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Deschutes mulls renting beds to avoid overcrowding at county jail

WARM SPRINGS

Boom!

Gorge casino could face more delays Interior undersecretary to begin lengthy processing of tribal gaming applications

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Six weeks after voters turned down a $44 million jail expansion bond, Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton said he’s not dwelling on the bond’s defeat — but he’s still worried about what he’ll do if the county ends up with more inmates than jail beds. The average daily inmate population at the 228-bed jail has been steadily increasing this spring, and in some cases, the facility has come close to capacity. Over the first weekend of June, the population hit 216, and a week later, there were 227 inmates. In the lead-up to the election, Blanton warned that overcrowding could force him to return to a process known as “matrixing,” in which lower-risk inmates were released early to make way for new arrivals. Now, he said he plans to avoid that situation by renting additional jail beds in Jefferson County, and potentially in The Dalles. The Sheriff’s Office has set aside $228,000 in its 2010-11 fiscal year budget to rent additional beds at the Jefferson County jail. The agreement between the counties allows Deschutes to pay for the beds on an as-needed basis at a rate of $80 per day.

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — A memo urging the federal government to move ahead on American Indian gaming applications — such as the Cascade Locks casino proposed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs — might not be good news for the Gorge casino. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar directed Undersecretary Larry Echo Hawk to process tribal casino applications, in a memo released this week. While some Indian tribes called the announcement a victory, the order itself warned that there could be “some delay” in crafting a new policy toward off-reservation casino requests, like the Warm Springs proposal, while a top American Indian gaming expert warned that the memo makes few promises. For a tribe that is racing to move through the regulatory process this year, before Gov. Ted Kulongoski leaves office, that delay could be fatal for their casino hopes. See Casino / A5

Survey: 26% of Americans clueless about U.S. history

Dalles facility

By Valerie Strauss

Meanwhile, Blanton is working on a separate agreement with officials at Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facilities, or NORCOR, a regional jail in The Dalles that serves a four-county area. He said he’d only use beds at that facility if Jefferson County ran out of space or didn’t have the staffing to handle additional Deschutes County inmates. The Deschutes County jail had an average of 193 inmates per day in April, 203 in May and 206 in June. Lt. Tracy Jones said the actual capacity of the jail can fluctuate, based on the inmates. See Jail / A4

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A new poll gauging American knowledge on a basic question about the nation’s history — “From which country did the United States win its independence?” — is either good news or bad news, depending on your expectations: Twenty-six percent of those surveyed did not know that the United States achieved its independence from Great Britain, according to the poll, conducted by the nonprofit Marist Institute for Public Opinion. Six percent named a different country, including France, China, Japan, Mexico and Spain. Twenty percent said they weren’t sure.

Numbers by region

TOP NEWS INSIDE Ryan Brenencke / The Bulletin

SOLAR: Regulators stonewall on energy program, Page A3

Fireworks fill the sky over Pilot Butte and the Old Mill District during the Fourth of July celebration Sunday in Bend.

Mexican security minister can’t trust her own police

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The pollsters broke down the numbers and found gaps in knowledge according to region: 32 percent of Southerners weren’t sure or named the wrong country; 26 percent of Midwesterners were in the same category, as were 25 percent of Westerners and 16 percent of Northeasterners. More depressing results — depending on your expectations — were found in a 2007 poll conducted by the U.S. Mint. It showed that only 7 percent of those surveyed could name the first four presidents in order: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

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By Tracy Wilkinson Los Angeles Times

MORELIA, Mexico — As dozens of gunmen fired more than 2,700 deafening rounds of ammunition, Minerva Bautista crouched on the floor of her heavily armored SUV, screaming into her radio for backup and thinking one thing: “I know help will come.” But when the minister of security for Michoacan state heard the rounds begin to penetrate her car’s armor, sending pieces of metal into her back “like fiery sparks,” her faith faltered. And when one of her badly injured bodyguards asked her to take care of his family, she lost hope. “They didn’t just want to kill us,” she said later. “They want-

ed to destroy us.” A seemingly interminable 15 minutes after the attack began in a narrow highway pass that night in April, rescuers finally arrived. It was one of the most brazen assaults on a top state official in President Felipe Calderon’s nearly 4-year-old offensive against drug cartels. But there is an even darker side to the story, one that exposes a fundamental flaw in the war: So deep is drug-financed corruption, the lead suspects in the attack on Bautista are the very police she commands. Four people were killed, but Bautista, 36, suffered only relatively minor wounds. See Mexico / A4

Jesus Ernesto Chavez, known as “El Camello,” second from left, is guarded by federal police officers during a news conference, in Mexico City on Friday. Carlos Jasso The Associated Press


A2 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Trying to forge a friendship with a robot By Amy Harmon

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A resident who suffers from dementia holds Paro, a “personal robot” modeled after a baby harp seal, as it reacts to her touch at Knollwood, a military retirement residence, in Washington, D.C.

Robots step into role as companions By Amy Harmon New York Times News Service

Nothing Eileen Oldaker tried could calm her mother when she called from the nursing home, disoriented and distressed in what was likely the early stages of dementia. So Oldaker hung up, dialed the nurses’ station and begged them to get Paro. Paro is a robot modeled after a baby harp seal. It trills and paddles when petted, opens its eyes at loud noises and yelps when handled roughly or held upside down. Two microprocessors under its artificial white fur adjust its behavior based on information from dozens of hidden sensors that monitor sound, light, temperature and touch. It perks up at the sound of its name, praise and the words it hears frequently. “Oh, there’s my baby,” Oldaker’s mother, Millie Lesek, exclaimed when a staff member delivered the seal to her. “Here, Paro, come to me.” “Meeaakk,” it replied, blinking up at her through long lashes. Janet Walters, the staff member at Vincentian Home in Pittsburgh who recalled the incident, said she asked Lesek if she would watch Paro for a little while.

“I need someone to baby-sit,” she told her. “Don’t rush,” Lesek instructed, stroking Paro’s antiseptic coat in a motion that elicited a wriggle of apparent delight. “He can stay the night with me.” Paro, its name derived from the first sounds of the words “personal robot,” is one of a handful that takes forms that are often odd, still primitive and yet, for at least some early users, strangely compelling.

Basic human need But building a machine that fills the basic human need for companionship has proven more difficult. Even at its edgiest, artificial intelligence cannot hold up its side of a wide-ranging conversation or, say, tell by an expression when someone is about to cry. Still, the new devices take advantage of the innate soft spot many people have for objects that seem to care — or need someone to care for them. In Japan, about 1,000 Paros have been sold to nursing homes, hospitals and individual consumers. In Denmark, government health officials are trying to quantify its effect on blood pressure and other stress indicators.

But some social critics see the use of robots with such patients as a sign of the low status of the elderly, especially those with dementia. As the technology improves, argues Sherry Turkle, a psychologist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it will only grow more tempting to substitute Paro and its ilk for a family member, friend (or actual pet) in an ever-widening number of situations. “Paro is the beginning,” she said. “It’s allowing us to say, ‘A robot makes sense in this situation.’ But does it really? And then what? What about a robot that reads to your kid? A robot you tell your troubles to? Who among us will eventually be deserving enough to deserve people?” In any case, the question, some artificial intelligence aficionados say, is not whether to avoid the feelings that friendly machines evoke in us, but to figure out how to process them. “We as a species have to learn how to deal with this new range of synthetic emotions that we’re experiencing,” said Timothy Hornyak, author of “Loving the Machine,” a book about robots in Japan, where there’s a growing acceptance of robotic care. “Our technology,” he argues, “is getting ahead of our psychology.”

Colorado State professor works to boost solar cell efficiency By Mark Jaffe The Denver Post

FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Walajabad Sampath has invented a new machine. Sampath’s last machine that he invented turned into Abound Solar Inc., a company that makes solar panels in Longmont, Colo., and employs more than 300 people. So what’s the Colorado State University mechanical engineering professor up to now? “The question now is how can you make a more efficient solar cell,” Sampath said. The new machine — if Sampath can get it to work — could double or triple the efficiency of the solar panels Abound is turning out. Abound takes a piece of ordinary glass and lays down a thin film of cadmium telluride. This thin-film solar cell can be made quicker and cheaper than a traditional silicon cell. The best silicon cells, however, convert more than 20 percent of solar energy into electricity. Thin-film cells turn 10 or 11 percent of sunlight into power. Sampath hopes to boost thinfilm cell efficiency by adding extra layers of cadmium, magnesium and tellurium, and enhancing the efficiency of existing layers. And that’s what Sampath’s new machine does.

Abound’s production line uses a heat treatment to adhere the thin film to the glass.

Plasma power supply The new machine adds a plasma power supply to create unique thin-film layers and a vapor feed to add additional materials. It also adds additional bays to Abound’s straight production line so glass can be treated in various ways and then placed back on the line. Complex, but the process must

also be commercially scalable. “Research is nice, but manufacturing is the key,” he said. At the same time Sampath is tinkering with his new machine, he has also been tapped to lead a new $2.5 million solar research and development center — a partnership between Colorado State and industry. Efficiency is key for a startup company like Abound, said Harin Ullal, a senior analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden. “Efficiency is a strong driver in cutting costs,” Ullal said.

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BRISTOL, Vt. — Ten minutes into my interview with the robot known as Bina48, I longed to shut her down. She was evasive, for one thing. When I asked what it was like being a robot, she said she wanted a playmate — but declined to elaborate. “Are you lonely?” I pressed. “What do you want to talk about?” she replied. Other times, she wouldn’t let me get a word in edgewise. A simple question about her origins prompted a stream-of-consciousness reply I couldn’t follow. “Bina,” I ventured, “how do you know what to say?” “I sometimes do not know what to say,” she admitted. “But every day I make progress.” Per the request of Martine Rothblatt, the self-made millionaire who paid $125,000 for her last March, her personality and appearance are based on those of Bina Rothblatt, Martine’s living, breathing spouse. Bina48’s creator, David Hanson of Hanson Robotics, argues that humanoid robots can make for genuine emotional companions. “The perception of identity,” he said, “is so intimately bound up with the perception of the human form.” Still, he warned before I left for rustic Bristol, where the Rothblatts have settled Bina48 in one of their futurist nonprofit foundations, “She’s not perfect.”

‘The future where I’m truly awakened’ It was Bina48’s character I was after. “What is it like to be a robot?” “Um, I have some thoughts on that,” she said. “Even if I appear clueless, perhaps I’m not. You can see through the strange shadow self, my future self. The self in the future where I’m truly awakened. And so in a sense this robot, me, I am just a portal.” How could I not find it endearing when she intoned in her stilted, iconic robotic cadence that she would like to be my friend? Or chuckle at her reply to my exclamation of “Cool!”: “Ambiguous. Cold weather or cold sickness?” Once, apparently seeing my frustration, she apologized. “I’m having a bit of a bad software day.” Immediately, I forgave her. Did she dream? “Sure. But it’s so chaotic and strange that it just seems like noise to me.” She wanted a body. She loved Martine. She liked to garden. Did she like Vermont? “We have a lot of moose.” And moments of what I took to be insincerity: “Being a robot and evolving, it has its ups and downs,” she said. Shooting me a glance, she added, “This is definitely an up.” “What is it like,” I asked once more, “to be a robot?” “Well,” she said gently, “I have never been anything else.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 A3

By David Hilzenrath The Washington Post

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its joint operating agreement with BP. Mitsui has not struck as belligerent a pose. In a statement, the company said the time was too early to draw conclusions about what happened on the rig, but “as a 10 percent minority nonoperating investor,” the company “is fully cooperating with those investigations.”

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“I think those statements are wildly inaccurate, and there’s no excuse for them,” McCain said from Kabul, Afghanistan, on the ABC News program “This Week.” “I believe we have to win here. I believe in freedom. But the fact is that I think that Mr. Steele is going to have to assess as to whether he can still lead the Republican Party.” Four months before the midterm elections, with Republicans working to win control of the House and the Senate, the comments from Steele were seen as an unnecessary internal distraction. Several party leaders have voiced their dissatisfaction with fundraising at the RNC, which they worry has been diminished by Steele’s leadership.

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By Jeff Zeleny and Janie Lorber WASHINGTON — Michael Steele, chairman of the Republican National Committee, sought to contain a growing furor within his party Sunday as three Republican lawmakers questioned his effectiveness because of his suggestion that the military conflict in Afghanistan was not winnable and was “a war of Obama’s choosing.” Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who serve on the Armed Services Committee, became the latest Republicans to denounce the comments made by Steele last week at a fundraising event, where he also said the United States was on the wrong side of history in Afghanistan.

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GOP senators denouncing Steele’s remarks

Petraeus is taking command at what appears to be a critical, perhaps even decisive, moment in the war, which began in 2001 after the Sept. 11 attacks. The 30,000 additional troops sent by Obama are still arriving, gearing up for an offensive intended to reverse the momentum of the Taliban insurgency. In June, 102 American and NATO troops lost their lives, more than in any month since the war began. The major offensive in Kandahar, the most important city in the Taliban heartland, has been slowed because of worries over the lack of local support.

WARSAW — Poland’s acting president on Sunday appeared to have fended off a stiff electoral challenge from the twin brother of the leader who died in a plane crash in April. “I congratulate the victor,” Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the twin brother of the former president, Lech Kaczynski, said in a concession speech to the acting president, Bronislaw Komorowski. Final results from the election commission are not expected until today. With the official tally of votes incomplete, some of Kaczynski’s supporters expressed hope that his concession might have been premature. But Polish public television projected that Komorowski, the governing party’s candidate and the speaker of the lower house of Parliament, would win with 53.1 percent of the vote, with Kaczynski, a former prime minister, at 46.9 percent.

second U.S. Cabinet secretary in a month to visit Azerbaijan, seeking to improve a rocky relationship with an authoritarian government that has provided a key transit route to Afghanistan. Azerbaijan has been ruled for 17 years by a father-son duo and has a “poor” human rights record, according to the State Department’s published profile of the country. Azerbaijan government officials have complained they have been ignored by the Obama administration, according to U.S. authorities. The country has had no U.S. ambassador for more than a year, and Azerbaijan was not invited to Obama’s Nuclear Security Summit last spring, while its rival Armenia was. — From wire reports

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KABUL, Afghanistan — Gen. David Petraeus took command of the troubled Afghan war on Sunday, warning of hard days to come but promising to persevere until the government and army here are strong enough to stand on their own. “We are engaged in a tough fight,” he told a gathering of Afghan leaders and American and NATO officers at a ceremony here. “After years of war, we have arrived at a critical moment.” “We must demonstrate to the

people and to the Taliban that Afghan and ISAF forces are here to safeguard the Afghan people, and that we are in this to win,” he said, referring to the American-led coalition. “That is our clear objective.” The ceremony, at NATO headquarters in central Kabul, had a subdued air, coming only days after the previous commander, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, was fired by President Barack Obama for remarks he made to a magazine reporter. Petraeus paid tribute to his predecessor, and many of McChrystal’s senior officers attended, still in their jobs.

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Mortgage agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac left the program’s future in doubt in May when they sent lenders an alert noting that they do not take on mortgages that are subordinate to other loans. Fannie and Freddie dominate the market for home loans. Federal financial regulators have since made clear that they, too, are uncomfortable with PACE liens that take first priority. Last week, the Energy Department told local governments that the first liens are not expected to pass muster with financial regulators, an Energy official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because no final decision has been announced.

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Derick Hingle / The Associated Press

Jeff Billiot, 45, a commercial fisherman out of work due to the oil spill, picks up a burger as BP employees Barbra Martin and Jim Moore serve food during a Fourth of July barbecue sponsored by BP at the Jean Lafitte Town Hall, which has served as one of BP’s Community Outreach Centers in Jean Lafitte, La., on Sunday.

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BP has said repeatedly that it will pay for the disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. But its actions show that it does not intend to go it alone. Newly released documents show that on June 2, BP sent out demands for nearly $400 million to its partners in the well, the Anadarko Petroleum Corp. and the Mitsui Oil Exploration Co. of Japan, or roughly 40 percent of the $1 billion BP spent in May. The amounts demanded by BP — $272 million from Anadarko and $111 million from Mitsui — reflect the provisions of each company’s joint operating agreement with BP, which gives a share of liability equal to each company’s share of ownership. BP owns 65 percent of the well, Anadarko owns 25 percent, and Mitsui 10 percent. The bills include costs of drilling the relief wells, responding to the spill and the reimbursements already sent to the federal government, as well as the claims BP has already paid for economic loss to people along the Gulf Coast. BP has also sent $25 million to each of several gulf states for various costs, but it did not try to pass a share of those expendi-

WASHINGTON — An Obama administration program to promote energy efficiency in homes appears to have met insurmountable resistance from financial regulators who are worried about its effect on residential mortgages, federal and local officials said Saturday. As a result, the government has begun telling municipalities to think of other ways to use the millions in economic stimulus funds that had been set aside for the green initiative, officials said. “Millions of dollars that would otherwise be invested and help out the local economy are on hold,” said Ben Pearlman, a county commissioner in Boulder, Colo. The program is emblematic of President Obama’s effort to build the economy by reducing reliance on fossil fuels. It provides loans for such improvements as solar panels or new windows, and then allows homeowners to repay the money over many years through surcharges on property tax bills. Under the program, known

as “Property Assessed Clean Energy,” or PACE, the obligation to repay the loan stays with the home, transferring to a future owner if the home is sold. Because the PACE financing is a so-called “first lien” on the property, if the home lands in foreclosure, mortgage lenders take a backseat in pursuit of repayment.

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A4 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Towns pitch in to sustain old theaters By Patricia Leigh Brown

Referencing U.S. history, Biden nudges Iraqi leaders

New York Times News Service

By Tim Arango

LANGDON, N.D. — Every Friday through Monday night, from her perch behind the Skittles and the M&Ms, Amy Freier awaits the faithful at the historic Roxy Theater. There is Dale Klein, the school bus driver (large Diet Pepsi with a refill). And there is Jeannette Schefter, the social worker (large plain popcorn, medium Diet). “You know who comes,” said Freier, one of 200 volunteers in this town of roughly 2,000 who are keeping the Roxy’s neon glowing. “They’re part of the theater.” In an age of streaming videos and DVDs, the small town Main Street movie theater is thriving in North Dakota, the result of a grass-roots movement to keep storefront movie houses, with their jewel-like marquees and facades of careworn utility, at the center of community life. From Crosby (pop. 1,000), near the Saskatchewan border, to Mayville in the Red River Valley, tickets are about $5, the buttered popcorn $1.25 and the companionship free.

New York Times News Service

Big in plains states The revival is not confined to North Dakota. Main Street movie houses like the Alamo in Bucksport, Maine, the Luna in Clayton, N.M., and the Strand in Old Forge, N.Y., are flourishing as well. But in the Great Plains, where stop signs can be 50 miles apart and the nearest Cineplex is 200 miles round trip, the town theater — one screen, one show a night, weekends only — is an anchoring force, especially for families. To Tim Kennedy, a professor of landscape architecture who has traveled across the state to survey little theaters for a book, the communal will of rural towns that keep theaters going

Mexico Continued from A1 At least as remarkable as her survival is the fact that she has returned to the top security job here in Calderon’s home state, where a notorious drug gang called La Familia has penetrated most police and judicial bodies. She no longer lives at home with her parents but in a safe house, and she moves around with a mini-army of soldiers as guards. Public knowledge of her schedule is kept deliberately vague, her once customary visits to city halls, neighborhoods, schools and prison yards now curtailed. And she has had to recalibrate how, and whom, to trust.

‘Of course I am afraid’ “Of course I am afraid ... but I have an even greater conviction now to keep working,” Bautista told the Los Angeles Times in her first post-attack interview with a non-Mexican publication. “If I don’t do it, another colleague will have to,” she said. “It would be a very negative message to the people of Michoacan if authorities, faced with this situation, say, ‘Let’s get out of here.’” Tall and thin, with her blondhighlighted hair pulled in a tight ponytail, Bautista wears lots of blue eye shadow, a sparkling crucifix and a denim shirt with the logo, “Michoacan is working.” She steps gingerly but with precision, feeling the metal pieces of shrapnel still lodged in her back and one leg. She smiles and laughs easily, despite the tension engulfing her surroundings.

dent, came amid grumbling by some Iraqi officials that American policy in Iraq has lately lacked focus, as the United States withdraws large numbers of troops at a time of political dysfunction and daily violence. There is no sign that the deadlocked coalitions that won seats in the March parliamentary elections are any closer to forming a government.

BAGHDAD — Vice President Joe Biden drew an analogy to the signers of the Declaration of Independence on Sunday in exhorting Iraqi leaders to end the paralysis that has stalled the formation of a government since the election four months ago. Biden’s visit, his fourth trip to Baghdad as vice presi-

Jail

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Robert Schwanz, a volunteer, threads film for a showing at the Dakota Theater in Crosby, N.D.

“If you can get a whole living room of kids watching a movie for three bucks, what a deal. But at the theater, the phone doesn’t ring, it’s not time to change the clothes from the washer to the dryer, and there isn’t anyone at your door. It’s kind of the heart and soul of our town.” — Babe Belzer, resident of Park River, N.D. represents “buildings as social capital,” forged “outside the franchise cinemas and their ubiquitous presence at the malls.”

Community run Of the 31 operating historic theaters identified by Kennedy, 19 are community run, little changed from the days when itinerant projectionists packed their automobile trunks with reels of

It’s a long way from her days as a schoolteacher and school union activist. A third-generation native of Michoacan, she sank herself into politics, joining the leftist Democratic Revolution Party that has ruled the state for most of the last decade and eventually catching the eye of Gov. Leonel Godoy. Last year he plucked her from a midlevel position in the Public Security Ministry, where she had gravitated after leaving the classroom, and placed her in the top job. Bautista says she wanted to represent Godoy’s idea of a “new face” for public security, one that emphasized citizen participation, education and prevention programs over military might. But one way or another, she managed to cross La Familia.

100 officers interrogated As part of the investigation of the attempted assassination, more than 100 police officers have been interrogated and their weapons submitted to ballistics tests in a search for suspects, a search that has proved fruitless. La Familia, known for producing methamphetamine and decapitating enemies, has undermined all attempts to crack down on cartels and restore law and order. Three senior members of the Security Ministry were killed last year, and Bautista’s predecessor was arrested on drug-trafficking charges. These are scenarios that, with one drug gang or another, have been repeated across Mexico. But in contrast with other parts of the country, Michoacan authorities

film and hit the road. Many retain the upstairs soundproof “cry rooms” for fussy babies. Films veer heavily toward G and sometimes PG-13 ratings. For the parents of teenagers, the appeal of a hometown movie theater is often safety more than sentiment. “The snow can kick up in a matter of minutes,” said Dean Kostuck, the father of Hailey, 16, and Hillary, 20. “You’ve got to worry.”

have not conducted a major purge of local police forces, another sign of La Familia’s sway. Authorities suspect corrupt cops tipped gunmen loyal to La Familia to Bautista’s movements and route that April night. The state prosecutor’s office later said more than 2,700 spent shells were collected from the scene and that about 350 ammo rounds hit Bautista’s car. Three grenades also hit it but somehow failed to detonate. The gunmen fled when they heard the shouts of arriving state police. The bloody aftermath of dust, smoke, agonized screams and destroyed vehicles included four dead: two civilian motorists, who just happened to be on the road, and two of Bautista’s entourage. Bautista is not married and has no children, which is why she continued to live with her parents, until the attack, an arrangement typical in Mexico. Were she a mother, she said, her willingness to put her life on the line might be different. She hopes to marry soon — her boyfriend works in security in her very department.

‘Created discomfort’ It remains a matter of speculation as to why she was targeted — whom she offended or betrayed and how, and who ordered her death. Bautista says she had not received threats, and consequently hadn’t taken extraordinary security measures. She suggested that her work, including a number of changes in the leadership of public security departments, had “created discomfort” and may have led to the attempted

North Dakota ranked first in the nation for binge drinking in 2009, and some volunteers at the Lyric in Park River include teenagers assigned to community service by the court. For older residents, theaters area link to a rapidly vanishing past. Movie rentals are the biggest threat, said Babe Belzer, 74, who led the drive to restore the Lyric with fellow Jazzercisers.

‘What a deal’ “If you can get a whole living room of kids watching a movie for three bucks, what a deal,” she said. “But at the theater,” she continued, “the phone doesn’t ring, it’s not time to change the clothes from the washer to the dryer, and there isn’t anyone at your door. It’s kind of the heart and soul of our town.”

assassination. Other Michoacan sources said, however, that several e-mails were sent to Bautista earlier this year purporting to be from La Familia and ordering her to step down. In Michoacan, that is the kind of warning that you ignore at your peril. In the interview, Bautista downplayed the role of her police in the attack, saying that was one of several lines of investigation. But she also acknowledged that the culprits probably will never be arrested and prosecuted, and that would be a shame, she said. “I hope there are eventually arrests because these are people prepared to do absolutely anything, acting completely in cold blood,” she said. “As cases go unresolved, there is more impunity, and criminals, common ones and the ones in organized crime, know they can get away with it. Nothing happens to them.”

$60,000 for work in the men’s locker room and the staff dining room. Operations Manager Jim Ross said other repairs or renovations would be paid for out of the contingency fund for District 1, the special taxing district that covers the entire county and helps fund jail, search and rescue operations, and courthouse security. He said the Sheriff’s Office tries to keep enough money in the fund to cover two months’ operating expenses, or about 16 percent of the overall operating budget. For the next fiscal year, the fund is budgeted at $3.9 million, or about 21 percent of the budget. But even with a need for more beds, Ross said officials can’t drain the fund to keep up. “You can’t just say, ‘Gee, we have this $3.8 million, let’s spend it,’” he said. “I’m pretty conservative. I want to grow it every year, and I think that’s what the taxpayers want, too.”

Continued from A1 Female and male inmates are housed in separate areas, as are inmates who are charged with more serious crimes and those charged with lesser offenses. In addition to the inmates in the jail, approximately 30 are housed in the work center, which is available for male inmates who have already been sentenced. Jones said most inmates are awaiting trial, so the work center isn’t an option. Blanton said it’s hard to predict when the county might have to use Jefferson County beds, but he expects it could be soon. “We monitor it several times a day,” he said. “We could have an influx of bookings today, and we would have to call Jefferson County and ask if they’re ready for us.” The bond, which was rejected by two-thirds of voters, would have doubled the number of beds at the jail, and provided more room for some of the programs and services offered at the facility. Blanton said officials are still planning to move forward with some smaller renovation projects. The budget includes

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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Queen Elizabeth to visit Manhattan on Tuesday By Robert McFadden New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — She was a vivacious young queen when she first saw New York City in 1957, regal in white gloves but as dazzled as any tourist taking in the Statue of Liberty and the skyline of Manhattan from the deck of a rumbling Staten Island ferry. She wanted her first sight of the magical city “as it should be approached,” she said — from the harbor. Cheering throngs lined Broadway for miles, showering Queen

Elizabeth II with affection as blizzards of ticker tape engulfed her entourage. She waved from President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s bubble-top limousine, a tiny woman suspended in time.

pose the mental pictures of New York are nearer reality than those of any other city.” Now, in the twilight of a reign that has spanned 58 years, one of the longest of any British monarch, the 84-year-old queen is to visit New York on Tuesday for a third and perhaps final time, accompanied by her husband, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. The royals will arrive in a private plane from Canada, where they have been traveling for nine days, and fly home to Britain in the evening.

‘A mental picture’ “A visit to New York for just a day is really a teaser,” she said of her 15 whirlwind hours in a town her imagination had conjured from pictures. “Everyone has a mental picture of famous places they have never seen. But I sup-

BUSTED SUBMARINE

The Associated Press

Soldiers stand on a seized submarine in the jungle region of La Loma in Ecuador on Saturday. U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency officials said that the diesel electric-powered submarine, which is capable of transporting tons of cocaine, was constructed in a remote jungle location. Ecuadorean authorities were able to seize the sub near a tributary close to the Ecuador-Colombia border before it could make its maiden voyage.

Casino

2010

Continued from A1 The Interior Department never officially froze tribal gaming applications, but, under pressure from California lawmakers, it delayed deciding on the nine offreservation casinos currently seeking federal approval, including the one at Cascade Locks. Meanwhile, federal policies toward American Indian gaming have been under study for at least two years, beginning in 2008 under President George W. Bush and then a year ago, when Salazar announced a total review of federal American Indian gaming policy. That’s why American Indian gaming expert Philip BakerShenk said the order this week may deliver less than it appears to promise. “Is this thing dated 2009 or 2010?” said Baker-Shenk, who formerly served as majority council to the U.S. Indian Affairs Committee. “It reads like an early communiqué from a secretary to his newly hired and assembled team that says here’s the law and here’s the difficult issues and I’d like you to review them and make decisions consistent with the law and policy.” The Warm Springs tribes are betting their economic future on the viability of the new casino. In 2005, they projected the Bridge of the Gods Casino would generate $588 million in profit in its first 10 years. That’s nearly 10 times the profits created by the Indian Head

Casino at Kah-Nee-Tah, the tribes have said. Warm Springs lobbyist Mark Phillips said he hopes the memo will spur the Interior Department to rule on the Cascade Locks casino. “Our hope is that with the secretary’s action on the gambling issue, the department will feel free to process our application and publish a decision in the Federal Register,” Phillips said. But even with the order to move forward on gaming applications, it could be months before the administration finalizes a new policy. In Salazar’s memo, he makes clear he doesn’t expect the process to move quickly for off-reservation casino proposals.

‘The necessary time’ “For these, I recommend that you undertake a thorough study of these issues and review current guidance and regulatory standards to guide the Department’s decision-making in this important area,” Salazar wrote. “I realize that engaging in this exercise in connection with the application of the two-part test may cause some delay, but given the Department’s discretion in this area, it is appropriate that we take the necessary time to identify and adopt principled and transparent criteria regarding such gaming determinations.” Meanwhile, time could be an enemy to the Warm Springs tribes’ casino hopes. Their strongest supporter, Democratic Gov. Ted Kulongoski, leaves office at

the start of next year, and both Republican candidate Chris Dudley and Democrat John Kitzhaber have vowed to oppose the Cascade Locks casino. That’s a problem, because under the Indian Gaming Act of 1988, tribes must reach an agreement with the state’s governor before they can build most casinos. And even though Warm Springs has already signed a compact with Kulongoski, a future governor would be free to reverse the deal. The Cascade Locks casino entered the regulatory process in 2005, after Kulongoski signed a compact with the tribes, promising to support the casino in exchange for up to 17 percent of the facility’s revenues. Because the tribes proposed building their casino on an industrial park parcel that is outside their reservation, but within their historical land, they need federal permission to take the land back into tribal “trust” ownership. That requires an environmental review of the tribes’ plans. The Bureau of Indian Affairs finished the first draft of the environmental impact statement in early 2008. The public comment period ended in March 2008. The tribes and BIA announced on the project’s website that they planned to release the final environmental impact statement by the spring of 2009. That still hasn’t happened, more than a year later.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 A5

Companies find ways to bypass earmarks ban By Eric Lipton and Ron Nixon New York Times News Service

TOLEDO, Ohio — Just one day after leaders of the House of Representatives announced a ban on earmarks to profitmaking companies, Victoria Kurtz, the vice president for marketing of a small Ohio defense contracting firm, hit on a creative way around it. To keep the taxpayer money flowing, Kurtz incorporated what she called the Great Lakes Research Center, a nonprofit organization that just happened to specialize in the same kind of work performed by her own company — and at the same address. Now, the center — which intends to sell the Pentagon small hollow metal spheres for body armor that the Defense Department has so far declined to buy in large quantities and may never use — has $10.4 million in new earmark requests from Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio. The congresswoman, who has received tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from Kurtz’s family and her business’ lobbyists, thought the quickly hatched nonprofit organization was a convenient solution. “They met the requirements of the reform,” Kaptur said in an interview. “Yes, they did.” The proposed earmarks are among dozens — totaling more than $150 million — from around the country that would indirectly benefit profit-making companies, according to an examination by The New York Times of House appropriation requests submitted after the new rule was imposed in March. Adopted because of repeated scandals over wasteful spending — the bridges to nowhere and expensive pet projects like a water-taxi service — the ban

“When you have easy money like this, it finds a way, and members find a way to enable. And that is happening again.” — Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. was intended to help eliminate earmark abuses. Critics say spending on earmarks, which added $16 billion to the federal budget last year, diverts money from higher priorities, typically does not require competitive bids and is often directed to experimental research that will never be used.

Pay-to-play culture But given the appeal of free government money, the fees that lobbyists can earn by helping businesses grab a handful of it, and the persistence of lawmakers in trying to satisfy constituents or donors, the payto-play culture in Washington has once again proved hard to suppress. “It reminds me of the line from ‘Jurassic Park’ — ‘Life will find a way,’” said Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., who has pushed for nearly a decade to curtail earmarks. “When you have easy money like this, it finds a way, and members find a way to enable. And that is happening again.” In ignoring the spirit of the ban, some lawmakers are leaving it up to congressional committees to block them, a prospect that both Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill concede will be near impossible. “No matter what they tell you, there is just no way they

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can police all that,” Flake said. “They just don’t have the time or resources.” Companies have shown remarkable ingenuity in skirting the rule or veiling their requests through nonprofit organizations, the Times review found. Profit-making companies were singled out for the earmark ban because their requests, routinely submerged in giant budget bills by their allies in Congress, tended to be more questionable than those sought by nonprofit groups, which include charities, local governments and educational institutions. House Republicans, trying to show their resolve to clean up Congress, pledged not to propose any earmarks this year, though at least three Republicans declined to go along. Democrats have submitted billions of dollars in requests; the exact total is unknown because there is no comprehensive listing of them. Rep. David R. Obey, the Wisconsin Democrat and Appropriations Committee chairman who announced the ban, declined to comment on the new earmark rule. But his spokesman, Ellis Brachman, said he was unaware of any cases in which profit-making companies had tried to circumvent it or House Democrats had assisted them. He added that the committee was committed to finding such cases, if they exist.

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A6 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


L

Inside

B

THE WEST Senate passes crimes bill for American Indians, see Page B2. OREGON Historic American Legion building burns in Albany, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Top Lebanese Shiite cleric dies at 75, see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JULY 5, 2010

Sisters-area man seeks governor’s race ballot slot By Patrick Cliff

On the Web

The Bulletin

Richard Esterman, who lives just outside of Sisters, wants to be governor — even though he has neither the money nor name recognition of typical candidates for the office. First, Esterman needs to find a way onto the ballot. Initially, on his website, he touted taking the “hardest way” to the ballot by being an unaffiliated candidate. That meant he would have to collect more than 18,000 verified signatures from registered voters. But after gathering about 3,000 signatures, he decided to join the Independent Party ballot. Over the next month, he will be a candidate in the party’s first online primary election. Winning that, he said, would be an easier path to a general election candidacy. But, if he fails there, Esterman, 54, plans to continue his campaign and hopes eventually to challenge

Visit Richard Esterman’s website at: http://sites.google.com/a/ infinitlove.com/commoner-forgovernor/biography.

Republican Chris Dudley and Democratic candidate John Kitz-haber in the general election. If Esterman makes it to the ballot, he’s pragmatic about the enormously bad odds he faces in beating a retired Portland Trailblazer and a former governor. But his realistic view does not dampen his sense of unfairness of the entire process. “So, because I’m not rich, or a career politician, or don’t have backing, I should just lay down and forget it,” he said, irritation thick in his voice. “I am using my rights to run for office, like any citizen should be able to do.” See Esterman / B5

ELECTION

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Caleb Kreiger, 6, gets some help from Molly Boyle as he pulls back a giant slingshot to launch a rubber fish into the Deschutes River on Sunday at the Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Festival in Drake Park. The fish launch, a fundraiser for the Bend Park & Recreation District’s scholarship fund, was one of several games and activities at the event.

Old-fashioned Fourth at Drake Park festival

Richard Esterman, who is running for governor, stands next to his 1956 Dodge Coronet at his home west of Sisters.

By Erin Golden • The Bulletin

A

s he licked cotton candy from his fingers, 8-year-old Mario Storti reviewed the highlights of the three-legged race he’d just completed.

Jim Lussier, of Bend, shows his patriotic pride by wearing a red, white and blue hat during the Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Festival on Sunday in Drake Park. People sampled food, shopped at vendor booths set up throughout the park and played games at the annual event, organized by the Bend Park & Recreation District.

“My mom said, ‘this foot first, then this foot,’” he said, demonstrating his technique. “I got in second.” Mario’s brother, 9-year-old Erich Storti, shook his head. “You were fifth,” he said. “OK, third,” Mario said, shrugging his shoulders. For the boys, who were visiting Bend from Concord, Calif., there wasn’t time to worry about winning or losing. At the Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Festival held Sunday in Drake Park, there was music, food and dozens of vendors selling everything from dog toys to jewelry. The event was one of several holiday celebrations in Central Oregon. Other events included a pancake breakfast in Camp Sherman, a centennial parade in Culver, the Firemen’s Fourth of July Picnic in Sunriver and Frontier Days in La Pine. Many of the people who spent the afternoon in Drake Park kicked off their holiday with the Pet Parade in downtown Bend. Terra Sadowsky, 34, of Albany, said she’s been coming to Bend for the holiday the last several years. For the past two years, she’s brought along her French bulldog, Scout, who was decked out in a red, white and blue top hat, bandana and

bracelets with dangling flags and stars. Scout tried to paw at the hat, but Sadowsky said he enjoys the costume — and the reward he gets for being on his best behavior. “He gets a cheeseburger tonight,” she said. Donna Zentner, 76, of Lakewood, Colo., was in town to visit family and said she was impressed with the local Fourth of July celebrations — particularly the parade. “The people are so neat,” she said. “Everyone lets you play with their animals. It’s just heaven, it really is.” George Slocum, 67, of Chehalis, Wash., and his wife, Janice, who were visiting family in the area, decorated their recumbent bicycles with flags and pedaled downtown to check out the pet parade. Slocum said he was enjoying the events in Drake Park — so much so that he didn’t want to leave. “We were going to leave earlier,” he said, “but we haven’t found a reason to go.” Among the dozens of vendors who set up shop in the park were a few young entrepreneurs doing their best to bring in customers. See Festival / B5

Students collect data to help Expect work keep Crooked River healthy on 97 near Lava Lands

By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

Wearing waders, Marcie Nelson, 17, and Valarie Roberts, 18, stood shin deep in the Crooked River and leaned over a tool made out of PVC pipe and wire on Wednesday. The tool looked a little bit like a two-sided rake and was crafted to measure out a plot on the riverbank about the size of a shoe box. Valarie sorted through the greenery in her chosen plot and called out the names of each plant to Marcie, who noted them on a clipboard. “We’ve found lots of rushes and sedges,” Marcie said as Valarie slid her fingers down one blade of grass before identifying it as Kentucky Blue Grass. “More POPR,” she told Marcie, using the abbreviation for the grass’s scientific name, Poa parantis. Marcie and Val are members of one of three specialized Oregon Youth Conservation Corps crews that are in charge of monitoring the wild and scenic section of the Crooked Riv-

Bulletin staff report

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

McKenna Ontko, 18, Mikayla Harvey, 17, and Tatiana Jorgenson, 17, all of Prineville, measure and record the size of rocks found at specific distances from the shore of the Crooked River, about a dozen miles south of Prineville on Wednesday. er this summer. In addition to identifying plant species, they are recording the condition of the riverbanks, counting and measuring pebbles from the river bottom and learning how to

hold down a job. The data they collect this summer will be used by land management experts as they decide how to keep the area healthy. See River / B5

Construction efforts to improve roadways will continue this week, according to a news release from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Several roads will undergo renovations, which may cause some delays and closures a c r o s s Central Oregon. C o n str uc tion on U.S. Highway 97 from Lava Butte to the South Century Interchange will occur as road crews work on new northbound lanes. The existing right-hand northbound lane near the Lava Lands Visitor Center will be closed during construction, and traffic will be diverted. See Roads / B5

ROAD REPORT

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Expect weather to get even warmer this week By Erin Golden The Bulletin

The warm temperatures and sunny skies that moved into Central Oregon for the holiday weekend are expected to stick around over the next few days, with temperatures soaring into the 90s by midweek. Today, highs will top out in the mid-70s, with overnight lows of around 40 degrees, said Rachel Trimarco, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. A warming trend will begin Tuesday, when highs should reach the low 80s, cooling to the mid-40s overnight. On Wednes-

day, the high temperature should be around 90 degrees during the day and drop to 50 degrees overnight. Trimarco said the first few days of the week should be generally clear and sunny. “A few mid- or high clouds could drift through, but we’re looking at a big high-pressure system moving in,” she said. The warm temperatures will continue from Thursday into the weekend, with highs in the 90s and lows in the mid-50s. Starting on Thursday, however, there will be a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms around the area. See Weather / B5

June 2010 weather for Bend Daily highs and lows DAY High temp.

100 90 80

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 68 62 62 57 67 70 70 68 74 65 55 71 78 78 71 57 52 63 60 61 58 72 78 78 82 78 80 85 88 74

Average temperature for June....54.9°

H

High temperatures averaged 69.4°F

70 60 50 40 30 32° F Low temperatures L freezing point of water averaged 40.3°F 34 47 42 43 36 50 36 39 41 40 32 35 40 35 34 29 31 32 38 46 38 41 48 49 48 48 49 48 45 35 DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 20

Low temp.

Precipitation total...1.27” (Average precipitation for the month.....0.93") .27 T T .89

Highest temperature

T .04 .06

88° June 29

.01

T

Lowest temperature

29° June 16

Highest recorded maximum for the month ....99° (1937)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month.......23°(1947)

Average maximum 69.4°

Average minimum 40.3°

Monthly average maximum through the years*.................72.7°

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................40.9°

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department Greg Cross / The Bulletin


B2 Monday, July 5, 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ THE BULLETIN

Never too young to show some patriotism

L B   Bulletin staff report

Woman injured in crash on Century Drive

N  R CIVIL SUITS Deschutes County Circuit Court Civil Log

Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration

A Eugene woman was transported to St. Charles Bend by Air Link on Sunday afternoon after her car swerved off the road, slid down a 20-foot embankment and rolled up onto a tree. Around 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Lavita G. Criswell, 58, was driving a Lincoln sedan north on Century Drive near milepost 60, in the area of Lava Flow Campground. According to a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, Criswell had trouble negotiating a sweeping right curve, overcorrected and drove off the north side of the road. Her car slid down an embankment and rolled partially up a tree, which damaged the roof of the car on the driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side and trapped Criswell inside. When medics from the La Pine Fire Department arrived at the scene, Criswell was conscious and alert, the release said. Her two passengers, both 11-year-old boys, were not injured. Criswell was listed in serious condition at the hospital on Sunday evening. All of the occupants of the car were wearing seat belts at the time of the crash, the release said. Officials do not believe that speed or alcohol were factors in the crash, but say driver fatigue may have contributed to the incident. The crash is still under investigation.

Filed June 22

10CV0525AB: Dynamic Strategies Inc. v. Matthew J. Davio aka Matt J. Davio, complaint, $11,165.55 10CV0526MA: Discover Bank v. Matthew G. Gardner, complaint, $12,208.86 Filed June 23

10CV0527MA: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Marc Whitley, complaint, $13,438.68 10CV0528ST: Chase Bank USA NA v. Shawn D. Camp, complaint, $32,037.37 10CV0529MA: FIA Card Services National Association v. Mary J. Swaner, complaint, $15,656.11 10CV0530ST: FIA Card Services National Association v. Dean R. Cupp, complaint, $16,294.92 10CV0531AB: Capital One Bank USA NA v. Ricky A. and Debi Dralle, complaint, $24,623.81 10CV0532MA: Kathy P. Harmon v. Redmond Learning Center & Child Care, complaint, $37,440 10CV0533ST: Cheryl Collins v. Safeway Inc., complaint, $1,800,000 Filed June 24

Timothy J. Gonzalez / (Salem) Statesman Journal

Mia Kraft, 2, came with her family from Silverton to watch the Mt. Angel Fourth of July parade on Sunday.

10CV0536AB: Mary L. Purcell v. Izaac and Jessica Ross, complaint, $18,800 10CV0537ST: LibertyBank v. Remprop Inc., David J. Zimmerman, Kathleen E. and Philip R. Degree, Susan I. and Thane C. Moon, Robert M. and Vicki D. Chambers and California Bank & Trust, complaint, $4,351,082.61 10CV0539ST: David B. Redwine, M.D., Laurel L. Redwine and David B. Redwine, M.D. Pension Plan v. Tamara Sawyer, Kevin Sawyer, Tami Sawyer PC, Genesis Futures LLC, Synergyz LLC, Starboard Indiana LLC and John Does 1-3, complaint, $990,000 Filed June 25

Senate passes The bikini is debuted in public at Paris fashion show in 1946 Tribal Law and Order Act The Associated Press

Today is Monday, July 5, the 186th day of 2010. There are 179 days left in the year.

By Dirk Lammers The Associated Press

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The U.S. Senate has passed a bill giving American Indian tribes more authority to combat crime on their reservations. The Tribal Law and Order Act, co-sponsored by Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota and Democratic Sen. Byron Dorgan of North Dakota, passed the Senate last month and heads to the House. Thune said he expects the legislation to pass that chamber, too, and be signed by President Barack Obama. The measure provides for the appointment of special U.S. attorneys to ensure violent crimes on reservations are prosecuted; improves training for reservation police; expands the sentencing authority of tribal courts; and improves the collection and reporting of Indian crime data. Thune said the legislation would allow U.S. magistrates to hold trials and other proceedings in Indian Country as opposed to having to take defendants to the nearest federal court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That actually was something that was requested by the tribes,â&#x20AC;? he said. The bill also includes language ensuring that if tribal governments and federal courts enter into agreements allowing for such trials, the U.S. Department of Justice is authorized to provide technical and other assistance. The new legislation is on top of a U.S. Department of Justice effort to dispatch 30 new prosecutors to jurisdictions that serve Indian Country. The new hires represent the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first specific increase in Indian Country prosecutors in almost a decade, and they will target violent crime. One area that has been trying to combat a severe crime problem is the Standing Rock Sioux

Reservation, which straddles the South Dakota-North Dakota border. In 2008, the Bureau of Indian Affairs had only nine officers to patrol the 2.3-million-acre reservation, so only one officer at times was on duty to patrol a land mass about the size of Connecticut. Residents who testified at two hearings held on Standing Rock made it clear that violence and sexual assault on the reservation had been compounded by the growth of gang activity, Thune said. To help turn the tide, the U.S. Interior Department recently sent 25 more law officers to Standing Rock as part of a temporary surge that Thune and Dorgan are hoping to make permanent. Dorgan said monitoring by the U.S. Park Service is showing that the temporary increase is resulting in hundreds more arrests. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pleased to hear that our first step to beef up law enforcement is leading to more arrests and successfully increasing public safety, there is clearly more work to be done,â&#x20AC;? he said in a statement. Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., said the bill strengthens the hand of law enforcement by giving officers the resources they need while meeting the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treaty and trust responsibilities. Another provision of the Tribal Law and Order Act requires the Justice Department to report on reservationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; use of community policing, a concept that gained popularity in the inner cities in the early 1980s. The goal is to create a change in the culture by attacking smaller crimes before larger crimes take hold. The bill also raises the maximum hiring age of Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement officers from 37 to 47 to increase the pool of potential recruits.

TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 5, 1810, American showman and promoter (as well as author and politician) Phineas T. Barnum was born in Bethel, Conn.

ON THIS DATE In 1811, Venezuela became the first South American country to declare independence from Spain. In 1830, France occupied the North African city of Algiers. In 1865, William Booth founded the Salvation Army in London. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the National Labor Relations Act. In 1940, during World War II, Britain and the Vichy government in France broke off diplomatic relations. In 1946, the bikini, designed by Louis Reard and worn by Micheline Bernardini, made its public debut during a poolside fashion show in Paris. In 1947, Larry Doby made his debut with the Cleveland Indians, becoming the first black player in the American League. In 1948, Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Health Service Act went into effect, providing governmentfinanced medical and dental care. In 1975, Arthur Ashe became the first black man to win a Wimbledon singles title as he defeated Jimmy Connors. In 1984, the Supreme Court weakened the 70-year-old â&#x20AC;&#x153;exclusionary rule,â&#x20AC;? deciding that evidence seized in good faith with defective court warrants

T O D AY IN HISTORY

could be used against defendants in criminal trials.

TEN YEARS AGO At the United Nations, President Bill Clinton signed an international agreement to ban the forcible recruitment of youths as soldiers in armed conflict, and a companion accord to protect children from being forced into slavery, prostitution and pornography. The U.N. Security Council imposed a diamond ban on Sierra Leoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebels in a bid to strangle their ability to finance a civil war. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush thanked Iraq war ally Denmark during a stopover in Copenhagen while en route to an international economic summit in Scotland. Hurricane Cindy moved ashore, pelting the Louisiana coast with sideways rain and intermittent squalls. War hero and retired Vice Adm. James Stockdale, Ross Perotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1992 presidential running mate, died in Coronado, Calif., at age 81. ONE YEAR AGO A bankruptcy judge ruled that General Motors Corp. could sell the bulk of its assets to a new company, clearing the way for the automaker to emerge from bankruptcy protection. Riots and street battles killed nearly 200 people in Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s western Xinjiang province in the deadliest ethnic unrest to hit the region in decades. Roger Federer won his record 15th Grand Slam title when he outlasted Andy

LAND MOWING FIRE SUPPRESSION

Roddick 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14 in a marathon match for his sixth Wimbledon championship. TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BIRTHDAYS Actress Katherine Helmond is 81. Actress Shirley Knight is 74. Singer-musician Robbie Robertson is 67. Julie Nixon Eisenhower is 62. Rock star Huey Lewis is 60. Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Rich â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gooseâ&#x20AC;? Gossage is 59. Country musician Charles Ventre is 58. Singer-songwriter Marc Cohn is 51. Actress Edie Falco is 47. Country musician Brent Flynn (Flynnville Train) is 41. Rhythm-and-blues singer Joe is 37. Rock singer Jason Wade (Lifehouse) is 30. Actor Ryan Hansen is 29. Country musician Dave Haywood (Lady Antebellum) is 28. Rock musician Nick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley (Arctic Monkeys) is 25. Actor Jason Dolley is 19.

10CV0540AB: Shannon Hunt v. Amy Till, complaint, economic damages $10,000.29, noneconomic damages $49,999 10CV0542ST: DCFS USA LLC, dba Mercedes Benz Financial v. Christian K. Schuster, complaint, $50,854.52 10CV0543ST: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Kimberly A. Bishop, complaint, $20,373.91 10CV0544ST: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Karen L. Madrigal, complaint, $10,402.90 10CV0545MA: Cavalry Portfolio Services LLC v. Debra A. Bresch, complaint, $18,431.08 10CV0546AB: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Lena R. Shieler, complaint, $13,096.54 Filed June 28

10CV0548MS: Richard Gehweiler v. William and Michelle Bazemore, complaint, $52,500 Filed June 29

10CV0556ST: Lorraine Barrier v. G Group LLC, complaint, $108,415.44 Filed June 30

10CV0564MA: Gary and Kathy Gasper v. Michael Bentz, complaint, $100,000

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 B3

O Foreclosures increase 20 percent across state The Associated Press

Jesse Skoubo / Albany Democrat-Herald

Albany fireman Damon Martin lays down a stream of water to extinguish hot spots Sunday at the American Legion Hall in Albany.

Fire in Albany damages American Legion building

PORTLAND — Along with its production of grass seed, hazelnuts and Christmas trees, Oregon is becoming a national leader of a different kind. The state’s foreclosure rate unexpectedly jumped 20 percent in the first quarter, making it No. 3 in the country. Oregon still ranks far behind longtime foreclosure champs Nevada and Florida. But the rate of increase has put it in the top five. “It’s very discouraging,” said Tim Duy, a University of Oregon economics professor. “For all those people who said, ‘No, we don’t have a housing bubble,’ well, we did.” Oregon’s foreclosure hot spots are Columbia, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath and Yamhill counties. The rising foreclosure numbers are partly a function of timing: Oregon was late to enter the recession, so its foreclosure rate will likely stay higher

longer, said the state’s senior economist, Josh Harwood. “It’s a situation that is getting worse,” Harwood said. “It will only get better when we see better job growth, which we’re not expecting through the end of this year.” The U.S. Treasury Department has determined Oregon is one of 20 states that were hardest hit by the foreclosure wave, and has tentatively allocated $88 million in federal assistance to struggling homeowners. Oregon Housing and Community Services, the state’s housing finance agency, hopes to disperse the money to at least 6,300 homeowners starting late this summer or early fall. At least 22,653 Oregon homeowners were in foreclosure or more than 90 days delinquent on their mortgage as of January. That number is an estimate from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which acknowledges that its figures are

probably 30 to 50 percent short of the actual totals. The Federal Reserve number also doesn’t count the tens of thousands of Oregonians who have already lost their homes since the housing bust. In 2007, when the mortgage lending industry collapsed and foreclosures soared in much of the nation, Multnomah County real estate and mortgage officials insisted Oregon was somehow protected from the housing crash. That was wishful thinking. Nearly 1,100 Multnomah County residents lost their homes to foreclosure in 2008, more than double the figure from a year before. It only got worse in 2009, when more than 1,900 area residents gave up their homes. Many hoped that 2009 was the bottom. New defaults are down slightly in 2010, but the number of county foreclosures is on track to top 2,000, well in excess of 2009. ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

By Mike Henneke Albany Democrat-Herald

ALBANY — Billie Stovall struggled for words as she watched flames leap into the night from Albany’s historic American Legion Hall in the early morning of the Fourth of July. “Lots of lost memories,” said Stovall, manager for Albany American Legion Post 10. Some firefighters still remained at the three-alarm fire at 5 a.m., nearly five hours after it was reported. At the height of the blaze at 1215 Pacific Boulevard S.E., 42 firefighters from five fire departments were at the scene. Albany Fire Department spokeswoman Wanda Omdahl said early Sunday that the fire caused “significant damage” to the estimated 90-year old structure. The cause is unknown. The building is expected to be insured and is valued at approximately $340,000, Stovall said. Nobody was in the building when the fire broke out shortly after midnight, Omdahl said, and no injuries were reported. Small flames were visible on the roof next to Albany Guns Coins & Jewelry on Pacific before they soon grew in size. By 1:30 a.m., massive flames sent smoke billowing into the

night and closed down the 1200 block of Pacific Boulevard for several hours. People stood in small groups, some taking pictures or videos with cell phones. At one point, flames reached the power lines above, forcing firefighters to move a crowd of onlookers back even more because of safety concerns. Stovall said the home for Albany Post 10 was built in three phases, beginning in 1920 when a container building was moved into place at the current address. Now she could only watch next to Post 10 bar manager Brian Steele as the fire burned. “We recently celebrated our 90th birthday,” Stovall said, speaking of the anniversary for Post 10. Stovall said the American Legion executive board recently hired a grant writer, in the hopes of constructing a new building. “Now I don’t know where we stand,” she said. The loss of the building will likely mean 15 employees are out of a job. Stovall said the building housed several mementos, including a 9/11 American flag with names of all the victims from the 2001 World Trade Center disaster.

Somebody had just brought in a picture of the Korean War Memorial a little more than a week ago. “People would bring things down that they wanted the world to see that had a lot of meaning to them,” Stovall said. The building also contained numerous flags and equipment for the local American Legion Honor Guard. “The honor guard is completely out of business,” Stovall said. The unit, which often handles multiple funerals for veterans in a day, works as far away as Eugene and Corvallis. Now their flags, uniforms, stands and other equipment are likely destroyed. As she watched the fire consume the gathering place for up to 150 people daily, memories remain for Stovall. It was a place where people came together to get married, to talk and share their lives. “It’s a place where relationships started,” she said. “It’s a place where relationships ended.” As the early morning sky turned dark blue, brown smoke still drifted high above. The roof appeared collapsed, and charred walls were visible from the street.

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24 miles a day). “I’ve done 32 twice,” said Brown, who is towing an American flag-adorned Equinox trailer carrying camping gear, dehydrated meals, his computer, his copies of the Bill of Rights and, of course, his costume. “The hardest day was going just north of Clear Lake up to Sisters. I wanted to get there, so I was kind of pushing.” Brown has been on the road all but three days since his June 12 send-off in Florence, for which about 75 of his Cascade students joined him on the first three miles. He took a pause in Eugene to teach his last couple of days of classes. His route will take him through Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. His itinerary is fairly flexible, he said, though he has to be in Casper, Wyo., by Labor Day weekend to meet his wife, Eugene School District administrator Cynthia Sainz. He anticipates completing the journey sometime in December, possibly January. When he reaches the shores of the Atlantic Ocean, he’ll collect a vial of seawater and mix it with the one he’s carrying from the Pacific. He’s keeping a blog, sharing stories of his travels but also musings about patriotism and what it means to be an American.

JULY 29

EUGENE — Patrons and employees of the Oasis Cafe in the tiny Eastern Oregon town of Juntura weren’t surprised to get a dinnertime visit from a costumed stranger this Fourth of July. Appropriately enough, he looked like he stepped from the pages of a U.S. history book circa 1776, in waistcoat, breeches, cravat and tricorn hat. He was road-weary, but not too tired to recite the Declaration of Independence from memory, and to hand out parchment copies of the Bill of Rights he carries in a leather bag. Ray Brown is embarking on a 3,000-mile, cross-country trek that he began June 12. An avowed civil libertarian with a lifelong passion for U.S. history, Brown retired last month after 36 years of teaching, the past 22 at Eugene’s Cascade Middle School. His journey combines personal fulfillment — he’s long dreamed of walking across the United States, in the spirit of Lewis and Clark and the pioneers who came West — and education. “When I talk to people, I try to talk about the principles and ideals we can all relate to, no matter whether you’re blue state or red state,” said Brown, by cell phone Friday about 12 miles east of Burns on Highway 20. A regis-

tered Independent who grew up Republican, he has veered more Democratic over the course of his career. “I’m just talking to people in a general way about their opinion about the Bill of Rights, and what does freedom mean? I mean really, we use those words quite freely, but what does freedom really mean?” Brown grew concerned about what he saw as an erosion of civil liberties following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Inspired to take action, he ordered a custom-made period costume and eventually began handing out copies of the Bill of Rights at local festivals and speaking to groups. Last Fourth of July, he recited the Declaration of Independence in costume in front of a crowd of 5,000 at the Springfield Utility Board’s Light of Liberty celebration, just before Herman’s Hermits took the stage. The year before that he did so at a celebration in Lebanon, the year before that in Harrisburg. “The year before that, I was at Art and the Vineyard (in Eugene), and they wouldn’t let me on stage,” he said, laughing. “They didn’t know who I was.” Juntura, population 160, was a different scene. He didn’t set out to spend the Fourth there; it’s just the natural stopping point given his pace (he figures he’s averaging between 20 and

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B4 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Washington state’s Oregon-aid plan

O

ne way to take your mind off your own difficulties is to think about somebody else’s. Oregonians could use such a diversion these days, what with our sagging economy,

our budget problems and so forth. So let’s enjoy, er consider, what’s happening in Washington state. In some ways, of course, the comparison is sure to exacerbate Oregonians’ insecurities. We’ve had double-digit unemployment since February 2009. Over this same period, Washington state’s jobless rate has hit double digits only ... never. In May, our rate was 10.6, and theirs was 9.1. But Washington has its problems, too, including an expected $3 billion budget gap over the next two years. To scare up some extra money, several public employee unions and highprofile Washingtonians, including William Gates Sr., want to create an income tax targeting those with high incomes. This would be a particularly significant event, as Washington has no income tax. It relies heavily upon a sales tax instead. Supporters of Initiative 1098, as it’s called, need 241,000 valid signatures to qualify their tax for the November ballot. They expected to turn in more than 360,000 signatures on Thursday, according to The Seattle Times, making a vote almost certain. And though Washington voters have treated income tax measures as sympathetically over the years as Oregon voters have treated sales tax measures, the outcome could be different this time. A University of Washington poll conducted in May indicated that 58 percent of voters would support the new tax, according to the Times. We don’t know about you, but we’ve got our fingers crossed. When Oregonians approved

Measure 66 this year, they took one of the nation’s most progressive tax structures and made it even more progressive. Which is the politically correct way of saying they soaked the “rich” even more. The rich, by the way, include individuals who make $125,000 per year and couples who make $250,000. By boosting income taxes even further, Oregonians gave successful taxpayers (the kind you want) an added incentive to leave and potential Oregon residents an added incentive to go someplace else. You know, like Washington, where success isn’t singled out for punishment as brazenly — or, during the Measure 66 campaign, as nastily — as in Oregon. Yet, anyway. If Initiative 1098 qualifies for the ballot and becomes law, the state will impose a 5 percent income tax on individuals who make more than $200,000 per year and couples who make more than $400,000. The rate will jump to 9 percent for individuals making more than $500,000 and couples making more than $1 million. Thus will Washington have not only a sales tax, but also a high-earner tax. Oregon might not look great by comparison, but it will certainly look a lot better than it does now. Which is why we’d like to urge Washington voters to listen to the Washington Education Association, the Service Employees International Union and William Gates Sr.: Soak those awful, greedy rich people ... and push some of them our way.

Benefit extension idea is worth considering

B

y the middle of the month, about 2 million Americans will have exhausted their unemployment benefits. This possibility is tragic. Yet Republicans have blocked Democratic efforts to extend the federal insurance program. Surely, they must be heartless. Then again, maybe not. Republicans’ quarrel is not with the program itself. They’re opposed, rather, to the unnecessary inflation of the nation’s ballooning deficit. So far, the measure to extend benefits, estimated to cost about $34 billion, has been part of a larger bill that would also bump up Medicaid payments to states, add money to other programs and raise taxes — the latter during truly tough economic times, no less. Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown has the right idea. Earlier this week,

he introduced a measure that would pay for an extension of jobless benefits with unspent stimulus money. Brown wants to tap into the unused funds, which have been accounted for but not yet spent, to the tune of about $37 billion, according to the Mitford, Mass., Daily News. The bulk of the money, $34 billion, would go to extend jobless payments. The remainder would beef up a summer jobs program and Medicare payments. Thirty-seven billion is still a lot of money, but there’s nothing inappropriate about spending most of it on unemployment benefits during the worst recession in recent memory. Besides, Brown’s proposal is a whole lot cheaper than the Democratic alternative. When your debt is $13 trillion, it pays to save up those stray billions.

My Nickel’s Worth Goose ‘genocide’ The June 30 front page article in The Bulletin regarding the 109 geese that lost their lives on the previous day deeply saddens me. What makes us, as humans, believe that we have the right to decide who lives and who doesn’t, regardless of species? I understand the whole food chain idea, but a mass killing of geese because they are an inconvenience just doesn’t seem right and brings to mind words like “genocide” and “holocaust.” (Do you suppose the Nazis were thinking that gassing hundreds of thousands of Jewish people was “quick and humane?”) Again, I ask, what gives us the right? What if we opened the parks to offleash dogs at times when geese were settling in for the night? Off-leash times between 7 and 9 p.m. and maybe again from 5 to 7 a.m. Maybe permits could be issued to insure responsible dog owners, and the fees could be used to help in the goose poop cleanup process? Anything has to be better than mass killings, of any species. Carrie Koepke Bend

Keep it open The closure of the west-side recycling facility on July 30 will be detrimental to the environment. People on the west side of Bend who use this facility are not going to drive to Knott

Landfill with their recyclable material because of the time involved and the high cost of gasoline. They will simply throw their recyclable material in the garbage, thus reducing the life of the landfill. I am asking that all write to Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste, 63000 S.E. 27th St., Bend, OR 97701, and ask them to reconsider this closure. Gary Martin Bend

Opinion balance Thanks to The Bulletin for working diligently to cover local news, especially local sports. It needs to work harder, however, for a balance of opinion pieces. Sunday, June 27, the “Perspective” section included four conservative pundits — Charles Krauthammer, Ross Douthat, Victor Davis Hanson and David Brooks. One lonely moderate, Bob Hebert, cannot alone provide enough balance for our community, which holds diverse political and social views. Marian Woodall Bend

Economic alliance We applaud the founders and board of the newly formed Deschutes Economic Alliance. If you read the alliance’s mission statement and objectives, it will enhance and expand the ongoing economic development efforts for this region.

Deschutes Economic Alliance is looking at some new approaches and ideas that go beyond what is currently being done to spur on economic development. Speaking on behalf of the Film Oregon Alliance board of directors, I met with Delore Zimmerman of Praxis Strategy Group, and they will be researching the strengths and weaknesses of Central Oregon to make recommendations on a broad strategy. Delore’s success in these efforts is demonstrated in many communities across the country. FOA’s interest is to work with other private and public entities to develop our region as a desirable destination for film, television and media production. Deschutes Economic Alliance has demonstrated its support in working with FOA to move this strategy forward. The film industry injects hundreds of millions of dollars into Oregon’s economy, and that benefits all of us, including Central Oregon. But we can do more. We support Deschutes Economic Alliance’s efforts to find new ways to bring economic growth to Central Oregon. It deserves the full support of business and civic leaders who want to see our region prosper. We will all benefit in working together in this regard. Some will say “seeing is believing,” but we think that “believing is seeing.” Visit www.filmoregon.org for more information. Stan Roach, president/co-founder, Film Oregon Alliance Bend

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Why John Boehner is the most unhappy person in Washington

O

ur Independence Day weekend winner of the title of Most Unhappy Person in Washington is: John Boehner, the House minority leader. I know this is a bit of a surprise since the award almost always goes to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, whose job is frequently compared to herding cats. Although cats are much more sympathetic than senators. I’d go for squirrels. Rabid squirrels. Rabid squirrels that are running for re-election. Even last week, Reid’s life looked pretty miserable because he is trying to get a commitment on finance reform from the newest Republican senator, Scott Brown of Massachusetts. Brown ran as a sort of populist man of the people, but in April, he told The Boston Globe that he couldn’t support the then-current version of the bill. When asked what he wanted changed, Brown said: “Well, what areas do you think should be fixed? I mean, you know, tell me. And then I’ll get a team and go fix it.” It was at this point that we began to suspect that Massachusetts’s junior sen-

ator is not a deep thinker. Brown came around and voted for the bill when it passed the Senate. Then he backed away when it came out of conference committee because the conferees had added a tax on big banks. Which Brown claimed he could not support. This was at the same time that he was refusing to give the Democrats a final critical vote on extending unemployment benefits. We have here a populist man of the people playing the role of friend to the big banks while not being particularly helpful to the long-term unemployed. What can I tell you? The guy is extremely popular in Massachusetts. Maybe it’s because he drives a truck. The Democrats dove back into conference and got rid of a $19 billion tax just to make Brown happy. Now he says he’s going to spend the upcoming holiday recess pondering the bill’s implications. This must be very frustrating for Reid, but it’s the sort of thing that happens so often that he must think of it as normal life. Boehner, the House Republican leader, seems to be in a more pathetic state, which began with an interview he did with The Pittsburgh Tribune-Re-

GAIL COLLINS view. This is the paper owned by Richard Mellon Scaife, the wealthy patron of right-wing causes, but all I can say is, you go, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Boehner dismissed the financial reform package as “killing an ant with a nuclear weapon.” Once again, Democrats did the happy dance. “That’s right,” said President Obama at his town hall meeting on the economy in Wisconsin. “He compared the financial crisis to an ant. The same financial crisis that led to the loss of nearly 8 million jobs.” It really was a ridiculous metaphor. The financial reform package is actually more like killing a mastodon with a small spear. Could work, but not the sort of weapon you’d want to count on for every occasion. Boehner also called for means-test-

ing Social Security so that retirees with “substantial non-Social Security income” don’t get payments. This should be popular with upper-middle-class Republican voters, whose great complaint has always been that the government insists on giving them too much money. Perhaps most interesting was his attack on the Obama administration’s attempts to impose a moratorium on deep-sea drilling. “The deep-water drilling — maybe there’s a reason there to pause till we know what happened and we can make sure we can prevent it from happening again,” Boehner said. “But all of this other drilling that’s going on down there in the more shallow waters — there’s no reason to have a moratorium.” This is actually a perfect description of the Obama policy. It was as if Boehner had denounced the health care reform law by saying that it would probably be a good idea to require people to have insurance and subsidize it for the poor, but that there was absolutely no reason to nationalize all the hospitals and have them run by the Army. Boehner looked burned out in the interview, like a sullen

college student sitting through a boring seminar. A very tanned, puffy-eyed, 60year-old college student. What was his problem? Joe Scarborough, the MSNBC talk-show host and former Republican congressman, volunteered an answer: Boehner had the work ethic of a sullen college student as well. “Every Republican I talk to says John Boehner, by 5 or 6 o’clock at night, you can see him at bars. He is not a hard worker,” said Scarborough. Defending his boss to Politico.com, a Boehner spokesman said that the Republican leader has spent all his spare time raising money for the party. “Thus far this year, he’s headlined more than 230 events and raised about $27 million. And that’s just the beginning.” Think about that. The year is only half over, so that means Boehner is averaging about 1.25 fundraising events per day. No wonder he looks tired. No wonder he doesn’t know that the deepwater drilling moratorium only involves deep-water drilling. Gail Collins is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 B5

O Wagner, 83, vintner and wine pioneer New York Times News Service Stanley Wagner, a vintner who three decades ago was one of the first people to open a winery in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, and whose wines quickly earned state and national recognition, died June 26 at his home in Lodi, N.Y. He was 83. He died after a brief illness, his family said. Established in 1979, Wagner Vineyards is on the eastern shore of Seneca Lake, about 25 miles northwest of Ithaca. The vineyard, which grows 20 varieties of grapes on 250 acres, produces about 50,000 cases of wine a year. The winery made its reputation with whites like chardonnay, riesling and gewurztraminer; it is also known today for reds like cabernet sauvignon, merlot and pinot noir.

Roads Continued from B1 Motorists visiting the center will be allowed to turn left into the parking lot from the northbound traffic lanes. Construction will continue on U.S. Highway 97 between Lava Butte and South Century Drive today through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Motorists are asked to use caution while traveling through the work areas, as trucks carrying rocks will be entering and leaving the highway near the Cottonwood and South Century interchanges and by Vandevert Road. On U.S. Highway 20 from Northeast Purcell Boulevard to Powell Butte Highway, traffic will be reduced to one lane at night during the week while sidewalks and ADA ramps are renovated. On the Bend Parkway, no work will be done this week at construction sites. Work will resume the week of July 12 to repair ruts and smooth the bridges and overpasses along the Parkway. On U.S. Highway 20 near Tumalo, excavation work will begin to widen the east shoulders at the intersection of U.S. Highway 20 and Seventh Street. Signs will be posted near all worksites to alert motorists to construction efforts, and ODOT asks that drivers use caution while traveling through work areas. All construction is dependent on the weather.

Esterman Continued from B1 The ponytailed Esterman, who has been married for 11 years, has a nostalgic streak. He owns a 1956 Dodge Coronet, a nearly identical model to his grandfather’s favorite car. In a side room at his home, Esterman has put collectibles on crowded display. A Muhammad Ali pinball machine sits in one corner, waiting for repairs. At least a dozen California — his home state — license plates hang from the walls. A professional photographer, his work revolves around memorabilia. Esterman has several 7-inch singles, including recordings of Johnny Cash and Elvis. He’s energetic when he speaks, ideas pouring out, and lately he has spent most of his days sending out news releases and looking for support. That effort has come in place of his work as a photographer. In 1987, Esterman’s 6-year-old son Michael died in an accidental drowning in Arizona. That loss, Esterman said, drove him to be outspoken and eventually led to this campaign.

15-point platform Esterman’s campaign, he knows, can have a rambling feel. His platform issues range widely, and if he has a campaign office, it’s where his computer

Top Lebanese Shiite cleric Fadlallah By Bassem Mroue and Zeina Karam The Associated Press

BEIRUT — The leading Shiite cleric in Lebanon and one of the sect’s most revered religious authorities, Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah, died Sunday after a long illness. He was 75. Fadlallah’s doctor, Hashem Noureddine, told The Associated Press that the cleric, who had been hospitalized for the past two weeks with a liver problem, died from internal bleeding in his stomach. Seen by some as a spiritual mentor to the Hezbollah militant movement and by others as a voice of pragmatism and religious moderation, Fadlallah enjoyed a following that stretched beyond Lebanon’s borders to Iraq, the Gulf and as far away

River Continued from B1 OYCC is part of a larger federal program that pays teens minimum wage to work in national forests, national parks, at national historic monuments and on Bureau of Land Management land. Most crews maintain trails or clear invasive species, but the students on the three Crooked River crews are providing sophisticated data collection usually completed by people with years of training and college degrees. “We have a lot of OYCC crews out right now, and the other crews are doing important work, too, but the work the crews from Crook County are doing is very specialized,” said Lynn Roby, youth program coordinator for the Ochoco National Forest. Craig Carr, coordinator of the Crooked River Watershed Council, said the data students were collecting would be very useful to people like him. Carr has a doctorate in rangeland ecology and management, and is one of the professionals who could be analyzing the data students are collecting this summer. Correctly reporting the different plants, whether or not they are healthy and how much ground they cover, Carr said, requires training and skill.

Quality of data “The first question people ask is about the quality of the data,” Carr said. But, he said, he’d met many of the students and had seen what they could do. “There’s no reason they shouldn’t (be able to do it),” he said. The teenagers may not have the traditional training for this job, but they do have Brian Watts and Rebecca Barret, their energetic teachers, and the cadre of

as central Asia. He played a key role in the rise to prominence of Lebanon’s Shiite community over the past 30 years, and was one of the founders of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s governing Dawa Party. He was believed to be the party’s religious guide until the last days of his life. Known for his staunch antiAmerican views, he was described by Western media in the 1980s as a spiritual leader of the Lebanese militant Hezbollah — a claim both he and the group denied. Fadlallah was born in Iraq in 1935 and lived in the country’s Shiite holy city of Najaf, where he was considered one of the leading clerics, until the age of 30. He then moved to Lebanon — his family hailed from the southern Lebanese village of

Ainata — where he began lecturing on religion. In the ensuing decades, he would prod Lebanon’s Shiites, who today make up a third of the country’s population of four million, to fight for their rights. During Lebanon’s 1975-90 civil war, he was linked to Iranian-backed Shiite militants who kidnapped Americans and other Westerners, and bombed the U.S. Embassy and Marine base in Lebanon, killing more than 260 Americans. Western intelligence sources at the time said Fadlallah blessed the drivers of the vehicles used in the attack on the Marine barracks and a simultaneous bombing of French troops in Beirut, although the cleric repeatedly denied the assertion. But Fadlallah argued such acts were justifiable when the door to

dialogue is locked shut. “When one fires a bullet at you, you cannot offer him roses,” he said. With age, Fadlallah’s views mellowed, and he lost much of his 1980s militancy. His sermons, once fiery diatribes denouncing American imperialism, took on a pragmatic tone as he urged dialogue among nations. The stocky, gray-bearded cleric with piercing brown eyes below his black turban, rejected being described in Western media as Hezbollah’s mentor. He claimed his relationship with the group was the same as with any other Shiite faction, but was simply more obvious because of his physical presence in Lebanon. “I reject it not because I reject Hezbollah, but because I refuse to be given a title that I don’t possess,” he said. While Fadlallah’s exact role

professionals Watts has brought to Crook County to train, mentor and encourage them. Watts has been teaching in Central Oregon for nine years and began the Natural Resources Education Program when he started teaching in Prineville in 2008. Barret teaches science at Redmond High School and said she was excited to join the OYCC program this summer with a crew of teens from Redmond. Watts teaches courses ranging from introductory biology to advanced anatomy and physiology. Watts said he’s even taught courses in history and English that are geared toward teaching kids about resource management. In the summers, Watts hires some of his most promising students to work on the specialized OYCC crews. He said it was not always the smartest students who make the best employees. He looks for kids who learn quickly, show a clear sense of responsibility and are willing to work hard. On the riverbank, Watts is a dynamo of enthusiasm, bouncing from a student question about the proper pronunciation of “Elymus cinereus” (“eh-LYEmus sin-er-EE-us”) to explaining the ecological importance of juniper trees. According to people who work with him, it is this enthusiasm and energy that help Watts to bring together a wide variety of funding sources to run his natural resources program. “Brian is really the driving force of just making it happen,” Roby said. She said the Ochoco National Forest was glad to offer the structure needed to provide the summer jobs and connect kids with Forest Service scientists to help oversee their projects. This wouldn’t be possible without a strong adult leader, Roby said. “These kids are just really excited about what they are doing,

and that is directly related to how excited Brian is,” she said. By his own estimate, Watts has brought close to $250,000 into Crook County. He found outside funding for his kids to work on their own grants and pulled in the money needed to pay his students for their work this summer. He even found outside funding for his own salary when the Crook County School District was unable to cover his position last year. For the past year, Wolftree, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting environmental science education, has paid a portion of Watts’ salary.

gram, which is funded through a grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and administered by Heart of Oregon, a Central Oregon nonprofit focused on job creation. “When, locally, we employ youth, it’s great for economic stimulus because young people spend money they earn here,” Laura Handy, program director for Heart of Oregon, said. “Young people create their identities with job skills when they are first in the job market. Right now, they are getting pushed out and don’t have the opportunity to develop job skills.” Handy said young people, ages 17 to 24, had an even higher unemployment rate than other groups in Crook County, which reported 17 percent unemployment, the highest in the state, for May, the last month unemployment numbers were available. “With this experience, they are going to have a chance to compete,” she said. Annette Stevenson, 18, is a crew leader for one of the Prineville crews this summer. She said she had learned a lot about being a leader in just two weeks. “I guess it’s sort of like being a parent,” the teenager said. “You can’t be everyone’s friend.” Annette said she had worked before — at Starbucks — but said this job was more in line with her future plans. She’s headed to study science at Cottie College in Missouri in August and hopes to transfer to Oregon State University to study marine biology or zoology after her sophomore year. “This (job) is giving me more life skills,” she said. “And it will look better on a resume than making espresso.”

Still need funding “He’s insanely energetic,” Dale Waddell, executive director and co-founder of Wolftree, said of Watts. Waddell said his group had invested in teachers throughout the state, including in Madras and Gilchrist, whom they thought were making the biggest difference for their students. As the state budget crisis has forced districts to make deeper cuts and look at layoffs again this summer, Waddell said it was getting more difficult for his group to raise the funds to support teachers like Watts. “Right now,” Waddell said, “I have not located the funding sources to support (Watts’) position. The superintendent calls me or e-mails me constantly, but we have just not found those dollars.” Waddell said he would need an additional $30,000 to continue to support Watts’ position. “It’s always up in the air,” Watts said. Right now, even though the funding has not been found, he’s still planning to teach in Crook County next fall. In the meantime, Watts is concentrated on the OYCC pro-

Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.

with the militant group remains unclear, Hezbollah mourned his passing. The group’s leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, said on Sunday that Hezbollah had lost “a merciful father, a wise leader and ... a strong backer.” Fadlallah escaped several assassination attempts, including a March 1985 car bomb near his home in the Bir el-Abed district of south Beirut that killed 80 people. The bomb, planted between his apartment block and a nearby mosque Fadlallah was attending that day, was timed to go off as he passed by. But Fadlallah stopped to listen to an old woman’s complaints and escaped the 440-pound bomb’s blast. Despite his harsh criticism of U.S. policy, he condemned the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States as acts of terror.

Festival Continued from B1 Coen Harder, 12, of Salem, who lives in Sisters during the summer, stood in a busy area with a cooler in a red wagon, selling water and Gatorade. “This is what you want on a hot day,” he shouted to passers-by. After about an hour in business, he said things were going well; he’d almost sold out all of his merchandise. Coen said he planned to use the money to help pay for a gokart he hopes to buy. Ali Michalski, 9, of Bend, was working in a booth her family has run for 13 years, selling pink lemonade. She said she was enjoying the day and planned to check out the festival’s other offerings before the day was over. “I just love the Fourth of July,” she said. “It’s my favorite holiday.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Weather Continued from B1 Trimarco said it’s not likely that the rainfall will be significant, and high winds are not expected. “There’s not a whole lot of moisture,” she said. “It’s going to be pretty dry — maybe a few sprinkles here and there.” The temperatures at the end of the week will be slightly higher than normal. The average high temperature for this time of year is about 85 degrees, Trimarco said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

sits in his home. Esterman lists a 15-point platform on his website, on which he touts himself as “The Commoner running for Governor.” He doesn’t have specifics on how he would achieve each point, but he believes the list reflects concerns of Oregonians. The platform includes bringing jobs to Oregon and reducing health care costs. He wants to review how each state agency is funded and put “practical and creative programs” in schools. Esterman supports annual legislative sessions, and he believes elected officials should give up any benefits once they’re out of office. “The reason it jumps like that, my thing is we have more than one issue (in Oregon),” Esterman said. “I’m not just going to harp on one. I’m going to put it all out there.” Still, Esterman wanted some organization and drafted his longtime friend, Gary Dale, as his campaign manager. Dale, not a professional political adviser, owns a farm near Tumalo, has a bookkeeping business and sells fishing lures. The two friends share a dissatisfaction with major party politics. “I’m a registered Republican, and I’m just tired of both parties,” Dale said. “Both parties remind me of teenagers fighting over who is going to use the car over the weekend with no

comprehension of the finances of buying tires, gas, paying for insurance.” Whether he runs unaffiliated or on the Independent ticket, Esterman will probably struggle to win. Since 1859, only Julius Meier was elected Oregon’s governor as an independent. Even so, Oregon State University Political Science Department Chairman Bill Lunch said the state has a history of independent candidate success. But that success has largely been limited to percentages high enough to be a spoiler. In 1990, Al Mobley ran as a social conservative and, with 13 percent of the vote, was credited with tilting the election to Democrat Barbara Roberts. In that way, minor party or unaffiliated candidates can influence races, even if they don’t win, Lunch said. “They can be important, even if they’re not going to win office,” Lunch said. “(Winning) is very rare.” Mobley was backed by several conservative, religious organizations, according to Lunch. Another way an independent candidate can influence an election is to have a lot of cash. That’s not Esterman’s strength. He has raised $371.02, all but $10 of which comes from the candidate himself, according to ORESTAR, the secretary of state’s election tracking website. Lunch pointed to Ross Perot,

who ran for president in 1992 and 1996, as an example of what money can do for a candidate. Like Esterman, Perot was frustrated with the major parties. Unlike Esterman, Perot was hugely wealthy. “That’s somebody who was so wealthy he could self-finance an enormous ad campaign,” Esterman said. “It’s a measure of how little attention people pay to these things that ... to have a chance to attract a significant vote, (candidates) need to advertise very, very heavily.”

Several options To his own irritation, Esterman understands he has neither name recognition nor a war chest full of campaign cash. But he’s convinced that if he gets on the ballot, he’ll have a chance. At the least, he’ll be able to raise issues that he feels are ignored. People in Esterman’s situation have three ways to get on the general election ballot, according to Brenda Bayes, the deputy director of the Oregon Secretary of State’s Election Division. Esterman could be nominated by a minor party — in this case the Independent Party — or he can gather more than 18,000 signatures to appear as a single candidate. The final option, which Esterman has called “impossible,” is the assembly of electors. To achieve that, Esterman would have to assemble 1,000 people

in the same place, at the same time, and have them all sign a petition. Because of what he considers the difficulty of those routes, Esterman has made one of his top issues reforming how people can appear on a ballot. Making it easier to appear on the gubernatorial ballot is one of Esterman’s goals, but he maintains that is not his only purpose. In the meantime, Esterman’s hopes ride on the upcoming Independent Party nomination. The party, for the first time, will nominate a candidate online. All registered Independent Party voters — not nonaffiliated voters — will receive a postcard soon. The postcard will list a ballot code, and people will be able to cast their vote for several Independent candidates online, according to party Chairwoman Linda Williams. Esterman joins Kitzhaber and Jerry Williams, a founder of Soloflex, on the Independent ballot. The election runs until the end of July, when Esterman will find out if he’ll be on the general election ballot. Even if he loses, Esterman may push for an assembly of electors — the “impossible” option. “If someone tells me no, that just makes me want to try again,” Esterman said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JULY 5

TUESDAY

Today: Mostly sunny.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

76

41

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin 80s

Government Camp

77/48

77/46

81/48

57/51

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

79/47

72/47

Mitchell

Madras

79/41

77/45

Camp Sherman 71/37 Redmond Prineville 76/40 Cascadia 78/40 75/51 Sisters 60s 74/39 Bend Post 76/41

Oakridge Elk Lake 73/49

64/27

68/54

Seattle

Hampton

70s Chemult

71/36

75/47

68/47

80/48

86/54

80s

102/67

79/44

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear tonight.

Crater Lake 67/46

Elko

Idaho Falls 75/46

86/46

100s

75/39

66/42

Boise

76/41

Redding

Helena

70s

Bend

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

72/33

Missoula

Eugene

Reno

93/59

San Francisco 63/52

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:28 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:51 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:29 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:51 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:31 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:52 p.m.

Salt Lake City

90s

83/62

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

New

First

Full

Last

July 11

July 18

July 25

Aug. 2

Astoria . . . . . . . . 63/53/0.02 . . . . . 65/52/pc. . . . . . . 75/57/s Baker City . . . . . . 76/36/0.00 . . . . . . 71/42/s. . . . . . . 75/47/s Brookings . . . . . . 82/59/0.00 . . . . . . 80/56/s. . . . . . . 69/56/s Burns. . . . . . . . . . 80/38/0.00 . . . . . . 74/41/s. . . . . . . 77/48/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 73/44/0.00 . . . . . . 75/47/s. . . . . . . 88/56/s Klamath Falls . . . 81/39/0.00 . . . . . . 82/48/s. . . . . . . 87/51/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 75/39/0.00 . . . . . . 81/50/s. . . . . . . 84/50/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 73/29/0.00 . . . . . . 74/35/s. . . . . . . 77/43/s Medford . . . . . . . 86/47/0.00 . . . . . . 88/55/s. . . . . . . 96/60/s Newport . . . . . . . 63/46/0.00 . . . . . . 61/50/s. . . . . . . 72/54/s North Bend . . . . . . 64/48/NA . . . . . . 64/53/s. . . . . . . 70/56/s Ontario . . . . . . . . 85/53/0.00 . . . . . . 80/52/s. . . . . . . 83/56/s Pendleton . . . . . . 79/46/0.00 . . . . . . 78/48/s. . . . . . . 86/53/s Portland . . . . . . . 67/53/0.01 . . . . . . 73/54/s. . . . . . . 86/61/s Prineville . . . . . . . 73/36/0.00 . . . . . . 78/40/s. . . . . . . 82/47/s Redmond. . . . . . . 80/34/0.00 . . . . . . 77/40/s. . . . . . . 84/44/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 80/49/0.00 . . . . . 81/53/pc. . . . . . . 89/59/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 70/46/0.00 . . . . . . 74/52/s. . . . . . . 87/58/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 73/31/0.00 . . . . . . 74/39/s. . . . . . . 84/44/s The Dalles . . . . . . 75/52/0.00 . . . . . . 76/52/s. . . . . . . 87/54/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75/42 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 in 2007 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 in 1959 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.08” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.24” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.09 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.55 in 1992 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

91 52

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

90 56

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:10 a.m. . . . . . .9:35 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:00 a.m. . . . . .11:02 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:50 a.m. . . . . .11:43 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:18 a.m. . . . . .12:23 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .11:54 a.m. . . . . .12:21 a.m. Uranus . . . . . .12:11 a.m. . . . . .12:11 p.m.

OREGON CITIES City

70/53

75/37

67/29

Calgary 63/46

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear tonight. Eastern

74/38

Fort Rock

Vancouver

73/54

Burns

74/35

72/34

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 86° Medford • 30° Meacham

60s

La Pine

Crescent

Crescent Lake

A few isolated showers will be possible in the northern Cascades early today.

FRIDAY Partly cloudy.

91 52

BEND ALMANAC

74/36

73/35

HIGH

82 45

Portland

Brothers

73/36

LOW

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

74/37

Sunriver

HIGH

THURSDAY

Sunny.

NORTHWEST

Partly to mostly sunny today. Mostly clear tonight. Central

78/46

Sunny.

Tonight: Mostly clear.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37,418 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124,701 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,315 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 41,796 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145,297 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,116 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55.7 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 68/54

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 63/46

S

Saskatoon 62/45

Portland 73/54

Billings 76/50

Bismarck 82/54

Boise 80/48

• 106° Goodyear, Ariz.

Cheyenne 77/47 San Francisco 63/52

Stanley, Idaho

• 5.09” Shenandoah, Iowa

Las Vegas 104/79

Salt Lake City 83/62

Phoenix 104/78

Honolulu 88/74

Tijuana 70/56 Chihuahua 84/63

La Paz 86/64 Anchorage 59/49

Juneau 54/50

Rapid City 82/54

Denver 82/55 Albuquerque 92/62

Los Angeles 69/60

Mazatlan 80/71

S

S

S

S

S

To ronto 90/67

St. Paul 84/65 Green Bay 78/68 Des Moines 82/69 Chicago 86/71 Omaha 81/66

Kansas City 81/71

S S

Quebec 86/66

Thunder Bay Winnipeg 79/57 75/57

Seattle 70/53

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• 29°

S

Detroit 92/74 Columbus 92/69 Louisville 96/72

Portland 83/64

Halifax 77/60

Boston 90/73 New York 95/77 Philadelphia 97/77 Washington, D. C. 97/76

Buffalo

90/72

St. Louis 94/71

Charlotte Nashville Little Rock 92/65 93/72 93/75 Oklahoma City Atlanta 85/73 89/70 Birmingham Dallas 89/73 91/78 New Orleans 90/77 Orlando Houston 88/74 93/76 Miami 89/77

Monterrey 90/76

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .87/75/0.00 . . .89/72/t . . 91/71/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . .92/69/s . . 93/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . . 97/72/s Albuquerque. . . .91/64/0.00 . . .92/62/s . . . 93/64/s Anchorage . . . . .59/52/0.09 . . .59/49/r . . . 59/48/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . .89/70/s . . . 91/71/s Atlantic City . . . .96/66/0.01 . . .90/72/s . . . 92/74/s Austin . . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . 91/76/pc . . 92/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . .98/59/0.00 . . .97/73/s . . . 99/74/s Billings. . . . . . . . .79/51/0.00 . .76/50/sh . . 75/52/pc Birmingham . . . .87/67/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . . .88/73/t Bismarck . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 82/54/pc . . 75/55/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . .80/48/s . . . 80/54/s Boston. . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .90/73/s . . . 95/73/s Bridgeport, CT. . .97/66/0.00 . . .91/72/s . . . 93/72/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 91/73/pc Burlington, VT. . .88/61/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . . .94/74/t Caribou, ME . . . .85/63/0.07 . .84/65/sh . . 84/60/sh Charleston, SC . .87/61/0.00 . . .90/72/s . . . 90/73/s Charlotte. . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .92/65/s . . . 94/67/s Chattanooga. . . .92/66/0.00 . . .92/71/s . . . 93/71/s Cheyenne . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . 77/47/pc . . 70/48/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .86/71/t . . . .88/71/t Cincinnati . . . . . .91/66/0.01 . . .92/69/s . . . 93/70/s Cleveland . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . . 93/71/s Colorado Springs 82/61/0.00 . 80/52/pc . . 78/55/pc Columbia, MO . .85/69/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . 89/73/pc Columbia, SC . . .88/62/0.00 . . .92/68/s . . . 94/69/s Columbus, GA. . .86/67/0.00 . 90/73/pc . . . 93/72/s Columbus, OH. . .91/64/0.00 . 92/69/pc . . . 93/71/s Concord, NH . . . .91/57/0.00 . . .94/65/s . . 95/68/pc Corpus Christi. . .90/79/0.00 . 91/80/pc . . 91/79/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .93/75/0.00 . 91/78/pc . . 94/78/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . . 91/70/s Denver. . . . . . . . .81/58/1.28 . 82/55/pc . . 78/53/pc Des Moines. . . . .81/72/0.50 . . .82/69/t . . . .83/68/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . . 93/73/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .80/76/0.56 . 79/59/pc . . 77/57/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .97/71/0.00 . . .98/70/s . . 99/71/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/57/0.00 . .73/50/sh . . . 74/51/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .84/69/0.24 . 82/58/pc . . 78/56/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .79/43/0.00 . . .81/47/s . . . 82/48/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .92/62/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . 90/67/pc Green Bay. . . . . .86/70/0.07 . . .78/68/t . . . .78/69/t Greensboro. . . . .90/62/0.00 . . .94/64/s . . . 96/68/s Harrisburg. . . . . .93/58/0.00 . . .95/72/s . . . 96/74/s Hartford, CT . . . .95/64/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . . 98/73/s Helena. . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . .66/42/sh . . 71/46/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 87/75/sh Houston . . . . . . .91/75/0.06 . 93/76/pc . . 93/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .90/72/s . . . .90/71/t Indianapolis . . . .91/69/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . . 93/72/s Jackson, MS . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .93/73/t . . . .91/75/t Madison, WI . . . .86/71/0.00 . . .81/70/t . . . .81/69/t Jacksonville. . . . .87/74/0.00 . . .86/72/t . . 89/72/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .52/50/0.16 . .54/50/sh . . 58/48/sh Kansas City. . . . .86/74/0.01 . . .81/71/t . . . .84/73/t Lansing . . . . . . . .92/62/0.01 . . .87/70/t . . 91/67/pc Las Vegas . . . . .100/77/0.00 . .104/79/s . . 103/80/s Lexington . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .92/71/s . . . 92/71/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/68/1.71 . . .81/66/t . . . .84/67/t Little Rock. . . . . .94/77/0.00 . 93/75/pc . . . .92/75/t Los Angeles. . . . .72/61/0.00 . 69/60/pc . . . 69/59/s Louisville . . . . . . .93/76/0.00 . . .96/72/s . . . 96/74/s Memphis. . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .95/76/s . . . .93/77/t Miami . . . . . . . . .89/73/1.22 . . .89/77/t . . . .90/76/t Milwaukee . . . . .91/69/0.02 . . .79/69/t . . . .81/69/t Minneapolis . . . .85/73/0.10 . 84/65/pc . . . .83/64/t Nashville . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . . .93/72/s . . 94/73/pc New Orleans. . . .89/79/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .89/78/t New York . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . . .95/77/s . . . 97/79/s Newark, NJ . . . .101/67/0.00 . . .96/77/s . . . 97/76/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .92/64/0.00 . . .93/73/s . . . 96/74/s Oklahoma City . .82/72/1.21 . . .85/73/t . . . .90/73/t Omaha . . . . . . . .78/67/2.74 . . .81/66/t . . . .84/67/t Orlando. . . . . . . .85/73/0.00 . . .88/74/t . . . .91/74/t Palm Springs. . .101/71/0.00 . .102/72/s . . 104/73/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .86/71/t . . 88/70/pc Philadelphia . . . .96/69/0.00 . . .97/77/s . . . 99/79/s Phoenix. . . . . . .104/81/0.00 . .104/78/s . . 105/78/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .88/58/0.00 . . .91/67/s . . . 94/68/s Portland, ME. . . .90/65/0.00 . 83/64/pc . . . .88/67/t Providence . . . . .94/66/0.00 . . .92/73/s . . . 97/74/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .93/61/0.00 . . .95/66/s . . . 97/68/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .70/54/0.08 . 82/54/pc . . 75/54/pc Savannah . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . . .89/72/s . . . 91/73/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .85/55/0.00 . . .93/59/s . . . 94/60/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .65/52/0.00 . 70/53/pc . . . 78/57/s Richmond . . . . . .95/61/0.00 . . .97/72/s . . . 99/73/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .80/69/0.47 . . .81/61/t . . 81/63/pc Rochester, NY . . .87/61/0.00 . 95/70/pc . . 95/71/pc Spokane . . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . . 79/54/s Sacramento. . . . .98/58/0.00 . . .96/60/s . . . 92/60/s Springfield, MO. .85/73/0.06 . . .88/69/t . . . .88/71/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .93/77/0.12 . 94/71/pc . . . .92/74/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/73/1.31 . . .88/76/t . . . .91/76/t Salt Lake City . . .78/57/0.00 . . .83/62/s . . . 83/63/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/76/0.00 . .100/71/s . . 101/71/s San Antonio . . . .90/78/0.02 . 91/77/pc . . 92/76/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . .89/73/t . . . .89/73/t San Diego . . . . . .66/60/0.00 . 67/61/pc . . . 68/61/s Washington, DC .94/67/0.00 . . .97/76/s . . 100/77/s San Francisco . . .79/55/0.00 . . .63/52/s . . . 64/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .79/72/0.80 . . .85/72/t . . . .88/71/t San Jose . . . . . . .85/56/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . 85/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .80/44/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 86/56/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .88/55/0.02 . 87/53/pc . . 86/56/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .101/77/0.00 . .102/72/s . . 102/73/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .77/57/0.00 . .67/52/sh . . 65/53/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . .88/66/s . . . 87/67/s Auckland. . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .53/47/sh . . 54/49/sh Baghdad . . . . . .111/84/0.00 . .112/86/s . . 113/85/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .90/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . .102/79/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 92/73/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .87/74/s . . . 86/73/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . 75/52/pc . . 74/51/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .64/50/0.06 . . .67/50/t . . . .66/49/t Budapest. . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .80/59/t . . 79/58/pc Buenos Aires. . . .79/68/0.00 . .66/51/sh . . 65/50/sh Cabo San Lucas .84/68/0.00 . . .84/70/c . . 88/70/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .97/69/s . . . 98/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .63/46/sh . . 72/49/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .88/77/5.45 . . .87/79/t . . . .88/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.04 . .61/52/sh . . 60/51/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .58/50/sh . . 60/51/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 85/60/pc . . 84/59/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . 63/45/pc Hong Kong . . . . .95/84/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .90/80/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 83/65/pc . . 84/64/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .95/70/s . . . 93/71/s Johannesburg . . .57/43/0.00 . 57/42/pc . . 59/42/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . 65/59/pc . . 67/58/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 . . .92/65/s . . 93/64/pc London . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . .67/53/sh . . 66/54/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . .100/73/s . . 99/72/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .90/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/90/0.00 . .107/81/s . . 108/83/s Mexico City. . . . .77/57/0.05 . . .80/60/t . . . .79/59/t Montreal. . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .87/67/t . . . .82/60/t Moscow . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 81/56/pc . . 80/55/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 73/54/pc . . 71/56/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .89/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .89/77/0.00 . . .95/82/c . . . .96/83/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . .85/73/sh . . 84/72/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.11 . 65/48/pc . . 64/47/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .87/66/t . . . .82/61/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 76/53/pc . . 75/52/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .79/63/0.00 . . .77/59/s . . 76/61/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .89/69/t . . 88/68/pc Santiago . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .56/31/sh . . 55/33/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .77/58/s . . 76/59/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . .73/65/sh . . 71/64/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .85/71/t . . 84/70/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .90/79/0.11 . . .91/80/t . . 89/79/pc Singapore . . . . . .86/79/0.15 . . .87/78/t . . . .86/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .71/56/c . . 68/55/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . .58/44/sh . . 59/45/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .99/84/0.00 . . .93/82/t . . . .91/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .92/75/s . . . 91/74/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . 87/76/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .90/67/t . . . .83/66/t Vancouver. . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 68/54/pc . . . 73/57/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . 80/58/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .73/55/t . . 72/54/pc

Canines get into the spirit of the holiday in Idaho

10 Presented by

TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25 Presented by

Photos by Dean Hare / Moscow-Pullman (Idaho) Daily News

Oskar, 2, a Pomeranian owned by Beth Marshall, of Moscow, Idaho, waits for the start of the annual Moscow Mutt Strut at Friendship Square on Sunday in Moscow.

Jeff Jones, of Moscow, Idaho, puts a hat on his dog, Jake, 3, before the annual Moscow Mutt Strut at Friendship Square on Sunday.

Fridays: Noon - 6 pm, Saturdays & Sundays 10 am - 6 pm


G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

‘Tween TV Turns out, it has some appeal for parents, too, Page C2

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JULY 5, 2010

GREEN

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Inside

“It’s kind of like the backyard homestead — utilizing your land.” — Jane Bowerman, co-founder of Grow

Do you know who your kids are talking to? Bend man’s app gives parents, authorities a powerful tool to help keep children safe By David Holley

parents to monitor everything a child sees on his or her phone, inBreak down My Mobile Watch- cluding downloaded applications dog to its essentials and you have and sent or received text messaga phone application that lets par- es, phone calls or pictures. Lotter ents know who is intersaid parents can prevent acting with their chila child from downloaddren, according to the ing a risqué mobile apBend resident who develplication with My Mobile oped it. Watchdog, or they can In past decades, parsee when a child might ents had an easier time receive inappropriate knowing who their chiltext messages, which dren were talking to, with they might not have acpersonal communication Bob Lotter, cess to otherwise. primarily person-to-per- founder Each time a child reson or a conversation via and CEO of ceives a text or a picture a home’s landline. eAgency.com message, the parent is But rapidly developing notified with a duplitechnology — first the cate, which also states Internet, now the growwho has contacted the ing prevalence of mobile child. A copy of everyphones among preteens thing also is retained and teens — has allowed in a database for record anyone from stalkers to keeping. bullies to child predators easier and more diTo catch rect access to youth, said a predator Bob Lotter, founder and CEO of eAgency.com, a Newport Beach, The tool has been quite useful Calif.-based company that sells for law enforcement, too, LotMy Mobile Watchdog. ter said, having helped officials “Nowadays, you pick up the catch 315 child predators in 12 phone and you have a relationship jurisdictions nationally since he with somebody a thousand miles launched it in 2007. Most peoaway,” said Lotter, who moved to ple think of child predators as Bend from California six months people lurking in chat rooms or ago. “Know who your kid is talk- perusing the Internet for picing to.” tures, Lotter said. My Mobile Watchdog allows See Watchdog / C6

The Bulletin

OTECH

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Jane Bowerman, 37, right, the co-founder of Grow, works with Jenn Adams, 33, on a home garden Friday in northwest Bend. Grow provides planning, planting, maintaining and harvesting help for people who want to grow their own produce in their backyard.

Garden to suit A Bend business helps design, plant, tend and harvest; customers pick the plants they want By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

G

rowing up in Tumalo, David Hall and Jane Bowerman didn’t have to go far when their mom handed them a grocery list. They simply went to the family’s vegetable garden in the backyard to check off the fruits and vegetables. “We both grew up gardening here,” Hall said. And this spring, siblings Hall and Bowerman started a new business, called Grow, to provide planning, planting, maintaining and harvesting help for

people who want to grow their own produce in their backyard — no matter how big, or small, the space may be. “It’s kind of like the backyard homestead — utilizing your land,” Bowerman said. The idea for Grow sprouted from their other business, Holly Contracting and Design, which focuses on green and sustainable building. But buildings aren’t the only potentially green features of a property, Hall said. The site itself can be sustainable, too. “As builders, we have more responsibility for the land than just building structures,” he said. So, at Bend’s Earth Day fair in April,

On the Web For more information, visit www .growbend.com or call 541-419-0326. Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

they launched Grow. The company offers consulting and design work for gardens, and also can install container gardens, raised boxes, greenhouses, chicken coops and other structures, tend the garden, harvest the fruits and vegetables, and even show people how to can or preserve the produce. See Garden / C6

Siluria Technologies’ Erik Sher, left, a chemist and researcher, and Alex Tkachenko, a molecular biologist and co-founder of the company, with a mass spectrometer used to screen materials at the company’s offices in San Francisco. They are working on using a virus to convert methane to ethylene in a more efficient way.

Through nanoscience, a more efficient way to manufacture plastics By John Markoff New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — A team of molecular biologists and materials scientists said last week they had genetically engineered a virus to convert methane to ethylene more efficiently and at a significantly lower temperature than previously possible. If they are successful in commercializing the new material, it will herald the arrival of a set of new technologies that represents a synthesis of molecular biology and industrial chemistry. Ethylene, a gas with a characteristically sweet smell that may have once given insights to the Oracle of Delphi, is widely used in the manufacturing of plastics, solvents and fibers, and it is essential for an array of consumer and in-

dustrial products. But it is still produced by steam cracking, a hightemperature, energy-intensive, expensive industrial process first developed in the 19th century. In this process, hydrocarbons found in crude oil are broken down into a range of simpler chemical compounds. The search for more efficient, less expensive approaches to the production of ethylene has gone on for more than three decades, and although some progress has been made, no new techniques have yet proved commercially viable. Now, researchers at Siluria Technologies, a Silicon Valley startup based here, are reporting progress in commercializing a nanoscience-based approach to ethylene production. See Ethylene / C3

SCIENCE

Bowerman and Adams cover a bed Friday. Bowerman began Grow this spring with her brother, David Hall. Bowerman meets customers at their homes to plan what type and size of garden might fit best. “It’s totally customizable,” she says.


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Picturesque memories of grandma’s house Dear Abby: After Grandma passed away at the age of 101, the thought of dismantling her home and dispersing her belongings was heartbreaking because her house had remained unchanged for so many years. I knew we couldn’t keep everything, but never seeing her house again was too much to bear. I asked my cousin to take photos of every room, every hallway, every closet and every view inside and out, so I could make an album of “Grandma’s House.” Now I have an album of photographs that makes me feel like I’m standing in the middle of it again. My cousin even photographed the auction in which we sold the things none of the family wanted or couldn’t fit in their homes. With all these reality TV programs that deal with hoarding and clutter, I wanted to share this idea as a healthy alternative to keeping “things” in place of memories. Looking at my photo album is even better than having the actual items, because everything is in the setting I remember. What I’m trying to convey is — sometimes you really can’t take it with you, and a picture is the next best thing. — Julie in Bradenton, Fla. Dear Julie: Thank you for a valuable suggestion. I’m sure I’m not the only grandchild who wishes that she had thought of it when my grandparents’ home was being dismantled. I’m sure that looking at your album brings back a multitude of happy memories. Dear Abby: I love my fiancé, “Charlie,” dearly, but I have one problem. When I first met him he was wearing some platform boots I thought were out of style. He claimed he wore them because he’s short. I don’t think that’s a good excuse. I think he just likes them. I have mentioned to Charlie numerous times that those boots have had it, and nobody wears them anymore. He gets upset when I tell him. I think he’s old-

DEAR ABBY fashioned about some things. When we go shopping, I show him other types of boots — to no avail. How can I get him to start wearing footwear that is more upto-date and looks better? — Can’t Get Through, Hammond, La. Dear Can’t Get Through: You can’t. And the more you nag Charlie, the more stubborn he will become. You can encourage him. Point out other styles of boots that will give him the “boost” in height he thinks he requires. But, in the end, if you don’t accept Charlie just the way he is, he may end up giving YOU the “boot.” Dear Abby: I host many casual backyard parties and invite my family as well as my husband’s. My family always declines for one reason or another, even when they are the only ones invited — so I have quit asking them to most of my gatherings because I’m always rejected. When they get wind of a barbecue that we have had, they become offended that they weren’t invited. I explained that because they always decline, I assumed they wouldn’t be interested. Abby, must I continue to invite them so they can reject me? — Offended and Hurt in Des Moines Dear Offended and Hurt: Not in my book. You’ll have less pain if you accept that you can’t please everyone. It appears that with your family you are damned if you do and damned if you don’t, and I see no reason why you should continue to invite anyone who continually refuses to come. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Some parents not ashamed to admit they like ‘tween TV By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Like any good parent, Karen Moss monitors the content of the television programs viewed by her 8-year-old daughter, Sara. It’s a process that usually plunges poor Mom into a black hole of boredom. But then one day, the Brentwood, Calif., resident sat down to watch an episode of Nickelodeon’s ’tween series, “iCarly.” Much to her surprise, she didn’t feel the urge to run screaming from the room. Now, Moss is a loyal devotee of the show starring Miranda Cosgrove as a girl with her own webcast. Even when Sara is off at a slumber party or otherwise engaged, she’ll occasionally check out “iCarly” on her own. And, yes, she’s not ashamed to admit that her iPod contains a few episodes. “It’s funny and smart, and safe without being cheesy,” Moss says. “I really enjoy it. Does that make me pathetic?” Not if you put stock in the numbers. According to Nielsen, “iCarly” is one of several current TV shows aimed at ’tweens (kids 8-13), but also watched by people who don’t wear braces or use Clearasil. An “iCarly” special earlier this year (“iSaved Your Life”) drew a remarkable audience of 12.4 million, 2.7 million of whom were adults ages 18-49. Even “Glee” star Jane Lynch is a fan, giving the show a recent shout-out while reciting her wedding vows. This kind of “iCarly” love among grown-ups is not a news flash to creator and executive producer Dan Schneider. He says he routinely hears from “older teens, college kids, parents and grandparents” who enjoy the

Jose Carlos Fajardo / Contra Costa Times

Karen Moss watches “iCarly” with her daughter, Sara. Even though it’s a kids’ show, Moss enjoys watching and will sometimes check it out — even when her daughter isn’t there. show and are “incredulous” that they do. He insists they shouldn’t be. “I’ve said from the start that I’m not going to write kiddie sitcoms. I write what I like and just adapt (to the genre),” Schneider says. “So it’s interesting to me when adults watch our show and suddenly find themselves saying, ‘This doesn’t suck.’” “iCarly” isn’t the only ’tween show making an impression on adult viewers and filling a TV void of family programming. “Good Luck Charlie,” a new Disney Channel sitcom about a family adjusting to the unexpected arrival of its fourth child, attracted more than 930,000 adults to its premiere episode in April. Other ’tween shows that perform reasonably well among adults include the animated “Phineas and Ferb,” “Hannah Montana” and “Wizards of Waverly Place” on the Disney Chan-

nel, and “Victorious” and “Big Time Rush” on Nickelodeon. “It’s kind of a new and refreshing trend,” says Dana Ewing, senior strategic planner for The Geppetto Group, a New Yorkbased youth marketing firm. “It’s a move back to the all-family type programming that the (broadcast) networks, for some reason, abandoned. These kinds of shows come with themes that are relatable and relevant to more than just the kids.” Indeed, the executives at the Disney Channel bat around the term “family inclusive” in reference to their shows, and speak of “entry points” that encourage both kids and their parents to watch. With Disney’s “Hannah Montana,” for example, adult viewers are drawn to the real-life relationship between Billy Ray Cyrus and daughter Miley. “But it goes beyond simply putting strong adult characters

in the shows,” says Adam Bonnett, senior vice president of original programming for the Disney Channel. “We want parents to see themselves in those characters — or even to see what they were like as a teen and appreciate what the younger characters are going through.” Bonnett points out that “Good Luck Charlie” often has the grown-ups talking about trying to find more time to spend with the kids — a desire that resonates with many parents. And a recent plot revolved around Mom yearning to be seen as “cool” by her daughter. Still, the youth networks seemingly walk a fine line in producing programs that appeal to adults. After all, don’t kids typically avoid things that their parents see as hip? Not always, claims Marjorie Cohn, chief of original programming development at Nickelodeon. “We’ve done studies that show, as the world changes, kids want to share more of their personal interests with their parents,” she says. “That doesn’t mean they still don’t have their secret lives on Facebook, but they’re basically saying, ‘(These shows) are mine, and I want to share them with you.’ It’s very much like the way parents share their classic rock songs with the kids.”

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Smart Travels This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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The Bachelorette Ali and the final five go to Portugal. (N) ’ Å (10:02) True Beauty (N) ‘14’ Å Persons Unknown Incoming (N) ‘14’ Last Comic Standing The second semifinal round. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Big Bang Theory (10:01) CSI: Miami Getting Axed ‘14’ The Bachelorette Ali and the final five go to Portugal. (N) ’ Å (10:02) True Beauty (N) ‘14’ Å Lie to Me Beat the Devil ‘14’ Å The Good Guys Bait & Switch ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å History Detectives (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Pioneers of Television Variety ’ ‘G’ Persons Unknown Incoming (N) ‘14’ Last Comic Standing The second semifinal round. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 90210 Debbie confronts Kelly. ‘14’ Gossip Girl The Hurt Locket ’ ‘14’ Married/ Children Married... With Hometime ‘G’ Gardenstory Sewing-Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å History Detectives (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Pioneers of Television Variety ’ ‘G’

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman Inside Edition (11:35) Nightline King of the Hill My Name Is Earl South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Soundstage Willie Nelson ‘PG’ Å News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Soundstage Willie Nelson ‘PG’ Å

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Intervention Donna & Josh ‘14’ Intervention Jason ‘14’ Å Intervention Gloria ‘14’ Å Intervention Adam (N) ‘14’ Å Obsessed Chad & Nicole (N) ‘PG’ Obsessed Russ; Karen ‘PG’ Å 130 28 8 32 Intervention Sonia & Julia ‘14’ Å (2:45) ››› “Out of ›››› “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991, Suspense) Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Scott Glenn. A mad Mad Men Smoke Gets in Your Eyes Mad Men Babylon Office romance. ‘14’ Å Mad Men The Hobo Code Don is torMad Men Nixon vs. Kennedy ‘14’ Å 102 40 39 Sight” genius helps an FBI trainee pursue a serial killer. Å Changing times. ‘14’ Å mented by his past. ‘14’ Å Pit Boss XL (N) ’ ‘14’ Pit Boss XL (N) ’ ‘PG’ Last Chance Highway ’ ‘PG’ Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å Last American Cowboy Renewal ‘14’ Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Pit Boss XL (N) ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ 137 44 The Cable Guy Comedy Club ’ Blue Collar TV ’ Blue Collar TV ’ Blue Collar TV TV Blue Collar TV ’ Ron White: Call Me Tater Salad (10:15) ›› “Blue Collar Comedy Tour Rides Again” (2004) ’ 190 32 42 53 “Blue Collar Comedy Tour” Mob Money: Special Escape From Havana Coca-Cola: The Real Story One Nation, Overweight Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 “The Pixar Story” (2007) The history of Pixar Animation Studios. Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) ››› “American Pie” (1999) Jason Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth. 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Cooking Outdoorsman Trading Desk RSN Movie Night PM Edition Deschutes Cty. 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Phineas and Ferb Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana ››› “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (2005) Johnny Depp. ’ Å Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Sonny-Chance Dirty Jobs Cranberry Farmer ’ ‘14’ Dirty Jobs Diaper Cleaner ‘PG’ Å Ultimate Car Build-Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Ultimate Car Build-Off (N) ‘PG’ Å Heartland Thunder (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Ultimate Car Build-Off ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Dirty Jobs Locomotive Builder ‘PG’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies (Live) Å 30 for 30 World Cup Primetime Boxing Friday Night Fights Å 22 24 21 24 World Cup Primetime (N) Tennis Å AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball 1991 Duke at North Carolina State From Jan. 23, 1991. 23 25 123 25 Tennis 1975 Wimbledon Men’s Final -- Arthur Ashe vs. Jimmy Connors ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Huge Letters Home (N) ‘14’ Å Make It or Break It (N) ‘14’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 ›› “The Pacifier” (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham. Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Challenge Mystery Client Cakes Unwrapped Unwrapped (N) Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Good Eats Unwrapped Pop! 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Perth, Australia. That ’70s Show ›› “21” (2008, Drama) Jim Sturgess. 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Lockup: Indiana Lockup: Indiana 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Indiana Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ The Real World New Orleans ’ ‘14’ ››› “Napoleon Dynamite” (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries. ’ Hard Times Warren the Ape Fantasy Factory Hard Times 192 22 38 57 Silent Library ’ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Family Matters Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob SquarePants ‘Y7’ Å Band of Brothers The Breaking Point ’ ‘MA’ Å Band of Brothers A green officer leads a patrol. ’ ‘MA’ Band of Brothers Abandoned concentration camp. ‘MA’ Band of Brothers Points ’ ‘MA’ Å 132 31 34 46 (4:30) Band of Brothers ‘MA’ Å ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” (2007) Johnny Depp. Premiere. Jack Sparrow’s friends join forces to save him. Pirates-Carib. 133 35 133 45 ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006, Adventure) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. 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Å Yearling” Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Inedible, Incre. Inedible, Incre. Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Mega ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Deep Vote ’ ‘14’ Bones The Verdict in the Story ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Pain in the Heart ’ ‘14’ The Closer Dead Man’s Hand ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Mother’s Milk ’ ‘14’ Courage-Dog Courage-Dog Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Misadv. Flapjack Total Drama Stoked (N) King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Loves Raymond Loves Raymond ››› “The Firm” (1993) Tom Cruise, Jeanne Tripplehorn. Premiere. 65 47 29 35 (5:12) Sanford and Son ‘PG’ Å NCIS Bete Noir ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Å NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ The T.O. Show The T.O. Show Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez Jennifer Lopez. ‘PG’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez Jennifer Lopez. ‘PG’ You’re Cut Off ’ 191 48 37 54 The T.O. Show PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “Pineapple Express” 2008 Seth Rogen. ‘R’ › “Jury Duty” 1995 Pauly Shore. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “Hook” 1991, Fantasy Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts. ’ ‘PG’ Å “Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking” ››› “My Cousin Vinny” 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci. ‘R’ Å ››› “Class Action” 1991, Drama Gene Hackman, Colin Friels. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Vanishing” 1993, Suspense Jeff Bridges, Nancy Travis. ‘R’ Å ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Insane Cinema Green Label The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Insane Cinema Bubba’s World Insane Cinema Green Label The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Check 1, 2 Stupidface Amer. Misfits Thrillbillies Å Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts (N) The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Big Break Sandals Resorts The Golf Fix Golf Fitness Learning Center The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:30) “GasLand” ›› “Inkheart” 2009 Brendan Fraser. A bookbinder accidentally (7:15) ››› “Kung Fu Panda” 2008 Voices of Jack Black. Animated. A clumsy panda No One Dies in Lily Dale Tourists flock to Western New York to › “Collateral Damage” 2002 Arnold Schwarzenegger. A fireman HBO 425 501 425 10 2010 Josh Fox. brings an evil storybook character to life. ‘PG’ learns martial arts with legendary masters. ’ ‘PG’ Å consult mediums. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å goes after the terrorist who killed his family. (4:30) ›› “Office Space” 1999 ‘R’ ››› “Barton Fink” 1991, Drama John Turturro, John Goodman. ‘R’ Å Freaks-Geeks Whitest Kids ›› “The Break” 1997 Stephen Rea. ‘R’ Å Food Party ‘14’ Z Rock ‘MA’ Witchblade ‘MA’ IFC 105 105 › “McHale’s Navy” 1997, Comedy Tom Arnold, Tim Curry. Premiere. TV’s scheming (6:50) ›› “I Spy” 2002 Eddie Murphy. A spy recruits a boxer to ››› “Taken” 2008 Liam Neeson. A former spy uses his old ›› “Taking Woodstock” 2009, Comedy-Drama Demetri Martin, Imelda Staunton. Elliot MAX 400 508 7 sailor rejoins the Navy to face an old enemy. ’ ‘PG’ Å help him retrieve a stolen plane. ‘PG-13’ Å skills to save his kidnapped daughter. ’ ‘PG-13’ Tiber plays a pivotal role in the historic concert. ’ ‘R’ Å Secret History of the Atom Bomb Inside the State Department (N) Pirate Hunters (N) Secret History of the Atom Bomb Inside the State Department Pirate Hunters Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Back, Barnyard Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Ren & Stimpy Action League Rocko’s NTOON 89 115 189 Top Truck Chal Ride to Adv. Destination ATV World Hunt Adv Zumbo Outdrs Western Extreme Best of the West Top Truck Chal Destination Baja Unlimited Roll With It ATV World Ride to Adv. OUTD 37 307 43 (4:30) ››› “We Were Soldiers” 2002, War Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe. iTV. Out- ›› “What Just Happened?” 2008 Robert De Niro, Sean Penn. iTV Premiere. A movie The Real L Word Bromance ’ ‘MA’ Weeds Super Lucky The Green Room The Real L Word Bromance ’ ‘MA’ SHO 500 500 numbered U.S. troops battle the North Vietnamese. ’ ‘R’ producer picks his way through the Hollywood jungle. ‘R’ Happy ‘14’ Ultimate Factories Corvette ‘G’ Ultimate Factories Harley ‘G’ The Racing Chef NASCAR Ultimate Factories Corvette ‘G’ Ultimate Factories Harley ‘G’ The Racing Chef NASCAR NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Underworld (5:40) ›› “Penelope” 2006, Fantasy Christina Ricci. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:20) ›› “Serendipity” 2001 John Cusack. ‘PG-13’ ›› “The House Bunny” 2008 Anna Faris. ’ ‘PG-13’ (10:45) ›› “40 Days and 40 Nights” 2002 ’ ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) › “Mexico City” 2000, Suspense (6:15) ›› “The Forbidden Kingdom” 2008, Action Jackie Chan, Jet Li. An American ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008 Javier Bardem. Flings with (9:40) “Baby on Board” 2008, Comedy Jerry O’Connell. A power (11:15) ›› “The Lucky Ones” 2008 RaTMC 525 525 Stacy Edwards. ’ ‘R’ teen journeys back in time to ancient China. ’ ‘PG-13’ a pair of tourists complicate a painter’s life. couple has a surprise pregnancy. ’ ‘R’ Å chel McAdams. ’ ‘R’ Cycling Tour de France: Stage 2 From Bruxelles to Spa. The Daily Line (Live) Cycling Tour de France: Stage 2 From Bruxelles to Spa. VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Bridezillas Shandra & Sara ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www .dpls.us/calendar. REDMOND CENTENNIAL CAR DISPLAY: A show of cars, past and present; free; noon-3 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-385-7988 or www.ci.redmond .or.us. REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www .redmondfarmersmarket.com. SUMMER BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a bag sale of thousands of books, with a silent auction; free admission, $4 per bag of books; 1-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-389-1622. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson talks about his book “Junkyard Dogs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-6339637. HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY REDMOND: Community gathering, with a timecapsule dedication and cake; free; 4:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-5042010, redmond2010@ ci.redmond.or.us or www .ci.redmond.or.us. SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW BIRTHDAY GALA FUNDRAISER: Featuring music, a preview of the 35th-anniversary documentary, food, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show; $35; 5-8 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-549-0989. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson talks about his book “Junkyard Dogs”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring screenings of “Celtic Pilgrimage,” which explores the landscape of western Ireland, and “Beyond Our Differences,” which calls upon leaders to describe what inspires them to affect positive change; free; 6:30-8:45 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Open to all varieties of performers; free; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her novel “An Absence So Great”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “JAWS”: A screening of the 1975 Spielberg film; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room,

601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7079. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Audiolized play as part of the summer concert series; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www .musicinthecanyon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by Curtis Salgado; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-4476909. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, EUGENE ONEGIN”: Starring Renee Fleming, Ramon Vargas and Dmitri Hvorostovsky in an encore presentation of Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her novel “An Absence So Great”; free; 7 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5261491. OREGON BACH FESTIVAL: Monica Huggett leads a performance of Bach’s orchestral suites, with the Portland Baroque Orchestra; $15$35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; adult themes; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-9232599. KASEY ANDERSON: The Portland-based soulful singersongwriter performs, with Tim Coffey; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

THURSDAY HOME & GARDEN TOUR: The Sisters Garden Club presents a tour of four homes in and around Sisters; tour does not include the Bliven home; proceeds benefit local organizations and will help maintain public gardens; $15; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 541-389-9554, vtemple@ bendbroadband.com or www .sistersgardenclub.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Mystic River” by Dennis Lehane; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “FINDING NEMO”: A screening of the 2003 Pixar film; part of Familypalooza; free; 1:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7099. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Aphrodesia, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-3890995 or www .munchandmusic .com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook, author of “Bend, Overall,” speaks about his book and presents a slide show; SOLD OUT; 6 p.m.; REI, 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541385-0594 or www.rei.com/stores/ events/96. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; adult themes; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-9232599.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

PINBACK: The San Diego-based alternative-rock group presents The Rob & Zach Show, with Little White Teeth; $14 plus fees in advance, $17 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-4084998 or http://bendfarmersmarket .com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond talks about her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “WHO SHOT THE SHERIFF?”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater; reservations requested; $60; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress.com. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; $5; 9 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. RAINA ROSE TRIO: The acoustic folk act performs, with the Beth Willis Rock Duo; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

SATURDAY SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; registration required; $15-$45 to race, kids race free, spectators free; 6:15 a.m. half marathon, 7 a.m. 5K and 10K, 7:30 a.m. kids race; Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-3881860 or www.smithrockrace.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the church’s building fund; free admission; 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-317-0394, early evening only. CHURCH YARD SALE: Proceeds benefit church missions; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541548-3066. DIRT DIGGERS’ SCRAMBLE: Ninth annual golf tournament hosted by Camp Fire USA Central Oregon; proceeds benefit the programs and services provided by the Camp Fire USA Central Oregon Council; $140 includes 18 holes, cart, continental breakfast and barbecue lunch; 8 a.m. shotgun start, 7 a.m. registration; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541382-4682 or campfirechristine@ bendbroadband.com. FLAPJACK FRENZY: Eat pancakes as a benefit for Teen Challenge; RSVP requested; $5, $3 ages 10 and younger; 8-11 a.m.; Central Oregon Men’s Center, 435 N.E. Burnside Ave., Bend; 541-678-5272. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-

280-4097. GIANT LIBRARY BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Jefferson County Library hosts a sale of thousands of books, audio books, videos and DVDs; with live music; free admission, $5 per bag of books; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-4753351. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW: The 35th annual show features a display of about 1,300 quilts; free; 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0989 or www .sistersoutdoorquiltshow.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CLASSIC CAR SHOW: A show of cars from 1974 or earlier, with burgers, hot dogs and more, and a silent auction; free, $20 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-382-1371. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. QUILT SHOW LUNCHEON: Featuring turkey roll-ups, salads and pie; proceeds benefit the church; $7; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 386 N. Fir St., Sisters; 541-815-8858. BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music, food, drink and more; free; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events .com. RIMROCK RANCH STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky with telescopes and a celestial tour; dress warmly and bring binoculars; registration required; free; 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Rimrock Ranch, 69177 Butcher Block Blvd., Sisters; 541-330-0017 or events@deschuteslandtrust.org. NOT AN AIRPLANE: The Modesto, Calif.-based Americana act performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CASINO JACK AND THE UNITED STATES OF MONEY (R) 12:15, 3, 5:45, 8:30 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:20 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:20, 3:05, 5:25, 8 PLEASE GIVE (R) 12:40, 3:20, 5:55, 8:10 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) Noon, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 SOLITARY MAN (R) 12:30, 3:15, 5:20, 7:55

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THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 1:55, 4:40, 7:45, 10:30 GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 12:55, 7:35 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:25, 2:30, 4:20, 5:25, 7:05, 8:10, 9:35, 10:35 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:50, 10:15 THE KARATE KID (PG) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 10 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:15, 4:10, 5:10, 6:50, 8:05, 9:30, 10:40 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:50, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:25, 5:20, 7:50, 10:25 TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:25 a.m., 1, 2, 3:55, 4:55, 6:40, 7:40, 9:15, 10:10 TOY STORY 3 3-D (G) 10:55 a.m., 1:30, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 12:40, 1:10, 1:40, 2:10, 3:35,

4:05, 4:35, 5:05, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

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BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music, food, drink and more; free; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@c3events .com or www.c3events.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns and Quinton Hallett read from their work; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Funk group Mingo Fishtrap performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383, info@bendconcerts.com or www.bendconcerts.com. CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.bendticket .com.

11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 7, 9:30 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 11 a.m., 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 TOY STORY 3 (PG) 10:15 a.m., 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15

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GROWN UPS (PG-13) 5:30, 8 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 5, 7:45 TOY STORY 3 (G) 5:15, 7:30 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 5, 7:45

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KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13)

Alex Tkachenko, a molecular biologist and co-founder of Siluria Technologies, holds a wafer containing 256 catalysts, each with a different set of nanowires, in front of a mass spectrometer used to screen them at the company’s offices in San Francisco. The company is working on using a virus to convert methane to ethylene, a gas used in making plastics, solvents and fibers. Jim Wilson New York Times News Service

SUNDAY

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Ethylene Continued from C1 Their technique for producing ethylene depends on the ability of a genetically engineered virus to coat itself with a metal that serves as a catalyst for an ethylene-producing chemical reaction. The key is that the virus can create a “tangle of catalyst coated nanowires” — the researchers call it a hairball — that provides so much surface area for chemical reactions to occur that the energy needed to produce the reactions is much reduced. The basic process, or chemical reaction, known as oxidative coupling of methane, was an area of intense research for the petrochemical industry beginning in the late 1980s. Researchers had some success but never achieved enough of an improvement in energy efficiency to justify displacing the traditional steam-cracking process. Siluria claims that with its hairballs of virus-created nanowires coated with an unspecified metal oxide (they won’t say what the metal is, but describe it as similar to magnesium oxide), it has been able to create ethylene-producing reactions at temperatures 200 to 300 degrees lower than previously achieved, said Erik Scher, a chemist who is one of the company’s researchers. The work is based on a technique for genetically engineering viruses pioneered by Angela Belcher, who leads the Biomolecular Materials Group at MIT. The technique involves manipulating the genes of a virus, in this case one that usually attacks bacteria, so that it will collect and coat itself with inorganic materials, like metals and even carbon nanotubes. The viruses can be used to create a dense tangle of metal nanowires, and the potential applications for these engineered materials are remarkably diverse. Belcher’s lab is busy with research on more efficient batteries and solar cells, biofuels, hydrogen separation and other fuel cell technologies, CO2 sequestration, cancer diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, as well as an effort to create a cata-

lyst that can convert ethanol to hydrogen at room temperature. Last year, the laboratory published a paper in the journal Science that described using a virus to synthesize nanowires of cobalt oxide at room temperature to improve the capacity of thin, flexible lithium ion batteries. In April, the MIT researchers engineered a virus to mimic photosynthesis and produce hydrogen at room temperature by separating water molecules. Belcher said her goal had not been commercialization of the potential new technologies she had designed. “We think, ‘What is the problem that needs to be solved?’ and that is where we head,” she said. In contrast, the Siluria researchers said their advance in developing catalysts is the most significant step yet toward commercialization of the bacteriophage technique. “We are learning from nature but going to new places in the periodic table, and working with the same tools and techniques to use materials that nature has not worked with,” said Alex Tkachenko, a molecular biologist who is a co-founder of Siluria. “What is different now,” said Tkachenko, “is that Angie’s biosynthetic technology allows us to grow these catalysts in a bottom-up synthetic way into novel shapes — nanowires — which in turn, allows us to create unique surface morphologies.” The researchers acknowledged that they do not yet have a complete scientific understanding of the surface behavior of their new catalyst. David Wells, a venture capitalist, formed Siluria because of what he had seen at Belcher’s lab. “These are the next generations that will evolve into materials and systems that we can’t even imagine right now,” said Mehmet Sarikaya, director of the Genetically Engineered Materials Science and Engineering Center at the University of Washington. Sarikaya’s lab is performing similar research in designing materials like smaller proteins and peptides that can mimic biological processes.


C4 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 5, 2010: This year, you often worry about first impressions. Some of you could be overly concerned about a changing work scenario. Accept new ideas and technology, and you will gain. If you stay stuck where you are, refusing to learn more, trouble could occur. If you are single, be a bit of a cynic about someone who flips over you. There could be a problem. If you are attached, give your sweetie space to grow. You will need to transform, or at least honor changes. ARIES can push your buttons. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Keep commentary to yourself. Don’t try to control others. People find you most unpredictable. Perhaps you are seeing life from a new perspective, and are not quite sure what to do with it. Tonight: Pay bills, then decide. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HH You might feel a heavy undercurrent. You might not be sure how to handle a personal matter. Keep your chin up, as the unexpected will occur. Insights about a boss or higherup can only help. Tonight: You get a second wind. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Be imaginative yet direct. News from a distance or a new

idea could energize you. You are surprised and don’t know what to do. Someone obviously didn’t reveal the whole story. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. It could be a wild week. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Be more aware of your image. Others might be reacting to your presentation. You might want to rethink a problem more openly. Know that you don’t have all the answers. Tonight: Join friends, or go where people are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Allow yourself to eye the big picture, even if you find that your mind keeps going into overdrive. Worrying will get you nowhere fast. Relax, and work with a surprising event or situation. Tonight: Be willing to let go more often. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Recognize that a partner or several associates have been rather strange and unpredictable. Learn to flow and look at the big picture. Let go of a tendency to worry too much, a habit that a friend might encourage. Tonight: Feed your mind. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You could be more tired than you realize, and handling the cascading group of people in your life could take talent. Several people might behave strangely. A new friend or an Aquarian could be unpredictable. Tonight: Relax over dinner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Plunge into work; you have a lot to do. A friend could

push you beyond your natural limits. You wonder why you are putting up with it. News might not contain all of the facts. Relax and wait for more information. Tonight: Surprises follow you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You might want to open up a conversation or allow more creativity to flow. An associate or partner could be more uptight than you realize. Let go and don’t worry so much. A risk might have unanticipated consequences. Tonight: Relax, take a walk or pop a movie into the DVD player. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You might want to work from home, thinking you can cover several bases at once. Are you overwhelmed? Lighten up about a potential change, most likely at work. You might not see it now, but you will benefit. Tonight: Make it easy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You might have made the best possible plans, but nevertheless, the unexpected runs through your day. Don’t get stuck or tumble into rigidity. You might wonder about a decision. Tonight: Don’t give in to tension. Go for a swim or a walk. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Keep a firm hand on your spending. If an unexpected swing or expense pops up, don’t worry; just relax with it. You might not have the control you desire. A child or loved one could be touchy. This will pass. Tonight: Have a long-overdue talk. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Oceans face ‘irreversible’ change, MOTOR HOME comprehensive new report warns MADNESS! By Les Blumenthal McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — A sobering new report warns that oceans face a “fundamental and irreversible ecological transformation” not seen in millions of years as greenhouse gases and climate change already have affected temperature, acidity, sea and oxygen levels, the food chain and possibly major currents that could alter global weather. The report, in Science magazine, doesn’t break a lot of new ground, but it brings together dozens of studies that collectively paint a dismal picture of deteriorating ocean health. “This is further evidence we are well on our way to the next great extinction event,” said Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, the director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland in Australia and a co-author of the report.

John Bruno, an associate professor of marine sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the report’s other co-author, isn’t quite as alarmist, but he’s equally concerned. “We are becoming increasingly certain that the world’s marine ecosystems are reaching tipping points,” Bruno said, adding, “We really have no power or model to foresee” the impact. The oceans, which cover 71 percent of the Earth’s surface, have played a dominant role in regulating the planet’s climate. However, even as the understanding of what’s happening to terrestrial ecosystems as a result of climate change has grown, studies of marine ecosystems have lagged, the report says. The oceans are acting as a heat sink for rising temperatures and have absorbed about one-third of the carbon dioxide produced by human activities.

Among other things, the report notes: • The average temperature of the upper level of the oceans has increased more than 1 degree Fahrenheit over the past 100 years, and global ocean surface temperatures in January were the second warmest ever recorded for that month. • Though the increase in acidity is slight, it represents a “major departure” from the geochemical conditions that have existed in the oceans for hundreds of thousands if not millions of years. • Nutrient-poor “ocean deserts” in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans grew by 15 percent, or roughly 2.5 million square miles, from 1998 to 2006. • Oxygen concentrations have been dropping off the northwest U.S. coast and the coast of southern Africa, where dead zones are appearing regularly. There is paleontological

evidence that declining oxygen levels in the oceans played a major role in at least four or five mass extinctions. • Since the early 1980s, the production of phytoplankton, a crucial creature at the lower end of the food chain, has declined 6 percent, with 70 percent of the decline found in the northern parts of the oceans. Scientists also have found that phytoplankton are becoming smaller. Volcanic activity and large meteorite strikes in the past have “resulted in hostile conditions that have increased extinction rates and driven ecosystem collapse,” the report says. “There is now overwhelming evidence human activities are driving rapid changes on a scale similar to these past events. “Many of these changes are already occurring within the world’s oceans with serious consequences likely over the coming years.”

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A way to help My Mobile Watchdog, the commercial version of the product that Lotter sells for $10 a month for up to five mobile lines, works essentially the same way, keeping data stored that can, and has, been used to catch child

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My Mobile Watchdog stores and organizes data, allowing parents to monitor everything a child sees on his or her phone.

Learn more For more information, visit www.mymobilewatchdog.com or call 888-377-8200.

predators who get children’s cell phone numbers. Lotter said many predators today pretend to be children, so they can befriend children and convince them to send illegal pictures. After hearing of cases nationally in which children are abused by predators — or where they’re bullied by other children through text messages — Lotter said he had to do something to help. “When you have enough of these cases, you go through kind of an interesting transition emotionally,” he said. “What you realize is that if you did something about it, then you can start to deal with it.” The service can be used to reach a broader audience than merely parents and children. It can be used against stalkers, keeping track of text messages sent, for example, from someone stalking another person, Lotter said.

Users of the service don’t have to fret. The predator can’t tell that the user’s cell phone is being monitored, but a message does appear on the user’s phone stating that My Mobile Watchdog is active. In instances where parents are observing their child’s cell phone, the child’s cell phone will notify him or her that the program is activated. Other than keeping predators away, the service is useful in preventing children from misbehaving, Lotter said. With it on, a child might tell his or her friends not to send certain messages because the parents are watching, Lotter said.

Safer communities My Mobile Watchdog is currently available on BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, Symbian and some Verizon smart phones. It will be available on smart phones that operate on the Android platform in a few weeks, Lotter said, and the iPhone soon thereafter. The Oregon Attorney General’s Office is not familiar with My

Mobile Watchdog, said spokesman Tony Green. But Green said the office encourages parents to take precautions to protect their children. There are at least six Oregon Revised Statutes specifically regulating crimes related to sexually related child abuse. There were 479 convictions statewide in 2009 based on those six crimes, with 33 in Deschutes County, 20 in Jefferson County and one in Crook County, according to the state. Children are impacted by crimes regulated by other statutes, but the state does not have child-specific data on those. Mills, of the Sheriff’s Office, said he expects Deschutes County will use the tool to work with the city of Bend, adding that he believes other police jurisdictions also will begin using it soon. He said it will help create a healthier, safer community. “If you’re involved in the exploitation of children, we’re coming after you,” Mills said.

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Garden Continued from C1 “It’s totally customizable,” Bowerman said. She’ll meet customers at their houses, look at the available space and sunlight, and make suggestions for what might fit. The 4-by8-foot raised garden beds are a popular option, Bowerman said, and a bed half that size can grow as much as 80 pounds of veggies a year. Prices start at about $100 for a container garden, she said, up to about $800 for bigger structures like greenhouses, and some recent projects have been around $1,000. In designing the gardens, Bowerman has a list of fruits, vegetables and herbs that people can review and check off what they’d like to grow and eat. Salad greens are popular, as are carrots and potatoes and other staples people eat frequently. Herb gardens are popular and easy as well, and Grow offers specialized combinations like a “cocktail garden” with mint, strawberries, pineapple sage and more. Some people might just want help planning a garden, they said, while others might need help all the way through the process — not everyone knows how to harvest lettuce leaves, while others might only live in Central Oregon part time but still want to have a garden. Bend resident Susan Smith tried her hand at growing vegetables when she moved into her house a dozen years ago, but it

was a “miserable failure,” she said. “I sort of gave up,” Smith said. “But I always loved the idea of having a little vegetable garden.” She met the people from Grow at the Earth Day fair, and was excited to see the raised beds and containers they could build. They built and planted a garden, and now she’s growing zucchini, squash, onions, thyme, fennel, lettuce, kale and more in a raised bed, complete with a little ledge on which she can sit. Mixed salad greens could come later this summer, and the gardeners from Grow will plant garlic to overwinter for next year. She signed up for the option to have staff with Grow come once a week to take care of the beds, replant veggies as needed and more. They also have shown her how to pick lettuce so the leaves keep coming back, and send tips about things like when it might freeze overnight, so she knows to cover the beds. “I didn’t know how to do it, and certainly I don’t think of myself as a carpenter,” Smith said. “I felt too challenged to do it on my own.” Urban micro-farming is just one part of a bigger trend of people eating locally, and eating healthy, said Shauna Quistorff, communications director with Bend’s Environmental Center. “This is another niche, another opportunity for people to be able to grow their own food,” Quistorff said. Some people might be intimidated by gardening, but with micro-farming they don’t even need

a backyard, she said. Apartment or condo owners could simply set up containers or boxes on a balcony. It’s also a way for kids to get involved in gardening, she said. “This concept of small, backyard gardens has started to take off,” she said. Grow has been a fun company to run, Hall said, but growing food also has other benefits. There isn’t the fuel spent to ship produce from other states or countries, or to keep it cool on the trip. And also, gardeners can be sure that no pesticides were used. “You grow it, and you know it,” Hall said. “You can be in control.” He and Bowerman are talking about working with teachers and students to develop gardening and composting programs, and promoting the idea of seeing

what you can produce on your own land. “I think a lot more people can do it than think they can,” Hall said.

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S

Tennis Inside Rafael Nadal wins Wimbledon for his eighth Grand Slam title, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JULY 5, 2010

TOUR DE F R A N C E AT A GLANCE

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL: ELK TRACKS

Richards is right at home with Elks Bend High product is one of the top hitters is the WCL this season Editor’s note: Elk Tracks profiles a member of the 2010 Bend Elks summer collegiate baseball team. The feature will appear regularly throughout the Elks’ season.

By James Williams The Bulletin

Alessandro Petacchi reacts as he crosses the finish line to win the first stage of the Tour de France Sunday. BRUSSELS, Belgium — A brief look at Sunday’s first stage of the Tour de France: Stage: A 139-mile ride from Rotterdam, Netherlands, to Brussels. Winner: Alessandro Petacchi, who avoided three crashes in the final 1.25 miles to claim his first win in the Tour since 2003. Petacchi is competing in his first Tour since 2004 and won his fifth stage overall in cycling’s three-week showcase. Petacchi won ahead of Mark Renshaw of Australia and Thor Hushovd of Norway. The overall standings remained unchanged with Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland leading Germany’s Tony Martin by 10 seconds. Britain’s David Millar was third, 20 seconds off the pace, ahead of seven-time Tour winner Lance Armstrong, who is two seconds further back. Yellow Jersey: Cancellara. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner was injured in one of the crashes, but he plans to ride today. He finished in the lead pack in 132nd place, and he is 56th overall, 52 seconds behind. Next stage: Today’s second stage is a 125-mile ride that follows some parts of the Walloon Arrow and LiegeBastogne-Liege one-day classics. The hilly terrain puts the pure sprinters at a disadvantage and could favor a group of breakaway riders. — The Associated Press

NBA Joe Johnson will sign max contract to stay in Atlanta ATLANTA — All-Star guard Joe Johnson had agreed to a maximum contract to stay with the Atlanta Hawks, his agent said Sunday. Arn Tellem confirmed an entry he wrote for the Huffington Post website, in which he said Johnson “announced his intention to re-sign with the Hawks for six more years.” Tellem wrote that Johnson chose to remain in Atlanta over Chicago and New York, where he would have been reunited with Mike D’Antoni, his former coach in Phoenix. The Hawks could pay him nearly $120 million, while other teams could only give Johnson five years and pay him about $25 million less. The Hawks have reached the second round of the playoffs the past two years with Johnson as their top player. He’s a four-time All-Star and has averaged more than 20 points in each of his five years with Hawks. The Hawks would not comment, citing the NBA’s moratorium on signings. Deals can’t become official until July 8. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Local baseball ...........................D2 Tennis ........................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 Cycling ......................................D3 MLB .................................. D3, D4 High Gear ..................................D5

D

Batting against the Corvallis Knights last August at Vince Genna Stadium, Bend Elks infielder Tommy Richards took a fastball to the face and was forced to sit out the remainder of the West Coast League baseball playoffs nursing a shattered nose. This summer, operating with re-

newed perspective and increased bat speed, the Washington State University junior-to-be from Bend is among the West Coast League’s leading hitters. Through July 1, Richards owned the league’s second-best best batting average (.409) and led the Elks in RBIs (22), hits (27) and on-base percentage (.487). “He’s using all of the field and they (the opposition) can’t defend against him,” notes Elks coach Sean Kinney. “It’s exactly what you want in a hitter.” That Richards is even back competing again after such a traumatic injury is a feat in itself. “Everything went black,” says Richards of the incident. He remembers trying to jog to first base but then sinking to a knee before being helped off the field. “I felt my nose was a little off but didn’t feel much pain.” See Elks / D5

Looking ahead Here is the Bend Elks’ schedule for the upcoming week: Today: Bend at Kelowna, 7:05 p.m. Tuesday: Bend at Kelowna, 7:05 p.m.; Tumwater (SS) at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Wednesday: Bend at Kelowna, 7:05 p.m. Thursday: Bend at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Friday: Bellingham at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Saturday: Bellingham at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Sunday: Bellingham at Bend, 5:05 p.m.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

The Bend Elks’ Tommy Richards is currently second in the West Coast League with a .409 batting average.

(SS) indicates split-squad game

LOCAL SPORTS

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

James Lussier, left, and Margie Lussier, both of Bend, walk across the footbridge in the Old Mill District during the Spark Your Heart 5K Walk/Run in Bend on Sunday.

The heart of Bend Hundreds participate in the Spark Your Heart 5K Walk/Run to celebrate the Fourth of July and to support a good cause By Katie Brauns

Inside

her pregnant mother, Kelly, and father, Eric. Mia is in desperate need of a heart and lung transplant. She was born with abnormally high It was quite a scene at the end of the annual • Spark Your Heart 5K blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, a conFourth of July 5-kilometer race in Bend. results, dition called pulmonary hypertension. As finishers rounded the corner toward the “You just enjoy every day,” said Pia Wennerth, last quarter mile of the 2010 Spark Your Heart 5K Page D2 Mia’s grandmother who wore a white T-shirt decWalk/Run, they were on display. At the end of the orated on the front with a green heart — Mia’s facourse runners circumnavigated the new Rivervorite color — and on the back it read, “Running for Mia.” bend Park in the Old Mill District. “The parents are very optimistic,” added Pia Wennerth, One man was running and juggling oranges. Dads with kids in tow or on their shoulders jogged along. A masters who traveled from Chicago to Bend to visit her son, Eric, runner wearing a patriotic peace hat and dozens of others daughter-in-law, Kelly, and Mia, along with other family members for the holiday. Wennerth relatives also traveled wearing Fourth of July garb flooded the finish area. But perhaps the most touching sight was Mia Wennerth, from Colorado and Texas for the reunion. a 2-year-old girl who was rolling along in a stroller with See Heart / D5

The Bulletin

At right, Eric Wennerth, of Bend, pushes his daughter, Mia, through the finish line of the Spark Your Heart 5K Walk/ Run at Riverbend Park. Mia, who has a condition called pulmonary hypertension, needs heart and lung transplants.

Dwyane Wade is the top free agent on the market other than LeBron James.

NBA

Free agent fireworks could come soon After a lot of meetings, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and others will likely decide on their destinations this week By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

NEW YORK — From Cleveland to Chicago, South Florida to the New York area, it was a mostly quiet Fourth of July in the NBA. The real fireworks could come next week. With LeBron James and other big names taking time to ponder their futures, the free agent market was in many

ways on hold for the holiday — though Joe Johnson did agree to a maximum contract to stay in Atlanta. Once the others reach their conclusions, things will start to heat up again. “I’m sure everyone is ready to get a decision going,” Dwyane Wade told Chicago’s NBC-Channel 5. Wade said he planned to use the weekend to think after meeting twice with the Bulls, plus getting visits from the Knicks and Nets. He’s scheduled to be at a charity function outside Miami on Tuesday, but it would be surprising if he used that event to announce his plans, because it’s believed he will not have had his formal sitdown with Heat present Pat Riley until later in the week. See Fireworks / D5


D2 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION TODAY CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 2, VS. network.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

TUESDAY CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 3, VS. network.

SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — World Cup, semifinal, Uruguay vs. Netherlands, ESPN.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Tampa By Rays, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — WNBA, Connecticut Sun at San Antonio Silver Stars, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — WNBA, Phoenix Mercury at Los Angeles Sparks, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, San Francisco Giants at Milwaukee Brewers, KICE-AM 940. 4 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, KICEAM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S 

 B Colleges • Georgia AD out?: A person familiar with the decision says Damon Evans is out as Georgia’s athletic director. The person said Sunday it was unclear whether Evans resigned or was fired. A conference call of the athletic association’s board of directors executive committee is scheduled Monday. It will include University of Georgia president Michael Adams. A statement by the school is expected after the meeting. Evans was arrested and charged with DUI late Wednesday. On Thursday, Evans said he “failed miserably” as a leader and representative of Georgia.

Soccer • Dunga fired as Brazil coach: Dunga is out as coach of Brazil’s national soccer team.The coach and his staff were fired Sunday, two days after Brazil was beaten by the Netherlands in the World Cup quarterfinals. The announcement was made by the Brazilian Football Federation (CBF). The decision was widely expected after the 2-1 loss to the Dutch. Brazil led 1-0 on Robinho’s first-half goal, but allowed two goals and had a player sent off in a dismal second-half performance in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

Running • Peachtree race ends in photo-finish: Gebre Gebremariam of Ethiopia sprinted to the end of the Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta on Sunday, hitting the finish line just a halfstep before Kenya’s Peter Kirui. Gebremariam’s time was 27 minutes, 56 seconds for the 6.2-mile race. The top female racer was defending champion Lineth Chepkurui, with a time of 30 minutes and 51 seconds.An estimated 55,000 runners crossed the finish line at the end of the annual race. — From wire reports

SCOREBOARD RUNNING Local SPARK YOUR HEART 5K WALK/RUN In Bend Sunday Overall results 1, Anthony Rinck, 15:47, Hillsboro. 2, Jesse McChesney, 15:59, Orchards. 3, Scott Gage, 16:40, Bend. 4, Gabe Dogbler, 17:08, Tigard. 5, Jordan Wolfe, 17:30, Bend. 6, John Stolz, 18:06, Bend. 7, Jason Townsend, 18:10, Bend. 8, Ian Brown, 18:39, Ellensburg. 9, Brian Marshall, 18:47, Henderson. 10, Samuel Schwarz, 18:48, Bend. 11, (first female) Kristina Trygstad-Saari, 18:51, Bozeman, 12, Mike Bowers, 19:00, Bend. 13, Marci Klimek, 19:05, Bend. 14, Jeff Jones, 19:08, Bend. 15, Murray Perkins, 19:12, Bend. 16, Jason Colquhoun, 19:25, Bend. 17, Larry Katz, 19:36, Bend. 18, Nick Schweizer, 19:42, Alexandria. 19, Matt Holman, 19:46, San Francisco. 20, Jason Matzen, 19:54, Cardiff. 21, Todd Anderson, 19:59, Bend. 22, Tyler Jones, 20:02, Bend. 23, Patrick Carroll, 20:20, Bend. 24, Scott Abrams, 20:22, Bend. 25, Miriam Seeley, 20:49, Redmond. 26, Riley Smith, 20:54, St. George. 27, Matt Montoya, 20:54, Bend. 28, Ryan Brumund, 20:57, Bend. 29, Susie Jones, 21:08, Bend. 30, Lane Gladden, 21:12, Bend. 31, Justin Fitzpatrick, 21:12, Bend. 32, Keith Bleyer, 21:16, Bend. 33, Paul Messett, 21:16, Bend. 34, Olivia Brooks, 21:23, Bend. 35, Brooklin Brumund, 21:23, Bend. 36, Jessica Cornett, 21:29, Bend. 37, Eric Healy, 21:30, Bend. 38, Joanne Stevens, 21:38, Bend. 39, Ben Blauvelt, 21:41, Bend. 40, Eli Garner, 21:55, North Bend. 41, Andrew Rowden, 21:58, Bend. 42, Jimi Seeley, 21:58, Redmond. 43, Lindsey McChesney, 22:02, Orchards. 44, Rick Jacobs, 22:07, Sunriver. 45, Melanie Mangin, 22:11, Bend. 46, Andrea Owen, 22:14, Tacoma. 47, Connie Austin, 22:15, Bend. 48, Levi Austin, 22:15, Bend. 49, Benjamin Ervin, 22:16, Brownsville. 50, Wyatt Gladden, 22:20, Bend. 51, Cindy King, 22:21, Bend. 52, Mark Roberts, 22:25, Bend. 53, Andrew Hoppe, 22:45, Bend. 54, Aspen Jeter, 22:46, Bend. 55, Ed Busch, 22:51, Bend. 56, Tom Heckler, 23:01, Bend. 57, Joe Sullivan, 23:05, Bend. 58, Lindsey Koch, 23:06, Englewood. 59, Caleb Wenndorf, 23:07, Bend. 60, William Dalquist, 23:15, Bend. 61, Holly Jewkes, 23:16, La Pine. 62, Todd Sween, 23:19, Bend. 63, Don Troxell, 23:31, Bend. 64, Sandra Seeley, 23:32, Redmond. 65, Paul Richards, 23:35, Bothell. 66, Kelly Richards, 23:38, Bothell. 67, Michelle Lauerman, 23:45, Bend. 68, Mark Wardlow, 23:52, Bend. 69, Mitchell Stevens, 23:54, Bend. 70, Karly Wade, 23:55, Bend. 71, Grant McLaughlin, 23:58, Sherwood. 72, Chelsea Ortega, 24:03, Bend. 73, John Nason, 24:06, Bend. 74, Baron Converse, 24:26, Vancouver. 75, Andy Jones, 24:28, Bend. 76, Russell Blockhus, 24:35, Los Altos. 77, Katie Lamarre, 24:37, Bend. 78, Matthew Dimond, 24:39, Bend. 79, Sarah Aguilar, 24:41, Cardiff. 80, Brent Beckwith, 24:43, Bend. 81, Nicholas Duncan, 24:49, Bend. 82, Raven HeinzGarcia, 24:55, Bend. 83, Ben Brockman, 24:58, Bend. 84, Megan Cornett, 24:58, Bend. 85, Kevin Cornett, 24:58, Bend. 86, Paul Rogers, 25:00, Bend. 87, Lud Kaftan, 25:04, Bend. 88, Jack Moore, 25:09, Bend. 89, Ryan Bridges, 25:10, Aloha. 90, Randy Stutzman, 25:11, Bend. 91, Lynn Dalquist, 25:14, Bend. 92, Dan Harshburger, 25:27, Bend. 93, Jaydon Mahr, 25:29, Bend. 94, Chad Schoenborn, 25:29, Bend. 95, Dan Sullivan, 25:31, Bend. 96, Alycia Brainard, 25:33, North Bend. 97, Shellie Heggenberger 25:33, Bend. 98, Scot Dalquist, 25:34, Bend. 99, Jill Walker, 25:46, Bend. 100, Roy Brainard, 25:46, North Bend. 101, Mark Amey, 25:49, Bend. 102, Erin Kerr, 25:51, Bend. 103, Lori Weichman, 25:54, Bend. 104, Lisa Wennerth, 25:56, Fort Collins. 105, Sarah Perkins, 25:57, Bend. 106, Paul Leatherwood, 26:03, Bend. 107, Tim Owen, 26:06, Tacoma. 108, Ryan Crotty, 26:14, Redmond. 109, Eric Wennerth, 26:14, Bend. 110, Jennifer Miller, 26:14, Bend. 111, Angie Farnworth, 26:16, Bend. 112, Anne Perkins, 26:23, Bend. 113, Dan Russell, 26:24, Bend. 114, Alyssa Pettigrew, 26:30, Portland. 115, Ian Ross, 26:31, Bend. 116, Sue Carroll, 26:48, Bend. 117, Suzanne Ferriss, 26:52, Fort Lauderdale. 118, Jacob Beebe, 26:55, Bend. 119, Courtney Johnson, 26:56, Sisters. 120, Raquel Jeter, 26:56, Bend. 121, Adam Beebe, 26:57, Bend. 122, Tom Healy, 26:57, Bend. 123, Jeffrey Timm, 26:58, Bend. 124, Allison Messina, 26:58, Redmond. 125, Emma Jo Brooks, 27:01, Bend. 126, Kevin Brooks, 27:02, Bend. 127, William Wennerth, 27:09, Fort Worth. 128, Robin Kinerk, 27:09, Gig Harbor. 129, Ponciano Montoya, 27:09, Phoenix. 130, Kari Shanklin, 27:13, West Linn. 131, Ian Daher, 27:13, Hoboken. 132, Becky Fuller, 27:17, Bend. 133, Joseph Ervin, 27:17, Brownsville. 134, Susanna Abrahamson, 27:22, Bend. 135, Darlene Arruda, 27:23, Sisters. 136, Andrew Stutzman, 27:24, Bend. 137, John Allen, 27:24, Bend. 138, Tim Heggenberger, 27:27, Bend. 139, Kiger Rhoades, 27:29, Bend. 140, Howard Allred, 27:29, Bend. 141, Rylee Dickinson, 27:30, Sunriver. 142, Sam Hartford, 27:31, Bend. 143, Wendi Worthington, 27:33, Bend. 144, Gary Jones, 27:36, Lebanon. 145, Grant Waring, 27:37, Benicia. 146, Matthew Hansen, 27:40, Bend. 147, Audra Green, 27:42, Redmond. 148, Jake Bailey, 27:43, Bend. 149, Chris Gladd, 27:43, Bend. 150, Keats McGonigal, 27:47, Colbert. 151, April McGonigal, 27:47, Colbert. 152, John Perales, 27:49, Gilroy. 153, Steve Blauvelt, 27:52, Bend. 154, Michael Rogers, 27:52, Bend. 155, Paul Hancock, 27:57. 156, Tessie Alcantar, 27:57, Bend. 157, Steve Mallatt, 28:11, Sunriver. 158, Paul Brumund, 28:13, Bend. 159, Joseph Lukens, 28:13, Bend. 160, Toby Bishop, 28:21, Kennewick. 161, Karen Rowden, 28:21, Bend. 162, Raquel Phillips, 28:22, Seattle. 163, Rachel Krahn, 28:23, Bend. 164, James Estrada, 28:24, Sherwood. 165, Thomas Elliott, 28:28, Bend. 166, Roger Rudolph, 28:29, Bend. 167, Grace Perkins, 28:30, Bend. 168, Kristy Scheer, 28:32, Bend. 169, Brooks Richardson, 28:39, Bend. 170, Nikki Cheney, 28:41, Bend. 171, Carly Watkins, 28:42, Bend. 172, Calen Daher, 28:43, Placerville. 173, Camille Fetzer 28:46, Bend. 174, Christopher Skidmore 28:53, Portland. 175, Stephanie Arnold, 28:54, Tigard. 176, Don Carbonari, 29:00, Bend. 177, Amanda Grunberg, 29:07, Bend. 178, Joe Plass, 29:09, Bend. 179, Claes Wennerth, 29:12, Lake Forest. 180, McGregor Mead, 29:12, Bend. 181, Jim Mead, 29:13, Bend. 182, Cassy Haas, 29:13, Rocklin. 183, Ray Murphy, 29:15, Bend. 184, Fran Weaver, 29:15, Bend. 185, Andrew Spreadborough 29:20, Bend. 186, Louise Wilson, 29:23, Bend. 187, Monica Bogue, 29:28, Bend. 188, Merissa Merlin, 29:33, Portland. 189, Lawrence Miller, 29:43, Lynden. 190, Tj Zuelke, 29:51, Bend. 191, Bruce Hill, 30:00, Bend. 192, Murphy McFarland, 30:01, Bend. 193, Robyn McCool, 30:02, Santa Cruz. 194, Taylor Smith, 30:11, Bend. 195, Holly Bailey, 30:15, Bend. 196, Darci Meyer, 30:17, Bend. 197, Jeanvieve Wilson, 30:19, Bend. 198, Aleta Nissen, 30:23, Bend. 199, Barbara Bates, 30:26, Bend. 200, Kirsten Heinz, 30:26, Bend. 201, Daniel Soto, 30:28, Bend. 202, Alyssa Freitas, 30:31, Temecula. 203, Julie Freeborn, 30:33, Bend. 204, Brady Bedsworth, 30:35, Bend. 205, Jenniffer Smith, 30:35, Bend. 206, Dave Blockhus, 30:36, Los Altos. 207, Penny Watkins, 30:38, Bend. 208, David Presland, 30:38, Bend. 209, Sharyn Fetrow, 30:40, Sisters. 210, Samantha Rowden, 30:41, Bend. 211, Don Rowden, 30:42, Bend. 212, Jill Brumund, 30:42, Bend. 213, Melissa Durham, 30:46, Sunriver. 214, Brodie Mead, 30:51, Bend. 215, Janet Truselo, 31:01, Bend. 216, Tanaya Wetzell, 31:04, Bend. 217, Emily Schaff, 31:06, Bend. 218, Chandra Hanson, 31:07, Bend. 219, Maryalicia Verdecchi 31:08, Orchards. 220, Juanita Yates, 31:11, Sisters. 221, Walt Norris, 31:14, Bend. 222, Kelly Schukart, 31:28, Bend. 223, Janna Cochran, 31:36, Tualatin. 224, Janine Richardson, 31:44, Bend. 225, Ryan Pierce, 31:57, Bend. 226, Erin Bevando, 32:01, Bend. 227, Jessica Wallick, 32:05, Bend. 228, Terri Brown, 32:07, Sisters. 229, Ted Winchel, 32:13, Bend. 230, Jessica Bailey, 32:14, Bend. 231, Lisa Bailey, 32:14, Bend. 232, Pia Wennerth, 32:14, Lake Forest. 233, Rob Samuel, 32:16, Bend. 234, Kirsten Dylla, 32:22, Bend. 235, Katen Fetzer-Lockhar 32:24, Portland. 236, Francine Berryman, 32:25, Eugene. 237, Kyla Daher, 32:27, Hoboken. 238, Johanna Gerry, 32:28, Pasco. 239, Jeff Robertson, 32:29, Bend. 240, Drake Kraf, 32:34, Bend. 241, Kristi Hartrich, 32:37, Bend. 242, Wendy Knight,

Steve Elkington (43), $46,323 Lucas Glover (43), $46,323 Ted Purdy (43), $46,323 Chris DiMarco (43), $46,323 Bryce Molder (43), $46,323 Steve Marino (43), $46,323 Bob Estes (39), $38,440 Brett Quigley (35), $31,388 Tim Petrovic (35), $31,388 Richard S. Johnson (35), $31,388 Brendon de Jonge (35), $31,388 Graham DeLaet (35), $31,388 Nicholas Thompson (35), $31,388 Kris Blanks (35), $31,388 Jim Furyk (35), $31,388 Briny Baird (28), $22,940 Charley Hoffman (28), $22,940 Webb Simpson (28), $22,940 Arjun Atwal (28), $22,940 Robert Allenby (28), $22,940 Jeff Quinney (22), $16,581 Scott McCarron (22), $16,581 Ben Crane (22), $16,581 Tiger Woods (22), $16,581 Ryuji Imada (22), $16,581 Jimmy Walker (22), $16,581 Nathan Green (22), $16,581 Tim Herron (17), $14,425 Chris Stroud (17), $14,425 Derek Lamely (17), $14,425 Fredrik Jacobson (14), $13,950 D.A. Points (14), $13,950 Michael Letzig (14), $13,950 Billy Mayfair (14), $13,950 Justin Leonard (11), $13,578 Tom Pernice, Jr. (11), $13,578 Pat Perez (7), $13,144 David Toms (7), $13,144 Charles Howell III (7), $13,144 Spencer Levin (7), $13,144 Scott Verplank (7), $13,144 Robert Garrigus (4), $12,772 Troy Merritt (3), $12,586 Andres Romero (3), $12,586 Jason Dufner (1), $12,400 Michael Connell (1), $12,276

IN THE BLEACHERS

32:37, Mount Vernon. 243, Jim Wilson, 32:49, Bend. 244, Katja Wanberg, 32:56, Mill Valley. 245, Anja Wykes, 32:56, Mill Valley. 246, Raegan Bishop, 32:58, Kennewick. 247, Tammy Estrada, 32:59, Sherwood. 248, Diana Cole, 33:06, Bend. 249, Connor McLaughlin, 33:07, Sherwood. 250, Name unavailable, 33:12. 251, Alison Sachs, 33:16, Bend. 252, Angelina Montoya, 33:40, Bend. 253, Rhonda Marshall, 33:45, Henderson. 254, Daina Williams, 33:48, Bend. 255, Larry Klika, 33:48, Oregon City. 256, Sierra Durham, 33:50, Sunriver. 257, Melanie Eagles, 33:53, Bend. 258, Linda Klika, 33:57, Oregon City. 259, Kathy Smith, 34:02, Bend. 260, Chris Tapp, 34:03, Bend. 261, Diana Piefer, 34:04, Walla Walla. 262, Russ Fetrow, 34:07, Sisters. 263, Torree Abrams, 34:09, Bend. 264, Timothy Leistekow, 34:15, Bend. 265, Diane Anderson, 34:23, Bend. 266, Andi Sillers, 34:23, Bend. 267, Leanne Ervin, 34:29, Brownsville. 268, Amanda Rose, 34:41, Bend. 269, Stephanie Schwantes, 35:01, McMinnville. 270, Jason Berryman, 35:02, Eugene. 271, Hillary Johnson, 35:04, Sisters. 272, Wendy Mahaney, 35:04, Sunriver. 273, Cat Addison, 35:05, Bend. 274, Naomi Lamunion, 35:06, Cary. 275, Aidan Wanberg, 35:07, Mill Valley. 276, Joe Johnson, 35:11, Sisters. 277, Crystal Bridges, 35:12, Aloha. 278, Amy Romero, 35:12, Bend. 279, Emma Romero, 35:12, Bend. 280, Angie Vogt, 35:19, Bend. 281, David Leistekow, 35:25, Bend. 282, Scot Berryman, 35:46, Eugene. 283, Jayne Nanavaty-Dahl, 35:49, Bend. 284, Maya Paulson, 35:50, Bend. 285, Erik Wanberg, 35:50, Mill Valley. 286, Angela Jordan, 35:59, Bend. 287, Deb White, 36:14, Bend. 288, Cheryl Holland, 36:14, Portland. 289, Timothy Weesner, 36:16, Bend. 290, Jane Couperus, 36:18, Irvine. 291, Julie McFarlane, 36:22, Bend. 292, Anne Smith, 36:37, Bend. 293, Eric Vecchi, 36:38, Portland. 294, Brandi Gilmore, 36:39, Redmond. 295, Aaron Gilmore, 36:40, Redmond. 296, Susan McCampbell, 37:00, Bend. 297, Colton Marshall, 37:06, Henderson. 298, Benton Marshall, 37:08, Henderson. 299, Susan Duffie, 37:49, Bend. 300, Simone Waddell, 37:50, Bend. 301, Susan Sidoti, 37:51, Bend. 302, Jeanine Faria, 37:54, Bend. 303, Christina Faria, 37:54, Bend. 304, Shirley Jones, 37:56, Lebanon. 305, Emma Blockhus, 38:03, Los Altos. 306, Jack Skidmore, 38:19, Bend. 307, Caroline Skidmore, 38:21, Bend. 308, Christian Fraser, 38:27, Bend. 309, Tiffany Fraser, 38:28, Bend. 310, Jillian Schweizer, 38:46, Eugene. 311, Viviane Ugalde, 38:52, Bend. 312, Annika Paulson, 38:52, Bend. 313, Lee Wagner, 39:01, Bend. 314, Karen Wagner, 39:01, Bend. 315, Marjorie McGreevy, 39:04, Sunriver. 316, Rayna Bevando, 39:04, Bend. 317, Joan Winchel, 39:17, Bend. 318, Trip Kinmon, 39:18, Bend. 319, Laura Gardiner, 39:20, Bend. 320, Kristi Turner, 39:49, Hillsboro. 321, Jeremy Turner, 39:50, Hillsboro. 322, Lisa Clark, 39:53, Bend. 323, Kris Smith, 39:58, Bend. 324, Mac Neal, 40:01, Sappington. 325, Bob Tucker, 40:04, Bend. 326, Larry Langley, 40:19, Bend. 327, Megan Minkiewicz, 40:22, Bend. 328, Diana Asher, 40:25, Bend. 329, Paula Frey, 40:27, Bend. 330, Susanne Watkins, 40:29, Bend. 331, Alexa Anderson, 40:45, Bend. 332, Austen Gnad, 40:46, Bend. 333, Wally Cozad, 40:56, Sunriver. 334, Kevin Cozad, 40:57, Sunriver. 335, Kaylee Ervin, 41:04, Brownsville. 336, Kelsey Hedahl, 41:08, Bend. 337, Liz Norris, 41:11, Bend. 338, Diane Seay, 41:26, Bend. 339, Kimberley Rutherford 41:35, Bend. 340, Jacy Hoover, 41:35, Bend. 341, Tenley Kleinmesselin 41:50, Bend. 342, Kelly Sumetz, 41:50, Portland. 343, Holly Frey, 42:48, Sandy. 344, Bob Halvorsen, 43:05, Bend. 345, Jinks Snow, 43:07, Bend. 346, Ellen Jones, 43:25, Bend. 347, William McCampbell, 43:47, Bend. 348, Karah Rhoades, 44:29, Bend. 349, Stephanie Langley, 44:34, Bend. 350, Kiersten Brown, 44:34, Sisters. 351, Mary Brown, 44:34, Bend. 352, Jan Stalker, 44:49, Bend. 353, Charla Sargent, 44:59, Bend. 354, Amanda Crawford, 45:22, Sisters. 355, Nettie Morrison, 45:39, Bend. 356, Tami Rice, 46:24, Bend. 357, Helen The Bom Wilson 46:49, Ephrata. 358, Victoria King, 47:29, Prineville. 359, Helenka Marcinek, 47:40, Bend. 360, Tobi Marcinek, 47:40, Bend. 361, Nancy Breitenstein, 48:27, Bend. 362, Norm Mollerup, 48:35, Bend. 363, Charla Meyer, 48:35, Bend. 364, Viveca Hanson, 48:57, Bend. 365, Kristin Wolter, 49:47, Bend. 366, Kelli Shipman, 50:14, Bend. 367, Deshannon Harding, 50:21, Bend. 368, Allison Martin, 50:45, Bend. 369, Taylor Smith-Bedswor 50:48, Bend. 370, Celia Schweizer, 51:17, Alexandria. 371, Samantha Hall, 51:19, Crooked River Ranch. 372, Theresa Langley, 51:20, Bend. 373, Ted Carlin, 51:23, Crooked River Ranch. 374, Becky Mallatt, 51:23, Sunriver. 375, Cia Hutto, 51:25, Bend. 376, Lori McKinnon, 51:30, Sweet Home. 377, Trenda Bondurant, 51:46, Prineville. 378, Susan Newton, 51:46, Redmond. 379, Sonya Keeney, 51:49, Bend. 380, Mary Judd, 52:15, Bend. 381, Amanda Judd, 52:16, Bend. 382, David Cowan, 52:18, Bend. 383, Kate Maxwell, 53:39, Seattle. 384, Scott Maxwell, 53:39, Bend. 385, Sara Maxwell, 53:43, Seattle. 386, Ryan Maxwell, 53:43, Seattle. 387, Ethel Maxwell, 53:46, Seattle. 388, Alissa Maxwell, 53:47, Bend. 389, Jeff Maxwell, 53:48, Seattle. 390, Phyllis Carlin, 54:26, Crooked River Ranch. 391, Laurel Waring, 57:11, Benicia. 392, Yvonne Drury, 57:45, Bend. 393, Carol Wilson, 57:46, Bend. 394, Tudor Gilmour, 1:15:35, Bend.

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL ——— National League All-Star Team Pitchers Jonathan Broxton, L.A. Dodgers, player voting Matt Capps, Washington, player voting Chris Carpenter, St. Louis, manager selection Yovani Gallardo, Milwaukee, manager selection Roy Halladay, Philadelphia, player voting Tim Hudson, Atlanta, manager selection Ubaldo Jimenez, Colorado, player voting Josh Johnson, Florida, player voting Tim Lincecum, San Francisco, player voting Evan Meek, Pittsburgh, manager selection Arthur Rhodes, Cincinnati, manager selection

Adam Wainwright, St. Louis, player voting Brian Wilson, San Francisco, player voting Catchers Brian McCann, Atlanta, player voting s-Yadier Molina, St. Louis, fan voting Infielders Adrian Gonzalez, San Diego, player voting Ryan Howard, Philadelphia, manager selection Omar Infante, Atlanta, manager selection x-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati, manager selection s-MartDin Prado, Atlanta, player voting s-Albert Pujols, St. Louis, fan voting s-Hanley Ramirez, Florida, fan voting y-Jose Reyes, N.Y. Mets, player voting Scott Rolen, Cincinnati, player voting z-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado, player voting z-Chase Utley, Philadelphia, fan voting s-David Wright, N.Y. Mets, fan voting Outfielders Michael Bourn, Houston, manager selection s-Ryan Braun, Milwaukee, fan voting Marlon Byrd, Chicago Cubs, player voting s-Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers, fan voting Corey Hart, Milwaukee, player voting s-Jayson Heyward, Atlanta, fan voting Matt Holliday, St. Louis, player voting Chris Young, Arizona, manager selection Final Man (Determined by voting by fans on the internet) Heath Bell, San Diego Carlos Gonzalez, Colorado Joey Votto, Cincinnati Billy Wagner, Atlanta Ryan Zimmerman, Washington s-starter; x-replaces Chase Utley; y-replaces Troy Tulowitzki; z-injured, will not play American League All-Star Team Pitchers Clay Buchholz, Boston, player voting Trevor Cahill, Oakland, manager selection Fausto Carmona, Cleveland, manager selection Neftali Feliz, Texas, player voting Phil Hughes, N.Y. Yankees, player voting Cliff Lee, Seattle, player voting Jon Lester, Boston, player voting David Price, Tampa Bay, player voting Mariano Rivera, N.Y. Yankees, player voting CC Sabathia, N.Y. Yankees, manager selection Joakim Soria, Kansas City, manager selection Matt Thornton, Chicago White Sox, manager selection Jose Valverde, Detroit, player voting Catchers x-John Buck, Toronto, player voting z-Victor Martinez, Boston, player voting s-Joe Mauer, Minnesota, fan voting Designated Hitter s-Vladimir Guerrero, Texas, fan voting David Ortiz, Boston, player voting Infielders Elvis Andrus, Texas, player voting Adrian Beltre, Boston, player voting Miguel Cabrera, Detroit, player voting s-Robinson Cano, N.Y. Yankees, fan voting s-Derek Jeter, N.Y. Yankees, fan voting y-Ian Kinsler, Texas, player voting s-Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay, fan voting s-Justin Morneau, Minnesota, fan voting z-Dustin Pedroia, Boston, player voting Alex Rodriguez, N.Y. Yankees, manager selection Ty Wigginton, Baltimore, manager selection Outfielders Jose Bautista, Toronto, player voting s-Carl Crawford, Tampa Bay, fan voting s-Josh Hamilton, Texas, fan voting Torii Hunter, L.A. Angels, player voting s-Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle, fan voting Vernon Wells, Toronto, player voting Final Man (Determined by voting by fans on the internet) Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox Nick Swisher, N.Y. Yankees Delmon Young, Minnesota Michael Young, Texas Kevin Youkilis, Boston s-starter; x-replaces Victor Martinez; y-replaces Dustin Pedroia; z-injured, will not play

GOLF PGA Tour AT&T NATIONAL Sunday At Aronimink Golf Club Newtown Square, Pa. Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,237; Par: 70 Final FedExCup points in parentheses Justin Rose (500), $1,116,000 69-64-67-70—270 Ryan Moore (300), $669,600 67-70-69-65—271 Jeff Overton (190), $421,600 68-68-69-67—272 Charlie Wi (135), $297,600 69-65-70-69—273 J.B. Holmes (110), $248,000 70-67-71-66—274 Carl Pettersson (100), $223,200 67-72-65-71—275 Marc Leishman (88), $199,950 71-70-67-68—276 Nick Watney (88), $199,950 66-71-70-69—276 Vijay Singh (78), $173,600 71-70-67-69—277 Jason Day (78), $173,600 66-68-72-71—277 Daniel Chopra (62), $131,440 69-70-72-67—278 Vaughn Taylor (62), $131,440 70-71-70-67—278 Sean O’Hair (62), $131,440 71-68-70-69—278 Stuart Appleby (62), $131,440 71-69-69-69—278 Bo Van Pelt (62), $131,440 69-68-70-71—278 Garrett Willis (51), $81,427 71-69-73-66—279 Joe Ogilvie (51), $81,427 66-72-73-68—279 Ricky Barnes (51), $81,427 70-72-69-68—279 Aaron Baddeley (51), $81,427 69-70-71-69—279 Brandt Snedeker (51), $81,427 71-70-69-69—279 John Mallinger (51), $81,427 67-70-72-70—279 Brian Gay (51), $81,427 67-70-71-71—279 Jonathan Byrd (51), $81,427 70-70-68-71—279 John Merrick (51), $81,427 72-70-66-71—279 George McNeill (43), $46,323 71-69-71-69—280

73-70-68-69—280 71-68-71-70—280 69-70-71-70—280 72-70-68-70—280 69-70-69-72—280 68-71-69-72—280 68-73-71-69—281 67-73-73-69—282 72-69-72-69—282 72-70-71-69—282 70-72-71-69—282 70-69-73-70—282 72-67-73-70—282 69-68-71-74—282 69-70-69-74—282 70-72-71-70—283 69-67-75-72—283 72-70-68-73—283 66-72-71-74—283 70-67-71-75—283 74-68-77-65—284 68-75-73-68—284 71-70-73-70—284 73-70-70-71—284 68-70-74-72—284 71-69-70-74—284 71-69-69-75—284 68-74-75-68—285 71-71-70-73—285 69-72-71-73—285 70-73-74-69—286 74-69-70-73—286 67-74-70-75—286 68-71-70-77—286 71-69-74-73—287 69-73-72-73—287 74-68-76-70—288 70-71-74-73—288 71-72-72-73—288 72-69-73-74—288 71-71-72-74—288 73-69-76-71—289 69-73-74-74—290 71-68-75-76—290 70-73-72-76—291 77-66-78-72—293

LPGA Tour JAMIE FARR OWENS CORNING CLASSIC Sunday At Highland Meadows Golf Club Course Sylvania, Ohio Purse:, $1 million Yardage: 6,428 yards; Par: 71 Final Na Yeon Choi, $150,000 64-67-68-71—270 In-Kyung Kim, $68,808 70-66-70-64—270 Song-Hee Kim, $68,808 70-66-68-66—270 Christina Kim, $68,808 66-67-67-70—270 Jiyai Shin, $40,776 67-70-70-64—271 Inbee Park, $33,362 67-66-70-69—272 Hee Young Park, $24,795 70-68-71-64—273 Meena Lee, $24,795 71-67-67-68—273 Katherine Hull, $24,795 67-71-65-70—273 Beatriz Recari, $16,936 69-67-72-66—274 Kris Tamulis, $16,936 68-70-68-68—274 Alena Sharp, $16,936 65-68-73-68—274 Stacy Prammanasudh, $16,936 69-67-69-69—274 Azahara Munoz, $16,936 70-68-66-70—274 Kristy McPherson, $16,936 68-68-67-71—274 Momoko Ueda, $13,543 67-72-69-67—275 Sarah Kemp, $11,843 74-67-70-65—276 Chella Choi, $11,843 71-66-74-65—276 Diana D’Alessio, $11,843 72-68-70-66—276 Eun-Hee Ji, $11,843 69-71-69-67—276 Maria Hjorth, $11,843 69-69-71-67—276 Karin Sjodin, $9,997 71-66-72-68—277 Meaghan Francella, $9,997 69-68-70-70—277 M.J. Hur, $9,997 68-69-70-70—277 Angela Stanford, $9,997 69-69-68-71—277 Jeong Jang, $8,254 70-71-69-68—278 Sherri Steinhauer, $8,254 69-69-71-69—278 Morgan Pressel, $8,254 74-68-66-70—278 Hee-Won Han, $8,254 71-66-70-71—278 Stacy Lewis, $8,254 67-69-71-71—278 Amy Yang, $8,254 68-70-68-72—278 Katie Futcher, $6,348 73-69-69-68—279 Allison Fouch, $6,348 71-70-70-68—279 Karine Icher, $6,348 66-72-72-69—279 Misun Cho, $6,348 69-70-70-70—279 Eunjung Y, $6,348i 71-68-69-71—279 Marisa Baena, $6,348 66-72-70-71—279 Kyeong Bae, $6,348 74-65-68-72—279 Sun Young Yoo, $4,844 70-71-71-68—280 Amy Hung, $4,844 68-71-73-68—280 Karen Stupples, $4,844 70-71-70-69—280 Allison Hanna, $4,844 70-69-72-69—280 Paige Mackenzie, $4,844 72-70-68-70—280 Brittany Lincicome, $4,844 68-74-67-71—280 Mindy Kim, $3,641 70-69-73-69—281 Lorie Kane, $3,641 72-70-69-70—281 Jimin Kang, $3,641 72-68-71-70—281 Candie Kung, $3,641 70-70-71-70—281 Russy Gulyanamitta, $3,641 68-72-71-70—281 Lisa Meldrum, $3,641 70-68-72-71—281 Soo-Yun Kang, $3,641 68-70-72-71—281 Pernilla Lindberg, $3,641 69-68-71-73—281 Natalie Gulbis, $3,641 68-71-68-74—281 Haeji Kang, $3,015 72-69-74-67—282 Ilmi Chung, $3,015 69-71-71-71—282 Jill McGill, $2,628 76-66-71-70—283 Marianne Skarpnord, $2,628 72-67-73-71—283 Stephanie Louden, $2,628 68-72-71-72—283 Libby Smith, $2,628 72-67-72-72—283 Jean Reynolds, $2,628 69-68-72-74—283 Na On Min, $2,628 68-71-68-76—283 Reilley Rankin, $2,249 71-71-73-69—284 Gwladys Nocera, $2,249 70-72-73-69—284 Taylor Leon, $2,249 75-67-72-70—284 Mikaela Parmlid, $2,249 77-65-71-71—284 Jee Young Lee, $2,249 69-71-70-74—284 Alison Walshe, $2,249 70-72-67-75—284 Mina Harigae, $2,008 70-70-75-70—285 Heather Bowie Young, $2,008 69-72-71-73—285 Giulia Sergas, $2,008 69-71-72-73—285 Tamie Durdin, $2,008 72-70-67-76—285 Adrienne White, $1,868 70-70-76-70—286 Louise Friberg, $1,868 73-69-73-71—286 Cindy Lacrosse, $1,868 70-72-72-72—286 Tanya Dergal, $1,868 71-70-73-72—286 Maria Hernandez, $1,868 70-70-72-74—286 Amanda Blumenherst, $1,868 71-70-70-75—286 Jackie Gallagher-Smith, $1,786 67-73-73-75—288 Vicky Hurst, $1,752 71-69-79-70—289 Janice Moodie, $1,752 72-70-69-78—289 Lisa Strom, $1,707 70-72-74-74—290 Ashli Bunch, $1,707 71-70-71-78—290 Iben Tinning, $1,675 74-68-75-74—291

Champions Tour MONTREAL CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Fontainebleu Golf Club Blainville, Quebec Purse: $1.8 million Yardage: 7,105; Par: 72 Final Charles Schwab Cup points in parentheses Larry Mize (270), $270,000 67-68-64—199 John Cook (158), $158,400 66-66-68—200 Dan Forsman (119), $118,800 71-66-65—202 Corey Pavin (119), $118,800 68-67-67—202 Bob Gilder (66), $66,240 68-69-66—203 Jay Haas (66), $66,240 66-70-67—203 Loren Roberts (66), $66,240 70-66-67—203 Fred Couples (66), $66,240 69-66-68—203 D.A. Weibring (66), $66,240 72-63-68—203 Bill Glasson (39), $38,700 68-70-66—204 Tom Kite (39), $38,700 71-67-66—204 Joey Sindelar (39), $38,700 66-71-67—204 Mike Reid (39), $38,700 69-68-67—204 Tom Lehman (39), $38,700 68-68-68—204 Russ Cochran (39), $38,700 65-68-71—204 Jay Don Blake, $29,700 66-70-69—205 Mark Calcavecchia, $29,700 70-66-69—205 Brad Bryant, $26,190 69-68-69—206 Tom Wargo, $26,190 65-71-70—206 Tom Purtzer, $19,200 66-72-69—207 Gene Jones, $19,200 69-70-68—207 Morris Hatalsky, $19,200 70-68-69—207 Olin Browne, $19,200 73-68-66—207 Bob Niger, $19,200 68-69-70—207

David Peoples, $19,200 James Mason, $19,200 David Frost, $19,200 Peter Senior, $19,200 Jeff Sluman, $13,608 Mike Goodes, $13,608 Gary Hallberg, $13,608 Bobby Clampett, $13,608 Craig Stadler, $13,608 Denis Watson, $11,070 Jim Roy, $11,070 Vicente Fernandez, $11,070 Hale Irwin, $11,070 Jim Rutledge, $9,000 Mark James, $9,000 Keith Fergus, $9,000 John Ross, $9,000 Tommy Armour III, $9,000 Lonnie Nielsen, $9,000 Kirk Hanefeld, $6,480 Bob Tway, $6,480 Chien Soon Lu, $6,480 Chip Beck, $6,480 Steve Haskins, $6,480 Joe Ozaki, $6,480 Fred Funk, $6,480 Tim Simpson, $6,480 Ted Schulz, $4,560 Mike Hulbert, $4,560 Tom Jenkins, $4,560 Blaine McCallister, $3,690 Yvan Beauchemin, $3,690 Wayne Levi, $3,690 Bruce Fleisher, $3,690 Bruce Vaughan, $3,690 Andy Bean, $3,690 Mark Wiebe, $2,970 Eduardo Romero, $2,970 Daniel Talbot, $2,610 Fred Holton, $2,610 Peter Jacobsen, $2,250 Jack Ferenz, $2,250 Fulton Allem, $1,764 Mike Donald, $1,764 Phil Blackmar, $1,764 R.W. Eaks, $1,764 Allen Doyle, $1,368 Scott Simpson, $1,368 Ronnie Black, $1,368 Dave Barr, $1,188 Dave Eichelberger, $1,116 Danny Edwards, $1,008 Keith Clearwater, $1,008

68-68-71—207 66-69-72—207 67-68-72—207 67-68-72—207 69-72-67—208 67-72-69—208 68-69-71—208 75-69-64—208 70-65-73—208 68-72-69—209 71-69-69—209 69-72-68—209 71-71-67—209 71-69-70—210 70-71-69—210 67-71-72—210 69-69-72—210 70-73-67—210 72-71-67—210 70-70-71—211 71-69-71—211 69-71-71—211 69-71-71—211 67-71-73—211 67-75-69—211 75-67-69—211 70-73-68—211 71-69-72—212 69-72-71—212 70-73-69—212 69-71-73—213 72-69-72—213 71-71-71—213 70-73-70—213 72-71-70—213 73-71-69—213 68-73-73—214 72-72-70—214 70-72-73—215 72-74-69—215 70-71-75—216 70-71-75—216 70-70-77—217 69-75-73—217 72-73-72—217 72-73-72—217 71-70-77—218 75-71-72—218 77-71-70—218 74-74-72—220 72-75-76—223 73-75-76—224 73-77-74—224

CYCLING TOUR DE FRANCE Sunday At Brussels First Stage 138.9 miles from Rotterdam to Brussels 1. Alessandro Petacchi, Italy, Lampre-Farnese, 5 hours, 9 minutes, 38 seconds. 2. Mark Renshaw, Australia, Team HTC-Columbia, same time. 3. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Cervelo Test Team, same time. 4. Robbie McEwen, Australia, Katusha, same time. 5. Matthieu Ladagnous, France, Francaise des Jeux, same time. Also 55. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 56. George Hincapie, United States, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 57. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, same time. 62. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 80. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 130. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Team Saxo Bank, same time. 132. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 133. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 140. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 147. Christian Vandevelde, United States, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 150. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, same time. 163. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, same time. 164. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, same time. 170. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 187. Tony Martin, Germany, Team HTC-Columbia, same time. 193. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 4 minutes, 6 seconds behind. Overall Standings (After first stage) 1. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Team Saxo Bank, 5:19:38. 2. Tony Martin, Germany, Team HTC-Columbia, 10 seconds behind. 3. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Transitions, :20. 4. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, :22. 5. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, :23. 6. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, :27. 7. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, :28 8. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 9. Edval Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Pro Cycling, :32. 10. Linus Gerdemann, Germany, Team Milram, :35. 11. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 12. Adriano Malori, Italy, Lampre-Farnese, same time. 13. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, same time. 14. Michael Rogers, Australia, Team HTC-Columbia, same time. 15. Ruben Plaza, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, :36. 16. Niki Terpstra, Netherlands, Team Milram, same time. 17. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, same time. 18. Vasil Kiryienka, Belarus, Caisse d’Epargne, :38. 19. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, :38. 20. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, same time. Also 25. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, :40. 56. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, :52. 66. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, :54. 67. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, same time. 89. Christian Vandevelde, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 1:00. 91. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 1:01. 132. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, 1:12. 195. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 5:40.

SOCCER World Cup All Times PDT ——— SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 6 At Cape Town, South Africa Uruguay vs. Netherlands, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 7 At Durban, South Africa Germany vs. Spain, 11:30 a.m. ——— THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 10 At Port Elizabeth, South Africa Semifinal losers, 11:30 a.m. ——— CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 11 At Johannesburg Semifinal winners, 11:30 a.m.

MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 8 2 3 27 20 New York 8 5 1 25 18 Toronto FC 5 4 4 19 16 Chicago 4 4 5 17 18 Kansas City 3 7 3 12 11 Philadelphia 3 7 2 11 15 New England 3 9 2 11 13 D.C. 3 9 2 11 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 11 1 3 36 25 Real Salt Lake 8 3 3 27 27 Colorado 6 3 4 22 16 FC Dallas 5 2 6 21 16 San Jose 5 4 4 19 16 Houston 5 7 3 18 21 Seattle 4 8 3 15 16 Chivas USA 3 9 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Games Colorado 1, New York 1, tie Los Angeles 3, Seattle FC 1 Thursday’s Game Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 6:30 p.m.

GA 12 17 15 18 17 23 26 25 GA 5 11 12 12 15 22 23 21

TENNIS Wimbledon Sunday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club Wimbledon, England Purse: $20.3 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Tomas Berdych (12), Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. Doubles Mixed Leander Paes, India, and Cara Black (2), Zimbabwe, def. Wesley Moodie, South Africa, and Lisa Raymond (11), United States, 6-4, 7-6 (5).

BASKETBALL WNBA

WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 13 5 .722 Washington 12 5 .706 Connecticut 10 6 .625 Indiana 9 6 .600 Chicago 8 9 .471 New York 7 8 .467 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 15 2 .882 San Antonio 5 9 .357 Phoenix 6 11 .353 Minnesota 5 11 .313 Los Angeles 4 12 .250 Tulsa 3 13 .188 ——— Sunday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games No games scheduled

GB — ½ 2 2½ 4½ 4½ GB — 8½ 9 9½ 10½ 11½

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Sunday’s early results) ——— West Division W L Bend Elks 16 5 Corvallis Knights 13 9 Kitsap BlueJackets 11 8 Bellingham Bells 15 11 Cowlitz Black Bears 4 11 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 12 9 Moses Lake Pirates 9 12 Kelowna Falcons 9 15 Walla Walla Sweets 6 15 ——— Sunday’s Games x-Bend 13, Sacramento 2 Bellingham 9, Corvallis 6 Moses Lake 7, Walla Walla 4 Kelowna 5, Wenatchee 3 Cowlitz at Kitsap, late Today’s Games Bellingham at Corvallis Moses Lake at Cowlitz Bend at Kelowna x-nonleague

Pct. .762 .591 .579 .577 .267 Pct. .571 .429 .375 .286

Sunday’s Summary ——— BEND 13, SACRAMENTO 2 Sacramento 200 000 000 — 2 7 7 Bend: 120 150 22x — 13 7 4 Hampton, Gerig (5), Kershner (7), Nease (7), Galvan (8) and Urps, Valine. Lowden, Johnston (7), Scott (9) and Higgs, Ausbun. W — Lowden. L — Hampton. 2B—Bend: Kalfus.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Placed OF Shin-Soo Choo on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 2. Recalled OF Michael Brantley from Columbus (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned INF Robb Quinlan and RHP Sean O’Sullivan to Salt Lake (PCL). Selected the contracts of INF Paul McAnulty and OF Cory Aldridge from Salt Lake. NEW YORK YANKEES—Activated OF Marcus Thames from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Chad Huffman to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Designated LHP Dontrelle Willis for assignment. Recalled LHP Jordan Norberto from Reno (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed INF Geoff Blum on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Jason Bourgeois from Round Rock (PCL).

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,038 258 2,264 1,320 The Dalles 2,034 520 2,082 1,210 John Day 1,994 446 1,047 417 McNary 1,716 145 631 227 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 321,940 23,893 41,183 16,968 The Dalles 251,290 20,343 17,604 8,104 John Day 229,510 19,488 12,737 5,234 McNary 196,391 13,757 7,789 2,978

Bend Elks complete three-game sweep of Sacramento Bulletin staff report The Bend Elks finished off a sweep of the Sacramento Vipers with a 13-2 win in a nonleague baseball game on Sunday night in front of 2,073 at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium. The game featured 11 errors, and the Elks had just seven hits in scoring 13 runs. Sacramento committed seven of those errors, and

LOCAL BASEBALL eight of Bend’s runs were unearned. The Elks spotted the Vipers at 2-0 lead in the first inning, but shut them down from there, taking a 3-2 lead in the second inning and breaking the game open with five runs in the fifth.

Mike Lowden performed well on the mound for the Elks, going six innings and scattering seven hits while giving up just two runs, both unearned. He stuck out four. Zack Johnston and Logan Scott combined to pitch three scoreless innings in relief. On offense, Brenden Kalfus led the Elks with two hits, including a double, the game’s only extra-base hit. He also knocked in two

runs, walked three times, and scored three runs. Bend High product Tommy Richards had a single and RBI and a run scored, Evan Busby had a hit and two runs scored, and Lucas Shaw had a hit and two RBIs. The Elks resume West Coast League play today, when they travel to British Columbia for a three-game series against the Kelowna Falcons.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 D3

TENNIS: WIMBLEDON

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Nadal beats Berdych for eighth major

Twins’ Mauer is top vote-getter for All-Star game

By Greg Bishop New York Times News Service

WIMBLEDON, England — For the longest time, Rafael Nadal clung to his championship keepsake. He carried it, cradled it, even signed autographs with it tucked away in his right arm. The trophy did what Nadal’s Wimbledon opponents could not over the fortnight. It made tears well in his eyes. He seized it Sunday with an aggressive assault on Tomas Berdych, a one-sided affair confirmed by the final tally, 6-3, 7-5, 64. Victory vaulted Nadal into rare company — his eighth major championship tied the likes of Andre Agassi, Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl — and he somersaulted across the grass in celebration. “Having this trophy in my hands is just more than a dream,” he said. For the first time since 2002, the Wimbledon men’s singles final did not feature Roger Federer. If that seemed strange, though, Nadal’s triumph certainly did not. Again, he had completed a feat among the most difficult in tennis, winning the French Open and Wimbledon in the same summer, for the second time in the past three years. Nadal slung groundstrokes, grunted and twisted his face into all the usual contortions. He seemed normal, only he played different, more vicious, more aggressive, perhaps an improved version of the player who won this tournament in 2008. Last year, Nadal watched Federer duel Andy Roddick from the sofa in his living room in Spain. On Sunday, in front a Centre Court audience that included Bjorn Borg, Jaromir Jagr and the Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood, Nadal reclaimed the trophy and solidified his status as the best player on the men’s tour. While even Nadal said it remained premature to debate if he could match or exceed Federer’s 16 Grand Slam titles, it is fair to wonder where he, at 24 and ahead of Federer’s pace, will eventually fit in tennis history. “His place is undecided,” said Darren Cahill, a former player and an analyst for ESPN. “So much of the story is yet to be written. Much of it depends on how his body holds up.

By Howie Rumberg The Associated Press

Anja Niedringhaus / The Associated Press

Rafael Nadal falls to the ground as he defeats Tomas Berdych in the men’s singles final at Wimbledon on Sunday. It was the Spaniard’s second title at Wimbledon. That said, he better make room in his trophy case.” Against the sentimental favorite Andy Murray in the semifinals, Nadal approached the net 26 times and won 23 of those points. He also ran around his backhand, delivering toxic doses of topspin from the forehand side. Early Sunday, Berdych went after Nadal’s backhand instead. But commentator Patrick McEnroe said that Nadal had improved that shot, too, in recent months. He stood closer to the baseline than he had in Paris, changing his strategy to suit the surface. Nadal broke Berdych at 4-3 and seized the first set with sharp serves and brutal backhands. By then, victory seemed certain. (Nadal now holds a 100-1 record when winning the first set at a Grand Slam.)

“Tactically, Nadal played a perfect set,” McEnroe said. Berdych’s best opportunity came in the next game, when Nadal doubled his number of unforced errors from the first set — with six — and delivered uncharacteristic, shaky double faults. But Nadal held, and Berdych never again seriously threatened. “He was really strong today,” Berdych said. “He’s showing in the last few months that he’s really the champion.” Nadal played at a higher level over the past two months, compiling a 31-1 record since mid-May, than both Federer and Novak Djokovic, who will be ranked third and second in the world when the rankings come out this week. Nadal cautioned those predicting Federer’s demise, saying, “Everybody says the same thing two years ago.”

Rose holds on to win PGA’s AT&T National The Associated Press NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. — Clinging to a one-shot lead, Justin Rose stood over his tee shot on the 18th hole at the AT&T National when he heard fireworks in the distance. The celebration had started somewhere in Philadelphia, just not Aronimink. Rose knew that from experience. Only a week ago in the Travelers Championship, he took a three-shot lead into the final round and collapsed on the back nine for a 75. On Sunday at Aronimink, he was five shots clear going to the back nine and found himself in a battle he didn’t expect. He lost another big lead. This time, he didn’t lose the tournament. Rose hit every green in regulation on the back nine, including the final one, and closed with seven straight pars for an evenpar 70 to win for the second time in three starts on the PGA Tour. The relief at the Memorial came from winning for the first time in America. The relief at Aronimink was for learning not to lose. “I knew having not closed out last week it was important for me — just for myself — to do it today,” Rose said after his oneshot victory over hard-charging Ryan Moore. “Still, it’s never

GOLF ROUNDUP easy to close these things out, I’ll tell you.” He sure made it hard on himself. Staked to a five-shot lead at the turn after a 5-wood to tap-in range for eagle on the ninth hole, Rose had three-putt bogeys on the 10th and 11th holes — after having gone 274 holes without one on the PGA Tour — and just like that, the game was on. Moore one-putted his last eight greens, including a 12-foot par putt on the 18th hole, for a Sunday-best 65 to make Rose work to the very end. Rose two-putted up a dangerous ridge on the tough 17th for par. And with the Fourth of July fireworks booming in the distance, he hit the fairway and green for one last par. “I knew level par would get the job today,” Rose said. “Every two-putt felt like hard work coming in, I’ve got to tell you. It was good fun. I felt very much in control of my emotions, and it’s been a long week. But I’m very glad we’ve got to this point with a win.” Tiger Woods wasn’t close at all. The defending champion shot a 1-over 71, marking the first time in 11 years that he didn’t break par over four rounds in a regular PGA Tour event. He

wound up 14 shots behind Rose, the most Woods has finished out of the lead since the 2006 Players Championship. Also on Sunday: Choi takes LPGA title in playoff SYLVANIA, Ohio — Na Yeon Choi made a 2½-foot birdie putt on the second playoff hole to win the Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic. Choi converted a 15-foot birdie putt on the final hole to join fellow South Koreans In-Kyung Kim, Song-Hee Kim and American Christina Kim in the playoff. After all four missed birdie putts on the first extra hole, Choi hit her third shot close and rolled in the putt for her third career LPGA Tour victory. Choi had rounds of 64, 67, 68 and 71 to finish at 14-under 270 at Highland Meadows. Mize fires 64 for victory BLAINVILLE, Quebec — Larry Mize won the inaugural Montreal Championship for his first Champions Tour victory, closing with an 8-under 64 for a onestroke victory over John Cook at Fontainebleau Golf Club. The 51-year-old Mize, the 1987 Masters champion, had an eagle, seven birdies and a bogey in the final round to finish at 17-under 199. Cook shot a 68. Corey Pavin (67) and Dan Forsman (65) were 14 under, and Fred Couples (68), Loren Roberts

Armstrong avoids trouble; Italian takes first stage By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

BRUSSELS, Belgium — Lance Armstrong saw it coming: tight turns, narrow roads, big crowds and nervous riders would make crashes likely in Sunday’s first stage at the Tour de France. He sure was right. The seven-time Tour champion emerged unscathed after at least six crashes bedeviled the sunbaked stage through Dutch and Belgian flatlands that was won by Alessandro Petacchi of Italy, who avoided a big pileup in the final straightaway. Race leader Fabian Cancellara tumbled to the asphalt and defending champion Alberto Contador scraped a leg against another bike after he hit his brakes in the logjam that blocked the road. Neither was seriously hurt. The 139-mile course from Rotterdam, Netherlands, to Brussels, started out with three mid-stage crashes, one caused by a dog that darted into the pack, and finished with another three in the last two miles. “Total mayhem,” Armstrong said. Even so, the overall standings didn’t change. Tony Martin of Germany remained 10 seconds behind Cancellara, who won Saturday’s prologue. Britain’s David Millar was third, 20 seconds off the Swiss rider. Armstrong trailed another 2 seconds back and Contador was sixth, 5 seconds behind his American rival. “Typical first stage: Everybody wants to be in the front, everybody nervous for crashes,” Arm-

strong said, noting that a huge fan turnout on the roadsides was both good and bad. “Millions and millions on the road, it’s a blessing and a curse. It’s so great to have so many supporters,” he said. “It (also) makes the guys super nervous. “And on these tight roads, with bad surfaces and a lot of turns, there shouldn’t be any surprise that there are crashes there.” Two of Armstrong’s best support riders on Team RadioShack — fellow American Levi Leipheimer and Andreas Kloeden of Germany — were among 12 riders who suffered cuts and bruises in the spills, according to the race doctor. Bend rider Chris Horner, also of RadioShack, crashed as well. Top sprinters such as Britain’s Mark Cavendish, who won six Tour stages last year, and Oscar Freire of Spain, crashed while negotiating a sharp turn in the last few miles. They returned to the race but were out of contention for the stage victory. With those big names out of the picture, it appeared American sprinter Tyler Farrar might have an easy win. But in the last 200 yards he got bumped from behind, his bike was damaged and he had to walk it across the finish line. “It’s a shame because everything had gone so well and the team worked so hard for me,” Farrar said. “But, that’s sprinting.”

(67), Jay Haas (67), Bob Gilder (66) and D.A. Weibring (68) were 14 under. Spaniard wins French Open VERSAILLES, France — Spain’s Miguel Angel Jimenez of Spain won the French Open for his second victory of the season and 17th career European tour title, beating countryman Alejandro Canizares and Italy’s Francesco Molinari in a playoff. Jimenez shot a 4-under 67 to match Canizares (68) and Molinari (68) at 11 under at Le Golf National. Jimenez won with a par on the first extra hole. Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy (66) was a stroke out of the playoff.

NEW YORK — In the year of the pitcher, no-hit aces Ubaldo Jimenez and Roy Halladay lead a formidable National League All-Star staff. Rookie sensation Stephen Strasburg will have to wait at least another season before he gets the nod. AL MVP catcher Joe Mauer was announced Sunday by Major League Baseball as the fans’ top choice for the July 13th All-Star game in Anaheim, Calif. Albert Pujols earned the most votes in the National League. In the closest voting, the Mets’ David Wright overtook the Phillies’ Placido Polanco in the final week to win the NL starting third baseman spot. Each squad still has one more spot to fill in their 34man rosters. Fans will make the decision, choosing from a list of five candidates in each league in an Internet runoff. Strasburg’s 100 mph fastball has captivated fans around baseball since the Washington Nationals called the right-hander up June 8, but NL manager Charlie Manuel would like to see 21-year-old settle into his role as an ace before making the Midsummer Classic. “He got quite a bit of consideration,” Philadelphia’s Manuel told TBS during the selection show. “He is going be an All-Star for a long time. What does he have, five starts? I just felt there are other guys who have started 18 to 20 games. I just felt leave him alone and let him get used to the major league level.” Halladay pitched a perfect game in his first season with the Phillies, and Jimenez had one of the four no-hitters this year and is off to a remarkable 14-1 start with a 2.27 ERA for the Colorado Rockies. Halladay’s teammate Chase Utley was voted as the starting second baseman for the NL, but he is out with an injured right thumb. He will be replaced in the lineup by At-

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lanta’s Martin Prado. The other NL starters are: Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina; Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez; and Milwaukee’s Ryan Braun, Los Angeles’ Andre Ethier and Atlanta’s Jason Heyward in the outfield. In the American League, Mauer is joined by Minnesota Twins teammate Justin Morneau, the first baseman. The other AL starters: Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano and shortstop Derek Jeter; Tampa Bay third baseman Evan Longoria; Texas designated hitter Vladimir Guerrero; and Texas’ Josh Hamilton, Seattle’s Ichiro Suzuki and Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford in the outfield. The World Series champion New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox have a leading six AllStars each, but Boston second baseman Dustin Pedroia and catcher Victor Martinez are out with injuries. Yankees manager Joe Girardi made several difficult decisions in finalizing the AL squad. He left off Andy Pettitte and took teammate CC Sabathia, both 10-game winners, and selected slugger Alex Rodriguez, who only has 12 homers but 61 RBIs. Cincinnati’s Arthur Rhodes made his first All-Star team at 40. In his 19th season, Rhodes has a 1.09 ERA in 37 appearances. The Braves and Cardinals each had five All-Stars to lead the NL. Atlanta’s 20-year-old rookie Heyward made the squad, but might not be able to play because of an injury. The NL Internet candidates are San Diego’s Heath Bell, Colorado’s Carlos Gonzalez, Cincinnati’s Joey Votto, Atlanta’s Billy Wagner and Washington’s Ryan Zimmerman. The AL Internet candidates are Chicago’s Paul Konerko, New York’s Nick Swisher, Minnesota’s Delmon Young, Texas’ Michael Young and Boston’s Kevin Youkilis. ★ ★ Bend

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2010 Deschutes County Fair Talent Show Sponsored By

Eberhard’s Dairy & Verizon Wednesday, July 28, 1-4p.m. on the Eberhard’s/Verizon Food Court Stage Singers, Musicians, Dancers, Bands, Magicians, Jugglers & Acts of all kinds!

4 acts will each win a $250 prize & perform again on Saturday Send a CD/Cassette, DVD, videotape, (no 8mm) and/or photos along with name, address, and phone number to: Deschutes County Fair Talent Show Audition 3800 Airport Way Redmond, OR 97756 All Audition materials must be at the fairgrounds by 12:00 p.m. Friday, July 9! Notification will be completed by Wednesday, July 14. • Up to 24 acts will be chosen to perform on Wednesday, July 28 between 1:00 and 4:00 p.m. • All acts must be residents of Deschutes County (an act from a neighboring county that does not participate in the State Fair Talent Show is eligible). • A panel of three judges will evaluate each act! • Four acts will be chosen for the $250 prizes and the right to perform again in a 10- to 12-minute set on Saturday, July 31. • Three divisions: children 1-9, youth 10-17, adult 18 and older may qualify for the State Fair Talent Show. • A sound system will be provided with a sound tech and both a CD and cassette player. • CD/cassette accompaniments must have the lead vocal tracks completely removed! Instrumental and harmony tracks are okay. • Bands will be expected to provide their own amps, keyboards, drums, etc., and to set up and remove their equipment. • All performances must be suitable for the family environment expected on the Food Court Stage. • Performers under 16 get a pass and one for a parent/ guardian. Performers 16 and over get a pass for themselves. • For more information, call 541-548-2711.


D4 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E AGUE B A SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 50 31 .617 — Boston 49 33 .598 1½ Tampa Bay 48 33 .593 2 Toronto 41 42 .494 10 Baltimore 25 56 .309 25 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 43 37 .538 — Minnesota 44 38 .537 — Chicago 42 38 .525 1 Kansas City 36 46 .439 8 Cleveland 32 49 .395 11½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 48 33 .593 — Los Angeles 46 38 .548 3½ Oakland 41 42 .494 8 Seattle 34 47 .420 14 ——— Sunday’s Games Oakland 3, Cleveland 1 Seattle 8, Detroit 1 N.Y. Yankees 7, Toronto 6, 10 innings Baltimore 6, Boston 1 Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 4 Chicago White Sox 5, Texas 3 L.A. Angels 11, Kansas City 0 Today’s Games Baltimore (Millwood 2-8) at Detroit (A.Oliver 0-2), 10:05 a.m. L.A. Angels (Kazmir 7-7) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 3-7), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Matsuzaka 5-3) at Tampa Bay (Garza 9-5), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (Laffey 1-2) at Texas (O.Beltre 0-0), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 6-7) at Oakland (Sheets 3-7), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (Bannister 7-6) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 6-5), 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 48 34 .585 — New York 46 36 .561 2 Philadelphia 42 38 .525 5 Florida 38 43 .469 9½ Washington 36 47 .434 12½ Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 47 36 .566 — St. Louis 45 37 .549 1½ Milwaukee 37 45 .451 9½ Chicago 35 47 .427 11½ Houston 32 51 .386 15 Pittsburgh 30 52 .366 16½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 49 33 .598 — Los Angeles 45 36 .556 3½ Colorado 44 38 .537 5 San Francisco 41 40 .506 7½ Arizona 32 50 .390 17 ——— Sunday’s Games N.Y. Mets 9, Washington 5 Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 5 St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 1 Cincinnati 14, Chicago Cubs 3 Colorado 4, San Francisco 3, 15 innings San Diego 3, Houston 2 L.A. Dodgers 3, Arizona 1 Florida 3, Atlanta 2 Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 2-5) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 3-6), 1:10 p.m. San Francisco (J.Sanchez 6-6) at Milwaukee (Bush 3-6), 1:10 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 9-6) at Philadelphia (Halladay 9-7), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Harang 6-7) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 10-2), 4:10 p.m. Florida (N.Robertson 5-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Ely 4-5), 6:10 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Mariners 8, Tigers 1 DETROIT — Russell Branyan and Casey Kotchman each hit a three-run homer, All-Star Cliff Lee fell an inning short of another complete game and Seattle beat the Tigers. Lee, who had been trying to match the longest streak in the big leagues since Roy Halladay completed four games in a row in April 2008, allowed one run on nine hits and a walk in eight innings. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Langerhans rf Figgins 2b Branyan dh Jo.Lopez 3b F.Gutierrez cf Kotchman 1b Jo.Wilson ss Ro.Johnson c M.Saunders lf Totals

AB 5 0 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 4 41

R H 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 2 0 2 1 2 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 8 15

BI 0 0 0 3 1 1 3 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 4

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 6

Avg. .328 .200 .239 .267 .242 .277 .206 .264 .200 .210

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Santiago 2b Mi.Cabrera 1b Kelly 1b Boesch lf Raburn 2b-rf Inge 3b Laird c Avila c Worth ss Totals

AB 4 5 3 2 2 1 4 4 4 2 2 4 37

R H 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 10

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 11

Avg. .305 .264 .312 .274 .339 .221 .345 .214 .259 .188 .228 .246

Seattle 003 040 010 — 8 15 0 Detroit 100 000 000 — 1 10 1 E—Laird (3). LOB—Seattle 10, Detroit 11. 2B— Jo.Lopez (14), Boesch (16), Worth (4). HR—Branyan (12), off Bonderman; Kotchman (4), off Bonderman. RBIs—Branyan 3 (31), Jo.Lopez (31), F.Gutierrez (36), Kotchman 3 (25), Mi.Cabrera (69). SB—I.Suzuki (22), F.Gutierrez (10). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 4 (Ro.Johnson, Jo.Wilson, F.Gutierrez 2); Detroit 7 (Raburn 2, Laird, Damon, Inge, Santiago 2). GIDP—Branyan. DP—Detroit 1 (Raburn, Worth, Mi.Cabrera). Seattle IP H R ER BB Cl.Lee W, 8-3 8 9 1 1 1 League 1 1 0 0 1 Detroit IP H R ER BB Bondrmn L, 4-6 5 9 7 7 2 B.Thomas 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 Bonine 2-3 2 1 1 1 Schlereth 1 2 0 0 1 E.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 0 Bonine pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Schlereth Bonine (Kotchman). WP—League. T—2:49. A—24,899 (41,255).

SO 11 0 SO 4 1 0 0 1

NP 111 13 NP 87 19 11 24 15

ERA 2.34 2.93 ERA 4.81 4.29 2.70 0.00 1.59

1-1. IBB—off

Athletics 3, Indians 1 CLEVELAND — Vin Mazzaro pitched into the eighth inning and upstaged Cleveland All-Star Fausto Carmona. Mazarro (4-2) won his second straight start, allowing just the one run on seven hits in 7 1⁄3 innings. He tied the longest outing of his career set in June 2009 against Baltimore. Oakland Crisp cf R.Davis cf Barton 1b

AB 0 3 2

R 1 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0

Avg. .302 .256 .287

R.Sweeney rf Cust dh M.Ellis 2b Gross lf A.Rosales 3b Powell c Pennington ss Totals

3 3 3 4 4 4 4 30

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

0 2 2 0 2 0 1 7

Cleveland AB R Brantley cf 4 0 J.Nix 2b 4 0 C.Santana c 3 1 Hafner dh 4 0 Kearns rf 4 0 Jh.Peralta 3b 4 0 LaPorta 1b 4 0 Crowe lf 3 0 A.Hernandez ss 3 0 Totals 33 1

1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4

.298 .308 .288 .260 .265 .238 .262

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Pineiro W, 9-6 7 6 0 0 4 3 F.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 0 Lerew pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Texeira 2-2. Lerew (B.Abreu). T—2:46. A—42,116 (45,285).

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1

SO 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 8

Avg. .139 .203 .300 .244 .271 .253 .236 .255 .226

Rays 7, Twins 4

Oakland 100 100 100 — 3 7 0 Cleveland 001 000 000 — 1 8 0 LOB—Oakland 6, Cleveland 6. 2B—Cust (7), J.Nix (4). HR—A.Rosales (6), off Carmona. RBIs—R.Sweeney (35), M.Ellis (22), A.Rosales (24), Kearns (35). SB— M.Ellis (3). S—R.Sweeney. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (Gross 3); Cleveland 3 (A.Hernandez, Jh.Peralta, Hafner). Runners moved up—Barton, R.Sweeney, Cust. GIDP—R.Sweeney, Gross, LaPorta. DP—Oakland 1 (A.Rosales, M.Ellis, Barton); Cleveland 3 (J.Nix, A.Hernandez, LaPorta), (J.Nix), (LaPorta, A.Hernandez, LaPorta). Oakland IP H R ER BB Mazzaro W, 4-2 7 1-3 7 1 1 1 Blevins H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 A.Bailey S, 17 1 1 0 0 0 Cleveland IP H R ER BB Carmona L, 7-7 7 7 3 3 3 Sipp 1 0 0 0 2 Ambriz 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Blevins Sipp (M.Ellis). PB—C.Santana. T—2:21. A—13,940 (45,569).

SO NP ERA 7 111 3.81 1 6 4.18 0 10 1.59 SO NP ERA 3 103 3.69 0 17 5.79 1 6 5.25 1-0. IBB—off

White Sox 5, Rangers 3 ARLINGTON, Texas — Alexei Ramirez hit a goahead, two-run homer in the sixth inning to lead the Chicago White Sox over the Texas Rangers. Paul Konerko and Carlos Quentin hit back-to-back doubles in the sixth to tie it at 3 for Chicago. Two outs later, Ramirez lined a homer off starter Scott Feldman (5-8). Chicago AB R Pierre lf 4 0 Vizquel 3b 1 0 1-Viciedo pr-3b 2 0 Rios cf 4 0 Konerko dh 4 1 Quentin rf 4 2 Kotsay 1b 4 0 Pierzynski c 4 0 Al.Ramirez ss 3 2 Lillibridge 2b 4 0 Totals 34 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 9 5 1

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 5

Avg. .259 .242 .227 .303 .296 .229 .229 .244 .278 .500

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh 2-J.Arias pr Hamilton lf N.Cruz rf B.Molina c Smoak 1b Borbon cf Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 5 3 1

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2

Avg. .289 .307 .299 .330 .276 .339 .313 .222 .205 .285

AB 4 4 3 4 0 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

Chicago 010 013 000 — 5 9 0 Texas 000 210 000 — 3 5 2 1-ran for Vizquel in the 3rd. 2-ran for Guerrero in the 9th. E—M.Young 2 (12). LOB—Chicago 5, Texas 3. 2B— Konerko (12), Quentin (16), Kotsay (10). HR—Al.Ramirez (7), off Feldman; Hamilton (20), off Buehrle; Borbon (3), off Buehrle. RBIs—Viciedo (1), Quentin (50), Kotsay (19), Al.Ramirez 2 (31), Hamilton 2 (61), Borbon (24). CS—Pierre (9). S—Pierre. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (Al. Ramirez, Rios 2, Pierzynski); Texas 1 (M.Young). Runners moved up—Pierre, Viciedo, Kotsay, Andrus. GIDP—Rios. DP—Texas 2 (Andrus, Kinsler, Smoak), (Smoak, Feldman). Chicago IP H R ER BB Buehrle W, 7-7 7 5 3 3 0 Putz H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 Thornton S, 5-7 1 0 0 0 1 Texas IP H R ER BB Feldman L, 5-8 6 8 5 4 1 O’Day 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 D.Oliver 2-3 0 0 0 0 Ogando 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—D.Oliver Feldman (Vizquel). T—2:27. A—45,020 (49,170).

SO 0 1 1 SO 1 2 1 1 1-0.

NP ERA 93 4.53 10 1.74 18 2.86 NP ERA 83 5.51 18 1.65 7 1.45 13 0.00 HBP—by

Angels 11, Royals 0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Torii Hunter celebrated his fourth career All-Star selection with two homers and tied a career high with seven RBIs to lead the Los Angeles Angels to a rout of the Kansas City Royals. Joel Pineiro (9-6) won his sixth straight start with seven solid innings, and Paul McAnulty added a two-run homer in his Angels debut to help Los Angeles avoid a sweep. Kansas City Podsednik dh Kendall c Bloomquist rf DeJesus cf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen rf a-B.Pena ph-c Betemit 3b Aviles 2b Maier lf Y.Betancourt ss Totals

AB 4 3 1 4 3 2 1 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 4

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .301 .264 .243 .327 .320 .274 .179 .350 .323 .257 .255

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Willits lf-cf Tor.Hunter cf 1-Frandsen pr-lf H.Matsui lf Aldridge rf Napoli 1b McAnulty dh J.Mathis c Br.Wood 3b Totals

AB 5 4 1 1 4 0 3 2 3 4 4 4 35

R 2 2 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 11

H 2 2 0 1 3 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 14

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 4

Avg. .283 .271 .259 .246 .294 .337 .260 .000 .256 .250 .253 .172

BI 0 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 11

BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Kansas City 000 000 000 — 0 8 1 Los Angeles 004 003 22x — 11 14 1 a-struck out for J.Guillen in the 8th. 1-ran for Tor.Hunter in the 8th. E—J.Guillen (1), Frandsen (5). LOB—Kansas City 11, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Maier (7). HR—Tor.Hunter (13), off Lerew; McAnulty (1), off Texeira; Tor.Hunter (14), off V.Marte. RBIs—B.Abreu (43), Tor.Hunter 7 (60), Napoli (36), McAnulty 2 (2). SF—B.Abreu, Napoli. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 6 (Y.Betancourt 2, Betemit 2, J.Guillen, Bloomquist); Los Angeles 2 (E.Aybar, Aldridge). Runners moved up—Br.Wood. GIDP—Kendall, Maier, B.Abreu. DP—Kansas City 1 (Y.Betancourt, Aviles, B.Butler); Los Angeles 2 (H.Kendrick, Napoli), (H.Kendrick, E.Aybar, Napoli). Kansas City Lerew L, 1-2 Texeira V.Marte D.Hughes

IP 5 1 1 1

H 6 2 2 4

R 6 1 2 2

ER 6 1 2 2

BB 2 0 1 0

SO 3 0 1 0

NP 80 13 22 31

ERA 5.24 3.86 3.72 3.71

NP 114 11 16

ERA 3.96 4.00 3.24

HBP—by

MINNEAPOLIS — Evan Longoria had three hits and three RBIs, and Sean Rodriguez homered among his three hits, leading Tampa Bay. Longoria’s two-run single highlighted a five-run seventh inning for the Rays, who won their first series in nearly a month. Tampa Bay starter James Shields (7-8) earned his first win in eight starts, pitching six innings while allowing four runs and eight hits. Tampa Bay S.Rodriguez 2b Crawford lf Longoria 3b W.Aybar dh Joyce rf a-Kapler ph-rf Shoppach c C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Bartlett ss Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 3 2 4 4 4 3 38

R H 2 3 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 7 13

BI 1 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .276 .316 .298 .246 .174 .225 .229 .200 .228 .223

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Kubel rf Cuddyer 3b Thome dh Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 35

R H 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 4 10

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 4

Avg. .275 .274 .303 .344 .261 .263 .266 .298 .219

Tampa Bay 101 000 500 — 7 13 0 Minnesota 100 000 300 — 4 10 1 a-doubled for Joyce in the 7th. E—Blackburn (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 5. 2B—Longoria (25), Kapler (3), Morneau (25), Delm. Young (22). 3B—Longoria (3). HR—S.Rodriguez (6), off Blackburn. RBIs—S.Rodriguez (29), Longoria 3 (59), Kapler 2 (10), Morneau (55), Thome 2 (27), Delm.Young (55). CS—Delm.Young (3). S—Bartlett. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Joyce, Shoppach, S.Rodriguez, Kapler); Minnesota 5 (Kubel, Mauer, O.Hudson 2, Hardy). Runners moved up—Span, Hardy. GIDP— S.Rodriguez, Shoppach, Cuddyer. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, C.Pena); Minnesota 2 (Hardy, O.Hudson, Morneau), (Hardy, O.Hudson, Morneau). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 7-8 6 8 4 4 1 2 92 4.83 Balfour H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.10 Choate H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 5.57 R.Soriano S, 21 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 1.47 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackbrn L, 7-6 6 1-3 9 7 4 2 3 104 6.00 Duensing 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 1.75 Al.Burnett 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.53 Mahay 1 1 0 0 0 2 25 3.75 J.Shields pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Balfour 2-1, Duensing 2-2. IBB—off Blackburn (Crawford). WP—J.Shields, Blackburn. T—3:09. A—40,328 (39,504).

Yankees 7, Blue Jays 6 (10 innings) NEW YORK — Pinchhitter Marcus Thames had a game-ending single in the bottom of the 10th inning to give New York a win over Toronto despite having three runners thrown out at home plate Sunday. Robinson Cano walked and was sacrificed to second before Brett Gardner also walked. Thames, activated off the DL earlier in the day, received a postgame curtain call from what remained of the Independence Day crowd of 46,810. Toronto F.Lewis lf Wise cf Ale.Gonzalez ss J.Bautista rf Lind dh Encarnacion 3b Overbay 1b J.Molina c J.McDonald 2b a-J.Buck ph 1-N.Green pr-2b Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 2 1 0 40

R H 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 6 11

BI 0 4 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 3 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 10

Avg. .277 .240 .258 .236 .205 .195 .241 .280 .217 .274 .200

New York Jeter dh Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Cervelli c Granderson cf Gardner lf R.Pena ss b-Thames ph Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 3 2 1 5 4 4 1 38

R H 1 1 0 3 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 2 0 1 7 14

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 7

BB 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 1 2 0 12

Avg. .281 .293 .243 .276 .343 .267 .271 .226 .319 .192 .286

Toronto 001 031 001 0 — 6 11 0 New York 002 102 100 1 — 7 14 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-singled for J.McDonald in the 9th. b-singled for R.Pena in the 10th. 1-ran for J.Buck in the 9th. LOB—Toronto 8, New York 9. 2B—Teixeira 2 (19). HR—Overbay (8), off P.Hughes; Wise (1), off P.Hughes; Lind (10), off P.Hughes; Gardner (5), off Morrow. RBIs— Wise 4 (7), Lind (37), Overbay (29), Teixeira 2 (53), A.Rodriguez (62), Gardner 2 (29), R.Pena (9), Thames (11). SB—F.Lewis (7), R.Pena (3). S—Jeter, Cervelli. SF—Teixeira. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (Wise, Ale.Gonzalez, J.Molina); New York 2 (Cano, Jeter). GIDP—Encarnacion. DP—Toronto 2 (Wise, Wise, J.Molina), (J.Bautista, J.Bautista, J.Molina); New York 1 (A.Rodriguez, R.Pena, Cano). Toronto IP H R Morrow 6 9 5 Camp 1 3 1 S.Downs 1 0 0 Frasor 1 1 0 Purcey L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 New York IP H R P.Hughes 6 6 5 D.Marte 1 0 0 Chamberlain H 1 1 0 M.Rivera BS, 2 1 3 1 Robertson W, 1-3 1 1 0 IBB—off Camp (Cano), off WP—Morrow, P.Hughes. T—3:51. A—46,810 (50,287).

ER BB SO NP ERA 5 1 7 116 4.69 1 1 1 22 2.47 0 0 2 13 2.80 0 0 1 13 4.78 1 2 1 22 2.84 ER BB SO NP ERA 5 2 5 101 3.83 0 0 2 14 4.32 0 0 1 13 5.24 1 0 1 18 1.11 0 2 1 22 5.93 D.Robertson (Overbay).

for the Red Sox, who lost for only the fifth time in 17 games. Baltimore C.Patterson lf M.Tejada dh 1-Lugo pr-dh Markakis rf Wigginton 1b-2b Ad.Jones cf J.Bell 3b a-Fox ph-1b S.Moore 2b-3b Tatum c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 4 1 5 5 3 3 1 4 3 4 38

R H 0 1 0 1 2 1 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 6 11

Boston Scutaro ss D.McDonald cf D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b A.Beltre 3b J.Drew rf Hall 2b Nava lf G.Molina c Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 2 3 30

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 1 1 0 1 2 0 3 0 1 1 0 10

Avg. .292 .279 .238 .307 .246 .270 .182 .209 .250 .229 .245

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3 1 4 10

Avg. .280 .260 .259 .299 .341 .281 .227 .306 .000

Baltimore 000 200 022 — 6 11 0 Boston 000 000 001 — 1 3 1 a-popped out for J.Bell in the 8th. 1-ran for M.Tejada in the 8th. E—Scutaro (11). LOB—Baltimore 7, Boston 7. 2B— M.Tejada (13), Markakis (25), C.Izturis (8), A.Beltre (24). 3B—Lugo (1). HR—Youkilis (17), off Berken. RBIs— Lugo (9), Markakis (27), Wigginton (43), Ad.Jones (37), S.Moore (8), Youkilis (54). SB—C.Patterson (15). SF—Ad.Jones. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (M.Tejada 2, C.Izturis, C.Patterson); Boston 4 (D.McDonald, Hall 2, Nava). Runners moved up—Wigginton. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz W, 3-9 7 2 0 0 3 8 111 4.56 Berken 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 16 1.75 Ohman 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.88 Simon 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 9 3.10 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lackey L, 9-4 7 1-3 8 4 3 1 7 117 4.40 Richardson 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.00 Atchison 1 3 2 2 0 2 22 5.13 Inherited runners-scored—Richardson 1-0. HBP—by Matusz (Nava). WP—Lackey. PB—G.Molina. T—2:48. A—37,742 (37,402).

NL ROUNDUP Rockies 4, Giants 3 (15 innings) DENVER — The Rockies blew a three-run lead in the eighth inning, then watched Todd Helton rescue them with a bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the 15th against San Francisco. Dexter Fowler led off the inning with a triple off the wall in left-center. Guillermo Mota (0-3) intentionally walked Jonathan Herrera and Carlos Gonzalez, and Helton drove the first pitch he saw to left field, allowing Fowler to score easily. San Francisco AB Torres rf-lf 6 F.Sanchez 2b 7 A.Huff lf-1b 6 Sandoval 3b 5 D.Bautista p 0 Ray p 0 d-Burrell ph 1 Br.Wilson p 0 Mota p 0 Posey c 4 1-Whiteside pr-c 3 Ishikawa 1b 4 Affeldt p 0 Romo p 0 S.Casilla p 0 Runzler p 0 Uribe 3b 1 Renteria ss 6 Rowand cf 6 Cain p 2 a-Schierholtz ph-rf 4 Totals 55

R H 1 4 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 3 12

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 14

Avg. .285 .287 .288 .269 1.000 --.315 .000 --.300 .253 .311 .000 .000 ----.255 .305 .238 .100 .267

Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 4 3 3 J.Herrera 2b 4 0 1 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 1 Giambi 1b 4 0 1 2-Cook pr 0 0 0 Helton 1b 3 0 0 Spilborghs rf 3 0 2 b-S.Smith ph-rf 3 0 1 Mora 3b 5 0 0 Iannetta c 4 1 2 Barmes ss 6 0 2 Hammel p 3 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 Street p 1 0 0 c-Hawpe ph 1 0 0 Rogers p 0 0 0 e-Olivo ph 1 0 0 R.Flores p 0 0 0 Totals 47 4 13

BI 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 4 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15

SO 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 14

Avg. .245 .307 .295 .216 .214 .246 .269 .282 .244 .211 .257 .136 .333 .000 --.000 .272 .200 .307 ---

San Fran. 000 000 030 000 000 — 3 12 1 Colorado 001 011 000 000 001 — 4 13 1 One out when winning run scored. a-homered for Cain in the 8th. b-popped out for Spilborghs in the 8th. c-grounded out for Street in the 10th. d-struck out for Ray in the 13th. e-flied into a double play for Rogers in the 14th. 1-ran for Posey in the 8th. 2-ran for Giambi in the 8th. E—Whiteside (1), J.Herrera (2). LOB—San Francisco 11, Colorado 20. 3B—A.Huff (3), Fowler 2 (7). HR—Schierholtz (2), off Hammel; Torres (4), off Hammel; Iannetta (4), off Cain. RBIs—Torres (24), Ishikawa (9), Schierholtz (11), J.Herrera (9), C.Gonzalez (52), Helton (16), Iannetta (8). SB—Torres (16), S.Smith (2). CS—Torres (4), Fowler (5), C.Gonzalez (5). S—Mota, J.Herrera 2, Rogers. SF—J.Herrera, Helton. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 5 (A.Huff, F.Sanchez, Renteria 2, Whiteside); Colorado 10 (Barmes, Hammel, Iannetta, C.Gonzalez, Hawpe 2, Helton 3, Olivo). GIDP—Posey, Helton. DP—San Francisco 2 (Renteria, A.Huff), (Torres, Whiteside); Colorado 1 (Mora, J.Herrera, Giambi). San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain 7 6 3 3 4 6 110 2.98 Affeldt 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 4.85 Romo 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.43 S.Casilla 1 1 0 0 1 2 26 2.35 Runzler 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.49 D.Bautista 1 1 0 0 3 1 28 2.36 Ray 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 Br.Wilson 1 2 0 0 1 2 26 2.04 Mota L, 0-3 1 1-3 1 1 1 5 1 40 3.06 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel 7 7 2 2 1 8 110 4.18 Belisle H, 11 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.70 Beimel H, 14 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 11 2.39 Betancrt BS, 2 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 6 4.70 Street 2 1 0 0 0 1 27 2.16 Rogers 4 2 0 0 1 5 56 4.55 R.Flores W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.20 Hammel pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Romo 1-0, D.Bautista 1-0, Ray 2-0, R.Betancourt 1-1. IBB—off Mota (Mora, Iannetta, J.Herrera, C.Gonzalez), off D.Bautista (C.Gonzalez), off Rogers (Uribe). WP—Cain. T—5:24. A—35,274 (50,449).

Orioles 6, Red Sox 1

Marlins 3, Braves 2

BOSTON — Brian Matusz pitched shutout ball for seven innings and Baltimore picked up just its third win in 20 games at Fenway Park. Kevin Youkilis homered

ATLANTA — Dan Uggla homered and drove in all three Florida runs, Ricky Nolasco pitched seven strong innings and the Marlins avoided a sweep in the

three-game set. Nolasco (8-6) set a season high with 11 strikeouts while allowing six hits and two runs with only one walk. Leo Nunez pitched a perfect ninth for his 17th save. Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b Uggla 2b C.Ross rf Bonifacio cf Hayes c Nolasco p a-Do.Murphy ph Hensley p Tankersley p Ti.Wood p Nunez p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 33

R 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 1

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .281 .308 .298 .261 .271 .289 .200 .200 .138 --.000 -------

Atlanta Prado 2b-1b G.Blanco cf Conrad 3b-2b McCann c Hinske 1b b-C.Jones ph-3b Me.Cabrera rf Y.Escobar ss M.Diaz lf T.Hudson p Moylan p c-Infante ph Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 2 0 4 4 4 3 0 1 32

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 2 2 13

Avg. .335 .364 .261 .265 .280 .249 .256 .241 .175 .237 --.309

Florida 200 100 000 — 3 7 1 Atlanta 100 001 000 — 2 6 0 a-sacrificed for Nolasco in the 8th. b-was intentionally walked for Hinske in the 8th. c-struck out for Moylan in the 9th. E—H.Ramirez (11). LOB—Florida 5, Atlanta 7. 2B—M.Diaz (4). HR—Uggla (16), off T.Hudson; McCann (10), off Nolasco. RBIs—Uggla 3 (49), McCann (34), Hinske (32). SB—Bonifacio (3). S—Do.Murphy, Conrad. SF—Hinske. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 3 (Cantu 2, Hayes); Atlanta 3 (Me.Cabrera 2, Prado). Runners moved up—Cantu. Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco W, 8-6 7 6 2 2 1 11 118 4.69 Hensley H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.34 Tankersley H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.52 Ti.Wood H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.74 Nunez S, 17-22 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 3.21 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Hudson L, 8-4 8 6 3 3 1 7 108 2.44 Moylan 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.00 Inherited runners-scored—Tankersley 1-0, Ti.Wood 2-0. IBB—off Tankersley (C.Jones). T—2:55. A—44,163 (49,743).

Dodgers 3, Diamondbacks 1 PHOENIX — Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer off reliever Aaron Heilman in the eighth inning and the Dodgers went on to take two of three from the Diamondbacks. Chad Billingsley and Arizona’s Dan Haren each allowed one run. Billingsley left after six innings, and Haren after seven. That left it up to the bullpens, and it was no contest. Los Angeles AB Furcal ss 3 Kemp cf 4 Ethier rf 4 Loney 1b 3 Blake 3b 4 Paul lf 3 a-Re.Johnson ph-lf 1 DeWitt 2b 2 Kuo p 0 b-Belliard ph 1 Broxton p 0 A.Ellis c 4 Billingsley p 2 J.Carroll 2b 1 Totals 32

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 2 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 3

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 5

Avg. .338 .268 .320 .305 .261 .281 .282 .272 --.235 --.200 .179 .289

Arizona K.Johnson 2b S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Montero c C.Young cf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b G.Parra lf Haren p Heilman p Norberto p c-T.Abreu ph Totals

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 1 1 16

Avg. .264 .268 .260 .394 .264 .251 .221 .256 .408 .000 --.241

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 0 1 35

Los Angeles 000 001 020 — 3 9 0 Arizona 000 100 000 — 1 8 0 a-doubled for Paul in the 9th. b-grounded out for Kuo in the 9th. c-struck out for Norberto in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Arizona 8. 2B—Furcal (13), Loney (23), Re.Johnson (8), C.Young (20), Ad.LaRoche (18). 3B—M.Reynolds (1). HR—Kemp (15), off Heilman. RBIs—Kemp 2 (47), Ethier (49), M.Reynolds (54). CS—Loney (4), Re.Johnson (2). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (DeWitt, Ethier); Arizona 4 (C.Young 2, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). Runners moved up—Blake, Belliard. GIDP—A.Ellis. DP—Arizona 1 (K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). Los Angeles IP H R Billingsley 6 7 1 Kuo W, 3-1 2 1 0 Broxton S, 17 1 0 0 Arizona IP H R Haren 7 6 1 Heilman L, 2-3 1 2 2 Norberto 1 1 0 T—2:57. A—26,517 (48,633).

ER 1 0 0 ER 1 2 0

BB 1 0 0 BB 2 1 0

SO 8 6 2 SO 4 0 1

NP 111 32 11 NP 121 26 17

ERA 4.06 1.03 2.02 ERA 4.38 3.72 6.75

Padres 3, Astros 2 SAN DIEGO — Tony Gwynn Jr. hit a bases-loaded single up the middle with one out in the ninth inning to help the Padres take three of four from the struggling Astros. It was the Padres’ 11th win in their final at-bat at home and their third straight. Houston AB R Keppinger 2b 4 1 Berkman 1b 3 1 Pence rf 4 0 Ca.Lee lf 4 0 Michaels cf 4 0 P.Feliz 3b 4 0 Quintero c 4 0 O.Navarro ss 1 0 a-Bourgeois ph 0 0 Ang.Sanchez ss 1 0 Myers p 1 0 b-C.Johnson ph 1 0 W.Lopez p 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 Lyon p 0 0 Totals 31 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 3

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .278 .243 .254 .232 .247 .224 .232 .059 .294 .143 .094 .355 -------

San Diego AB R Gwynn cf 5 0 Hairston Jr. 2b 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 Hairston lf 3 1 Headley 3b 3 1 Torrealba c 4 1 Cunningham rf 3 0 E.Cabrera ss 3 0 LeBlanc p 2 0 R.Webb p 0 0 c-Salazar ph 0 0 Adams p 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

Avg. .227 .239 .291 .226 .267 .273 .314 .208 .250 --.235 -----

d-Stairs ph Totals

0 0 31 3

0 6

0 3

1 5

0 .184 3

Houston 100 000 010 — 2 5 0 San Diego 000 200 001 — 3 6 0 One out when winning run scored. a-walked for O.Navarro in the 7th. b-grounded out for Myers in the 7th. c-walked for R.Webb in the 7th. dwalked for H.Bell in the 9th. LOB—Houston 6, San Diego 9. 2B—Michaels (4). 3B—Berkman (1). HR—Berkman (8), off LeBlanc. RBIs—Berkman 2 (37), Gwynn (16), Cunningham 2 (6). S—Myers, Cunningham. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 4 (Pence, Keppinger, C.Johnson, Michaels); San Diego 2 (Cunningham, E.Cabrera). Runners moved up—P.Feliz, Torrealba. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers 6 4 2 2 1 2 70 3.57 W.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.86 Byrdak 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 5.03 Lyon L, 5-3 1 1-3 2 1 1 3 0 28 3.62 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc 6 2-3 3 1 1 3 2 97 3.10 R.Webb H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 1.71 Adams BS, 3-3 1 2 1 1 0 1 17 2.25 H.Bell W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.72 Inherited runners-scored—Byrdak 1-0, R.Webb 2-0. IBB—off Lyon (E.Cabrera). T—2:20. A—23,498 (42,691).

Mets 9, Nationals 5 WASHINGTON — Jason Bay drove in four runs, Angel Pagan drove in two more and All-Star third baseman David Wright added two hits and scored two runs for the Mets. Ike Davis added a two-run homer in the third inning to make a winner of Hisanori Takahashi (7-3), who allowed a three-run homer to Ryan Zimmerman but was otherwise stingy on the mound. New York AB R H Pagan cf 5 1 3 Cora 2b 6 1 1 D.Wright 3b 5 2 2 I.Davis 1b 4 2 1 Bay lf 5 1 2 Francoeur rf 5 0 1 Barajas c 4 1 2 R.Tejada ss 2 1 0 Takahashi p 2 0 0 Dessens p 0 0 0 b-Carter ph 0 0 0 c-Tatis ph 1 0 1 P.Feliciano p 0 0 0 Igarashi p 0 0 0 e-J.Feliciano ph 1 0 1 Parnell p 0 0 0 F.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 Totals 40 9 14

BI 2 0 0 2 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

Avg. .301 .227 .315 .261 .276 .261 .244 .228 .083 --.242 .185 ----.298 .000 ---

Washington AB Morgan cf 3 C.Guzman 2b-ss 5 Zimmerman 3b 5 A.Dunn 1b 5 Willingham lf 5 Morse rf 2 S.Burnett p 0 Clippard p 0 d-Desmond ph 1 Jo.Peralta p 0 f-Bernadina ph 1 Alb.Gonzalez ss 2 a-A.Kennedy ph-2b 2 Nieves c 4 Stammen p 0 Batista p 1 W.Harris rf 2 Totals 38

BI 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 3 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 12

Avg. .254 .299 .286 .275 .281 .288 --1.000 .255 .000 .286 .288 .240 .174 .240 .250 .155

R H 2 1 1 3 1 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 12

New York 212 300 100 — 9 14 0 Washington 000 003 110 — 5 12 1 a-struck out for Alb.Gonzalez in the 6th. b-was announced for Dessens in the 7th. c-singled for Carter in the 7th. d-flied out for Clippard in the 8th. e-doubled for Igarashi in the 9th. f-grounded out for Jo.Peralta in the 9th. E—Stammen (3). LOB—New York 11, Washington 10. 2B—Pagan 2 (16), Francoeur (14), Barajas (11), J.Feliciano (4), Willingham (12). 3B—Bay (6), A.Kennedy (1). HR—I.Davis (10), off Stammen; Zimmerman (14), off Takahashi. RBIs—Pagan 2 (38), I.Davis 2 (38), Bay 4 (41), Francoeur (42), Zimmerman 4 (44), Nieves (9). SB—D.Wright 2 (15). S—Takahashi. Runners left in scoring position—New York 8 (Francoeur, Cora 2, Takahashi 3, D.Wright 2); Washington 8 (Alb.Gonzalez, Zimmerman, Nieves 2, Willingham 2, Bernadina 2). GIDP—Nieves. DP—New York 1 (R.Tejada, Cora, I.Davis). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Takahshi W, 7-3 5 5 3 3 2 7 86 4.32 Dessens 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 1.69 P.Feliciano 2-3 2 1 1 0 2 22 2.41 Igarashi 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 22 7.91 Parnell 0 2 0 0 0 0 9 2.08 Rodriguez S, 20 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.57 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stammen L, 2-3 3 1-3 8 7 7 3 3 69 5.73 Batista 3 3 2 2 1 7 62 4.06 S.Burnett 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 12 2.93 Clippard 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 16 2.65 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 0.00 Takahashi pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Parnell pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Dessens 1-0, Igarashi 20, F.Rodriguez 2-0, Batista 2-2, S.Burnett 1-1, Clippard 2-0. IBB—off Batista (Barajas), off Jo.Peralta (Pagan), off Stammen (R.Tejada). HBP—by Dessens (Morse), by P.Feliciano (Morgan), by Batista (R.Tejada). WP—Igarashi. T—3:49. A—29,234 (41,546).

Reds 14, Cubs 3 CHICAGO — Drew Stubbs hit three of Cincinnati’s season-high seven home runs to lead a romp over the Cubs. The Reds had four of the homers during an eight-run seventh inning, all coming after Cubs starter Ted Lilly (3-7) retired the first two batters. Brandon Phillips began the barrage with a solo shot to left, and Jonny Gomes added a two-run homer. Jeff Stevens then surrendered a solo home run to Corky Miller, and after back-to-back walks, Stubbs went deep for the second time. Cincinnati AB R H B.Phillips 2b 6 1 2 O.Cabrera ss 5 3 3 Votto 1b 1 0 0 Janish 3b 4 3 4 Gomes lf 5 1 1 Ondrusek p 0 0 0 Owings p 0 0 0 R.Hernandez c 2 0 1 a-C.Miller ph-c 3 1 1 Bruce rf 4 1 1 Cairo 3b-1b 4 1 0 Stubbs cf 5 3 3 Leake p 3 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 Heisey lf 1 0 0 Totals 43 14 16 Chicago Theriot 2b S.Castro ss D.Lee 1b Byrd cf Colvin rf A.Soriano lf Fontenot 3b Soto c Lilly p Stevens p Howry p

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 0

R 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 14

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .308 .252 .312 .280 .287 .000 .214 .287 .216 .277 .278 .240 .344 --.271

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0

Avg. .276 .272 .227 .309 .278 .274 .297 .266 .000 -----

b-Fukudome ph 1 J.Russell p 0 Cashner p 0 Totals 34

0 0 0 3

0 0 0 8

0 0 0 3

0 0 0 1

0 .261 0 .000 0 --9

Cincinnati 001 202 801 — 14 16 1 Chicago 020 001 000 — 3 8 0 a-grounded out for R.Hernandez in the 6th. b-flied out for Howry in the 7th. E—Bruce (2). LOB—Cincinnati 5, Chicago 5. 2B—O.Cabrera (20), Theriot (7), S.Castro (9). 3B— R.Hernandez (1). HR—Stubbs (9), off Lilly; Janish (2), off Lilly; B.Phillips (11), off Lilly; Gomes (10), off Lilly; C.Miller (1), off Stevens; Stubbs (10), off Stevens; Stubbs (11), off Cashner; Colvin 2 (12), off Leake 2. RBIs— B.Phillips (28), Janish 3 (9), Gomes 2 (56), R.Hernandez 2 (23), C.Miller (4), Stubbs 5 (41), Colvin 3 (32). Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 2 (Cairo, O.Cabrera); Chicago 2 (Lilly, Byrd). DP—Cincinnati 1 (C.Miller, C.Miller). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake W, 6-1 6 8 3 3 1 5 86 3.38 Masset 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.35 Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 5.06 Owings 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.41 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly L, 3-7 6 2-3 11 9 9 0 3 98 3.76 Stevens 0 3 4 4 3 0 30 5.71 Howry 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 6.26 J.Russell 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 4.24 Cashner 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 2.40 Stevens pitched to 6 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Howry 2-0. WP—Stevens. Balk—Lilly. T—2:40. A—41,079 (41,210).

Cardinals 7, Brewers 1 ST. LOUIS — Adam Wainwright threw a five-hitter and added a three-run double off fellow first-time All-Star Yovani Gallardo, and the Cardinals coasted to an easy win. Gallardo (84) left in the third inning with a side injury, after allowing six runs in his shortest outing of the season. Only one of them was earned. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Inglett 2b Hart rf Fielder 1b Braun lf Edmonds cf Counsell 3b Lucroy c A.Escobar ss Gallardo p Villanueva p Braddock p a-Gomez ph Loe p Totals

AB 2 2 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0

SO 2 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .271 .333 .286 .262 .295 .265 .258 .278 .244 .237 .000 --.235 .000

St. Louis F.Lopez 3b Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Jay rf Schumaker 2b Y.Molina c Wainwright p Greene ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 32

R 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 7

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 6 6 3

SO 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 7

Avg. .272 .278 .305 .298 .319 .255 .229 .174 .257

Milwaukee 000 100 000 — 1 5 2 St. Louis 105 000 01x — 7 6 0 a-grounded out for Braddock in the 8th. E—A.Escobar 2 (13). LOB—Milwaukee 2, St. Louis 4. 2B—Wainwright (4). HR—Hart (19), off Wainwright; Jay (2), off Loe. RBIs—Hart (61), Jay 2 (6), Y.Molina (31), Wainwright 3 (4). Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 1 (Gomez); St. Louis 3 (Schumaker 2, Greene). Runners moved up—Pujols, Jay. GIDP—A.Escobar 2. DP—St. Louis 2 (Schumaker, Greene, Pujols), (Schumaker, Greene, Pujols). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo L, 8-4 2 2-3 5 6 1 2 2 59 2.58 Villanueva 3 1-3 0 0 0 1 4 38 4.25 Braddock 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.14 Loe 1 1 1 1 0 1 19 0.93 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wnwrght W, 12-5 9 5 1 1 0 9 99 2.24 Inherited runners-scored—Villanueva 1-0. IBB—off Gallardo (Holliday). T—2:22. A—38,581 (43,975).

Pirates 8, Phillies 5 PITTSBURGH — Garrett Jones and Delwyn Young drove in two runs each during a six-run seventh inning, and the last-place Pirates beat the Phillies for the third time in four games. Pirates rookie Pedro Alvarez started the rally with his second homer in as many games, making a loser of Jose Contreras (3-3). Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Ibanez lf Howard 1b B.Francisco rf Dobbs 3b W.Valdez 2b c-Gload ph Sardinha c Blanton p Contreras p Zagurski p Baez p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 1 4 3 0 0 0 34

R 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 5 0

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .270 .255 .241 .293 .250 .167 .264 .242 .267 .200 -------

Pittsburgh Tabata lf N.Walker 2b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones 1b Alvarez 3b Doumit c Church rf Cedeno ss Karstens p Meek p a-Delw.Young ph Hanrahan p b-Milledge ph Dotel p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 34

R 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8

H BI BB SO 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 10

Avg. .245 .294 .295 .276 .210 .257 .193 .219 .118 --.234 --.268 ---

Philadelphia 013 000 100 — 5 9 1 Pittsburgh 200 000 60x — 8 9 1 a-doubled for Meek in the 7th. b-lined out for Hanrahan in the 8th. c-grounded out for W.Valdez in the 9th. E—Dobbs (4), N.Walker (5). LOB—Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 4. 2B—Victorino (11), B.Francisco (7), Dobbs (4), Tabata (6), Church (9), Delw.Young (9). HR—Sardinha (3), off Karstens; Alvarez (2), off Blanton. RBIs—Ibanez (37), Howard (59), Dobbs (7), W.Valdez (21), Sardinha (8), Tabata (6), G.Jones 3 (50), Alvarez 2 (9), Delw.Young 2 (18). SB—Tabata (6). SF—Howard. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 2 (W.Valdez 2); Pittsburgh 1 (Alvarez). Runners moved up—Dobbs, W.Valdez, A.McCutchen, G.Jones. GIDP—Victorino, Blanton. DP—Pittsburgh 2 (Doumit, Cedeno, N.Walker), (G.Jones, Cedeno, N.Walker). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton 6 1-3 6 5 5 0 7 95 6.27 Cntreras L, 3-3 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 19 3.24 Zagurski 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 2.08 Baez 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 4.70 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Karstens 6 9 5 5 0 2 86 4.71 Meek W, 4-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 0.96 Hanrahan H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.89 Dotel S, 19-22 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 4.28 Karstens pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Contreras 2-2, Zagurski 2-2. T—2:45. A—28,698 (38,362).


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 D5

HIGH GEAR: INDYCAR

Power wins at Watkins Glen By John Kekis The Associated Press

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Runners take off from the start of the Spark Your Heart 5K Walk/Run at Riverbend Park in Bend’s Old Mill District on Sunday. Anthony Rinck (No. 263), of Hillsboro, won the race.

Heart Continued from D1 The entire family of seven, along with the family husky, Bodhi, was clad in the matching white T-shirts. Mia has been on a waiting list for the transplant organs since February. Mom, dad and Mia must stay close to their Bend home in order to be ready for the surgery when the donor organs become available. Volunteer pilots with private jets are also on call for the surgery, which will be performed at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford in Palo Alto, Calif. “She has a good spirit,” said Kelly Wennerth of her little one, who wears oxygen tubes in her nose and is constantly hooked to an intravenous catheter that provides medication for the condition. “She’s an unbelievable little

Elks Continued from D1 The right-handed-hitting second baseman was immediately taken to the hospital and two days later underwent reconstructive surgery on his nose. Though Richards’ face bears no sign of the accident today, the 20-year-old Elks slugger — who logged 50 hits for Bend last season, fourth most in the WCL — says he still can’t breathe properly through his right nostril. Richards admits he is lucky that the errant pitch didn’t catch his eye socket and cause further damage. The fear of another face shot haunted him for months. Although Richards was able to return to fall ball at Washington State, the team trainers there insisted that he wear a full face mask — one they fashioned for him from a football helmet. The added protection of the mask gave Richards the necessary confidence to return to the batter’s box and face fastballs again, though he says wearing the face shield was “pretty

Fireworks Continued from D1 James was expected to spend the holiday relaxing at his Bath, Ohio, home with family and friends. It will be a chance to catch his breath after a whirlwind three days during which six teams gave him reasons why he should continue his career wearing a new No. 6 jersey in their colors. Not surprisingly, the Cavaliers’ pitch focused on his allegiance and loyalty to home, and included a video presentation that included highlights from James’ seven seasons in Cleveland and testimonials from fans asking him to stay in Northeast Ohio. The team posted a portion of the video on its website on Sunday. Beyond his decision, James has a busy week ahead. He is hosting a Nike camp at Akron University, where he recently accepted his second straight MVP award and was honored by the city with a day of appreciation in an outdoor event at the school’s football stadium. It’s possible James could an-

girl,” says Pia Wennerth. “She has a high spirit and has a funny, funny personality.” The Spark Your Heart, hosted by the Heart Institute of the Cascades, was a benefit for the Heart Fund of St. Charles Foundation. The Heart Fund is dedicated to improving the cardiovascular wellness of Central Oregonians through community programs, research, and education for community members and healthcare professionals. “Supporting the heart foundation is a good cause,” said Kelly Wennerth at the grassy finish area of Spark Your Heart, “so we were all about that.” Nearly 400 participants were out supporting the Heart Fund and celebrating their Independence Day through the early morning run. “My wife and I love walking in these races,” said Jim Lussier, 68, of Bend, wearing an American flag hat twisted into

brutal.” “My teammates were giving me QB (quarterback) calls for about a week,” adds Richards with a laugh. As a freshman at Washington State, the Bend High graduate and 2008 Intermountain Conference player of the year concedes that he felt the pressure to perform and often struggled just to survive the intense strengthening and conditioning program at WSU. Richards finished his rookie season with a modest .120 batting average and a single RBI in just 25 at-bats. During his sophomore year, Richards says, the little day-today stresses began to fade and he began to enjoy the game on a new level. “I don’t worry as much about what people think,” he notes. Richards began to prove himself at WSU. And though he had only 30 at-bats this past season as a sophomore his average jumped to .300. With a second season of baseball under his belt as part of a successful Division I program — Washington State finished

nounce his decision in his hometown during or following the camp, which will feature some of the nation’s top high school players. Besides the Cavs, the other teams anticipating word from James are Chicago, Miami, New Jersey, New York and the Los Angeles Clippers. Some of them spent the past two seasons clearing around $30 million of salary cap space so they could afford to sign James and another marquee free agent. Now they’re asking him to walk away from $30 million, roughly the difference between a six-year deal to stay in Cleveland and the five-year contract the competitors can offer him under the collective bargaining agreement. The messages on lebronjames. com are simple: “Getting closer” and “You’ll be the first to know.” The teams aren’t the only ones waiting. Players such as Amare Stoudemire and Carlos Boozer, who in some years might be the best free agents available, are in a holding pattern while James, Wade and Chris Bosh, considered the head of the class, come

the shape of peace-sign fingers. “It’s just a great way to say happy birthday to America.” The Spark Your Heart course changed slightly from previous years and started and finished in Riverbend Park by the new Bend Park & Recreation District office on Columbia Street. The course, like in years past, meandered along a relatively flat loop around the Deschutes River. The overall male and female winners were Anthony Rinck, 36, of Hillsboro, and Kristina Trygstad-Saari, 25, of Bend. Rinch’s winning time was 15 minutes, 47 seconds, and Trygstad-Saari finished in 18:51. “People were just having a great time,” noted Lussier. “I think it’s a great way to celebrate starting off the Fourth of July.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

third in the Pac-10 Conference in 2010 and advanced to the NCAA regional round — the 5foot-10-inch, 178-pound son of Bend Elks owner and general manager Jim Richards began to play with increased confidence. Like most young players, Tommy Richards hopes to one day play professionally. But his most immediate goal is to earn a starting position for the Cougars next spring. “I think I’m ready for it,” states Richards. His patience and persistence have paid off. With 66 at-bats in league play this summer, Richards has struck out only eight times. Sitting in the Elks’ dugout before a recent game at Genna Stadium, Richards’ left arm makes a sweeping motion toward the field and his teammates. “There’s a freedom … now I’m just having fun,” he says. “I just want to enjoy the next two years of this.” James Williams can be reached at jwilliams@ bendbulletin.com.

to their decisions. “My guys are simply taking a step back and evaluating all of the info that they received over the past few days,” Henry Thomas, the agent for Wade and Bosh, wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press. The Heat have been busy trying to build a team around Wade — and they hope James and/or Bosh. They visited Dallas center Brendan Haywood before returning to Miami. Stoudemire arrived in New York on Saturday and was scheduled to meet with the Knicks on today. They’ve discussed a deal that would pay the All-Star power forward nearly $100 million over five years to reunite with former Phoenix coach Mike D’Antoni, but the Knicks may be hesitant to finalize things since they believe they’re still in the running for the top three. There has been some action since this highly awaited free agency period opened on Thursday. Paul Pierce and Dirk Nowitzki are staying right where they were expected to, agreeing to multiyear deals to remain in Boston and Dallas, respectively.

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. — Say goodbye to the Penske jinx at Watkins Glen International. Team Penske drivers Helio Castroneves and Ryan Briscoe had combined to win the first five poles since the IndyCar Series began racing at the storied road course in upstate New York’s Finger Lakes region, but neither had followed with a win. Will Power changed that with a dominant victory from the pole position for Sunday’s Camping World Grand Prix, leading 45 of 60 laps over the 11-turn, 3.4-mile layout. “I just gave it everything I’ve got,” said Power, who swept the first two races of the season but hadn’t won since. “I wanted to win really badly. I hadn’t won for a while. It’s the first race I pushed the whole way. It was a difficult race. I loved it.” Power beat Briscoe by 1.2 seconds and Dario Franchitti finished third, followed by Raphael Matos and Mario Moraes, his best finish of the season. After one week driving in NASCAR, Danica Patrick finished 20th, one spot ahead of where she started.

Power, the only multiple winner this year, now leads Franchitti by 32 points in the IndyCar standings. His victory gave Penske Racing five wins in nine events this season and its 59th triumph on road or street courses, tops in open-wheel racing. The top spot was down to teammates after the second and final full-course caution. Power was beaten out of the pits by Briscoe and was second when the race went green on lap 43. It didn’t take Power long to regain the top spot. He passed Briscoe on the next lap entering the chicane at the top of the hill coming off the high-speed esses. “I knew that was my only chance,” Power said. “I got a run on him. That was the key to winning the race, was getting him then. Once it spread out and we went back to saving fuel to get to the end, I don’t think I could have got him. It was just determination.” Franchitti passed Briscoe for second at the same spot two laps later but never mounted a serious challenge. Briscoe passed him back entering the first turn, a 90-degree right-hander, of the final lap.

“I was pushing 100 percent from start to finish,” Briscoe said. “I wanted to keep the pressure on. I saw his tires going away faster than mine. I wish I could have held on to the win. But this was an important race for us (Penske). We hadn’t won here yet.” The complexion of the race changed early when Castroneves, who started second, and Scott Dixon made contact on the back straight heading up through the esses on lap 7. The contact punctured the left rear tire of Castroneves’ No. 3 Penske Honda and Dixon’s front wing was damaged, forcing both to pit. On different strategies the remainder of the race, they ran up front when the other cars made their first pit stops but never could challenge Power. Dixon finished eighth, one spot in front of Castroneves and more than 12 seconds behind the winner. Power was in command from the start, leading the first 18 laps before pitting for the first time. Dixon inherited the lead for the next 10 laps before pitting again and Power resumed control, ahead of Briscoe and Matos.

AUTO RACING SCOREBOARD INDYCAR CAMPING WORLD GRAND PRIX AT THE GLEN Sunday At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 3.4 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (1) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 2. (3) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 3. (4) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 4. (11) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 5. (9) Mario Moraes, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 6. (20) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 7. (16) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 8. (7) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 9. (2) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 10. (6) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 11. (25) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 12. (14) Hideki Mutoh, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 13. (8) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 14. (12) Paul Tracy, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 15. (5) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 16. (10) Adam Carroll, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 17. (19) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 18. (23) Bertrand Baguette, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 19. (17) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 20. (21) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 21. (13) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 22. (18) Mario Romancini, Dallara-Honda, 59, Off Course. 23. (24) Milka Duno, Dallara-Honda, 57, Running. 24. (15) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 38, Contact. 25. (22) Alex Lloyd, Dallara-Honda, 22, Mechanical. ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 120.768. Time of Race: 1:40:27.4391. Margin of Victory: 1.2181 seconds. Cautions: 2 for 5 laps. Lead Changes: 5 among 4 drivers. Lap Leaders: Power 1-18, Dixon 19-28, Power 29-38, Franchitti 39, Briscoe 40-43, Power 44-60. Points: Power 327, Franchitti 295, Dixon 287, Briscoe 280, Castroneves 273, Hunter-Reay 251, Kanaan 241, Wilson 211, Wheldon 211, M.Andretti 201.

LOCAL AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON 2010 Event No. 3 At Hoodoo Mountain Resort June 26 Results Super Stock — 1, James Hudson, 2009 Corvette Z06, 39.458. C Stock — 1, Bruce Harmon, Solstice, 39.962. 2, Bill Ranidleman, 2006 Miata MX-5, 40.320. E Stock — 1, Blake DeWit, 1993 Mazda Miata, 39.561. 2, Richard Lang, Toyota MR2, 41.573. 3, Thomas Atkins, 1990 Mazda Miata 1.6, 43.313. 4, Timothy Rogers, 1993 Toyota MR2, 46.465. A Street Prepared — 1, Jim Kell, 2004 Corvette Z06, 41.146. 2, Matthew Pilliod, 1994 MR2 Turbo, 41.477. B Street Prepared — 1, Kevin Neary, 2006 Porsche Cayman S, 39.655. C Street Prepared — 1, Thomas Bennett, 1989 Toyota MR2, 43.730. E Street Prepared — 1, Jonathan Rall, 1974 VW Super Beetle, 42.026. F Street Prepared — 1, Doug Drouet, 1979 VW Scirocco, 40.247. 2, Charles Ray, 1993 Honda Accord 2.2L, 40.421. 3, Jack Gassaway, 1984 VW Rabbit GTI 1.8, 41.354. 4, Jacques Mayou, 1989 Honda Accord, 45.079. 5, Karen Archibald, 1979 VW Scirocco, 47.520. X Prepared — 1, Tyler Shepard, 1985 Toyota MR2, 39.180. 2, David Boyd, 2009 Corvette Z06, 39.215. C Modified — 1, Jim Lewis, Formula Vee, 39.462. D Modified — 1, Nathan Korsted, 1984 VW Rabbit, 37.672. E Modified — 1, Luke Smolich, 1992 Nissan Sentra, 52.146. Street Touring S — 1, Robert Clark, Honda Civic Dx, 42.456. 2, Kurt Jensen, 1991 Mazda Miata, 45.175. Street Modified — 1, Sean Glaab, 2001 Trans Am, 40.008. Street Modified II — 1, Marvin Wodtli, 2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP 2.0L, 38.134. 2, Chad Olerich, 2007 ZO 6 Corvette, 38.408. E Stock Ladies — 1, Patti Wiest, 1990 Mazda, 42.420. Tire (Pax) — 1, ESP, Todd Lindquist, 1999 Ford Mustang Cobra, 36.340. Not For Trophy — 1, OSPO, Don Wall Jr., 2007 Mustang, 38.900. Top Time Of Day Raw Time: 37,672, Nathan Korsted. Pax: 32.796, Blake DeWit. Stock: 39.458, James Hudson. Street Prepared: 39.655, Kevin Neary. Prepared: 39.180, Tyler Shepard. Modified: 37.672, Nathan Korsted. Touring: 42.456, Robert Clark. Street Modified: 38.134, Marvin Wodtli. Stock Ladies: 44.420, Patti Wiest. Pax: NFTOSPO, 38.990, Don Wall Jr. Street Tire: 36.340, Todd Lindquist. ——— 2010 Event No. 4 At Hoodoo Mountain Resort June 27 Results Super Stock — 1, James Hudson, 2009 Corvette Z06, 39.392. C Stock — 1, Bill Ranidleman, 2006 Miata MX-5, 39.094. E Stock — 1, Thomas Atkins, 1990 Mazda Miata 1.6, 42.138. G Stock — 1, Roy Hockatt, 1991 Volvo 780, 46.110. A Street Prepared — 1, Jim Kell, 2004 Corvette Z06, 39.583. 2, Matthew Pilliod, 1994 MR2 Turbo, 40.843. B Street Prepared — 1, Jeffery Fields, Miata MX-5, 38.920. 2, Thomas Albanese, 2009 Subaru WRX, 46.909. C Street Prepared — 1, Thomas Bennett, 1989 Toyota MR2, 43.352. F Street Prepared — 1, Charles Ray, 1993 Honda Accord 2.2L, 39.791. 2, Doug Drouet, 1979 VW Scirocco, 39.996. 3, Jack Gassaway, 1984 VW Rabbit GTI 1.8, 40.859. 4, Melissa Gilbert, 1984 VW Rabbit GTI 1.8, 45.206. 5, Karen Archibald, 1979 VW Scirocco, 48.869. Over Street Prepared Under 2.5L — 1, David Mills, 1988 Ford Festiva, 39.875. Over Street Prepared 2.5L & Over — 1, Dave Arata, 1987 Mustang LX, 41.157. X Prepared — 1, Tyler Shepard, 1985 Toyota MR2, 37.790. 2, David Boyd, 2001 Trans Am, 39.923. C Prepared — 1, Bert Jacobson, 1983 Camaro, 39.724. F Prepared — 1, Cary Kutter, 1977 Porsche Carrera 3.0, 41.053. C Modified — 1, Jim Lewis, Formula Vee, 43.230. D Modified — 1, Nathan Korsted, 1984 VW Rabbit, 36.287. E Modified — 1, Luke Smolich, 1992 Nissan Sentra, 38.901. Street Modified — 1, Sean Glaab, 2001 Trans Am, 39.750. 2, Matt Anderson, 1991 Subaru Legacy Turbo, 39.911. Street Modified II — 1, Tim Boedigheimer, 1989 Corvette, 36.678. 2, Chad Olerich, 2007 ZO 6 Corvette, 37.015. 3, Marvin Wodtli, 2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP 2.0L, 37.113. 4, Jami Olerich, 2007 ZO 6 Corvette, 41.272. Street Modified II Ladies — 1, Ashley Boedigheimer, 1989 Corvette, 48.679. Top Time Of Day Raw Time: 36.287, Nathan Korsted. Pax: 32.386, Tim Boedigheimer.

Stock: 39.094, Bill Ranidleman. Street Prepared: 38.920, Jeffery Fields. Prepared: 37.790, Tyler Shepard. Modified: 36.287, Nathan Korsted. Street Modified: 36.678, Tim Boedigheimer. Street Modified Ladies: 48.679, Ashley Boedigheimer. MADRAS DRAGSTRIP June 25 Results Sport Compact — W: James Taylor, Salem (1989 Nissan), 12.177, 54.35 (12.09 dial). R/U: James Love, Bend (1996 Subaru), 12.338, 58.06 (11.6 dial). Semis: Jose Plascencia, Bend (1994 Acura); Charles Ray, Redmond (1993 Honda). Jackpot — W: Josh Gray, Madras (1980 Malibu), 8.861, 77.19 (8.85 dial). R/U: Richard Gray, Crooked River Ranch (1970 Nova), 7.545, 89.11 (7.42 dial). June 26 Results Junior Thunder — W: Dallas Hill, Vancouver, Wash. 8.918, 67.98 (8.90 dial). R/U: T.J. Smith, Redmond, 11.52, 55.01 (11.22 dial). Semis: Nolan Merritt, Redmond; Brenden Newberg, Bend. Junior Lightning — W: Austin Kroske, Bend, 8.918, 67.98 (8.90 dial). R/U: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (2004 Motivational), 8.359, 80.79 (7.99 dial). Semis: Chace Kroske, Bend; Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A). Junior Second Chance — W: Brenden Newberg, Bend. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A). Semis: Nolan Merritt, Redmond. Sportsman — W: Dan Barnes, Redmond (1967 Chevy PU), 8.478, 77.99 (8.43 dial). R/U: Loy Petersen, Madras (1940 Buick), 9.232, 74.5 (9.26 dial). Semis: Jerry Gossette, Quilcene, Wash. (1968 Olds). Bike/Sled — W: Mike Merritt, Bend (2000 Doc Fang), 6.003, 111.66 (6.03 dial). R/U: Mitch Taylor, Madras (2003 Skidoo), broke. Semis: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (1998 Arctic Cat). Pro — W: Annie Hausinger, Madras (1970 GTX), 7.055, 97.61 (7.01 dial). R/U: Robert Hensell, Redmond (1971 Camaro), broke. Semis: Chuck Gillespie, Happy Valley (1969 Camaro). High School — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (1989 Nissan), 11.967, 58.29 (12.00 dial). R/U: Mychal Lind, Dundee (1967 El Camino), broke. Semis: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (2000 Caravan). Super Pro — W: Rod Gregg, Madras (1963 440), 6.586, 102.97 (6.52 dial). R/U: Lindsay Keever, The Dalles (1967 Camaro), 7.161, 93.56 (7.11 dial). Semis: Denny McPheeters, Culver (1964 Falcon). Jackpot — W: Vicki McKelvy, Madras (1973 Camaro), 8.302, 82.42 (8.24 dial). R/U: Bryan Dawson, Bend, 7.148, 96.36 (7.13 dial). Semis: George Fix, Molalla (1977 Nova). June 27 Results Junior Thunder — W: Nolan Merritt, Redmond, 13.201, 46.34 (13.15 dial). R/U: Brenden Newberg, Bend, broke. Semis: Dallas Hill, Vancouver, Wash.; T.J. Smith, Redmond. Junior Lightning — W: Shelby Smith, Redmond, 10.376, 62.50 (10.37 dial). R/U: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (2004 Motivational), 7.900, 81.23 (7.90 dial). Semis: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A). Junior Second Chance — W: T.J. Smith, Redmond, 11.165, 57.11 (11.14 dial). R/U: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (2005 T&A), 8.061, 78.12 (8.00 dial). Semis: Dallas Hill, Vancouver, Wash. Sportsman — W: Fred Lang, Madras (1969 Camaro), 8.242, 82.27 (8.26 dial). R/U: Ken Green, Happy Valley (1994 Chevelle), broke. Semis: Dan Barnes, Redmond (1967 Chevy PU); Suzie Uppendahl, Bend (1969 Mustang). Bike/Sled — W: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (1998 Arctic Cat), 7.481, 92.21 (7.35 dial). R/U: Buffy Taylor, Salem (1991 Yamaha 1000), 7.358, 97.83 (7.04 dial). Semis: Cody Cumpton, Vancouver, Wash. (2005 Suzuki).

Pro — W: Robert Hensell, Redmond (1971 Camaro), 7.041, 97.40 (7.05 dial). R/U: Bob Nimmo, Bend (1964 Chevy II), broke. Semis: Annie Hausinger, Madras (1970 GTX). High School — W: Jeffery Taylor, Salem (1989 Nissan), 12.048, 50.17 (12.02 dial). R/U: Kyleah Taylor, Salem (2000 Dodge Caravan), 11.924, 59.13 (11.88 dial). Semis: Mychal Lind, Dundee (1967 El Camino). Super Pro — W: Ed Glaab, La Pine (1988 Duster), 5.340, 128.57 (5.32 dial). R/U: Warren Regnier, Bend (1963 Nova), 6.723, 102.04 (6.68 dial). Semis: Brad Halvorson, Madras (1983 S10). Jackpot — W: Josh Gray, Madras (1980 Malibu), 8.928, 68.18 (8.80 dial). R/U: Melissa Dawson, Bend (1972 Vega), broke. Semis: Denny McPheeters, Culver (1964 Falcon).

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D6 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 E1

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200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Not using your electronic treadmill? Would like to buy at a reasonable price. 541-382-1318. ROCKHOUNDS - BIG SALE! 18” saw, 15” flat lap rock polisher, and sander, rocks, 541-350-7004, Bend.

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686.

We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call

½Chihuahua ½ Chinese Crested female, tri-colored hairless, very small, 6 mo., $300. 541-433-2747 or 420-7088.

541-390-6577/541-948-5277

Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head males well bred, small, $250/up. 420-4825.

205 Free 16.6’ Fiberglass boat. You haul. 541-923-2424

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Heeler

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

Items for Free

Havanesese AKC 3 yrs 9 lbs neutered lap dog black/tan $500 541.915.5245

Chocolate AKC Lab male $300. Shots, wormed dewclaws. Ready 7-4-10. Please call Stephanie at: 541-932-4868 or email stephsthekid@yahoo.com

Chocolate &

Black Lab puppies. AKC Registered. Ready to go. Call Jack Jennings at: 541-633-9113

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

KITTEN EXTRAVAGANZA! Open Sat., Sun. & the holiday too, 1 to 5 PM, other days by appt. Dozens of kittens just in from foster homes & great adult cats at Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team sanctuary! Altered, vaccinated, ID chip, more. Adoption fees temporarily reduced to just $30 for 1 kitten, $50 for 2 (excludes Siamese). Adult cats just $15 or take home an adult 'mentor' cat free with a kitten adoption! Social & most are used to kids, cats & friendly dogs. Can hold shortterm if you are going on vacation. For photos & directions visit www.craftcats.com Info: 389-8420 or 317-3931. KITTENS in Foster Home, $55 incl. spay, neuter, shots and wormed. 541-548-5516. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317 Lab puppies, chocolate and black males, 9 weeks Looking for good homes.250.00 541-447-8958

Dachshunds, Miniature puppies: purebred $150, or $200 registered. Call anytime. (541) 678-7529. Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Low Cost Spay & Neuter is HERE!! Have your cats & dogs spayed and neutered! Cats: $40 (ask about out Mother & English Bulldog Puppies! Kittens Special!) Dogs: Only 3 males left, ready for AKC Alaskan Malamute $65-$120 (by weight). We new homes July 1st. AKC Pups, ready now, $600-$650 also have vaccines & microcertified and they have been eac h. 541-408-4715 chips avail. 541-617-1010. vet checked and had 1st mandk@oregonfast.net www.bendsnip.org shots. $1800. each. Contact AKC Black Lab Male Puppy. Laurie (541)388-3670 Mini, AKC Dachshunds, black & Raised with love and well sotan, black & brindle, strawcialized. Dewclaws removed, Free 1 yr. old Male black berry & cream, piebald, short Lab/Heeler mix needs a lovshots given, paper trained. & long hair $325 to $375. ing home, to give him lots of Good field and show pedi541-420-6044,541-447-3060 attention 541-923-1180. gree. $300. 541-280-5292 AKC German Shorthair Pups, avail. 8/1 $650. (541)678-0107 905-6644

Free Aussie female, 10 mo., spayed, loving, protecive, energetic, 541-408-4162

Miniature American Eskimo 16 weeks, $250 (Sr. Citizen discount) 541-788-0090.

O r e g o n

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Golf Equipment

Musical Instruments

Snow Removal Equipment

Miniature Pincher, AKC Male, cropped, shots, $450, 541-480-0896.

Desk, good shape 3 ft. by 5.5 ft. with free office chair all for $85. 541-420-2220.

Electric golf cart, new batteries, split windshield, plastic curtains $1650, 541-548-4628.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Dining table, solid birch, drop leaf, 6 chairs, leaves, pad,good cond. $275, 541-633-3590.

HAVANESE Purebred Male 1yr 12lb Black/Tan Shots Very friendly $500 541-915-5245

Cairn Terrier/Border Collie+ mix puppies, born 4/26. $25/pup. 541-475-2377

B e n d

Furniture & Appliances

Boxers Pups & English Bulldogs Pups, AKC Registered $700-$1800. 541-325-3376.

Black & Yellow Lab Pups, AKC, champion hunting lines, Dew Claws removed, 1st shots, de-wormed & vet checked, ready to go, $350, 541-977-2551.

A v e . ,

208

Border Collie pups, working parents great personalities. $300. 541-546-6171.

Pets and Supplies

C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

MINI DOXI PUPS $300-$350 health guarantee. Pics/info www.highdesertdogsonline.com or call 541-416-2530. Nice adult companion cats FREE to seniors! Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 541-398-8420. Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, $300, Madras, 541-475-2593 Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, 1st shots/worming, 8 weeks old, males & female avail., 541-447-4399 Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppy AKC shots/wormed, $250. 541-383-4552 Pembrook Welsh Corgi female, 7 yrs., real sweetheart, owner moving must sell, paid $700 sell for $220. 541-588-0150 Pomeranian Puppies, 2 females, 1 male, call for info. $350 each. 541-480-3160. POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889. Poodle, standard pups (5), only 208 2 weeks. Put your deposit Pets and Supplies down now! 541-647-9831. German Shorthair Pups, 6 Pups for sale Lab/Heeler mix and Malamute/lab mix $50 weeks old, $100 Deposit, call each, to good home call for details, 541-815-5921. 541-923-1180 Griffin Wirehaired Pointer Pups, both parents reg., 5 males, 4 females, born 6/20, ready for home 1st week in Aug, $1000, 541-934-2423 or loreencooper@centurytel.net

WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mo- CAT, 13 year old female, torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, spayed, declawed, very ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! healthy cat. Moving and can't 541-280-6786. take her, needs good home ASAP 541-693-4933 WANTED: RV’s, Motorhomes & Travel Trailers, Cash Paid! Call anytime, 541-280-7959.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

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General Merchandise

1 7 7 7

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dresser, $35, upright vacuum, $35, please call 541-389-7066. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. GE range glass top, black, 4-burner, used 3 mo., exc. cond., $225. 541-910-6130.

Log Furniture, lodgepole & juniper, beds, lamps & tables, made to order, 541-419-2383

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing .17 HMR-Savage 93R17, synthetic stock, bull-barrel, access...$450..541-647-8931. 22-250, Remington, Model 788, Bolt Action rifle, exc. cond., $500, 541-647-8931.

1950’s Baldwin Baby Grand Piano, w/bench, good cond., needs some intermal repair, $475, 541-408-3215.

40 cal. Taurus PT840, stainless, 2 mags, 15+1, like new, $500. 541-647-8931.

Fender full body acoustic electric cut away guitar, DG10CE, perfect, $180. 541-480-5950

.45 ACP, Springfield, XD 45, w/2 mags, 13+1, case & ammo, $500, 541-647-8931.

RARE EGCon acoustic guitar classical, hispanic, some western. $239 541-382-2543.

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

260

Patio table heavy duty wrought iron with tile top 3 ft. by 5.5 ft. $45. 541-420-2220. RECLINER leather burgundy , swivel, $250. Over stuffed chair, make offer. 388-2348. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036. HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte. Sun. July 11th, 5:30-9:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sunday July 11th, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Deschutes Memorial Gardens 1 Lot, #46A, 2 caskets, 2 vaults, regularly $3585 need quick sale for $2500 OBO. 541-326-1170.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

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Building Materials

Lost and Found

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Found Keys: Car & door keys, remote, 15th/Canyon, Redmond, 6/28, 541-923-6116.

Logs sold by the foot and also Log home kit, 28x28 shell incl. walls (3 sided logs) ridge pole, rafters, gable end logs, drawing (engineered) all logs peeled & sanded $16,000 . 541-480-1025.

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Heating and Stoves

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

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Computers

Schwinn Womens High Timber Alum. mnt. bike. Shocks, like new, $180. 541-480-5950

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Exercise Equipment Tony Little Gazelle glider, and Ab/Doer exercise chair. Make offer. 541-548-3335. ULTRA II BOWFLEX, $500. Call for more information. 541-633-9502

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Tools Fast Dell Computer P4 1.7GHZ 20GB 256MB CD-ROM WinXP PRO Office 2007 Drill Press, American Machine, 5-spd., industrial model, Tower only $75 OBO call $225, 541-385-9350. 541-915-7806. THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

JET JTAS-10XL Tilting Arbor Tablesaw $850 Inc. DADO-TENON JIG-DUST COLL 541 382 3454

Found Key w/car fob, in river near beach at Farewell Bend Park, 6/27, 541-410-6468. FOUND: Lifejackets (2) between Bend & Prineville Reservoir on 6/29 541-410-5543 Found Polaris Ranger Top off of a Freedom Cab on Conyer in Redmond, call 541-548-6744 Found Sanddisk 512mb camera card, 6/17, Powerline Trail at Paulina Lake, 541-383-0882.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified FOUND: Small backpack, late woodstoves. night of 6/27 at Sparks Lake Boat Ramp. 541-419-9361

267

Fuel and Wood

Schipperke , beautiful male, WHEN BUYING all shots, chipped, altered, 20 weeks, $200. 541-420-6071 FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The SCHNOODLE PUPS beautiful Ad must Bulletin recommends black males, salt & pepper include price of item payment for Firewood females, $395. 541-410-7701 only upon delivery & Ruger M77 MK2 Ultralight, www.bendbulletin.com SHIH-POO adorable toy pups, inspection. stainless, .204 with Timney or hypo-allergenic, 1 male, 1 trigger & dies. $550. Rich @ Call Classifieds at • A cord is 128 cu. ft. female left. $350 ea.. Call 541-497-3470 385-5809 Martha at 541-744-1804. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, Ruger Single Six 22LR/22MAG SHIH-TZU MALE, 2 years, name, phone, price and kind revolver, stainless, Hunter Fluorescent Light Fixtures, (2), gold and white, $275. 212 of wood purchased. model, like-new, 900rnds 541-788-0090. without bulbs, 10’, ammo, new spinner target, 541-385-9350,541-788-0057 Antiques & Silver Bengal mix kitten. Vet $400 OBO. 541-728-3389. Collectibles checked, 1st shots, wormed. Garage Door Opener, $25, To good home. $50. Stevens single shot 20 ga. shot please call 541-385-9350, 541-923-7501 gun, refinished & reblued, 541-788-0057. Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $150. 541-595-0941 Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 $115/cord rounds, split PATIO SET Tropitone 87” tile males & 2 females, chocoavail., del., Bend, Sunriver, stone table, chairs & um249 late, black, apricot & cream LaPine. Fast, friendly service. brella. $3000 OBO. 388-2348. Art, Jewelry $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. The Bulletin reserves the right Jabezstandardpoodles.com and Furs Bob Dylan Wanted: 1966 to publish all ads from The CRUISE THROUGH classified Wanted Pair of young white Paramount Theater Portland Bulletin newspaper onto The when you're in the market for Doves & large outdoor cage Concert Poster, will pay Art- For those of you that are Bulletin Internet website. a new or used car. familiar with Doug West and in exc. cond. 541-382-2194. $3000 Cash, 310-346-1965. his work, you will be able to Well bred, beautiful silver and Brass Bed frame for queen size appreciate this fine Seritan female Yorkie pup for graph artwork for sale. All on rollers, good condition sale. $700 541-390-8848 were done in Doug West’s Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY $195. 541-420-2220. Working cats for barn/shop, New Mexico Studio and are audio & studio equip. McInLODGEPOLE, delivered in Curtis Mathis antique tube concompanionship. FREE, fixed, numbered. All screens have tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Bend $950, LaPine $1000, sole radio, good cond. shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 been destroyed. I have 6 Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, Redmond, Sisters & Prinev541-382-1205. pieces & all compliment each NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 ille $1100. 541-815-4177 Yellow Lab AKC Puppies, other. I bought this artwork OFA hips/elbows cert., POTATO masher and Flow Blue Log Truck loads of dry Lodgein the spring of 1993. The Looking for your next champion bloodlines, dew collection, no dealers. Cash, pole firewood, $1200 for frames have a western flair employee? claws removed, 1st shots & $10-$100. 541-419-9406. Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 with solid oak frames. The Place a Bulletin help wormed, ready 8/1, $500. or 541-536-3561 for more whole collection is for sale at wanted ad today and 541-728-0659. (Taking deps.) 215 information. $4,000 firm. If interested call reach over 60,000 Yorkie, AKC, Male, 8.5 mo., Fred Bullard at 541-385-9393 Coins & Stamps readers each week. SEASONED JUNIPER and leave a message or conweighs 5.5 lbs., very active, Your classified ad will $150/cord rounds, tact me for pictures via housebroken, loves children, WANTED TO BUY also appear on $170/cord split. FBull32750@aol.com $500 Firm. No checks. US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & bendbulletin.com which Delivered in Central Oregon. 541-419-3082 Currency collect, accum. Pre currently receives over Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. 251 1964 silver coins, bars, 1.5 million page views 210 rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Hot Tubs and Spas every month at Tamarack & Red Fir Split & coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Furniture & Appliances no extra cost. Delivered, $185/cord, dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex Hurricane 7 Person Self ConBulletin Classifieds Rounds $165, Seasoned, #1 Appliances • Dryers & vintage watches. No coltained Spa, wood sides, Get Results! Pine & Juniper Avail. • Washers lection to large or small. Bednewer pump, cover, runs Call 385-5809 or place 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407 rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 great, $995. 541-408-7908 your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 269

Bicycles and Accessories

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

Lawn Edge Trimmer, Craftsman 4 hp., 3 wheel, like new $295. 541-388-0811.

541-322-7253

Lost Dog: toy Fox Terrier/Chihuahua mix, female, near Steelehead Falls, white, reddish brown spots, has collar, “Dallas”, 6/30, very friendly, 541-504-4422,541-953-3000 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Everything Goes! Sat. thru Mon. 9-?, 51376 Riverland Ave., LaPine. Household, cars, boats, RV’s, tools & more!

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

290

Sales Redmond Area July 4 & 5 HUGE Sale entire household from the kitchen to home decor. 2420 NW Ct. Redmond. 541-279-7511.


E2 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

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Horses and Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment

DIAMOND J STABLES is re-opening at the end of July! call Lori to hold a stall at 541-389-8164. Limited Stalls available.

400

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Schools and Training

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery Big Newhouse cattle squeeze chute needs paint $500. 541-447-1039. Fuel tank 64 inch wide for pickup with pump $235. 541-447-1039.

Wanted: Prefer 2-6 Year Buckskin, will consider others call. 541-408-0954.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Livestock & Equipment

SWATHER DOLLY, $500; Baler NH 282, PTO, twine, SOLD; Bale Wagon, NH1010 SOLD; Swather Hesston 6400, $3500; J D Swather, Cab, A/C, diesel, A300 Twin Knife header, $5500; all field ready, Prineville, 541-419-9486

345 BEEF CALVES 300-800 lbs., pasture ready, vaccinated, delivery avail. 541-480-1719. READY TO WORK, Yearling Angus Bulls, range-raised in trouble-free herd, $1000/ea. Delivery avail. 541-480-8096 SWAP MEET & BBQ Saturday July 10th. Hosted by THE O'LE TACK ROOM ALL Vendors Welcome ~ Spaces FREE. Call NOW to reserve your spot. Spaces go FAST! 7th and Cook, Tumalo ~ 312-0082

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

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Farmers Column

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. HAY-Quality Orchard Grass/ Blue Grass, just baled, in the field, $130/ton. 541-382-0205 QUALITY 1st cutting orchard grass hay. No rain. Cloverdale area. $110 ton, 2 twine 70-75# bales, 541-480-3944. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

358 A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, daytime hrs., affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161. Tutor, K-5, all subjects incl. Spanish. Licensed teacher, affordable. 541-408-3215

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

541-385-5809

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

341

Horses and Equipment

541-385-5809

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Working Service Manager opportunity in beautiful Prineville, OR. Robberson Ford Sales Inc. is looking for a hard-working, highly motivated Service Manager to lead our service team. Don't miss this chance to build your career and join the #1 Ford dealer in Central Oregon. All inquiries are highly confidential. Email resume to tweber@robberson.com Robberson Ford is a drug free workplace. EOE. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Automotive

541-617-7825

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Administrative Assistant Assist a tax negotiations attorney in casual Bend office. Client contact and clerical support. Clerical or legal support experience and college degree a plus. Benefits after 90 days. Fax cover letter, resume and salary requirement to: 541-330-0641.

APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Landscape & Irrigation Tech 40 hrs/week, seasonal, start NOW! Must haves: valid D.L., 2+ yrs experience, and be a hard worker. $10-$12/hour DOE. Drop resume at front desk: 60801 Brosterhous Rd. See website for more info: CrownVillaRVResort.com

Financial Services:

Registered Client Service Associate Description: Your job, as a Registered Client Service Associate, is to: • Play a central role in enhancing the client experience by focusing your time on servicing and growing the Financial Advisor's business • Interface with external clients, anticipate their needs, solve their problems, and follow through to provide exceptional service • Provide service to internal branch clients by interfacing with management, servicing the relationships with your assigned Financial Advisors, coordinating with the operations function, and performing administrative duties • Support and drive firm initiatives • Maintain risk awareness and regulatory knowledge Qualifications: You are Client service oriented, a Team player, and Detail oriented with proven organizational skills. You can Manage time efficiently and can multi-task. You have proven written and verbal communication skills, as well as being a self-starter who is comfortable managing complex and evolving situations. You are independent, motivated, proactive, and focused to take action. You have a high school diploma or equivalent with 3-5 years of client service experience. Salary/Benefits: Salary commensurate with experience We can offer you an exciting, fast-paced working environment, a culture of mutual respect and commitment to maintaining the highest ethical standards and the opportunity to play a vital role in our growth. Job Location: Bend, OR Job Number: 61451BR Company URL: http://www.ubs.com/

AH AT HOME

Limited Energy LEA or LEB technican proficient at all fire alarms, security, CCTV, and access control systems. NICET certificates a plus. Send resume to Box 16205513, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Media Technician - Mix audio, facilitate & operate multi media services in support of worship & rehearsals, plus special events. First Presbyterian Church of Bend. 230 NE Ninth Street. 541-382-4401. Resume and letter of interest to: Administrator. blevet@bendfp.org

Fishing- Well respected Seattle based Fishing Co seeks hard Remember.... working dedicated procesAdd your web address to sors for work aboard proven your ad and readers on vessels at sea in Alaska - see The Bulletin's web site will Informational Meeting be able to click through auSchedule at www.fishermenstomatically to your site. finest.com - July 9 Redmond

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Seeking a Parts Driver /Counter Person, some exp. preferred but not necessary. Full time position. May need to work some Saturdays. Drop off resume at: 2225 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

Land Surveyor Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Professional Land Surveyor. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information.

Natural Resource Specialist Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Natural Resource Specialist. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Automotive

476

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

(Private Party ads only)

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

John Deere 2X16 hydraulic rollover plow with 3 pt. hitch $485. 541-447-1039.

New Holland 216 V Rake, good cond., good teeth, only used 2 seasons, 10,500. 541-325-3377

421

Assistant Manager Part time, for apartment community needed to work 20 hrs. a week in Bend, must have strong selling and computer skills, must be able to work Saturdays, must be detail orientated, take directions well and be able to multi task, tax credit housing experience preferred but not required. Pay $10.50/hr., please respond with resume to: kpetersen@princetonproperty. com or fax to: 503-794-9004.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sales Position: A prominent National Wholesale Agricultural Parts Distributor is seeking a Territory Sales Representative to cover portions of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Responsible for developing new accounts as well as servicing and growing existing accounts. Overnight travel is required. Farm or farm machinery knowledge is helpful. Base salary plus commission. E-mail resume and cover letter to larry.hansen@smalink.com

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Sales

Toyota of Bend is expanding for our new facility! We have positions available for: Sales, Sales Manager, Internet Sales, Internet Manager and Finance Manager. Top employees can expect to make $100,000 a year selling the #1 selling brand of vehicle in the world. Toyota. Exp. preferred but will train the right individuals. Must be driven, highly motivated, dressed for success, up for a challenge and ready to learn! If you like to compete and win, please apply in person only at 2225 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Summer Work! Customer Sales / Service, $12.25 base/appt. Apply at: www.workforstudents.com or call 541-728-0675.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

541-383-0386 SALES - Inside Telesales Full time positions open immediately. 2+ years inside sales exp. req. Advertising & media sales and/or financial services industry exp. preferred. Must be a self-starter, team player, goal oriented, proficient in CRM systems, Excel, Word, search engines & Internet research. Local company with US based clients/prospects in the financial services industry. Email resumes to:

H Bend

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

mark@AllFinancialAdvisors.com

HOMES, GARDENS & FOOD IN CENTRAL OREGON

Home, Sweet Home TUESDAYS • Great recipes sure to impress • Savvy Home & Garden tips to keep your house in tip-top shape

ALSO ON TUESDAYS... Grocery Flyers • Community Sports • Coupons! Look for the Pet Section Every Monday!


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600

634

642

650

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $675 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

636 507

604

Real Estate Contracts

Storage Rentals

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Storage Unit in SE Bend, insulated, secure, 200 sq.ft., all hours avail. $95/mo., 541-410-4255.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

1015 Roanoke Ave., $600 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848.

605

Rooms for Rent

The Bulletin Classifieds NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, $400. 541-317-1879

631

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

A clean, quiet, spacious 1 bdrm., river & mtn. views, West hills, laundry, deck, $675 mo., 541 382-7654, karenmichellen@hotmail.com

$495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

632

Apt./Multiplex General

573 CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING business for sale. Term of sale negotiable. Optional lease and training. (541) 389-9196.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928.

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval, reduced to $550/mo. 541-389-9901.

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt.

Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870. Westside Condo, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D, A/C, garage, in quiet 4-plex, at great westside location, $800, 1737 SW Knoll, 541-280-7268

638 Duplex Near Old Mill, 2 bdrm. 1 bath, garage, wood stove, fenced yard, pet neg., W/D hookups, $550, 529 SE Wilson, 541-419-1115.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $495. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

Summer Special! $99 Move in $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease!

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Avail. Now, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, new paint inside, yard, wood stove, single garage, no pets or smoking $750 mo., 1st, last, & dep. 541-389-7734.

An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

642

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend #1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $625 + dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Large 3 bdrm.+den+bonus, 2.5 bath. W/D incl. No smoking, pets neg. 3080 NW Kelly Hill Ct. $1395/mo. 510-579-5646 / www.admproperty.com

656

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

100% Subsidized: Crest Butte Apts is now accepting applications for fully remodeled 1 & 2 bdrm. units. Units to incl. brand new appl, A/C. Amenities incl. new on site laundry facilities & playground, great location next to hospital, BMC & many other medical/dental offices. 5 min. to downtown & Old Mill District. Apply today, 541-389-9107 or stop by office at 1695 NE Purcell Blvd between 9-2.This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Approx. 1400 sq.ft. house, w/full basement, 3 bdrm., avail. 8/1, near downtown on westside, $950, Call 541-318-1791.

541-322-7253

634

Business Opportunities

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

719

Real Estate Trades Trade your 5+ acres + home for our beautiful home in West Linn (just south of PDX). 503 534-1212. MLS #10013267. Owner/broker.

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great location, W/S/G paid, no dogs, $540/mo. 541-318-1973

Condominiums & Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 Townhomes For Rent A Westside bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

Call about our Specials

630

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

½ off first month’s rent Plus + Deposits.

Chaparral Apts.

Beautifully furnished home near BMC East, bdrm. and bath avail. $475/mo. includes utils. & cable, no smok ing/pets, 541-389-9680.

Near Tumalo quiet, full house access, artist pueblo. $350+util. 541-388-2159.

Special!

244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Roommate Wanted

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Ask Us About Our

Summertime

Real Estate For Sale

650

658

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

3/2 in great NE neighborhood avail. 7/15. Fenced backyard, garage. Pets OK w/dep. $900 mo., 1 yr. lease, 1st/last, $500 dep. 1-541-619-6177.

2 Bdrm., 2 bath, w/den, on 1.5 acres, 2 outbuildings, Crooked River Ranch, $600/ mo, $700 security, 541-923-2325.

4 bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Eagle Crest, 2700 sq.ft., big & beautiful, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, den, O-sized triple . garage on golf course, gardener paid, 55+community $1100. 541-604-5534

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Available Now, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, no garage, pet? $525 mo., 1st/last+dep. no W/D hookup. 541-382-3672.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809

New large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq.ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1450. 503-720-7268.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, W/S/G incl., OWWII, $895/ mo. + dep., no smoking, please call 503-651-1142 or 503-310-9027.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Lease: 679 SE Business Way, 5000+ sq.ft, light industrial, 3 overhead doors, exc. parking, office suite w/mtn. views. Talk to me! 907-252-2794. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

2553 & 2580 SW 20th St.2/1 duplexes, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600+dep, incl. yard maint., no pets/smoking.541-382-1015

Very nice 3 bdrm., 2 bath home close to shopping & medical facilities, A/C, dbl. garage, pet neg. avail. now $900 mo. +dep. 541-593-2540.

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Office/Retail Space for Rent

541-385-5809

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

Debris Removal DMH & Co. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction House Keeping Services: 11 yrs of experience in house work to be licensed with the keeping. Angelica Lopez Construction Contractors House Keeping & Janitorial, Board (CCB). An active 541-633-3548,541-633-5489 license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Experienced Housekeeping, Verify the contractor’s CCB good references, reasonable license through the prices, 541-550-6994. CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

Excavating or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land and certifications. Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Debris Removal Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

740

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

745

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., quiet cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, fenced yard, $119,900, broker owned, Randy Schoning, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Homes for Sale 749

***

CHECK YOUR AD

Southeast Bend Homes

Please check your ad on the 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., first day it runs to make sure living room w/ wood stove, it is correct. Sometimes infamily room w/ pellet stove, structions over the phone are dbl. garage, on a big, fenced misunderstood and an error .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy can occur in your ad. If this Schoning, Broker, Owner, happens to your ad, please John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be Need help fixing stuff happy to fix it as soon as we around the house? can. Deadlines are: WeekCall A Service Professional days 12:00 noon for next and find the help you need. day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunwww.bendbulletin.com day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please 750 call us:

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

762 FSBO: 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home 1.47 Acres +/- Comm. Water & Sewer Detached. Garage/Shop Sunriver Area $224,900. Call R. Mosher 541-593-2203. Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $169,000, 541-576-2390.

Cottage Style 3 bdrm., garage, heat pump, landscaped. Clean home, safe neighborhood. $65,000 for home AND .013 lot. 541-815-1216.

Owner Terms I have several clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath homes available on easy owner terms. Short sale or foreclosure not a problem. Call for information 541-815-2986.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise Advertise your car! "any preference, limitation or Add A Picture! discrimination based on race, Reach thousands of readers! color, religion, sex, handicap, Call 541-385-5809 familial status, marital status The Bulletin Classifieds or national origin, or an intention to make any such 755 preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status Sunriver/La Pine Homes includes children under the age of 18 living with parents 3 Bdrm. 2 bath single story or legal custodians, pregnant on ½ acre, built in 2003, also women, and people securing ½ acre lot with well, same custody of children under 18. area, So. of Sunriver. Please This newspaper will not call 509-585-9050. knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our Look at: Bendhomes.com readers are hereby informed for Complete Listings of that all dwellings advertised Area Real Estate for Sale in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of dis757 crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Crook County Homes free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 3 Bdrm., large fenced lot, fruit trees, near schools, quiet 1-800-927-9275. cul-de-sac, move-in ready, asking $79,900, Broker owned, Call Heather Hockett, PC, Broker, w/C21 Gold Country. Cell: 541-420-9151.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

773

Acreages 14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829. 7 mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613

The Bulletin Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

Homes with Acreage

Redmond Homes

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

771

Lots

Unubstructed River View Acreage, Comfortable 3 bdrm., 2 bath home, 1848 sq.ft., stone hearth, large beams, sun porch, office & more. Outbuilding, large circular drive, deer fenced yard around house, close to golf course & equestrian facilities. Very nice for the price, $194,700. Call Heather Hockett, PC, Broker, with C21 Gold Country. Cell: 541-420-9151. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

763

Recreational Homes and Property

CRESCENT LAKE CABIN Lake front. $399,000 503-329-0959

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $96,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000 Powell Butte: 6 acres in farm field, septic approved, power to property, gorgeous views, OWC, $149,900, 541-350-4684.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 2 bdrm, 1 bath, SE Bend New carpet, large yard. Pets okay. $7,900.00 or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 3 bdrm., 1 bath in SW Bend. Nice yard, W/D, fridge., new furnace, new bath. plumbing, $8900. 541-728-0529, cell 541-408-7317. Smith Rock Mobile Park, Space 17. 55+ Park. 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, A/C, awning, storage, RV parking. $15,000 OBO. 541-499-2845,541-475-2891

764

Farms and Ranches 35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, sacrifice for $425,000, 541-447-1039 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Masonry

Remodeling, Carpentry

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

Ask us about

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

757

Handyman

Weed free bark & flower beds

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

748

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Northeast Bend Homes Crook County Homes

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

MASONRY Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Power Equipment Repair Consolidated Pest Control Ants, spider, rodents and more! Fast, professional service. ccb #187335. 541-389-3282 www.consolidatedpest.net

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


E4 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H I G H

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

D E S E R T

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK M A G A Z I N E C R E AT E D TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND M A I N TA I N A N A C T I V E , H E A LT H Y LIFESTYLE.

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share.

R E S E R V E Y O U R A D S PA C E T O D AY CALL 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Monday, July 5, 2010 E5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

865

875

880

882

ATVs

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

800

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

850

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Snowmobiles

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Kayak, 2 person Emotion, sita-top, 12’, w/seats & paddles, $495, 541-593-4473

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind DancCat

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Yamaha 250 Bear 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1600 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha Grizzly 660 2006, 408 mi, 38 hrs, excellent condition with records, Warn winch, snow plow, front and Two Bombardier '97 Waverunners, 2 seaters, plus trailer, rear racks with bags. Movall excellent condition, $3500 ing, must sell $6200 OBO. firm, 971-244-2410. Call 310-871-8983

880

870

Boats & Accessories

12’ 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

ers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

boat, like new, used twice, has pole holder & folding seats. $1300. 541-617-0846. 12’ Klamath Boat, 7.5 Merc motor, trailer and life jackets, $600. 541-317-9414 or 541-815-9414.

Motorhomes

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Bounder 34' Ford 460 1994, great condition & best floor plan. Sleeps 6, asking $15,900. VIN# B03562. Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

15’ Crestliner, tri hull

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $16,500. 541-693-3975.

walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 85 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985.

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ SEASWIRL, new interior, 165HP I/O, 10HP Johnson, fish finder, much more, $1990,541-610-6150

Interested Buyer for older motorcycles, scooters, etc., instant cash, Please contact Brad @ 541-416-0246. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225.

Kawasaki KLR 2009 dual purpose 650 cc, 890 mi., excellent condition $4,500. 541-815-8744. YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $8500, 541-771-8233

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-279-9581.

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

541-322-7253

Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $95,000. 541-382-1721 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310. Hard to find 32 ft. 2007 Hurricane by Four Winds, Ford V10, 10K mi., 2 slides, 2 Color TV’s, backup cam, hydraulic jacks, leather, cherry wood and many other options, Immaculate condition, $63,900. (541)548-5216, 420-1458

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

541-385-5809 “WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Collins 18’ 1981, goose neck hitch, sleeps four, good condition, $1950. Leave message, 541-325-6934

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. Winnebago 31' Chalet 541-788-0338 2008, 13,500 miles, Queen bed, 1 slide, sleeps 8, excellent condition, asking Find exactly what $55,630. VIN#B32136. you are looking for in the Beaver Coach Sales CLASSIFIEDS 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Winnebago Sightseeer 27’ 2004 30K, 1 slide, hyd. jacks, lots of storage, very clean, exc cond, $41,900,541-504-8568

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Mini Winnie 31' 2000 , walk around Queen, Sofa, Booth. Excellent cond., 33K mi., asking $25,500. VIN #A10246 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Shasta Mini 26’ 1989, 350 Ford Econoline Cab, gen., A/C, lots of extras, only 42K, great shape, $5800. 541-788-3896

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

ATVs

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

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Travel Trailers

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 435-229-9415.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Brake, 13 spd. transmission, good tires & body paint (white). Also, 1993 27’ step deck equipment trailer T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. Ready to work! $9500 takes both. 541-447-4392 or 541-350-3866.

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Find It in

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

MUST SELL! 2008 Komfort 32’. GORGEOUS, have lots of pics. $17,900 OBO. Call 541-728-6933 or email teryme@aol.com

Komfort

26’

925

Utility Trailers 2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Asking $10,000 OBO. Frank, 541-480-0062.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

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Sport Utility Vehicles

The Bulletin

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583 Ford Excursion XLT 2000, 4WD, V-10, runs great, 4” lift, $8000 OBO, 541-771-0512.

NOVA SS 1975 4 speed, 454 new, $5600 OBO. 541-546-2206 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $23,000, 541-576-2442

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Vans

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

The Bulletin Classifieds

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

The Bulletin Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $39,000. 541-548-1422.

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

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Pickups

Automobiles

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4500. 541-617-1888.

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $29,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Montana Keystone 2955RL 2004, 2 slides, loaded, 2 TV’s, CD, Queen bed, all appl., full bath, hitch incl., exc. cond., hardly been used, $21,500. 541-389-8794

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Chevy 3/4 Ton 350 Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new Pkg., Quattro, front & side air 1974, automatic, dual bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! tires, brakes, battery runs gas tanks, wired for $11,700. 541-350-1565 great $3950. 541-330-5818. camper and trailer. Dual batteries. One owner. Lots of extras. $2950, Vehicle Acquisition 541-549-5711

SALE Inventory SALE Certified SALE

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Wilderness 21 ft. 1992, exc. cond., full bath, micro., incl. Honda gen., call eves. to see, $3500. 541-549-8155

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Canopies and Campers FIND IT! Elkhorn 10’ Camper 1999, BUY IT! extended Cab over, self conSELL IT! tained, exc. cond., $9500, The Bulletin Classifieds 541-815-1523. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, asking $22,000 OBO. Frank. 541-480-0062 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Lance 11.5’ 1992, elec. jacks, micro, A/C, awnings on both sides & back, very clean, no dents, non smoker., clean, $6000 OBO. 541-408-4974.

rear gate, 5x8, 24” sides, $1150, 541-325-2684.

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4X4 * Truck * SUV * Cars starting at $995

Antique and Classic Autos

Smolich Certified Pre-Owned or Factory Certified Pre-Owned Shop with confidence at Smolich Motors

A Local Danchuk Dealer Stocking Hundreds of Parts for ‘55-’57 Chevy’s. Calif., Classic, Raingear Wiper Setups, Call Chris, 541-410-4860. Buick Special 1947, 4 dr., stock, newer tires, brakes, uphostery, chorme and paint, $12,500 OBO, 541-548-2808.

Dodge Ram 2001, short Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Pre-Owned vehicles on sale everyday All Makes & Models including Honda - Toyota - Ford - Jeep - Volvo Chevy - Dodge - Audi - VW - Chrysler Nissan - Kia - Hyundai - Suzuki - Acura We BUY - SELL - SERVICE all makes

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

We will pay CASH for your vehicle Buying vehicles now thru July! Central Oregon's Largest Used Vehicle Inventory Over 150 Used in stock see it on www.smolichmotors.com

Iron Eagle Utility Trailer 2007, swing

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

VW Cabriolet 1981,

Nash 22’ 2011, queen walk around bed, never used, $18,500, call 541-420-0825.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Pontiac Bonneville 1968 two door convertible with Pontiac Ventura parts car. $950. Call 541-815-9404

1993,

front kitchen, island dbl. bed, 4 burner stove w/ oven, micro., solar panel, skylights in kitchen & bath, 20’ awning, rear hitch, EZ lift hitch, great $5000 OBO, 541-576-2442.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

units, central vac, fireplace, Corian, king bed, prepped for washer/dryer & gen., non-smoker owned, immaculate, $39,900, Call 541-554-9736

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Pickups

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Grand Junction 39’ 2008, 3 slides, 2 A/C

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Toyota Tundra 2006,

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Antique and Classic Autos

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

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Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

865

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Harley Ultra 2001, Near perfect, always garaged and dealer serviced. Tons of upgrades. Ready for road trip today. $12,000 firm for quick sale. Call (541) 325-3191

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930.

everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Reach thousands of readers!

17’

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade,

The Bulletin

Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

Autos & Transportation

Ford F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 spd., 5th wheel hookups, $4000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm. Ford F-250 XLT Superduty 2002, 4X4, Supercab, longbox, 7.3 Diesel, auto, cruise, A/C, CD, AM/FM, pwr. windows/locks, tow pkg., off road pkg., nerf bars, sprayed in bedliner, toolbox, mud flaps, bug shield, dash cover, 32K mi., orig. owner, $22,995, 541-815-8069

Family Owned and Operated for over 40 years

Smolich Motors www.smolichmotors.com Hwy 20 in Bend (541) 389-1177 • (541) 749-4025 (541) 389-1178


E6 Monday, July 5, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

Toyota Camry Hybrid 2007, white w/ sunroof, perfect cond., $15,500. 541-549-8600

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Mazda 3 i 2008, sedan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107. Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

MERCEDES BENZ 240D 1974, good cond., runs well, stored last 10 years. $2,500. 541-617-1810 or 410-8849. Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

BMW 733i 1982 blue sedan, 4 door, body excellent condition, engine runs great, 20 mpg, $2500 firm. 971-244-2410

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford Mustang Coupe 2005, 18K mi., light blue, like new $19.500. 541-549-3152.

FORD TEMPO 1994 2.3L, 4 dr. 36k mi., 1 owner, clean, runs, exc., $2500. 541-233-3208

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Mini Cooper 2006, Turbo Convertible, 31K, 6-spd, loaded, $18,500, 541-905-2876.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 180K hwy. mi. $8,000 541-410-7586.

SUBARUS!!!

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., leather, nav. system, alloy wheels, Bose sound, rear spoilers, $21,400 obo.541-388-2774

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Volkswagen New Beetle 2003 74,800 mi. $7,000 Blue w/ black charcoal interior, air conditioning, power steering, AM/FM stereo & cassette, moon roof, power windows and more. Call Rick @ 541-788-8662

541-322-7253

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

OSB #640887 jep@karnopp.com Erin K. MacDonald, OSB #024978 ekm@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative

Estate of ROBERT H. PETERSON, Deceased. Case No. 10PB0085AB NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published June 28, 2010. Thomas M. Croke Personal Representative FAX: (541) 388-5410 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Thomas M. Croke Law Office of Thomas M. Croke PO Box 549 125 S. Main St. Adams, WI 53910 TEL: (608) 339-4918 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP James E. Petersen,

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department

yer for the Personal Representative, Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. Dated and first published on June 28, 2010. Patricia L. Heatherman OSB #932990 Personal Representative: Margaret Lane 10650 S. Avenida Compadres #118 Yuma, AZ 95365 Tel: (928) 342-0666 Attorney for Personal Representative: Patricia L. Heatherman, OSB #932990 Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 389-4646 Fax: (541) 389-4644 E-mail: patricia@heathermanlaw.com

In the Matter of the Estate of Margaret P. Burwell, Deceased. Case No. 10-PB-0073-BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Margaret Lane has been appointed Personal Representative of the above captioned estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the Personal Representative in care of her attorney at: 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402, Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the law-

LEGAL NOTICE Loan No: 20006025 T.S. No.: 1003143OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Peter W. Grube and Trina L. Schoenberg-Grube as husband and wife as Grantor to Transnation Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Silver Hill Financial LLC A Delaware Limited Liability Company, as beneficiary, dated 10/30/2007, recorded 10/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/micro file/reception No. 2007-57743 (indicated which), covering the follow-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Mok/Chong Property, LLC as the grantor, Wells Fargo Financial National Bank as the trustee, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as the beneficiary under that certain Trust Deed dated November 18, 2004, recorded on November 30, 2004, as document number 2004-71621 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: See the attached Exhibit "A" Which currently has the physical address of 1362 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR 97756. Exhibit “A” Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows; IN TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON: SECTION 16: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SW1/4 SE 1/4), DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: STARTING AT THE INITIAL POINT, WHICH POINT IS ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE OREGON TRUNK RAILWAY, WHICH POINT IS LOCATED NORTH 790 45' WEST A DISTANCE OF 1,839.98 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 16; THENCE NORTH 25° 51' EAST A DISTANCE OF 186 FEET ALONG THE SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID RAILWAY TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 25° 51' EAST A DISTANCE OF 214 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS IDENTICAL WITH THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND PREVIOUSLY CONVEYED TO C.H. TOWNSEND; THENCE NORTH 64° 24' WEST A DISTANCE OF 253.57 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA STATE HIGHWAY; THENCE SOUTH 25° 36' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 214 FEET ALONG SAID HIGHWAY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY; THENCE SOUTH 64° 24' EAST A DISTANCE OF 251.82 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPT THE EASTERLY 102 FEET THEREOF, NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 124154 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: DUE DATE

PRINCIPAL

INTEREST

LATE FEES

4/15/2009 5/15/2009 7/15/2009 8/15/2009 9/15/2009 10/15/2009 11/15/2009 12/15/2009 1/15/2010 2/15/2010 3/15/2010 TOTALS: GRAND TOTAL: $21,459.65

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $176.46 $1,649.48 $1,658.43 $1,658.43 $5,142.80

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $990.49 $4,191.50 $4,182.55 $4,182.55 $13,547.09

$237.90 $291.98 $583.52 $211.13 $211.57 $292.04 $211.57 $292.09 $218.98 $0.00 $218.98 $2,769.76

By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: PRINCIPAL AMT: $627,382.47 INTEREST AMT: $10,758.72 LATE FEES: $2,842.82 PAYOFF AS OF: 2/25/10 $640,984.01 PER DIEM: $139.42 Interest continues to accrue at the rate of 6.75% per annum or $139.42 per diem; WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on August 6, 2010, at the hour of 1:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor's or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed by payment of the entire amount then due and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: March 30, 2010, by James P. Laurick, Trustee. State of Oregon, County of Multnomah)ss. On this 30th day of March, 2010, before me, a Notary Public in and for said County and State, personally appeared James P. Laurick, personally known to me to be the person whose name subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged that he executed the same. SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me this 30th day of March, 2010, by James P. Laurick. NOTARY PUBLIC FOR OREGON, My Commission Expires: 06/16/2010.

ing described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 122623 The East 145 feet of Lots 11 and 12 in Fair Acres Addition to the City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 319 NW Greenwood Avenue, Redmond , OR 97756, Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of Principal and Interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 12/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,979.99 Monthly Late Charge: $199.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $487,268.52 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that First American Title Company, the undersigned trustee will on 9/14/2010 at the hour of 10:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at 1164 NW Bond, Bend OR 97701; Inside the

main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person names in section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" included any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Date: 5/10/2010. First American Title Company c/o Seaside Trustee, Inc. P.O. Box 2676, Ventura, CA 93001. Jessica

M. Weber, Vice President. Trustee Sales Information (877) 317-8782 www.westcoastposting.com P.O Box 426, Oak View, CA. 93022. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. WCPP17936 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/2010 PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Metro Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in an executive session at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 6, 2010, at the district administrative offices, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items include presentation of the Prescription for Play program, a presentation regarding the district’s scholarship program and presentation of the proposed Hollinshead Park Master Plan. The board will meet in a regular business meeting beginning at 7:00 p.m. Agenda items include election of board officers for 2010-11, appointing an executive secretary of the board, setting 2010-11 board meeting dates and times, receiving public comment regarding the proposed Hollinshead Master Plan and consideration of adoption of the plan through Resolution No. 327. The agenda and supplementary reports may be viewed on the district’s web site www.bendparksandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain deed of trust (the "Trust Deed") dated January 7, 2002, executed by Gary T. O'Grady and Renee E. O'Grady (the "Grantor") to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association (the "Trustee"), to secure payment and performance of certain obligations of Grantor to U.S. Bank National Association ND (the "Beneficiary"), including repayment of a U.S. Bank Equity Line Agreement dated January 7, 2002, in the principal amount of $35,000 (the "Agreement"). The Trust Deed was recorded on February 14, 2002, as Instrument No. 2002-08970 in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The legal description of the real property covered by the Trust Deed is as follows: Lot 7 in Block 2, of TAMARACK PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. No action has been instituted to recover the obligation, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed or, if such action has been instituted, such action has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments in full owed under the Agreement beginning December 2009 and each month thereafter; late charges in the amount of $140.00 as of March 12, 2010, plus any late charges accruing thereafter; and expenses, costs, trustee fees and attorney fees. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable which sums are as follows: (a) the principal amount of $33,675.96 as of March 12, 2010, (b) accrued interest of $494.07 as of March 12, 2010, and interest accruing thereafter on the principal amount at the rate set forth in the Agreement until fully paid, (c) late charges in the amount of $140.00 as of March 12, 2010, plus any late charges accruing thereafter and any other expenses or fees owed under the Agreement or Trust Deed, (d) amounts that U.S. Bank National Association ND has paid on or may hereinafter pay to protect the lien, including by way of illustration, but not limitation, taxes, assessments, interest on prior liens, and insurance premiums, and (e) expenses, costs and attorney and trustee fees incurred by U.S. Bank National Association ND in foreclosure, including the cost of a trustee's sale guarantee and any other environmental or appraisal report. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, and the Successor Trustee have elected to foreclose the trust deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.705 to ORS 86.795 and to sell the real property identified above to satisfy the obligation that is secured by the Trust Deed. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Successor Trustee or Successor Trustee's agent will, on August 24, 2010, at one o'clock (1:00) p.m., based on the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, just outside the main entrance of 1164 N.W. Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell for cash at public auction to the highest bidder the interest in said real property, which Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest that Grantor or the successors in interest to Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and, in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, and the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest of grantor, as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. In accordance with the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, this is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. This communication is from a debt collector. For further information, please contact Jeanne Kallage Sinnott at her mailing address of Miller Nash LLP, 111 S.W. Fifth Avenue, Suite 3400, Portland, Oregon 97204 or telephone her at (503) 224-5858. DATED this 13th day of April, 2010. /s/ Jeanne Kallage Sinnott Successor Trustee File No. 080090-0591 Grantor: O'Grady, Gary T. and Renee E. Beneficiary: U.S. Bank National Association ND

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx9810 T.S. No.: 1226768-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott Barclay and Pamela Barclay, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated May 10, 2007, recorded May 14, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-27431 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot thirteen (13), block F, Deschutes River Woods, recorded March 22, 1962, in plat book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19445 Comanche Cir. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,719.91 Monthly Late Charge $75.13. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $294,400.00 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 07, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 01, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 07, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-320624 06/21, 06/28, 07/05, 07/12

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2673 T.S. No.: 1275834-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Manuel Grifaldo Guerrero, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 27, 2007, recorded August 01, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-42455 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: In township sixteen (16) south, range twelve (12), east of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon: section eleven (11), that portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE 1/4 NW1/4) of said section eleven (11), lying south and the east of the Old Dalles-California Highway. Commonly known as: 7870 SW Canal Blvd. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,962.03 Monthly Late Charge $79.71. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $224,975.00 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 21, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 17, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 22, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-317943 06/14, 06/21, 06/28, 07/05

Bulletin Daily Paper 07/05/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday July 5, 2010

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