 28.33 SmCapVal 30.49 SpecIn 12.05 Value 20.43 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.63 RiverSource A: DEI 8.59 DivrBd 5.00 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.66 PremierI r 16.50 TotRetI r 11.15 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.82 S&P Sel 17.19 Scout Funds: Intl 28.04 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.57 AmShS p 36.53 Sequoia 117.62 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.21 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.26 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.53 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.10 IntValue I 24.63

+0.32 +1.31 +0.47 +0.24 +1.09 +0.76 -0.01 +0.20 +0.17 +0.27 +0.21 +0.32 +0.34 +0.93 +0.94 +0.05 +0.51

-2.2 +5.0 +1.0 +4.4 -5.8 +4.2 +6.0 +1.9 +1.3 +0.9 +0.5 +0.1 -0.3 +2.4 +5.2 +3.4 +4.5 -0.2

+0.27 -2.6 +0.19 -1.8 +6.1 +0.27 +2.2 +0.42 +1.2 +0.28 +3.9 +0.73 -0.5 +0.38 -0.9 +0.75 -2.9 +0.80 -1.8 +0.80 -2.0 +2.80 +7.0 NA +0.49 -5.4 +1.25 -3.9 +0.42 -2.5 +0.43 -2.3

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.59 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.07 CpOpAdl 66.06 Energy 104.61 500Adml 100.80 GNMA Ad 11.05 HlthCr 47.76 HiYldCp 5.56 InfProAd 25.32 ITsryAdml 11.67 IntGrAdm 52.94 ITAdml 13.70 ITGrAdm 10.10 LtdTrAd 11.13 LTGrAdml 9.49 LT Adml 11.12 MuHYAdm 10.50 PrmCap r 59.29 STsyAdml 10.86 ShtTrAd 15.95 STFdAd 10.91 STIGrAd 10.78 TtlBAdml 10.75 TStkAdm 27.14 WellslAdm 50.53 WelltnAdm 49.60 Windsor 38.97 WdsrIIAd 40.26 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.01 CapOpp 28.59 DivdGro 12.80 Energy 55.70 EqInc 18.06 Explr 59.06 GNMA 11.05 GlobEq 15.40 HYCorp 5.56 HlthCre 113.15 InflaPro 12.89 IntlGr 16.63 IntlVal 28.37

+0.29 +1.8 +0.01 +1.72 +2.36 +2.22 -0.01 +0.43 +0.01 -0.01 -0.03 +1.53

-0.02 +0.63 +0.27 +0.71 +0.96 +0.83

+4.4 -4.8 -6.7 -0.9 +6.2 -4.9 +6.2 +3.7 +7.4 -2.0 +3.8 +8.3 +2.2 +9.9 +3.8 +4.6 -3.8 +2.6 +1.0 +3.1 +3.8 +6.0 -0.3 +4.4 +1.1 -2.4 -3.1

+0.35 +0.74 +0.23 +1.26 +0.33 +1.69 -0.01 +0.38 +0.01 +1.03 -0.01 +0.48 +0.85

+3.1 -4.8 -1.8 -6.7 +0.4 +3.1 +6.1 -1.7 +6.1 -4.9 +3.6 -2.1 -7.3

-0.02 -0.08

+1.47

ITIGrade 10.10 LifeCon 15.46 LifeGro 19.58 LifeMod 17.94 LTIGrade 9.49 Morg 15.20 MuInt 13.70 MuLtd 11.13 MuShrt 15.95 PrecMtls r 20.14 PrmcpCor 11.90 Prmcp r 57.12 SelValu r 16.39 STAR 17.51 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 15.47 TgtRetInc 10.83 TgRe2010 21.02 TgtRe2025 11.41 TgtRe2015 11.53 TgRe2020 20.24 TgRe2030 19.36 TgtRe2035 11.59 TgtRe2040 18.99 TgtRe2045 11.99 USGro 15.57 Wellsly 20.86 Welltn 28.72 Wndsr 11.55 WndsII 22.68 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 100.80 Balanced 19.58 EMkt 26.00 Europe 23.92 Extend 33.78 Growth 26.81 ITBnd 11.37 MidCap 16.98 Pacific 9.45 REIT r 16.41 SmCap 28.51 SmlCpGth 17.39 SmlCpVl 13.59

-0.02 +0.15 +0.39 +0.26 -0.08 +0.32

+0.66 +0.28 +1.41 +0.42 +0.24 +0.44 +0.08 +0.25 +0.20 +0.16 +0.33 +0.38 +0.25 +0.41 +0.26 +0.34 +0.11 +0.41 +0.28 +0.46

+8.2 +3.3 +0.7 +2.2 +9.8 -0.5 +3.8 +2.1 +1.0 -1.4 -1.7 -3.9 +2.8 +0.8 +3.8 +1.2 +3.4 +2.4 +0.8 +1.9 +1.4 +0.3 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -5.4 +4.3 +1.0 -2.4 -3.2

+2.23 -0.9 +0.26 +2.3 +0.59 +0.4 +0.83 -7.8 +1.03 +3.4 +0.60 -1.4 -0.04 +8.5 +0.45 +3.8 +0.20 -2.4 +0.64 +12.4 +0.94 +3.7 +0.55 +3.3 +0.46 +4.1

STBnd

10.63 -0.01 +3.4

TotBnd

10.75 -0.02 +5.9

TotlIntl

13.75 +0.38 -4.6

TotStk

27.14 +0.63 -0.3

Value

18.35 +0.40 -0.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

8.90 +0.27

NS

ExtIn

33.82 +1.03 +3.5

GrwthIst

26.81 +0.60 -1.3

InfProInst

10.31 -0.01 +3.7

InstIdx

100.15 +2.21 -0.9

InsPl

100.15 +2.21 -0.8

InsTStPlus

24.53 +0.57 -0.2

MidCpIst

17.04 +0.45 +3.9

SCInst

28.55 +0.94 +3.8

TBIst

10.75 -0.02 +6.0

TSInst

27.15 +0.63 -0.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

83.27 +1.84 -0.9

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10.63 -0.01 +3.4

TotBdSgl

10.75 -0.02 +6.0

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26.20 +0.61 -0.3

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13.33 +0.32 -4.2

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10.79 +0.15 -2.2

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4.81

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Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.76

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B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com.

D I SPATC H E S Central Oregon Cable Advertising recently purchased KBNZCBS and has changed its name to Zolo Media to reflect multiplatform local advertising and television production capabilities. Zolo Media provides multiple video advertising options for Central Oregonians, including KBNZ-CBS, 27 national cable networks on BendBroadband and Crestview Cable, COTV11 on BendBroadband and The Home Showcase on AdCentral4. Kitchens Etc., which provides design, planning and installation of kitchens, has moved to a new location at 380 S.E. Third St. Hours of operation at the new showroom are MondayThursday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and by appointment.

GM buys subprime lender for $3.5B

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Ola Day Spa, 2600 S.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. WORDPRESS BASICS: Learn the difference between a post and a page, upload images and how to write for the web; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. MONITORING THE SOCIAL MEDIA BUZZ: Alpine guest instructor, Chevy Pham, will present tools and techniques to tune in to online conversations; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. THE FRESH WEB: A short review of web news for the week ending July 23; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

By Nick Bunkley New York Times News Service

DETROIT — General Motors said Thursday that it had agreed to buy a financing company, AmeriCredit, for $3.5 billion so it can lease more vehicles and increase sales to consumers with lower credit ratings. The transaction, expected to close in the fourth quarter, gives GM a captive financing arm for the first time since 2007, when it sold control of GMAC Financial Services. GM recently considered starting a new financing arm or reacquiring GMAC, now known as Ally Financial, to strengthen its lending capabilities and to raise the carmaker’s value ahead of a public stock offering. “Our dealers have been telling us that not having an in-house finance arm hurt our ability to finance certain loans and leases,” Edward Whitacre Jr., GM’s chief executive, said in a conference call. “It hurt our ability to meet rising customer demand for GM cars and trucks. Now we’re going to fix that.” Analysts said GM and Chrysler, which lost its own captive financing arm, Chrysler Financial, during last year’s bankruptcy reorganization, have been at a disadvantage because they no longer had as much of a say in which customers could get approved for loans as rivals like the Ford Motor Co. and Toyota. Jesse Toprak, the vice president of industry trends and insights at TrueCar.com, which tracks vehicle pricing, said GM’s sales could jump as much as 20 percent if it aggressively courts subprime buyers. Toprak said many consumers have low credit scores because of isolated negative events like late bill payments but otherwise pose a low risk of default. As a result, they are being turned away by lenders who tightened their credit standards after subprime mortgages helped cause the recession. “They’re basically being ignored simply because of the paranoia. It used to be there was lending like drunken sailors, but now it’s the opposite,” Toprak said. “If GM can fill in that void, there’s a big potential for return for them.” Shareholders of AmeriCredit, which is based in Fort Worth, Texas, and has 3,000 employees, would receive $24.50 a share, a 24 percent premium over Wednesday’s closing price of $19.70. AmeriCredit was founded in 1992 and has assets of about $10 billion. GM will use money from its cash reserves, which stand at more than $30 billion as a result of the aid it received from the federal government before and during last year’s bankruptcy. “We’re in the fortunate position that we have a very strong balance sheet,” GM’s chief financial officer, Christopher Liddell, said. “That gives us the flexibility to do acquisitions like this.” GM said its ownership of the company would have minimal impact on its balance sheet and would not detract from its goal of regaining a strong investmentgrade credit rating. AmeriCredit will maintain direct access to the capital markets for financing requirements, GM said.

SUNDAY SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs, and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task

force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak July 26; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or stacy .jenkins@nfib.org.

MONDAY SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs, and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak today; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or stacy .jenkins@nfib.org. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs, and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak July 26; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or stacy .jenkins@nfib.org. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS

SUCCESS PROGRAM: Jason Moyer, of Cascadian Group; Jens Anderson, of Jones & Roth CPAs & Business Consultants; Kim Medford, of Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt; and Scott Larson, of Bend Venture Conference, will speak. This is a precursor to the Bend Venture Conference in mid-October; $25 for chamber members, $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS BUSINESS RESOURCE LUNCHEON: Speaker Tami MacLeod, attorney at Karnopp Peterson LLP, will discuss current issues and options regarding short sales, foreclosures and bankruptcy. Registration requested by July 26; members $20, nonmembers $25; 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; joy@ bendproperty.com. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or

bendetg@gmail.com. GREEN DRINKS: Central Oregon’s monthly networking for business and sustainability. Hosted by NorthWest Crossing and The Garner Group. Enjoy a truly green drink by bringing your own cup; free; 5-7 p.m.; Discovery Park Lodge, 2868 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www .envirocenter.org. TAKE CHARGE, WISE USE OF CREDIT CARDS: Learn the benefits and costs of credit cards, how to build a good credit history, the warning signs of having too much debt, how to avoid credit card fraud, and how to get and read your credit report and credit score. Light refreshments will be served. Call to reserve a space; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 395 S.E. Fifth St., Madras; 541-382-1795.

FRIDAY July 30 COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Aug. 2 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.;

PRESENTING 5 DAYS OF FREE FUN AT THE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR JULY 28 - AUGUST 1

TIME

WEDNESDAY

11:30 - 12:00 12:00 - 12:30 12:30 - 1:00 1:00 - 1:30 1:30 - 2:00 2:00 - 3:00

THURSDAY

FUN!

FRIDAY JALAPENO EATING CONTEST

SATURDAY

SUNDAY RONALD MCDONALD

WATERMELON EATING CONTEST

PIE-EATING CONTEST

APPLE BOBBING

HULA HOOP DANCE PARTY

WHEELBARROW RACE & SACK RACE

HULA HOOP DANCE PARTY

WHEELBARROW RACE & SACK RACE

3-LEGGED RACE SACK RACE

SMOKEY BEAR BIRTHDAY PARTY

FAMILY FIRE BUCKET BRIGADE

3:00 - 4:00 4:00 - 5:00 5:00 - 6:00

CUPCAKE WALK

FOOTBALL THROW

CUPCAKE WALK

TUG OF WAR

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

STICK HORSE BARREL RACE

WATER BALLOON TOSS

HULA HOOP CONTEST

RONALD MCDONALD

6:00 - 7:00

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

7:00 - 8:00

ROOSTER CROWING CONTEST

FAMILY FIRE BUCKET BRIGADE

LIMBO

WATER BALLOON TOSS

8:00 - 9:00

COOKIE CHALLENGE

GOLF BALL TOWER

ELEPHANT IN CHINA SHOP

BIKE GLOW PARADE

FEATURED STAGE & FIELD EVENTS 3-Legged Race Bring a friend you don't mind being tied to (literally). This traditional race requires teamwork.

Hula Hoop Contest How long can you hula hoop? Swivel your hips for a prize.

Smokey Bear B-day Party Join Smokey Bear and DC for birthday treats, party favors, and photographs.

Cupcake Walk No talent? No problem. There's a reason "cake walk" means easy. Wheelbarrow Race Bring a partner for this time-tested, people-powered race. Water Balloon Toss Less messy than the egg toss, and more refreshing on a hot summer day!

Watermelon-Eating Contest Slurp a slice of simply scrumptious sweetness ... SWIFTLY!

Hula Hoop Dance Party – This is your chance to hone your hooping skills for Friday’s Hula Hoop Contest. Borrow our hula hoop, or bring your own. We’ll provide the music and the space for you to hula hoop to your heart’s content. Cookie Challenge – Start with a cookie on your forehead and move it into your mouth without using your hands. First one to eat the cookie (without cheating!) wins. Golf Ball Tower – Can you stack three golf balls on top of each other so they’ll

Family Fire Bucket Brigade We bet this will be the most fun you’ve ever had hauling water back and forth!

stand alone for a full second? Can you do it faster than anyone else? Enter this contest

Beard & Moustache Making Contest – Can’t grow a beard? Make your

to find out.

Stick Horse Barrel Racing Test your riding skills on a wooden steed.

own, using the supplies provided at the Family Fun Zone stage. Then, show off your

Elephant in a China Shop – We’ll provide the elephant trunk. You use it to

fake facial hair in the Beard & Moustache Contest.

knock over all the “china.” Fastest elephant wins!

Sack Race Hop your way to fame in a sack.

Chill Out – Sometimes, you just need a little break. Bring the whole family to the

Bike Glow Parade - Ever wondered how to make a bike glow in the dark? This

Jalapeno-Eating Contest A spicy way to enjoy the day! Never mind the sweat on your brow. Just keep popping those peppers.

Family Fun Zone stage for some arts and crafts in the shade. We might even break

is your chance to find out how to transform your bicycle into an electro-luminescent

out the popsicles!

piece of art, making it much safer to ride at night.

Apple Bobbing No hands allowed, but teeth are fair game in this old-fashioned game for young children.

Other Activities in the Zone include:

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY Aug. 4 BANKS & OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about the different kinds of financial institutions in our community. Registration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY Aug. 5 SMALL-BUSINESS RETIREMENT SOLUTIONS: Find out about small-business retirement plan choices, determine key factors to consider when choosing a plan, and learn about SEP and SIMPLE IRAs and Qualified Retirement Plans. Registration required by Aug. 4; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com.

IT’S FREE! BEARD & MOUSTACHE MAKING CONTEST

Pie-Eating Contest Easy Part: Be the first one to finish your pie. Messy Part: No forks allowed.

Aug. 3

Once you’ve paid for general admission, come enjoy games, contests, exhibits, and more! Cash Prizes, Carnival Tickets, and Ribbons

SPONSORED BY:

DC SAYS ... IT’S ALL

TUESDAY

An old-fashioned, affordable county fair with something fun for everyone!

FAMILY FUN ZONE PRESENTED BY:

Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend.

STAGE FIELD FEATURED EVENTS WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE STAGE OR IN THE FIELD AREA Thank you, volunteers! Without volunteers, we’d never be able to offer all these free activities in the Family Fun Zone. Central Oregon Association of Realtors has provided more than a dozen volunteers to help us organize games on the field and stage. Safe Kids is providing volunteers for the Commute Options bicycle corral. If you see them, please give them a pat on the back and thank them for helping out.

Above scheduled events take place in the field/stage area of The Bulletin Family Fun Zone. Presented by St. Charles Medical Center. Sponsored by Central Oregon Association of Realtors, McDonald’s, Old Mill District.

WOOL BUSTERS! Mutton Bustin’ at its best. Up to 55 lbs, helmets provided. 11:00-1:00 Wool Busters 1:30 - 3:00 Wool Busters 3:00 Sheep Scramble 4:00-6:00 Wool Busters 6:00 Sheep Scramble

FREE PIG RACES! FREE PEDAL TRACTOR PULL! FREE I.D. TAGS FOR KIDS! FREE PONY RIDES! FREE PETTING ZOO! FREE INFLATABLE JOUSTING!


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OREGON Abandoned cars pulled from bottom of cliff, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

Trouble with traveling sales crews is rare, Bend police say But it’s wise to be wary if a salesperson comes knocking at the door

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

Panel backs $500K restoration grant Federal funds slated for wildfire reduction project By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — A federal advisory committee recommended Thursday that a Deschutes National Forest restoration project receive $500,000 this year, with millions more possible over the next decade. The Collaborative Landscape Forest Restoration Committee — a group of officials, scientists, environmental advocates and timber industry representatives from across the country — selected the Deschutes proposal as one of 10 nationwide

to win a grant in the first year of the new program. The final decision on which proposals are funded must be approved by the U.S. Forest Service. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger, who traveled to D.C. to testify and watch the committee’s three days of work, said the grant, if it gets the Forest Service stamp of approval, will cut the risk of wildfire in the forest that stretches from Bend to Sisters at the foot of the Cascades. “This is a great opportunity to be able

to protect it before it burns,” Unger said of the forest. The Deschutes proposal, which was co-written by the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, the Forest Service and the Nature Conservancy, would target more than 100,000 acres of forest. It includes water quality, wildfire reduction, forest thinning and other components. Phil Chang, a program manager at COIC, said he was glad the proposal had cleared a key hurdle, but he’s not popping any corks until the grant funding is official. “To know we came out of the advisory process on top is reassuring,” Chang said. Committee members cited Central

Oregon’s history of collaboration among conservation, industry and local government officials as a key advantage. They also ranked highly the region’s ability to quickly begin work on the proposal. The Deschutes proposal had been the lowest-ranked project in a review by the Forest Service’s regional office in Portland, but it ended up as the top pick out of five proposals from Oregon and Washington. There was a bit of suspense on Thursday morning when the committee chose which two forests from the Northwest would be funded. See Forest / C6

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Wednesday’s brawl between members of two door-to-door sales teams at a Bend motel was a first — at least in recent memory — for police. But in the summer, when traveling sales crews often show up in town, it’s not uncommon for officials to get several calls from residents who are confused or concerned about people showing up on their doorstep. Though many people who travel through neighborhoods to sell products do work for legitimate companies, there have been problems in Bend and other cities with scams, overly aggressive sales tactics and even salespeople who use the opportunity to scope out a property for a future burglary. Sgt. Ron Taylor of the Bend Police Department said serious incidents related to door-to-door sales are relatively rare, but people shouldn’t be afraid to ask questions if they feel uncomfortable. “Should people be cautious? Yes,” Taylor said. “Take normal precautions, like trying to verify someone’s (business information). But if they are not interested in what a person is selling, they should either not open the door or minimize their contact with sales individuals and tell them, ‘I’m not interested,’ and shut the door.” The people involved in Wednesday’s incident work for Atlantic Circulation Inc., a Pennsylvaniabased magazine sales company, and the Kirby Company, which is based in Ohio and sells vacuum cleaners throughout the country. See Sales / C6

A little fun fair at the

Tips on dealing with door-to-door salespeople • Check for identification from the seller. Get a business card and contact information for the company. • Do some research on the company before making a purchase. Look up the company online, and check for reports on the Better Business Bureau’s website, www.bbb.org. • Don’t be pressured into buying something. If you’re interested in making a purchase, ask the salesperson to come back later after you’ve checked into the company. • Know the laws about doorto-door sales. Oregon law requires salespeople to provide identification and explain why they’re calling or at your door within 30 seconds after beginning a conversation. Also, the Federal Trade Commission’s “Cooling Off” rule can provide buyers with three days to cancel some purchases from door-todoor sales. • Contact the police if you are concerned about overly aggressive sales tactics or if something seems suspicious. Sources: Bend Police Department and the Better Business Bureau

Correction In a story headlined “Salespeople feud at Bend motel,” which appeared Thursday, July 22, on Page C1, details about a fight between two groups of door-to-door salespeople were incorrect, due to incorrect information supplied to The Bulletin. The magazine sales team was staying at the Chalet Motel, and the vacuum sales team drove to the motel before the scuffle. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

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ounty fair season began in Central Oregon this week with the opening of the Jefferson County Fair in Madras on Wednesday. Above, students from The Children’s Learning

Center of Madras watch as a competitor struggles toward the finish line in the Kids Pedal Tractor Pull on Thursday. At right, Carson King, 6, of Madras, powers down on the pedals, going the distance to win the tractor pull as announcer Alan Bruess, 46, of Cheney, Wash., follows behind. Carson pulled a weight of 225 pounds for 20 feet to win the competition. The Jefferson County Fair continues through Saturday; the Deschutes County Fair will open Wednesday and run for five days, while the Crook County Fair will take place Aug. 4-7.

In-home services restored United Way to give out nearly $1M in funding for seniors, the disabled Emergency Board votes to dip into reserves for $17.1M By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

Home services for seniors and people with disabilities were restored, at least temporarily, by a unanimous vote of the Oregon Legislative Emergency Board on Thursday. “These are cuts we simply can’t afford to make,” state Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, said.

IN THE LEGISLATURE Buckley, a member of the emergency board, was one of the five legislators who organized the restoration of funding for home services. “The people in these programs aren’t going to go away,” he said. “They come back into the system at a higher cost.” In early July, the Oregon Department of Human Services announced that most of the in-

home services it funds would be cut as a result of the governor’s recent 9 percent, across-theboard cut to the state budget. Thursday’s unanimous decision by the 20-member emergency board to allocate $17.1 million of the DHS reserve funds will sustain a variety of programs that provide home services. One of the largest of these was Oregon Project Independence, which allows seniors to stay in their homes by providing assistance for everything from bathing to vacuuming. See Services / C6

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

United Way of Deschutes County will give nearly $1 million to nonprofit community organizations over the next 12 months. Thanks to local businesses and community members, United Way will distribute about $985,550 to its 26 partner agencies and other nonprofits designated by donors. According to Ken Wilhelm, United Way executive director, the largest recipients will be NeighborImpact with more

than $66,000 and Saving Grace with $50,000. Other nonprofits receiving large donations are the Boys & Girls Club of Central Oregon, The Loft at Cascade Youth & Family Center, the Central Oregon Council on Aging and the KIDS Center. Area businesses and individuals donated nearly $1.3 million to the 2009-10 fundraising campaign, which ended June 30. According to United Way, about 84,360 people were served in the 2009-10 year. See Funding / C5


C2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Prineville man in jail for deer killings A Prineville man was arrested earlier this week in connection with an Oregon State Police investigation of the illegal killing of deer near Paulina. Bradley Brock, 20, was arrested Tuesday and lodged in the Crook County jail on suspicion of four counts each of illegal taking of deer, unlawful waste of wildlife and first-degree theft. In January, a rancher contacted OSP to report he had found two deer that had been shot. Additional investigation turned up another two dead deer. All four were does, and at least two were pregnant. Evidence found at the scene was turned over to the OSP Forensic Services Division Crime Lab, which was able to link Brock to the shootings.

One hospitalized after crash in La Pine One man was hurt Thursday morning in a crash involving a semitrailer and a small SUV in La Pine, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. Daniel Gage, 43, of Bend, was driving north on U.S. Highway 97 north of First Street at around 8:10 a.m., when his Suzuki Grand Vitara drifted into the southbound lane. Ross Mann, 60, of Eatonville, Wash., was driving south in a semitrailer loaded with steel. Mann steered right in an effort to avoid Gage’s vehicle, but Gage struck the trailer. Rescuers from the La Pine Fire Department stabilized Gage, and he was extracted from his vehicle and trans-

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

ported to St. Charles Bend by helicopter. Gage was in critical condition as of 8:30 p.m. Mann was not injured. Traffic was restricted to one lane for approximately one hour following the crash.

Redmond Police Department

Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 5:42 p.m. July 21, in the 900 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:27 p.m. July 21, in the 100 block of Southwest 26th Street. Theft — A theft was reported

Computer recycling event in Madras Central Oregonians can recycle unwanted televisions, computers and monitors for free at Madras High School on Sunday, according to a news release from Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality. The event, which will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., will be held in the school’s parking lot on 390 S.E. 10th St. Up to seven items can be recycled per person free of charge. However, other desktop items such as keyboards, speakers, printers or scanners will not be recycled for free.

and an arrest made at 1:38 p.m. July 21, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:32 p.m. July 21, in the 300 block of Southeast Jackson Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:17 p.m. July 21, in the 2300 block of Northwest Antler Court. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 7:58 a.m. July 21, in the 2200 block of Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:15 a.m. July 21, in the 700 block

of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Prineville Police Department

DUII — Terral Raymond CrosdaleCraig, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:06 a.m. July 21, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:10 p.m. July 21, in the 20900 block of Royal Oak Circle in Bend. Theft — A wallet and cell phone were reported stolen at 5:29 p.m. July 21, in the 7700 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of

The Associated Press PORTLAND — A prosecutor and a county sheriff investigating the disappearance of 7year-old Kyron Horman went to county commissioners Thursday to discuss funding for the probe, but dodged questions about whether they are close to making an arrest. Multnomah County commissioners approved District Attorney Michael Schrunk’s request for an extra $196,000 for his office’s investigation into Kyron’s disappearance. But, in an unexpected move, Sheriff Dan Staton tabled a separate request for about $240,000 in additional funding for his office until October. Staton said the sheriff’s office will return $500,000 in contingency funding approved last month and another $400,000 from the last budget after his agency was able to hold down costs. Staton and Schrunk went to

The city of Bend is seeking five to seven people to sit on a new advisory committee that will deal with issues related to water, wastewater, stormwater and street infrastructure. The Infrastructure Advisory Committee will consist of five to seven city residents appointed by the Bend City Council for four-year terms. Applications, which are available from the city, will be accepted until 5 p.m. Aug. 16. For more information, contact the city of Bend at 541-3885505 or visit the website www .ci.bend.or.us.

commissioners to talk about funding in their effort to find Kyron, last seen at Skyline School on June 4, when his stepmother took him to a science fair. Though the case has gripped the community, the cost of finding Kyron is an issue for the cash-strapped government. Commissioner Deborah Kafoury asked why this particular case is getting so much attention from law enforcement when there are other missing children: “Is this really that unusual?� “Yes, it is an unusual case,� Schrunk said. “I think you have a lot of different dynamics. You have a school. You have a science fair. You have a lot of people involved. And you have seemingly no explanation for why the child is missing.� Staton, who said the case has so far cost $365,000, said investigators have seized 200 sets for records and are sifting through the 3,000 leads that have been generated.

“We currently have 38 full 4inch binders on this investigation, and we’re not even halfway through at this particular point,� he said. Staton later told reporters not to take Thursday’s action — in which the prosecutors needed money and his office didn’t — as a sign that an arrest was near. Staton said investigators have not found any items that belong to Kyron, and again declined to name the stepmother, Terri Moulton Horman, as a person of interest in the investigation. Terri Horman, who has raised Kyron since he was an infant, is the last known person to have

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 23, 1885, Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died in Mount McGregor, N.Y., at age 63. ON THIS DATE In 1892, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia was born. In 1914, Austria-Hungary issued a list of demands to Serbia following the killing of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by a Serb assassin; the dispute led to World War I. In 1945, French Marshal Henri Petain, who had headed the Vichy government during World War II, went on trial, charged with treason. (He was convicted and condemned to death, but the sentence was commuted; Petain died in prison on this date in 1951.) In 1952, Egyptian military officers led by Gamal Abdel Nasser launched a successful coup against King Farouk I. In 1958, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II named the first four women to peerage in the House of Lords. In 1967, a week of deadly racerelated rioting that claimed 43 lives erupted in Detroit. In 1977, a jury in Washington, D.C., convicted 12 Hanafi Muslims of charges stemming from the hostage siege at three buildings the previous March. In 1985, Commodore International Ltd. unveiled its Amiga 1000 personal computer during a press event at New York’s Lincoln Center. Bandleader Kay Kyser, known for his “Kollege of Musical Knowledge,� died in Chapel Hill, N.C. (sources differ on whether he was 79 or 80). In 1986, Britain’s Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson at Westminster Abbey in London. (The couple divorced in 1996.) In 1990, President George H.W. Bush announced his choice of Judge David Souter, of New Hampshire, to succeed retiring Justice William J. Brennan on the U.S. Supreme Court. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton rejoined the troubled Middle East talks at Camp David after hurrying back from a four-day trip to Asia. Leaders of the major industrial countries concluded their summit in Japan by announcing a campaign to slash the number of deaths worldwide from AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y Lance Armstrong clinched his second straight victory in the Tour de France. Tiger Woods, at 24, became the youngest player to win the career Grand Slam with a record-breaking performance in the British Open. Karrie Webb, 25, won the U.S. Women’s Open.

Mark Buehrle of the Chicago White Sox pitched the 18th perfect game in major league history, a 5-0 win over Tampa Bay. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Gloria DeHaven is 85. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy is 74. Actor Ronny Cox is 72. Radio personality Don Imus is 70. Country singer Tony Joe White is 67. Rock singer David Essex is 63. Actor Larry Manetti is 63. Singer-songwriter John Hall is 62. Actress Belinda Montgomery is 60. Rock musician Blair Thornton (Bachman Turner Overdrive) is 60. Actress Edie McClurg is 59. Actor Woody Harrelson is 49. Rock musician Martin Gore (Depeche Mode) is 49. Actor Eriq Lasalle is 48. Rock musician Yuval Gabay is 47. Rock musician Slash is 45. Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman is 43. Rock musician Nick Menza is 42. Model-actress Stephanie Seymour is 42. Actress Charisma Carpenter is 40. Rhythm-and-blues singer Sam Watters is 40. Country singer Alison Krauss is 39. Rhythmand-blues singer Dalvin DeGrate is 39. Rock musician Chad Gracey (Live) is 39. Actor-comedian

FIVE YEARS AGO Multiple bomb blasts in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik killed at least 64 people. London police acknowledged that Jean Charles de Menezes, the man they had shot and killed on a subway car in front of horrified commuters, had nothing to do with recent bombings of the city’s transit system. Accordionist Myron Floren died in Los Angeles County at age 85. ONE YEAR AGO Michael Jackson’s personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, was named in a search warrant as the target of a manslaughter probe into the singer’s death. Authorities arrested 44 people in New Jersey in a corruption probe.

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Marlon Wayans is 38. Country singer Shannon Brown is 37. Actor Omar Epps is 37. Retired MLB All-Star Nomar Garciaparra is 37. Former White House intern Monica Lewinsky is 37. Actress Stephanie March is 36. Country musician David Pichette (Emerson Drive) is 33. Rhythm-and-blues singer Michelle Williams is 30. Actor Daniel Radcliffe is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “To be proud and inaccessible is to be timid and weak.� — Jean Baptiste Massillon French clergyman (1663-1742)

seen the boy. She contacted the elementary school when Kyron didn’t come home from school on the day of the science fair. The sheriff’s office conducted a massive search of the area before declaring the case a criminal investigation on June 14. The boy’s father, Kaine Horman, left Terri Horman about two weeks later.

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More money approved in missing boy case

Applicants sought for new Bend committee

The Associated Press

criminal mischief was reported at 2:58 p.m. July 21, in the 16600 block of Oakridge Place in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:20 p.m. July 21, in the 56800 block of Venture Lane in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:05 a.m. July 21, in the 19400 block of Indian Summer Road in Bend.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 C3

O O  B Man trampled by water buffalo

Brian Davies / The (Eugene) Register-Guard

Using an excavator, Bob Bateman Jr. loads a junked car onto a flatbed truck after extricating it from the base of Blue Mountain, east of Cottage Grove on Tuesday.

Cliffside garbage dump in cleanup Heavy machinery pulls cars, other junk up 200 feet By Mark Baker The (Eugene) Register-Guard

COTTAGE GROVE — It was born in Auburn Hills, Mich., sometime between 1979 and 1982. It died on the side of a mountain southeast of Cottage Grove who knows when, most likely shoved to its demise 150 to 200 feet below a rocky cliff by a car thief, a drunken youth or maybe even its last owner. On Tuesday, the black Dodge Omni with the red POW/MIA bumper sticker “Don’t let them be forgotten” returned from the dead, hauled back by a highlead logging system for a ghostly encore. And in its next life? “It’ll come back as a Lexus,” said Norm Maxwell, a forestry technician for the Bureau of Land Management’s Eugene District, cracking wise before driving away with the car’s remains. The Dodge Omni, riddled with rusted bullet holes, is one of five cars that somehow got tossed off the cliff at the top of 3,012-foot Blue Mountain. Most of them have been there for years. Maxwell, who specializes in finding junked cars in Lane County’s woods and arranging for their removal, discovered the vehicles about a decade ago. He figured that they had never been removed. But last summer, he noticed

that someone, probably a logger, had removed the front end and V-8 engine from the remains of a four-wheel-drive vehicle. That’s when he realized it was possible to remove the cars and other debris. Earlier this year, the BLM hired logger Bob Bateman Jr., of Monroe, who runs Bateman Forest Management, to do the job.

More than just cars Besides the five cars, there’s a gasoline trailer, a metal oil tank, a large open-bed trailer, appliances, bike frames and tires in the mossy woods at the bottom of the cliff kept company by plenty of empty beer cans and shotgun shells. After a test run, hauling a string of old tires up the side of the cliff to see if the system he rigged would work, Bateman went to work on the Omni from inside his excavator. The car had been hooked to the end of a cable by a member of Bateman’s crew working below the cliff. An old two-wheel logging arch was connected to the excavator, and a cable running through the arch from a yarder acted like a pulley system. The most difficult part was the approach to the edge of the cliff, where Bateman made sure the arch didn’t tumble to its own woodsy death as he gently moved it with the excavator. Once the crumpled car had been reeled like a fish to the top of the cliff by the yarder, Bateman jumped out of the excavator’s cab and made some adjustments to the arch before jumping back in and hauling the car over the edge, the vehicle tilting side-

ways as he dragged it all the way to the top. From there, he put the claw bucket on the excavator, picked up the car like a dinosaur snatching its prey and carried it to Maxwell’s flatbed trailer. Next stop? Schnitzer Steel on Highway 99 in Eugene, where the BLM usually gets about $300 for a car’s scrap metal. The BLM is paying Bateman $6,000 for his work, which he hopes to complete this week. The federal agency is using money from soil and restoration funds and garbage cleanup funds to pay him, said Cheshire Mayrsohn, a BLM botanist coordinating the Blue Mountain removal project. Some money could come from restitution in a drug case tied to the gasoline tanker, which was stolen from Bend Oil Co., and the trailer.

PORTLAND — A man suffered leg injuries when he was trampled by water buffalo at a feedlot near the town of Damascus just south of Portland. The 50-year-old man, who was not immediately identified, was airlifted to a Portland hospital for treatment of injuries and puncture wounds to his legs described as “nonlife-threatening.” Steve McAdoo, spokesman for Clackamas Fire District 1, said the man had moved three buffalo onto the back of a truck about 9 a.m. Monday before the animals burst back out, knocking him down and trampling him. A co-worker called 911 as the buffalo ambled back toward their pen. McAdoo said each of the water buffalo weighs about 1,200 pounds.

3 arrested at home of marijuana patient ALOHA — Three people were arrested at the home of a registered Oregon medical marijuana patient and caregiver after a search turned up more than 100 plants and nearly 4 pounds of marijuana. Detectives from the Westside Interagency Narcotics Team served a search warrant Wednesday in the Portland suburb of Aloha after a tip that marijuana was being grown and sold at the residence. Arrested were 49-year-old Melanie Ann Orr, her daughter, 20-year-old Amanda Dawn Orr, and 45-year-old Michael Eugene King. All were charged with manufacture, distribution and possession of a controlled substance. Police said Melanie Orr is a registered medical marijuana

patient, and King is a registered caregiver. A 9mm semiautomatic pistol and a 12-gauge shotgun were also seized with the marijuana.

Couple sues park after car crushed by tree EUGENE — A couple has filed a lawsuit against Yosemite National Park after a tree crushed their car. Lisa Thorpe and David Stone claim no warning signs were posted on Tioga Pass Road when their car was struck on Sept. 16, 2008. The lawsuit alleges that park employee Jared Brown was felling trees nearby, cutting one in a way that caused another tree to fall into the road, smashing the car. The complaint said Thorpe suffered serious and painful injuries, including a spinal cord fracture that required a protective “halo” medical device implanted

in her skull for a year. Stone had less serious physical injuries. But the suit claims he suffered mental and emotional trauma in the accident. — From wire reports

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Plans to limit access A crew from the Clean Forest Project, a nonprofit organization that combats illegal dumping in the woods, worked last week to gather garbage around the junked cars into cargo nets that Bateman was able to reel in Tuesday. The crew also is helping with the removal of the cars this week. The BLM plans to block vehicle access to the edge of the cliff, which is reached by a long, winding gravel logging road off Mosby Creek Road. “In our experience, garbage attracts garbage,” Mayrsohn said. “So our plan is to block the road. We’re hoping we can make it someplace where people can come and enjoy.” They’ll just have to park and walk, however, if they want to see the breathtaking view.

Lakeview Efforts to increase logging residents still mired, task force finds appealing biomass plant By Jeff Barnard

The Associated Press

The Associated Press LAKEVIEW — Some Lakeview residents are appealing city planning commission approval of a plant that would generate electricity from forest thinnings and sawmill scraps. The Herald and News reported that the City Council will hold a hearing Aug. 10 on the proposed biomass plant. Opponents of the plant are worried it will create dust, bad smells and noise, reduce property values and scenic vistas, and affect air quality and water use. Wind power developer Iberdrola Renewables Inc. of Portland hopes to make the $20 million plant the first biomass power generator it owns. Last month, the project received a $1.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

GRANTS PASS — A federal task force said Thursday that major obstacles — from deep mistrust to policies demanding protection of threatened species — still stand in the way of increasing logging in Western Oregon. The timber industry responded that the Obama administration was letting down rural timber towns with struggling economies. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar created the task force a year ago after dissolving the Bush administration plan to boost logging on U.S. Bureau of Land Management timberlands. Salazar said the Western Oregon Plan Revision was indefensible under the Endangered Species Act. The task force found that policies for protecting salmon and spotted owl habitat created by the Northwest Forest Plan in 1994 still stand in the way of in-

tensive logging, a high level of mistrust remains between the timber industry and conservation groups, and federal planning documents used to lay out timber sales are so broad they won’t stand up to Endangered Species Act demands. The report said noncontroversial thinning projects that have accounted for most of the logging in recent years are running out, and it called for a time-out in spotted owl habitat. The report suggested creation of several new committees to look for solutions to lingering problems. Among them would be a team to review the science used to create WOPR, as well as the needs of species that depend on old-growth forests. It also recommended a new steering committee to create a common vision for management of northwest forests while meeting the demands of environmental laws.

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C4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Bend’s sweet code change

T

he buzz about Monday’s Bend Planning Commission meeting is bees. The commission is scheduled to consider a proposal to

allow domesticated beehives on residential lots in Bend. Bees can bring some danger. With a reason, they will sting. We doubt people who are allergic to bee stings will be pleased with a neighborhood hive. But the proposed change to city code isn’t without careful restrictions. It includes standards that regulate location, density and maintenance of the hives. Colonies can’t be plopped down right next to a property line. The hives themselves have to be protected by a security fence. There is a limit of one colony per 5,000 square feet of lot area, up to a maximum of eight colonies regardless of lot size. Any colony that is aggressive or swarms must be re-queened. We would hope Bend’s beekeepers would also be neighborly about their bees. This change isn’t being made just to make some outlaw backyard hives legal. Aaron Henson, a senior planner for Bend who worked on the code change, said he didn’t know of any. Bend beehives would bring benefits. It could mean fresh local honey for sale in farmers markets and stores.

The proposed change to city code isn’t without careful restrictions. It includes standards that regulate location, density and maintenance of the hives. Bees are terrific little pollinators. And while new beekeepers will need some training, bees already know their work and are pretty well self-sufficient. Domestic beehives in Bend may also be helpful in another way. You’ve probably heard of colony collapse disorder, the label for the mysterious disappearance of domesticated honeybees. Researchers are still pursuing the cause. Bend beehives could provide a bit more diversity for the bee population, helping defend bees from the disorder and whatever else. The code change does deserve careful review. For the most part, though, the change is a sweet one. Domesticated bees focus on making honey.

Wanted: Leadership in Oregon education T wenty-seven states recently adopted national education standards for their schools. Not Oregon. Perhaps a dozen more states will adopt those national standards in the next few weeks, according to The New York Times. Not Oregon. Earlier this year, the Obama administration announced the early state winners in its Race to the Top $4.35 billion education reform competition. Again, not Oregon. What is Oregon doing? You wouldn’t call it heroic. As for trying to win the educational reform dollars from Race to the Top, Oregon is not even trying anymore. Gov. Ted Kulongoski said the state didn’t have any chance because, in part, of lack of statewide support for reform. If that’s true, why haven’t we heard about his efforts to drum it up? On adopting national education standards, Susanne Smith, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Education, said the state school board is “reviewing it.” Education officials are trying to decide whether it’s the best step for Oregon, and education officials are trying to figure out how much it would cost. Those are good and important things to learn. Other states, though,

have already managed to review it. Other states have found a way to make the financial contribution necessary. And according to an analysis released Wednesday by the Fordham Foundation, an educational reform group, Oregon students would benefit from the new standards. While Oregon’s math standards may be somewhat comparable to the national ones, Oregon’s English standards fall way short. That means that even if Oregon students are meeting state English standards, Oregon aims low. They are not getting what they will need to compete with other students for success in college and careers. Oregon’s education leadership isn’t doing nothing. The state is applying for a grant from the Race to the Top Assessment Program. Along with other states, it would give Oregon the money to develop tests that are better at figuring out what students know and can do. Oregon’s Chalkboard Project, a reform group, is experimenting across the state, including one aimed at improving teaching in Central Oregon. And perhaps most importantly, most educators we’ve met in Central Oregon give their job their best every day. Oregon is far from being completely left behind in education reform. But Oregon needs high standards, well-designed assessments and educator accountability. We won’t get there with lackluster leadership from Kulongoski and the state board.

The enemies are within America By Keith Sime Bulletin guest columnist

O

utside of Independence Hall when the Constitutional Convention of 1787 ended, Benjamin Franklin was asked, “Well, Doctor, what have we got, a Republic or a Monarchy?” With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, “A Republic, if you can keep it.” For the ensuing 220 plus years, we have successfully defended our Republic from enemies without. However, if our country continues on its present course, we will not be able to keep it, not because of enemies from without, but from within. In a speech shortly before his election, touting “Change We Can Believe In,” Candidate Barack Obama stated, “We are five days away from fundamentally transforming the United States of America.” Subsequently, Rahm Emanuel, Obama’s Chief of Staff, stated that, “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste (referring to the financial crisis arising from the 2008 financial meltdown). So, where do we stand after 18 months with Obama as President, a Democratic majority in the House and until recently, a veto-proof Democratic majority in the Senate? In February 2009, Congress passed the Stimulus Bill. We were told that unless this bill passed, unemployment would go over 9 percent and that if it was passed, unemployment would remain below 8 percent. Current unemployment is at 9.5 percent — with no reason to believe that it will go down soon, and according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we have lost a net 2.4 million jobs since its passage. Is this change we can believe in? In March of 2010, Congress passed

IN MY VIEW the 2,000-plus-page Healthcare Act on a strictly Democratic party line vote against the desire of the majority of Americans. It takes over one-sixth of the United States economy, establishes more than 150 new governmental agencies/commissions/etc., took over the student loan program (to lessen the cost of the bill), left out the $200 billion-plus Dr. “Medicare fix,” brings 30-40 million more people into the health care system, was supposed to reduce health care costs (it doesn’t) and although nowhere contained in the Constitution, requires everyone to purchase government-approved health care insurance. More change we can believe in? The 2,000-plus-page financial overhaul bill has passed the House and Senate. If this bill is to meet its announced purpose, i.e., to prevent the recurrence of the financial meltdown of 2008, why is there nothing in the bill about Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, which arguably played a major role in the 2008 meltdown. According to the Congressional Budget Office, American taxpayers are currently on the hook for $145 billion in housing losses connected to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans, and the losses could balloon to $400 billion if housing prices fall further. Some experts caution that the cost to taxpayers could hit as much as $1 trillion. Sen. Dodd’s comment on the bill named after him: “No one will know until this is actually in place how it works.” More change we can believe in? And what about the southern border where illegal aliens, drugs and no telling how many terrorists continue to cross? Finally, after years of border neglect, Arizona passed a law mirror-

ing the federal law regarding illegal immigrants in order to try to get some semblance of control. And what does the administration do? Sue the state. More change we can believe in? On April 20, 2010, there was an inexcusable explosion on the Deep Water Horizon oil rig in the Gulf. Although the responsibility for the blowout rests with BP, as does the financial responsibility for the cleanup, the administration has been feckless in its response. Illustrative of administration ineffectiveness was the response of two separate administration officials interviewed on Fox News on day 55 of the oil spill. When asked about the waiver of the Jones Act, a 75-year-old act prohibiting foreign flags from assisting cleanup in United States waters, Adm. Allen said that he hadn’t had any requests for a waiver. Yet when Carol Browner, the Environmental Protection Agency director, was asked the same question the same day, she said that the Coast Guard hadn’t requested it yet. More change we can believe in? And on the immediate horizon, the potential for a Cap and Trade Bill, expiration of the Bush tax cuts and discussion within the administration for a value-added tax. So, while the Europeans are looking for ways to reduce their deficits, our spending is out of control. Our Republic is being assaulted from within, and we are losing the America that the founding fathers envisioned and the one in which I grew up. We do need change, but change that believes in us and not change that we are experiencing. Our first opportunity to make an impact is coming in November. So “Remember November” — Let’s Take Back America. Keith Sime lives in Sunriver.

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In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

A regrettable farewell to a longtime Bend family business

W

hile I’m sure Lithia Motors will do a fine job for its Central Oregon customers, it’s hard to say goodbye to a company that’s been in business in Bend since 1916. Worse, it’s hard to say goodbye to a business that’s been owned by a single family all that time. Robert S. Thomas — Bob — is the grandson of Walter Coombs, who founded the Bend Garage Co. in 1916 in a small building on Bond Street between Franklin and Minnesota avenues. A year later, it had outgrown the space and so went south, to the corner of Greenwood Avenue and Wall Street. When it settled into a brand-new building at the corner of Wall Street and Louisiana Avenue in 1937, The Bulletin gave the move extensive coverage, and those old stories are filled with names that today mark streets and parks in town. Among the company’s first sales in 1916 was a car to The Bulletin for a

circulation contest, according to one of those moving-day articles. The car was won by Miss Frances Steidl, whose family name stays alive on Steidl Road just west of the Deschutes River. The first Chevrolet went to T. H. Foley, the man who donated Pilot Butte to the state of Oregon for a park. In all, the Coombs and Thomas families saw their company through seven homes around Bend, the last move coming in 1967 to its current location on Third Street. Until this week, there’s always been a family member at its head. Bob, Young Bob if you grew up in my family, took over from his father in 1981. The elder Bob replaced Coombs, his father-in-law, in 1958. Keeping the two Bob Thomases straight was an ongoing problem for new reporters when the elder Thomas was still alive. There was a natural tendency to call Old Bob Thomas, Bob Sen-

JANET STEVENS ior, and Young Bob, Bob Junior. In fact, Young Bob is Robert S., while Old Bob was Robert W. Surviving through three generations put Bend Garage Co., later Bob Thomas Car Co., ahead of the game statistically speaking. According to Family Business magazine, fewer than a third of all family-owned companies are passed on to even a second generation, much less a third. Those that don’t simply fold are sold for a variety of reasons, often because an ever-expanding family finds little common interest in the company

Grandpa used to run. That wasn’t the case with the Thomas family. Rather, a combination of events no doubt made the company’s sale inevitable. Most immediate was the loss of the General Motors franchise the company had held from its earliest days, but equally important was the fact that there were no more offspring left interested in running the store. Bob’s two children have careers elsewhere, and neither was inclined to come home and take over from their dad. Too, at 63, Bob can retire gracefully now if a bit earlier than he might otherwise have done. So this week marks the end of one of the region’s oldest family businesses, and that’s sad. For now, however, the family remains rooted here, and that’s good. Bob’s mother, Dorris, is getting on in years, but she’s as sharp and wonderful as she ever was. I’ve known her all my life and also known most of that

time why she was my mother’s most cherished friend. She has an unerring moral compass that she passed on to her two children, and their presence is surely her gift to the community she’s lived in nearly all her life. Both Bob and his sister, Susan McKnight, are the good citizens communities must have to thrive: hard working, generous with their time and talent, and interested in leaving their hometown in as good or better shape than they found it. With the sale to Lithia Motors, Bob and his wife, Clella, may well decide to go elsewhere. It would be tough, no doubt, to watch someone else run a business you’ve put so much of yourself into. I hope they stay, however. They have and continue to make Bend a better place, and we’d all be poorer without them. Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 C5

O Betty Ann Tolke

D N   Betty A. Tolke, of Redmond Jan. 28, 1933 - July 20, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: Memorial - Monday, July 26, 2010, 11:00 a.m., Community Presbyterian Church Wellness Ministries, PO Box 1689, Redmond, OR 97756. Contributions may be made to:

Community Presbyterian Church Wellness Ministries, PO Box 1689, Redmond, OR 97756.

Bonnie J. Reed, of Formerly of Eugene Jan. 8, 1928 - July 21, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date in Eugene, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

LaVonne Patrice Griffin, of Culver Mar. 1, 1933 - July 17, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Memorial Services to be held on Friday, August 13, 2010 at 11:00 am at Culver Christian Church. Contributions may be made to:

Mt. View Hospital Auxiliary.

Don Steven Miller, of Redmond Mar. 3, 1950 - July 21, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 Services: Celebration of Life, Sun. 7/25, 2 pm-4 pm at the family home in Redmond.

Iris Jeanne Benson, of Crooked River Ranch July 4, 1926 - July 21, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Memorial Services will be held at a later date.

Jonathan S. Martens, of Bend April 14, 1963 - July 10, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: 3:00 pm, August 14, 2010, Diamond Lake Campground, C-7 location.

Gordon Wayne Eldridge, of Prineville June 9, 1924 - July 20, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Graveside services will be held on Monday July 26, 2010, 10:00 a.m. at Juniper Haven Cemetery, Prineville, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

VFW post 1412, 405 N. Main St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Funding Continued from C1 The bulk of the funds comes through the group’s annual campaign. “Most of it is raised at workplaces in the fall. It’s our bread and butter,” Wilhelm said. “We go out and talk to people in the workplace, and that money comes through payroll deductions.” The money will help keep existing services running at the nonprofits, many of which have seen a significant increase in people needing services. For Lisa Burbidge, executive director for the Boys & Girls Club of Central Oregon, the $46,500 her organization will receive is “a huge gift.” The club has seen its summer attendance double this year, from 275 kids in 2009 to about 550 in 2010, as families around the region have faced unemployment and other economic challenges. “There’s a huge need,” Burbidge said. “And we love United Way dollars because they’re steady and reliable.” The money will go to fund the club’s homework help program, as well as programs that teach health, leadership and life skills, and programs that get kids exercising. About $550,000 of the funds will go to United Way’s 26 partner agencies, which range from Bethlehem Inn to the KIDS Center. The remaining $434,000 is from donations that were earmarked by donors to specific nonprofits, some of which are also affiliated with United Way. This year, donations remained largely the same as last year. But United Way was able to give out $20,000 more than in the 2009-10 fiscal year. “There was enough wiggle room in the budget that we could give away a little more,” Wilhelm said. And Wilhelm said he was thrilled that, even in a challenging

Cochran, writer of country music, dies

January 28, 1933 - July 20, 2010

economic time, donors still gave to the cause. “We found that to be an encouraging aspect of this. We certainly have some folks who are not in a position to give,” he said. “But we also have some who stepped forward and gave for the first time or gave more than they usually give, so fortunately it evened out.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Betty Ann Tolke of Redmond, OR, died on Tuesday, July 20, 2010. She was born January 28, 1933, in Portland, OR to parents, Henry and Rose (Albrecht) Weihl. Betty grew up in Fargher Lake, WA. After high school, she received her nursing degree at Emanuel School of Nursing in Portland. For many years, she worked for Home Health Care in Washington County, and later for Tuality Health Care as a visiting nurse. On Oct. 20, 1956, she married William I. (Bill) Tolke in Portland. While her children were growing up, she was very active in their activities and was always active in her church. She enjoyed traveling all over the country and internationally. Betty especially enjoyed floating the Grand Rhonde River in Eastern Oregon for a number of years on deer hunting trips. She enjoyed all activities with her family and Oregon State Football. She was a member of the Tualatin Plains Presb. Church (The Old Scotch Church) and Community Presb. Church in Redmond, since moving to Redmond in 1996 from Banks, Oregon. Betty leaves behind her husband, Bill; sons, Chris and wife, Alicia of Redmond, Jeffrey and wife, Mary of Eagan, Minn.; daughter, Susan and husband, Doug Duncan of Vancouver, WA and her sister, Edith Bokemeier of Portland. There are eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorial services to be held on Saturday, July 24, 2010, at The Old Scotch Church, Hillsboro, OR, at 12:30 p.m. A second memorial service will be held Monday, July 26, at 11 a.m. at Community Presbyterian Church in Redmond, OR. Those who wish, may send memorials in Betty’s name to Community Presbyterian Church Wellness Ministries, PO Box 1689, Redmond, OR 97756. You may also visit www.redmondmemorial.com to send condolences to the family.

New York Times News Service NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Hank Cochran, a singer and songwriter who wrote major hits for Patsy Cline, Burl Ives and Eddy Arnold and whose songs appeared on the country charts for more than four decades, died Thursday at his home in Hendersonville, Tenn., near Nashville. He was 74. His death was announced by his publicist, Martha Moore, who said he had been suffering from pancreatic cancer. Heartache was Cochran’s great theme as a songwriter. For Cline he wrote the lovelorn “I Fall to Pieces” (with Harlan Howard), and for Arnold the angst-ridden ballad “Make the World Go Away.” Distinguished by their shuffling rhythms, sweeping melodies and emotional candor, both songs became No. 1 country singles and crossed over to the pop chart. Scores of pop singers, from Bing Crosby to Etta James to Elvis Costello, have recorded songs written by Cochran. His greatest impact, though, came as a composer of country hits, including No. 1 singles like Vern Gosdin’s “Set ’Em Up Joe” and George Strait’s “Chair.” Jeannie Seely’s version of Cochran’s torch ballad “Don’t Touch Me” won a Grammy Award for best female country and western vocal performance in 1967. She and Cochran were married from 1969 to 1979. As a performer, Cochran placed three hits in the country Top 40 in the early 1960s. Songwriting, however, increasingly became his focus after he moved to Nashville to take a job as a writer and song plugger.

Inventor of ‘black box’ flight data recorder dies The Associated Press SYDNEY — David Warren, an Australian scientist who invented the “black box” flight data recorder, has died, defense officials said. He was 85. Warren, who died Monday, came up with the idea for the cockpit voice recorder after investigating the crash of the world’s first commercial jet airliner, the Comet, in 1953, the

Department of Defence said in a statement. He thought it would be helpful for airline accident investigators to have a recording of voices in the cockpit. He designed and constructed a black box prototype in 1956, but it took several years before officials understood just how valuable the device could be and began installing them in commercial airlines worldwide.

Cloid Brenner Wigle, age 94, was born April 3, 1916 at the family home in Harrisburg, Oregon on the Wigle Pioneer Land claim. He passed away peacefully at the home he built in Riddle, surrounded by family and caregivers July 5, 2010. He graduated from Silverton HS in 1935 where he was active in multiple sports. Sports of all kinds would prove to be a central part of his later life as he followed his children, grandchildren and many local athletes in Douglas County. After high school he was active in dairy farming and supervised the Woodburn School for Boys dairy until joining the Army despite having a governor’s exemption in 1942. He volunteered for Airborne and became one of the early members of the 82nd airborne. He made four combat jumps in the European Theatre; Sicily, Italy, Normandy on D-day and Market Garden in Holland. He was wounded the day after D-day and was a prisoner of war for a brief time in Normandy. He recovered from that significant hip wound to return to fight in the later parts of WWII. Post WWII he attended Oregon State University briefly and then married Rita Ferschweiler in 1945 and moved to Riddle in 1947. Cloid and Rita were blessed with five children, Kent (Sue) of Coos Bay, Dick Wigle (deceased), Rod (Carla) Wigle of Bend, Colleen (Dennis) Hunt of Pendleton and Gail (Rick) Weaver of Myrtle Creek, plus eleven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. An avid hunter and fisherman he fostered that passion in his sons and grandchildren. After 25 years working at Hanna Nickel he retired to his workshop to craft his toys, kitchen wares, “fish-wackers” and most importantly his wood baseball bats and fungoes which ended up in the hands of many players and coaches across the country including Alex Rodriquez and Sparky Anderson. Always a willing teacher he helped many a young baseball player “turn” their own bat on his wood lathe. He also became well known for sharing his WWII experiences with high schools all over the state bringing a face and a reality to the history books. This allowed Cloid to rid himself of some of the demons of combat and reconnect with many airborne friends in the later years. Quick with a joke and not knowing a stranger he will be missed by many. He was preceded in death by his wife of 62 years, Rita and his son Dick. A memorial service for the family at his gravesite at Veterans Memorial Garden in Roseburg is scheduled for Friday August 6, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. Saturday August 7, 2010 there will be a community gathering in Tri-City at the South Umpqua baseball field beginning at 11:00 a.m. Following Cloid’s family and friends will gather at the family home in Riddle noon to 3:00 p.m. Contributions in Cloid’s name may be made to your own youth sports organizations to keep the Kids playing.


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JULY 23

SATURDAY

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

89

43

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

89/49

86/50

85/51

80s

71/51

Willowdale Warm Springs 90s 91/49 Mitchell 92/50 Madras

Marion Forks 85/40

Camp Sherman 84/40 Redmond Prineville 89/43 Cascadia 86/44 88/44 Sisters 87/42 Bend Post Oakridge Elk Lake 86/42

77/31

86/40

86/39

77/57

Burns

87/50

88/55

81/51

Idaho Falls 86/50

Elko

104/70

95/53

88/42

Reno

98/65

San Francisco

Mostly sunny skies and warm.

80s

78/49

Helena

Boise

89/43

Redding

90/46

Crater Lake

Bend

93/58

Eastern

84/40

80s

Grants Pass

87/41

Silver Lake

85/37

85/50

Eugene

Mostly sunny skies and warm.

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

86/60

88/41

80/33

70s

Portland

Hampton Fort Rock

79/53

63/53

90s

Salt Lake City 93/68

100s

City

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

July 25

Aug. 2

Aug. 9

Aug. 16

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

92 48

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 61/55/0.01 . . . . . 70/54/pc. . . . . . . 72/56/s Baker City . . . . . . 85/42/0.00 . . . . . . 83/48/s. . . . . . . 93/52/s Brookings . . . . . . 83/48/0.00 . . . . . 63/53/pc. . . . . . 63/52/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 88/44/0.00 . . . . . . 88/48/s. . . . . . 96/54/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 83/51/0.00 . . . . . . 87/50/s. . . . . . . 94/55/s Klamath Falls . . . 87/49/0.00 . . . . . . 92/55/s. . . . . . . 95/56/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 90/48/0.00 . . . . . . 92/56/s. . . . . . 95/59/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 86/41/0.00 . . . . . . 87/39/s. . . . . . . 95/45/s Medford . . . . . . . 91/59/0.00 . . . . . . 98/64/s. . . . . . 103/66/s Newport . . . . . . . 63/52/0.00 . . . . . 62/50/pc. . . . . . 67/53/pc North Bend . . . . . . 64/48/NA . . . . . 63/50/pc. . . . . . 64/51/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 89/62/0.00 . . . . . . 92/58/s. . . . . . . 98/63/s Pendleton . . . . . . 86/59/0.00 . . . . . . 89/54/s. . . . . . . 96/56/s Portland . . . . . . . 71/54/0.00 . . . . . 86/60/pc. . . . . . . 93/63/s Prineville . . . . . . . 81/49/0.00 . . . . . . 86/44/s. . . . . . . 95/55/s Redmond. . . . . . . 86/50/0.00 . . . . . . 89/45/s. . . . . . . 99/48/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 88/57/0.00 . . . . . . 89/57/s. . . . . . . 96/60/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 79/54/0.00 . . . . . . 87/55/s. . . . . . . 94/58/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 83/50/0.00 . . . . . . 87/42/s. . . . . . . 95/54/s The Dalles . . . . . . 83/67/0.00 . . . . . . 91/56/s. . . . . . . 99/56/s

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

MEDIUM 2

HIGH

4

6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

MEDIUM

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,268 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95,966 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 73,299 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 36,705 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136,676 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,680 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,145 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.5 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

88 47

WATER REPORT

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters..................................Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97........Ext. La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras..........High Prineville ..........................High

LOW

Mostly sunny, isolated PM storms developLOW ing.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84/55 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 1959 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 in 1965 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.44” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.60” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.97 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.28 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

FIRE INDEX

Friday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:50 a.m. . . . . . .9:45 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:37 a.m. . . . . .10:31 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:35 a.m. . . . . .10:54 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:05 p.m. . . . . .11:14 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:50 a.m. . . . . .11:09 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .10:56 p.m. . . . . .11:00 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

82/40

87/39

85/38

75/54

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:44 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:45 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:38 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:18 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:20 a.m.

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny, isolated PM storms developLOW ing.

HIGH

96 52

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 91° Medford • 41° La Pine

MONDAY

Mostly sunny, hot, isolated PM storms developLOW ing.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

70s

85/41

LOW

96 48

NORTHWEST

Central

La Pine

HIGH

Morning clouds are expected near the coast; otherwise skies will be mostly sunny today.

87/45

90/48

89/43

Morning clouds, then mostly sunny skies.

Sunny and hot.

Tonight: Clear and cool.

Today: Plenty of sunshine and warm.

SUNDAY

HIGH

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .93/74/c . . 94/71/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . . .91/71/t . . 90/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .87/65/0.03 . . .79/71/t . . . .88/69/t Albuquerque. . . .90/66/0.00 . . .91/68/t . . . .86/69/t Anchorage . . . . .62/53/0.00 . . .59/51/c . . 59/51/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . 94/74/trace . 96/75/pc . . 96/76/pc Atlantic City . . . .91/71/0.01 . 89/76/pc . . . .91/79/t Austin . . . . . . . . .93/74/0.07 . 92/73/pc . . 95/72/pc Baltimore . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . 97/77/pc . 100/80/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .81/56/t . . . 85/59/s Birmingham . . . .97/76/0.00 . .100/77/s . 100/78/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .77/62/0.00 . . .75/56/t . . 83/57/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . . .88/55/s . . . 95/60/s Boston. . . . . . . . .85/69/0.00 . . .82/71/t . . . .85/73/t Bridgeport, CT. . .86/68/0.00 . . .81/74/t . . . .92/78/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .82/74/t . . . .84/70/t Burlington, VT. . .81/64/0.00 . . .77/66/t . . . .79/71/t Caribou, ME . . . .76/63/0.11 . . .78/55/s . . . .76/60/t Charleston, SC . .95/76/0.00 . 92/78/pc . . 91/79/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .96/74/0.00 . 97/74/pc . . 99/76/pc Chattanooga. . . .97/76/0.00 . . .98/75/s . . . 99/76/s Cheyenne . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .88/56/s . . 81/56/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .89/69/0.01 . . .94/76/t . . . .87/71/t Cincinnati . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . . 91/73/s Cleveland . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .93/75/t . . . .92/69/t Colorado Springs 87/63/0.00 . . .90/59/t . . . .77/61/t Columbia, MO . .92/74/0.00 . 95/76/pc . . 93/73/pc Columbia, SC . . .98/76/0.00 . 99/75/pc . 100/76/pc Columbus, GA. . .98/75/0.00 . 97/77/pc . . 96/76/pc Columbus, OH. . .87/69/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 92/71/pc Concord, NH . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .82/65/t . . . .82/69/t Corpus Christi. . .91/78/0.11 . . .90/77/t . . 92/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .97/79/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . 98/79/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .86/71/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . 89/71/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .90/60/0.07 . 91/62/pc . . 85/62/pc Des Moines. . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . . .85/63/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . . .92/76/t . . . .91/68/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .74/63/0.00 . 76/60/pc . . . .77/58/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . .94/74/t . . . .94/73/t Fairbanks. . . . . . .62/53/0.00 . . .71/49/c . . . 66/51/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.01 . 81/62/pc . . 80/58/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .75/58/0.04 . . .77/52/t . . . .79/54/t

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 75/54

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 79/53

Cheyenne 88/56

Needles, Calif.

• 6.90” Webster City, Iowa

Las Vegas 103/84

Salt Lake City 93/68

Denver 91/62 Albuquerque 91/68

Los Angeles 73/62

Phoenix 104/86

Honolulu 88/75

Tijuana 75/62 Chihuahua 88/69

La Paz 99/73 Anchorage 59/51

Winnipeg 80/56

Juneau 58/48

Services

Forest

S

S

S S

Quebec 79/63

Thunder Bay 78/57

St. Paul 86/70

S

To ronto 87/70

Boston 82/71

Halifax 78/58 Portland 80/65

Miami 89/80 Monterrey 87/76

FRONTS

“We’ve bought ourselves some time, but we’re not out of the woods.” — Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, on funding for in-home services

thing to do for Oregon’s most vulnerable population. Stiegler said she had received more calls and e-mails from her Central Oregon constituents on this issue than any since her election. “(OPI) allows a modicum of dignity to people,” Stiegler said. “These are people who’ve played by the rules all their life. They’ve done what we’ve asked them to do. The last thing any of us want to do is slap them upside the face and say, ‘Thank you, but ...’” For Jack O’Malley, 72, the issue is personal. In good health himself, O’Malley spent years caring for his ailing mother and now volunteers with the AARP in Bend. He credited the Legislature with making the right decision and said enough people became upset about the issue that their message was heard. “I’m really thankful that something got done,” O’Malley said. “It didn’t sound like anything was going to get done, and (seniors) were just going to be cut off. This is sort of a godsend for a number of people.” Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.

Ultimately the work could generate up to 108 jobs, 86 in the private sector, the plan estimates. The proposal also includes 33,000 acres of the Skyline Forest, which is privately owned land northwest of Bend. The Deschutes Land Trust has targeted the parcel as a potential community forest, where sustainable logging would help pay off bonds used to buy the land. Federal funding couldn’t be spent to restore that part of the forest, but matching funds and services from private partners and other agencies would be directed to work in the Skyline Forest. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Sales Continued from C1 A vacuum salesman involved in the fight said his crew is based in Bend. The magazine sales team was staying at the southeast Bend motel where the incident took place, and police said many of the people involved do not live in Central Oregon. Traveling sales groups often employ young people, who spend the summer knocking on doors and taking orders. Taylor said one of the most common complaints from resi-

dents is about salespeople who won’t take no for an answer. “We have over the years had a few situations where someone has become too aggressive, where they have tried to prevent somebody from closing a door with their hand or foot,” he said. “And those, obviously, we are going to take more seriously.” Kyle Kavas, a spokeswoman for the Better Business Bureau, said her organization often gets complaints about selling practices, delivery problems and other concerns about some door-to-door sales companies. The BBB has received 145

INTERNATIONAL

complaints for Atlantic Circulation Inc.’s corporate office in the last three years. Complaints for the Kirby Company are often directed to the local branches, and information about a Bend branch was not available, she said. The corporate office has received 29 complaints in the last three years from buyers in the U.S. “The biggest problem is the anonymity,” she said. “Many of them come with a marked car or name tag, but that still doesn’t really prove they work for the company they say they work for.”

Like Taylor, Kavas suggested that people do some research on a company before agreeing to a purchase. In Bend, traveling sales companies are required to have a city business license. Atlantic Circulation received a permit in 2008 that expired in June 2009, and does not have a current license. A search for Kirby Vacuum did not turn up any license records, according to a city official. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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Continued from C1 An initial vote ended in a threeway tie between Deschutes, the Tapash Sustainable Forest Collaborative in Eastern Washington and the Lakeview Forest in Southern Oregon. In a revote, Deschutes finished on top. According to the Deschutes proposal, about 20,000 acres planned for thinning would generate woody debris that could be used for biomass power generation. That would make it more likely that proposed biomass power plants, including ones in Warm Springs and La Pine, which have stalled in recent years, would be completed, the proposal argues.

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GOTEAMKIA.COM

Continued from C1 The board’s decision will extend funding for OPI through February. Three other home service programs, including one for children with developmental disabilities, had funding restored through June. Though temporary, the restoration of funding is immediate. For example, seniors in Central Oregon can expect to have most of their services restored as early as next week, according to Pamela Norr, executive officer for the Central Oregon Council On Aging. Many legislators hope to restore funding entirely when the Legislature is back in session, but the plan for how to do that is not yet complete, Buckley said. “We’ve bought ourselves some time, but we’re not out of the woods,” he acknowledged. “We have a lot left to do.” In Central Oregon, 70 seniors were benefiting from OPI services before they were discontinued on July 16, Norr said. She called the restoration of funding, even on a temporary basis, “fantastic,” but said COCOA would be launching an advocacy group, led by a senior, to keep the message at the forefront. “I think it’s important that seniors continue to feel empowered,” Norr said. COCOA will find out exactly how much of its funding is being restored next week, Norr said. Rep. Judy Stiegler, D-Bend, applauded the board’s decision Thursday, saying it was the right

Mazatlan 88/79

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Buffalo Green Bay 82/74 83/67 New York Detroit 87/78 Chicago 92/76 Philadelphia 94/76 92/78 Omaha Des Moines Columbus Washington, D. C. 92/73 92/73 91/73 98/80 Louisville Kansas City 96/79 95/80 St. Louis Charlotte 99/80 97/74 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 94/77 98/75 98/77 Atlanta Birmingham 96/75 Dallas 100/77 96/80 New Orleans 94/76 Orlando Houston 92/78 93/75

Rapid City 80/57

Boise 88/55 San Francisco 63/53

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Bismarck 75/56

Billings 81/56

Portland 86/60

• 106° Stanley, Idaho

Saskatoon 75/58

Seattle 77/57

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• 34°

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Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .79/63/0.99 . . .89/72/t . . . .87/65/t Rapid City . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . .80/57/t . . . 81/58/s Savannah . . . . . 96/74/trace . 93/78/pc . . 93/79/pc Green Bay. . . . . .69/61/0.99 . . .83/67/t . . . .81/62/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .92/62/0.00 . . .98/65/s . . 100/67/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .64/54/0.01 . 77/57/pc . . . 84/59/s Greensboro. . . . .93/76/0.00 . 99/76/pc . . 98/77/pc Richmond . . . . . .97/74/0.00 . 99/76/pc . . 101/78/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .81/68/0.48 . 85/64/pc . . 82/59/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .88/70/0.00 . 92/75/pc . . . .97/75/t Rochester, NY . . .81/61/0.00 . . .81/73/t . . . .86/70/t Spokane . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 91/60/s Hartford, CT . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .80/71/t . . . .95/75/t Sacramento. . . . .80/53/0.00 . . .95/59/s . . . 94/60/s Springfield, MO. .91/75/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 94/73/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .81/51/s . . . 88/56/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . 99/80/pc . . 97/74/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .95/78/0.00 . . .90/79/t . . . .94/79/t Honolulu . . . . . . .84/74/0.00 . . .88/75/s . . . 88/76/s Salt Lake City . . .92/66/0.00 . 93/68/pc . . . 95/72/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . 99/77/pc . 101/78/pc Houston . . . . . . .91/78/0.00 . 93/75/pc . . 90/77/pc San Antonio . . . .89/78/0.00 . . .91/76/t . . 94/74/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . 95/78/pc . . 96/76/pc Huntsville . . . . . .96/76/0.00 . .100/75/s . . 100/75/s San Diego . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . . .69/62/s . . . 71/63/s Washington, DC .95/79/0.00 . 98/80/pc . 101/81/pc Indianapolis . . . .88/71/0.10 . 94/74/pc . . 92/72/pc San Francisco . . .70/55/0.00 . 63/53/pc . . . 64/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .98/77/0.00 . 97/76/pc . . 95/72/pc Jackson, MS . . . .96/74/0.00 . .100/74/s . . . .99/74/t San Jose . . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 83/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .88/52/s . . . 96/60/s Madison, WI . . . .85/64/1.48 . . .87/73/t . . . .85/64/t Santa Fe . . . . . . .88/60/0.30 . 89/57/pc . . 87/60/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .104/85/0.00 . .107/83/s . . 108/82/s Jacksonville. . . . .94/72/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 93/75/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .56/51/0.09 . . .58/48/r . . . .58/49/r Kansas City. . . . .92/78/0.00 . 95/80/pc . . . .91/73/t Amsterdam. . . . .72/59/0.00 . .67/57/sh . . 65/45/pc Mecca . . . . . . . .108/84/0.00 106/86/pc . 107/84/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .81/61/1.08 . . .89/72/t . . 87/65/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . 94/76/pc . . . 97/75/s Mexico City. . . . .66/59/0.55 . . .73/57/t . . . .75/56/t Las Vegas . . . . .105/86/0.00 . .103/84/s . 107/86/pc Auckland. . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .60/52/sh . . 58/45/sh Montreal. . . . . . .81/63/0.44 . . .77/65/t . . . 86/68/c Lexington . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . 93/74/pc . . 93/75/pc Baghdad . . . . . .111/86/0.00 . .112/84/s . . 111/83/s Moscow . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 94/71/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .94/77/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . 87/66/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .93/79/0.20 . . .87/78/t . . . .88/79/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . 73/54/pc . . . 71/53/s Little Rock. . . . .100/80/0.00 . . .98/77/s . 100/75/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . 93/75/pc . . 91/74/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .88/81/0.01 . . .89/81/t . . . .91/80/t Los Angeles. . . . .69/63/0.00 . . .73/62/s . . . 73/63/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .88/76/s . . 87/75/pc New Delhi. . . . . 89/78/trace . . .88/78/t . . . .89/80/t Louisville . . . . . . .92/76/0.00 . 96/79/pc . . . 98/80/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . .74/58/sh . . 73/53/sh Osaka . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .88/76/t Memphis. . . . . . .94/79/0.00 . .100/78/s . . 101/78/s Bogota . . . . . . . .81/43/0.98 . .68/51/sh . . 63/52/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . 65/48/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . .89/80/t . . . .90/79/t Budapest. . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . 90/66/pc . . 77/58/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .82/63/0.14 . . .78/64/t . . . 85/67/c Milwaukee . . . . .79/66/1.44 . . .90/76/t . . . .85/68/t Buenos Aires. . . .52/34/0.00 . . .55/38/s . . . 57/40/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .70/55/sh . . 70/51/pc Minneapolis . . . .77/68/0.28 . . .86/70/t . . 83/64/pc Cabo San Lucas .95/79/0.00 . 94/79/pc . . . 93/79/c Rio de Janeiro. . .90/68/0.00 . . .85/66/s . . 81/64/sh Nashville . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .98/75/s . . . 99/76/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . .96/74/s . . . 95/71/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .92/71/s . . 85/67/pc New Orleans. . . .94/81/0.00 . 94/76/pc . . . .93/78/t Calgary . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . .79/53/sh . . . 83/54/s Santiago . . . . . . .57/30/0.01 . .51/39/sh . . 50/37/sh New York . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . . .99/79/t Cancun . . . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . 89/78/pc . . . .90/79/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . .74/59/sh . . 75/62/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .91/74/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . .101/80/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 64/48/pc . . 68/55/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .68/66/0.00 . .84/70/sh . . 79/70/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .92/79/0.00 . . .99/79/s . . . 98/79/s Edinburgh . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . 61/45/pc . . . 65/54/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .87/76/t Oklahoma City . .95/73/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . 96/76/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .76/58/sh . . 77/54/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .92/81/t . . . .88/80/t Omaha . . . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 86/67/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . .69/47/s . . . 67/46/s Singapore . . . . . .81/75/0.73 . . .88/76/t . . . .87/78/t Orlando. . . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . . .92/78/t . . . .92/77/t Hong Kong . . . . .88/81/1.32 . . .85/78/t . . . .84/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .71/56/sh . . 67/55/sh Palm Springs. . .101/78/0.00 . .109/80/s . . 111/80/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 87/71/pc . . . 89/72/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .59/43/sh . . 58/44/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .90/74/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 91/68/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .91/60/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . . 89/72/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .96/82/t . . . .94/82/t Philadelphia . . . .90/74/0.00 . 92/78/pc . . . .99/80/t Johannesburg . . .64/43/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 65/41/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .87/74/s . . . 87/76/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .96/84/0.00 104/86/pc . 108/87/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .61/59/0.00 . . .64/59/s . . . 63/58/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . . .94/79/t . . . .93/80/t Pittsburgh . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .90/74/t . . . .91/71/t Lisbon . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . . 89/64/s Toronto . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . . .87/71/t Portland, ME. . . .81/63/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . . .73/68/t London . . . . . . . .72/57/0.06 . .66/50/sh . . 67/51/pc Vancouver. . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . . 78/55/s Providence . . . . .85/68/0.00 . . .82/73/t . . . .93/78/t Madrid . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . 92/69/pc . . 95/70/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . 70/54/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 99/77/pc . 100/78/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .88/79/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . 89/63/pc . . 72/62/sh

COSTCO HWY 20


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College Football Inside Alabama coach Nick Saban called out agents, but are college coaches any better? See Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

MLB MLB begins testing for HGH in minors NEW YORK — Major League Baseball implemented random blood testing for human growth hormone in the minor leagues on Thursday, the first professional sports league in the United States to take the aggressive step against doping. The blood testing becomes part of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, which commissioner Bud Selig introduced in 2001 to test for performanceenhancing drugs. “The implementation of blood testing in the minor leagues represents a significant step in the detection of the illegal use of human growth hormone,” Selig said in a statement. “HGH testing provides an example for all of our drug policies in the future.” Testing will be limited to players with minor-league contracts because they are not members of the players’ association, which means blood testing is not subject to collective bargaining. The players association has long been against blood testing. “The union’s position on HGH testing remains unchanged,” union executive director Michael Weiner said. “When a test is available that is scientifically validated and can be administered safely and without interfering with the players’ ability to compete, it will be considered.” — The Associated Press

Rallying to the X Games Bend’s Carl Decker has a chance to compete in the new SuperRally car-racing event next week ADVENTURE SPORTS

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arl Decker describes the X Games as “the Olympics for people that play video games.” Everything at the X Games is bigger, crazier, and more dangerous than most mainstream sports. And when the X Games adds a new event, you can expect it to be the nuttiest of them all.

MARK MORICAL

So as Carl Decker, an accomplished professional mountain biker from Bend, prepares for a chance to race his car in the Summer X Games 16’s new SuperRally event next week in Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, this is what he is thinking: “Basically, I’m prepared to total my car — and hoping not to.” See X Games / D6

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Professional mountain bike racer and rally car driver Carl Decker sits in the Subaru he uses for racing, in the garage of his house in Bend on Monday.

CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC

A new leader, an old leader CCC at a glance A look at what’s happening in the Cascade Cycling Classic, a stage race held in Central Oregon Tuesday through Sunday: Thursday The Skyliner’s Time Trial, Stage 2, was a time-trial venue with a gradual ascent from Bend’s Summit High School west toward Tumalo Falls on Skyliners Road. At 8 miles, riders turned around and returned to Summit High.

TOUR DE F R A N C E AT A GLANCE COL DU TOURMALET, France — A brief look at Thursday’s 17th stage of the Tour de France: Stage: The 17th took the riders on a 108-mile ride from Pau to the peak of the Col du Tourmalet, a stage recognized as the highlight of this year’s race. Winner: Andy Schleck of Luxembourg won in 5 hours, 3 minutes, 29 seconds, but with his rival Alberto Contador of Spain on his shoulder. Third was Joaquin Rodriguez of Spain. Yellow Jersey: Contador holds on to his 8-second lead, and that should be enough to guarantee him overall victory in Paris on Sunday. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner finished the stage in eighth place, 1:45 back. He is in 10th overall in the standings, 10:37 behind. Quote of the Day: “It’s a life lesson. Beyond the debate, I admire the performance of the man. It’s a great thing to see a guy who has won the Tour seven times prepared to ride 35 or 40 minutes back.” — France President Nicolas Sarkozy on Lance Armstrong. Next stage: After four days of hanging on at the back, the sprinters are expected to come to the fore for today’s 18th stage, a 123-mile virtually flat ride from Salies-deBearn to Bordeaux. It will be the last chance for the sprinters to test their legs before the Champs-Elysees. — The Associated Press

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Today Stage 3: Cascade Lakes Road Race Pro Men, 10 a.m. Pro Women, 10:40 a.m. This race starts at Summit High School in west Bend for the pro men’s field and at Wanoga Sno-park for the women’s field. The stage takes riders on a gradual ascent up Century Drive and turns south on Forest Service Road 45, going south and east toward Crane Prairie Reservoir. The course hooks up to Cascade Lakes Highway, climbing north and then east to the finish at Mt. Bachelor’s West Village Lodge.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mara Abbott rides to a second-place finish in Thursday’s timetrial stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Skyliners Road in Bend. Abbott now holds the overall lead after the stage.

PRO WOMEN

Overall standings were reshuffled when national champion Mara Abbott took the overall lead after the time-trial stage By Heather Clark For The Bulletin

Being back in the town where she recently won a national championship provided inspiration for Mara Abbott. The 24-year-old Peanut Butter & Co. TWENTY12 rider erased a 26-second deficit during Thursday’s Stage 2 of the Bend Memorial Clinic Cascade Cycling Classic to overthrow New Zealander Cath Cheatley of Colavita/Baci. Abbott’s ride propelled her to the top spot in the overall CCC standings, and she now holds a

lead of more than a minute over her closest challenger. Webcor’s Erinne Willock, 28, posted the fastest time among 96 elite women in the 16-mile Skyliners Time Trial in west Bend, earning the stage victory in 35 minutes, 56 seconds. Abbott came in second on the stage, nine seconds back. Tuesday’s prologue winner, Alison Powers of Team Vera Bradley Foundation, gave up 44 seconds to Willock in Thursday’s stage to finish in third place. See Women / D5

Top three men overall (through Stage 2): 1, Rory Sutherland, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, 3:34:17. 2, Ben Day, Fly V Australia, 3:34:33. 3, Darren Lill, Fly V Australia, 3:35:14 Top three women overall (through Stage 2): 1, Mara Abbott, Peanut Butter & Co.TWENTY12 4:07:17. 2, Cath Cheatley, Colavita/ Baci Pro Cycling 4:08:30. 3, Erinne Willock, Webcor Builders, 4:09:16. For results from Thursday’s stage and overall times, see Scoreboard, Page D2.

Online For more videos of the Cascade Cycling Classic, visit www. bendbulletin.com/ cycling

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Rory Sutherland begins a ride to third place in Thursday’s timetrial stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Skyliners Road in Bend. Sutherland held onto the overall lead through two stages.

PRO MEN

Aussies are now first and second in overall standings, as UnitedHealthCare’s Rory Sutherland still holds overall lead By Mark Morical The Bulletin

The Australians are ruling Central Oregon. After Thursday’s Skyliners Time Trial, which was won by Aussie Ben Day, Australians are now 1-2 in the men’s overall standings of the Bend Memorial Clinic Cascade Cycling Classic. Day, who lives in Boulder, Colo., but is originally from Brisbane, Australia, won the 16-mile time trial staged west of Bend in 31 minutes, 28 seconds. “It’s been a month since I

raced, and I haven’t done a lot of intensity in my training,” said Day, who rides for Fly V Australia. “The last couple days have been a little bit painful. But I’ve had great TT (time trial) form all year, and I’m really happy to be consistent with it and get another win here.” Jesse Sergent, of TrekLIVESTRONG, finished second, 15 seconds slower than Day. Rory Sutherland, an Australian with UnitedHealthcare, was third, 27 seconds behind. See Men / D5

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL Overall leader Alberto Contador, center, rides during Thursday’s stage.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Cycling ......................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 College football .........................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

Sour start to series for Bend in Walla Walla Sweets score seven in sixth to down Elks Bulletin staff report WALLA WALLA, Wash. — One sour inning doomed the Bend Elks on Thursday against the host Walla Walla Sweets. Walla Walla won its third con-

secutive West Coast League game, topping Bend 7-6 on the strength of a seven-run sixth inning. Trailing 50 entering the sixth, the Sweets rallied for their first lead of the night, scoring seven runs off just two hits to take a 7-5 advantage. Bend pitchers hit three Walla Walla batters and walked five more in arguably the Elks’ worst inning of the season. Bend (25-13 WCL) made some

noise in the ninth inning, scoring one run before loading the bases with just one out. Mitch Karraker struck out and Kerry Jenkins flew out to center field, though, to end the game. Offensively, the Elks outhit the Sweets 13-5. Andy Hunter went three four five with three runs batted in, Donald Collins added three hits and one run scored and Tommy Richards continued to swing a hot bat, going

two for four with two runs scored and an RBI. Nick Loredo took the loss for Bend, giving up four runs in a third of an inning. Elk starter Jordan Remer was effective until the sixth inning, where he was tagged for three runs before being relieved by Loredo. Bend is back on the field today at 7:05 p.m. with another road game at Walla Walla.

Next up • West Coast League: Bend Elks at Walla Walla Sweets • When: Today, 7:05 p.m.


D2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 18, VS. network.

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Scandinavian Masters, second round, Golf. 9 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior British Open, second round, ESPN2. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Children’s Hospital Invitational, second round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Canadian Open, second round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Evian Masters, second round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 11 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Brickyard 400, practice, ESPN2.

TENNIS 1 p.m. — ATP, Atlanta Championships, quarterfinals, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — ATP, Atlanta Championships, quarterfinals, ESPN2.

SOFTBALL 5 p.m. — 2010 World Cup, Japan vs. United States, ESPN.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, light heavyweights, Belbut Shumenov vs. Vyacheslav Uzelkov, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Colorado Rockies at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

SATURDAY CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 19, VS. network.

GOLF 4:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Scandinavian Masters, third round, Golf. 9 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior British Open, third round, ESPN. 10 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Evian Masters, third round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Canadian Open, third round, CBS. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Children’s Hospital Invitational, third round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 7 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Brickyard 400, qualifying, ESPN2. 9:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Kroger 200, final practice, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Kroger 200, qualifying, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — IndyCar, Honda Indy Edmonton, qualifying, VS. network (taped). 3:30 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Mopar Mile-High Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Kroger 200, ESPN.

TENNIS 10:30 a.m. — ATP, U.S. Open Series, Atlanta Championships, semifinals, ESPN2.

SOFTBALL 11 a.m. — USA Futures vs. Team USA, ESPN (same-day tape). 1 p.m. — Men’s slow-pitch, Canada vs. United States, ESPN. 5 p.m. — World Cup, Japan vs. United States, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, New York Mets at Los Angeles Dodgers, Fox. 5:30 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Texas Rangers, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — USA Exhibition, Blue vs. White, ESPN2.

SUNDAY CYCLING 5 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 20, VS. network.

GOLF 4:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Scandinavian Masters, final round, Golf. 9 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior British Open, final round, ESPN2. 10 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Evian Masters, final round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Canadian Open, final round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Children’s Hospital Invitational, final round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — Formula One, Grand Prix of Germany, Fox (same-day tape). 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Brickyard 400, ESPN. 2 p.m. — IndyCar, Honda Indy Edmonton, VS. network. 4 p.m. — Drag rracing, NHRA Mopar Mile-High Nationals, final eliminations, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Colorado Rockies at Philadelphia Phillies, TBS. 1 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, FSNW. 5 p.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs, ESPN.

TENNIS Noon — ATP, U.S. Open Series, Atlanta Championships, final, ESPN2.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 1 p.m. — AVP Nivea Tour, Malibu Open, men’s final, ABC. 8 p.m. — AVP Nivea Tour, Malibu Open, women’s Final, ESPN2.

SOFTBALL 2 p.m. — World Cup, Canada vs. United States, ESPN2.

RADIO SUNDAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs, ESPN.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

CYCLING

IN THE BLEACHERS

TOUR DE FRANCE Thursday At Col du Tourmalet, France 17th Stage 108.1 miles from Pau to the Haute-Pyrenees with Category 1 climbs to Col de Marie-Blanque and Col du Soulor followed by a finishing Hors Category climb to Col du Tourmalet. 1. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, 5 hours, 3 minutes, 29 seconds. 2. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, same time. 3. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 1:18. 4. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, 1:27. 5. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 1:32. 6. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, 1:40. 7. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, same time. 8. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, 1:45. 9. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, 1:48. 10. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, 2:14. 11. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-Farnese, 3:00. 12. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, 3:26. 13. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, 3:30. 14. John Gadret, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 3:35. 15. Kanstantsin Siutsou, Belarus, Team HTC-Columbia, 3:44. 16. Steve Morabito, Switzerland, BMC Racing Team, 3:58. 17. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, 4:12. 18. Carlos Barredo, Spain, Quick Step, 4:16. 19. Vasil Kiryienka, Belarus, Caisse d’Epargne, 4:27. 20. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, same time. Also 42. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, 8:59. 43. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 62. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 14:41. 67. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, 15:35. Overall Standings (After 17 stages) 1. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, 83 hours, 32 minutes, 39 seconds. 2. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, 8 seconds behind. 3. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 3:32. 4. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, 3:53. 5. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, 5:27. 6. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, 6:41. 7. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 7:03. 8. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, 9:18. 9. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, 10:12. 10. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, 10:37. 11. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 12:46. 12. Ruben Plaza, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 13:01. 13. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, 14:24. 14. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, 14:44. 15. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, 16:00. 16. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 17:57. 17. John Gadret, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 17:59. 18. Thomas Lovkvist, Sweden, Sky Pro Cycling, 18:30. 19. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick Step, 20:03. 20. Daniel Moreno, Spain, Omega Pharma-Lotto, 25:23. Also 23. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, 37:58. 45. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, 1:22:00. 46. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, 1:23:37. 60. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, 1:45:30. 86. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 2:37:40. 102. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 3:02:50. 115. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, 3:11:09. 147. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, 3:41:19. 149. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 3:42:52. 2010 BEND MEMORIAL CLINIC CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC Thursday Skyliners Time Trial 16 miles Men Pro 1 (top 25) 1, Ben Day, Fly V Australia, 31:28.405. 2, Jesse H Sergent, Trek-LIVESTRONG, 31:43.551. 3, Rory Sutherland, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, 31:55.796. 4, Ben Jacques-Maynes, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 31:57.545. 5, Jeremy Vennell, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 0:32:07.105. 6, Darren Rolfe, Fly V Australia, 32:26.822. 7, Alex Dowsett, Trek-LIVESTRONG, 32:28.591. 8, Darren Lill, Fly V Australia, 32:39.186. 9, Nathan D Brown, Trek-LIVESTRONG 32:48.625. 10, Timothy R Roe, Trek-LIVESTRONG 32:50.082. 11, Walker Savidge, Holowesko Partners, 32:50.880. 12, Robert Britton, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 32:53.811. 13, Cesar Grajales, Cole Sport p/b High West, 32:56.867. 14, Benjamin King, Trek-LIVESTRONG, 32:57.678. 15, Jesse Moore, California Giant Berry Farms, 33:00.281. 16, Marc De Maar, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, 33:00.362. 17, Carter Jones, RideClean P/B Patentit.com, 33:03.518. 18, Andy Jacques-Maynes, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 33:14.183. 19, Jai Crawford, Fly V Australia, 33:18.415. 20, Jesse Anthony, Kelly Benefit Strategies, 33:26.805. 21, Taylor Sheldon, Holowesko Partners, 33:28.445. 22, Julian C Kyer, Trek-LIVESTRONG, 33:29.989. 23, Andrew Talansky, California Giant Berry Farms, 33:31.222. 24, Benjamin T. King. Trek-LIVESTRONG, 33:31.541. 25, Kevin Rowe, Team Exergy, 33:31.588. Overall standings (top 10) 1, Rory Sutherland, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, 3:34:17. 2, Ben Day, Fly V Australia, 3:34:33. 3, Darren Lill, Fly V Australia, 3:35:14. 4, Marc De Maar, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, 3:35:24. 5, Jeremy Vennell, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 3:35:40. 6, Cesar Grajales, Cole Sport p/b High West, 3:35:44. 7, Robert Britton, BISSELL Pro Cycling, 3:35:55. 8, Timothy R Roe, Trek-LIVESTRONG 3:35:55. 9, Jai Crawford, Fly V Australia, 3:36:10. 10, Benjamin T. King, Trek-LIVESTRONG, 3:36:16. Women Pro 1/2 (top 25) 1, Erinne Willock, Webcor Builders, 35:56.588. 2, Mara Abbott, Peanut Butter & Co.TWENTY12 36:05.712. 3, Alison Powers, Team Vera Bradley Foundation, 36:40.284. 4, Anne Samplonius, Team Vera Bradley Foundation, 37:12.377. 5, Alison K Shanks, Bike NZ 37:23.090. 6, Megan Guarnier, Team TIBCO, 37:40.268. 7, Amber Rais, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling, 37:43.043. 8, Cath Cheatley, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling, 37:44.885. 9, Rushlee Buchanan, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling, 0:37:51.522. 10, Tara Whitten, Keller Rorhback Cycling Team, 37:59.103. 11, Katheryn Mattis, Webcor Builders, 38:00.509. 12, Meredith Miller, Team TIBCO, 38:07.353. 13, Kristin Sanders, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling, 38:08.021. 14, Amanda Miller, Team TIBCO, 38:10.137. 15, Carla Swart, Team Vera Bradley Foundation, 38:13.514. 16, Rebecca Much, Team TIBCO, 38:33.174. 17, Sue Butler, Touchstone Climbing, 38:42.862. 18, Jane Robertson, Metromint Cycling, 38:56.908. 19, Robin Farina, Team Vera Bradley Foundation, 39:02.222. 20, Kelly Mcdonald, Touchstone Climbing, 39:05.233. 21, Andrea Graus, Webcor Builders, 39:10.181. 22, Megan M Hottman, Treads.com/DFT 39:10.409. 23, Patricia S Bailey, Keller Rorhback Cycling Team, 39:11.297. 24, Emily Kachorek, Touchstone Climbing, 39:11.614. 25, Molly S Van Houweling, Metromint Cycling, 39:21.129. Overall standings (top 10) 1, Mara Abbott, Peanut Butter & Co.TWENTY12 4:07:17. 2, Cath Cheatley, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling 4:08:30. 3, Erinne Willock, Webcor Builders, 4:09:16. 4, Alison Powers, Team Vera Bradley Foundation, 4:10:32. 5, Rushlee Buchanan, Colavita/Baci Pro Cycling, 4:11:02. 6, Amber Rais, Colavita/Baci, Pro Cycling, 4:11:47. 7, Meredith Miller, Team TIBCO, 4:12:08. 8, Tara Whitten, Keller Rorhback Cycling Team, 4:13:04. 9, Katheryn Mattis, Webcor Builders, 4:13:16. 10, Emily Kachorek, Touchstone Climbing, 4:13:25.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Columbus 9 3 4 31 New York 8 6 2 26 Toronto FC 6 5 4 22 Chicago 4 5 5 17 Kansas City 4 8 4 16 Philadelphia 4 8 2 14 New England 4 9 2 14 D.C. 3 11 3 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Los Angeles 12 2 4 40 Real Salt Lake 9 4 3 30 FC Dallas 6 2 7 25

GF 22 18 18 18 13 18 15 12

GA 13 19 17 19 20 26 26 28

GF 29 28 19

GA 10 13 13

San Jose 6 4 5 23 20 Colorado 6 4 5 23 17 Houston 5 7 4 19 21 Seattle 5 8 4 19 18 Chivas USA 4 9 2 14 17 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game Los Angeles 2, San Jose 2, tie Saturday’s Games FC Dallas at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. Houston at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m.

18 14 22 24 21

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 14 7 .667 Washington 13 7 .650 Atlanta 14 9 .609 Connecticut 12 9 .571 Chicago 11 11 .500 New York 10 10 .500 Western Conference W L Pct x-Seattle 19 2 .905 Phoenix 9 12 .429 San Antonio 8 13 .381 Minnesota 7 13 .350 Los Angeles 6 16 .273 Tulsa 4 18 .182 x-clinched playoff spot ——— Thursday’s Games Indiana 76, Los Angeles 57 San Antonio 74, Minnesota 72 Phoenix 123, Tulsa 91 Today’s Game New York at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.

GB — ½ 1 2 3½ 3½ GB — 10 11 11½ 13½ 15½

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Thursday’s results) ——— West Division W L Bend Elks 25 13 Corvallis Knights 21 14 Kitsap BlueJackets 19 16 Bellingham Bells 19 18 Cowlitz Black Bears 9 23 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 19 13 Moses Lake Pirates 16 18 Kelowna Falcons 18 22 Walla Walla Sweets 12 21

Pct. .658 .600 .543 .514 .281 Pct. .594 .471 .450 .364

Thursday’s Games Corvallis 4, Moses Lake 1 Wenatchee 2, Bellingham 1 Kelowna 10, Cowlitz 1 Walla Walla 7, Bend 6 Today’s Games Moses Lake at Corvallis Wenatchee at Bellingham Kelowna at Cowlitz Bend at Walla Walla Thursday’s Summary ——— Bend 110 030 001 — 6 13 2 Walla Walla 000 007 00x — 7 5 1 Remer, Loredo (6), Stiltner (6), Deaton (6) and Higgs, Karraker (8); Richardson, Overbay (8), Burke (9) and Stewart. W — Richardson. L— Loredo.

GOLF PGA Tour CANADIAN OPEN Thursday At St. George’s Golf and Country Club Course Toronto Purse: $5.1 million Yardage: 7,079; Par: 70 (34-36) (a-amateur) First Round Brent Delahoussaye 28-34—62 Vance Veazey 30-34—64 Brock Mackenzie 31-33—64 Dean Wilson 30-35—65 Hunter Mahan 31-34—65 Charley Hoffman 32-33—65 Jimmy Walker 32-33—65 Rich Barcelo 30-35—65 Steve Wheatcroft 33-32—65 Spencer Levin 34-31—65 Daniel Chopra 33-32—65 Brian Stuard 30-35—65 Matt Jones 30-36—66 Nicholas Thompson 32-34—66 Bob Estes 33-33—66 Tim Clark 30-36—66 Joe Durant 32-34—66 Greg Chalmers 31-35—66 Troy Merritt 35-31—66 Chris Stroud 32-34—66 Michael Letzig 31-35—66 Jason Bohn 33-33—66 Rob Grube 33-33—66 Retief Goosen 32-35—67 John Huston 33-34—67 Trevor Immelman 32-35—67 Bill Lunde 33-34—67 Mark Hensby 31-36—67 Kevin Na 35-32—67 Ricky Barnes 32-35—67 Stephen Ames 32-35—67 Joe Ogilvie 33-34—67 Briny Baird 31-36—67 Steve Lowery 32-35—67 J.J. Henry 31-36—67 Jon Mills 31-36—67 David Duval 33-35—68 Alex Prugh 33-35—68 Jay Williamson 32-36—68 Camilo Villegas 35-33—68 Ryan Palmer 33-35—68 Nathan Green 32-36—68 Roger Tambellini 33-35—68 Chad Campbell 33-35—68 Tom Pernice, Jr. 32-36—68 Jeev Milkha Singh 33-35—68 Paul Casey 31-37—68 Marco Dawson 33-35—68 James Nitties 32-36—68 Adam Hadwin 31-37—68

Lee Janzen Kevin Streelman James Driscoll Brendon de Jonge Chris Riley Chris DiMarco Mark Wilson Johnson Wagner Luke Donald Justin Bolli Matt Hill Jarrod Lyle Danny Lee Arjun Atwal Kent Jones Brett Quigley Charlie Wi Stuart Appleby John Daly Ryuji Imada Steve Flesch Tom Gillis Paul Azinger Chad Collins D.A. Points Brad Faxon Rocco Mediate Matt Kuchar Scott Verplank Scott McCarron Cliff Kresge Charles Howell III Paul Stankowski Cameron Percy Martin Flores Garth Mulroy Steve Elkington Bryce Molder Webb Simpson Graham DeLaet Bob Heintz Matt Bettencourt Sean O’Hair Blake Adams Tim Herron Lucas Lee Aaron Baddeley Carlos Franco Cameron Tringale Billy Mayfair Mathias Gronberg Carl Pettersson Brenden Pappas Jonathan Byrd Kirk Triplett Chris Wilson a-Nick Taylor Matt Every Jerry Kelly Glen Day Andrew McLardy a-Eugene Wong Jeff Quinney Aron Price a-Cam Burke Ted Brown Dave Bunker Will Wilcox Omar Uresti J.P. Hayes Alex Cejka David Hearn Aaron Goldberg Barrett Jarosch Todd Hamilton Craig Bowden Mike Weir Josh Teater Chris Ross Brandt Snedeker Craig Barlow Jeff Gove Bill Haas Kevin Stadler Kevin Johnson Jerod Turner Gary Woodland Woody Austin Skip Kendall Kevin Sutherland Roland Thatcher Fred Couples John Mallinger Jeff Puska Henrik Bjornstad David Lutterus Ben Boudreau Charles Warren Robert Gamez Ted Purdy Pat Perez Michael Connell Jim Rutledge a-Beon Yeong Lee Robert Garrigus Brian Davis

35-34—69 36-33—69 33-36—69 32-37—69 35-34—69 35-34—69 32-37—69 31-38—69 32-37—69 32-37—69 33-36—69 33-36—69 33-36—69 32-37—69 33-36—69 33-36—69 33-36—69 33-36—69 34-35—69 34-35—69 31-38—69 31-38—69 33-36—69 35-34—69 32-38—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 32-38—70 32-38—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 32-38—70 35-35—70 34-37—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 33-38—71 34-37—71 36-35—71 32-39—71 32-39—71 33-38—71 34-37—71 34-37—71 33-38—71 35-36—71 32-39—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 33-38—71 32-40—72 34-38—72 33-39—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 33-39—72 34-38—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 33-39—72 35-38—73 33-40—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 34-39—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 34-39—73 34-39—73 34-39—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 34-39—73 37-37—74 38-36—74 37-38—75 34-41—75 36-39—75 36-39—75 38-38—76 36-40—76 38-40—78 WD WD

Champions Tour SENIOR BRITISH OPEN Thursday At Carnoustie Golf Links (Championship Course) Carnoustie, Scotland Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,297; Par: 71 First Round a-amateur Jay Don Blake 67 Bernhard Langer 67 Carl Mason 67 Mark Wiebe 68 Dan Forsman 68 Bruce Vaughan 68 Mike Donald 69 Jeff Sluman 69 John Cook 69 Larry Mize 69 Sam Torrance 69 Corey Pavin 69 Olin Browne 70 Jay Haas 70 Mark Calcavecchia 70 Russ Cochran 70 David Peoples 70 Gary Hallberg 70 Morris Hatalsky 71 James D. Mason 71 a-Randy Haag 71 Tom Lehman 71 David Frost 71 Jimmy Heggarty 71 Peter Senior 71 Loren Roberts 71 John Gould 72 Ross Drummond 72 Ronnie Black 72 Fraser Mann 72 John Harrison 72 Ian Woosnam 72 Mike Goodes 73 Marc Farry 73

Steve Van Vuuren Chris Williams Gordon Brand Jnr. Angel Franco Michael Allen Graham Banister Denis O’Sullivan Gene Jones Gordon J. Brand a-Andy Stubbs Seiki Okuda Tsukasa Watanabe Mark James Craig Stadler Tom Watson Chip Beck David Merriman Domingo Hospital Trevor Dodds Mike Cunning Stephen Bennett Tommy Armour III Eduardo Romero Des Smyth John Benda Steve Cipa Mark Belsham Manuel Pinero George Ryall Boonchu Ruangkit Sandy Lyle Fred Funk Andrew Oldcorn Bill Longmuir Roger Chapman Alastair Webster Bob Cameron Ted Schulz Lance Tenbroeck Mike Clayton Mark Carnevale Peter Fowler Philip Blackmar David J. Russell Barry Lane Tim Simpson Peter Mitchell Vicente Fernandez Glenn Ralph Martin Poxon Jerry Bruner Fred Holton Bob Gilder Mike Harwood C.S. Lu Costantino Rocca Juan Quiros Bob Boyd Bobby Lincoln J.L. Lewis a-Paul Simson Pete Oakley Isao Aoki Denis Watson Nick Job Bobby Clampett Frankie Minoza Eamonn Darcy Matt Briggs Noel Ratcliffe Kazuhiro Takami Adan Sowa Mark Balen Nobuo Serizawa Katsuyoshi Tomori Hideki Kase Michael S. Harmon Joe Stansberry Tony Johnstone Wayne Grady a-Robert Vallis Bertus Smit Jeb Stuart Scott Simpson Robert Wrenn Denis Durnian a-Michael Mercier Delroy Cambridge Jose Rivero Andrew Reynolds Martin Gray Carlo Alberto Acutis a-Steve Rogers Bob Charles Jim Rhodes Barrie Stevens a-David Gilchrist Gary Trivisonno Kirk Hanefeld Christy O’Connor Jnr. Antonio Garrido a-Tom Lockwood Mike Reid Kevin Spurgeon John Chillas John Hoskison Graham Gunn Billy Jack Grant Turner Brad Smith

73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 78 78 78 78 79 79 79 79 79 79 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 81 82 82 82 83 83 83 84 87

LPGA Tour EVIAN MASTERS Thursday At Evian Masters Golf Club Evian-les-Bains, France Purse: $3.25 million Yardage: 6,345; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Morgan Pressel 31-35—66 Melissa Reid 33-33—66 Sun-Ju Ahn 33-33—66 M.J. Hur 34-33—67 Song-Hee Kim 33-34—67 Jeong Jang 33-35—68 Meena Lee 33-35—68 Yani Tseng 35-33—68 Mika Miyazato 34-34—68 Michelle Wie 35-33—68 Mi-Jeong Jeon 35-33—68 Na Yeon Choi 33-35—68 Momoko Ueda 36-33—69 Sun Young Yoo 31-38—69 Pat Hurst 32-37—69 Ai Miyazato 35-34—69 Alexis Thompson 32-37—69 Gwladys Nocera 35-34—69 Lee-Anne Pace 35-34—69 Anja Monke 34-35—69 Mayu Hattori 34-35—69 Yukari Baba 33-36—69 Haeji Kang 33-36—69 Suzann Pettersen 35-34—69 Angela Stanford 34-35—69 Kyeong Bae 33-37—70 Lindsey Wright 35-35—70 Catriona Matthew 34-36—70 Anna Nordqvist 36-34—70 Vicky Hurst 35-35—70 Jiyai Shin 35-35—70 Diana Luna 33-37—70 Azahara Munoz 36-34—70 Brittany Lincicome 34-36—70 Shanshan Feng 37-33—70 Smriti Mehra 34-36—70 Marianne Skarpnord 35-36—71 In-Kyung Kim 36-35—71 Stacy Prammanasudh 34-37—71 Alena Sharp 32-39—71 Helen Alfredsson 36-35—71 Paula Creamer 35-36—71 Miki Saiki 35-36—71 Giulia Sergas 37-34—71 Florentyna Parker 33-38—71 Candie Kung 34-37—71 Kristy McPherson 35-36—71 Maria Hjorth 36-35—71 Karen Stupples 39-32—71 Juli Inkster 34-37—71 Akane Iijima 33-38—71 Beatriz Recari 36-36—72 Laura Diaz 35-37—72 Cristie Kerr 37-35—72 Chie Arimura 36-36—72 Sophie Gustafson 38-34—72 Amy Yang 37-35—72 Karine Icher 34-38—72 Yuri Fudoh 37-35—72 Sakura Yokomine 35-37—72 Teresa Lu 37-36—73 Rui Kitada 37-36—73 Meaghan Francella 35-38—73 Stacy Lewis 38-35—73 Jimin Kang 36-37—73 Amanda Blumenherst 36-37—73 Natalie Gulbis 36-37—73 Tamie Durdin 36-37—73 Maria Hernandez 36-37—73 Felicity Johnson 34-39—73 Rikako Morita 35-38—73 Hee-Won Han 35-38—73 Wendy Ward 35-38—73 Karrie Webb 36-37—73 Linda Wessberg 36-37—73 Soo-Yun Kang 33-40—73 Kaori Aoyama 37-37—74 Seon Hwa Lee 38-36—74

Christina Kim Yoshimi Kohda Miho Koga Janice Moodie Amy Hung Shi Hyun Ahn Ji Young Oh Inbee Park Hee Young Park Asako Fujimoto Karen Lunn Hee Kyung Seo Mariajo Uribe Hyun-Ji Kim Eun-Hee Ji Sherri Steinhauer Maria Verchenova Ran Hong Trish Johnson Ayako Uehara Iben Tinning Bo-Mee Lee Jee Young Lee Katherine Hull Eunjung Yi Brittany Lang Virginie Lagoutte-Clement Bomi Suh Nicole Gergely Sandra Gal Kristie Smith Caroline Rominger Laura Davies

37-37—74 34-40—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 35-39—74 36-38—74 34-40—74 37-38—75 36-39—75 39-36—75 37-38—75 35-40—75 37-38—75 38-37—75 38-37—75 35-41—76 36-40—76 38-38—76 36-40—76 39-37—76 36-40—76 38-38—76 39-37—76 37-39—76 37-39—76 38-39—77 36-42—78 40-40—80 39-41—80 37-44—81

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— GERMAN OPEN Thursday Hamburg, Germany Singles Third Round Juan Carlos Ferrero (6), Spain, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-4, 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 7-6 (1), 6-0. Potito Starace, Italy, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Thomaz Bellucci (7), Brazil, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (10), Germany, 7-5, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer (3), Austria, def. Jeremy Chardy, France, 7-5, 7-6 (4). Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Julian Reister, Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, def. Nikolay Davydenko (1), Russia, 6-4, 6-4. ATLANTA CHAMPIONSHIPS A U.S. Open Series event Thursday Johns Creek, Ga. Singles Second Round Andy Roddick (1), United States, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-1, 6-7 (1), 6-3. Xavier Malisse (7), Belgium, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-3.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— SLOVENIA OPEN Thursday Portoroz, Slovenia Singles Second Round Ksenia Pervak, Russia, def. Alexandra Panova, Russia, 6-2, 7-5. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Maria Elena Camerin, Italy, 7-5, 6-1. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def. Rossana de los Rios, Paraguay, 6-3, 6-0. Anastasiya Yakimova, Ukraine, def. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, 1-6, 6-3, 1-0, retired. NUERNBERGER GASTEIN LADIES Thursday Bad Gastein, Austria Singles Second Round Patricia Mayr, Austria, def. Tathiana Garbin (7), Italy, 6-3, 6-4. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, 6-2, 7-5. Alize Cornet, France, def. Andrea Petkovic (1), Germany, 6-2, 7-5. Yvonne Meusberger, Austria, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 7-5, 7-5.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Reinstated RHP Kevin Millwood from the 15-day DL. BOSTON RED SOX—Activated OF Jeremy Hermida from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Daniel Nava to Pawtucket (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Activated OF Rick Ankiel from the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Traded RHP Sean O’Sullivan and LHP Will Smith to Kansas City for INF Alberto Callaspo. MINNESOTA TWINS — Activated INF Alexi Casilla from the 15-day DL. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Recalled INF Mike McCoy from Las Vegas (PCL). Optioned LHP Marc Rzepczynski to Las Vegas. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Reinstated C Ramon Hernandez from the 15-day DL. Assigned C Corky Miller outright to Louisville (IL). Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Isringhausen on a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned OF Lorenzo Cain to Nashville (PCL). Activated RHP Yovani Gallardo from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP Chad Cordero on a minor league contract and assigned him to Buffalo (IL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with OF Timo Perez on a minor league contract and assigned him to Reading (EL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Recalled C Jason Jaramillo from Indianapolis (IL). Placed C Ryan Doumit on the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Signed G C.J. Watson and traded him to Chicago for a 2011 second-round draft pick. INDIANA PACERS — Signed G Lance Stephenson to a multiyear contract. LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Agreed to terms with C Theo Ratliff on a one-year contract. MIAMI HEAT — Signed G Carlos Arroyo. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER — Signed general manager Sam Presti to a multiyear contract extension. SAN ANTONIO SPURS — Signed G Gary Neal. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Placed TE Joe Klopfenstein on injured reserve. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed TE Tony Moeaki. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Signed DE Bobby McCray to a one-year contract. Waived LB Harry Coleman, LB Sam Maxwell, DE Brandon Sharpe and CB Marcell Young. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed DB Stevie Brown. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS — Re-signed G Ondrej Pavelec to a two-year contract. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Traded C Marty Reasoner to Florida for C Jeff Taffe. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Re-signed D Grant Clitsome to a one-year contract. OTTAWA SENATORS — Signed F Mike Hoffman. Resigned F Cody Bass to a one-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Re-signed F Jannik Hansen to a one-year contract.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 338 80 4,672 2,243 The Dalles 366 85 4,161 1,993 John Day 305 102 2,296 1,063 McNary 559 89 2,812 1,290 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 337,818 27,450 135,275 66,142 The Dalles 266,790 23,286 82,084 42,053 John Day 246,468 23,368 55,321 27,478 McNary 215,252 16,392 33,345 14,803


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 D3

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

S  B

Schleck wins 17th stage but Contador set for title By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

COL DU TOURMALET, France — Alberto Contador never wavered. Under a blistering attack from Andy Schleck, the Spaniard tightened his grip on a third Tour de France title in four years by matching every acceleration his rival threw at him during the ride up a fabled Pyrenean climb in Thursday’s 17th stage. Schleck delivered on his promise to ride well on the last mountain of this year’s race. It just wasn’t enough to shake Contador. Schleck set a punishing pace up the last six miles on the ascent of the Col du Tourmalet, but the Spaniard shadowed him wheelto-wheel the whole way. In the end, Schleck won the 108.1-mile trek from Pau by a half bikelength, but failed in his bid to take the yellow jersey from Contador and gain time on his rival ahead of Saturday’s time trial. “I did short accelerations really many times, it was the only possibility I had to try to drop him,” Schleck said. “But he was too strong.” The Tourmalet was the last of three tough climbs in the stage made in cool temperatures under a drizzle and fog. Frenzied fans — including some near-streakers — ran alongside the duelists on the ascent, at least once seeming to irk Schleck. On the second climb, the Col du Soudor, a flock of sheep strayed into the road, causing some riders to swerve, brake and stop, though no one crashed. With only three days of racing left before Sunday’s finish in Paris, and two of the stages unlikely to alter the top of the standings, the two men knew that Thursday’s leg was crucial. Schleck had vowed to make an all-out effort. On the Tourmalet, he repeatedly turned around, at times speaking to Contador or trying to catch his gaze in an attempt at mind games. The Spaniard never took the bait. “I wanted him to pass, I wanted

Bas Czerwinski / The Associated Press

Andy Schleck crosses the finish line with overall leader Alberto Contador, left, to win the 17th stage of the Tour de France cycling race on the Col du Tourmalet in the Pyrenees on Thursday. to be behind and attack him, but of course, he’s very smart, and I knew that he only had to stay in my wheel,” Schleck said. “I think Alberto did the right thing, he’s a great professional.” Every time Schleck made a burst, Contador was right there, dancing lightly side to side up out of his saddle in a smooth rhythm. Contador did what he needed to, and appeared to slow at the end, leaving Schleck to win his second stage this Tour, in 5 hours, 3 minutes, 29 seconds. “He was really so strong and at the end, the sprint for me was not the most important thing,” said Contador, who finished in the same time to remain in front by 8 seconds. “Today, the most important thing for me was not to lose time.” The wild card now is Saturday’s 32.3-mile time-trial, a discipline in which Contador excels. Schleck said before Thursday’s

stage that he’d need to pick up a minute on Contador to have a chance of victory. It was a day of scaled-down and revised expectations. “I changed my mind when I crossed the finish line today,” Schleck said. “We will see in the time trial.” “My dad always used to say that the one who did a good time trial, he fell off the bike when he finished,” Schleck said, “and that’s what I plan to do on Saturday.” Seven-time champion Lance Armstrong, who finished 4:12 behind the leading duo in 17th place, again revised down his hopes at the Tour. At the start of the three-week race, the 38-year-old Texan had hoped to be a contender in his last Tour. That aspiration vanished in the debut in the Alps in Stage 8, when crashes slowed him down three times and he lagged in the climbs.

Then, Armstrong began angling for a stage victory. His last big chance for that came in Tuesday’s 16th stage, but he came up short in a final sprint among breakaway riders to finish sixth. After Thursday’s final mountain day, his expectations came down again. Asked what the chances were now of winning a stage, Armstrong replied: “Slim to none.” He’s now focused on making sure his RadioShack squad maintains its lead in the team general classification. “The most important thing was that we stay ahead in the team GC, and that’s what we did,” Armstrong said. He’s in 23rd place overall — 37:58 behind Contador. In the meantime, sprinters are likely to step up during today’s 18th stage, a mostly flat 123-mile ride from Salies-de-Bearn to Bordeaux.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Blake leads strong U.S. showing at Senior British The Associated Press CARNOUSTIE, Scotland — Jay Don Blake shot a 4-under 67 to lead a strong American showing in the opening round of the Senior British Open at Carnoustie on Thursday. Blake is in a three-way tie at the top of the leaderboard alongside Germany’s Bernhard Langer and England’s Carl Mason. Below that trio the only nonAmerican in the next 17 places was Scotsman Sam Torrance, who shot a 69. Carnoustie, widely rated as the toughest links layout on the British Open championship rotation, is vastly different from most of the courses on the Champions Tour. “It’s a golf course where you can’t be aggressive because you can’t fly the ball at flags like we are used to over in the courses we play in America,” said Blake, who had six birdies and two bogeys. “I have had to learn a whole new game, which is fun. It’s exciting, but it’s tough. “I just tried to stay out of the death bunkers, as I call them, because it’s a certain one-shot penalty getting in them.” Mason, playing in the afternoon after wind had subsided, was the only player to get to 5 under after a run of five birdies in six holes. However, his chances of an outright lead were ruined

Danny Lawson / The Associated Press

Germany’s Bernhard Langer plays from a bunker on the 18th hole during the Senior British Open at Carnoustie Golf Club, Carnoustie, Scotland, on Thursday. Langer is tied for the first-round lead. when his 3-iron approach to the 10th hole ended with his ball plugged in the steep face of a greenside bunker. “It was so bad, there was no way I could get the ball out at the first attempt,” he said after taking a double-bogey 6. Among the Americans chasing the leaders were U.S. Ryder Cup captain Corey Pavin (69) and former captain Tom Lehman (71). Of the three former European captains in the field, only Torrance emerged from the first round under par. He’s hoping to complete a golfing double for his 78-year-old father.

Bob Torrance was the coach who built Padraig Harrington’s swing before his 2007 victory at Carnoustie in the British Open. With his game in poor shape, Sam went home this week to seek some fatherly advice. “He’s a great coach,” Sam Torrance said. “He sees things that nobody else sees. He gave me a great swing thought and it worked. I would love to win here now at Carnoustie, but there is a long way to go.” Also on Thursday: Oosthuizen tied for lead STOCKHOLM — British Open champion Louis Oosthuizen shot a 5-under 67 and was tied with

Australia’s Richard Green and Dustin Johnson of the United States after the first round of the Scandinavian Masters. Just four days after his runaway victory at St. Andrews, Oosthuizen started full of confidence on an overcast, breezy day at the Bro Hof Slott course with a birdie at the par-5 578-yard first hole. The South African finished the front nine in 1-under 35. He collected five more birdies on the back nine, but was unable to take the overall lead after a bogey at the 13th. Scottish Open champion Edoardo Molinari was one shot back after a 4-under 68. American Pressel fires 66 EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France — Morgan Pressel of the United States birdied the first three holes and finished with a 6-under 66 to lead after the first round of the Evian Masters. Melissa Reid of England and Sun-Ju Ahn of South Korea each birdied the last hole to join her in the lead. Song-Hee Kim and M.J. Hur of South Korea were a stroke behind the leaders. Michelle Wie was tied for sixth after a 68. Defending champion Ai Miyazato of Japan was three shots behind the leaders after a 69, along with Suzann Pettersen and Angela Stanford.

Football • Georgia’s Green says he’s never been to Miami: A party on Miami’s South Beach and sports agents were once again hot topics at the Southeastern Conference media days, with South Carolina and Georgia taking center stage on Thursday. Gamecocks coach Steve Spurrier said tight end Weslye Saunders told him he did nothing wrong during his trip to South Beach; Georgia receiver A.J. Green insisted he’s never even been to Miami. The party at Club Liv in the Fontainebleau hotel in May has been the subject of investigations by the NCAA and several schools, including defending national champion Alabama and North Carolina. • North Carolina coach Davis says players cooperating with NCAA: North Carolina football coach Butch Davis broke his public silence on the NCAA investigation into the University of North Carolina’s football program on Thursday, telling a banquet audience the NCAA has said it will move quickly in the probe that brought investigators to campus last week. In prepared remarks in front of the banquet crowd, Davis said the NCAA had assured UNC it would “expedite” its investigation. • Dez Bryant agrees on terms of deal with Cowboys: Dez Bryant agreed to terms of a contract with the Dallas Cowboys on Thursday, making the receiver the first of this year’s NFL first-round picks with a deal. The Cowboys announced the deal in a news release the day before they report to training camp in San Antonio. • 49ers’ Ray McDonald pleads not guilty to DUI: San Francisco 49ers defensive lineman Ray McDonald has pleaded not guilty to driving under the influence. San Mateo County Assistant District Attorney Karen Guidotti said Thursday that McDonald’s attorney entered the plea on the player’s behalf on Monday. McDonald was arrested June 12 after a California Highway Patrol officer pulled him over in his black BMW on Interstate 280 for allegedly driving 94 mph. His blood-alcohol content was not released. • Former Browns center Bentley sues team over staph: Former Cleveland Browns center LeCharles Bentley has filed a lawsuit against the team over a career-ending staph infection he says he contracted at the team’s facility. Bentley’s attorney, Shannon Polk, said Thursday that the lawsuit filed in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court seeks at least $25,000 in damages for alleged fraud and negligent misrepresentation. Bentley could seek more money in court. Polk says Bentley nearly died from the infection while he was rehabbing from a knee injury. She says the Browns persuaded Bentley to rehab there and never told him about “a host of unsanitary conditions” or other players who had contracted staph there.

Baseball • Judge keeps Aug. 4 auction for Texas Rangers: The Texas Rangers’ auction is on. A federal bankruptcy judge decided Thursday to keep the Aug. 4 date to auction off the team, rejecting requests to delay it nearly two months so bidders could line up financing. And Mark Cuban, the outspoken owner of the Dallas Mavericks and a billionaire businessman, may be among those bidding on the Rangers. • Rose’s bat auctioned for $158,776: The black Mizuno bat that Pete Rose used to get his final hit has been auctioned for $158,776, less than expected for the 32 ounces of baseball history. Rose used the bat for hit No. 4,256, a single off San Francisco’s Greg Minton on Aug. 14, 1986. His final hit stands as the major league record. Lelands.com auctioned the 34-inch, 32-ounce bat online this month. Seven bids were received. • Moyer headed to DL, Phillies set rotation: Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jamie Moyer is headed for the 15-day disabled list with an elbow injury that forced him out of his last start after only one inning. The 47-year-old left-hander was hurt Tuesday and general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said he had a sprained ulnar collateral ligament and a strain of the flexor pronator tendon. Amaro said that Moyer would be out indefinitely, but the team hadn’t determined Thursday whether he’d require reconstructive surgery. • Royals trade Callaspo to Angels for two pitchers: In a move geared toward the future, the Royals traded third baseman Alberto Callaspo to the Los Angeles Angels for two pitchers just before Thursday’s series opener against the New York Yankees. The Royals acquired right-hander Sean O’Sullivan and minor-league lefty Will Smith, but the deal also clears the way for Mike Moustakas, one of the organization’s top prospects.

Basketball • Nate Robinson back for full season with Celtics: Nate Robinson joined the Boston Celtics at the trade deadline last season and didn’t really do much until the playoffs. Now he’s getting a head start. Robinson re-signed with Boston on a two-year deal reportedly worth $4 million, giving him a chance to learn the system in training camp instead of picking things up on the fly. • Hornets’ Paul requests to be traded: A person familiar with the situation says Chris Paul has requested a trade and the New Orleans Hornets have scheduled a face-to-face meeting with the star guard on Monday. Paul will sit down with new head coach Monty Williams, new general manager Dell Demps and team president Hugh Weber, the person told The Associated Press on Thursday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the team had not made plans to meet with Paul public. Paul, who cannot opt out of his contract for two years, said recently that he likes New Orleans but will be unhappy playing for the Hornets if they fail to demonstrate a commitment to winning immediately. • Arroyo returns to Heat, will vie to be starter: Carlos Arroyo has finalized his deal to return to the Miami Heat. Arroyo appeared in 72 games and made 35 starts at point guard for Miami last season, then decided to return to the club after a brief stint as a free agent. He averaged 6.1 points and 3.1 assists, plus had a stellar 4.17 assist-to-turnover ratio. — From wire reports

You Can’t Be Shy When It Comes To Pie!

at the

Deschutes County Fair Wednesday, July 28 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm In The Bulletin

Journeyman shoots 62 to lead Canadian Open The Associated Press TORONTO — Brent Delahoussaye thought he would be overmatched at St. George’s Golf and Country Club. It turns out, the historic course was no match for the former Clemson player whose lone pro victory came in the 2006 Hooters Tour Classic. The 29-year-old Delahoussaye shot an 8-under 62 on Thursday to match the Canadian Open re-

PGA TOUR cord and take a two-stroke lead in the national championship. “I’ve been hitting it well. I was just getting in my own way,” Delahoussaye said. “Today, I was like, you know what, ‘I’m just going to go out there and play. This course doesn’t set up good for me, so I’m just going to go out there

with a good attitude and not worry about it.’ And look where I am now.” He had an eagle, seven birdies and a bogey in perfect scoring conditions on the Stanley Thompson-designed course, the tree-lined, hilly layout that features thick rough, narrow fairways and undulating greens. “The key was probably hitting fairways,” the short-hitting Dela-

houssaye said after hitting 13 of 14 fairways in regulation, 14 of 18 greens and needing only 24 putts. Vance Veazey and Brock Mackenzie shot 64s, and Mahan, Dean Wilson, Charley Hoffman, Jimmy Walker, Rich Barcelo, Steve Wheatcroft, Spencer Levin, Daniel Chopra and Brian Stuard had 65s. Seventy of the 156 players broke par and the field average was 69.712.

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D4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 60 34 .638 — Tampa Bay 57 37 .606 3 Boston 54 42 .563 7 Toronto 48 48 .500 13 Baltimore 30 65 .316 30½ Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 52 42 .553 — Detroit 50 44 .532 2 Minnesota 51 45 .531 2 Kansas City 41 54 .432 11½ Cleveland 40 55 .421 12½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 56 40 .583 — Los Angeles 51 47 .520 6 Oakland 48 47 .505 7½ Seattle 37 59 .385 19 ——— Thursday’s Games Detroit 5, Toronto 2 N.Y. Yankees 10, Kansas City 4 Minnesota 5, Baltimore 0 Texas 3, L.A. Angels 2 Boston 8, Seattle 6, 13 innings Today’s Games Kansas City (Bannister 7-8) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 7-8), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Duensing 3-1) at Baltimore (Guthrie 3-10), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Niemann 8-2) at Cleveland (Carmona 9-7), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Marcum 8-4) at Detroit (Porcello 4-7), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (J.Saunders 6-9) at Texas (C.Wilson 8-5), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 8-8) at Oakland (Cahill 9-3), 7:05 p.m. Boston (Beckett 1-1) at Seattle (J.Vargas 6-4), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 1:10 p.m. Minnesota at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m. Toronto at Detroit, 10:05 a.m. Minnesota at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 1:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 56 39 .589 — Philadelphia 49 46 .516 7 New York 49 47 .510 7½ Florida 47 48 .495 9 Washington 42 54 .438 14½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 54 42 .563 — Cincinnati 53 44 .546 1½ Milwaukee 44 53 .454 10½ Chicago 43 53 .448 11 Houston 39 56 .411 14½ Pittsburgh 34 61 .358 19½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 55 39 .585 — San Francisco 53 43 .552 3 Colorado 51 44 .537 4½ Los Angeles 51 45 .531 5 Arizona 37 59 .385 19 ——— Thursday’s Games Florida 3, Colorado 2 Washington 7, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 8, San Diego 0 Philadelphia 2, St. Louis 0, 11 innings Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 3, Arizona 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Today’s Games St. Louis (Suppan 0-5) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 4-7), 11:20 a.m. Colorado (Cook 4-5) at Philadelphia (Halladay 10-8), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Correia 6-6) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 6-7), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 10-8) at Florida (Sanabia 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 0-1) at Houston (Norris 2-7), 5:05 p.m. Washington (Stammen 2-4) at Milwaukee (Narveson 86), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (J.Sanchez 7-6) at Arizona (E.Jackson 68), 6:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 7-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Padilla 4-2), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 10:05 a.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Houston, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Florida, 4:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 5:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at Florida, 10:10 a.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Cincinnati at Houston, 11:05 a.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Red Sox 8, Mariners 6 (13 innings) SEATTLE — John Lackey came within four outs of a no-hitter, only to watch his Boston Red Sox blow a comfortable lead and cost him a win before beating Seattle in 13 innings. Seldom-used Eric Patterson doubled home two runs with two outs in the 13th and the Red Sox overcame Seattle’s five-run ninth against Manny Delcarmen and closer Jonathan Papelbon. Josh Bard broke up Lackey’s bid for baseball’s fifth no-hitter this season on a clean single to right-center with two outs in the eighth. The last-place Mariners then rose up for five runs on three hits and two Boston errors to tie it in the ninth. Boston AB Scutaro ss 6 D.McDonald lf 5 D.Ortiz dh 6 Youkilis 1b 6 A.Beltre 3b 6 J.Drew rf 5 Cameron cf 5 Hall 2b 4 a-E.Patterson ph-2b2 Cash c 4 b-Lowrie ph 1 Brown c 1 Totals 51

R H 2 2 0 0 0 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 13

Seattle AB I.Suzuki rf 5 Figgins 2b 5 F.Gutierrez cf 5 Jo.Lopez 3b 5 Bradley lf 5 Smoak dh 6 Kotchman 1b 4 1-Langerhans pr-1b2 J.Bard c 3 2-M.Saunders pr 0 Ro.Johnson c 2

R 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0

BI 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 8

Gomes lf 4 R.Hernandez 1b 4 Stubbs cf 4 Cairo 3b 3 Hanigan c 3 Volquez p 0 Fisher p 2 Bray p 0 Jor.Smith p 0 a-L.Nix ph 1 Masset p 0 Totals 33

WIDE LOAD COMING HOME

STANDINGS

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 3 1 1 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 11

Avg. .279 .257 .252 .303 .336 .269 .273 .232 .208 .150 .333 .125

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0

Avg. .312 .229 .256 .235 .205 .207 .216 .208 .189 .228 .200

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 5

.275 .281 .245 .302 .316 .000 .000 --.000 .246 ---

Washington 123 000 100 — 7 10 0 Cincinnati 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 a-singled for Jor.Smith in the 8th. LOB—Washington 6, Cincinnati 5. 3B—W.Harris (2). HR—A.Dunn (23), off Volquez; Bernadina (6), off Bray. RBIs—Morgan (19), Bernadina (26), Zimmerman (51), A.Dunn 2 (61), A.Kennedy (17), L.Hernandez (1), R.Hernandez (24). SB—Morgan 3 (24). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 5 (Bernadina 2, Zimmerman, L.Hernandez, A.Dunn); Cincinnati 2 (O.Cabrera, Stubbs). Runners moved up—Bernadina 2, Zimmerman. GIDP—Nieves. DP—Washington 1 (Bernadina, A.Dunn); Cincinnati 1 (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, R.Hernandez). Washington IP H R ER BB SO Hrnndez W, 7-6 9 7 1 1 0 5 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Volquez L, 1-1 2 1-3 5 6 6 4 4 Fisher 3 2-3 1 0 0 0 4 Bray 1 1 1 1 0 1 Jor.Smith 1 2 0 0 0 0 Masset 1 1 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Fisher 1-0. T—2:50. A—23,115 (42,319).

NP 102 NP 75 44 14 19 13

ERA 3.12 ERA 7.56 7.36 6.48 3.24 4.74

Marlins 3, Rockies 2

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh Pirates catcher Erik Kratz, left, tags out Milwaukee Brewers’ Prince Fielder, who was attempting to score in the eighth inning on a single to right field by Alcides Escobar, during Thursday’s game in Pittsburgh. Ja.Wilson ss Totals

4 0 46 6

2 7

1 4

0 1 .257 5 10

Boston 003 002 100 000 2 — 8 13 3 Seattle 010 000 005 000 0 — 6 7 1 a-struck out for Hall in the 11th. b-lined out for Cash in the 11th. 1-ran for Kotchman in the 9th. 2-ran for J.Bard in the 9th. E—Scutaro (12), Hall 2 (8), Jo.Lopez (11). LOB— Boston 7, Seattle 8. 2B—Cameron (10), E.Patterson (7), Kotchman (11). HR—Hall (9), off Rowland-Smith; J.Drew (12), off Rowland-Smith; Scutaro (5), off B.Sweeney; F.Gutierrez (9), off Delcarmen. RBIs—Scutaro (30), D.Ortiz (60), J.Drew 2 (47), Hall 2 (27), E.Patterson 2 (14), F.Gutierrez 2 (40), Kotchman (30), Ja.Wilson (11). SB—Bradley (7). S—Figgins. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 4 (D.Ortiz, Cash 2, Brown); Seattle 4 (I.Suzuki, Figgins, Bradley 2). Runners moved up—Smoak. GIDP—A.Beltre, Cash. DP—Boston 1 (Lackey, Youkilis); Seattle 2 (Jo.Lopez, Figgins, Kotchman), (Ja.Wilson, Figgins, Kotchman). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lackey 8 2 1 0 1 6 116 4.36 Delcarmen 0 2 4 3 1 0 12 5.05 Pplbn BS, 4-25 1 1 1 0 2 2 30 3.15 D.Bard 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.75 Okajima W, 3-2 2 2 0 0 1 1 30 5.34 Ramirez S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.73 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rowland-Smith 6 8 5 5 1 4 84 6.27 B.Sweeney 1 3 1 1 1 1 31 4.02 J.Wright 3 0 0 0 0 2 30 5.06 Aardsma 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.88 Olson L, 0-3 2 2 2 2 1 2 38 5.52 B.Sweeney pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Delcarmen pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Papelbon 2-2, J.Wright 20. IBB—off Papelbon (I.Suzuki), off Okajima (F.Gutierrez). HBP—by Lackey (Ja.Wilson). WP—Rowland-Smith. PB—Cash. T—3:57. A—28,074 (47,878).

Tigers 5, Blue Jays 2 DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera started a three-run eighth inning with an RBI double, and Justin Verlander settled down after a rocky start to go eight innings in Detroit’s victory over Toronto. Verlander (12-5) struggled the first two innings but ended up allowing two runs and eight hits. He walked two batters in the first inning but didn’t issue another base on balls. Toronto AB R Wise lf 5 0 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 J.Bautista rf 4 0 V.Wells cf 3 0 Lind dh 3 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Overbay 1b 4 1 J.Buck c 4 1 Encarnacion 3b 4 0 Totals 35 2 Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon lf Ordonez dh Mi.Cabrera 1b Raburn rf S.Sizemore 3b Kelly 3b Laird c Santiago 2b Worth ss Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 0 3 3 2 30

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 9 2 2

R H 0 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 5 10

BI 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 7

Avg. .243 .429 .238 .272 .217 .203 .251 .284 .242

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 4

Avg. .308 .281 .301 .347 .209 .198 .217 .187 .270 .274

Totals

34 5

9

4

4

Baltimore Pie lf M.Tejada 3b Markakis rf Scott dh Wigginton 1b Fox 1b Ad.Jones cf S.Moore 2b Tatum c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 1 2 3 3 3 3 31

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

5

Avg. .286 .271 .299 .285 .249 .222 .272 .209 .275 .254

Minnesota 300 100 100 — 5 9 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 LOB—Minnesota 6, Baltimore 5. 2B—Mauer (29), Delm.Young (28), Fox (7), C.Izturis (9). HR—Cuddyer (10), off Millwood. RBIs—Cuddyer (45), Delm.Young 3 (70), Butera (6). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Hardy, Kubel 2); Baltimore 3 (Markakis, S.Moore, Fox). Runners moved up—O.Hudson, Punto, Pie, Scott, Ad.Jones. GIDP—Cuddyer, Ad.Jones. DP—Minnesota 1 (Pavano, Hardy, Cuddyer); Baltimore 2 (Ad.Jones, Wigginton), (S.Moore, C.Izturis, Wigginton). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavano W, 12-6 9 5 0 0 1 4 102 3.26 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Millwood L, 2-9 6 1-3 7 5 5 3 2 109 5.84 M.Gonzalez 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 16 13.50 Uehara 2 1 0 0 0 2 30 2.51 Inherited runners-scored—M.Gonzalez 1-0. IBB—off M.Gonzalez (Mauer). T—2:38. A—20,108 (48,290).

Rangers 3, Angels 2 ARLINGTON, Texas — Cliff Lee pitched into the ninth inning to beat fellow All-Star Jered Weaver, and Texas edged Los Angeles to give the AL West leaders a six-game lead over the second-place Angels. Lee (9-4) allowed five hits, struck out four and didn’t walk a batter over 8 1⁄3 innings in his third start since he was acquired from Seattle in a six-player trade July 9. Neftali Feliz got two outs for his 26th save. Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf Napoli 1b H.Matsui dh J.Rivera lf M.Izturis 3b J.Mathis c a-Frandsen ph Bo.Wilson c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 1 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0

SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4

Avg. .285 .275 .256 .290 .261 .249 .256 .252 .229 .294 .220

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh 1-J.Arias pr-dh Hamilton lf N.Cruz rf B.Molina c C.Davis 1b Borbon cf Totals

AB 2 3 4 4 0 3 4 3 3 3 29

R 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 4

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 5

Avg. .276 .299 .304 .315 .277 .353 .324 .244 .184 .272

Toronto 020 000 000 — 2 9 0 Detroit 000 110 03x — 5 10 1 E—S.Sizemore (7). LOB—Toronto 8, Detroit 6. 2B—Y.Escobar (1), J.Bautista (20), A.Hill (14), Overbay (21), Damon (24), Mi.Cabrera 2 (30). 3B—Wise (2). HR—J.Buck (14), off Verlander. RBIs—J.Buck 2 (47), A.Jackson (21), Mi.Cabrera 2 (85), Raburn (18), Laird (16). SB—V.Wells (5). CS—A.Hill (1), Worth (1). SF—Laird. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 5 (A.Hill 3, J.Bautista, Overbay); Detroit 3 (Ordonez 2, Santiago). Runners moved up—S.Sizemore. DP—Toronto 3 (A.Hill, Overbay), (J.Buck, J.Buck, Encarnacion), (J.Buck, J.Buck, A.Hill).

Los Angeles 000 010 100 — 2 5 0 Texas 100 002 00x — 3 8 0 a-grounded out for J.Mathis in the 8th. 1-ran for Guerrero in the 8th. LOB—Los Angeles 3, Texas 7. 2B—H.Matsui (15), M.Izturis (9), Guerrero (15), Hamilton (31), N.Cruz (16). HR—Napoli (18), off Cl.Lee; M.Young (13), off Jer. Weaver. RBIs—Napoli (44), M.Izturis (19), M.Young (56), Hamilton (71), B.Molina (7). SB—N.Cruz (12), C.Davis (2). SF—B.Molina. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 1 (J.Mathis); Texas 4 (B.Molina 2, M.Young, C.Davis). Runners moved up—J.Rivera. GIDP—M.Young. DP—Los Angeles 1 (E.Aybar, Napoli).

Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Romero L, 7-7 7 7 3 3 4 3 Camp 1 3 2 2 0 1 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Vrlnder W, 12-5 8 8 2 2 2 5 Vlvrde S, 20-21 1 1 0 0 0 2 R.Romero pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Camp 1-1. T—2:29. A—34,476 (41,255).

Los Angeles IP H R ER Weaver L, 9-6 6 7 3 3 F.Rodriguez 2 1 0 0 Texas IP H R ER Cl.Lee W, 9-4 8 1-3 5 2 2 N.Feliz S, 26-28 2-3 0 0 0 T—2:44. A—39,876 (49,170).

NP 103 20 NP 120 13

ERA 3.52 2.76 ERA 3.76 1.27

BALTIMORE — Carl Pavano pitched a five-hitter to earn his career-high seventh straight victory, and Minnesota beat Baltimore. Pavano (12-6) struck out four and walked one in his fifth complete game of the season and 12th of his career. The right-hander is 7-0 in nine starts since June 3. AB 5 5 3 2 3 4 4 4 4

R 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 2 3 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0

SO 5 0 SO 4 0

NP 118 29 NP 99 8

ERA 3.22 3.60 ERA 2.56 3.70

Yankees 10, Royals 4

Twins 5, Orioles 0

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer dh Kubel rf Cuddyer 1b Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Punto 3b Butera c

BB 2 2 BB 0 0

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1

Avg. .269 .287 .297 .262 .278 .316 .254 .245 .161

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez hit his 599th home run, Derek Jeter had an inside-the-park shot and New York beat Kansas City on a strange night in the Bronx. Jorge Posada had a goahead double and a bizarre throwing error that cost New York a run and put Yuniesky Betancourt on second after striking out. But the Yankees rebounded to help CC Sabathia (13-3) win his ninth straight decision. Kansas City Podsednik lf Kendall c DeJesus cf Ankiel cf B.Butler 1b

AB 5 4 2 3 4

R 0 1 0 0 1

H BI BB 2 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1

SO 2 1 1 3 1

Avg. .301 .272 .318 .200 .317

J.Guillen dh Betemit 3b Aviles 2b Bloomquist rf Y.Betancourt ss Totals

3 4 5 4 5 39

0 1 0 2 1 2 1 3 0 0 4 14

1 1 0 0 0 3

2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 11

.279 .377 .300 .255 .259

New York AB R H Jeter ss 5 2 2 Swisher rf 5 1 2 Teixeira 1b 5 2 3 A.Rodriguez 3b 5 1 3 2-R.Pena pr-3b 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 Posada c 3 1 1 Thames dh 3 0 1 1-Curtis pr-dh 0 1 0 Granderson cf 3 0 1 Gardner lf 3 1 0 Totals 36 10 14

BI 1 2 1 4 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 10

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3

Avg. .274 .303 .261 .275 .193 .332 .268 .289 .259 .239 .296

SO 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 6

Kansas City 210 001 000 — 4 14 1 New York 201 020 14x — 10 14 1 1-ran for Thames in the 8th. 2-ran for A.Rodriguez in the 8th. E—Podsednik (3), Posada (4). LOB—Kansas City 14, New York 7. 2B—J.Guillen (15), Aviles (10), Bloomquist (5), Swisher (23), Teixeira (24), A.Rodriguez 2 (24), Posada (14). HR—Jeter (9), off Chen; A.Rodriguez (16), off Tejeda. RBIs—Podsednik (38), J.Guillen (57), Betemit (11), Jeter (45), Swisher 2 (56), Teixeira (66), A.Rodriguez 4 (78), Posada (35), Thames (14). SB—Podsednik 2 (27), Kendall (7), Bloomquist (6). S—Bloomquist, Granderson. SF—Thames. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 8 (DeJesus 2, Podsednik, Ankiel, Bloomquist, J.Guillen 2, Y.Betancourt); New York 5 (Posada, Thames 2, Teixeira, Cano). Runners moved up—Cano.

Durbin W, 2-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.23 Lidge S, 8-11 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 4.08 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright 6 6 0 0 0 6 96 1.94 Boggs 2 2 0 0 0 1 22 2.47 D.Reyes 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.42 Motte 2 0 0 0 0 2 18 2.50 McClllan L, 1-3 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 2.06 T.Miller 0 1 1 1 1 0 7 4.03 Salas 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 18 1.04 D.Reyes pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T.Miller pitched to 2 batters in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Motte 1-0, Salas 2-1. IBB—off Salas (Rollins). WP—Wainwright. T—3:11. A—40,062 (43,975).

Braves 8, Padres 0 ATLANTA — Tim Hudson dominated San Diego again, Alex Gonzalez finished his first homestand in Atlanta with four hits and the Braves rolled to an easy win over the Padres. Gonzalez had hits in his first four atbats to give him a streak of hits in six straight at-bats over two games, four shy of the Atlanta record. He struck out in the eighth to end it.

Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen L, 5-4 6 9 5 5 2 6 102 4.38 Tejeda 1 1 1 1 0 0 11 3.32 D.Hughes 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 7 5.01 Bl.Wood 2-3 3 2 2 0 0 17 5.27 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sbathia W, 13-3 6 1-3 11 4 3 4 9 120 3.18 Robertson H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.76 Chmbrln H, 20 1 2 0 0 1 1 27 5.66 Park 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 5.74 Inherited runners-scored—Bl.Wood 2-2, D.Robertson 2-0. IBB—off Sabathia (Kendall). WP—Chen, Sabathia. Balk—Sabathia. T—3:22. A—47,484 (50,287).

San Diego Hairston Jr. 2b Salazar 2b Headley 3b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Gwynn cf Hundley c Venable rf-1b Hairston lf-cf-lf E.Cabrera ss Durango cf Mujica p Richard p R.Webb p Cunningham lf-rf Totals

AB 3 0 4 3 0 4 3 4 3 3 0 1 0 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

NL ROUNDUP

Atlanta Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b M.Dunn p Moylan p Glaus 1b M.Diaz lf 1-McLouth pr-cf Ale.Gonzalez ss D.Ross c Me.Cabrera cf-lf T.Hudson p a-Hinske ph 2-Medlen pr Infante 3b Totals

AB 4 5 5 0 0 4 3 1 5 5 2 3 0 0 0 37

R H 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 4 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 13

Phillies 2, Cardinals 0 (11 innings) ST. LOUIS — Placido Polanco homered leading off the 11th inning, and Philadelphia survived another poor offensive showing with a victory that ended St. Louis’ eight-game winning streak and averted a four-game sweep. Cole Hamels allowed one hit in eight innings, a solid single by Matt Holliday leading off the fourth, in 91-degree heat and high humidity. Philadelphia Polanco 3b Victorino cf Ibanez lf Howard 1b Werth rf Rollins ss Schneider c C.Ruiz c W.Valdez 2b b-Dobbs ph Ransom 2b Hamels p Madson p c-Gload ph J.Romero p Durbin p Lidge p Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 0 3 1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 42

R H 1 3 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 12

St. Louis Miles 2b Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Salas p Craig rf D.Reyes p Motte p McClellan p T.Miller p Jay lf Y.Molina c B.Ryan ss d-Schumaker ph Wainwright p Boggs p Winn rf Greene 3b a-F.Lopez ph-3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 2 0 2 2 1 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .319 .253 .248 .303 .279 .227 .241 .272 .239 .202 .200 .146 .000 .247 --.000 ---

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 1 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .327 .271 .306 .309 --.139 .000 .000 .500 --.378 .235 .186 .252 .151 .000 .284 .267 .274

Philadelphia 000 000 000 02 — 2 12 0 St. Louis 000 000 000 00 — 0 1 1 a-struck out for Greene in the 9th. b-struck out for W.Valdez in the 10th. c-flied out for Madson in the 10th. d-grounded out for B.Ryan in the 11th. E—Holliday (2). LOB—Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 2. 2B—Victorino (15), Werth (30), Schneider (3). HR—Polanco (6), off McClellan. RBIs—Polanco (30), Werth (51). SB—Jay (1). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 7 (Werth 2, Hamels, W.Valdez, Ibanez, Ransom 2); St. Louis 1 (Winn). Runners moved up—Howard, W. Valdez, Schumaker. GIDP—Rollins, W.Valdez. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Victorino, Howard); St. Louis 2 (Miles, Pujols), (Pujols, B.Ryan). Philadelphia Hamels Madson J.Romero

IP 8 1 1-3

H 1 0 0

R 0 0 0

ER 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0

SO 7 1 0

NP 97 7 4

ERA 3.40 5.87 3.10

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 4 BI 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .253 .220 .271 .294 .224 .255 .235 .240 .203 .421 --.171 --.296

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .317 .261 .255 .000 --.254 .256 .176 .370 .263 .262 .261 .273 .182 .330

San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Atlanta 211 000 40x — 8 13 0 a-was hit by a pitch for T.Hudson in the 7th. 1-ran for M.Diaz in the 7th. 2-ran for Hinske in the 7th. E—Venable (3). LOB—San Diego 7, Atlanta 11. 2B—Ale.Gonzalez (2), D.Ross (6), Me.Cabrera 2 (15). RBIs—Heyward 2 (48), C.Jones (37), Glaus (60), Ale. Gonzalez 2 (2), D.Ross (18), Hinske (36). S—Richard. SF—Glaus. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 5 (Headley, Richard, Durango, Hundley 2); Atlanta 6 (D.Ross, T.Hudson 3, Glaus 2). Runners moved up—E.Cabrera, Prado. GIDP— Hundley, Durango. DP—Atlanta 2 (Ale.Gonzalez, Prado, Glaus), (Ale. Gonzalez, Prado, Glaus). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard L, 7-5 6 9 4 3 2 5 105 3.57 R.Webb 2-3 4 4 4 2 1 39 3.49 Mujica 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.78 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hdson W, 10-5 7 4 0 0 1 4 101 2.47 M.Dunn 1-3 0 0 0 3 0 19 0.00 Moylan 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.58 Inherited runners-scored—Mujica 3-0, Moylan 3-0. IBB—off R.Webb (Me.Cabrera), off Richard (Me.Cabrera). HBP—by R.Webb (Hinske), by T.Hudson (E.Cabrera). T—2:55. A—26,450 (49,743).

Nationals 7, Reds 1 CINCINNATI — Adam Dunn hit a two-run homer off Edinson Volquez, who had a rough time in his second start since elbow surgery, and the Nationals earned a four-game series split. Volquez (1-1) dominated Colorado last Saturday in his return from reconstructive elbow surgery. He had control problems this time, giving up six runs in only 2 1⁄3 innings. Washington Morgan cf Bernadina rf Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b Alb.Gonzalez 2b C.Guzman ss Desmond ss W.Harris lf A.Kennedy 2b-1b Nieves c L.Hernandez p Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 0 4 0 3 3 3 4 36

R H 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 7 10

Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Bruce rf

AB 4 4 4

R 0 1 0

BI 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 7

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 4

SO 0 2 0 4 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 10

Avg. .258 .278 .295 .278 .295 .292 .254 .197 .250 .185 .143

H BI BB 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0

SO 0 0 0

Avg. .288 .255 .261

MIAMI — Ronny Paulino hit the winning single with the bases loaded and none out in the ninth inning to send Colorado to its fifth loss in seven games since the All-Star break. Pinch hitter Emilio Bonifacio hit his first triple of the year to start the bottom of the ninth against Jhoulys Chacin (58), and Paulino brought him home after two intentional walks. Colorado AB R S.Smith rf-lf 4 0 J.Herrera 2b 4 1 Giambi 1b 4 0 1-C.Gonzalez pr 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 Fowler cf 0 0 Mora lf-1b 3 0 Stewart 3b 4 1 Spilborghs cf-rf 3 0 Olivo c 4 0 Barmes ss 4 0 De La Rosa p 2 0 a-Hawpe ph 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 Eldred 1b 1 0 J.Chacin p 0 0 Totals 33 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 2 2 15

Avg. .281 .309 .280 .305 .000 --.222 .253 .255 .263 .311 .255 .167 .262 .333 .261 .087

Florida Coghlan lf Do.Murphy ss G.Sanchez 1b Uggla 2b Cantu 3b Veras p Hensley p Nunez p b-Bonifacio ph C.Ross cf Stanton rf R.Paulino c Jo.Johnson p Helms 3b Totals

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 3 5 12

Avg. .265 .250 .303 .271 .263 --.000 --.278 .275 .227 .276 .119 .242

AB 3 3 4 4 3 0 0 0 1 3 2 4 2 1 30

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Colorado 010 000 010 — 2 7 0 Florida 110 000 001 — 3 6 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-walked for De La Rosa in the 7th. b-tripled for Nunez in the 9th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 7, Florida 8. 2B—J.Herrera (3), Spilborghs (7), G.Sanchez (23). 3B—Bonifacio (1). HR—Stewart (13), off Jo.Johnson; C.Ross (8), off De La Rosa. RBIs—Giambi (23), Stewart (47), G.Sanchez (43), C.Ross (47), R.Paulino (33). SB—Giambi (2), Olivo (5), Coghlan (10), G.Sanchez (4). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 4 (Mora, S.Smith 2, Spilborghs); Florida 3 (Cantu 2, Uggla). GIDP—Stewart. DP—Florida 1 (Uggla, Do.Murphy, G.Sanchez). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA De La Rosa 6 3 2 2 3 8 97 5.65 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.67 Beimel 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.20 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.67 J.Chacin L, 5-8 0 2 1 1 2 0 15 4.13 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jo.Johnson 6 1-3 5 1 1 1 11 120 1.61 Veras H, 7 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 4.15 Hensley BS, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 3.05 Nunez W, 4-2 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.66 Beimel pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. J.Chacin pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Betancourt 1-0, Veras 2-0. IBB—off J.Chacin (C.Ross, Stanton). HBP—by Hensley (Mora). T—2:54. A—29,102 (38,560).

Giants 3, Diamondbacks 0 PHOENIX — Matt Cain pitched eight sharp innings in a combined three-hitter and San Francisco took advantage of tired Arizona for a win. Andres Torres hit a solo homer off Rodrigo Lopez (5-9) and rookie Buster Posey extended his hitting streak to 16 games, helping the Giants (53-43) reach a season-high 10 games over .500 after their 13th win in 17 games. San Francisco Torres lf F.Sanchez 2b A.Huff 1b Ishikawa 1b Posey c Sandoval 3b Uribe ss Schierholtz rf Rowand cf M.Cain p Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 4 4 3 0 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 33

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 1

SO 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 8

Avg. .274 .272 .300 .325 .353 .266 .256 .249 .238 .111 .000

Arizona C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf Montero c M.Reynolds 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b S.Drew ss G.Parra lf Qualls p R.Lopez p Gillespie lf Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 3 4 3 3 0 2 1 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 10

Avg. .268 .275 .275 .310 .216 .255 .266 .263 --.071 .236

San Francisco 101 000 100 — 3 7 0 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 E—M.Reynolds (14). LOB—San Francisco 5, Arizona 6. 2B—Uribe (18), J.Upton (19). HR—Torres (9), off R.Lopez. RBIs—Torres (35), Posey (31), Rowand (28). SB—A.Huff (5), Rowand (3), C.Young (20). CS—J.Upton (6). S—M.Cain. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 3 (F.Sanchez, Torres, Sandoval); Arizona 1 (M.Reynolds). Runners moved up—Schierholtz. GIDP—Sandoval. DP—Arizona 1 (Qualls, S.Drew, Ad.LaRoche).

San FranciscoIP H R ER M.Cain W, 8-8 8 3 0 0 Wlson S, 27-29 1 0 0 0 Arizona IP H R ER R.Lopez L, 5-9 7 5 3 3 Qualls 2 2 0 0 WP—M.Cain. T—2:27. A—17,230 (48,633).

BB 3 0 BB 1 0

SO 9 1 SO 7 1

NP 117 12 NP 119 25

ERA 3.10 1.93 ERA 4.58 7.86

Brewers 3, Pirates 2 PITTSBURGH — Yovani Gallardo came off the disabled list and pitched six shutout innings for Milwaukee. Prince Fielder and Rickie Weeks both homered for the second time in the series for the Brewers, who allowed a combined 26 runs in losing the previous two games. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Inglett rf Coffey p Capuano p McGehee 3b Braun lf Fielder 1b Edmonds cf-rf Lucroy c Counsell 3b Axford p A.Escobar ss Gallardo p a-C.Gomez ph-cf Totals

AB 4 4 0 0 1 5 2 4 4 4 0 4 1 2 35

R H 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 3 10

Pittsburgh Tabata cf Delw.Young rf N.Walker 2b G.Jones 1b Alvarez 3b Milledge lf Kratz c Cedeno ss Ohlendorf p Meek p b-Crosby ph Ja.Lopez p Hanrahan p c-Church ph Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 1 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 9

Avg. .277 .301 .000 .000 .275 .284 .263 .274 .288 .239 --.245 .231 .242

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 2

SO 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .265 .260 .320 .273 .250 .281 .125 .246 .053 --.233 .000 --.189

Milwaukee 000 100 200 — 3 10 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 200 — 2 7 0 a-singled for Gallardo in the 7th. b-grounded out for Meek in the 7th. c-grounded out for Hanrahan in the 9th. LOB—Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 8. 2B—Lucroy (4), Counsell (7), N.Walker (15). 3B—Weeks (3). HR—Fielder (24), off Ohlendorf; Weeks (19), off Meek. RBIs—Weeks 2 (62), Fielder (46), N.Walker 2 (21). SB—Tabata (10). S—Gallardo. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Edmonds, Gallardo, Braun, Counsell); Pittsburgh 3 (Alvarez 2, G.Jones). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 9-4 6 5 0 0 1 5 95 2.45 Coffey H, 10 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 22 4.66 Capuano H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.38 Axford S, 13-13 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 19 2.70 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ohlndorf L, 1-8 6 5 1 1 1 6 103 4.39 Meek 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 1.34 Ja.Lopez 1 2 0 0 1 1 21 2.55 Hanrahan 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 3.67 Inherited runners-scored—Capuano 1-0. HBP—by Gallardo (Delw.Young), by Ohlendorf (Weeks). WP— Ohlendorf 2. T—3:12. A—18,715 (38,362).

Dodgers 2, Mets 0 LOS ANGELES — Hiroki Kuroda threw eight outstanding innings, Matt Kemp drove in both runs and Los Angeles beat the offensively inept New York. It was the Dodgers’ second consecutive 2-0 win, having edged San Francisco a night earlier. New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Francoeur rf Carter lf Thole c L.Castillo 2b Takahashi p a-Beltran ph Dessens p P.Feliciano p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 2

SO 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .277 .307 .304 .250 .247 .266 .429 .238 .067 .250 -----

Los Angeles Furcal ss J.Carroll lf-2b Ethier rf Kemp cf Blake 3b Loney 1b Belliard 2b Paul lf R.Martin c Kuroda p b-G.Anderson ph Kuo p Totals

AB 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 0 2 2 1 0 27

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 3

SO 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .333 .284 .306 .264 .252 .304 .216 .270 .246 .000 .186 ---

New York 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Los Angeles 100 000 10x — 2 4 0 a-popped out for Takahashi in the 8th. b-grounded out for Kuroda in the 8th. LOB—New York 5, Los Angeles 4. 2B—Kemp (19). HR—Kemp (17), off Takahashi. RBIs—Kemp 2 (56). CS—Jos.Reyes (3), D.Wright (8), Loney (5). Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Takahashi 2, Francoeur); Los Angeles 3 (Blake, Ethier 2). Runners moved up—J.Carroll, G.Anderson. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tkahashi L, 7-5 7 3 2 2 2 5 105 4.52 Dessens 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 1.64 P.Feliciano 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.68 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kuroda W, 8-8 8 5 0 0 1 4 112 3.48 Kuo S, 3-4 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 0.86 Inherited runners-scored—P.Feliciano 2-0. IBB—off Dessens (Furcal), off Kuroda (L.Castillo). T—2:45. A—42,299 (56,000).

LEADERS AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Hamilton, Texas, .353; MiCabrera, Detroit, .347; Morneau, Minnesota, .345; ABeltre, Boston, .339; Cano, New York, .332; DeJesus, Kansas City, .318; Butler, Kansas City, .317; Crawford, Tampa Bay, .317. RUNS—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 71; Youkilis, Boston, 70; Teixeira, New York, 69; MiCabrera, Detroit, 68; Jeter, New York, 67; Cano, New York, 66; Hamilton, Texas, 65. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 85; ARodriguez, New York, 78; Guerrero, Texas, 76; Hamilton, Texas, 71; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 70; Konerko, Chicago, 66; Teixeira, New York, 66. HITS—Hamilton, Texas, 132; ISuzuki, Seattle, 122; Cano, New York, 121; MiCabrera, Detroit, 119; ABeltre, Boston, 118; MYoung, Texas, 118; Butler, Kansas City, 113. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Furcal, Los Angeles, .333; Polanco, Philadelphia, .319; Prado, Atlanta, .317; Byrd, Chicago, .314; Holliday, St. Louis, .309; Pagan, New York, .307; Pujols, St. Louis, .306; Ethier, Los Angeles, .306. RUNS—BPhillips, Cincinnati, 70; Prado, Atlanta, 67; Weeks, Milwaukee, 65; Votto, Cincinnati, 63; Howard, Philadelphia, 61; Fielder, Milwaukee, 60; Kemp, Los Angeles, 60; Pujols, St. Louis, 60. RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 75; Hart, Milwaukee, 70; Pujols, St. Louis, 68; DWright, New York, 67; Gomes, Cincinnati, 64; Loney, Los Angeles, 64; Votto, Cincinnati, 64. HITS—Prado, Atlanta, 128; Howard, Philadelphia, 114; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 113; Byrd, Chicago, 111; Loney, Los Angeles, 110; Braun, Milwaukee, 109; Weeks, Milwaukee, 109.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 D5

Women

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Ben Day cranks through the finish in Thursday’s time-trial stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Skyliners Road in Bend. Day, an Australian, won the stage.

Men Continued from D1 Sutherland, who also lives in Boulder, retained the yellow leader’s jersey and now has a 16-second advantage on his countryman Day, who rode into second place overall with his time trial performance on Thursday. Darren Lill of Fly V Australia is in third place overall, 57 seconds behind Sutherland. Lill is South African, giving the top three men’s spots an entirely international flavor. Thursday’s time trial was a 16-mile out-and-back ride on Skyliners Road, starting and finishing at Bend’s Summit High School. “It’s a really hard course,” Day said. “You need to pace yourself, but go out hard and hold on to the finish.” Sutherland echoed that opinion. “It’s a deceivingly hard

course,” Sutherland said. “It’s a cracked road and hard to pick a good line. It’s a hard course, especially coming back — you can only pedal so fast.” With riders atop the overall standings, UnitedHealthcare and Fly V Australia will likely be battling it out over the next three days to get one of their riders the overall CCC victory. That has been a common theme in several races this season for two of the country’s strongest cycling teams. “That’s what we’ve been doing most of the year, so we’re used to it,” Sutherland said. “(Fly V Australia riders) are smart racers, but we’ve got a great team.” “I’m sure every day at this race I’ll just keep getting better and better,” Day said. “With myself right up there in (the overall standings), I think we can put a lot of pressure on UnitedHealthcare. We’re in a pretty good position right now. Rory’s shown he’s a strong

rider, so we’ll have to be on our ballgame.” The battle continues in today’s Cascade Lakes Road Race, an 84-mile stage starting at Summit High and finishing with a climb up to Mt. Bachelor’s West Village Lodge. The men’s race starts at 10 a.m. and is expected to finish a little after 1 p.m. “It’ll be an interesting day,” Sutherland said. UnitedHealthcare’s Marc de Maar won Wednesday’s McKenzie Pass Road Race, and Sutherland finished second. De Maar is now fourth in the overall standings, 1:07 behind his teammate Sutherland. “(Wednesday) is a pretty good indication of how Marc and I are going,” Sutherland said. “That’s a great spot to be in (first and fourth). It suits Marc and myself very well.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Continued from D1 The strong individual performance from Willock bumped her into third overall, 1:59 behind the new leader. Cheatley, 27, lost nearly two minutes and her yellow jersey to Abbott, and she enters today’s Cascade Lakes Road Race 1:13 behind. At last month’s road nationals in Bend, Abbott produced two stellar performances from which she said she drew confidence in her return to Central Oregon for the CCC. She not only earned the road title at the same Summit High School venue where Thursday’s Skyliners Time Trial was held, she also landed a podium spot with her third-place finish in the time trial national championship. “It’s really fun to be able to come back to Bend after having success here at nationals,” she said. “It’s coming back to such a good place. “I did well at the (nationals) time trial, which was my first good time trial in a while,” Abbott added. “To be able to come here and do that again is really special.” The young climbing sensation also noted that her recent success in the time trial discipline signals growth as an all-around rider. “To be able to take the GC (general classification) lead with the time trial is something I have never done before,” she offered. “It’s the sort of thing you need to be able to do to be a well-rounded rider. So that’s a really an exciting step, more so than winning a mountain stage.” The final 20 riders during Thursday’s time trial took off from the start line in one-minute intervals and in reverse order of general classification. They embarked on an out-and-back route that included a gradual 8-mile climb over a rough and at times winding forest road, followed by a fast descent back to town. Willock left the start house just one minute behind Powers, and she knew she was having a personal-best performance when she caught the former time trial national champion before the halfway point. “Allison is a very good time trialist always, so I knew if I kept her in sight, or even caught her on that hill, that I was having a good day,” said the 28-year-old from Victoria, British Columbia. The Skyliners race marked Willock’s first-ever win in a time trial. “I’ve always been kind of hitand-miss with it,” admitted Willock, a top-10 finisher in the 2009 world championship road race

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Erinne Willock pedals her way to a victory in Thursday’s time-trial stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Skyliners Road in Bend.

“I’ve always been kind of hit-and-miss with it. I have had some decent [time trials]; never won one before. I was just going to go as hard as I could and whatever happened, happened.” — Cyclist Erinne Willock, after winning the time-trial stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic on Thursday.

and a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team. “I have had some decent ones; never won one before. I was just going to go as hard as I could and whatever happened, happened.” Before an overall winner is crowned on Sunday, the elite women’s field in the CCC faces three more stages: a road race with a mountaintop finish today, a criterium on Saturday, and a hilly circuit race on Sunday. “With three days left, you don’t know what’s going to happen, but that’s what makes it exciting,” said Abbott. “The last few days have been big steps in the right direction for our team and

I’m excited to be able to do some more.” With more mountains ahead, Willock expects the pain will be dished out by the field’s worldclass climbers. “We have a really strong team here and they’ll do their best to get me up as high as we can,” she said. “There’s still a lot of racing. “But Mount Bachelor,” she said with a sigh, her sentence left incomplete. “Mara and Cath are amazing. It’ll (come down to) pretty much hanging with them.” Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com. ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

Agents aren’t saints, but coaches can be just as bad By Jim Litke The Associated Press

P

imps? Really, Nick? If agents are no better than pimps, what does that make you and all those other suddenly sanctimonious college coaches who lie to kids while recruiting them in the first place? Nick Saban took home $4 million or so last year from Alabama, which has collected more probation-worthy violations (three) than any other high-profile football program in the country over the last two decades. The SEC used to be the runaway leader in the category but was doing a pretty good job cleaning itself up. At least until last week. That’s when a raft of accusations about players receiving “extra benefits” from an agent — beginning with a player at ACC school North Carolina — detoured quickly into SEC waters. In short order, South Carolina, Florida and Alabama all learned they were officially under suspicion by the NCAA — Georgia was added to the list Thursday — prompting the tirade from Saban at the conference’s annual media days festivities. “I don’t think it’s anything but greed that’s creating it right now on behalf of the agents. The agents that do this — and I hate to say this, but how are they any better than a pimp? “I have no respect for people who do that to young people. None,” Saban continued. “How would you feel if they did it to your child?” Oh, I don’t know, maybe the same way some parents felt when their son came home and told them you decided not to renew his scholarship, which undoubtedly said more about the caliber of athlete he is than whether he was a good student. Or maybe the way the parents felt when their kid came home and told them you were leav-

C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L C O M M E N TA R Y ing Akron behind for Michigan State, then Michigan State for LSU, then LSU for the Miami Dolphins. And don’t even get us started about leaving the Dolphins in the lurch, since you flat-out lied about leaving Miami. Loyalty can be a funny thing, no? So spare us the lecture about how much you care. Most coaches genuinely care about their guys, Saban included, and would love to see them graduate. It makes life easier all the way around. But the No. 1 priority for those at Saban’s level is to win, and make plenty of money doing it. No one should have any illusions about that. At the very top of Division I football, everyone is using everyone — the suits who run the Bowl Championship Series, the university presidents, coaches, athletic directors and yes, those evil agents — and all of them are getting paid except for the kids. To be fair, the kids are plenty culpable. They know the rules, and the overwhelming majority abide by them. On top of that, every big-time athletic program has at least one full-time compliance officer, and some employ as many as seven or eight. No one is forcing them to go to parties, drive cars they can’t afford or take envelopes stuffed with cash. And Saban is right in one important way about the greaseball agents and their runners. They know the temptations they’re dangling could not only derail a kid’s career, it could put an entire program underwater for years to come, a la Southern California after Reggie Bush. Everyone hates agents — even scrupulous agents — unless they have one. The problem with making unscrupulous agents the villains in this drama is that just like the kids they pick off,

they’re only the low-hanging fruit. Considering the way college football is structured, it’s nothing short of laughable to hear the coaches and conference commissioners occupying the branches above to suggest the rot could be stopped there. Big-time college football is effectively running a minorleague system for the NFL, and they’re doing it largely on the backs of kids whose football schoolwork is so demanding that many will never be able to take advantage of the scholarship that gets thrown in with it. It’s not about the scholarships, anyway. As incoming

Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly noted not too long ago, both of his predecessors routinely boasted some of the best graduation rates in the nation and both got fired. But not surprising, the most honest assessment of the whole mess was uttered by Steve Spurrier. When asked about how best to go about cleaning it up, the old ballcoach admitted he didn’t have a solution, then added: “I guess sometimes the lure of taking some cash right away affects all of us.” Perfect.

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D6 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A S  C   Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Carl Decker works with the Subaru he uses for rally-car racing, in Bend on Monday.

X Games Continued from D1 The X Games SuperRally will feature drivers racing four at time on a short indoor course of dirt, paved sections and jumps. Cars are souped up for maximum speed and power. The fastest drivers will work their way through a series of elimination heats to the final. Decker, 35, is actually an alternate for the event, which is scheduled for Saturday, July 31. But he says he figures he has a 60 to 70 percent chance of competing due to drivers crashing out in the regular rally-racing event to be staged earlier in the day. “Some guys will have already wrecked and won’t be able to drive,” Decker says. While he admits that his car — a 1993 Subaru Impreza with a 2006 Subaru STI engine — is inferior to the cars that will be driven by most racers, Decker knows the fastest car does not always win. Cars ahead of Decker could easily crash, he notes, and then he can sail right past them to victory. “I’m not planning on winning the X Games, but I’ll take my shot,” Decker says. “I don’t have as good a chance as anybody, but my race should be easier to win than regular rally because there’s people running into each other. There could be a clog of rolledover cars, and I just keep going.” Decker grew up in Bend, sometimes driving crazily on local back roads. His father, Mike Decker, is a former pursuit specialist for the Oregon State Police who used to teach cops how to chase fugitives. In typical rally-car racing, drivers race on gravel or dirt roads in road-legal cars, reaching speeds well over 100 mph. Competition is conducted in a point-to-point format, as drivers race against the clock over a series of stages, leaving at regular intervals from checkpoints along the way. In these events, Decker usually races with his good friend, fellow Bend mountain biker Adam Craig, as his co-driver. Decker, who began competing in rally racing about three years ago, says the co-driver is almost more important than the driver. As the co-driver, Craig flips through a two-inch-thick manual, deciphering instructions that explain what’s around each blind corner. Because the SuperRally event is staged on a short, indoor course that the drivers can see in its entirety, no co-driver is needed. Decker, who says he makes a good living as a pro mountain biker, says he has poured thousands of dollars into his Subaru. But that pales in comparison with what other drivers in the SuperRally event spend on their cars. “Everybody’s gonna have really cool equipment — and then me,” Decker says. “My equipment is rad for a guy working on his own car, but I’m the only guy working

SuperRally at X Games 16 Summer X Games 16 is set for July 29-Aug. 1 in Los Angeles. SuperRally, in which Bend’s Carl Decker is hoping to compete, is scheduled to be televised on ESPN between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday, July 31. on his own car. These guys spend hundreds of thousands for this race. People are building cars for this race that are going to be quarter-million-dollar cars.” Decker says he qualified as an alternate for the event by virtue of his 14th-place standing in the Rally America National Championship Series, and because ESPN — which produces and televises the annual X Games — liked his background story as a mountain biker. Top drivers in the SuperRally field include Tanner Foust, who this season is running five rounds in the European Rallycross Championship, (the format on which the X Games SuperRally is based), and Sverre Isachsen, the defending European Rallycross champion. “You just can’t describe how violent it is inside the cars,” Foust was recently quoted saying on www.espn.com. Also in the SuperRally field are action-sports stars who have crossed over into rally racing: BMX rider Dave Mirra and freestyle motocross rider Travis Pastrana. Pastrana produces and stars in an MTV program called “Nitro Circus,” and it appears that Decker will be welcomed into the action-sports celebrity circle at the X Games. “The ‘Nitro Circus’ is lending me their RV for the pits,” Decker says. “I’m gonna be part of the ‘Nitro Circus’ crew for the week. It’s going to be a bizarre week.” Decker began planning his bid for the X Games last year when he found some breaks in his bike-racing schedule. He and Craig competed in rally races in Michigan, Missouri, Washington and Oregon this season. Decker’s performance in the four national championship series races was enough for ESPN to take notice. “Once we made the car more powerful, it was apparent that we could run with guys that were making the X Games,” Decker says. But he is careful not to let rally racing interfere with his cycling career, and it appears it has not. Earlier this month, Decker won the All-Mountain World Championships — a cross between crosscountry and downhill mountain biking — in Downieville, Calif. “I have to be sure to take a step back from (rally racing) when I start doing too much,” Decker says. “It’s really tiring trying to do all my own work (on the car), when my job is to race bikes and

be competitive.” Decker was planning to leave today for the X Games, which begin Thursday and run through Sunday, Aug. 1. For now, he can focus on the thrill of rally racing and a chance for X Games gold. “When it’s working well, it’s as good as anything out there,” Decker says of rally. “It’s a lot of commitment, a lot of timing, and just being in the zone. “It’s amazing how fast you can go.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

BIKING

Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com.

COG WILD MOUNTAIN BIKE SHUTTLES: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:30 p.m., the shuttle to Swampy Lakes Sno-park leaves from Cascade Lakes Brewery; Wednesday shuttles also available to Sunriver (3 p.m.) and Swampy Lakes (5:30 p.m.); cost is $10 per rider and bike; to reserve a spot, call 541-3857002 or visit www.cogwild.com. REBOUND SPORTS PERFORMANCE OUTDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instructed by professional cyclists Brig Brandt and Bart Bowen, these outdoor cycling classes will develop aerobic fitness as well as focus on riding skill and tactics; classes will meet every Wednesday at noon and every Thursday at 5:30 p.m.; info@ reboundspl.com or 541-585-1500. HIGH DESERT BMX: Regular races are Mondays and Wednesdays, with registration and open practice from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., races begin at 6:30 p.m.; 541-815-6208 or www.highdesertbmx.org. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE/COG WILD MIGHTY BIKES: An introduction to the basics of mountain biking for ages 8-12; choose between cross-country mountain biking and freeride mountain biking; Tuesdays and Thursdays, through Aug. 27; cross-country meets from 9-11 a.m.; freeride meets from 4-6 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865 BEND ENDURANCE/COG WILD MINI BIKES: An introduction to the basics of cross-country mountain biking for ages 6-8; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9-11 a.m., through Aug. 26; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on

HIKING GUIDED HIKES: Silver Striders Guide Service, three guided hikes per week, Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m.; hikes geared toward those age 50 and older; $20 per person; 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com.

MISCELLANEOUS THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

PADDLING STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING RACE SERIES: Every Wednesday evening from 6-8 p.m. in July and August on the Deschutes River in Bend; a cumulative score will be used at the end of the series to send paddlers on to the championship race on Sept. 29 in Southern California; the top three women and three men from each race series will qualify for the championships; geoff@ aldercreek.com or 541-317-9407. YAKATAK KIDS KAYAK CAMP: For ages 8–16 to learn whitewater kayaking skills; two four-day camps this summer: Monday-Thursday, Aug. 9–12; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursdays; bring lunch; all kayaking equipment is provided and the camp meets at Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe; $225; Geoff Frank at 541317-9407 or geoff@aldercreek.com. PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407.

ROLLER DERBY BANKED TRACK ROLLER DERBY TRYOUTS: Tryout for Bend’s banked track roller derby league; $7 fee; July 29, 6-7:30 p.m.; 541-410-5633 or www.renegadesor.com. JR. ROLLER DERBY SUMMER CAMPS: For girls ages 9-17; Lava City Roller Dolls will teach team building, communication and how to roller skate; Mean Satine at sshinemoon@ gmail.com; $125; Aug. 9-12; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each day. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY OPEN PRACTICES: From 6 to 9 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; at Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave. in Bend; first practice free, $7 thereafter, $35 per month; www.renegadesor.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Group accommodates 7- to 11-minute-mile pace; Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; locations vary, Bend; 541-317-3568; jenny@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. CASCADE LAKES RELAY REGISTRATION: Now open for the team relay running event from Diamond Lake to Bend, set for July 30-31; race is 216 miles long; www.cascadelakesrelay.com.

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD CYCLING HIGH DESERT BMX In Bend July 19 Results 13 Girls — 1. November Burling. 2. Shyanne Bighaus. 3. Olivia Armstrong. 26-30 Cruiser — 1. Jonathon Norton. 2. Derek Camacho. 3. Kelli Norton. 5 & under Novice — 1. Carson Cox. 2. Finn Simones. 3. Bowie Helzer. 7 Novice — 1. Adam Harper. 2. Hudson Pifferini-Carter. 8 Intermediate — 1. Diesel Vecqueray. 2. Zane Strome. 3. Suddy Helzer. 9 Novice — 1. Jacob Severson. 2. Isaac Pomeroy. 3. Hunter Seidel. 10 Expert — 1. Jaxson Norton. 2. Milo Norton. 3. Trace Turner. 12 Intermediate — 1. Cammeron Griggs. 2. Tristin Reid. 3. Clinton Seidel.

17-18 Expert — 1. Dustin Robertson. 2. Austin Reid. 3. Zachary Reid. ——— July 21 Results 13 Girls — 1. Olivia Armstrong. 2. Shyanne Bighaus. 3. November Burling. 21-25 Cruiser — 1. Dustin Robertson. 2. Derek Camacho. 3. Ryan Armstrong. 36-40 Girls Cruiser — 1. Kelli Norton. 2. Sunny Harmeson. 3. Denise Ortiz-Campbell. 5 & under Novice — 1. Gunnar Sanchez. 2. Max Paskewich. 3. Bowie Helzer. 6 Intermediate — 1. Durgan Mikean. 2. Suddy Helzer. 3. Elliot Henson. 7 Novice — 1. William Minshew. 2. Hudson Pifferini-Carter. 3. Daniel Obryant. 8 Intermediate — 1. Diesel Vecqueray. 2. Hendrix Pursell. 3. Hayden Pursell. 9 Novice — 1. Isaac Pomeroy. 2. Noah Hensley. 3. Elliott Schaffner.

9 Intermediate — 1. Nate Henson. 2. Milo Norton. 3. Griffin McKean. 12 Novice — 1. Ezra Schaffner. 2. Nicholas Minshew. 3. Trace Turner. 12 Intermediate — 1. Dustin Robertson. 2. Sage Green. 3. Jaxson Norton. 12 Expert — 1. River Stredwick. 2. Zakkary Campbell. 3. Jack Beeler.

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F

Inside

FAMILY INSIDE

K I D C U LT U R E

There’s no better time for reading than summertime

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, see Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Pew: Motherhood has shifted since 1990

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids.

Pew Research Center recently came out with demographics comparing mothers in 1990 and those in 2008. Today, we have a smaller percentage of teenage mothers (10 percent of all births were to teen moms in 2008, compared with 13 percent in 1990). A higher percentage of babies were born to moms age 35 or older in 2008 (14 percent) versus 1990 (9 percent). The average age for women having their first child was 25 in 2008, up from age 24 in 1990. The percentage of unmarried women giving birth has leaped dramatically to 41 percent in 2008, up from 28 percent of all births in 1990. Most mothers who gave birth in 2006 had at least some college education (54 percent), compared with 41 percent in 1990. That percentage shot up to 71 percent for those age 35 and older. The report is based on information from the Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics as well as a national survey conducted by the Pew Research Center.

Oh, summer! It means so many different things to children and their families: Traveling, playing in the park, swimming, looking at clouds, and, of course, reading and listening to books, books and more books. Here are a few suggested books that explore the big and small joys of summer.

Submitted photos

“Let’s Do Nothing” by Tony Fucile When all else fails, “Let’s Do Nothing,” a wonderfully funny picture book by Tony Fucile, invites the reader to join Frankie and Sal in their pursuit of doing absolutely nothing. It is much harder than it sounds. At the end, the boys realize even doing nothing is doing something. So get out there and “Let’s Do Nothing.”

Recession hits children, says report In 2010, the percentage of children living in poverty is expected to reach 22 percent, its highest level since 1970, according to the 2010 Child and Youth Well-Being Index. The index also shows a decline in the number of children enrolled in prekindergarten programs, The index is based on information from the U.S. Census, Centers for Disease Control and other data sources. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

Correction

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN Details, Page E3

High Desert Classic This is the place to be for horse-lovers. More than 700 horses will participate in a wide range of events during this huge event outside of Bend.

Illustration by Jennifer Montgomery / The Bulletin

Moving

forward Relocating to a new home can be challenging for aging adults and their families

Firecracker Fun Fly Spectators are free to come and watch these radio-controlled models take to the air during flying demonstrations at Popp’s Field east of Bend.

Fair time! Central Oregonians can check out the Jefferson County Fair & Rodeo in Madras this weekend. The Deschutes County Fair kicks off Wednesday; it offers free admission for those 12 or younger on Thursday.

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

In a story headlined “From east to west,” which appeared Thursday, July 22, on Page E1, a highway was misidentified. See corrected map on Page E6. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE

By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

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nna Marshall lived in Lewiston, Idaho, goodbye to her friends. But she’s happy she made the for 60 years. It’s where she went to colmove. “I knew it was time.” lege, raised a family and made great Moving at 84 isn’t like moving at 25. The roots are friends. When her husband died more deeper and the challenges are greater. than 20 years ago, she helped Marion Somers, a geriatric care manager form a group for widows who got together in California and author of “Elder Care for dinners, playing cards and having fun. Made Easier,” says moving is hard for older Marshall loved her house, her neighborhood, individuals. “She’s leaving everything she her church and community. This was her knows to go somewhere she doesn’t know home. anything.” But last November, the 84-year-old moved It can be isolating, and it’s almost always to Bend and now lives in Whispering Winds, complicated, says Somers. But the biggest an independent retirement facility. problem she sees is that “people don’t think Marshall thought about moving for a about any of these issues” when preparing to few years before she did it. Ultimately, she move a family member. decided to move close to her daughter and Inside grandchildren. • “Tips for The decision to move Keeping up with household tasks was families, see starting to get harder and less enjoyable. She Older individuals move for many reasons. Page E6 had some healthproblems, including a hip reOften the moves, like Marshall’s, are so an oldplacement and two knee replacements. Marer relative can be closer to family. Sometimes shall remembers her daughter, Shelley Jones, seniors move because of their own desire to be a nurse at St. Charles Bend, telling her, “It’s time, Mom, closer; other times it’s the adult children who are pushfor you to get over here.” ing for the move. It was hard for Marshall to leave, especially saying See Moving / E6

ISSUES IN AGING

“Duck, Duck Moose” by Dave Horowitz This book shares the story of Duck and Duck, who are heading to Florida for the winter and invite Moose along for the ride. Now Moose is a bit of a homebody, but he reluctantly agrees to hop in the backseat of the ducks’ convertible while whining the whole way. Once in Florida, though, the beaches and the Upicks quickly win Moose over. Summer is now approaching and Moose cries the whole way home, but it all works out in the end as Moose brings a little bit of Florida with him. See Books / E6

Soothing advice for unhappy campers By Julia Edwards Chicago Tribune

This summer, millions of families will make the first drive down Camp Road, bidding farewell to a child for perhaps the longest time they have ever spent apart. The minute the wheels start crunching down that gravel, the stomachs of both passenger and driver will fill with butterflies. For some children, the opportunity for independence may come with excitement and ease, while others may experience separation anxiety. The best remedy, say experts, begins at home, before that onelast-hug moment. See Campers / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Siblings suffer consequences of mom’s disregard for truth Dear Abby: My mother has a long history of lying in what appears to be her attempt to manipulate others. She is now 75, and my siblings and I know not to accept anything she says as the truth, and to always check with each other in order to find out the whole story. The other day she lied to me about a doctor’s appointment. Shortly after I talked to her, my sister called me, furious about what Mom had really done. I called Mom back that evening to give her a chance to tell the truth. Instead, she made up another lie to cover up what she had done. That’s when I told her I had already spoken to my sister. The whole situation makes me very sad, which I told her. I let her know I am “on to her” and have decided to give both of us some time to think about the situation. I know you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, and I have given up trying. I love Mom, but her continued manipulation of others has driven me away from her. Is there any way for her to see how much her inappropriate behavior affects those of us who care about her? — Sad Son In Austin, Texas Dear Sad Son: No. And by cross-checking whatever your mother tells you with your siblings, you are handling a difficult situation as well as you can. Dear Abby: Our 19-year-old son is home from college for the summer and he “knows everything.” His father and I have told him to wash all fruits and vegetables we buy fresh from the market before eating them. He feels this is not important and continues to eat apples, strawberries and lettuce directly from the container or plastic bag without rinsing them. Please let me know if our fears are real. I have always been told washing is necessary. I would love to show him something on this subject because he thinks I’m silly and overprotective. — Mother Knows Best In Texas Dear M.K.B.: If seeing it in print

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com

DEAR ABBY will get your son’s attention, I’m happy to oblige. Have him try this experiment: The next time he decides to eat a nice, shiny apple, have him soak it for five to 10 minutes in water to which several tablespoons of vinegar have been added. This will remove the waxy coating that is usually sprayed on them, and with it any dirt or “little critters” that may have become attached. Also, periodically on the nightly news we hear announcements of FDA recalls because of salmonella or E. coli that has been discovered on various vegetables. Although some are packaged as ready-to-eat, they, too, should be rinsed before using. Consider it “health insurance.” Dear Abby: I am the parent of a child with special needs. To an outsider he looks different; adults and children stare at him when we’re out. My son is not aware of their impolite behavior, but I am — and it really irks me. What should I say to these insensitive people? — Boiling Mad In New Jersey Dear Boiling Mad: I don’t think you should say anything. It is not unusual for individuals of every age to do a double take when they see someone — or something — that is “different.” Of course staring is impolite, but unless someone makes a remark or asks a question about your son, you should ignore the person. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘Jensen Project’s’ dialogue a huge miss By Mary McNamara Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — “What’s to keep you from rebooting the nanobot once I’ve given you the assembler?” You have to hand it to Walmart; when it does a thing, it does it big. “The Jensen Project,” a two-hour, self-described family-friendly movie, also produced by P&G, is not just bad, it’s super bad. So bad, in fact, that it’s almost worth watching for its “Mystery Science Theater 3000” potential. Nothing bonds a family more than the opportunity to predict cheesy dialogue — “all the systems have been shut down!” — preferably in unison. Similarly, one could easily construct a drinking game involving the term “molecular assembler,” though I can’t imagine that’s what the good folks at Walmart’s family moments department had in mind. “The Jensen Project,” in case you were wondering, was not named after whoever came up with the brilliant idea of allowing the wholesome forces of corporate America to create an oasis of G-rated content in the corrupt wasteland of network television. No, it refers to a secret hightech lab deep in, according to the news release anyway, the Allegheny Mountains, where a variety of geniuses have been gathered to solve the world’s problems. (And yes, that is LeVar Burton.) Except one of the geniuses has gone rogue, taking with him a medical nanobot that in the right hands could save the world or in the wrong hands end it. You will know which

‘The Jensen Project’ Where: NBC When: 8 tonight

hands it is heading for when I tell you that rogue scientist Edwin (David Edwards) has a Roman emperor haircut and that his new point person says things like, “My investors won’t be pleased.” To save the nanobot and the world, Jensen Project administrator Ingrid (Patricia Richardson) must reach out to former project smarty pants Claire Thompson (Kellie Martin), who left the lab’s mountain stronghold in tears when her mentor (that would be Edwin) said really mean things about her, like she wasn’t that smart and her nanobot prototype was stupid. Of course, it turns out that he was totally lying just so he could steal the nanobot himself, not caring at all that he had shaken Claire’s self-esteem so terribly that she

was reduced to teaching (teaching!) and having clipped conversations with her doctor-husband, Matt (Brady Smith). The good news about “The Jensen Project” is that the product placement is minimal, all things considered. But frankly, it would have been worth a few more shots of Diet Pepsi and prototypical skycars if that would have meant more time and attention paid to the dialogue, the writing and the delivery.” Catnip, no doubt, for Martin, who after “Life Goes On” and a stint on “ER” has perfected her Scowl of Concern on Hallmark Channel’s “Mystery Woman” series. Smith is given little to do save act supportive, which is actually quite heroic, considering he is forced to spend the climactic scene wearing what appears to be a human-sized version of the suit worn by the Oompa Loompas when they transport Mike Teevee in the original “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.”

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It’s too bad, actually, because there’s a decent enough if very familiar concept behind “The Jensen Project” buried under all the wooden dialogue, barely believable gadgetry and 7-ton soundtrack. But while the writers and fans of “Doctor Who,” “Fringe” or even the “Mission: Impossible” films know that the best way to ensure suspension of disbelief is to acknowledge it, often with a wink, the creative team behind “The Jensen Project” doesn’t seem to have a sense of humor. Which is a problem. Because when you’re shooting off at the mouth about molecule assemblers and saving the world with an app, you really need to let the audience laugh with you. Otherwise, their only alternative is to laugh at you.

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:01) Judge Judy Inside Edition (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos According to Jim Malcolm-Mid. Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Rudy Maxa Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Expeditions Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Smart Travels Expeditions Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wife Swap Funderburgh/Warren ‘PG’ Friday Night Lights Injury List ‘14’ 48 Hours Mystery ’ ‘14’ Å Wife Swap Funderburgh/Warren ‘PG’ House Black Hole ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å News Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Friday Night Lights Injury List ‘14’ Smallville Persuasion ’ ‘PG’ Å Hometime ‘G’ Gardenstory Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Primetime: What Would You Do? 20/20 (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A young man’s trust leads to tragedy. (N) ’ Å Medium Pain Killer ’ ‘PG’ Å Flashpoint The Good Citizen (N) ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? 20/20 (N) ’ Å Bones The Devil in the Details ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘G’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC A young man’s trust leads to tragedy. (N) ’ Å Supernatural Abandon All Hope ‘14’ Married... With Married/ Children Sewing-Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Lark Rise to Candleford ‘G’ Å Need to Know (N) ’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Late Show Inside Edition (N) (11:35) Nightline King of the Hill My Name Is Earl South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Austin City Limits ’ ‘G’ Å News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Austin City Limits ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

American Justice The First 48 Bad Call; Ricochet ‘14’ Criminal Minds Empty Planet ‘PG’ Criminal Minds Profiler, Profiled ‘PG’ Criminal Minds ’ ‘PG’ Å The Glades Bird in the Hand ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 American Justice: Barbara Stager (2:30) “Heartbreak ›› “Blood Work” (2002, Suspense) Clint Eastwood, Jeff Daniels, Anjelica Huston. A former FBI agent ›››› “Pulp Fiction” (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman. Criminals cross paths in three inter- ››› “Enter the Dragon” (1973) Bruce 102 40 39 Ridge” searches for a murderer. locked tales of mayhem. Å Lee, John Saxon. Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Whale Wars ’ ‘14’ Å Whale Wars Sliced in Two ‘14’ Å Whale Wars Revenge Is Mine (N) ’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars Revenge Is Mine ’ 68 50 12 38 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ 137 44 World’s Strictest Parents ’ Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The Singing Bee (N) ’ Your Chance To Dance Episode 101 The Singing Bee ’ Your Chance To Dance Episode 101 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents Toscano ››› “Wall Street” (1987) Michael Douglas. A yuppie broker courts a corporate raider with inside information. Hair Free Paid Program 51 36 40 52 ››› “Wall Street” (1987) Michael Douglas. A yuppie broker courts a corporate raider with inside information. Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Com.-Presents Com.-Presents Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Simmons Com.-Presents 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Primal Quest Inside Golf ‘G’ Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Hannah Forever Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Killer Ants ’ ‘PG’ Å Man, Woman, Wild Amazon ’ ‘PG’ Man, Woman, Wild Botswana ‘PG’ Dual Survival Split Up (N) ‘14’ Å Man, Woman, Wild Amazon ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Softball 2010 World Cup: Japan vs. United States From Oklahoma City. ISKA Champ. ISKA Champ. Boxing Friday Night Fights (Live) Å NASCAR Now Softball 2010 World Cup: Japan vs. United States From Oklahoma City. Boxing 22 24 21 24 ATP Tennis NASCAR Racing From July 27, 2008. (N) NASCAR Racing From July 26, 2009. (N) NASCAR Racing: 2007 Nextel Cup 23 25 123 25 NASCAR Racing 1995 Brickyard 400 From Indianapolis. Å ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Garlic cook-off. Chopped Crunch Time Diners, Drive-Ins Diner, Drive-In Chefs vs. City Palm Springs (N) Good Eats Rachael Vaca. 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 8 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Double Jeopardy” (1999) Tommy Lee Jones, Ashley Judd. ›› “The Da Vinci Code” (2006, Mystery) Tom Hanks. A religious mystery could rock foundations of Christianity. Rescue Me Breakout ‘MA’ 131 Holmes on Homes Pasadena 911 ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Outdoor Room Curb/Block Sarah’s House Color Splash: Mi House Hunters House Hunters Design Star ‘G’ Å 176 49 33 43 Divine Design ‘G’ Get It Sold ‘G’ Gangland Kill ’Em All ‘14’ Å Modern Marvels Saws ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Doors ‘PG’ Å Gangland Devil’s Fire ‘14’ Å Gangland Deadly Triangle ‘14’ Å Gangland Wild Boyz ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Gangland Latin Kings. ‘14’ Å Wife Swap LaBrie/Zaring ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Break-Up” (2006) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer Aniston. Å Will & Grace ‘PG’ Will & Grace ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Flynn/Orris ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Lockup: Holman Lockup: Raw Inmate violence. Lockup: Corcoran Lockup 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann True Life Reconnect with a mother. True Life Compulsive shopping. ’ ›› “Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. ’ ››› “How She Move” (2007, Drama) Rutina Wesley. Premiere. ’ 192 22 38 57 If You Really Knew Me ‘PG’ Å SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob The Penguins The Troop ’ ‘G’ Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Walker, Texas Ranger ‘PG’ Å Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport Knockout Sport 132 31 34 46 Walker, Texas Ranger Rodeo ‘PG’ Stargate SG-1 Talion ’ ‘PG’ Å Haven Butterfly Eureka A New World ’ Å Eureka Blind rage infects everyone. Haven Harmony (N) Eureka Blind rage infects everyone. 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘14’ Å Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Best of Praise First to Know 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan, Jerry Stiller. Å Neighbors 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ “The Poor Little Rich Girl” (1917) Mary Pickford. Silent. Gwen’s ››› “Heidi” (1937) Shirley Temple, Jean Hersholt. A Swiss girl ››› “The Little Princess” (1939) Shirley Temple. A girl escapes (9:45) ›› “Honeymoon” (1947) Shirley Temple, Franchot Tone. (11:15) ›› “Big Bad Mama” (1974) Angie 101 44 101 29 family is rich, but she is lonely and unhappy. must leave her grandfather’s Alpine home. boarding school to find her soldier father. A diplomat tries to reunite two young lovers. Dickinson, William Shatner. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ DC Cupcakes ’ DC Cupcakes ’ Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress DC Cupcakes (N) DC Cupcakes (N) Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Crimebusters ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” (2001, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler. Å Memphis Beat 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Excalibur ’ ‘14’ Courage-Dog Courage-Dog Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Total Drama Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone Star Wars: Clone King of the Hill King of the Hill Stroker and Hoop American Dad ’ 84 Extreme Hawaiian Escapes ‘PG’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Mysteries of the Smithsonian ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Extreme Workplaces ‘G’ Å Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:32) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS A Mafia dumping ground. ‘PG’ NCIS Suspicion ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” 15 30 23 30 House Honeymoon ’ ‘14’ Å 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments Unplugged ‘PG’ You’re Cut Off ’ 191 48 37 54 Behind the Music Usher ‘PG’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) ›› “The Vanishing” 1993 ››› “A League of Their Own” 1992 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG’ Å (8:10) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å The Pillars of the Earth Fire destroys Kingsbridge church. ’ Å (5:07) ››› “William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet” 1996 ‘PG-13’ Å Fox Legacy (7:37) ››› “William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet” 1996 ‘PG-13’ Å Fox Legacy (10:07) ››› “William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet” 1996 ‘PG-13’ Flip Feast Tour The Gypsea Tour The Daily Habit New Pollution Moto: In Out Check 1, 2 ‘14’ Flip Feast Tour The Gypsea Tour The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Moto: In Out Blue Carpet Props Å Thrillbillies Å LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf RBC Canadian Open, Second Round From St. George’s Golf and Country Club in Etobicoke, Ont. Golf U.S. Girls’ Junior Amateur, Day 5 From Pinehurst, N.C. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å “Jack’s Family Adventure” (2009) Jonathan Silverman. The Golden Girls (11:14) The Golden Girls ‘PG’ Å REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ (6:15) ›› “The In-Laws” 2003, Comedy Michael Douglas, Albert Brooks. A CIA agent › “What Happens in Vegas” 2008 Cameron Diaz. Two strangers (9:45) ››› “The Hangover” 2009, Comedy Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. Three pals Hung ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 ‘PG’ Å wreaks havoc on his future in-law. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å awake together and find they are married. ’ must find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ Å Everything You ›› “Office Space” 1999 Ron Livingston. ‘R’ Å Whitest Kids Whitest Kids Freaks-Geeks (8:45) Food Party ›› “Turistas” 2006, Horror Josh Duhamel. ‘NR’ Å Whitest Kids Z Rock ‘MA’ Speed Grapher IFC 105 105 ›› “Brüno” 2009 Sacha Baron Cohen. The gay Austrian fash- Co-Ed Confidential (4:45) ›› “Code of Silence” 1985, Crime Drama Chuck Norris, ››› “Role Models” 2008, Comedy Seann William Scott, Paul (8:15) ›› “Gothika” 2003, Horror Halle Berry, Robert Downey Jr. Strange events MAX 400 508 7 Henry Silva, Bert Remsen. ‘R’ Å 4 PLAY ‘MA’ Rudd, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. ’ ‘R’ Å plague a confined psychologist. ’ ‘R’ Å ionista brings his show to America. ’ ‘R’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Escaping the Great White (N) The Truth Behind the Nasca Lines Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Escaping the Great White The Truth Behind the Nasca Lines Nat Geo Amazing! NGC 157 157 Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Rocko’s Life Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Reel in, Outdoors Match Fish. Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Outdoor’s 10 Match Fish. Speargun Hunter Hunting, Country On Your Own Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Deer City USA American Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 Penn & Teller: Strikeforce Challenger Series Shane Del (5:15) ›› “Yonkers Joe” 2008, Drama Chazz Palminteri, Christine Lahti. iTV. A con ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. iTV. James Bond The Real L Word Free Pass ’ ‘MA’ Penn & Teller: SHO 500 500 Bulls...! ’ ‘MA’ Bulls...! ’ ‘MA’ Rosario vs. Lolohea Mahe man’s family gets in the way of a scheme. ’ ‘R’ Å seeks revenge for the death of Vesper Lynd. ’ ‘PG-13’ NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: AAA Insurance 200 (Live) Trackside At... Formula 1 Debrief (N) NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: AAA Insurance 200 SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ’ (7:20) ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ The Pillars of the Earth Fire destroys Kingsbridge church. (N) ’ Å ›› “Tears of the Sun” 2003, Action Bruce Willis. ’ ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:05) ››› “Little Women” 1994, Drama (6:05) “Black Irish” 2006, Drama Brendan Gleeson, Michael Angarano, Tom Guiry. A ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart. A col- “Frat Party” 2009 Randy Wayne. A young man throws a wild › “Stan Helsing” TMC 525 525 Winona Ryder. ’ ‘PG’ lege graduate takes a lowly job at an amusement park. ‘R’ bash on the eve of his wedding. ’ ‘R’ Å 2009 ’ ‘R’ teen struggles to rise above his family’s dysfunction. ’ ‘R’ Cycling Tour de France: Stage 18 From Salies-de-Bearn to Bordeaux. The Daily Line (N) Cycling Tour de France: Stage 18 From Salies-de-Bearn to Bordeaux. VS. 27 58 30 20/20 The Ties That Bind Us Å 20/20 on WE A Father’s Flight ‘PG’ 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer Pater Familias ‘PG’ ›› “The Bodyguard” 1992 ‘R’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P’ G   M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

WEDNESDAY

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. FRIDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: Competition featuring 700 horses with amateur and professional riders making their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. SHOOTOUT AT HORSE RIDGE: A cowboy shooting tournament for gunfighters; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-385-6021 or www.hrp-sass.com. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 84-mile and 71-mile Cascade Lakes Road Race stage begins at Summit High School for men and at Wanoga Sno-park for women; both end at Mt. Bachelor Ski Area; free for spectators; 10 a.m.; 541388-0002 or www.mbsef.org/ CascadeCyclingClassic. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The 77th annual event features exhibits, live music, livestock auctions, helicopter rides, tractor pulls, an NPRA rodeo and more; $6, $3 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger and 65 and older; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. ORGAN RECITAL: Mark Oglesby performs an organ concert in celebration of the church’s 100th anniversary; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-4701.

SATURDAY WINGS AND WHEELS: Event includes a display of antique cars and aircraft, aerial demonstrations, plane rides and more; with a pancake breakfast and silent auction, proceeds benefiting New Generations Early Childhood Development Center; free admission, breakfast is $6, $4 ages 5-10, free ages 4 and younger; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; Sunriver Airport, 57200 River Road; 541-593-4603 or shartung@ sunriver-resort.com. HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: Competition featuring 700 horses with amateur and professional riders making their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. SHOOTOUT AT HORSE RIDGE: A cowboy shooting tournament for gunfighters; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-385-6021 or www.hrp-sass.com. FIRECRACKER FUN FLY: The Bend Aero Modelers host a day of radio-controlled model flying demonstrations and exhibits; bring a lawn chair; free; 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Popp’s Field, milemarker 17 on E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-330-5508, waldemar.frank@gmx.net or www.bamrc.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. SISTERS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: Featuring arts, crafts, food, entertainment, a classic car cruise and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-8905. “FINDING NEMO”: A screening of the 2003 Pixar film; part of Familypalooza; free; 10:30 a.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-617-7099. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The 77th annual event features exhibits, live music, livestock auctions, helicopter rides, tractor pulls, an NPRA rodeo, a parade and more; $6, $3 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 10 a.m. parade, 11 a.m.10 p.m. fair; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. MINING DAY: Experience the life of a placer miner, stake a claim and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.;

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Fair-goers watch the acrobatics of one of the several rides at the Deschutes County Fair during opening day last year. The fair kicks off Wednesday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The Downtown Criterium takes place on Wall and Bond streets, between Oregon and Idaho avenues; free for spectators; 5:45 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef. org/CascadeCyclingClassic. “COPPELIA”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet presents the tale of a lifelike doll in Central Europe; $10; 7 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-9306 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com.

SUNDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: Competition featuring 700 horses with amateur and professional riders making their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.4 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. SHOOTOUT AT HORSE RIDGE: A cowboy shooting tournament for gunfighters; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-385-6021 or www.hrp-sass.com. SISTERS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: Featuring arts, crafts, food, entertainment and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the MakeA-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-549-8905. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 83- or 52-mile Awbrey Butte Circuit Race takes begins and ends at Summit High School; free for spectators; 1 p.m.; Summit High

School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef. org/CascadeCyclingClassic. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Americana band Great American Taxi performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383, info@bendconcerts.com or www. bendconcerts.com. “COPPELIA”: The Central Oregon School of Ballet presents the tale of a lifelike doll in Central Europe; $10; 3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-9306 or www. centraloregonschoolofballet.com.

MONDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www. redmondfarmersmarket.com.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. PHIL STACEY: The former American Idol contestant performs, with Michael Robert; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-323-2880, ext. 121. LEON RUSSELL: The distinguished rock ‘n’ roll musician performs; $30 or $35; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

Story times, library youth events for July 23-29 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • PAJAMA PARTY: Ages 3-5; 6:45 p.m. Wednesday. • RIVER READER: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Thursday. • YOUR BODY IN MOTION: Movement, music and rhythm; ages 6 and younger; 10:30 a.m. Monday.

10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • RIVER READER: Ages 6-11; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.

CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLER STORY TIME: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. • BI-LINGUAL STORYTIME: All ages; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. • RIVER READER: Ages 6-11; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. • WATER COLORS AND CRAFTS: In Madras 2 p.m. Tuesday, Warm Springs 2 p.m. Wednesday; Culver 2 p.m. Thursday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages;

REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. • RIVER READER: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SUMMER MOVIE MATINEE: Grades 6-12; 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday.

SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • RIVER READER: Ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. • TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 10 a.m. Wednesday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

HIGH DESERT CLASSIC II: Competition featuring 700 horses with amateur and professional riders making their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR: The annual event includes rides, exhibits, food, games and more; $9, $6 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger and 62 and older; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711 or www.expo.deschutes.org. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring big-band and swing music by Betty Berger Big Band; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www. visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by Del Rio; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. RHYTHM ON THE RANGE: Head for the Hills performs as part of Sunriver Resort’s concert series; free; 6-8 p.m.; Meadows Golf Course, 1 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-593-1000 or www.sunriverresort.com. VEGETARIAN LUAU POTLUCK: Roasted vegan hot dogs and burgers provided; bring a side dish; with live entertainment; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541480-3017. DESCHUTES COUNTY RODEO: Northwest Professional Rodeo Association-sanctioned performance features riding, roping, tying and more; free with admission to the Deschutes County Fair; 6:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.expo .deschutes.org.

THURSDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC II: Competition featuring 700 horses with amateur and professional riders making their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR: The annual event includes rides, exhibits, food, games and more; $9, $6 ages 62 and older, free ages 12 and younger; 10 a.m.10 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.expo.deschutes.org. “LUCKY HUDSON AND THE STAR OF DELHI”: Bend Theatre for Young People presents the comedy about a budding detective crime writer who gets in trouble when fictional villains become real; $8, $5 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-1395 or www.bendtheatre.org. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Orgone, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.munchandmusic.com. DESCHUTES COUNTY RODEO: Northwest Professional Rodeo Association-sanctioned performance features riding, roping, tying and more; free with admission to the Deschutes County Fair; 6:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.expo. deschutes.org. “LUCKY HUDSON AND THE STAR OF DELHI”: Bend Theatre for Young People presents the comedy about a budding detective crime writer who gets in trouble when fictional villains become real; $8, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-419-1395 or www. bendtheatre.org. JOE DIFFIE: The country singer performs; free with fair admission and ticket (available from 99.7 FM); 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711 or www.expo.deschutes.org.

The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Courtesy 20th Century Fox

John Corbett plays the dad in the film “Ramona and Beezus,” with Bridget Moynahan and Selena Gomez, who are sisters in the film. See the full review in GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Ramona And Beezus’ Rating: G, all ages admitted. What it’s about: An imaginative 9-year-old pest bungles everything from school projects to both her sister’s and her favorite aunt’s romances. The kid attractor factor: It costars Selena Gomez and is based on those beloved Beverly Cleary novels. Good lessons/bad lessons: “It’s good to scare yourself, once in a while.” “We’re not going to let one bad day get us down.” Violence: None. Language: Disney clean. Sex: An old-fashioned grownup romance and a sweet teen one, too. Drugs: Don’t be ridic. Parents’ advisory: More sentimental than slapsticky, this kids’ comedy is suitable for all ages.

‘The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’ Rating: PG for fantasy action violence, some mild rude humor and brief (profane) language. What it’s about: A college science student learns he is destined to become a sorcerer and begins his training as villains chase and battle his teacher. The kid attractor factor: An action film with a heavy dose of magic. Good lessons/bad lessons: Wise wizards pay attention in science class. Violence: A bit, cartoonish and exaggerated. Language: Pretty clean Sex: Flirtation Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: Every bit as family friendly as your average Harry Potter movie.

‘Inception’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of violence and action throughout. What it’s about: A team of spies infiltrates dreams to steal secrets or implant ideas. The kid attractor factor: Leonardo DiCaprio stars, and “Dark Knight” director Christopher Nolan is behind the camera.

Good lessons/bad lessons: “Positive emotion trumps negative emotions every time.” Violence: A high body count, a bit of blood. Language: Not much profanity. Sex: None Drugs: Sedatives so that dreams can be invaded. Parents’ advisory: Smart, thought-provoking but probably too violent, too dense and too long for the younger set. Take the PG-13 rating seriously.

‘Despicable Me’ Rating: PG for rude humor and mild action What it’s about: A villain with an image problem resolves to steal the moon, but needs the help of cute orphans to do it. The kid attractor factor: It’s an animated comedy with “rude humor.” Good lessons/bad lessons: Some kids never stop trying to impress their mom. Violence: A bit, cartoonish and exaggerated Language: Disney clean Sex: Not a hint of it Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: Suitable for all ages, its appeal seems a bit younger than “Toy Story 3.”

‘The Twilight Saga: Eclipse’ Rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of action and violence, and some sensuality. What it’s about: Bella and Edward approach “graduation,” in more ways than one. The kid attractor factor: Hot vampires and werewolves, teens treating death carelessly. Good lessons/bad lessons: If the guy wants to “wait until we’re married,” he has his reasons. Violence: Not remotely as bloody as you might expect. Language: A “d” here and there, an “a” word or two. Sex: Getting there. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: The specialeffects fights might lure kids, but the talk-talk-talk and heavy breathing make it inappropriate for 11 and younger.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, July 23, 2010: This year, you come up with excellent solutions when focused. Perhaps you spend too much time judging your performance at work and in other areas. Realize what you have to offer as opposed to what you don’t do well. A foreigner, education or perhaps a spiritual type of experience opens you up even more. If you are single, someone very different easily could sashay into your life. Though this person might not be a life mate, it certainly is an experience. If you are attached, the two of you can gain through pursuing a hobby together or perhaps actually planning that special trip. CAPRICORN might push you harder than you want. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You feel as if you must handle certain obligations, like it or not. You have shared possibilities openly. No one but you will carry a project to the finish line. How you approach work and your obligations might be up for revision. Tonight: A force to behold now that the weekend is here. TAURUS (April 20-May 21) HHHHH Take advantage of an ability to back off your position and view a matter more clearly. Check in with several respected friends who also have a different view. Detach, and you’ll find answers more easily. Understanding and empathy evolve as well. Tonight: Skip your normal routine.

GEMINI (May 22-June 20) HHHHH Use a meeting to obtain results. You could be surprised by how this specific group changes its focus. An unexpected insight points to a new direction. Achieving a desired goal might take longer than you anticipated. Tonight: Chat over munchies. Relax with friends. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer to others. Understand what needs to happen in order to move key people back into your life. Perhaps they need to process as you did. Help them along. Don’t allow yourself to be distracted from key benchmarks. Tonight: A must appearance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Whether you like it or not, you are in the trenches, and any work left undone will tumble on you. A delay might be aggravating yet necessary to solidify plans. Not everything is as you believe it is. Quietly read the tea leaves. Tonight: Off running errands, playing it low-key. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your creativity flourishes as you breeze through one issue after another. A partner whose support you count on could suddenly feel soft, or not as committed. Look at your options in the next few weeks. Tonight: So happy it is the weekend! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Many of you want to stay close to the givens, especially as you sense a change in the wind. Pressure builds, as others seem to need your feedback and attention. How you handle pressure comes out. Tonight: Snuggle in rather than go out.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Keep conversations moving. How you handle a change and what you are doing on an active level define your ability to achieve a goal. A project needs to slow down in order to see if there are any problems. Tonight: Visit with your pals. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be aware of the costs before you OK a project or idea. Emotional or financial risks might pay off, but understand that you could have a backfire. A partner or associate is great at spending your funds. Tonight: Indulge a friend or loved one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Express yourself and don’t hold back any longer. The Moon in your sign adds energy and charisma. Others sense your power. A family member or domestic issue needs handling sooner or later. Tonight: All smiles. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might want to pull back some. You see someone’s support and caring yet notice a change in his or her attitude. Consider sitting back and becoming more observant. Don’t beat yourself up for a misjudgment. Tonight: Mysteriously vanish. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Observe your influence in a meeting. Dealing with others individually might not be as effective. Note some very dramatic changes within your circle of friends. You might wonder what is going on. Don’t challenge your friends. Tonight: Where the action is. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


Moving Continued from E1 If the older relative is reluctant to move, Gail McGonigle, author of “Dad’s Home Alone: Caring for Your Elderly Parent,” encourages family members to see if they can find a solution to keep the person in place, even if that place is hundreds or thousands of miles away. If the person has a strong network and support group, it can be “really devastating to pull them away from that,” and McGonigle knows of many cases in which the person who is moved goes into a decline. In being forced to move, some older individuals get the message that they can’t take care of their own life anymore, and this takes away their sense of independence. They can become despondent. With her own father, McGonigle opted to hire care providers to work in his home after he was reluctant to move closer to her. When moving is the best option, McGonigle encourages family members to make sure to let the parent be involved in decisions along the way. “It’s so important to figure out some way to honor them and show them respect.” Angela Vanderpool, marketing director for Whispering Winds, says the biggest challenge for some family members is “letting Mom or Dad make the decision” about where to live. The adult children do a lot of research and may feel they know best. But Vanderpool says the most successful transitions come when the older relative is also on board. She also encourages the adult children to be patient and give the older relative time to make the choice. The biggest advice she can offer is for families to make this decision when it’s not an emergency, but that is not what usually happens. Many families don’t think about this until the situation is dire, according to Vanderpool. Gail Samaha, creator of an elder care planning division in Boston, agrees. “I have to say, people wait until there’s a crisis,” she says. “People are so reluctant to be proactive.” In order to be proactive, she suggests families talk about the move well in advance. Samaha suggests family members take into account their older relative’s health and how that might be impacted by a move. They should also consider what the role of the person living closest will be, as well as the roles of other siblings and relatives. Finances also play a big role in this decision. Trudi Turnbow, the community sales manager for Cougar Springs Senior Living in

Campers Continued from E1 Tom Madeyski, executive director of three YMCA camps in San Diego County, Calif., encourages parents to talk about the camp’s fun activities to spark excitement and other positive feelings while they’re packing together for the trip. Visit the camp’s website and review the promotional materials to reinforce those feelings. “Take a look at the pictures online at all the fun the kids are having,” he said. “Give the message, ‘I have confidence in your ability to go and flourish.’” Indeed, confidence is a key ingredient to remedy homesickness. If a child has had success spending the night away from home before, she should be reminded of that accomplishment. But if sleepovers have been rare or upsetting, the child may need a smooth overnighter before camp. Alan Kazdin, professor of child psychiatry at Yale University and director of the Yale Parent Center, suggests sending the child to “pretend camp” with friends or relatives for one night. Although parents may favor a

Books Continued from E1 “A Mighty Fine Time Machine” by Suzanne Bloom Travel doesn’t always have to be mean going from place to place, but maybe instead, delightful flights of imagination. Grant and Antoine, an aardvark and armadillo, have traded all their candy for a time machine, but as their friend Samantha tells them, “Boys, you’ve been bamboozled.” It’s only a box, but after a lot of hard work, disappointments and readjustments, it becomes the best bookmobile ever. “A Mighty Fine Time Machine” is a mighty fine picture book.

Tips for families • Downsizing can be tough and emotional. Consider hiring a private company to help to help take the emotion out of the process. Somers takes photographs of special items and writes down the history of the object, then puts those into an album for seniors. This way, the items can go, but the memories remain. • Make sure the senior’s address book is up-to-date, including the phone numbers and addresses for neighbors, church members and friends. • Ask family members to write down their expectations and concerns regarding the move, then discuss. Not all of these can be solved, but just talking about these issues can help. • Offer the older individual choices, from retirement homes to churches. Listening and offering some measure of control can help. • Think ahead and plan regarding medical care options. Will the senior have a doctor in town upon arrival? • Research activities, clubs and organizations the older individual can join or participate in. • Talk about this issue before it becomes an emergency. — Information from Marion Somers, Gail McGonigle, Trudi Turnbow and Angela Vanderpool

Redmond, encourages families to consider how stable they are. She’s seen some cases where the older relative moves to be near a child, who then has to relocate. “I’ve seen it more than once. It’s almost like they’ve been abandoned again,” said Turnbow.

Challenges Many seniors have to downsize in order to move. One of the toughest parts for Marshall was sorting through all of the things she had saved, all of the boxes she hadn’t opened in 15 years. She had to come to a place where she realized “those are just things” and could let go of the china, the refinished furniture and the crystal. Somers says downsizing is difficult for many people. Getting rid of things is complex, and emotions play a big part. “Every time you touch a book, every time you touch an object, they have a story behind that item,” said Somers. When she’s working with clients, Somers takes photographs of objects and writes out the accompanying story and then places that into a photo album. This way, they don’t have their

Camp dos, don’ts BEFORE CAMP: • Do pack together and build excitement. • Don’t promise a quick route home if they’re unhappy.

DROP-OFF: • Do help make your camper’s bed and meet the counselor. • Don’t linger and interrupt first-day activities.

LETTER WRITING: • Do ask plenty of questions that focus on your favorite camper’s activities. • Don’t dwell on negative feelings.

tough-love approach, Kazdin’s research has shown that not all kids respond well to cold-turkey separation. “For most children, these procedures may not be needed,” Kazdin said. “But if they are needed, they are so much better than tossing the child in the camp water (and) expecting them to swim.” When parents bring their child to camp, they should leave

“Larry Gets Lost” by John Skewes If you are heading off to the big cities of San Francisco, New York or Seattle (or just wish you were), you might want to join Larry, who stars in his own nonfiction travel series entitled “Larry Gets Lost.” These wonderful, easy-reading books for children of all ages highlights many of the wonderful things to do and see while travelling to these cities. Both armchair and actual travelers will relish getting lost with Larry.

— Recommendations from Cheryl Weems, collection development librarian, youth services, Deschutes Public Library system

C OV ER S T OR I ES items, but they get to keep their memories. Vanderpool often recommends families hire an outside service to help seniors downsize, referring them to the local business Family Ties, which specializes in these kinds of tasks. Sometimes having an outside professional do this work can help keep emotions in check. Another big adjustment is finding a new doctor and other medical providers. Ideally, families would have a local doctor lined up before the older relative arrives. Moving someone into an assisted living or memory care facility can require more steps. Turnbow says she has worked with numerous family members to move people here from out of state. First, the facility staff members need to find out as much information as possible. The individual needs to have an evaluation assessment, which can be conducted at one of the facility’s sister properties throughout the country. This helps determine in which setting the individual should be placed (Cougar Springs doesn’t care for patients who require skilled nursing care). After the evaluation, the next step is to ensure the person has a local doctor. Turnbow also helps families figure out how to move their loved one and their belongings across country.

Making it home Making friends is hard, especially at an older age. Somers encourages family members to look into associations, clubs and activity groups for their older family members to join. Finding a church to attend can also help them feel connected. Somers says it’s important to always offer a choice, while encouraging them to get involved. Some people will not want to join anything. Somers says some people are just loners or have been miserable grouches all their lives. This won’t change. Even outgoing individuals may find it difficult to get involved after a move. McGonigle related a personal story that is illustrative of the challenges many families face. A friend moved her mother to California and tried to get her involved and connected in all sorts of activities, but the older woman resisted at every turn. “She wouldn’t have anything to do with it. She didn’t want to start all over again,” said McGonigle. Marshall is happy about her move to Bend and enjoying her life here, even while she is still adjusting to Bend. She misses the milder weather of Lewiston,

as soon as the bed has been made and belongings have been unpacked. This will create the easiest transition away from mom and dad — and into camp. Madeyski calls this the “critical first 24-hour” period. The trick is to get campers engaged as soon as possible in camp activities, not thoughts of home. But it is normal for children to need a day or two for the newness to wear off and the familiarity and fun to set in. Of the 3,500 campers who come through Madeyski’s camps every summer, only about 10 leave early — but many fake stomachaches or act withdrawn at the start. Though parents may be alarmed when they get homesick letters three days after dropping their child off, these were letters written during the first 24 hours. By the same token, parents should report on the action at home and withhold their own sadness. Kazdin says that it is normal for conscientious parents to feel anxious. Pam Cobb Heuberger, owner of Camp Runoia, in Belgrade Lakes, Maine, agrees. “Parents should remember it’s the gift of camp that they’re giving to their child and not be so focused on their own needs.”

Submitted photos

but she loves getting to see her daughter and grandchildren frequently. They like to come for breakfast and visit often. Marshall is still deciding on a church for herself. She also hasn’t engaged in many social activities or clubs as she did in Lewiston, saying she’s not sure she needs it. She is satisfied focusing on family life. Marshall is also planning to get an Oregon driver’s license, but she’s not quite ready. Marshall encourages people in her position to let go and embrace some changes. “You have to give up some of your pet peeves.” If you need help, Marshall says, you need to be flexible and “go along with the plan.” Turnbow moved her own mom here; she’s 93 and Turnbow says she “does beautifully,” even running a card game. “My advice would be to do it.” Sisters resident Rachel Steck’s parents recently moved from Buffalo, N.Y., to be near her. When they are older, she knows she will likely serve as their caregiver. But she hopes that is a long way off. Steck’s parents retired only recently and are in their 60s. They made the move very early, in part to avoid so many of the challenges that would come with a move later in life. They live in Salem, which is where Steck works during the week. Steck says establishing boundaries and having clear communication are also important to making the arrangements work. “My best piece of advice is to move when you’re still feeling young and vibrant enough to recreate a community,” said Steck. Her 90-year-old grandmother also made the move to Salem from New York. Several years back, she and Steck’s grandfather moved across the state. Her grandfather’s health was not in good shape and they weren’t able to make many new friendships. Her grandmother’s experience is part of what inspired Steck’s parents to make the move at an earlier age, when they are both healthy and active. While this option may not be feasible for many families, having a plan is a good idea for every family.

Correction This is the corrected map for the story headlined, “From east to west,” which appeared Thursday, July 22, on Page E1. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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Join us for this year’s fantastic Tour of Homes™ at Brasada Ranch where we’ll have two beautiful homes built by Black Rock Construction. While you’re here, be sure to make time for our BBQ and Ice Cream Social. The BBQ runs from 12-4 on Fridays and 11-4 on Saturdays and Sundays, and it’s just $6. Enjoy free ice cream at the Ice Cream Social from 11-6 each day at the Athletic Club. This is also the perfect time to check-out the amazing real estate values currently available at Brasada Ranch. For more information call Brasada Ranch Real Estate at (541) 504-3200. The Central Oregon Tour of Homes™ runs July 16-18 and 23-25, 12-6 on both Fridays, and 10-6 both Saturdays and Sundays. We look forward to seeing you there! 16986 SW Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte, Oregon

Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

10 Presented by

TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25 Presented by

Fridays: Noon - 6 pm, Saturdays & Sundays 10 am - 6 pm


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 F1

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General Merchandise

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies German Shepherd puppy, 7 wk old male, Purebred, without papers. $300 and comes with bag of food, collar and leash. I can email or text pictures. Please call (541)410-5788.

200 BEAGLE Bailey is a 5 mo old male that comes from cham201 pion/AKC lines. He has had New Today his shots and been microchipped. Call 541-848-0434 2006 JD PTO brush hog, for more details. 5’ wide, $500. Black Lab male 9 wks, AKC reg., 541-553-1471. shots, dew claws, champion 202 $350. 541-788-5161. Want to Buy or Rent Black Lab Male Puppy, AKC, Dew claws removed, shots Pro-Form or Schwinn Recumgiven, good show and field bent exercise bike wanted, pedigree. Raised with love. call 541-389-9268. $200, 541-280-5292. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mo- Black Lab Pups, AKC, torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, champion hunting lines, Dew ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Claws removed, 1st shots, 541-280-6786. de-wormed & vet checked, ready to go, $350, Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for 541-977-2551. old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top Border Collie pups, workdollar paid, Estate incl. Honing parents great personaliest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 ties. $300. 541-546-6171. Wanted washers and dryers, Brindle Boxer Pup, 1 male AKC working or not, cash paid, Registered $700 , 1st two 541- 280-6786. shots 541-325-3376.

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Items for Free (2) 10’ Galvanized metal roof caps, 541-504-0707

1 7 7 7

Chihuahuas, purebred, 3 males, 15 weeks old, $100 ea., please call 541-763-2018.

German Shorthair AKC Pups, 8 wks, $300 females, $250 males, 541-815-5921. German Wirehair Pointer Pups, ready now, $200/ea. 541-408-6099. Griffin Wirehaired Pointer Pups, both parents reg., 5 males, 4 females, born 6/20, ready for home 1st week in Aug, $1000, 541-934-2423 or loreencooper@centurytel.net

Havanese. AKC, only 1 left from this years litter. Traditional white/cream "cuban silk dog". Hypo-allergenic, non shedding. Bred from champion lines. For more pics and information go to: www.oakspringshavanese.com or call Patti 503-864-2706

Heeler

Pups, standards & minis,$150 ea. 541-280-1537

Chi-pom puppies, 2 males, one all white, one all black. Make very good small family pets. Jack Russell/Maltese Puppies, (2) 8 weeks old, $100 each, Child friendly. Weaned and cute, 541-420-9006. 208 ready for a home. $150 or best offer. Photos available. JAPANESE CHIN unique pupPets and Supplies 541-480-2824 pies. $400. Ready now. 541-447-0210 English Bulldog Pup, AKC Reg, The Bulletin recommends 1 male left $1700, all shots extra caution when Kittens, just in from foster 541-325-3376. purchasing products or homes, social, playful, alservices from out of the tered, shots, ID chip, free vet English Mastiff pups, Pure area. Sending cash, checks, visit! Low adoption fee, disbreed. 3 females left, 2 or credit information may count for 2. Nice older kitbrindle 1 Fawn. 14 weeks, be subjected to fraud. For tens & adult cats also avail$500 & up. 541-279-1437 more information about an able. Sat/Sun 1-5, call re: English Springer Spaniel advertiser, you may call the other days. 317-3931, Puppies AKC Field, ready Oregon State Attorney 389-8420. Info/photos/map: now. Liver & white, males General’s Office Consumer www.craftcats.org. $500, females $600. Beaver Protection hotline at Creek Kennels 541-523-7951 “Kittens, Kittens, Kittens” 1-877-877-9392. millerbeavercreekkennels.com The Humane Society of Redmond has Kittens. Adoption Free 1 yr. old Male black lab fee of $40.00 includes spay/ mix to a good home with no neuter, microchip, first set of other dogs and 2 fifteen vaccinations & a free health Adult Cat Adoption Special week old Female Malamute/ exam with a local VeterinarDuring the Month of July Lab mix pups, $50, ian. All kittens are tested for adoption fee for all adult cats 541-350-6545 feline aids/leukemia. For is only $20.00. All Cats are more information come by “Free Barn Cats” tested for feline aids/leukethe shelter at 1355 NE Hemmia. Adoption includes spay/ The Humane Society of Redlock Ave or call us at mond has Free Barn Cats neuter, microchip, first set of 541-923-0882. available. All Barn Cats have vaccinations and a free been tested for feline aids/ health exam with a local vetKoi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. leukemia, vaccinated, spayed erinarian. For information Central Oregon Largest /neutered. For more info call come by the shelter at 1355 Selection. 541-408-3317 541-923-0882 or come by NE Hemlock Ave or call the shelter at 1355 NE Hem- Labradoodles, 541-923-0882. . Australian lock Ave. Imports 541-504-2662 AKC CHOC. lab pups 4 males, www.alpen-ridge.com 10 wks, dew claws, wormed Free: Cute Kittens, 3 male, 1 female, 1 white silvertip, to & shots, $300. 541-378-7600 LABS, AKC, chocolate & black go homes. 541-318-1653. Aussie Stumpy Tail Cattle males. Reduced price only Dog/Heeler pups, 5 weeks, French & English Bulldog pups. $200 each. Family raised and $200, 1 female, 3 males, parents on site. Avail. now. (541) 382-9334. 541-385-0977. 541-447-8958 www.enchantabull.com http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Tools

Fuel and Wood

***

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Professional Tile Saw, 10 inch, 2 HP, exc. shape. $200. 541-480-5950

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177

Low Cost Spay & Neuter is HERE!! Have your cats & dogs spayed and neutered! Cats: $40 (ask about out Mother & Kittens Special!) Dogs: $65-$120 (by weight). We also have vaccines & microchips avail. 541-617-1010. www.bendsnip.org Mini Dachshunds, AKC, black & tan, short hair, wormed, shots, call for info, $275, 541-420-6044,541-447-3060 Nice adult companion cats FREE to seniors! Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 541-398-8420. POODLES, AKC Toy,home raised. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889. Rat Terriers, tiny, 2 females $150 ea., 1 male, $100, 541-410-6596. Shih-Malt , male, 8 weeks, 1st shot, wormed, feisty, $300, 541-419-3082

Shih Poos - Toy, non-shedding puppies, Great family pets, Three males left. $350, call Kelly, 541-489-3237 or 541-604-0716. Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 males & 2 females, chocolate, black, apricot & cream $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 Jabezstandardpoodles.com STANDARD POODLE PUPS: black and silver, 2 females, 3 males, $400. 541-647-9831.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com Sectional Sofa, curved, 2 piece, 10 matching pillows, ottoman, $495,541-382-9172

Solid Oak, Coffee & End tables, $125, please call 541-388-2348. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

212

CLEANING OUT years of hunting, fishing, reloading. Some new, some old, few guns. Call for info. 541-749-8982. GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036. H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352 Marlin, 17HMR, 917M2, Bull Barrel, w/scope and case, $375 OBO, 541-647-8931. Mossberg 500, 12 ga. pump, like new w/box, accessories, $250 OBO, 541-647-8931 Remington 700 .264 Win Mag Sendero SFII. Less than 75 rounds fired. $875. Leupold VXIII 6.5-20x40. 1" tube, AO, TPS rings. $450. $1195 for whole pkg., 541-977-3130 S & W, 40 cal., stainless, holster, case & ammo, $350 OBO, 541-647-8931. Taurus, 40 cal., stainless, w/2 mags, holster & ammo, like new,$450 OBO 541-647-8931 Weatherby Vanguard, Synthetic, 22/250, Leopold 3x9, $675 OBO; CZ Stainless breakdown gun, .22 mag, .410 over/under, exc. cond., $625, 541-728-1036

247

Antiques & Collectibles

Sporting Goods - Misc.

TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUCHONS), 5 females, 1 male, 7 wks. July 15th. CKC reg., hypoallergenic, non-shedding, 1st shots $350-$400. 541-460-1277

Organ Antique Collectible, it works all wooden and simple made by Federal. $495, Please call #541-350-5423.

Coleman 2 burner liquid gas camp stove. Exc. shape. $40/ea. 541-480-5950.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420

TV, 52” Big screen, works WANTED TO BUY great, exc. cond. Asking US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & $800. 541-480-2652. Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, 255 rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Computers coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex THE BULLETIN requires com& vintage watches. No colputer advertisers with mullection to large or small. Bedtiple ad schedules or those rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the 240 name of the business or the Crafts and Hobbies term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Stained Glass, bevels, solder, defined as those who sell one tools, starter set, $200 takes computer. all. 541-388-0212.

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bar Stools, (3), elegant, light color wood, $15/ea., 541-382-9172 Bench, wood storage, $20, Wood-type storage bench, $15, 541-382-9172 Chairs, 12 classic modern metal, stack in space of one chair, $15/ea. 541-382-9172 Dresser, Solid oak, 4-drawer, dovetail joints, $175, call Bill at 541-350-1711. Entertainment Center, w/27” Hitachi TV, $100; Sleeper Couch, queen size, $100; Freezer Upright, Blue Ribbon, 17 cu.ft., off white, $100, please call 541-598-4714. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Hide-A-Bed, queen size, Simmons, like new upholstery, $200, 541-548-0504. Log Bdrm. set, w/queen mattress, box springs, frame, headboard, & footboard, 2 side tables, 6 drawer chest, 3 lamps, complete set, $999; Twin recliner loveseat, beige & brown, $200, 2 recliners, burgundy microfiber, set, $100, MOVING SALE, call 541-549-6996.

215

Coins & Stamps

242

Exercise Equipment

253

TV, Stereo and Video

257

Musical Instruments

Concept 2 commercial rowing machine, New. Pd. $1200, asking $800. 541-388-2118 Health Walker, $30, please call 541-388-2348 for more information. Nordic Track SL 710 Recumbant exercise bike, pd $450, asking $200. 541-388-2118

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Ski Equipment

Buy My Pianos, lessons incl., consoles, digitals, & grands, new & used, 541-383-3888.

Water skis, 1 set of Cut and Jump $50 OBO. Call for more info. 541-447-1039.

Digital Piano, Yamaha Clabinova, $1500, please call 541-389-4353.

245

260

243

Golf Equipment

Misc. Items

Clubs, Calloway X20,steel irons, 5-PW, w/4 hybrid, 3 mo. old, $300;Taylor Made Tour Burner driver, Pro Force V-2 regular shaft, $100, 541-350-7076.

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Irons, full set,ladies right hand, like new, graphite shafts, w/ bag, $199, 541-815-9939.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Barretta 9mm 92FS $500. S&W 9mm 639 $400. ‘94 32WS $900. REM 700, 22-250, Elite 4000 scope, Bi-pod $1000.(3) Recurve Bows. 541-388-2118 Browning Semi Automatic 7mm Magnum, made in Belgian, Leopold scope make offer near $1000 541-389-0259.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

Saws: Table $50, Chainsaw, Poulan, $60, Various hand tools tools, $1-$5 ea, 2-wheel wheelbarrow, $20, Ladders: 20’ $50; 6’ bifold ladder, $20, Sanders, (2), $10/ea., Please call 541-306-4632. Wagner Paint Crew, used twice, $90 OBO; 7” wet tile saw, $50, OBO, call 541-306-4632.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

Building Materials

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 FAN, Industrial size for shop or warehouse, 28 in. fan blades 2 spd. brand new $135 541-504-9210. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Propane Tank, 30 gallon, $50, please call 541-977-6259 for more info. The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

265 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

263

Tools Chainsaws, Stils, 660, w/new top end, $850 OBO; 441, w/ new top end, $750 OBO; 044, very good shape, $600 OBO; Generator, Honda, E3000, low hours, $1350 OBO, 541-419-1871.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Moving our Showroom to new Location and we have the following items for sale. Contempory Galley Style 270 Kitchen - $5500 , a few misc. Lost and Found Cabinets, Executive Kimball Cherry Desk set $250., coFound: 7/7 Female Aussie Red rian countertop$400, corian Healer mix, in Tumalo area, sink $300, please call purple collar, 541-419-8646 #541-385-6809

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

BarkTurfSoil.com

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

Ad must include price of item

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $165 for 1, or $290 for 2, Bend Delivery Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Found: 7/8, mix breed male dog, in Sunriver OWW area, call 541-593-5551 Found: Female Aussie/Redheeler mix, 7/7,Tumalo area. 3-4 yrs., Purple collar, no tags. Brenda 541-419-8646 Found Glasses, bifocals, 7/13, near Rock Creek by Crane Prairie, 541-504-5575. Found: Nintendo DS, in Drake Park, 7/10, call to identify, 541-610-4026. FOUND: prescription glasses, along Deschutes River at Meadow Camp. Call to ID 541-788-7305. FOUND remote control for digital camera on the dock at Rock Creek Campground, at Crane Prairie on July 19. Call 541-977-4288 to Identify. Found Table saw cutting guide, near O’Neil Junction, 7/15, 541-923-0198 after 2 pm. FOUND: Trailer hitch ball mount, Huntington Rd. and So. Century Drive. 541-420-2571. Lost Cat, Female, petite Bengal, NW Crossing area, lost 7/19, please call 949-246-8982. Lost Cat: Orange, male, DRW, S. Navajo Rd. area, Sat. 7/17, 541-383-2304.

LOST Kelpie dog, female, black w/small white patch on her chest. Responds to Tate, is wearing a faded orange collar w/rabies & ID tags. Last seen West Side Nursery on West Hwy 126, Redmond. REWARD and NO questions asked. 541-280-9540 Lost Ring, brown, wooden, square, has white spiral shell in center, Downtown/West side Bend, afternoon of 7/15, call 541-579-1041. Reward. Lost Sony Digital Camera on 7/17, on 6th & Burnside. Reward! Call 256-874-4560 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178


F2 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. 2006 JD PTO brush hog, 5’ wide, $500. 541-553-1471. Ford 8N Tractor, 3 point hitch, 6’ blade, dirt scoop, $1750 for all, 541-382-6028.

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Grass Hay, Central Oregon Pasture Mix, $135/ton, will load, barn stored. Please call 541-475-0383 or 503-209-5333.

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sweet 2010 Grass Hay - no rain, barn stored, top quality. Free grapple load. $150/ton or $140/10 ton. Elt Farms. 541-923-3534.

Farmers Column

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Free: Baby Bunnies! Call 541-923-7501 Free Roosters, variety of breeds, for more info call 541-548-6635.

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Horses and Equipment Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Cutting Orchard Grass, 2-tie, $110/ton, Alfafla Grass Mix Feeder hay, $90/ton, good quality Alfalfa, $110/ton, 541-475-4242, 541-948-0292 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. EXCELLENT GRASS HAY FOR SALE, fine stems, leafy green, 80 lb. bales, $125 ton in Culver, 541-475-4604.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com DIAMOND J STABLES is re-opening at the end of July! call Lori to hold a stall at 541-389-8164. Limited Stalls available. Heel-O-Matic Roping Steer, $1500, please call 541-382-6702.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Livestock & Equipment Goats. 4-H, Registered Nubian Buck $300 Milking NubianX 2yr doe $150 541-281-4047

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Estate Sales

Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Estate Sale: July 23, 24, 25. 9 to 6, 2591 NE Ravenwood Dr., Antiques: woodworking tools, clock, dishes, collectibles, books, records. 1000’s of feet of hardwood: black walnut, teak, maple, oak, pine. New woodworking tools. 100’s of pictures and frames, hardwood cutting boards. Household goods/furniture. Riding lawnmower.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802 MEGA - MULTI, 65400 Kiowa Dr. SAT 8-4, Old Bend/ Redmond Hwy., @Swalley. Craig's List - Fri/Sat.

Sat. July 24

8:00-4:00. Furniture, tools, household items. 6100 S. Hwy. 97 #12 Redmond. No early birds.

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Fundraiser Sales Gigantic parking lot sale at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 NW 19th St., Redmond. Fri., 7/23, 8-4 and Sat., 7/24. 8-2.

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Sales Northwest Bend 100 Yr. old Treasures, bottles, 1910-1930 magazines, jars, treadle sewing machine, tools. Loom, warping board, furniture, futon, portable DW, stamp machine, wood molding, shelving AND POTTERY by PETER MEYER. 45 NW Greeley IN ALLEY Sat. & Sun., July 24 & 25, 8-4.

358 A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Meat & Animal Processing LOCAL BEEF - Taking limited orders for our natural beef half or whole. Slaughter is Oct. 18. Deposit required. 541-382-8393 or message.

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Produce and Food KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, Oregon U Pick: Semi-Cling Peaches - Spring Crest Ready Picked: Sweet Cherries, Bring Containers, Open 7 Days per week, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Only. (541) 934-2870

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Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states and British Columbia. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin in Sept. Registration now open, www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

470

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, Domestic & 3-days. Reach 3 million clasIn-Home Positions sified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Move-In Help Wanted in Washington, Utah & British Prineville, To unload/unpack, Columbia. (916) 288-6019 early Aug. Must be able to lift email: elizabeth@cnpa.com heavy appl., 702-876-6566. for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) We are looking for an experienced caregiver APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER for our elderly parents. Part-Time This is an employee position, Fox Hollow Apts. and possible live-in. 541-383-3152 541-480-0517 or 541-548-3030 Cascade Rental Management jensen.cpa@bendcable.com

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ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CLASSIFIED

SALES

ERS PARADISE** Christmas in July--Huge Multi-Family Garage Sale. Many new items (still boxed), camping items, household items, costume jewelry, clothing and so much more. This Saturday & Sunday, July 24-25 *8am to 3pm* 1747 NE Wichita Way (off 27th by the hospital) Follow the lime green signs. See you!! Fundraiser for Peace Center/ Central OR, Huge yard sale, Sat. July 24, 9-2, 816 NW Hill St., Household items, clothes, jewelry, books, small appl. & furniture. 541-504-2536.

Huge Garage Sale: 1981 Corvette, 35’ Motorhome, Casio Keyboard, bamboo chairs, bikes, golf equip., dbl. pane RV windows, RV awnings, household misc,linens, clothes, & much, more, Fri. & Sat. 8-5, Sun 8-?, 60872 Onxy. HUGE Sale DRW Fri. 9-6 & Sat. 9-3, all must go! Misc. household, tools, bin shelving, lots of freebies 60335 Zuni Circle follow pink signs LARGE SALE Fri, & Sat 8-3, household items, tools, fishing camping, large Coca Cola collection and more. 19399 Indian Summer Rd., DRW

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Bookkeeper/Secretary, Experienced. Part-time, 20-30 hrs./week, Pay DOE, Call 541-977-6714.

Firefighters, Wildland Physical 3 mile walk test is required. 2 pieces ID: Photo ID and Social Security card or Birth Certificate. No ID No Applications! Must be 18 years old. Out of town for 1-30 days and go anywhere in the U.S. PatRick Corp. 1199 NE Hemlock, Redmond, OR For more info: 541-923-0703

Automotive Front End/Suspension Tech needed. Experience is essential for this fast paced job. Send replies to: 1865 NE Hwy 20, Bend, OR 97701.

REPRESENTATIVE

CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for caregivers, part/full-time, in Sisters area. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim or Evangelina for more information. Se habla espanol. 541-923-4041 from 9 am.-6pm, Mon.-Fri.

This position sells and services classified advertising for private party advertising customers as well as some commercial accounts with ads in The Bulletin, Redmond Spokesman and Central Oregon Nickel Ads. The position assists customers with ad creation, copy writing, and ad features in an effort to make their advertising successful. The position also makes outbound sales calls to commercial accounts, and does weekly follow up with existing customers.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Excellent communication and presentation skills are necessary for success. The successful candidate must be able to manage multiple tasks and information about multiple publications, meeting the needs of the customer and the deadlines of the newspaper. The candidate must also offer outstanding customer service.

Driver CDL req. w/ dbl. endorsement, must have 1 yr. exp. driving. Parked in Madras, evening position. Call 541-475-4221.

A minimum of 1 year experience in sales, and / or a solid background in marketing, retail or telephone sales is required for consideration. The position is hourly, 40 hours per week and offers a competitive compensation / bonus plan with benefits. Please send a cover letter and resume to Sean Tate, Bulletin Advertising Manager at state@bendbulletin.com, or mail to Sean Tate at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please. Please submit your application by July 26th, 2010.

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FOR THE GUYS and Gals too! 40+ year collection of power & hand tools, hunting, fishing, camping & golf equip., men’s bike, fridge, freezer, Pampered Chef, toys, & much much more. Fri. & Sat. 8-4, Multi-family sale, follow signs from Powell Butte Hwy/Alfalfa Market Rd. to 62750 Stenkamp Rd., corner of Dixon Loop.,

Sat. 8-2, 20669 NE Sierra Dr., off Empire, 2006 Polaris Quad /Trailer,furniture, household, misc., new silk flowerbaskets.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 8-4. Outdoor sports gear, clothes and tools. For info 480-4943. 1992 NE Purser ave.

Big Stonehaven Garage Sale Multiple houses participating, Sat. 7/24, 9-2:30, off Murphy Rd. & Country Club Dr.

MOVING SALE! SAT ONLY! Many construction items, old 7AM-12PM-TV, butcher ammo, sandblast pot & hose, block, crystal, desk, eleccutting torch w/mini tanks, tronics, & much more! 20775 new router, cement finish Double Peaks Dr--Just off Moving Sale: Sat. & Sun. tools, recumbant excersize Cooley & Boyd Acres 8-2, 3241 NW Fairway bike, Sat. & Sun. 9-3, 60254 Heights. Bikes, furniture, Agate Rd., DRW. Multi-family Garage Sale, Sat. golf clubs & much more. July 24, 7 am - 3 pm, 63165 MOVING SALE! Furniture, Brookstone Ln., 284 tools, kitchenware, various 541-385-1035. items. Saturday & Sunday, Sales Southwest Bend 8-3. 1181 SW Chamberlain. Multi-Family Sale: Fri. & 45 Years of Stuff! Books, fish- Multi-Family Garage & EsSat., 8-4, Misc. Horse tack, ing, household, beanie batate Sale: Quality furniture, Silver Show Bridles, etc, probies. 59884 Cheyenne Rd. toys, tools, misc., Fri.-Sun., fessionally framed Sisters DRW. Thurs.-Sun. 8am-5pm. 19917 SW Hollygrape St.. Rodeo Posters, 4X4 ATV $1500, bar stools, fine jew286 elry, TV’s, designer handbags, 61135 Kepler St golf clubs & carts, carpet Sales Northeast Bend 7/23-24, 7:30. Kid & Men shampooer, Longerberger, clothes. Toys. Small appl, Nutri-System, clothes, & 8-3 Fri./Sat., 21369 NE Pelican furniture (incl. antique). much more! 63140 WaterDr., Furn., home decor, milk Washer/Dryer, '03 Audi cress Way can, grill, sports equip., dog sled, tools, & much more! Multi-family sale, porch set, A Nine Chick Sale. Sat. 8-3, lots oak entertainment center, of misc., some furniture. books, baby stuff, toys, 3055 19560 Sager Lp., West on NE Fairmont Ct Sat 7/24 8-3 Powers, left on Brookswood, right on River Rim, right on MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Stonegate, left on Sager Lp. SATURDAY ONLY!!! Toys, clothes,& some larger items Fri. Sat., Sun, 8-3, Tools, pool as well. Sale is from 8am-1 heater, organ, old train set, pm only! 2425 NE Jones Rd. go-kart, & much more. 60091 Bend, Oregon 541-410-7182 Cinder Butte Rd, DRW.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

A Classified Inside Sales position is available in The Bulletin’s advertising department.

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend **A BARGAIN HUNT-

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

SAT. 8-2. Cookie jar collection, girls Peg Perego stroller, girls clothes, toys, queen mattress, table saw, glider & misc. furn. 2729 Red Oak Dr.

288

Sales Southeast Bend

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

General •Preschool 3 Teacher, part time, exp. req. • Office assistant, one day a week + fill ins. Applications at eastmontcommunityschool.com

Lead Generator, Part-time, Costco Roadshow 7/29 -8/9, Hunter Douglas & Carpeting. 1-866-298-8607. Email bskinner@customdecorators.com

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Sales Other Areas

Sales Other Areas

HUGE GARAGE SALE Fri., 7/23 Alfalfa gigantic garage sale, 9-3. Sat. 7/24 9-2. 927 NW corner of Dodds and Walker Redwood Place. TVs, elecRd. Sat. July 24 and Sun. tronics, desks & more. July 25th. 541-390-7778. Huge Sale: Fri. & Sat., 9-3, Moving & Must Sell -- Make Furniture, Toys, appl., tools, Offers! Powell Butte, Fri.-Sat. computer monitors, more! 8-5, 8671 Yahooskin Dr., 2831 SW Helmholtz Way. off Riggs Rd, truck, household, tools, TV, antique fire Multi-Family Sale: 8-5, Fri. & hose carrier, display racks, Sat. Geely 2005 Scooter, cabinets,cabinet hinges, more! hunting gear, TV’s, tires, electronics, and misc. items, 695 NE Redwood Ave. Multi-family Sale, Fri. 23rd 8 am -2 pm & Sat. 24th 8 am-1 pm. Lots of baby items and more. 2112 NW 19th Place, Redmond. 541-653-6803.

Sales Redmond Area

Garage Sale: Sat. Only, 9-5, 303 No. Canyon Dr., lots of linens, tools, and something for everyone!

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Sales Redmond Area

Church Parking Lot Sale, 22080 Bear Creek Rd. Fri. & Multi-family yard sale. Sat. Sat. 8am-?. Furniture, sport8-5. 6330 NW Jackpine Ave., ing goods, camping, appl., follow signs off Hwy 126. clothing, etc. 541-382-8791. Collectibles, oak table, books much more. Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 20996 Greenmont Dr., S. Sat. Only 8-2, 745 Angus on 15th, left on Desert Woods, Lane, Angus Acres, Terleft on Greenmont, lots of rebonne name brand qualglass, furniture, knick knacks. ity items for the home, children & everything in between Huge Moving Sale! Fri. and Sat. 8am-?, 60898 Raintree Dr. Sat. & Sun. 8-4. Tack, furniture, off Knott Rd. Antiques, yard refrigerator, toys, kids art, pineapple twin beds, clothes & misc. Hwy 126 to bedding, kitchenware, new 59th, north on 59th to 126. items, home decor, Red Hat stuff, lamps, rugs, too much St. Thomas Altar Society to list. NO JUNK! Annual Rummage Sale St. Thomas Parish Hall. Moving Sale! 12th & Evergreen, 1001 SE 15th St., Space 76, Redmond, Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am-5pm. Fri. 7/23, 9am-3pm, Sat. 7/24, 9am-noon 290 $1 Bag Sale Sat. 9am-noon. 50 Years of Accumulation: Sat.-Sun., 8-5, 1404 E Ave, Terrebonne, lots of great stuff,something for everyone!

Financial Controller in Health Care Business,. Part Time, experience preferred. Fax resume to Pfeifer & Associates, 541-383-4935 or mail to 23 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend, 97701.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Summit Crest Neighborhood Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-4, Helmholtz & Wickiup, Redmond.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Moving Sale, Sat. Only 8:30-4:30, 17228 Avocet Dr. off Snow Goose in OWWII, furniture, tools, heavy equip., appliances & misc. household SISTERS VIEW RANCH YARD SALE. 17337 Hwy 126, between Cloverdale and Geo. Cyrus Road, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sat. & Sun. Great items for college dorms, everyday use, & gift ideas. HAY! We even have hay! “water park” for kids, 5-10 yrs old. (541) 521-1031…see you there!

Dave McConnell

ESTATE

SALE

15983 GREEN FOREST RD., LAPINE SALE

Friday, July 23 & Saturday, July 24 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday. (Take Hwy 97 south from the Baker Rd. overpass and go 17.2 miles - turn right at Lapine State Park sign - State Rec Rd. and follow almost 3.8 miles to 5th St. turn south and follow 2.2 miles to Green Forest Rd.) 1978 Dodge 1 ton pickup with 440 Chyrsler engine; 1990 Alpenlite 25/2 5th Wheel; MTD 8/26 Snow Blower; Jonsered chainsaw; Air Compressor; Compound Table saw; Oak Dining table and four chairs; Freezer; Washer and Dryer; Two Queen Beds; Sofa and Love Seat; Dressers; Desks; Lots of Kitchen items; Electrical tools; 1' square metal tubing; Aluminum rolled roofing; two cords of firewood; Scrap metal; Fishing poles and reels and gear; Shovels; Rakes; Hoes; Gas generator 4400; Table saw; Nice Treadmill; Press; Block Hoist; Electrolux canister vacuum; Linens; Books; Maple dressers; Microwave; Small electrical appliances; Three nice ladders; Staple guns and staples; drills; Grinder; Garden tools; garden and garage chemicals. Hundreds of other items. Presented by:

Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days ~

541-382-5950 eves


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Medical Wallowa Memorial Hospital, located in Enterprise, OR currently has a full-time position available for a Laboratory MT/MLT with outstanding Benefits Package. If interested please contact Linda Childers, Human Resource Director at (541) 426-5313, or visit our website at www.wchcd.org. EOE Millwrights: Warm Springs Forest Products Industries is seeking journeyman level millwrights for openings in Warm Springs, Oregon. Applicants must be able to: • Perform various duties in a fast paced modern sawmill. • Perform trouble shooting, maintenance, repairs and replacements for production equipment. • 1-3 Years of industrial maintenance experience as a journeyman or equivalent. • Broad trade skills - welding, pneumatics, hydraulics. • Strong mechanical skills able to use a variety of hand and power tools. • Good reading skills for drawings, service manuals, and blueprints. • Able to work safely. Warm Springs Forest Products offers a safe work environment as well as competitive wages, benefits packages, and 401K plan. E-mail: dhenson@wsfpi.com

Teacher - Lake County ESD is now accepting applications for a Special Education Teacher. Applicants must have or qualify for Oregon licensure as a Teacher with Handicapped Learner Endorsement. This is a parttime (.5 FTE) position with a salary range $17,300$26,300 DOE, partial benefits. Position closes 8/5/10. Applications are available at the ESD (357 No. L St. Lakeview, OR, 541.947.3371), email: dgoss@lakeesd.k12.or.us or on EdZapp. Submit application, resume and cover letter.

Technical Support Specialist 4 Working with complex informations systems and software applications. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent work experience required. Full time $3,875-$6,310/mo. Plus benefits. Job announcement and online OJD application available at: http://courts.oregon.gov/ojd/j obs. Closes July 28, 2010. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 F3 636

Finance & Business

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

500 600 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

630

Rooms for Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Sales

DOOR-TO-DOOR SALES High Commission, Low Collect Local Product Earn Head-of-Household level income of $800 to $1500 per week We provide all training and may be able to assist with transportation if needed. If you have sold cars, rental cars, insurance, cellular phones, cable or magazines, you will be successful working with us.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

You’ll never know if you missed a big opportunity if you don’t call - five minutes could make a real difference in your life. Call today:

541-508-2784

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

541-383-0386 SALES - Between High School and College? Over 18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what you're worth!!! Travel w/Successful Business Group. Paid Training. Transportation, Lodging Provided. 1-877-646-5050. (PNDC) Sales

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Career opportunity selling the best European cars in the World. Carrera Motors is looking for the right candidate to sell Porsche, Audi, VW, BMW and quality used automobiles. Auto experience is not necessary, however, a strong background in sales is mandatory. Candidates who possess a book of business of qualified customers will be the best fit for this position. Excellent pay and benefits. Email resumes to Rebecca@carreramotors.com or davidt@carreramotors.com.

personals

&

Awbrey Butte master bedroom. Incredible views. A/C, hot tub. 5 min. walk to COCC. $500mo. Call Gary 306-3977. Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $25/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 Room for rent in home, own bath, $450/mo. + util. Near shopping. 541-312-5781 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Mt. Bachelor Village: furn. or unfurn., 2/2 w/deck, W/D, hardwood, gas fireplace, remodeled, W/S/G paid. $800/mo. 541-815-0688

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special

Beautiful 2 bdrm, quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928. 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Duplex, 1400 sq.ft., dbl. attached garage, W/D incl., fenced yard, $675 per mo., please call Harold, 541-480-2092.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Newly Remodeled QUIMBY St. APTS. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 62+ or Disabled 1bdrm Units W/Air Cond. Rent Based on Income Project Based Section 8 Onsite Laundry, Decks/Patios, Water, sewer & garbage paid. CALL 541-382-9046 TTY 1 800-545-1833 Income Limits Apply Equal Housing Opportunity $ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend

Local senior conservative male with exc refs. will SHARE 2 Bdrm, 2 bath Condo (winterspring) in Lake Havasu, AZ in EXCHANGE for SHARING Central OR, 2 bdrm. home (summer/fall). Write PO BOX 1390, Redmond, OR 97756.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

573

UBS Financial Services, Reg. CSA, Series 7/63 Req. Minimum 3 yrs Exp. Strong customer focus. Fax Resume to: 503-221-5862 HR Manager

603

Rental Alternatives

Loans and Mortgages

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

Rentals

H

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

I, Diane Dilworth, will not be responsible for any debts, other than my own.

1015 Roanoke Ave., $590 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrm, dishwasher W/S/G paid, oak cabinets, carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 541-383-2430

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath Townhouse style apt., W/D hookup, no pets/smoking,120 SE Cleveland, $625, W/S/G paid, 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

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Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. views. No pets or smoking $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500 Old Mill Studio, separate entrance, all utilities pd. $500 mo. plus $500 deposit. Small pet neg. No smoking. 541-382-1941. Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $530. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

Summer Special! $99 Move in $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease!

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2553 & 2580 SW 20th St.2/1 duplexes, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600+dep, incl. yard maint., no pets/smoking.541-382-1015

Call about our Specials

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • West paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

Summertime Special! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Cute Duplex, SW area, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, private fenced yard, W/D hookup, $700 mo.+ dep., call 541-480-7806. Four plex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo. + dep. pet neg. 541-480-7806

Large 3 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, fenced yard, sprinklers, single car garage, avail. now, $775/mo. + $500 dep. 541-815-3279,541-815-3241

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Houses for Rent General

Adult Care

Child Care Services

Domestic Services

Babysitter -Through the summer & weekends, great with kids - have 2 younger sisters, 3 years experience, your home or mine, 541-526-5894

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933 House Keeping Services: 11 yrs of experience in house keeping. Angelica Lopez House Keeping & Janitorial, 541-633-3548,541-633-5489

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

Quality House Cleaning: Exp. & dependable, For refs. & appt., Call Angelina 541-350-5162.

Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552 Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

Anne’s Domestic Services has openings for new clients who are in need of a helping hand with shopping, meal prep, errands, Dr. appt., house cleaning, etc. Will schedule FIND IT! daily/weekly. Reasonable BUY IT! rates, satisfaction guaranSELL IT! teed. Call 541-389-7909 or The Bulletin Classifieds 541-815-7888.

and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Excavating

Domestic Services

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

I DO THAT!

Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

650

654

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

2 Bdrm. Duplex, gas fireplace, back yard, $825/mo. incl. yard maint & water, no smoking, pet okay, 1225 NE Dawson Dr. 402-957-7261 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1556 sq.ft., family room, w/wood stove, big rear deck, fenced yard, dlb. garage, w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 NE Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 decks, sunny, skylight, W/D hookup, fenced, private, W/S/G paid, cats ok, great landlord, $650,541-350-0958

Large private lot, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, RV Parking, $800, 1st & Last, Tanglewood, no smoking, avail. 8/1, 541-388-0053.

700

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Private 3 bdrm., 2 bath, on 5 acres, Tumalo area, extra large garage, guest house, small barn, fenced, horse & dogs OK, $1350 mo. 541-480-2233

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend Avail. Now, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, fenced yard, deck, close to shopping, garage, no pets or smoking $725 mo., 1st, last, & dep. 541-389-7734.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Foxborough, 1656 sq.ft., new Rental rate! If you have a carpet, 3/2, gas fireplace, all home to rent, call a Bulletin appl., W/D, treck deck, dbl. Classified Rep. to get the garage, $975/mo. no smoknew rates and get your ad ing or pets, Ave. Aug. 1. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 541-389-1416

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

ROOM AVAIL. FOR LADY in loving adult foster home, discounts avail. 541-388-2348.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

658

705

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate Services

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S New large luxury family AND SELLERS of real eshome 3/2.5 3200 sq.ft., tate in Central Oregon. To W/D, fridge, daylight base- place an ad call 385-5809 ment, large lot, views, no pets. $1450. 503-720-7268.

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Remodeled 3 bdrm. home, on 5 acres, near Terrebonne, horse property,small barn,new furnace,1765 sq.ft., $1050 avail. 8/5, Chris, 541-504-9373.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

719

Real Estate Trades Trade your 5+ acres + home for our beautiful home in West Linn (just south of PDX). 503 534-1212. MLS #10013267. Owner/broker.

740 2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796. 3 Bdm., 1700 Sq.ft., 1.75 bath, 1/2 acre, hardwood, vaulted ceilings, laundry room, walk in, 2 car garage, $925/mo. $950 dep., 541-420-5247.

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Immaculate, Updated SW Bend Townhome, 1500 sq.ft,3 bdrm, 3 bath, A/C, new paint, stainless appl, fireplace 2 decks, $245,000, 503-358-6190.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end The Bulletin Classifieds unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 687 furnished. 541-749-0994.

Commercial for Rent/Lease

744

Open Houses

Lease: 679 SE Business Way, 5000+ sq.ft, light industrial, 3 overhead doors, exc. parking, office suite w/mtn. views. Talk to me! 907-252-2794. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft.,

30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District

www.ThePlazainBend.com

OPEN HOUSE Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing

Pricing starting from $1200/ month

Call 541-743-1890

Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

745

Homes for Sale Amazing mountain view on 5 acres outside of Sisters, 2 bed, 1 bath, 992 sq ft home (interior needs finish work) w/ two car garage, great shop, and detached office, www.sistersviewhome.com, $224,000, 208-921-1436.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing W e e d fr e e b a r k & fl o w e r b e d s Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

C o lli n s L a w n M a i n t e n a n c e Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714 Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Weekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Masonry 541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

LADYBUG LAWN CARE Clean up, maintenance, pruning, bark, edging, affordable, reliable quality service 541-279-3331, 541-516-1041 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free. Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid. 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Tile, Ceramic

Personal Services

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Consolidated Pest Control Ants, spider, rodents and more! Fast, professional service. ccb #187335. 541-389-3282 www.consolidatedpest.net

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com


F4 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

745

860

870

880

880

881

882

882

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Boats & RV’s

John Day: 2003 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1920 sq.ft., wood, stove, forced air heat, vaulted living room, Silestone counters stainless appl., master suite/ walk in closet, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056

800

Know your neighbors! Nestled in Bend's only environmentally friendly co-housing community. http://home.bendbroadband.com/higherground/. Lots of sunlight! 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 1450 sq. ft., foam panel construction, large decks, cozy loft. Bamboo floors. $239,000 Call Jen: 541 678-5165.

Snowmobiles

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

746

Northwest Bend Homes COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CLOSE. Near Tumalo park & river, 1.25 acres, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, pond, studio, 4-car garage. Owner/ broker, 541-633-3033. $313,000. FSBO, Gated Community w/all amenities on 1/2 acre, 3+2 & bonus studio apt, near river, elec./wood heat, $350,000. 541-617-5787.

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Interested buyer for older motorcycles, scooters, etc. Will pay cash. Please contact Brad @ 541-416-0246 Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225.

850

750

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 leather saddle bags, rear seat mi., exc. cond., factory cover, rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 well maintained, $2900 OBO, mi., barely broke in, $4750. call 541-280-5524. Please call 541-788-1731, 19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, leave msg. if no answer, or w/swing away dual axle 860 email ddmcd54@gmail.com tongue trailer, inboard moMotorcycles And Accessories for pics. tor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, holding tank, canvas enRED UCED TO SELL NOW! closed, less than 20 hours on beautiful bike, ready to ride, boat, must sell due to health full windshield, foot pads, $34,900. 541-389-1574. leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 19’ GALAXY I/0, good engine, mi., barely broke in, $4000. BMW 75/7 866xx w/side & tank good outdrive, needs maniCall 541-788-1731, leave msg. bags many extras/upgrades fold and interior, on trailer, if no answer, or for pics email eg. shocks, solo seat rack, $800 OBO. 541-306-8366. ddmcd54@gmail.com elec. ignition, dual plugs, crash bars, tool kit, pump & BMW rag, $2750 OBO; RS fairing, white, incl. mounting bracket, $500 OBO, Luftmeister side 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 tanks, black, $500 OBO, misc Run About, 220 HP, V8, parts eg. triple clamp master open bow, exc. cond., very cylinder head, temp repair Yamaha Rhino 2006, 660 cc, fast w/very low hours, manuals, air mail leather vest lots of extras incl. tower, (TRAILER INCLUDED) Re& jacket, 541-280-8811 pkg. Bimini & custom trailer, cently serviced, Winch, Bideal $3250 OBO. $19,500.. 541-389-1413 kini top, GPS, Storage box, Windshield. Not abused, Clean, 1100 mi., $7500 503-380-1119 (Bend).

Redmond Homes 4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

18’ SEASWIRL, new interior, 165HP I/O, 10HP Johnson, fish finder, much more, $1990,541-610-6150

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $7900, 541-771-8233

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

865

ATVs HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040 Harley Davidson Duece Softail 2005, 8400 mi., Screamin’ Eagle pipes, teal blue, asking $11,000, Call 541-388-7826.

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

F S B O : Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge, $255,000, owner terms, 541-617-5787.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Find It in 757 Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

762

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $147,000, 541-576-2390.

763

Recreational Homes and Property

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike, very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike, $12,000 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

CRESCENT LAKE CABIN Lake front. $399,000 503-329-0959 764

Farms and Ranches 35 ACRE irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, reduced to $395,000. Will consider trade for small acreage or ? 541-447-1039.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $15,000 obo. 541-693-3975.

4/2 Ranch home+ 2nd home & studio, 6.64 acres, irrigation, 2 shops. $11,000+ rental income yr. $449,900. 541-771-8731 www.fsbo.com Ad 136190

541-322-7253

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

Acreages 20 Acres in Christmas Valley, Off Oil Dry, $10,000 or will trade for guns or ???, for more info please call 541-728-1036. 7 Mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613 CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $96,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000 Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

Harley FXDWG 1997, wide glide, Corbin

$550 OBO!

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Honda 1984,

Magna

V45

exc. cond., runs great, $2500, call Greg, 541-548-2452.

Honda Shadow 750 2007, 1045 mi. Excellent condition, extras, $4900, 541-815-3693

Priced lowered! 12’ Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft boat, like new, used twice, has pole holder & folding seats. $1200. 541-617-0846.

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

The Bulletin 880

Motorhomes

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, & trailer, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

seat, saddle bags, low mi., $9500, Call Rod, 541-932-4369.

Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

OUT-CAST Pac 1200, never in water, great for the Deschutes, John Day or small lakes. Cost new $2800, asking $1400 firm. Go to www.outcastboats.com to view boat. 541-420-8954

818-795-5844, Madras 16’ Aluminum JetCraft 2001, w/2002 Mercury 60HP motor, fully equiped and extra clean, $10,500, Call 541-536-5701.

17’

771

18’ 1967 Sail Boat w/trailer, great little classic boat. $1000 OBO. 541-647-7135.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Move-In Ready! Homes start at $8999. Delivered & set-up start at $28,500, on land, $49,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782.

OWNER FINANCE AVAILABLE: 2 bdrm, 1 bath, new windows, new flooring, fresh paint, $8900 or $1000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130.

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930.

34’

1996,

21,000 miles, great cond., $15,000, 541-389-3237.

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-279-9581. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, Price Reduced, 7.5 KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed, Queen hidea-bed, $90,000. 541-382-1721

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $78,000. 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

MUST SELL! 2008 Komfort 32’. GORGEOUS, have lots of pics. $16,500 OBO. Call 541-728-6933 or email teryme@aol.com

Fifth Wheels

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Canopies and Campers EAGLE CAP 2008 short bed camper. slide right side. Canopy on left side. elect. jacks, generator, microwave, radio, AM/FM sound system. $18,950. 541-923-8770

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

541-322-7253

291L, 30 & 50 amp service, 2 slides, ceiling fan, A/C, surround sound, micro., always stored under cover, under 5K mi. use, orig. owner, like new. $19,500, also G M C Diesel 2007 tow pickup avail. 9K mi., $37,000, 541-317-0783.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, now will sell wholesale for $19,500, Frank. 541-480-0062.

Northerlite 2003, FSC, perfect, $12,000. Ford F350 1996, 4x4, 7.3 turbo, all options & Pristine.$7500.541-420-4276

890

RVs for Rent 2005 38’ Atasca Motorhome, self contained, 3 slides, private party. 541-536-6223.

SUBARU SUMMER SALE! ’98 SUBARU OUTBACK

’97 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON

Limited, Manual

Clean Car

VIN:644760

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, model

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

885

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

VIN:600057

’98 SUBARU IMPREZA OUTBACK SPORT WAGON Auto, Clean Car

VIN:801206

’01 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON ’98 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X ’01 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON Automatic, Clean Car

VIN:311305

’00 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5 South Wind 35P 1997, Back Up camera, Satellite dish, tires 2yr. old Refurbished Interior and fresh service. Sale Price $21,777. VIN# A02441 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

VIN:635720

’05 SUBARU LEGACY GT Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Leather

Manual

Automatic, Very Nice

Limited Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

RV Consignments

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $39,000. 541-815-4121

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

CHECK OUT OUR NEW MAP FEATURE ONLINE @

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM /GARAGESALES

’02 SUBARU OUTBACK SEDAN Limited

VIN:208657

VIN:663144

’03 SUBARU OUTBACK Limited, Auto, Moonroof Low Miles, Very, Very Clean! VIN:648509

’08 SUBARU IMPREZA SEDAN ’04 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON Manual, Low Miles

H6, Very Clean, Auto

VIN:521582

VIN:605604

’05 SUBARU OUTBACK SEDAN ’08 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5 SEDAN ’08 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN

“WANTED” 24' Conquest class C 2006, great floor plan, like new condition 14,000 miles, 1 slide. $43,900. VIN# A82830 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

VIN:644760

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:219087

18.5’ FourWinns 1998, runabout, open bow, sport seating, 5.0L V-8, Samson Tower, dual batteries, canvas cover, always garaged, low hrs., exc. cond., $9500, 541-420-4868.

Limited, Loaded, Auto, Moonroof, Very Clean

We c your SECTION!!!the f to yo Call 541-385-5809 to gara advertise and drive traffic to

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

your garage sale today!!

Manual, Low Miles, Very Clean!

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:203215

Auto, Very Clean, Low Miles

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:814295

775

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Bounder

Winnebago Sightseeer 27’ 2004 30K, 1 slide, hyd. jacks, lots of storage, very clean, exc cond, $41,900,541-504-8568

Springdale Travel Trailer 2005, loaded, excellent condition, call for pictures and info, $12,000, 541-548-4459.

’07 SUBARU IMPREZA OUTBACK SPORT WAGON

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 3/1 in DRW. Nice yard, W/D, fridge., new furnace, new bath plumbing, quiet park. $8900 OBO. 541-728-0529. 60311 Cheyenne Rd., #16

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

870

Boats & Accessories

Homes with Acreage FSBO: 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home 1.47 Acres +/- Comm. Water & Sewer Detached. Garage/Shop Sunriver Area $224,900. Call R. Mosher 541-593-2203.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1600 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

BOUNDER 32' 2003, Mint Condition, 12K miles, seldom used, like NEW, garaged, 2TV, 2 Slides, Ford Triton, Onan generator, beautiful! $49,000. 541-408-0955.

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i Wagon, Low Miles, Automatic

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:304770

VIN:528438

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:225659

’07 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X

’08 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X

Auto, Very Clean, Very Nice Car!

Auto, Low Miles, Very Clean

Certified Pre-Owned

Certified Pre-Owned

VIN:710825

’06 SUBARU TRIBECA

VIN:704170

’08 SUBARU FORESTER

Limited, 5-Passenger, Very Clean, Low Miles

LL Bean, Moonroof

Certified Pre-Owned

Certified Pre-Owned

VIN:404099

’08 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON 2.5XT ’00 FORD F250 XLT 4X4 Turbo, Limited, Leather, Loaded, Manual, Very Clean, Low Miles

Automatic, Leather, Moonroof, Very Clean, Low Miles

Lifted, Supercab, Shortbed, 7.3L Diesel

VIN:715412

’03 FORD EXPEDITION 4x4, Loaded, Leather

Certified Pre-Owned VIN:301669

VIN:B98765

VIN:C11496

We don’t sell cars, we help you buy them! • No Credit • Bankruptcy

• Repossession Ok • We Can Help You!

CALL 888-701-7019 CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through July 25, 2010.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, July 23, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

932

933

935

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

900

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Ford F150 Lariat 2001, step side, 4x4, loaded, white w/tan, leather, CD, tow pkg., running boards, alloy wheels, all pwr., exc., 109K, avail. 9/1, KBB private at $9400, call 541-306-4632. FORD F150 work truck, 1979 long bed, 2WD, manual, good tires, 170k mi., orig. owner. $1200. 541-420-2638.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 435-229-9415.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

TWO HANGARS at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. spots for 5 airplanes. Fully leased, income producing. $536 annual lease. $250,000 both For details, 541-815-6085.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Brake, 13 spd. transmission, good tires & body paint (white). Also, 1993 27’ step deck equipment trailer T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. Ready to work! $9500 takes both. 541-447-4392 or 541-350-3866.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

(Private Party ads only) Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884 Toyota 4Runner 1998, 1 owner, 155K, Rare 5-spd, 4WD. $5500, 971-218-5088. Local.

940

FORD F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 spd., 5th wheel hookups, $1750. 541-382-6310 after 4pm.

Vans

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Sale due to death! 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, too much to list. Must Sell - First $8000. 541-593-3072.

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Ford F350 XLT CrewCab 2007

4x4,6.0 Diesel long box, auto, X-liner, Super Hitch, camper ready, 20K, Arizona beige, like new, $32,500, 541-815-1523

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

GMC Sierra 2500 1995, 4X4, 350 auto, club cab, A/C, power, 117K, hideaway gooseneck ball, $4500, please call 541-815-8236. GMC Sierra HD 2001

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Now asking WHOLESALE for $8750. Frank, 541-480-0062.

Audi A3 2.0 Turbo, 6-spd. manual, 25K mi., exc. cond. Incl: 4 winter tires on alloy wheels. Great car, 32 MPG, $19,500- OBO 541-389-0404

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Ext. Cab, short box, Duramax diesel 4x4, SLT Trim, Leather, 91k mi., exc. cond., $17,995 VIN#E327113 DLR 0225

Audi A4 Avant Wagon 1998, great

933 International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Sport Utility Vehicles

CHEVY SILVERADO 1989 ¾ ton 4x4, with canopy, $2000. 541-588-0207.

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

(4) BF Goodrich P23575R15, M&S 75%. Nice tires. $140. 541-480-5950 Engine Brite Automotive Creeper, good cond., $15, call 541-388-1533. Super Chips part #735-5682, fits 2003-2007 Dodge 5.9 Cummins, $250. (541) 923-2595. Tires, (4), All Season, size, 235/65R17, $80, please call 541-598-4714. Tires, Four Maxxis 760 Bravo, P225/70R16 102S mounted on American Racing wheels, like new $500 OBO (541)280-2684

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Smolich Auto Mall Lowest Price of Year Event!

GOING IN THE SERVICE MUST SELL! 1984 Dodge 360 V8 4 speed, 4x4, Edelbrock Cam, 650 4 barrel carb, $1000. 541-977-7596 or 549-5948.

Dodge Durango 2007 Only 16K Miles! VIN #551428

Only $19,787

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Dodge Ram 2500 2007 Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Quad Cab, SLT 4 door, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. Loaded! $30,995 VIN#J590169

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $23,000, 541-576-2442

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Mazda 6 2009 Only 34K miles! Vin #M26517

***

Only $15,291

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure Honda Civic LX it is correct. Sometimes in2006, 4-door, 45K miles, structions over the phone are automatic, 34-mpg, exc. misunderstood and an error cond., $12,480, please call can occur in your ad. If this 541-419-4018. happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please Honda Civic LX, 2006, call us: auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, 385-5809 $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069 The Bulletin Classified *** HONDA CRV EX 2008, color silver, int. grey leather, 12,400 mi. exc. cond. $25,900. 541-330-1260.

Smolich Auto Mall

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Hyundai Tiburon 2008 Only $12,988

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

541-389-1178 • DLR

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

366

runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 366

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

We will pay CASH for your vehicle Buying vehicles now thru July!

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Smolich Auto Mall Lowest Price of Year Event!

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Kia Amanti 2008 Only 19K miles! Vin #158662

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Only $14,897 Dodge Challenger 2010 Only 1K Miles! VIN #129754

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Only $29,347

541-389-1178 • DLR

Smolich Certified Pre-Owned or Factory Certified Pre-Owned Shop with confidence at Smolich Motors

We BUY - SELL - SERVICE all makes

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon's Largest Used Vehicle Inventory Over 150 Used in stock see it on www.smolichmotors.com

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Smolich Auto Mall AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0, 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great gas mi., exc. cond.! $23,500 41-475-3670

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

SUBARUS!!!

The Bulletin Classifieds Chrysler Town & Country Limited 1999, AWD, loaded, hitch with brake controller, Thule carrier, set of studded tires, one owner, clean, all maintenance records, no smoke/dogs/kids. 120,000 miles. $6,000 OBO. 541-350-2336.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

541-749-4025 • DLR

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Mercedes 230SLK 1998, exc. cond., extra wheels/studded tires, convertible hardtop, yellow/black leather, many extras. $6300 OBO,541-617-0268

Only 18K Miles! Vin #266412

miles, Excellent Condition, includes 4 studless snow tires. $13,950, 541-788-4952

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Toyota Prius 2006, 31K

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $20,500 OBO. 541-388-2774.

366

Family Owned and Operated for over 40 years

Smolich Motors www.smolichmotors.com Hwy 20 in Bend (541) 389-1177 • (541) 749-4025 (541) 389-1178

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Ford Focus 2007, 17,982 miles, includes winter tires and rims, $11,000. 541-475-3866

Sweet Summer Sales Event

test drive any vehicle and receive a ½ gallon of Eberhards® ice cream.....while supplies last ’99 Dodge Ram 1500

$

7,995

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

CAR SWAP HEADQUARTERS THURSDAY 7/22 4 Days Only

’99 GMC Sonoma SLS

$

7,998

FRIDAY 7/23

SATURDAY 7/24

’08 Chevy Aveo5 LS

$

SUNDAY 7/25

’06 Toyota Corolla CE

$

9,988

10,887

VIN: 160700

VIN: 517676

VIN: 240399

VIN: 695696

’08 Chevy Cobalt LT

’02 Ford Explorer XLT

’00 BMW 7-Series 740iL

’05 Chrysler Town & Country

$

$

10,989

$

10,998

$

$

10,998

11,944

VIN: 227979

VIN: A58108

VIN: P11804

VIN: 288125

’07 Kia Rondo LX

’04 Ford Expedition XLT

’09 Dodge Caliber SXT

’09 Dodge Caliber SXT

$

$

12,498

$

12,888

12,929

12,930

VIN: 081846

VIN: A62257

VIN: 172294

VIN: 157499

’09 Chevy Cobalt Lt

’09 Kia Spectra EX

’03 Chevy Silverado 1500

’04 Dodge Dakota SLT

$

$

$

12,998

$

12,998

$

$

12,998

13,988

VIN: 176646

VIN: 612277

VIN: 340596

VIN: 691770

’08 Toyota Yaris

’06 Mazda6 S Sport

’02 GMC Envoy SLT

’08 Mazda3 i

13,994

$

13,998

$

$

13,998

14,889

VIN: 167102

VIN: M34470

VIN: 241844

VIN: 807888

’10 Mazda3 i

’04 Ford Explorer XLT

’09 Mazda5 Sport

’07 Subaru Legacy 2.5i

14,994

$

14,998

$

$

15,930

15,998

VIN: 109530

VIN: B19777

VIN: 350830

VIN: 214818

’07 Dodge Dakota ST

’08 Dodge Nitro SXT

’08 Ford Taurus X SEL

’05 Jeep Liberty Renegade

$

$

$

16,498

16,556

$

16,987

16,995

VIN: 242605

VIN: 137336

VIN: A34218

VIN: 615760

’04 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer

’10 Kia Soul Plus

’10 Kia Soul Plus

’09 Kia Sedona LX

$

16,998

$

VIN: A11965

’07 Ford Explorer XLT

$

18,729

17,498

$

$

17,990

VIN: 057053

VIN: 160218

’07 Ford F150 XLT

’05 Chevy Silverado 2500HD LS

$

22,785

$

17,998 VIN: 303944

’06 Ford F250 XLT

$

22,998

23,128

VIN: A33831

VIN: A26009

VIN: 323253

VIN: A23839

’06 Nissan Titan SE

’09 Kia Borrego LX

’06 Ford F250 XLT Diesel

’08 Subaru Tribeca Limited

$

23,998 VIN: 513840

$

24,888 VIN: 031904

$

VIN: A54514

541-550-5555 PRE-OWNED!!

OF BEND

$

25,988

611 NE PURCELL

26,994 VIN: 406136

HOME OF THE $

21.95*

N

OIL CHANGE! *All makes, all models up to 5 quarts.

PURCELL

Chevy

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

car, great shape, 120K miles, excellent snow car $4995. 541-383-8917

GOTEAMKIA.COM

Chevrolet Tahoe 2007, exc. cond., loaded w/options 57000 mi., call for details 541-536-3345,541-410-0645 $29,999, still on warranty. Heavy Duty Enclosed Trailer, inside 17’x7.5’x7.5,’ new tires/ brakes, 2 spares, watertight, secure, $1780, 541-977-3336

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $1100, Call 541-388-4167.

CHECK YOUR AD

Audi S4 2000, 6spd, V6TT, 112k, AWD, very clean, all maint. records. $9000 541-788-4022

tow pkg., loaded, runs great, 112K mi. $9,995. 541-383-8917.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1990, $1500 asking, Please call 541-536-2836.

Toyota Tundra 2006,

935 Chevy Avalanche Super Deal! Z71 2002, 4x4,

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

541-598-3750

Pickups

Chevy 3/4 Ton 350 1974, automatic, dual gas tanks, wired for camper and trailer. Dual batteries. One owner. Lots of extras. $2500, obo, 541-549-5711

Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

975

VW Super Beetle 1974,

16 FT. Utility Trailer, 82 in. wide bed, above inside rails, ramps, (2) 25 lb axles, spare tire, equalizer hitch, 4 in tie down straps, only 2K mi. $2195 OBO. 541-639-2596.

Top Model, 50K miles, blue, all accessories, need the money, $7900, call Barbara, in Eugene at 541-953-6774 or Bob in Bend, 541-508-8522.

Automobiles

Reach thousands of readers!

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

pkg., canopy incl, $950 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Buick Lacrosse 2006,

Ford F-150, XLT 1994, 2/WD Clean inside and out. with canopy. 4.9- 6 cylinder. asking $2,395 541-416-0569

Ford F250 1983, tow Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., 2 tops, consider trade, 541-593-4437.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

COSTCO HWY 20

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F6 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY DANIEL UPDEGRAFF AND KAREN UPDEGRAFF, husband and wife, Plaintiffs, VS. SYLVIA JACOBSEN, NELS JACOBSEN, BILL JACOBSEN, CHERYL JACOBSEN, CONNIE BERGER, SHIRLEY OSBORNE HERNANDEZ, BETTY KASEWETER, RICK KASEWETER, PEGGY KASEWETER, GLEN JACOBSON, EMMETT JACOBSEN, NONA JACOBSEN, MARGARET JACOBSON LEE, DENNIS HYDE, ALVIN HYDE, IKE JACOBSEN, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, Defendants. No. 06CV0044ST SUMMONS To: SHIRLEY OSBORNE HERNANDEZ, GLEN JACOBSON, and ALL OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN The amended complaint on file herein seeks to establish that the plaintiffs herein are the sole owners of the real property described in the complaint. The complaint requires that if any defendant claims some right, title, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint, to file with the court a document setting forth what right, title, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint person claims. The relief the plaintiffs demand is that no one aside from themselves have any right, title, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint You are hereby required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above entitled action within thirty (30) days from the date of first publication of this summons, which is and in case of you failure to do so, for want thereof, Plaintiff shall apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in this case or the other side shall win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer”. The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days from the date of first publication, which is, along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service upon the plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 1/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,842.26 Monthly Late Charge $73.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $265,036.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from 12/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/10/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Marvell L. Carmouche Signature ByAuthorized Signatory ASAP# 3565638 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010

Michael Henderson OSB#69075 Attorney for Plaintiffs 360 NW Vermont Pl., Suite 10 Bend, Or 97701 LEGAL NOTICE On July 16, 2010, WatchTV, Inc. filed applications with the FCC for construction permits for new digital companion low power TV stations to serve Bend on Channels 16 and 17, each with 15 kW ERP, transmitting from 62700 Awbrey Road, Bend, Oregon not rebroadcasting any other station. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602393020 T.S. No.: OR-217217-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DANNY RAY PARSLEY, ALSO KNOWN AS DANNY R. PARSLEY as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MULTI-STATE HOME LENDING, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/15/2009, recorded 7/27/2009, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2009-31803 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 165789 / 151320 AA 02202 That portion of the Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast of Section 20. Township 15 South. Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschures County, Oregon, described as follows:Beginning at a point South 00'23'48' East, 422 feet and North 89'02'48' East, 30 feet from the Northwest corner of said Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter thence North 89'02'48 East, 230.00 feet; thence South 00'23'48 East, 100.98 feet; thence South 89'12'49' West, 230.00 feet, thence North 00'23'48' West, 100.31 feet to the point of beginning.EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion dedicated to the City of Redmond by Deed of Dedication recorded August 30, 1999, in Book 1999, Page 42230. Official Records.Commonly known as: 1850 SW 23RD STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756-8822 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $265,036.43; plus accrued

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0428193023 T.S. No.: OR-217166-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KENNETH L. SCHILLING, JR. as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/17/2006, recorded 4/24/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-27843 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 20-10-12-AO-02800 117285 LOT 28 IN BLOCK 22 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 56765 SOLAR DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $154,243.25; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $876.71 Monthly Late Charge $33.33 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,243.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.5% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI

TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/12/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3568507 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429452568 T.S. No.: OR-203207-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KENNETH ALLISON and MARCI D. ALLISON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 6/30/2006, recorded 7/5/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-46117 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251278 LOT THIRTEEN (13), BEAR CREEK ESTATES P.U.D. RECORDED JANUARY 25, 2006 IN CABINET G, PAGE 1027, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL 4 OF BEAR CREEK VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM STAGE 1, RECORDED AUGUST 10, 2001 IN CABINET E, PAGE 682, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 182 NORTHEAST TELIMA LANE BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $329,768.95; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,451.83 Monthly Late Charge $108.20 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $329,768.95 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.875% per annum from 2/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/21/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Donna Fitton Signature ByAuthorized Signatory ASAP# 3566255 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0470018698 T.S. No.: OR-217102-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GARETT J. FLOYD AND KRISTIN FLOYD, AS TENANTS BY THEIR ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 8/15/2006, recorded 9/1/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-60171 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133292 LOT 6 IN BLOCK 1 OF GLACIER VIEW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20536 SNOW CAP PLACE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $337,036.23; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,481.09 Monthly Late Charge $110.61 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $337,036.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all

trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/1/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Marvell L. Carmouche Signature ByAuthorized Signatory ASAP# 3566475 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0178757506 T.S. No.: OR-217214-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PHILLIP C. WHITE AND ADRIAN J. WHITE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 6/26/2007, recorded 6/29/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-36451 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 249664 LOT 27 OF VISTA MEADOWS, PHASE 2, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1595 NW TEAKWOOD LANE REDMOND, OREGON 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice

has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $251,960.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,679.11 Monthly Late Charge $70.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $251,960.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/1/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3567117 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-97178

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0044284156 T.S. No.: WC-245384-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, FLORENCE B. WATERS, A MARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 10/31/2006, recorded 11/6/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-73523 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 145191 / 240499 ALL THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES STATE OF OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 5 OF WILD HORSE RIDGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 69131 BAY DR. SISTERS, Oregon 97759-9663 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $820,358.89; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/15/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,070.98 Monthly Late Charge $153.55 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $820,358.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.03% per annum from 2/15/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3570720 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0180130809 T.S. No.: OR-234753-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JUDY A. VAN HULZEN, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 10/23/2007, recorded 10/29/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-57181 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 149902 LOT FIFTEEN (15), BLOCK TWENTY-THREE (23), ROMAINE VILLAGE UNIT 9, RECORDED JANUARY 19, 1978, IN CABINET B, PAGE 317, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19640 GUNWOOD LANE BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $89,787.92; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $734.81 Monthly Late Charge $22.49 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $89,787.92 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 4/1/2009 until

paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 4/30/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3553352 07/02/2010, 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0264 T.S. No.: 1287999-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRUCE H. BERROTH, AND JILL A. BERROTH, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE INS. CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 3/6/2007, recorded 3/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-15219, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2007-HE6. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-THREE, BLOCK TWENTY-NINE, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 17384 KINGFISHER DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2009 5 payments at $ 1,676.58 each $ 8,382.90 9 payments at $ 1,509.49 each $ 13,585.41 (06-01-09 through 07-06-10) Late Charges: $ 1,022.86 Beneficiary Advances: $ -1,483.99 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 21,507.18 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $272,800.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.375% per annum from 05/01/09 to 11/1/2009, 7.375% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 5, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 7/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ken Venting and Randi Venting, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 28, 2005, recorded September 29, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-66146 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 38 of Arrowhead Phases I, II, III & IV City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2868 NE Sedalia Loop Bend OR 97701-9869. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 15, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $903.41 Monthly Late Charge $54.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $172,077.24 together with interest thereon at 6.300% per annum from October 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 09, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3640269 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

R-326698 07/23, 07/30, 08/06, 08/13


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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7401274626 T.S. No.: OR-247841-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TORREY W. SHARP AND TERESA J. SHARP, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS. COMP., A CALIFORNIA CORP., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/7/2006, recorded 10/13/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-68654 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206689 LOT EIGHT (8), SPRING MEADOW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 107 NORTH DARK HORSE LANE SISTERS, Oregon 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $159,955.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,128.04 Monthly Late Charge $44.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $159,955.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/14/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3571753 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031085251 T.S. No.: 10-08899-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TAALOLO PAU JR. as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on April 13, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-25309 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 199366 LOT SEVENTY, NI-LAH-SHA-PHASE 2 AND 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 524 NE APACHE CIRCLE, REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,111.55 Monthly Late Charge $55.58 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 190,551.58 together with

interest thereon at the rate of 7.00000 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on November 4, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 9, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3647871 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0021694096 T.S. No.: 10-09601-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KENNETH P. ALDRICH AND TIFFANY ALDRICH, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO, as trustee, in favor of AMERICAN HERITAGE LENDING, as Beneficiary, recorded on May 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-36487 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17 14 29 00 01500 LOT TWENTY-FOUR (24), BEND CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, TRACT 2, UNIT 2, RECORDED FEBRUARY 11, 1963, IN CABINET A, PAGE 99, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 62770 JUNIPER RD., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,894.10 Monthly Late Charge $134.71 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $348,289.72 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.22500 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on November 3, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 9, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3647884 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441850708 T.S. No.: OR-247880-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ALI KING as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC , as Beneficiary, dated 8/4/2006, recorded 8/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-55213 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 208253 LOT 9, CHESTNUT PARK, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20316 SHETLAND LOOP BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $184,943.16; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,136.63 Monthly Late Charge $56.83 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $184,943.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/7/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/17/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3574000 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/4/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3558014 07/02/2010, 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010

plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,009.32 Monthly Late Charge $80.37 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $264,622.64 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/20/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 4/30/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3553383 07/02/2010, 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441980836 T.S. No.: OR-157890-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JERONIMO NUNEZ AGUIRRE and JUANA NUNEZ RICO, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR OWNIT MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/26/2006, recorded 8/4/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-53543 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 179486 LOT FOURTEEN (14), BLOCK SIX (6), HAYDEN VILLAGE, PHASE II, RECORDED MARCH 15, 1991, IN C-526, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1849 SW 31ST STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $174,377.44; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 12/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,263.11 Monthly Late Charge $59.28 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $174,377.44 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from 11/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/15/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Des-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0186798203 T.S. No.: OR-247095-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHERYL WHITE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 8/15/2008, recorded 8/20/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-34695 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241182 LOT FIVE (5), SISTERS PARK PLACE, RECORDED OCTOBER 7, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 57, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 327 EAST BLACK BUTTE AVENUE SISTERS, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $264,622.64; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments,

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx4372 T.S. No.: 1280614-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7439212630 T.S. No.: OR-247620-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVID MADRIGAL AND KATHY MADRIGAL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC , as Beneficiary, dated 2/18/2005, recorded 2/28/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-11629 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 171570 PARCEL 1 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. PP2000-57 FILED OCTOBER 23, 2000 AND BEGIN LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 61022 SKY HARBOR DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $359,250.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,496.00 Monthly Late Charge $39.29 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $359,250.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not

then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3570593 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0640122510 T.S. No.: OR-229573-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHRISTOPHER JON ULDRICKS and CATHERINE L. ULDRICKS, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GATEWAY BUSINESS BANK, DBA MISSION HILLS MORTGAGE BANKERS, as Beneficiary, dated 8/19/2008, recorded 8/22/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-34950 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 194503 Lot Forty-Five (45), Awbrey Village Phase I, recorded December 9, 1997, in Cabinet D, Page 541, Deschutes County, Oregon, Except that portion of Lot 65 described as follows: Beginning at the Easterly corner common to Lots 44 and 45, Awbrey Village Phase 1, as shown on that plat on file with the Deschutes County Surveyor as CS 13133, said corner being on the Westerly right of way of Craftsman Drive, thence South 56º05'49" West, 122.79 feet to the East line of Lot 77 of said Awbrey Village Phase 1; thence along said East line South 33º55'54" East, 3.90 feet; thence leaving said East line North 54º41'51" East, 122.83 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 3093 NW CRAFTSMAN DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: U npaid principal balance of $356,602.19; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,941.15 Monthly Late Charge $121.01 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and

payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $356,602.19 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 6/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/10/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 4/30/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton, Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3614870 07/02/2010, 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2267 T.S. No.: 1287076-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Christopher J. Plachta, and Cathleen M. Plachta, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 07, 2006, recorded April 24, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-27809 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11, in block 1 of Providence Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3063 NE Waverly Ct. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,784.37 Monthly Late Charge $76.35. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $228,758.38 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Radames A. Jimenez and Heidi L. Jimenez, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 02, 2006, recorded August 08, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-54267 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot ten, (10) in block seven (7) of Squaw Creek Canyon Recreational Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 70075 Sorrell Dr. Sisters OR 97759-9864. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 15, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,256.01 Monthly Late Charge $95.72. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $525,083.91 together with interest thereon at 6.790% per annum from April 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 28, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-322664 07/02/10, 07/09, 07/16, 07/23

R-326022 07/23, 07/30, 08/06, 08/13


F8 Friday, July 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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struing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/25/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3586386 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010, 08/13/2010

culine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/14/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3571689 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010

cessors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/4/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3558339 07/02/2010, 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359339933 T.S. No.: OR-225062-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KALIN AYHAN, A SINGLE MAN AND MARILYN SLY, A SINGLE WOMAN, IN JOINT TENANCY as Grantor to ESTHER SANTOS, as trustee, in favor of BANKUNITED, FSB, as Beneficiary, dated 7/11/2006, recorded 7/17/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-48882 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 164168 LOT TWENTY (20), BLOCK THREE (3), CREST RIDGE ESTATES, RECORDED DECEMBER 23, 1980, IN CABINET B, PAGE 791, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 6955 NW LARCH COURT REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $695,595.79; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,122.45 Monthly Late Charge $106.12 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $695,595.79 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5% per annum from 4/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/23/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3568853 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441714516 T.S. No.: OR-248819-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEFFREY A. MADDOX AND NANCY JO MADDOX as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 6/21/2006, recorded 6/27/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-44155 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 105448 THE NORTH HALF (N 1/2) OF LOTS 7 AND 8 IN BLOCK 44 OF CENTER ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF VACATED SEVENTH STREET WHICH INURED TO SAID LOTS BY ORDINANCE NO. NS-1590, RECORDED MAY 5, 1993 IN BOOK 297, PAGE 2262 OF DESCHUTES COUNTY OFFICIAL RECORDS. Commonly known as: 855 NE 7TH STREET BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the

obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $228,258.24; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,833.13 Monthly Late Charge $79.83 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $228,258.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/14/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/24/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3583749 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010, 08/13/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601666784 T.S. No.: OR-217139-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RAYMOND BLEVINS AND CARRIE J. BLEVINS, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRELY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/16/2006, recorded 6/26/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-43878 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209074 LOT 41, FAIRHAVEN, PHASE V, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 353 NORTHWEST 23RD STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $241,934.19; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,310.48 Monthly Late Charge $65.52 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $241,934.19 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/1/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front

entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Marvell L. Carmouche Signature ByAuthorized Signatory ASAP# 3567429 07/09/2010, 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0593998206 T.S. No.: OR-239568-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CRAIG A. HORRELL AND LAURA M. HORRELL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/24/2006, recorded 4/28/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-29475 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 205257 LOT THIRTEEN (13), TASMAN RISE, PHASE I AND II, RECORDED JANUARY 15, 2002, IN CABINET F. PAGE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3401 NE WILD RIVERS LOOP BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $344,770.83; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,621.68 Monthly Late Charge $112.29 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $344,770.83 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 9/28/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default

occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/17/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3574451 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0026898783 T.S. No.: WC-244697-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, HERBERT MANOR, AN UNMARRIED MAN, AND BARBARA P. GORDON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 8/26/2004, recorded 8/27/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-51803 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206933 LOT 18, DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING - PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19812 DECOY COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $162,393.59; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 1/15/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,085.02 Monthly Late Charge $34.12 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $162,393.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.6% per annum from 12/15/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/15/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In con-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0473737823 T.S. No.: OR-217490-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LISA A. LITTLETON as Grantor to DESCHUTES TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) , as Beneficiary, dated 4/25/2007, recorded 5/4/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-25664 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 183760 LOT SIXTY-FIVE, EASTBROOK ESTATES PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1961 NORTHEAST WINDY TREE COURT BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $179,859.41; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,184.91 Monthly Late Charge $48.71 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $179,859.41 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the mas-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441976644 T.S. No.: OR-162283-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DANIEL CASTRO, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR OWNIT MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 8/15/2006, recorded 8/24/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-58051 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: R1-001 171226 CD 00700;183608 LOT SIXTY-TWO (62), TIMBERLINE, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1912 NE PROVIDENCE DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $221,513.54; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,503.46 Monthly Late Charge $75.17 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $221,513.54 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.875% per annum from 4/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 9/15/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective suc-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7435878467 T.S. No.: OR-215841-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL P. ANDRAKIN, AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO. , A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION , as Beneficiary, dated 2/21/2003, recorded 3/17/2003, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2003-17485 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 205638 / 171136BD01500 LOT SIXTY (60) , NORTHWEST CROSSING, PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1247 NORTHWEST FORT CLATSOP STREET BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $199,011.53; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,684.50 Monthly Late Charge $68.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $199,011.53 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/11/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest ac-

quired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/19/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3578106 07/16/2010, 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441802329 T.S. No.: OR-248818-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, NORMAN W. MOORE JR. AND DEANNA M. MOORE, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MERITAGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 7/14/2006, recorded 7/20/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-49790 RE-RECORDED 2/5/2007 AS INSTRUMENT #2007-7356 TO ADD ARM RIDER (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 181138 LOT EIGHT (8), BLOCK FOUR (4), PROVIDENCE PHASE 3, RECORDED MARCH 18, 1992, IN CABINET C, PAGE 626, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1170 NORTHEAST PROVIDENCE DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $298,045.49; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 3/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent

installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,296.39 Monthly Late Charge $102.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $298,045.49 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from 2/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/14/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/24/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3583734 07/23/2010, 07/30/2010, 08/06/2010, 08/13/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8081 T.S. No.: 1287872-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David M. Estopare and Tamela J. Estopare, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 27, 2007, recorded January 09, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-01091 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE 1/4SE1/4) of Section Twenty-three (23), Township Sixteen (16) South, Range Eleven (11), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, which is described as follows: Commencing at the East Quarter corner of said Section 23; thence South 57°24'28" West, 225.87 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 17°37'02" East, 626.60 feet; thence South 00°03'09" West, 601.06 feet; thence South 89°53'10" West, 200.00 feet; thence North 00°03'09" East, 600.86 feet; thence South 89°53'10" West, 283.27 feet; thence North 08°19'01" East, 206.77 feet; thence North 64°21'21" East, 49.77 feet; thence North 31°01'22" East, 212.49 feet; thence North 35°15'37" East, 157.36 feet; thence North 08°36'17" East, 57.15 feet; thence North 62°38'48' East, 11.19 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 65365 Concorde Ln. Bend OR 97701-8160. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay escrow advance when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,962.46 Monthly Late Charge $127.04. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $559,436.31 together with interest thereon at 7.350% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 09, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-326011 07/23, 07/30, 08/06, 08/13


EVENTS: High Desert Classic is back in town, PAGE 11

GAMING: MOVIES: A review of ‘NCAA ‘Ramona and Beezus’ Football 11,’ PAGE 25 and two others open, PAGE 26

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN JULY 23, 2010

Dig roots music? This week has a lot to offer, PAGES 3-7


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Eleanor Pierce, 541-617-7828 epierce@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a Web site, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

inside

Cover photo illustration by Althea Borck / The Bulletin Photo courtesy www.flickr.com/aaronescobar

MUSIC • 3

FINE ARTS • 12

OUT OF TOWN • 22

• COVER STORY: Roots music hits Central Oregon, including: • Hillstomp • Los Lonely Boys • Leon Russell • Dusty Rhodes & The River Band • Great American Taxi • Moonalice • Mystic Roots • Neal McCoy • Joe Diffie • West Wind Ranch Americana Festival • The Pines • Orgone • Phil Stacey plans concert • NightSounds brings singer-songwriters to stage • MadHappy Lounge has opening party

• Young artist shows at PoetHouse • Plein air painting planned for Saturday • School stages “Coppélia” ballet • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• Portland hosts rooftop movies • A guide to out of town events

AREA 97 CLUBS • 9

CALENDAR • 16

GAMING • 25 • Review of “NCAA Football 11” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 26

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

• Guide to area clubs

• A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 10

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• “Salt,” “Ramona and Beezus” and “Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work” open in Central Oregon • “Cop Out,” “The Losers,” “Mother,” “The Runaways,” “A Town Called Panic” and “Prodigal Sons” are out on DVD and Blu-ray • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

541-382-1811

• Take a look at recent releases

EVENTS • 11 • High Desert Classic horse shows continue

• Make your plans for later on • Talks and classes listing

RESTAURANTS • 20 • A review of The Original Kayo’s

HOOKER CREEK EVENT CENTER

FREE CONCERTS Neal McCoy

Joe Diffie

Styx

DANCING WIT

H THE STE

ERS!

Weird Al Yankovic

7pm Wednesday, July 28

7pm Thursday, July 29

7pm Friday, July 30

7pm Saturday, July 31

Free with ticket from 99.7!

Free with ticket from 99.7!

Free with ticket from 98.3!

Listen to The Mountain for details. Fair admission not included.

Listen to The Mountain for details. Fair admission not included.

Listen to The Twins for details. Fair admission not included.

Free with ticket from 98.3! Listen to The Twins for details. Fair admission not included.

ENJOY THE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR • JULY 28 THRU AUGUST 1


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

PAGE 3

music Photo illustrations by Althea Borck / The Bulletin; courtesy www.flickr.com/aaronescobar

The roots of it all Without question, rock ’n’ roll’s family tree is vast and varied, wel-

This week, local music fans have a slew of opportunities to explore

coming all kinds under its shady canopy. The bigger the tree, the

those roots, as rock bands from all across the spectrum roll through

healthier the roots, and rock’s roots run deep, reaching back many

Central Oregon. Can you dig it?

generations to country, blues, gospel and beyond.

LOS LONELY BOYS

— Ben Salmon

HILLSTOMP

Courtesy Candise Kola

T

Submitted photo

T

he Texas-based blues-rock trio Los Lonely Boys burst onto the national scene in 2004 with “Heaven,” a vibrant rockabye tune that signaled a promising new voice in American music, one without the lily-white lineage of so many of our hitmakers. On the heels of that big hit, the boys — three brothers: Henry, Jojo and Ringo Garza — seemed poised to follow in the footsteps of their forefathers, whether you call them Latino, Chicano, Tex-Mex, or whatever. Ritchie Valens blazed trails, Carlos Santana and Los Lobos paved the way, and Los Lonely Boys had the look and the chops to go a long way. While the brothers haven’t exactly retreated in the years since, they’ve hardly taken chances or pushed themselves. The Garzas are preternaturally skilled at their chosen style; they can probably whip up a crunchy groove and some sizzling guitar licks in their sleep. But many of their songs have an inoffensive, antiseptic sheen that sounds like a

band playing it safe. Who knows what the future holds? With a band this talented, anything is possible, and Los Lonely Boys is working on its fourth album, which was recently delayed while Jojo Garza rested his damaged vocal cords. Which leaves us with the guys’ most recent release, last year’s “1969” EP, which features covers of Santana, the Beatles, The Doors and Buddy Holly. The band touts the EP as a tribute to the generation that “walked the moon and transcended Woodstock.” Which is all fine and good. But it makes you long for these three post-Gen-Xers to quit looking back and start moving forward. Los Lonely Boys, with Mosley Wotta; 6:30 p.m. Saturday, doors open 5:30 p.m.; $16 (general admission), available at Newport Market (541-382-3940), $57 (dinner tickets), available at the venue; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; 541-385-3062 or www.athleticclubofbend.com. — Ben Salmon

he new album from Bend’s fave Portland-based junk-blues duo, Hillstomp, peers “into the darker corners of the band’s psyche,” according to the literature that came with “Darker the Night,” out now on In Music We Trust Records. If you’ve been to one of Hillstomp’s handful of local shows over the past few years, all sweaty and frenetic and fun, you may be wondering whether a peek into its psyche is what you want from this band. Sometimes you just wanna get clubbed in the head with pitiless punk-blues till you’re blind, right? Don’t worry, Hillstomp fans: “Darker the Night” is more polished than the duo’s earlier recorded work, but it retains most of the energy for which guitarist Henry Kammerer and drummer John Johnson are known. The key words there are “most of,” because as long as Hillstomp records, it will be nigh on impossible to capture the ferocity that is their live show. The rest of the band’s hallmarks are here, though. Deep, dark trance-blues from Mississippi’s hill country, hillbilly pickin’ straight from the front porch, and punk frenzy befitting the basement in which Kammerer and Johnson concocted their brew. The difference on “Darker” is you get a dose of the duo’s songwriting skill and sense of subtlety. Who knew? Note: This must be the first piece written about Hillstomp that doesn’t mention Johnson’s drum kit made of buckets and lids and cans and duct tape. Oops. I guess I just did. Hillstomp, with The Dela Project; 9 tonight; $8; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989. — Ben Salmon


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

roots of music: rock

Courtesy www.flickr.com/50826080@N00

DUSTY RHODES & THE RIVER BAND

LEON RUSSELL

Courtesy Julian Konwinski

Y Submitted photo

D

usty Rhodes & The River Band just sounds like a band that should be from somewhere in the sweaty, small-town deep South, perhaps formed by friends who ditched out of church choir, or among dorm-mates at some Southeastern Conference school. Both their name and their sound sounds like that. Turns out Dusty Rhodes & The River Band actually are from the endless civilization known as Anaheim, Calif., but they’ve soaked in the right stuff somewhere, because their songs are enormously fun smash-ups of rock, fun, soul, pop and fun. Also, more fun. Dusty’s crew is one part Arcade Fire, one part Kings of Leon, one part ‘60s throwback (a la The Band or the Stones), and one part singalong gospel revival. That’s four parts of awesome that’ll melt your steely cool exterior and draw you in

like a rock ’n’ roll band should. It’s also that kind of stylistic diversity that helped Dusty and his band clean up at March’s Orange County Music Awards, where they won not only Best Live Band, but Best Country/Americana band and Best Rock band. “It’s just straight up good music,” drummer Eric Chirco said in an article on the Fender guitar website. “I think it’s for anybody who likes different styles of music. … We might play in front of a total punker crowd or an older hippy crowd and I think they all see our show and leave thinking, ‘Wow, that was good music.’” Dusty Rhodes & The River Band; 9 p.m. Sunday; $5; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com. — Ben Salmon

ou have to have a pretty weighty resume to even think of beginning your official bio with this sentence: “Leon Russell is a music legend and perhaps the most accomplished and versatile musician in the history of rock ’n’ roll.” But it ain’t bragging if you can back it up. And the truth is, I could fill this entire space just name-dropping for the keyboardist, guitarist and songwriter from Oklahoma. Like Leon Russell needs me to tell you he toured with Jerry Lee Lewis just out of high school, or that he became one of L.A.’s most in-demand session players shortly thereafter. Or that his self-titled solo album featured a couple of Beatles, a couple of Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton, to name a few.

Or that his songs (“A Song For You,” “This Masquerade,” “Tight Rope”) have been recorded by everyone from Ray Charles and B.B. King to The Carpenters. Or that he led Joe Cocker’s band on a world tour, and earned a Grammy playing bluegrass with banjo godfather Earl Scruggs. Or that, at age 68, he still puts out records on his own label, and he still tours all the time, playing for folks who know what a treat it is to see a man whose name may not be as household as some of his contemporaries, but who has seen and done so much. Leon Russell; 8 p.m. Tuesday; $30 or $35, available through the Tower; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. — Ben Salmon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

roots of music: jam

G R E A T AMERICAN TAXI

G

reat American Taxi has all the trappings of a jam band. They’re from Colorado. They’re led by Vince Herman, famed founding member of Leftover Salmon. They have an unwieldy band name. And they do jam. But I saw Great American Taxi play Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom in Bend a couple years ago, and I was struck by the lean, efficient nature of this so-called jam band. Instead of interminable, Deadinspired noodling and ceaseless soloing, Herman’s Taxi is mostly a muscular country-rock outfit capable of reaching into the worlds of blues, bluegrass, gospel and Southern funk with impressive ease. This is no surprise; Herman assembled a band of his local scene’s all-stars for a one-off gig in 2005, and the Taxi has been rolling along ever since, slaying

Submitted photo

any genre that strikes its fancy. What is surprising is how tightly packed their tunes are, at least until the end of the night, when the beverages are really flowing and the songs open up into, yes, traditional jam-band territory. And they’re darned good at

that, too. Great American Taxi; 2:30 p.m. Sunday, gates open at 1 p.m.; free; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383 or www .bendconcerts.com. — Ben Salmon

MOONALICE

A

few things have changed in the Moonalice camp since last time the jamhappy, Bay Area-based rock ’n’ roll tribe was in Bend. First and foremost, their most recognizable face — former Saturday Night Live bandleader G.E. Smith — has left the band amicably, according to Moonalice principal Roger McNamee. Also gone, at least for now, is Jack Casady, arguably the greatest rock bassist in the world. That kind of high-profile talent was always possible for Moonalice thanks to the Silicon Valley riches of McNamee, a successful venture capitalist by day and aspiring musician by night. And McNamee is still interested, which means the Moonalice machine moves on, with skilled players like Barry Sless (Phil Lesh, David Nelson Band), John Molo (Bruce Hornsby) and Pete Sears (Rod Stewart, Jefferson Airplane) on board. It also means McNamee is still trying a new model with Moonalice, eschewing traditional means of operating his band and instead giving away tons of music via Twitter and Facebook. In

Submitted photo

fact, Moonalice is working on a new album, “Free,” to be released “only on the web and only for free.” The first single, “It’s 4:20 Somewhere,” has been downloaded more than 400,000 times. In that same spirit, everyone who pays to get into Moonalice’s

show tonight in Bend gets a free poster specific to the gig. Moonalice; 9 tonight, doors open 8 p.m.; $7; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com. — Ben Salmon

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PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

roots of music: twang

Courtesy www.flickr.com/anyalogic

WEST WIND RANCH AMERICANA MUSIC FESTIVAL

THE PINES

Courtesy Darin Back

S

THE RIVER PIGS Submitted photo

I

don’t know if it’s the economy causing people to be resourceful or what, but it seems like some of the best music-focused parties in Central Oregon recently have been the result of a few folks setting up some instruments in a field and letting ‘er rip. Take this weekend’s two-day Americana Music Festival, for example. On the West Wind Ranch right between Bend and Sisters, a whole bunch of bands that loosely fall under the Americana umbrella will jam tonight and all day tomorrow. There are no big sponsor banners or beer companies sticking their sticker on everything. Just good music, food and drinks, a full moon, room to dance and a hand-drawn flyer pointing the way.

Tonight, the lineup includes Leif James, The River Pigs, Mosley Wotta and some moonlight jams. Saturday’s lineup features the Pigs and James again, plus The Anvil Blasters, Big Pine & The Pitchtones, Brent Alan, the Wise Guise, The Prairie Rockets and students from Bend’s String Theory Music. There’s also free camping on Friday and Saturday nights, and free workshops with local legend Scott Foxx. Good times! West Wind Ranch Americana Music Festival; 5-10 tonight, noon-10 p.m. Saturday; $15 for one or both days, free for kids younger than 12; West Wind Ranch, 66280 Jericho Road, Bend; 541-480-0897 or nina.hahler@gmail.com. — Ben Salmon

ometimes, it seems the only roots-music bands that roll through Bend are those that infuse folksy songs and instrumentation with punk-rock energy and bluster. I’m not saying that’s truly the way it is. I’m just saying, there are a lot of acts doing the hillbilly whirlwind thing right now. And that’s cool. But it takes a very different kind of skill to show restraint, to relax and ride a melancholy groove into the dusk. The Pines have that skill. They’re a couple of native Iowans who met in a Mexican barrio in Arizona and now call Minneapolis home, and you can hear those travels in their sound; David Huckfelt and Benson Ramsey make music with a Midwestern sense of ease, the sparseness of the Southwest, and a DIY ethos that must fit nicely in the Twin Cities’ vaunted indie scene. The Pines have three albums

out, stuffed with songs that evoke a murkier Bob Dylan fronting a slightly less spicy Calexico. There are flecks of blues that flicker throughout, and the melodies and vocals Huckfelt and Ramsey glide along, unhurried, honeyed and haunting. Their hometown daily paper called it “starkly poetic, buzzed-about Americana,” and their hometown alt-weekly put them on the cover of their issue dedicated to the best local albums of 2009. City Pages called The Pines’ “Tremolo” a “delicately arranged and timeless” work. If that’s not convincing enough, consider that Ramsey is the son of Bo Ramsey, longtime collaborator with Bend fave Greg Brown. Or visit www.thepinesmusic.com and immerse yourself. The Pines; 9 p.m. Wednesday; $5; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. — Ben Salmon

NEAL MCCOY AND JOE DIFFIE at the Deschutes County Fair

T

he county fair circuit is home to many stars from country music’s earlier eras, and while Neal McCoy, pictured at right, and Joe Diffie, left, are still out there singing twangy songs with punny lyrics about love, loss and life, there’s no question their golden years were the early 1990s. That’s when Diffie ruled the charts with hits like “John Deere Green,” “Third Rock from the Sun” and “Pickup Man,” and McCoy did the same with “No Doubt About It” and “Wink,”

among others. Both men will play shows at the Deschutes County Fair next week, with McCoy on Wednesday and Diffie on Thursday. Both shows are at 7 p.m., and tickets are free after you pay admission to the fair. Listen to “The Mountain” radio station at 99.7 FM to get tickets. They’ll be giving them away. For more on the fair, visit www .expo.deschutes.org. — Ben Salmon

Submitted photos


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

PAGE 7

roots of music: reggae and funk

MYSTIC ROOTS

ORGONE

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W

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P

erhaps this is the true essence behind the success of Bend’s Munch & Music series: By Thursday evening, it seems, folks in this outdoorsy, culture-friendly town are ready to be done with the work week, descend upon Drake Park, and dance until their cares melt away, at least for a few hours. Every time I’m at Munch & Music, that area in front of the stage is shoulder-to-shoulder with revelers, seemingly lost in the sound. Even when the music isn’t particularly danceable, they are there. What’s it going to be like on Thursday, when a real, locktight, dance-worthy band is out there playing? I suspect that once Orgone takes the stage next week, all of Drake Park will transform into a boogie-down production the likes of which Munch & Music has never seen. That’s how au-

thoritatively funky this crew is. The core of the Los Angelesbased band is a rhythm section sharpened by more than a decade of playing together, and the rest of the group surrounds that groove with a dizzying take on funk, soul, hip-hop and Afrobeat that sounds both convincingly vintage and undeniably modern. The gritty production lends the music a nice, urban vibe, and the three-piece horn section will light up your ears with vibrant color. Then there’s vocalist Fanny Franklin, who XLR8R maga-

zine said “fits in very nicely between Sharon Jones and Amy Winehouse.” From The Meters and Funkadelic to the Dap-Kings and The Greyboy Allstars … you pick the era, and Orgone belongs. Head on over to www.orgonespace. com to see for yourself. Orgone at Munch & Music; 5:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday; free; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.munchandmusic.com. — Ben Salmon

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

hat can you say about the Mystic Roots crew that’ll return to Bend’s top reggae haunt, The Summit Saloon & Stage, tonight? The band is a true grass-roots success story, with emphasis on the “grass” … well, and the “roots.” Formed by college buddies in Chico, Calif., Mystic Roots spent 10 years spreading their message — unity, love, positivity — to the West’s endless sea of people who love to party in the name of unity, love and positivity before things really began to happen for them on a bigger scale. Since the mid-2000s, the band has been the subject of a television show on the The Learning Channel, toured across the United States, and traveled with reggae legend

Pato Banton as his official backing band. Everywhere they’ve been, they’ve found new fans of their head-nodding hybrid of roots reggae, hip-hop, dub and funk. Now based in San Diego, Mystic Roots is preparing to release their new album, “CaliHI,” later this year. On their website, they call it “long-anticipated,” and considering it’s only their second full-length album in 14 years as a band, that’s probably true, at least among Mystic Roots’ sizable and spirited fan base. Mystic Roots, with Monk, Marko, MC Mystic and K-Boy; 9:30 tonight, doors open 8:30 p.m.; $8; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; www.randompresents .com. — Ben Salmon

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010

music Upcoming Concerts J uly 3 0 — Styx (rock), D e s c h u t e s C o u n t y F a ir & E x p o C e n t e r, R e d m o n d , 5 4 1- 5 4 8 - 2 7 1 1 or w w w. e x p o. d e s c h u te s. o r g. J u l y 3 1 — The Congress (Americana), S il v e r M o o n B re win g & T a p r o o m, B e n d, 5 4 1- 3 8 3 - 8 3 3 1 or w w w. s il v e r m o o n b r e w i n g . c o m . J u l y 3 1 — “Weird Al” Yankovic (pop satire), D e s c h u t e s C o u n t y F a ir & E x p o C e n t e r, R e d m o n d, 5 4 1- 5 4 8 - 2 7 1 1 o r w w w .e x p o . d e s c h u te s. o r g . A u g . 1 — Stolen Sweets (swing-jazz), L e s S c h w a b A m p h it h e a t e r, B e n d , 5 4 1- 3 2 2- 9 3 8 3 or w w w. b e n d c o n c e rt s . c o m . A u g . 3 - 5 — Town Mountain (bluegrass), M c M e n a m i n s O l d S t. F r a n c i s S c h o o l, 5 4 1- 3 8 2- 5 1 7 4 or w w w. m c m e n a m i n s.c o m . A u g . 4 — Keegan Smith and The Fam (blues-rock), M e a d o w s G o lf C o u r s e , S u n ri v e r, 5 4 1 - 5 9 3 - 1 0 0 0 o r w w w . s u n ri v e r - r e s o r t. c o m . A u g . 5 — Michael Franti & Spearhead (reggae/pop/rock), L e s S c h w a b A m p h it h e a t e r, B e n d, 5 4 1- 3 2 2 - 9 3 8 3 o r w w w . b e n d c o n c e rt s . c o m . A u g . 5 — Dar Williams (folk), T o w e r T h e a t r e , B e n d, 5 4 1- 3 1 7- 0 7 0 0 o r w w w .t o w e r t h e a t r e . o r g .

Ex-‘Idol’ Phil Stacey comes to Bend I have a co-worker who used to watch “American Idol” pretty closely. And when I heard that Phil Stacey was coming to play a show in Bend, I told her. And she couldn’t remember who Phil Stacey was. Even after I described him: Military man. Missed the birth of his child to audition for “Idol.” Bald. So, Stacey may not be the most memorable personality ever to survive the “Idol” machine. And he may not be the most talented. But he did seem like a nice guy (if television is to be believed), and he does have a monster voice, which helped him reach the Top 5 on the sixth season of the most watched TV show on the planet. That’s not so bad. (His big mistake was singing Bon Jovi’s “Blaze of Glory.” How can America not eliminate someone who sings “I’m going out in a blaze of glory!”? Or, for that matter, someone who sings a Bon Jovi song?) Stacey’s big voice has also helped him transition into a successful post-“Idol” career singing soaring, earnest Christian pop songs. He’ll perform those songs Tuesday at Bend’s Trinity Lutheran Church as part of Kim Schouw’s Concerts of Faith series, which brings free shows to Bend (though donations are accepted). Schouw’s next events:

Phil Stacey Submitted photo

Two nights with guitar virtuoso Phil Keaggy in September. Phil Stacey, with Michael Robert; 7 p.m. Tuesday; $10 suggested donation at the door; Trinity Lutheran School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-3232880, ext. 121.

NightSounds hosts three of Bend’s best The new Bend Performing Arts Center’s NightSounds at the PAC series has been gaining steam over the past few months, booking local artists to play what is, by all accounts, a terrific and intimate listening room. Tonight, NightSounds scores its biggest coup yet, as three of

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Central Oregon’s best young MadHappy holds singer-songwriters come togeth- grand reopening er for a night of excellent local music. I still see the question on FaceThe lineup features the bluesy book and Twitter, when someone sounds of Eric Tollefson, Reed mentions the MadHappy Lounge: Thomas Lawrence’s laid-back What the heck is that? And where pop and the gorgeous is it? folk of Erin Cole-Baker. These people should Also on the bill is Kaybe reading The Bulletin’s leb James. music blog, Frequency, If you’re open to local where we told the story music, you know what a of longtime Bendistillsweet slate that is. And if ery Martini Bar manyou’re one of those types ager Reggie Martinez, that turns your nose up who dreamed of ownat music made by folks Erin ing his own party spot who actually live here, Cole-Baker someday, and made that let down your guard and dream a reality a few give this show a try. I weeks back by purchasbet you’ll be impressed. ing the bar from BendisTollefson, Lawrence and tillery and renaming it Cole-Baker aren’t just the MadHappy Lounge. “good for Bend,” they Martinez made a few each have the chops to cosmetic and menu make it anywhere. changes, and the place If that’s not enough has been hosting conmotivation for you, this Eric Tollefson certs ever since. Tonight, will be one of Lawthough, he’ll hold his rence’s final shows in official grand re-openBend before he moves to ing, kicking off around Nashville later this sum9 p.m. mer, and he’s planning The flyer for the night on playing a bunch of is pretty classic. It